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Sample records for informatics trial enhancement

  1. Development of a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system to enhance rehabilitation clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Martinez, Clarisa; Wang, Jing; Liu, Ye; Liu, Brent

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials usually have a demand to collect, track and analyze multimedia data according to the workflow. Currently, the clinical trial data management requirements are normally addressed with custom-built systems. Challenges occur in the workflow design within different trials. The traditional pre-defined custom-built system is usually limited to a specific clinical trial and normally requires time-consuming and resource-intensive software development. To provide a solution, we present a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system for managing stroke rehabilitation clinical trials with intelligent workflow. The intelligent workflow engine provides flexibility in building and tailoring the workflow in various stages of clinical trials. By providing a solution to tailor and automate the workflow, the system will save time and reduce errors for clinical trials. Although our system is designed for clinical trials for rehabilitation, it may be extended to other imaging based clinical trials as well.

  2. The Health Informatics Trial Enhancement Project (HITE): Using routinely collected primary care data to identify potential participants for a depression trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recruitment to clinical trials can be challenging. We identified anonymous potential participants to an existing pragmatic randomised controlled depression trial to assess the feasibility of using routinely collected data to identify potential trial participants. We discuss the strengths and limitations of this approach, assess its potential value, report challenges and ethical issues encountered. Methods Swansea University's Health Information Research Unit's Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) database of routinely collected health records was interrogated, using Structured Query Language (SQL). Read codes were used to create an algorithm of inclusion/exclusion criteria with which to identify suitable anonymous participants. Two independent clinicians rated the eligibility of the potential participants' identified. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using the kappa statistic and inter-class correlation. Results The study population (N = 37263) comprised all adults registered at five general practices in Swansea UK. Using the algorithm 867 anonymous potential participants were identified. The sensitivity and specificity results > 0.9 suggested a high degree of accuracy from the algorithm. The inter-rater reliability results indicated strong agreement between the confirming raters. The Intra Class Correlation Coefficient (Cronbach's Alpha) > 0.9, suggested excellent agreement and Kappa coefficient > 0.8; almost perfect agreement. Conclusions This proof of concept study showed that routinely collected primary care data can be used to identify potential participants for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of folate augmentation of antidepressant therapy for the treatment of depression. Further work will be needed to assess generalisability to other conditions and settings and the inclusion of this approach to support Electronic Enhanced Recruitment (EER). PMID:20398303

  3. Enhancing the Informatics Evaluation Toolkit with Remote Usability Testing

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brian E.

    2009-01-01

    Developing functional clinical informatics products that are also usable remains a challenge. Despite evidence that usability testing should be incorporated into the lifecycle of health information technologies, rarely does this occur. Challenges include poor standards, a lack of knowledge around usability practices, and the expense involved in rigorous testing with a large number of users. Remote usability testing may be a solution for many of these challenges. Remotely testing an application can greatly enhance the number of users who can iteratively interact with a product, and it can reduce the costs associated with usability testing. A case study presents the experiences with remote usability testing when evaluating a Web site designed for health informatics knowledge dissemination. The lessons can inform others seeking to enhance their evaluation toolkits for clinical informatics products. PMID:20351839

  4. Nursing informatics and nursing ethics: addressing their disconnect through an enhanced TIGER-vision.

    PubMed

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    2013-01-01

    All healthcare visions, including that of The TIGER (Technology-Informatics-Guiding-Educational-Reform) Initiative envisage a crucial role for nursing. However, its 7 descriptive pillars do not address the disconnect between Nursing Informatics and Nursing Ethics and their distinct communities in the clinical-disciplinary landscape. Each sees itself as providing decision support by way of information inputs and ethical insights, respectively. Both have reasons - ideological, professional, institutional - for their task construction, but this simultaneously disables each from engaging fully in the point-of-(care)-decision. Increased pressure for translating 'evidence-based' research findings into 'ethically-sound', 'value-based' and 'patient-centered' practice requires rethinking the model implicit in conventional knowledge translation and informatics practice in all disciplines, including nursing. The aim is to aid 'how nurses and other health care scientists more clearly identify clinical and other relevant data that can be captured to inform future comparative effectiveness research. 'A prescriptive, theory-based discipline of '(Nursing) Decisionics' expands the Grid for Volunteer Development of TIGER's newly launched virtual learning environment (VLE). This provides an enhanced TIGER-vision for educational reform to deliver ethically coherent, person-centered care transparently.

  5. Infusing informatics into interprofessional education: the iTEAM (Interprofessional Technology Enhanced Advanced practice Model) project.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Diane J; Barton, Amy J; Knapfel, Sarah; Moore, Gina; Trinkley, Katy

    2014-01-01

    The iTEAM goal is to prepare advanced practice nurses, physicians and pharmacists with the interprofessional (IP) core competencies (informatics, patient centric, quality-focused, evidence based care) to provide technology enhanced collaborative care by: offering technology enhanced learning opportunities through a required informatics course, advanced practice courses (team based experiences with both standardized and virtual patients) and team based clinical experiences including e-health experiences. The innovative features of iTEAM project will be achieved through use of social media strategies, a web accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system, a Virtual Clinic/Hospital in Second Life, various e-health applications including traditional telehealth tools and consumer oriented tools such as patient portals, social media consumer groups and mobile health (m-health) applications for health and wellness functions. It builds upon the schools' rich history of IP education and includes clinical partners, such as the VA and other clinical sites focused on care for underserved patient populations. PMID:24943525

  6. Enhancing "Mathematics for Informatics" and its Correlation with Student Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divjak, B.; Erjavec, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, changes in "Mathematics for Informatics" at the Faculty of Organisation and Informatics in the University of Zagreb are described, and correlated with students pass rates. Students at the Faculty work in an interdisciplinary field, studying Informatics within a business context. The main reason for introducing the changes in the…

  7. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  8. Enhancing informatics competency under uncertainty at the point of decision: a knowing about knowing vision.

    PubMed

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn; Dowie, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Most informatics activity is aimed at reducing unnecessary errors, mistakes and misjudgements at the point of decision, insofar as these arise from inappropriate accessing and processing of data and information. Healthcare professionals use the results of scientific research, when available, and 'big data', when rigorously analysed, as inputs into the probability judgements that need to be made in decision making under uncertainty. But these judgements are needed irrespective of the state of 'the evidence' and personalised evidence on person/patient-important criteria is very often poor or lacking. This final stage in 'translation to the bedside' has received relatively little attention in the medical, nursing, or health informatics literature, until the recent appearance of 'cognitive informatics'. Positive experience and feed-back from several thousand students who have experienced exercises in assigning probabilities informs our future vision in which better decisions result from healthcare professionals--indeed all of us--having accepted that probability assignment is a skill, with the internal coherence and external correspondence of the probabilities assigned as twin evaluative criteria. As a route to improved correspondence--in the absence of the systematic recording and monitoring of real world judgments that would be the normal pathway to quality improvement--a 'Prober' is a set of statements to which the respondent supplies their personal probabilities that a statement is true. They receive the proper Brier score and its decomposition as analytical feedback, along with graphic representations of their discrimination and calibration, the two key components of good correspondence. Provided with estimates of their sensitivity (mean probability true for true statements) and specificity (1 minus mean probability true for false statements) they can visualise themselves as a 'test' when making diagnostic and prognostic judgements , thereby being given the

  9. The role of public health informatics in enhancing public health surveillance.

    PubMed

    Savel, Thomas G; Foldy, Seth

    2012-07-27

    Public health surveillance has benefitted from, and has often pioneered, informatics analyses and solutions. However, the field of informatics also serves other facets of public health including emergency response, environmental health, nursing, and administration. Public health informatics has been defined as the systematic application of information and computer science and technology to public health practice, research, and learning. It is an interdisciplinary profession that applies mathematics, engineering, information science, and related social sciences (e.g., decision analysis) to important public health problems and processes. Public health informatics is a subdomain of the larger field known as biomedical or health informatics. Health informatics is not synonymous with the term health information technology (IT). Although the concept of health IT encompasses the use of technology in the field of health care, one can think of health informatics as defining the science, the how and why, behind health IT. For example, health IT professionals should be able to resolve infrastructure problems with a network connection, whereas trained public health informaticians should be able to support public health decisions by facilitating the availability of timely, relevant, and high-quality information. In other words, they should always be able to provide advice on methods for achieving a public health goal faster, better, or at a lower cost by leveraging computer science, information science, or technology. PMID:22832993

  10. The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-01-01

    Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

  11. Informatics Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kate

    2012-01-01

    The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

  12. Enhancing entrepreneurship and professionalism in medical informatics instruction: a collaborative training model.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Cathryn A; Rychlewski, Walt; Teat, Marty; Clawson, Darrin

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an innovative training program designed to foster entrepreneurship and professionalism in students interested in the field of medical informatics. The course was developed through a private-public interinstitutional collaboration involving four academic institutions, one private firm specializing in health care information management systems, and a philanthropic organization. The program challenged students to serve in multiple roles on multidisciplinary teams and develop an innovative hand-held solution for drug information retrieval. Although the course was technically and behaviorally rigorous and required extensive hands-on experience in a nontraditional learning environment, both students and faculty responded positively.

  13. Museum Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

  14. Informatics in Infection Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michael Y; Trick, William E

    2016-09-01

    Informatics tools are becoming integral to routine infection control activities. Informatics has the potential to improve infection control outcomes in surveillance, prevention, and connections with public health. Surveillance activities include fully or semiautomated surveillance of infections, surveillance of device use, and hospital/ward outbreak investigation. Prevention activities include awareness of multidrug-resistant organism carriage on admission, enhanced interfacility communication, identifying inappropriate infection precautions, reducing device use, and antimicrobial stewardship. Public health activities include electronic communicable disease reporting, syndromic surveillance, and regional outbreak detection. The challenge for infection control personnel is in translating the knowledge gained from electronic surveillance systems into action.

  15. Health informatics.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, M; Webb, A; Goldschmidt, A

    2001-01-01

    Health informatics is the development and assessment of methods and systems for the acquisition, processing and interpretation of patient data with the help of knowledge from scientific research. This definition implies that health informatics is not tied to the application of computers but more generally to the entire management of information in healthcare. The focus is the patient and the process of care. The apparent information overload and the imperfection of medical decision making motivate the use of information systems for medical decision support. Health informatics provides tools to control processes in healthcare, acquire medical knowledge and communicate information between all people and organisations involved with healthcare. Although the development of medical information systems may often lag behind the available possibilities, the technological state of the current medical information systems is better than it is generally held to be. Health informatics should help healthcare professionals to provide better and more cost-effective care and enable healthcare systems to be more efficient and to adapt better to our patients' needs. Health informatics may reshape the way we deliver care to meet the demands of the future.

  16. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  17. Health Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

  18. Feedback after Good Trials Enhances Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies (Chiviacowsky & Wulf, 2002, 2005) have shown that learners prefer to receive feedback after they believe they had a "good" rather than "poor" trial. The present study followed up on this finding and examined whether learning would benefit if individuals received feedback after good relative to poor trials. Participants practiced a…

  19. Climate Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

  20. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  1. Biodiversity informatics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman F

    2007-01-01

    Biodiversity informatics is an emerging field that applies information management tools to the management and analysis of species-occurrence, taxonomic character, and image data. A wide and growing range of tools is available for both curators and researchers. The development and implementation of formal data exchange standards and query protocols have made it possible to integrate data holdings from collections around the world. The current technological environment is summarized; protocols, standards, and tools for data management, sharing, and integration are reviewed; and methods and tools for analyzing species-occurrence and character data are examined. Direct access to primary data and imagery has the power to transform the means by which taxonomy is practiced and its results disseminated to the general community.

  2. Global health informatics education.

    PubMed

    Hovenga, E J

    2000-01-01

    Health informatics education has evolved since the 1960s with a strong research foundation primarily in medical schools across the USA and Europe. By 1989 health informatics education was provided in some form by at least 20 countries representing five continents. This continues to progress, in Europe with the help of a number of special projects, via the integration of informatics into pre registration health professional courses, undergraduate and post graduate course work and research degree programs. Each program is unique in terms or content and structure reflecting the many foundation disciplines which contribute or are incorporated in the health informatics discipline. Nursing informatics education is not as widespread. Indeed the evidence suggests a poor uptake of informatics by this profession. Advances in computer based educational technologies are making innovative modes of educational delivery possible and are facilitating a shift towards learner centred, flexible and life long learning. Greater cooperation between Universities is recommended. PMID:10947666

  3. Information science for the future: an innovative nursing informatics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Travis, L; Flatley Brennan, P

    1998-04-01

    Health care is increasingly driven by information, and consequently, patient care will demand effective management of information. The report of the Priority Expert Panel E: Nursing Informatics and Enhancing Clinical Care Through Nursing Informatics challenges faculty to produce baccalaureate graduates who use information technologies to improve the patient care process and change health care. The challenge is to construct an evolving nursing informatics curriculum to provide nursing professionals with the foundation for affecting health care delivery. This article discusses the design, implementation, and evaluation of an innovative nursing informatics curriculum incorporated into a baccalaureate nursing program. The basic components of the curriculum framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. The presented integrated curriculum is effective in familiarizing students with informatics and encouraging them to think critically about using informatics in practice. The two groups of students who completed the four-course sequence will be discussed.

  4. Health Informatics: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

  5. The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Kilbridge, Peter M.; Classen, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health records, support for adverse event detection and reporting, and greater investment in research at the intersection of informatics and patient safety. Leading organizations have demonstrated that health care informatics approaches can improve safety. Nevertheless, significant obstacles today limit optimal application of health informatics to safety within most provider environments. The authors offer a series of recommendations for addressing these challenges. PMID:18436896

  6. Origins of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Morris F.

    1986-01-01

    Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

  7. Enhancing Adherence among Older African American Men Enrolled in a Longitudinal Cancer Screening Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Marvella E.; Havstad, Suzanne; Vernon, Sally W.; Davis, Shawna D.; Kroll, David; Lamerato, Lois; Swanson, G. Marie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to enhance adherence among older (aged 55 years and older) African American men enrolled in a cancer screening trial for prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. For this study, we defined "adherence" as completing the trial screenings. Design and Methods: We used a randomized trial design. Case managers…

  8. Informatics in Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cakir, Serhat

    1994-01-01

    In the last twenty years the rapid change in the informatics sector has had economic and social impact on private and government activities. The Supreme Council for Science and Technology of Turkey assigned highest priority to the informatics in its meeting in February 1993. With this advice TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey) intends to give a strong impulse to development of a research policy in this field.

  9. What is biomedical informatics?

    PubMed Central

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

  10. Clinical Microbiology Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

  11. Clinical microbiology informatics.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-10-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future.

  12. What Is Primary Care Informatics?

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Primary care informatics is an emerging academic discipline that remains undefined. The unique nature of primary care necessitates the development of its own informatics discipline. A definition of primary care informatics is proposed, which encompasses the distinctive nature of primary care. The core concepts and theory that should underpin it are described. Primary care informatics is defined as a science and as a subset of health informatics. The proposed definition is intended to focus the development of a generalizable core theory for this informatics subspecialty. PMID:12668690

  13. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  14. Development of a novel imaging informatics-based system with an intelligent workflow engine (IWEIS) to support imaging-based clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent J; Martinez, Clarisa; Zhang, Xuejun; Winstein, Carolee J

    2016-02-01

    Imaging based clinical trials can benefit from a solution to efficiently collect, analyze, and distribute multimedia data at various stages within the workflow. Currently, the data management needs of these trials are typically addressed with custom-built systems. However, software development of the custom-built systems for versatile workflows can be resource-consuming. To address these challenges, we present a system with a workflow engine for imaging based clinical trials. The system enables a project coordinator to build a data collection and management system specifically related to study protocol workflow without programming. Web Access to DICOM Objects (WADO) module with novel features is integrated to further facilitate imaging related study. The system was initially evaluated by an imaging based rehabilitation clinical trial. The evaluation shows that the cost of the development of system can be much reduced compared to the custom-built system. By providing a solution to customize a system and automate the workflow, the system will save on development time and reduce errors especially for imaging clinical trials.

  15. Multi-Sensory Informatics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katai, Zoltan; Toth, Laszlo; Adorjani, Alpar Karoly

    2014-01-01

    A recent report by the joint Informatics Europe & ACM Europe Working Group on Informatics Education emphasizes that: (1) computational thinking is an important ability that all people should possess; (2) informatics-based concepts, abilities and skills are teachable, and must be included in the primary and particularly in the secondary school…

  16. Molecular Pathology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak

    2015-06-01

    Molecular informatics (MI) is an evolving discipline that will support the dynamic landscape of molecular pathology and personalized medicine. MI provides a fertile ground for development of clinical solutions to bridge the gap between clinical informatics and bioinformatics. Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical arena has triggered major endeavors in MI that are expected to bring a paradigm shift in the practice of pathology. This brief review presents a broad overview of various aspects of MI, particularly in the context of NGS based testing. PMID:26065793

  17. Informatics and the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-08-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a

  18. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

  19. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

  20. RAS - Target Identification - Informatics

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Informatics lab group develops tools to track and analyze “big data” from the RAS Initiative, as well as analyzes data from external projects. By integrating internal and external data, this group helps improve understanding of RAS-driven cancers.

  1. Informatics: A Brief Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Shaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

  2. Informatics confronts drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B

    2013-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74000 emergency room visits and 195000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

  3. Multidisciplinary education in medical informatics--a course for medical and informatics students.

    PubMed

    Breil, Bernhard; Fritz, Fleur; Thiemann, Volker; Dugas, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Design and implementation of healthcare information systems affect both computer scientists and health care professionals. In this paper we present our approach to integrate the management of information systems in the education of healthcare professionals and computer scientists alike. We designed a multidisciplinary course for medical and informatics students to provide them with practical experience concerning the design and implementation of medical information systems. This course was implemented in the curriculum of the University of Münster in 2009. The key element is a case study that is performed by small teams of medical and informatics students. A practical course on management of information systems can be useful for medical students who want to enhance their knowledge in information systems as well as for informatics students with particular interests in medicine.

  4. Globalising health informatics: the role of GIScience.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hamish; Nicholas, Nick; Georgiou, Andrew; Johnson, Julie; Travaglia, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Health systems globally are undergoing significant changes. New systems are emerging in developing countries where there were previously limited healthcare options, existing systems in emerging and developed economies are under significant resource pressures and population dynamics are creating significant pressures for change. As health systems expand and intensify, information quality and timeliness will be central to their sustainability and continuity. Information collection and transfer across diverse systems and international borders already presents a significant challenge for health system operations and logistics. Geographic information science (giscience) has the potential to support and enhance health informatics in the coming decades as health information transfers become increasingly important. In this article we propose a spatially enabled approach to support and increasingly globalised health informatics environment. In a world where populations are ageing and urbanising and health systems are linked to economic and social policy shifts, knowing where patients, diseases, health care workers and facilities are located becomes central to those systems operational capacities. In this globalising environment, health informatics needs to be spatially enabled informatics.

  5. What is health informatics?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F

    2001-10-01

    Health informatics is a relatively recent jargon term for a subject that may be of great interest to health services researchers and policy makers. Most countries with highly developed health systems are investing heavily in computer hardware and software in the expectation of higher quality for lower costs. Recent systematic reviews have indeed demonstrated the health benefits of a range of electronic tools, particularly in the areas of prevention and therapeutic monitoring. However, there remains a relative lack of published evaluations of informatics tools and methods. Uncritical adoption of new systems based on the pressures of technological push continue to discredit policy makers who have had to commit significant resources despite inadequate information on what can be realistically expected from a proposed system. There are great opportunities for researchers interested in evaluation to fill the vacuum left by informaticists who are too busy writing their next line of code.

  6. Pre-Trial EEG-Based Single-Trial Motor Performance Prediction to Enhance Neuroergonomics for a Hand Force Task.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Andreas; Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Reis, Janine; Tangermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for building electrophysiological predictors of single-trial motor performance variations, exemplified for SVIPT, a sequential isometric force control task suitable for hand motor rehabilitation after stroke. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data of 20 subjects with mean age of 53 years was recorded prior to and during 400 trials of SVIPT. They were executed within a single session with the non-dominant left hand, while receiving continuous visual feedback of the produced force trajectories. The behavioral data showed strong trial-by-trial performance variations for five clinically relevant metrics, which accounted for reaction time as well as for the smoothness and precision of the produced force trajectory. 18 out of 20 tested subjects remained after preprocessing and entered offline analysis. Source Power Comodulation (SPoC) was applied on EEG data of a short time interval prior to the start of each SVIPT trial. For 11 subjects, SPoC revealed robust oscillatory EEG subspace components, whose bandpower activity are predictive for the performance of the upcoming trial. Since SPoC may overfit to non-informative subspaces, we propose to apply three selection criteria accounting for the meaningfulness of the features. Across all subjects, the obtained components were spread along the frequency spectrum and showed a variety of spatial activity patterns. Those containing the highest level of predictive information resided in and close to the alpha band. Their spatial patterns resemble topologies reported for visual attention processes as well as those of imagined or executed hand motor tasks. In summary, we identified subject-specific single predictors that explain up to 36% of the performance fluctuations and may serve for enhancing neuroergonomics of motor rehabilitation scenarios. PMID:27199701

  7. Pre-Trial EEG-Based Single-Trial Motor Performance Prediction to Enhance Neuroergonomics for a Hand Force Task

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Andreas; Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Reis, Janine; Tangermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for building electrophysiological predictors of single-trial motor performance variations, exemplified for SVIPT, a sequential isometric force control task suitable for hand motor rehabilitation after stroke. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data of 20 subjects with mean age of 53 years was recorded prior to and during 400 trials of SVIPT. They were executed within a single session with the non-dominant left hand, while receiving continuous visual feedback of the produced force trajectories. The behavioral data showed strong trial-by-trial performance variations for five clinically relevant metrics, which accounted for reaction time as well as for the smoothness and precision of the produced force trajectory. 18 out of 20 tested subjects remained after preprocessing and entered offline analysis. Source Power Comodulation (SPoC) was applied on EEG data of a short time interval prior to the start of each SVIPT trial. For 11 subjects, SPoC revealed robust oscillatory EEG subspace components, whose bandpower activity are predictive for the performance of the upcoming trial. Since SPoC may overfit to non-informative subspaces, we propose to apply three selection criteria accounting for the meaningfulness of the features. Across all subjects, the obtained components were spread along the frequency spectrum and showed a variety of spatial activity patterns. Those containing the highest level of predictive information resided in and close to the alpha band. Their spatial patterns resemble topologies reported for visual attention processes as well as those of imagined or executed hand motor tasks. In summary, we identified subject-specific single predictors that explain up to 36% of the performance fluctuations and may serve for enhancing neuroergonomics of motor rehabilitation scenarios. PMID:27199701

  8. Pre-Trial EEG-Based Single-Trial Motor Performance Prediction to Enhance Neuroergonomics for a Hand Force Task.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Andreas; Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Reis, Janine; Tangermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for building electrophysiological predictors of single-trial motor performance variations, exemplified for SVIPT, a sequential isometric force control task suitable for hand motor rehabilitation after stroke. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data of 20 subjects with mean age of 53 years was recorded prior to and during 400 trials of SVIPT. They were executed within a single session with the non-dominant left hand, while receiving continuous visual feedback of the produced force trajectories. The behavioral data showed strong trial-by-trial performance variations for five clinically relevant metrics, which accounted for reaction time as well as for the smoothness and precision of the produced force trajectory. 18 out of 20 tested subjects remained after preprocessing and entered offline analysis. Source Power Comodulation (SPoC) was applied on EEG data of a short time interval prior to the start of each SVIPT trial. For 11 subjects, SPoC revealed robust oscillatory EEG subspace components, whose bandpower activity are predictive for the performance of the upcoming trial. Since SPoC may overfit to non-informative subspaces, we propose to apply three selection criteria accounting for the meaningfulness of the features. Across all subjects, the obtained components were spread along the frequency spectrum and showed a variety of spatial activity patterns. Those containing the highest level of predictive information resided in and close to the alpha band. Their spatial patterns resemble topologies reported for visual attention processes as well as those of imagined or executed hand motor tasks. In summary, we identified subject-specific single predictors that explain up to 36% of the performance fluctuations and may serve for enhancing neuroergonomics of motor rehabilitation scenarios.

  9. Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-01-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that

  10. Accelerating the Global Workforce Demand for Nurse Informaticians: Advanced Health Informatics Certification (AHIC).

    PubMed

    Gadd, Cynthia; Delaney, Connie W; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Greenwood, Karen; Williamson, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in professional recognition of nursing informatics vary by country but examples exist of training programs moving from curriculum-based education to competency based frameworks to produce highly skilled nursing informaticians. This panel will discuss a significant credentialing project in the United States that should further enhance professional recognition of highly skilled nurses matriculating from NI programs as well as nurses functioning in positions where informatics-induced transformation is occurring. The panel will discuss the professionalization of health informatics by describing core content, training requirements, education needs, and administrative framework applicable for the creation of an Advanced Health Informatics Certification (AHIC). PMID:27332309

  11. Uncertainty of trial timing enhances acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Servatius, R J

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibit enhanced eyeblink conditioning in omission and yoked training as well as with schedules of partial reinforcement. We hypothesized that spacing CS-US paired trials over a longer period of time by extending and varying the inter-trial interval (ITI) would facilitate learning. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI) and were grouped as behaviorally inhibited (BI) and non-behaviorally inhibited (NI) based on a median split score of 15.5. All participants received 3 US alone trials and 30CS-US paired trials for acquisition training and 20CS alone trials for extinction training in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a 50-ms air puff unconditional stimulus (US). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a short ITI (mean=30+/- 5s), a long ITI (mean=57+/- 5s) or a variable long ITI (mean=57 s, range 25-123 s). No significant ITI effects were observed for acquisition or extinction. Overall, anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibited enhanced conditioned eyeblink responses as compared to non-vulnerable individuals. This enhanced acquisition of CRs was significant in spaced training with a variable long ITI, but not the short or long ITI. There were no significant effects of ITI or BI on extinction. These findings are interpreted based on the idea that uncertainty plays a role in anxiety and can enhance associative learning in anxiety vulnerable individuals. PMID:26873040

  12. Uncertainty of trial timing enhances acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Servatius, R J

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibit enhanced eyeblink conditioning in omission and yoked training as well as with schedules of partial reinforcement. We hypothesized that spacing CS-US paired trials over a longer period of time by extending and varying the inter-trial interval (ITI) would facilitate learning. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI) and were grouped as behaviorally inhibited (BI) and non-behaviorally inhibited (NI) based on a median split score of 15.5. All participants received 3 US alone trials and 30CS-US paired trials for acquisition training and 20CS alone trials for extinction training in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a 50-ms air puff unconditional stimulus (US). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a short ITI (mean=30+/- 5s), a long ITI (mean=57+/- 5s) or a variable long ITI (mean=57 s, range 25-123 s). No significant ITI effects were observed for acquisition or extinction. Overall, anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibited enhanced conditioned eyeblink responses as compared to non-vulnerable individuals. This enhanced acquisition of CRs was significant in spaced training with a variable long ITI, but not the short or long ITI. There were no significant effects of ITI or BI on extinction. These findings are interpreted based on the idea that uncertainty plays a role in anxiety and can enhance associative learning in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

  13. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  14. Training Residents in Medical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerant, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

  15. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  16. Informatics applied to cytology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Automation and emerging information technologies are being adopted by cytology laboratories to augment Pap test screening and improve diagnostic accuracy. As a result, informatics, the application of computers and information systems to information management, has become essential for the successful operation of the cytopathology laboratory. This review describes how laboratory information management systems can be used to achieve an automated and seamless workflow process. The utilization of software, electronic databases and spreadsheets to perform necessary quality control measures are discussed, as well as a Lean production system and Six Sigma approach, to reduce errors in the cytopathology laboratory. PMID:19495402

  17. Biomedical informatics: changing what physicians need to know and how they learn.

    PubMed

    Stead, William W; Searle, John R; Fessler, Henry E; Smith, Jack W; Shortliffe, Edward H

    2011-04-01

    The explosive growth of biomedical complexity calls for a shift in the paradigm of medical decision making-from a focus on the power of an individual brain to the collective power of systems of brains. This shift alters professional roles and requires biomedical informatics and information technology (IT) infrastructure. The authors illustrate this future role of medical informatics with a vignette and summarize the evolving understanding of both beneficial and deleterious effects of informatics-rich environments on learning, clinical care, and research. The authors also provide a framework of core informatics competencies for health professionals of the future and conclude with broad steps for faculty development. They recommend that medical schools advance on four fronts to prepare their faculty to teach in a biomedical informatics-rich world: (1) create academic units in biomedical informatics; (2) adapt the IT infrastructure of academic health centers (AHCs) into testing laboratories; (3) introduce medical educators to biomedical informatics sufficiently for them to model its use; and (4) retrain AHC faculty to lead the transformation to health care based on a new systems approach enabled by biomedical informatics. The authors propose that embracing this collective and informatics-enhanced future of medicine will provide opportunities to advance education, patient care, and biomedical science.

  18. Harnessing Technology to Improve Clinical Trials: Study of Real-Time Informatics to Collect Data, Toxicities, Image Response Assessments, and Patient-Reported Outcomes in a Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pietanza, M. Catherine; Basch, Ethan M.; Lash, Alex; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.; Zhao, Binsheng; Shouery, Marwan; Shaw, Mary; Rogak, Lauren J.; Wilson, Manda; Gabow, Aaron; Latif, Marcia; Lin, Kai-Hsiung; Wu, Qinfei; Kass, Samantha L.; Miller, Claire P.; Tyson, Leslie; Sumner, Dyana K.; Berkowitz-Hergianto, Alison; Sima, Camelia S.; Kris, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In clinical trials, traditional monitoring methods, paper documentation, and outdated collection systems lead to inaccuracies of study information and inefficiencies in the process. Integrated electronic systems offer an opportunity to collect data in real time. Patients and Methods We created a computer software system to collect 13 patient-reported symptomatic adverse events and patient-reported Karnofsky performance status, semi-automated RECIST measurements, and laboratory data, and we made this information available to investigators in real time at the point of care during a phase II lung cancer trial. We assessed data completeness within 48 hours of each visit. Clinician satisfaction was measured. Results Forty-four patients were enrolled, for 721 total visits. At each visit, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) reflecting toxicity and disease-related symptoms were completed using a dedicated wireless laptop. All PROs were distributed in batch throughout the system within 24 hours of the visit, and abnormal laboratory data were available for review within a median of 6 hours from the time of sample collection. Manual attribution of laboratory toxicities took a median of 1 day from the time they were accessible online. Semi-automated RECIST measurements were available to clinicians online within a median of 2 days from the time of imaging. All clinicians and 88% of data managers felt there was greater accuracy using this system. Conclusion Existing data management systems can be harnessed to enable real-time collection and review of clinical information during trials. This approach facilitates reporting of information closer to the time of events, and improves efficiency, and the ability to make earlier clinical decisions. PMID:23630218

  19. Bioimage Informatics for Big Data.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Zhi; Bria, Alessandro; Li, Yujie; Kleissas, Dean Mark; Drenkow, Nathan G; Long, Brian; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Hanbo

    2016-01-01

    Bioimage informatics is a field wherein high-throughput image informatics methods are used to solve challenging scientific problems related to biology and medicine. When the image datasets become larger and more complicated, many conventional image analysis approaches are no longer applicable. Here, we discuss two critical challenges of large-scale bioimage informatics applications, namely, data accessibility and adaptive data analysis. We highlight case studies to show that these challenges can be tackled based on distributed image computing as well as machine learning of image examples in a multidimensional environment. PMID:27207370

  20. An Effectiveness Trial of a New Enhanced Dissonance Eating Disorder Prevention Program among Female College Students

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Butryn, Meghan L.; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Efficacy trials indicate that a dissonance-based prevention program in which female high school and college students with body image concerns critique the thin-ideal reduced risk factors, eating disorder symptoms, and future eating disorder onset, but weaker effects emerged from an effectiveness trial wherein high school clinicians recruited students and delivered the program under real-world conditions. The present effectiveness trial tested whether a new enhanced dissonance version of this program produced larger effects when college clinicians recruited students and delivered the intervention using improved procedures to select, train, and supervise clinicians. Method Young women recruited from seven universities across the US (N = 408, M age = 21.6, SD = 5.64) were randomized to the dissonance intervention or an educational brochure control condition. Results Dissonance participants showed significantly greater decreases in risk factors (thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dieting, negative affect) and eating disorder symptoms versus controls at posttest and 1-year follow-up, resulting in medium average effect size (d = .60). Dissonance participants also reported significant improvements in psychosocial functioning, but not reduced healthcare utilization or unhealthy weight gain. Conclusions This novel multisite effectiveness trial with college clinicians found that the enhanced dissonance version of this program and the improved facilitator selection/training procedures produced average effects that were 83% larger than effects observed in the high school effectiveness trial. PMID:24189570

  1. The origins of informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Collen, M F

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

  2. Building Informatics Environment

    2008-06-02

    The Building Informatics Environment is a modeling environment based on the Modelica language. The environment allows users to create a computer model of a building and its energy systems with various time scales and physical resolutions. The environment can be used for rapid development of, e.g., demand controls algorithms, new HVAC system solutions and new operational strategies (controls, fault detection and diagnostics). Models for building energy and control systems are made available in the environment.more » The models can be used as provided, or they can be changed and/or linked with each other in order to model the effects that a particular user is interested in.« less

  3. Informatics — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The EDRN provides a comprehensive informatics activity which includes a number of tools and an integrated knowledge environment for capturing, managing, integrating, and sharing results from across EDRN's cancer biomarker research network.

  4. Informatics integration in a medical residency program: early experiences.

    PubMed

    Moidu, K; Leehy, M A; Steinberg, I; Einreinhofer, S; Falsone, J J; Cleary, J; Nair, S; Mazur, E

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Informatics training was integrated into the medical residency program at Norwalk Hospital. The program objective was to familiarize the residents with clinical applications of information technology that could enhance their productivity in clinical practice. In its first year, the curriculum was theory oriented. Evaluation of the program at the end of the first year led to a significant restructuring of the program format and curriculum. The trainees did not find theory to be of immediate clinical value, in the second year the program emphasis was redirected toward the development of practical skills. Next year, in 1993, 'Informatics Clinics' were initiated to develop practical Informatics skills that would be useful in a clinical setting. This approach was more successful but did not offer a complete solution. The degree to which the concepts and methods learned are clinically utilized by residents will depend upon the degree of reinforcement provided in the clinical residency years. In addition, there is a need for the development of assessment standards for the evaluation of Informatics literacy levels. In the absence of assessment standards the level of Informatics literacy in medical graduates remains undetermined Consequently, it is difficult to determine whether the training received has transformed expectations into reality.

  5. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Salma H.; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area. PMID:27135022

  6. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Mulla, Salma H; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area.

  7. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Mulla, Salma H; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area. PMID:27135022

  8. Using informatics to capture older adults’ wellness

    PubMed Central

    Demiris, George; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Reeder, Blaine; Wilamowska, Katarzyna; Zaslavsky, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how informatics applications can support the assessment and visualization of older adults’ wellness. A theoretical framework is presented that informs the design of a technology enhanced screening platform for wellness. We highlight an ongoing pilot demonstration in an assisted living facility where a community room has been converted into a living laboratory for the use of diverse technologies (including a telehealth component to capture vital signs and customized questionnaires, a gait analysis component and cognitive assessment software) to assess the multiple aspects of wellness of older adults. Methods A demonstration project was introduced in an independent retirement community to validate our theoretical framework of informatics and wellness assessment for older adults. Subjects are being recruited to attend a community room and engage in the use of diverse technologies to assess cognitive performance, physiological and gait variables as well as psychometrics pertaining to social and spiritual components of wellness for a period of eight weeks. Data are integrated from various sources into one study database and different visualization approaches are pursued to efficiently display potential correlations between different parameters and capture overall trends of wellness. Results Preliminary findings indicate that older adults are willing to participate in technology-enhanced interventions and embrace different information technology applications given appropriate and customized training and hardware and software features that address potential functional limitations and inexperience with computers. Conclusion Informatics can advance health care for older adults and support a holistic assessment of older adults’ wellness. The described framework can support decision making, link formal and informal caregiving networks and identify early trends and patterns that if addressed could reduce adverse health events

  9. Education review: applied medical informatics--informatics in medical education.

    PubMed

    Naeymi-Rad, F; Trace, D; Moidu, K; Carmony, L; Booden, T

    1994-05-01

    The importance of informatics training within a health sciences program is well recognized and is being implemented on an increasing scale. At Chicago Medical School (CMS), the Informatics program incorporates information technology at every stage of medical education. First-year students are offered an elective in computer topics that concentrate on basic computer literacy. Second-year students learn information management such as entry and information retrieval skills. For example, during the Introduction to Clinical Medicine course, the student is exposed to the Intelligent Medical Record-Entry (IMR-E), allowing the student to enter and organize information gathered from patient encounters. In the third year, students in the Internal Medicine rotation at Norwalk Hospital use Macintosh power books to enter and manage their patients. Patient data gathered by the student are stored in a local server in Norwalk Hospital. In the final year, we teach students the role of informatics in clinical decision making. The present senior class at CMS has been exposed to the power of medical informatics tools for several years. The use of these informatics tools at the point of care is stressed. PMID:10134760

  10. High throughput screening informatics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng Bruce

    2008-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS), an industrial effort to leverage developments in the areas of modern robotics, data analysis and control software, liquid handling devices, and sensitive detectors, has played a pivotal role in the drug discovery process, allowing researchers to efficiently screen millions of compounds to identify tractable small molecule modulators of a given biological process or disease state and advance them into high quality leads. As HTS throughput has significantly increased the volume, complexity, and information content of datasets, lead discovery research demands a clear corporate strategy for scientific computing and subsequent establishment of robust enterprise-wide (usually global) informatics platforms, which enable complicated HTS work flows, facilitate HTS data mining, and drive effective decision-making. The purpose of this review is, from the data analysis and handling perspective, to examine key elements in HTS operations and some essential data-related activities supporting or interfacing the screening process, and outline properties that various enabling software should have. Additionally, some general advice for corporate managers with system procurement responsibilities is offered.

  11. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  12. Driving the Profession of Health Informatics: The Australasian College of Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher; Veil, Klaus; Williams, Peter; Cording, Andrew; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Grain, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, bodies representing health informatics or promoting health informatics are either societies of common interest or universities with health informatics courses/departments. Professional colleges in Health Informatics (similar to the idea of professional colleges in other health fields) are few and far between. The Australasian College of Health Informatics has been in existence since 2001, and has an increasing membership of nearly 100 fellows and members, acting as a national focal point for the promotion of Health Informatics in Australasia. Describing the activities of the college, this article demonstrates a need for increasing professionalization of Health informatics beyond the current structures.

  13. Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Luden, Nicholas D.; Saunders, Michael J.; D’Lugos, Andrew C.; Pataky, Mark W.; Baur, Daniel A.; Vining, Caitlin B.; Schroer, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate (CHO) solutions can enhance endurance performance (≥30 min). The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of ‘metabolic strain’. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse (PRO) on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% Wmax) followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided. Following 15 min of muscle function assessment, 10 min of constant-load cycling (3 min at 35% Wmax, 7 min at 55% Wmax) was performed. This was immediately followed by a 2 km time trial. Subjects rinsed with 25 mL of CHO, PRO, or placebo (PLA) at min 5:00 and 14:30 of the 15 min muscle function phase, and min 8:00 of the 10-min constant-load cycling. Magnitude-based inferential statistics were used to analyze the effects of the mouth rinse on 2-km time trial performance and the following physiological parameters: Maximum Voluntary Contract (MVC), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), Heart Rate (HR), and blood glucose levels. The primary finding was that CHO ‘likely’ enhanced performance vs. PLA (3.8%), whereas differences between PRO and PLA were unclear (0.4%). These data demonstrate that late-race performance is enhanced by a CHO rinse, but not PRO, under challenging metabolic conditions. More data should be acquired before this strategy is recommended for the later stages of cycling competition under more practical conditions, such as when carbohydrates are supplemented throughout the preceding minutes/hours of exercise. PMID:27657117

  14. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, David S.; Levy, Bruce P.; Lane, William J.; Lee, Roy E.; Baron, Jason M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Dighe, Anand S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including

  15. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology

    PubMed Central

    Swedlow, Jason R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multi-dimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition are reportedly frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remains largely unsolved. Like the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solution. PMID:19416072

  16. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology.

    PubMed

    Swedlow, Jason R; Goldberg, Ilya G; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multidimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition is reported frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remain largely unsolved. As in the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges, and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solutions.

  17. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on curative and health enhancement effects of forest therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Mutoh, Yoshiteru; Honda, Takuya; Shiozawa, Nobuyoshi; Okada, Shinpei; Park, Sang-Jun; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Kamada, Masamitsu; Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Handa, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the evidence for curative and health enhancement effects through forest therapy and to assess the quality of studies based on a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Study design A systematic review based on RCTs. Methods Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which forest therapy was applied. The following databases – from 1990 to November 9, 2010 – were searched: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Ichushi- Web. All Cochrane databases and Campbell Systematic Reviews were also searched up to November 9, 2010. Results Two trials met all inclusion criteria. No specific diseases were evaluated, and both studies reported significant effectiveness in one or more outcomes for health enhancement. However, the results of evaluations with the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) 2010 and CLEAR NPT (A Checklist to Evaluate a Report of a Nonpharmacological Trial) checklists generally showed a remarkable lack of description in the studies. Furthermore, there was a problem of heterogeneity, thus a meta-analysis was unable to be performed. Conclusion Because there was insufficient evidence on forest therapy due to poor methodological and reporting quality and heterogeneity of RCTs, it was not possible to offer any conclusions about the effects of this intervention. However, it was possible to identify problems with current RCTs of forest therapy, and to propose a strategy for strengthening study quality and stressing the importance of study feasibility and original check items based on characteristics of forest therapy as a future research agenda. PMID:22888281

  18. Progress with Formalization in Medical Informatics?

    PubMed Central

    van der Maas, Arnoud A.F.; Ten Hoopen, A. Johannes; Ter Hofstede, Arthur H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The prevailing view of medical informatics as a primarily subservient discipline in health care is challenged. Developments in both general informatics and medical informatics are described to identify desirable properties of modeling languages and tools needed to solve key problems in the application field. For progress in medical informatics, it is considered essential to develop far more formal modeling languages, modeling techniques, and tools. A major aim of this development should be to expel ambiguity from concepts essential to medicine, positioning medical informatics “at the heart of health care.” PMID:11230381

  19. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  20. Five periods in development of medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2014-02-01

    Medical informatics, as scientific discipline, has to do with all aspects of understanding and promoting the effective organization, analysis, management, and use of information in health care. While the field of Medical informatics shares the general scope of these interests with some other health care specialities and disciplines, Medical (Health) informatics has developed its own areas of emphasis and approaches that have set it apart from other disciplines and specialities. For the last fifties of 20th century and some more years of 21st century, Medical informatics had the five time periods of characteristic development. In this paper author shortly described main scientific innovations and inventors who created development of Medical informatics.

  1. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  2. The health informatics cohort enhancement project (HICE): using routinely collected primary care data to identify people with a lifetime diagnosis of psychotic disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that routinely collected primary care data can be used to identify potential participants for trials in depression [1]. Here we demonstrate how patients with psychotic disorders can be identified from primary care records for potential inclusion in a cohort study. We discuss the strengths and limitations of this approach; assess its potential value and report challenges encountered. Methods We designed an algorithm with which we searched for patients with a lifetime diagnosis of psychotic disorders within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) database of routinely collected health data. The algorithm was validated against the "gold standard" of a well established operational criteria checklist for psychotic and affective illness (OPCRIT). Case notes of 100 patients from a community mental health team (CMHT) in Swansea were studied of whom 80 had matched GP records. Results The algorithm had favourable test characteristics, with a very good ability to detect patients with psychotic disorders (sensitivity > 0.7) and an excellent ability not to falsely identify patients with psychotic disorders (specificity > 0.9). Conclusions With certain limitations our algorithm can be used to search the general practice data and reliably identify patients with psychotic disorders. This may be useful in identifying candidates for potential inclusion in cohort studies. PMID:22333117

  3. Policy Implications of Education Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

  4. Biomedical informatics methods in pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the study of the genetic basis of individual variation in response to therapeutic agents. Pharmacogenomics may potentially affect on every step of health care and every drug treatment protocol. The optimal approach to pharmacogenomics in hypertension requires the integration of different disciplines, in which biomedical informatics plays an essential role. This chapter describes biomedical informatics methods used in dealing with key issues in pharmacogenomics. These key issues include the association between structure and function, the interaction between gene and drug, and the correlation between genotype and phenotype. Heterogeneous resources, including web sites, databases, and software analysis tools, are selected, organized, and integrated in practical methods to support these studies. Bioinformatics methods described in this chapter include genetic sequence searching, comparison, structural modeling, functional analysis, and systems biology studies, with emphasis on single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Medical informatics methods such as disease and drug information and clinical terminology are also embraced in this chapter. This combination of both biological and medical informatics provides comprehensive methodologies to resolve complex problems in pharmacogenomics.

  5. Enhancing a sustainable healthy working life: design of a clustered randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To improve a sustainable healthy working life, we have developed the intervention 'Staying healthy at work', which endeavours to enhance work participation of employees aged 45 years and older by increasing their problem-solving capacity and stimulating their awareness of their role and responsibility towards a healthy working life. This research study aims to evaluate the process and the effectiveness of the intervention compared with care as usual. Methods/design The study is a cluster-randomized controlled trial design (randomized at the supervisor level), with a 1-year follow-up. Workers aged 45 years and older have been enrolled in the study. Workers in the intervention group are receiving the intervention 'Staying healthy at work'. The main focus of the intervention is to promote a healthy working life of ageing workers by: (1) changing workers awareness and behaviour, by emphasizing their own decisive role in attaining goals; (2) improving the supervisors' ability to support workers in taking the necessary action, by means of enhancing knowledge and competence; and (3) enhancing the use of the human resource professionals and the occupational health tools available within the organization. The supervisors in the intervention group have been trained how to present themselves as a source of support for the worker. Workers in the control group are receiving care as usual; supervisors in the control group have not participated in the training. Measurements have been taken at baseline and will be followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome measures are vitality, work ability and productivity. The secondary outcomes measures include fatigue, job strain, work attitude, self-efficacy and work engagement. A process evaluation will be conducted at both the supervisor and the worker levels, and satisfaction with the content of the intervention will be assessed. Discussion The intervention 'Staying healthy at work' has the potential to provide

  6. Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw Teng; Gray, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions * health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings * major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation * using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. PMID:20407180

  7. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to

  8. Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Mæland Knudsen, Lina Merete

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

  9. Acute whole body UVA irradiation combined with nitrate ingestion enhances time trial performance in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Muggeridge, David J; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Grace, Fergal M; Willis, Gareth; Thornhill, Laurence; Weller, Richard B; James, Philip E; Easton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to increase nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, reduce blood pressure (BP) and enhance exercise performance. Acute exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-A light also increases NO bioavailability and reduces BP. We conducted a randomized, counterbalanced placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of UV-A light alone and in combination with nitrate on the responses to sub-maximal steady-state exercise and time trial (TT) performance. Nine cyclists (VO2max 53.1 ± 4.4 ml/kg/min) completed five performance trials comprising 10 min submaximal steady-state cycling followed by a 16.1 km TT. Following a familiarization the final four trials were preceded, in random order, by either (1) Nitrate gels (NIT) + UV-A, (2) Placebo (PLA) + UV-A, (3) NIT + Sham light (SHAM) and (4) PLA + SHAM (control). The NIT gels (2 × 60 ml gels, ~8.1 mmol nitrate) or a low-nitrate PLA were ingested 2.5 h prior to the trial. The light exposure consisted of 20 J/cm(2) whole body irradiation with either UV-A or SHAM light. Plasma nitrite was measured pre- and post-irradiation and VO2 was measured continuously during steady-state exercise. Plasma nitrite was higher for NIT + SHAM (geometric mean (95% CI), 332 (292-377) nM; P = 0.029) and NIT + UV-A (456 (312-666) nM; P = 0.014) compared to PLA + SHAM (215 (167-277) nM). Differences between PLA + SHAM and PLA + UV-A (282 (248-356) nM) were small and non-significant. During steady-state exercise VO2 was reduced following NIT + UVA (P = 0.034) and tended to be lower in NIT + SHAM (P = 0.086) but not PLA + UV-A (P = 0.381) compared to PLA + SHAM. Performance in the TT was significantly faster following NIT + UV-A (mean ± SD 1447 ± 41 s P = 0.005; d = 0.47), but not PLA + UV-A (1450 ± 40 s; d = 0.41) or NIT + SHAM (1455 ± 47 s; d = 0.28) compared to PLA + SHAM (1469 ± 52 s). These findings demonstrate that exposure to UV-A light alone does not alter the physiological responses to exercise or improve

  10. The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

  11. The scope and direction of health informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

  12. Cognitive hacking and intelligence and security informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Paul

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes research on cognitive and semantic attacks on computer systems and their users. Several countermeasures against such attacks are described, including a description of a prototype News Verifier system. It is argued that because misinformation and deception play a much more significant role in intelligence and security informatics than in other informatics disciplines such as science, medicine, and the law, a new science of intelligence and security informatics must concern itself with semantic attacks and countermeasures.

  13. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, José; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and often excluded from clinical trials in the US. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. We conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of three individual sessions of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) to three individual sessions of counseling as usual (CAU) on treatment retention and frequency of substance use, with all assessment and treatment sessions conducted in Spanish among 405 individuals seeking treatment for any type of current substance use. Treatment exposure was good, with 66% of participants completing all three protocol sessions. Although both interventions resulted in reductions in substance use during the 4-week therapy phase, there were no significant treatment condition by time interactions nor site by treatment condition interactions. Results suggest that the individual treatments delivered in Spanish were both attractive to and effective with this heterogeneous group of Hispanic adults, but the differential effectiveness of MET may be limited to those whose primary substance use problem is alcohol and may be fairly modest in magnitude. PMID:19803579

  14. The Telehealth Enhancement of Adherence to Medication in Pediatric IBD (TEAM) Trial: Design and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Gray, Wendy N.; Hente, Elizabeth; Loreaux, Katherine; Ittenbach, Richard F.; Maddux, Michele; Baldassano, Robert; Sylvester, Francisco; Crandall, Wallace; Doarn, Charles; Heyman, Melvin B.; Keljo, David; Denson, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is a significant health care issue requiring regular behavioral treatment. Lack of sufficient health care resources and patient/family time commitment for weekly treatment are primary barriers to receiving appropriate self-management support. We describe the methodology of the Telehealth Enhancement of Adherence to Medication (TEAM) trial for medication nonadherence in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For this trial, participants 11–18 years of age will be recruited from seven pediatric hospitals and will complete an initial 4-week run in to assess adherence to a daily medication. Those who take less than 90% of their prescribed medication will be randomized. A total of 194 patients with IBD will be randomized to either a telehealth behavioral treatment (TBT) arm or education only (EO) arm. All treatment will be delivered via telehealth video conferencing. Patients will be assessed at baseline, post-treatment, 3-, 6-, and 12-months. We anticipate that participants in the TBT arm will demonstrate a statistically significant improvement at post-treatment and 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up compared to participants in the EO arm for both medication adherence and secondary outcomes (i.e., disease severity, patient quality of life, and health care utilization). If efficacious, the TEAM intervention could be disseminated broadly and reduce health care access barriers so that patients could receive much needed self-management intervention. PMID:26003436

  15. Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

  16. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    PubMed

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  17. How can we improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education to encourage careers in Biomedical and Pathology Informatics?

    PubMed

    Uppal, Rahul; Mandava, Gunasheil; Romagnoli, Katrina M; King, Andrew J; Draper, Amie J; Handen, Adam L; Fisher, Arielle M; Becich, Michael J; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta

    2016-01-01

    The Computer Science, Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) program was initiated in 2011 to expose the critical role of informatics in biomedicine to talented high school students.[1] By involving them in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) training at the high school level and providing mentorship and research opportunities throughout the formative years of their education, CoSBBI creates a research infrastructure designed to develop young informaticians. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be an expert in the emerging fields of biomedical informatics and pathology informatics requires accelerated learning at an early age.In our 4(th) year of CoSBBI as a part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Academy (http://www.upci.upmc.edu/summeracademy/), and our 2nd year of CoSBBI as an independent informatics-based academy, we enhanced our classroom curriculum, added hands-on computer science instruction, and expanded research projects to include clinical informatics. We also conducted a qualitative evaluation of the program to identify areas that need improvement in order to achieve our goal of creating a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics in the era of big data and personalized medicine.

  18. How can we improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education to encourage careers in Biomedical and Pathology Informatics?

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Rahul; Mandava, Gunasheil; Romagnoli, Katrina M.; King, Andrew J.; Draper, Amie J.; Handen, Adam L.; Fisher, Arielle M.; Becich, Michael J.; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta

    2016-01-01

    The Computer Science, Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) program was initiated in 2011 to expose the critical role of informatics in biomedicine to talented high school students.[1] By involving them in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) training at the high school level and providing mentorship and research opportunities throughout the formative years of their education, CoSBBI creates a research infrastructure designed to develop young informaticians. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be an expert in the emerging fields of biomedical informatics and pathology informatics requires accelerated learning at an early age.In our 4th year of CoSBBI as a part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Academy (http://www.upci.upmc.edu/summeracademy/), and our 2nd year of CoSBBI as an independent informatics-based academy, we enhanced our classroom curriculum, added hands-on computer science instruction, and expanded research projects to include clinical informatics. We also conducted a qualitative evaluation of the program to identify areas that need improvement in order to achieve our goal of creating a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:26955500

  19. Clinical Research Informatics: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize significant developments in Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) over the past two years and discuss future directions. Methods Survey of advances, open problems and opportunities in this field based on exploration of current literature. Results Recent advances are structured according to three use cases of clinical research: Protocol feasibility, patient identification/recruitment and clinical trial execution. Discussion CRI is an evolving, dynamic field of research. Global collaboration, open metadata, content standards with semantics and computable eligibility criteria are key success factors for future developments in CRI. PMID:26293865

  20. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO)

    PubMed Central

    Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The emerging operational role of the “Chief Clinical Informatics Officer” (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). Background The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. Discussion An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. Conclusion A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science. PMID:27081413

  1. Mobile phone SMS messages can enhance healthy behaviour: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jayne A; King, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Healthy behaviour, such as smoking cessation and adherence to prescribed medications, mitigates illness risk factors but health behaviour change can be challenging. Mobile phone short-message service (SMS) messages are increasingly used to deliver interventions designed to enhance healthy behaviour. This meta-analysis used a random-effects model to synthesise 38 randomised controlled trials that investigated the efficacy of SMS messages to enhance healthy behaviour. Participants (N = 19,641) lived in developed and developing countries and were diverse with respect to age, ethnicity, socioeconomic background and health behaviours targeted for change. SMS messages had a small, positive, significant effect (g = 0.291) on a broad range of healthy behaviour. This effect was maximised when multiple SMS messages per day were used (g = 0.395) compared to using lower frequencies (daily, multiple per week and once-off) (g = 0.244). The low heterogeneity in this meta-analysis (I (2) = 38.619) supports reporting a summary effect size and implies that the effect of SMS messaging is robust, regardless of population characteristics or healthy behaviour targeted. SMS messaging is a simple, cost-effective intervention that can be automated and can reach any mobile phone owner. While the effect size is small, potential health benefits are well worth achieving.

  2. Mobile phone SMS messages can enhance healthy behaviour: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jayne A; King, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Healthy behaviour, such as smoking cessation and adherence to prescribed medications, mitigates illness risk factors but health behaviour change can be challenging. Mobile phone short-message service (SMS) messages are increasingly used to deliver interventions designed to enhance healthy behaviour. This meta-analysis used a random-effects model to synthesise 38 randomised controlled trials that investigated the efficacy of SMS messages to enhance healthy behaviour. Participants (N = 19,641) lived in developed and developing countries and were diverse with respect to age, ethnicity, socioeconomic background and health behaviours targeted for change. SMS messages had a small, positive, significant effect (g = 0.291) on a broad range of healthy behaviour. This effect was maximised when multiple SMS messages per day were used (g = 0.395) compared to using lower frequencies (daily, multiple per week and once-off) (g = 0.244). The low heterogeneity in this meta-analysis (I (2) = 38.619) supports reporting a summary effect size and implies that the effect of SMS messaging is robust, regardless of population characteristics or healthy behaviour targeted. SMS messaging is a simple, cost-effective intervention that can be automated and can reach any mobile phone owner. While the effect size is small, potential health benefits are well worth achieving. PMID:25739668

  3. Case report medical eponyms: an applied clinical informatics opportunity.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, L N Guptha Munugoor; Greco, P J; Kaelber, D C

    2012-01-01

    Medical eponyms are medical words derived from people's names. Eponyms, especially similar sounding eponyms, may be confusing to people trying to use them because the terms themselves do not contain physiologically descriptive words about the condition they refer to. Through the use of electronic health records (EHRs), embedded applied clinical informatics tools including synonyms and pick lists that include physiologically descriptive terms associated with any eponym appearing in the EHR can significantly enhance the correct use of medical eponyms. Here we describe a case example of two similar sounding medical eponyms--Wegener's disease and Wegner's disease-- which were confused in our EHR. We describe our solution to address this specific example and our suggestions and accomplishments developing more generalized approaches to dealing with medical eponyms in EHRs. Integrating brief physiologically descriptive terms with medical eponyms provides an applied clinical informatics opportunity to improve patient care.

  4. The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sora, Sebastian A.

    2008-01-01

    Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

  5. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  6. Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore Allan

    2002-01-01

    Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

  7. The Impact of Medical Informatics on Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Prudence W.

    The thesis of this paper is that the growth of the field of medical informatics, while seemingly a potential threat to medical librarianship, is in fact an opportunity for librarianship to both extend its reach and also to further define its unique characteristics in contrast to those of medical informatics. Furthermore, because medical…

  8. Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

  9. Teaching Some Informatics Concepts Using Formal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sojung; Park, Seongbin

    2014-01-01

    There are many important issues in informatics and many agree that algorithms and programming are most important issues that need to be included in informatics education (Dagiene and Jevsikova, 2012). In this paper, we propose how some of these issues can be easily taught using the notion of a formal system which consists of axioms and inference…

  10. A repository of codes of ethics and technical standards in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Hamman W; Zaïane, Osmar R

    2014-01-01

    We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository.

  11. A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Zaïane, Osmar R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository. PMID:25422725

  12. Effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy on Employment Outcomes in Early Schizophrenia: Results from a 2-Year Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of psychosocial cognitive rehabilitation on employment outcomes in a randomized controlled trial for individuals with early course schizophrenia. Method: Early course schizophrenia outpatients (N = 58) were randomly assigned to cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) or an enriched supportive therapy (EST) control and…

  13. Randomized Clinical Trial of Motivational Enhancement of Substance Use Treatment among Incarcerated Adolescents: Post-Release Condom Non-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Golembeske, Charles; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Miranda, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Evaluated impact of motivational enhancement (ME) of substance abuse treatment compared to relaxation training (RT) on sex without condoms (overall and involving substance use) 3 months following release among incarcerated adolescents. This randomized clinical trial involved 114 incarcerated adolescents from the Northeast. Regression analyses…

  14. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy in substance misusing schizophrenia: results of an 18-month feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Hogarty, Susan S; Greenwald, Deborah P; Litschge, Maralee Y; McKnight, Summer A F; Bangalore, Srihari S; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Cornelius, Jack R

    2015-02-01

    Substance use is a frequent problem in schizophrenia, and although many substance misusing patients with the disorder also experience considerable cognitive impairments, such individuals have been routinely excluded from clinical trials of cognitive remediation that could support their functional and addiction recoveries. This study conducted a small-scale feasibility trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in substance misusing schizophrenia patients to assess the feasibility and efficacy of implementing comprehensive neurocognitive and social-cognitive remediation in this population. A total of 31 schizophrenia outpatients meeting addiction severity criteria for alcohol and/or cannabis use were randomized to 18months of CET or usual care. Feasibility findings indicated high degrees of satisfaction with CET, but also presented significant challenges in the recruitment and retention of substance misusing patients, with high levels of attrition (50%) over the study period, primarily due to positive symptom exacerbation. Intent-to-treat efficacy analyses showed large and significant improvements in neurocognition (d=.86), social cognition (d=1.13), and social adjustment (d=.92) favoring CET. Further, individuals treated with CET were more likely to reduce alcohol use (67% in CET vs. 25% in usual care) during treatment (p=.021). These results suggest that once engaged and stabilized, CET is a feasible and potentially effective treatment for cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia who misuse alcohol and/or cannabis. Substance misusing patients who are able to engage in treatment may be able to benefit from cognitive remediation, and the treatment of cognitive impairments may help improve substance use outcomes among this underserved population. PMID:25510926

  15. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy in substance misusing schizophrenia: results of an 18-month feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Hogarty, Susan S; Greenwald, Deborah P; Litschge, Maralee Y; McKnight, Summer A F; Bangalore, Srihari S; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Cornelius, Jack R

    2015-02-01

    Substance use is a frequent problem in schizophrenia, and although many substance misusing patients with the disorder also experience considerable cognitive impairments, such individuals have been routinely excluded from clinical trials of cognitive remediation that could support their functional and addiction recoveries. This study conducted a small-scale feasibility trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in substance misusing schizophrenia patients to assess the feasibility and efficacy of implementing comprehensive neurocognitive and social-cognitive remediation in this population. A total of 31 schizophrenia outpatients meeting addiction severity criteria for alcohol and/or cannabis use were randomized to 18months of CET or usual care. Feasibility findings indicated high degrees of satisfaction with CET, but also presented significant challenges in the recruitment and retention of substance misusing patients, with high levels of attrition (50%) over the study period, primarily due to positive symptom exacerbation. Intent-to-treat efficacy analyses showed large and significant improvements in neurocognition (d=.86), social cognition (d=1.13), and social adjustment (d=.92) favoring CET. Further, individuals treated with CET were more likely to reduce alcohol use (67% in CET vs. 25% in usual care) during treatment (p=.021). These results suggest that once engaged and stabilized, CET is a feasible and potentially effective treatment for cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia who misuse alcohol and/or cannabis. Substance misusing patients who are able to engage in treatment may be able to benefit from cognitive remediation, and the treatment of cognitive impairments may help improve substance use outcomes among this underserved population.

  16. Enhancing ventilation in homes of children with asthma: pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Woodfine, Louise; Neal, Richard D; Bruce, Nigel; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Linck, Pat; Mullock, Linda; Nelhans, Nick; Pasterfield, Diana; Russell, Daphne; Russell, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Background Few robust studies have tested whether enhancing housing also improves health. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of installing ventilation systems, and central heating where necessary, in the homes of children with moderate or severe asthma. Design and setting Pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) in homes within Wrexham County Borough, Wales, UK. Method A pragmatic RCT was carried out, of a tailored package of housing improvements providing adequate ventilation and temperature, following inspection by a housing officer. One hundred and ninety-two children with asthma aged 5 to 14 years, identified from general practice registers, were randomised to receive this package, either immediately or a year after recruitment. At baseline, and after 4 and 12 months, parents reported their child's asthma-specific and generic quality of life, and days off school. Results The package improved parent-reported asthma-specific quality of life significantly at both 4 and 12 months. At 12 months, this showed an adjusted mean difference between groups of 7.1 points (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8 to 11.4, P= 0.001): a moderate standardised effect size of 0.42. The generic quality-of-life scale showed reported physical problems were significantly reduced at 4 months, but not quite at 12 months, when the mean difference was 4.5 (95% CI = -0.2 to 9.1, P= 0.061). The improvement in psychosocial quality of life at 12 months was not significant, with a mean difference of 2.2 (95% CI = -1.9 to 6.4, P= 0.292). Parent-reported school attendance improved, but not significantly Conclusion This novel and pragmatic trial, with integrated economic evaluation, found that tailored improvement of the housing of children with moderate to severe asthma significantly increases parent-reported asthma-related quality of life and reduces physical problems. Collaborative housing initiatives have potential to improve health. PMID:22054336

  17. Five Periods in Development of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    Medical informatics, as scientific discipline, has to do with all aspects of understanding and promoting the effective organization, analysis, management, and use of information in health care. While the field of Medical informatics shares the general scope of these interests with some other health care specialities and disciplines, Medical (Health) informatics has developed its own areas of emphasis and approaches that have set it apart from other disciplines and specialities. For the last fifties of 20th century and some more years of 21st century, Medical informatics had the five time periods of characteristic development. In this paper author shortly described main scientific innovations and inventors who created development of Medical informatics. PMID:24648619

  18. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    PubMed

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel. PMID:25924417

  19. Health informatics 3.0.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Dipak

    2011-01-01

    Web 3.0 promises us smart computer services that will interact with each other and leverage knowledge about us and our immediate context to deliver prioritised and relevant information to support decisions and actions. Healthcare must take advantage of such new knowledge-integrating services, in particular to support better co-operation between professionals of different disciplines working in different locations, and to enable well-informed co-operation between clinicians and patients. To grasp the potential of Web 3.0 we will need well-harmonised semantic resources that can richly connect virtual teams and link their strategies to real-time and tailored evidence. Facts, decision logic, care pathway steps, alerts, education need to be embedded within components that can interact with multiple EHR systems and services consistently. Using Health Informatics 3.0 a patient's current situation could be compared with the outcomes of very similar patients (from across millions) to deliver personalised care recommendations. The integration of EHRs with biomedical sciences ('omics) research results and predictive models such as the Virtual Physiological Human could help speed up the translation of new knowledge into clinical practice. The mission, and challenge, for Health Informatics 3.0 is to enable healthy citizens, patients and professionals to collaborate within a knowledge-empowered social network in which patient specific information and personalised real-time evidence are seamlessly interwoven.

  20. Exploration of the e-patient phenomenon in nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Gee, Perry M; Greenwood, Deborah A; Kim, Katherine K; Perez, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy; DeVon, Holli A

    2012-01-01

    The availability of health information on the Internet has equalized opportunities for knowledge between patients and their health care providers, creating a new phenomenon called the e-patient. E-patients use technology to actively participate in their health care and assume higher levels of responsibility for their own health and wellness. This phenomenon has implications for nursing informatics research related to e-patients and potential collaboration with practitioners in developing a collective wisdom. Nursing informatics can use the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom (DIKW) framework to understand how e-patients and clinicians may achieve this collective wisdom. Nurse informaticists can use constructivism and Gadamerian hermeneutics to bridge each stage of this framework to illustrate the fundamentals of patient and clinician interactions and commonality of language to achieve a collective wisdom. Examining the e-patient phenomenon will help nurse informaticists evaluate, design, develop, and determine the effectiveness of information systems used by e-patients. The Internet can facilitate a partnership between the patient and clinician and cultivate a collective wisdom, enhanced by collaboration between nurse informatics and e-patients. PMID:22221955

  1. Integrating medical informatics into the medical undergraduate curriculum.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, L S; Fabri, P J

    1997-01-01

    The advent of healthcare reform and the rapid application of new technologies have resulted in a paradigm shift in medical practice. Integrating medical Informatics into the full spectrum of medical education is a viral step toward implementing this new instructional model, a step required for the understanding and practice of modern medicine. We have developed an informatics curriculum, a new educational paradigm, and an intranet-based teaching module which are designed to enhance adult-learning principles, life-long self education, and evidence-based critical thinking. Thirty two, fourth year medical students have participated in a one month, full time, independent study focused on but not limited to four topics: mastering the windows-based environment, understanding hospital based information management systems, developing competence in using the internet/intranet and world wide web/HTML, and experiencing distance communication and TeleVideo networks. Each student has completed a clinically relevant independent study project utilizing technology mastered during the course. This initial curriculum offering was developed in conjunction with faculty from the College of Medicine, College of Engineering, College of Education, College of Business, College of Public Health. Florida Center of Instructional Technology, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa General Hospital, GTE, Westshore Walk-in Clinic (paperless office), and the Florida Engineering Education Delivery System. Our second step toward the distributive integration process was the introduction of Medical Informatics to first, second and third year medical students. To date, these efforts have focused on undergraduate medical education. Our next step is to offer workshops in Informatics to college of medicine faculty, to residents in post graduate training programs (GME), and ultimately as a method of distance learning in continuing medical education (CME).

  2. A National Agenda for Public Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Yasnoff, William A.; Overhage, J. Marc; Humphreys, Betsy L.; LaVenture, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The AMIA 2001 Spring Congress brought together members of the the public health and informatics communities to develop a national agenda for public health informatics. Discussions of funding and governance; architecture and infrastructure; standards and vocabulary; research, evaluation, and best practices; privacy, confidentiality, and security; and training and workforce resulted in 74 recommendations with two key themes—that all stakeholders need to be engaged in coordinated activities related to public health information architecture, standards, confidentiality, best practices, and research; and that informatics training is needed throughout the public health workforce. Implementation of this consensus agenda will help promote progress in the application of information technology to improve public health. PMID:11687561

  3. Materials Informatics: Fast Track to New Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Peurrung, Loni M.; Marder, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for new materials development focus on either deeper fundamental-level studies or generation of large quantities of data. The data challenge in materials science is not only the volume of data being generated by many independent investigators, but its heterogeneity and also its complexity that must be transformed, analyzed, correlated and communicated. Materials informatics addresses these issues. Materials informatics is an emerging information-based field combining computational, statistical, and mathematical approaches with materials sciences for accelerating discovery and development of new materials. Within the informatic framework, the various different forms of information form a system architecture, an iterative cycle for transforming data into knowledge.

  4. Case-based medical informatics

    PubMed Central

    Pantazi, Stefan V; Arocha, José F; Moehr, Jochen R

    2004-01-01

    Background The "applied" nature distinguishes applied sciences from theoretical sciences. To emphasize this distinction, we begin with a general, meta-level overview of the scientific endeavor. We introduce the knowledge spectrum and four interconnected modalities of knowledge. In addition to the traditional differentiation between implicit and explicit knowledge we outline the concepts of general and individual knowledge. We connect general knowledge with the "frame problem," a fundamental issue of artificial intelligence, and individual knowledge with another important paradigm of artificial intelligence, case-based reasoning, a method of individual knowledge processing that aims at solving new problems based on the solutions to similar past problems. We outline the fundamental differences between Medical Informatics and theoretical sciences and propose that Medical Informatics research should advance individual knowledge processing (case-based reasoning) and that natural language processing research is an important step towards this goal that may have ethical implications for patient-centered health medicine. Discussion We focus on fundamental aspects of decision-making, which connect human expertise with individual knowledge processing. We continue with a knowledge spectrum perspective on biomedical knowledge and conclude that case-based reasoning is the paradigm that can advance towards personalized healthcare and that can enable the education of patients and providers. We center the discussion on formal methods of knowledge representation around the frame problem. We propose a context-dependent view on the notion of "meaning" and advocate the need for case-based reasoning research and natural language processing. In the context of memory based knowledge processing, pattern recognition, comparison and analogy-making, we conclude that while humans seem to naturally support the case-based reasoning paradigm (memory of past experiences of problem-solving and

  5. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence with Weight Loss, a Vanguard Trial: The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Cheryl L.; Byers, Tim E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Elias, Anthony; Krontiras, Helen; Liu, Jingxia; Naughton, Michael; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Wyatt, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer among women in developed countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and mortality in both pre-and postmenopausal women. Co-morbid medical conditions are common among breast cancer survivors. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is a 4-year randomized clinical trial of 693 overweight/obese women aged ≥21 years diagnosed with any early stage breast cancer (stages I[≥1 cm]-III) within the previous five years, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving sustained weight loss and to examine the impact of weight loss on quality of life and co-morbidities, and to enable future exploration of biochemical mechanisms linking obesity to lower likelihood of disease-free survival. This trial is strategically designed as a vanguard for a fully-powered trial of women who will be evaluated for breast cancer recurrence and disease-free survival. Participants were recruited between 2010 and 2012 at four sites, had completed initial therapies, and had a body mass index between 25 and 45 kg/m2. The intervention featured a group-based cognitive-behavioral weight loss program with telephone counseling and tailored newsletters to support initial weight loss and subsequent maintenance, with the goal of 7% weight loss at two years. This study has high potential to have a major impact on clinical management and outcomes after a breast cancer diagnosis. This trial initiates the effort to establish weight loss support for overweight or obese breast cancer survivors as a new standard of clinical care. PMID:23266440

  6. Reducing breast cancer recurrence with weight loss, a vanguard trial: the Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial.

    PubMed

    Rock, Cheryl L; Byers, Tim E; Colditz, Graham A; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ganz, Patricia A; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Elias, Anthony; Krontiras, Helen; Liu, Jingxia; Naughton, Michael; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Wyatt, Holly

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer among women in developed countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and mortality in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Co-morbid medical conditions are common among breast cancer survivors. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is a 4-year randomized clinical trial of 693 overweight/obese women aged ≥21years diagnosed with any early stage breast cancer (stages I[≥1cm]-III) within the previous five years, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving sustained weight loss and to examine the impact of weight loss on quality of life and co-morbidities, and to enable future exploration of biochemical mechanisms linking obesity to lower likelihood of disease-free survival. This trial is strategically designed as a vanguard for a fully-powered trial of women who will be evaluated for breast cancer recurrence and disease-free survival. Participants were recruited between 2010 and 2012 at four sites, had completed initial therapies, and had a body mass index between 25 and 45kg/m(2). The intervention featured a group-based cognitive-behavioral weight loss program with telephone counseling and tailored newsletters to support initial weight loss and subsequent maintenance, with the goal of 7% weight loss at two years. This study has high potential to have a major impact on clinical management and outcomes after a breast cancer diagnosis. This trial initiates the effort to establish weight loss support for overweight or obese breast cancer survivors as a new standard of clinical care.

  7. Scientific papers for health informatics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Samáris Ramiro; Duarte, Jacy Marcondes; Bandiera-Paiva, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    From the hypothesis that the development of scientific papers, mainly in interdisciplinary areas such as Health Informatics, may bring difficulties to the author, as had its communicative efficacy decreased or compromising their approval for publication; we aim to make considerations on the main items to good players making this kind of text. The scientific writing has peculiarities that must be taken into consideration when it writes: general characteristics, such as simplicity and objectivity, and characteristics of each area of knowledge, such as terminology, formatting and standardization. The research methodology adopted is bibliographical. The information was based on literature review and the authors' experience, teachers and assessors of scientific methodology in peer review publications in the area. As a result, we designed a checklist of items to be checked before submission of a paper to a scientific publication vehicle in order to contribute to the promotion of research, facilitating the publication and increase its capacity in this important area of knowledge.

  8. Enhancing relationship functioning during the transition to parenthood: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Daley-McCoy, Cathyrn; Rogers, Maeve; Slade, Pauline

    2015-10-01

    This randomised controlled trial examined the feasibility of enhancing relationship functioning in couples during the transition to parenthood through the development and delivery of a low-intensity antenatal intervention. The 2-h psycho-educational programme marks the first of its kind to be trialled in the UK and was delivered as an adjunct to existing antenatal classes provided through the National Health Service. A cluster randomised design was used as antenatal classes rather than participants were randomly allocated to either treatment condition. Feasibility was assessed on the basis of pragmatic delivery and acceptability of the intervention. Data from 47 participants who received the intervention and 36 participants who did not was then compared to provide a preliminary indication of its effectiveness. Outcomes were assessed in terms of relationship satisfaction, couple communication and psychological distress. The intervention appeared feasible in terms of pragmatic delivery, rates of uptake and attendance at sessions. Participant evaluation forms also indicated that people were reasonably satisfied with the intervention and would recommend it to friends. Three significant phases × condition interactions were indicated using mixed-methods analyses of variance (ANOVAs); women in the intervention condition reported significantly less deterioration in relationship satisfaction (F(1, 44) = 3.11; p = 0.021; eta(2) = 0.07), while men in the intervention condition reported significantly less deterioration in couple communication (F(1, 35) = 2.59; p = 0.029; eta(2) = 0.08) and significant improvement in their experience of psychological distress (adjusted z = 1.99; p = 0.023; Cohen's d = 0.47). These positive preliminary indicators lend support to future large-scale investigation. PMID:25663309

  9. Consumer Informatics in Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To explore the informatic requirements in the home care of chronically ill patients. Design: A number of strategies were deployed to help evoke a picture of home care informatics needs: A detailed questionnaire evaluating informational needs and assessing programmable technologies was distributed to a clinic population of parents of children with cancer. Open ended questionnaires were distributed to medical staff and parents soliciting a list of questions asked of medical staff. Parent procedure training was observed to evaluate the training dialog, and parents were observed interacting with a prototype information and education computer offering. Results: Parents' concerns ranged from the details of managing day to day, to conceptual information about disease and treatment, to management of psychosocial problems. They sought information to solve problems and to provide emotional support, which may create conflicts of interest when the material is threatening. Whether they preferred to be informed by a doctor, nurse, or another parent depended on the nature of the information. Live interaction was preferred to video, which was preferred to text for all topics. Respondents used existing technologies in a straightforward way but were enthusiastic about the proposed use of computer technology to support home care. Multimedia solutions appear to complement user needs and preferences. Conclusion: Consumers appear positively disposed toward on-line solutions. On-line systems can offer breadth, depth and timeliness currently unattainable. Patients should be involved in the formation and development process in much the same way that users are involved in usercentered computer interface design. A generic framework for patient content is presented that could be applied across multiple disorders. PMID:9223035

  10. Building the Foundations of an Informatics Agenda for Global Health - 2011 Workshop Report

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Muzna; Kratz, Mary; Medeiros, Donna; Pina, Jamie; Richards, Janise; Zhang, Xiaohui; Fraser, Hamish; Bailey, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    contribution from key stakeholders. The global health informatics agenda and roadmap can provide guidance to countries for developing and enhancing their individual and regional agendas. PMID:23569628

  11. Comparative effectiveness research and medical informatics.

    PubMed

    D'Avolio, Leonard W; Farwell, Wildon R; Fiore, Louis D

    2010-12-01

    As is the case for environmental, ecological, astronomical, and other sciences, medical practice and research finds itself in a tsunami of data. This data deluge, due primarily to the introduction of digitalization in routine medical care and medical research, affords the opportunity for improved patient care and scientific discovery. Medical informatics is the subdiscipline of medicine created to make greater use of information in order to improve healthcare. The 4 areas of medical informatics research (information access, structure, analysis, and interaction) are used as a framework to discuss the overlap in information needs of comparative effectiveness research and potential contributions of medical informatics. Examples of progress from the medical informatics literature and the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System are provided.

  12. Biomedical informatics in Switzerland: need for action.

    PubMed

    Lovis, Christian; Blaser, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical informatics (BMI) is an umbrella scientific field that covers many domains, as defined several years ago by the International Medical Informatics Association and the American Medical Informatics Association, two leading players in the field. For example, one of the domains of BMI is clinical informatics, which has been formally recognised as a medical subspecialty by the American Board of Medical Specialty since 2011. Most OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries offer very strong curricula in the field of BMI, strong research and development funding with clear tracks and, for most of them, inclusion of BMI in the curricula of health professionals, but BMI remains only marginally recognised in Switzerland. Recent major changes, however, such as the future federal law on electronic patient records, the personalised health initiative or the growing empowerment of citizens towards their health data, are adding much weight to the need for BMI capacity-building in Switzerland.

  13. Strategic leadership skills for nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anne; Hamer, Susan

    Nurses need to integrate information and information technology into routine practice and embrace opportunities to manage care in new ways. This article describes a programme that aims to help senior nurses develop strategic leadership skills in the area of informatics.

  14. Integrating Informatics Content into the Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Elizabeth; Trangenstein, Patricia; Gordon, Jeffry; McNew, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary nursing curricula require that nursing informatics content be integrated across the various levels of the programs that are offered. Many such programs face national accreditation requirements that typically relate more to technology than to informatics. International standards vary in these requirements. How can nursing programs meet these vastly different criteria yet continue to level informatics content that follows quality curriculum standards? This presentation describes one approach across programs that considers already developed competencies in nursing informatics while also taking into consideration the various roles that the graduates will have to assume in advanced practice nursing roles. Levels discussed include the baccalaureate, master's, doctorate in nursing practice, and the traditional Doctor of Philosophy degrees. PMID:27332211

  15. Nursing Informatics Education: Latino America & Caribe.

    PubMed

    Hullin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this panel is to share the current status of Nursing Informatics education at the national (Chile) and regional level. All the panelists are involved in different educational programs by face to face, online and small workshops. The scope is to anyone who is interested in the education in nursing informatics in Spanish, since the entire panelists participate in the design & development of educational programs from certificate, diploma, bachelor, master and PhD curriculums. PMID:27332321

  16. Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

  17. Evolution of medical informatics in bibliographic databases.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paula; Pedernera, Federico; Montenegro, Sergio; Borbolla, Damian; Garcia Marti, Sebastián; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2004-01-01

    Medical informatics became a medical specialty during the last years and this is evidenced by a great amount of journal articles regarding the subject published worldwide. We compared the presentation of Medical Informatics in two different bibliographic databases: MEDLINE and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences). Previous studies described how Medical Informatics was represented in MEDLINE, but we wanted to compare it to a regional database as LILACS. We search both databases completely (MEDLINE 1966 -2002 and LILACS 1982-2002) using the keyword "Medical Informatics" as MeSH term in MEDLINE and as DeCS term in LILACS, and we added "medical informatics" as text word and analyzed the references obtained as results. We found that MEDLINE properly represents the impact of Medical Informatics in non-Latin-American international journals, but lacks of a considerable amount of articles from this region, while LILACS, although in comparison it is smaller in size, has more articles regarding the subject. So we think that LILACS properly represents the specialty in Latin America and the Caribbean Region.

  18. An informatics agenda for public health: summarized recommendations from the 2011 AMIA PHI Conference

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kenneth W; Gotham, Ivan J; Holmes, John H; Lang, Lisa; Miner, Kathleen; Potenziani, David D; Richards, Janise; Turner, Anne M; Fu, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    The AMIA Public Health Informatics 2011 Conference brought together members of the public health and health informatics communities to revisit the national agenda developed at the AMIA Spring Congress in 2001, assess the progress that has been made in the past decade, and develop recommendations to further guide the field. Participants met in five discussion tracks: technical framework; research and evaluation; ethics; education, professional training, and workforce development; and sustainability. Participants identified 62 recommendations, which clustered into three key themes related to the need to (1) enhance communication and information sharing within the public health informatics community, (2) improve the consistency of public health informatics through common public health terminologies, rigorous evaluation methodologies, and competency-based training, and (3) promote effective coordination and leadership that will champion and drive the field forward. The agenda and recommendations from the meeting will be disseminated and discussed throughout the public health and informatics communities. Both communities stand to gain much by working together to use these recommendations to further advance the application of information technology to improve health. PMID:22395299

  19. Nursing Informatics Research Priorities for the Future: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    We present one part of the results of an international survey exploring current and future nursing informatics (NI) research trends. The study was conducted by the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA-NISIG) Student Working Group. Based on findings from this cross-sectional study, we identified future NI research priorities. We used snowball sampling technique to reach respondents from academia and practice. Data were collected between August and September 2015. Altogether, 373 responses from 44 countries were analyzed. The identified top ten NI trends were big data science, standardized terminologies (clinical evaluation/implementation), education and competencies, clinical decision support, mobile health, usability, patient safety, data exchange and interoperability, patient engagement, and clinical quality measures. Acknowledging these research priorities can enhance successful future development of NI to better support clinicians and promote health internationally.

  20. Nursing Informatics Research Priorities for the Future: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    We present one part of the results of an international survey exploring current and future nursing informatics (NI) research trends. The study was conducted by the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA-NISIG) Student Working Group. Based on findings from this cross-sectional study, we identified future NI research priorities. We used snowball sampling technique to reach respondents from academia and practice. Data were collected between August and September 2015. Altogether, 373 responses from 44 countries were analyzed. The identified top ten NI trends were big data science, standardized terminologies (clinical evaluation/implementation), education and competencies, clinical decision support, mobile health, usability, patient safety, data exchange and interoperability, patient engagement, and clinical quality measures. Acknowledging these research priorities can enhance successful future development of NI to better support clinicians and promote health internationally. PMID:27332195

  1. Trial participants’ experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore trial participants’ experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Design: Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Participants: Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Setting: Eight English NHS usual care settings. Method: Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Results: Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. Conclusions: As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect. PMID:22837542

  2. X-Informatics: Practical Semantic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The discipline of data science is merging with multiple science disciplines to form new X-informatics research disciplines. They are almost too numerous to name, but they include geoinformatics, bioinformatics, cheminformatics, biodiversity informatics, ecoinformatics, materials informatics, and the emerging discipline of astroinformatics. Within any X-informatics discipline, the information granules are unique to that discipline -- e.g., gene sequences in bio, the sky object in astro, and the spatial object in geo (such as points, lines, and polygons in the vector model, and pixels in the raster model). Nevertheless the goals are similar: transparent data re-use across subdisciplines and within education settings, information and data integration and fusion, personalization of user interactions with the data collection, semantic search and retrieval, and knowledge discovery. The implementation of an X-informatics framework enables these semantic e-science research goals. We describe the concepts, challenges, and new developments associated with the new discipline of astroinformatics, and how geoinformatics provides valuable lessons learned and a model for practical semantic science within a traditional science discipline through the accretion of data science methodologies (such as formal metadata creation, data models, data mining, information retrieval, knowledge engineering, provenance, taxonomies, and ontologies). The emerging concept of data-as-a-service (DaaS) builds upon the concept of smart data (or data DNA) for intelligent data management, automated workflows, and intelligent processing. Smart data, defined through X-informatics, enables several practical semantic science use cases, including self-discovery, data intelligence, automatic recommendations, relevance analysis, dimension reduction, feature selection, constraint-based mining, interdisciplinary data re-use, knowledge-sharing, data use in education, and more. We describe these concepts within the

  3. Informatics Systems and Tools to Facilitate Patient-centered Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction There is a growing international focus on patient-centered care. A model designed to facilitate this type of care in the primary care setting is the patient-centered medical home. This model of care strives to be patient-focused, comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible, and focused on quality and safety of care. Objective The objective of this paper is to identify the current status and future trends of patient-centered care and the role of informatics systems and tools in facilitating this model of care. Methods In this paper we review recent scientific literature of the past four years to identify trends and state of current evidence when it comes to patient-centered care overall, and more specifically medical homes. Results There are several studies that indicate growth and development in seven informatics areas within patient-centered care, namely clinical decision support, registries, team care, care transitions, personal health records, telehealth, and measurement. In some cases we are still lacking large randomized clinical trials and the evidence base is not always solid, but findings strongly indicate the potential of informatics to support patient-centered care. Conclusion Current evidence indicates that advancements have been made in implementing and evaluating patient-centered care models. Technical, legal, and practical challenges still remain. Further examination of the impact of patient-centered informatics tools and systems on clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:26293847

  4. [Informatics in the Croatian health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

    2005-01-01

    Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA

  5. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Chouvarda, I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. Methods With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Results Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Conclusions Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated. PMID:26123910

  6. Chapter 17: bioimage informatics for systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies.

  7. Informatics at the National Institues of Health

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Biomedical informatics, imaging, and engineering are major forces driving the knowledge revolutions that are shaping the agendas for biomedical research and clinical medicine in the 21st century. These disciplines produce the tools and techniques to advance biomedical research, and continually feed new technologies and procedures into clinical medicine. To sustain this force, an increased investment is needed in the physics, biomedical science, engineering, mathematics, information science, and computer science undergirding biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging. This investment should be made primarily through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, the NIH is not structured to support such disciplines as biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging that cross boundaries between disease- and organ-oriented institutes. The solution to this dilemma is the creation of a new institute or center at the NIH devoted to biomedical imaging, engineering, and informatics. Bills are being introduced into the 106th Congress to authorize such an entity. The pathway is long and arduous, from the introduction of bills in the House and Senate to the realization of new opportunities for biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging at the NIH. There are many opportunities for medical informaticians to contribute to this realization. PMID:10428000

  8. History of health informatics: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Cesnik, Branko; Kidd, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    In considering a 'history' of Health Informatics it is important to be aware that the discipline encompasses a wide array of activities, products, research and theories. Health Informatics is as much a result of evolution as planned philosophy, having its roots in the histories of information technology and medicine. The process of its growth continues so that today's work is tomorrow's history. A 'historical' discussion of the area is its history to date, a report rather than a summation. As well as its successes, the history of Health Informatics is populated with visionary promises that have failed to materialise despite the best intentions. For those studying the subject or working in the field, the experiences of others' use of Information Technologies for the betterment of health care can provide a necessary perspective. This chapter starts by noting some of the major events and people that form a technological backdrop to Health Informatics and ends with some thoughts on the future. This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The history of computing * The beginnings of the health informatics discipline.

  9. Chapter 17: Bioimage Informatics for Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies. PMID:23633943

  10. Effect of an informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum on nursing informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Karen S; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Jenkins, Melinda; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-12-01

    Effective and appropriate use of information and communication technologies is an essential competency for all health care professionals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effect of an evolving informatics for evidence-based practice (IEBP) curriculum on nursing informatics competencies in three student cohorts in the combined BS/MS program for non-nurses at the Columbia University School of Nursing. A repeated-measures, non-equivalent comparison group design was used to determine differences in self-rated informatics competencies pre- and post-IEBP and between cohorts at the end of the BS year of the combined BS/MS program. The types of Computer Skill competencies on which the students rated themselves as competent (> or =3) on admission were generic in nature and reflective of basic computer literacy. Informatics competencies increased significantly from admission to BS graduation in all areas for the class of 2002 and in all, but three areas, for the class of 2003. None of the three cohorts achieved competence in Computer Skills: Education despite curricular revisions. There were no significant differences between classes at the end of the BS year. Innovative educational approaches, such as the one described in this paper demonstrate promise as a method to achieve informatics competence. It is essential to integrate routine measurement of informatics competency into the curriculum so that approaches can be refined as needed to ensure informatics competent graduates.

  11. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on education in health and medical informatics.

    PubMed

    2000-08-01

    The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) agreed on international recommendations in health informatics/medical informatics education. These should help to establish courses, course tracks or even complete programs in this field, to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives concerning education in health and medical informatics (HMI), particularly international activities in educating HMI specialists and the sharing of courseware. The IMIA recommendations centre on educational needs for healthcare professionals to acquire knowledge and skills in information processing and information and communication technology. The educational needs are described as a three-dimensional framework. The dimensions are: 1) professionals in healthcare (physicians, nurses, HMI professionals, ...), 2) type of specialisation in health and medical informatics (IT users, HMI specialists) and 3) stage of career progression (bachelor, master, ...). Learning outcomes are defined in terms of knowledge and practical skills for healthcare professionals in their role (a) as IT user and (b) as HMI specialist. Recommendations are given for courses/course tracks in HMI as part of educational programs in medicine, nursing, healthcare management, dentistry, pharmacy, public health, health record administration, and informatics/computer science as well as for dedicated programs in HMI (with bachelor, master or doctor degree). To support education in HMI, IMIA offers to award a certificate for high quality HMI education and supports information exchange on programs and courses in HMI through a WWW server of its Working Group on Health and Medical Informatics Education (http:www.imia.org/wg1). PMID:10992757

  12. Randomized Trial of Continuing Care Enhancements for Cocaine-Dependent Patients following Initial Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, James R.; Lynch, Kevin G.; Coviello, Donna; Morrison, Rebecca; Cary, Mark S.; Skalina, Lauren; Plebani, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The effects of cognitive-behavioral relapse prevention (RP), contingency management (CM), and their combination (CM + RP) were evaluated in a randomized trial with 100 cocaine-dependent patients (58% female, 89% African American) who were engaged in treatment for at least 2 weeks and had an average of 44 days of abstinence at baseline.…

  13. Enhancing Attachment Organization among Maltreated Children: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Kristin; Dozier, Mary; Bick, Johanna; Lewis-Morrarty, Erin; Lindhiem, Oliver; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Young children who have experienced early adversity are at risk for developing disorganized attachments. The efficacy of Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC), an intervention targeting nurturing care among parents identified as being at risk for neglecting their young children, was evaluated through a randomized clinical trial. Attachment…

  14. Thinking outside the Randomized Controlled Trials Experimental Box: Strategies for Enhancing Credibility and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2013-01-01

    Some evaluators employ randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the gold standard of evidence-based practice (EBP). Critics of RCT designs argue that RCTs do not include the complexity of program participants' experiences or clinical expertise, and couple this with criticisms that it is difficult to transfer RCT findings from the laboratory to…

  15. Preparing for the third millennium: the views of life informatics.

    PubMed

    Li, Z R; Tian, A J; Yang, Y Y

    1998-01-01

    The chief aspects of this paper are the condition of the birth of life informatics and its tasks, basic concepts, principles, and structure. There are three phases of combining informatics with medicine: product, technological, and theoretic application of which the goals are respectively the informatization of numerical and word processing, data of medical treatment, and the knowledge of medicine. While reached the third phase we have dealt with two types of biological information, physical and nonphysical, i.e., body information (i.e., the information about body's components and structure), and life information (i.e., the information about life codes and life programs). Life informatics is a main branch of bioinformatics. It is a new member of the medical informatics family, and as such is younger than health informatics, nursing informatics, and dental informatics. It's task is to assist biologists and medical doctors to recognize and interfere the human life information procedure just as they are doing well with human body's matter and energy system. Its basic concepts are life information, life information medicine, and life information therapy. Its most important principles are information materialism, general informatics, and information determinism. Its main branches are biomolecule, cellular, organic, individual, and social informatics. In the third millennium, the life informatics will be a leading discipline in biology, medicine and informatics, which will gradually influence modern philosophy and other humanities.

  16. Image informatics in systems biology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2005-02-01

    Digital optical microscopy, coupled with parallel processing and a large arsenal of labeling techniques, offers tremendous values to localize, identify, and characterize cells and molecules. This generates many image informatics challenges in requiring new algorithms and tools to extract, classify, correlate, and model image features and content from massive amounts of cellular and molecular images acquired. Image informatics aims to fill this gap. Coupling automated microscopy and image analysis with biostatistical and data mining techniques to provide a system biologic approach in studying the cells, the basic unit of life, potentially leads to many exciting applications in life and health sciences. In this presentation, we describe certain new system biology applications enabled by image informatics technology.

  17. Earth Science Informatics Comes of Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jodha, Siri; Khalsa, S.; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    The volume and complexity of Earth science data have steadily increased, placing ever-greater demands on researchers, software developers and data managers tasked with handling such data. Additional demands arise from requirements being levied by funding agencies and governments to better manage, preserve and provide open access to data. Fortunately, over the past 10-15 years significant advances in information technology, such as increased processing power, advanced programming languages, more sophisticated and practical standards, and near-ubiquitous internet access have made the jobs of those acquiring, processing, distributing and archiving data easier. These advances have also led to an increasing number of individuals entering the field of informatics as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also encompasses the use of computers and computational methods to support decisionmaking and other applications for societal benefits.

  18. Health Informatics for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Planning

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R.V.; Ryutov, T.; Neches, R.; Upperman, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective 1. To conduct a review of the role of informatics in pediatric disaster preparedness using all medical databases. 2. To provide recommendations to improve pediatric disaster preparedness by the application of informatics. Methods A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINHL and the Cochrane Library using the key words “children” AND “disaster preparedness and disaster” AND “informatics”. Results A total of 314 papers were initially produced by the search and eight that met the selection criteria were included in the review. Four themes emerged: tools for disaster preparedness, education, reunification and planning and response. Conclusion The literature pertaining to informatics and pediatric disaster preparedness is sparse and many gaps still persist. Current disaster preparedness tools focus on the general population and do not specifically address children. The most progress has been achieved in family reunification; however, the recommendations delineated are yet to be completed. PMID:23616840

  19. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  20. Software engineering education in medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Leven, F J

    1989-11-01

    Requirements and approaches of Software Engineering education in the field of Medical Informatics are described with respect to the impact of (1) experiences characterizing the "software misery", (2) status and tendencies in software methodology, and (3) educational status and needs in computer science education influenced by the controversy "theoretical versus practical education". Special attention is directed toward the growing importance of analysis, design methods, and techniques in the professional spectrum of Medical Informatics, the relevance of general principles of systems engineering in health care, the potential of non-procedural programming paradigms, and the intersection of Artificial Intelligence and education. Realizations of and experiences with programs in the field of Software Engineering are reported with respect to special requirements in Medical Informatics.

  1. Application of biomedical informatics to chronic pediatric diseases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases affect millions of children worldwide leading to substantial disease burden to the children and their families as well as escalating health care costs. The increasing trend in the prevalence of complex pediatric chronic diseases requires innovative and optimal delivery of care. Biomedical informatics applications play an important role in improving health outcomes while being cost-effective. However, their utility in pediatric chronic diseases has not been studied in a comprehensive and systematic way. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the effects of biomedical informatics applications in pediatric chronic diseases. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases from inception of each database to September 2008. We included studies of any methodological type and any language that applied biomedical informatics to chronic conditions in children and adolescents 18 years of age or younger. Two independent reviewers carried out study selection and data extraction. Quality assessment was performed using a study design evaluation instrument to appraise the strength of the studies and their methodological adequacy. Because of heterogeneity in the conditions and outcomes we studied, a formal meta-analysis was not performed. Results Based on our search strategy, 655 titles and abstracts were reviewed. From this set we identified 27 relevant articles that met our inclusion criteria. The results from these studies indicated that biomedical informatics applications have favourable clinical and patient outcomes including, but not limited to, reduced number of emergency room visits, improved knowledge on disease management, and enhanced satisfaction. Seventy percent of reviewed papers were published after year 2000, 89% of users were patients and 11% were either providers or caregivers. The majority (96%) of the selected studies reported improved outcomes

  2. Enhanced relapse prevention for bipolar disorder – ERP trial. A cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the feasibility of training care coordinators to offer enhanced relapse prevention for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, Fiona; Gamble, Carol; Kinderman, Peter; Taylor, Lee; Chandler, Claire; Tyler, Elizabeth; Peters, Sarah; Pontin, Eleanor; Sellwood, William; Morriss, Richard K

    2007-01-01

    Background Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a common and severe form of mental illness characterised by repeated relapses of mania or depression. Pharmacotherapy is the main treatment currently offered, but this has only limited effectiveness. A recent Cochrane review has reported that adding psycho-social interventions that train people to recognise and manage the early warning signs of their relapses is effective in increasing time to recurrence, improving social functioning and in reducing hospitalisations. However, the review also highlights the difficulties in offering these interventions within standard mental health services due to the need for highly trained therapists and extensive input of time. There is a need to explore the potential for developing Early Warning Sign (EWS) interventions in ways that will enhance dissemination. Methods and design This article describes a cluster-randomised trial to assess the feasibility of training care coordinators (CCs) in community mental health teams (CMHTs) to offer Enhanced Relapse Prevention (ERP) to people with Bipolar Disorder. CMHTs in the North West of England are randomised to either receive training in ERP and to offer this to their clients, or to continue to offer treatment as usual (TAU). The main aims of the study are (1) to determine the acceptability of the intervention, training and outcome measures (2) to assess the feasibility of the design as measured by rates of recruitment, retention, attendance and direct feedback from participants (3) to estimate the design effect of clustering for key outcome variables (4) to estimate the effect size of the impact of the intervention on outcome. In this paper we provide a rationale for the study design, briefly outline the ERP intervention, and describe in detail the study protocol. Discussion This information will be useful to researchers attempting to carry out similar feasibility assessments of clinical effectiveness trials and in particular cluster randomised

  3. Clinical informatics sub-specialty board certification.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christoph U; Shorte, Vanessa; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2013-11-01

    Increased funding for health information technology and the advance of electronic health records in hospitals and practices have created the need for a new specialist: the clinical informatician. Clinical informatics was recognized in 2011 as the latest subspecialty in medicine by the American Board of Medical Specialties. This article reviews the need for this new specialty as well as the steps necessary for its creation. The content and training requirements for clinical informatics are discussed as well as eligibility criteria for taking the board examination. Training programs as well as board preparation are addressed along with the expected impact that this new field will have on the practice of medicine.

  4. Agent-oriented captology for medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Bărbat, B E; Zamfirescu, C B; Costache, G

    2000-01-01

    Considering that neither captology nor agent-orientation, are applied in medical informatics, as they could be, the paper presents a broad-spectrum generic architectural framework to support developing adaptive medical applications, based on synergistic correlation between persuasive interfaces and intelligent agents. Their main features are adapted for medical informatics. Lying on this groundwork, the design space for agent-oriented persuasive applications is defined and several guidelines for its main dimensions are given. The approach is instantiated through an agent-based test-bench application, having the purpose to persuade to quit smoking.

  5. A "fundamental theorem" of biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes, in words and pictures, a "fundamental theorem" to help clarify what informatics is and what it is not. In words, the theorem stipulates that a person working in partnership with an information resource is "better" than that same person unassisted. The theorem is applicable to health care, research, education, and administrative activities. Three corollaries to the theorem illustrate that informatics is more about people than technology; that in order for the theorem to hold, resources must be informative in addition to being correct; and that the theorem can fail to hold for reasons explained by understanding the interaction between the person and the resource.

  6. What we have learned: the impact of quality from a clinical trials perspective

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this review article we address the radiation oncology process improvements in clinical trials and review how these changes improve the quality for the next generation of trials. In recent years we have progressed from a time of limited data acquisition to the present in which we have real time influence of clinical trials quality. This enables immediate availability of the important elements including staging, eligibility, response and outcome for all trial investigators. Modern informatics platforms are well designed for future adaptive clinical trials. We review what will be needed in the informatics architecture of current and future clinical trials. PMID:22177875

  7. Intervening to Enhance Cortisol Regulation Among Children At Risk for Neglect: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Kristin; Dozier, Mary; Bick, Johanna; Gordon, M. Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly sensitive to conditions of maltreatment. In particular, neglected children have shown a flatter slope with lower wake-up values relative to non-neglected children. An intervention, Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC), was developed to enhance biological and behavioral regulation in young children at risk for neglect. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in a randomized clinical trial for children with involvement with Child Protective Services. Following the interventions, children receiving the ABC intervention (n = 49) showed more typical cortisol production, with higher wake-up cortisol values and a steeper diurnal slope than children receiving the control intervention (n = 51). These results suggest that the ABC intervention is effective in enhancing biological regulation. PMID:25156798

  8. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict. PMID:26580469

  9. The ENHANCES study—Enhancing Head and Neck Cancer patients’ Experiences of Survivorship: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few cancers pose greater challenges than head and neck (H&N) cancer. Residual effects following treatment include body image changes, pain, fatigue and difficulties with appetite, swallowing and speech. Depression is a common comorbidity. There is limited evidence about ways to assist patients to achieve optimal adjustment after completion of treatment. In this study, we aim to examine the effectiveness and feasibility of a model of survivorship care to improve the quality of life of patients who have completed treatment for H&N cancer. Methods/Design This is a preliminary study in which 120 patients will be recruited. A prospective randomised controlled trial of the H&N Cancer Survivor Self-management Care Plan (HNCP) involving pre- and post-intervention assessments will be used. Consecutive patients who have completed a defined treatment protocol for H&N cancer will be recruited from two large cancer services and randomly allocated to one of three study arms: (1) usual care, (2) information in the form of a written resource or (3) the HNCP delivered by an oncology nurse who has participated in manual-based training and skill development in patient self-management support. The trained nurses will meet patients in a face-to-face interview lasting up to 60 minutes to develop an individualised HNCP, based on principles of chronic disease self-management. Participants will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome measure is quality of life. The secondary outcome measures include mood, self-efficacy and health-care utilisation. The feasibility of implementing this intervention in routine clinical care will be assessed through semistructured interviews with participating nurses, managers and administrators. Interviews with patients who received the HNCP will explore their perceptions of the HNCP, including factors that assisted them in achieving behavioural change. Discussion In this study, we aim to improve the quality of life of a

  10. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O’Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes. PMID:26392755

  11. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  12. An overview of the medical informatics curriculum in medical schools.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, J. U.; Levine, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    As medical schools incorporate medical informatics into their curriculum the problems of implementation arise. Because there are no standards regarding a medical informatics curriculum, medical schools are implementing the subjects in various ways. A survey was undertaken to amass an overview of the medical informatics curriculum nationally. Of the responding schools, most have aspects of medical informatics incorporated into current courses and utilize existing faculty. Literature searching, clinical decision-making, and Internet are the basic topics in the current curricula. The trend is for medical informatics to be incorporated throughout all four years of medical school. Barriers are the difficulties in faculty training, and slow implementation. PMID:9929263

  13. After three decades of Medical Informatics Europe congresses.

    PubMed

    Dezelic, Gjuro

    2009-01-01

    European medical informatics professionals traditionally gather at congresses of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) named "Medical Informatics Europe - MIE". After more than three decades of successive organization of these congresses, some important points of their history of are presented. As the MIE Congress in Sarajevo, organized by the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BHSMI), is the third EFMI event in the western part of South-East Europe, a short review of the development of medical informatics in this part of Europe, together with important events in its history, will shortly be presented.

  14. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730)

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Nikola; O’Connor, Rebecca; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; England, Timothy J.; Connell, Louise A.; Walker, Marion F.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke. Methods A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1) placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind), and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1), at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment. Results Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12) and serious adverse events (SAE) (9 vs 3, p = 0.10). On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned) therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23%) of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21%) were cancelled due to patient (94, 17%) and therapist factors (20, 4%). No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365. Conclusions Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design

  15. Medical informatics on the Internet: creating the sci.med. informatics newsgroup.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, A M; Sittig, D F

    1995-01-01

    A Usenet newsgroup, sci.med.informatics, has been created to serve as an international electronic forum for discussion of issues related to medical informatics. The creation process follows a set of administrative rules set out by the Usenet administration on the Internet and consists of five steps: 1) informal discussion, 2) request for formal discussion, 3) formal discussion, 4) voting, and 5) posting of results. The newsgroup can be accessed using any news reader via the Internet. PMID:7583645

  16. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  17. Imaging Informatics: 25 Years of Progress.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, J P; Erickson, B J; Kahn, C E

    2016-06-30

    The science and applications of informatics in medical imaging have advanced dramatically in the past 25 years. This article provides a selective overview of key developments in medical imaging informatics. Advances in standards and technologies for compression and transmission of digital images have enabled Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) and teleradiology. Research in speech recognition, structured reporting, ontologies, and natural language processing has improved the ability to generate and analyze the reports of imaging procedures. Informatics has provided tools to address workflow and ergonomic issues engendered by the growing volume of medical image information. Research in computeraided detection and diagnosis of abnormalities in medical images has opened new avenues to improve patient care. The growing number of medical-imaging examinations and their large volumes of information create a natural platform for "big data" analytics, particularly when joined with high-dimensional genomic data. Radiogenomics investigates relationships between a disease's genetic and gene-expression characteristics and its imaging phenotype; this emerging field promises to help us better understand disease biology, prognosis, and treatment options. The next 25 years offer remarkable opportunities for informatics and medical imaging together to lead to further advances in both disciplines and to improve health.

  18. Cognitive informatics in biomedicine and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vimla L; Kannampallil, Thomas G

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a burgeoning interdisciplinary domain comprising of the cognitive and information sciences that focuses on human information processing, mechanisms and processes within the context of computing and computer applications. Based on a review of articles published in the Journal of Biomedical Informatics (JBI) between January 2001 and March 2014, we identified 57 articles that focused on topics related to cognitive informatics. We found that while the acceptance of CI into the mainstream informatics research literature is relatively recent, its impact has been significant - from characterizing the limits of clinician problem-solving and reasoning behavior, to describing coordination and communication patterns of distributed clinical teams, to developing sustainable and cognitively-plausible interventions for supporting clinician activities. Additionally, we found that most research contributions fell under the topics of decision-making, usability and distributed team activities with a focus on studying behavioral and cognitive aspects of clinical personnel, as they performed their activities or interacted with health information systems. We summarize our findings within the context of the current areas of CI research, future research directions and current and future challenges for CI researchers.

  19. Informatics and Small Computers in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Jose; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights potential benefits and more pressing social and legal problems facing Latin American nations in the area of informatics and small computers. Discussion covers potential uses (education, office applications, agriculture, national planning); role of central governments; implications for economic development; and transborder…

  20. Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

  1. Informatics for neurocritical care: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Manley, Geoffrey T; Huang, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    Neurocritical care relies on the continuous, real-time measurement of numerous physiologic parameters. While our capability to obtain such measurements from patients has grown markedly with multimodal monitoring in many neurologic or neurosurgical intensive care units (ICUs), our ability to transform the raw data into actionable information is limited. One reason is that the proprietary nature of medical devices and software often prevents neuro-ICUs from capturing and centrally storing high-density data. Also, ICU alarm systems are often unreliable because the data that are captured are riddled with artifacts. Informatics is the process of acquiring, processing, and interpreting these complex arrays of data. The development of next-generation informatics tools allows for detection of complex physiologic events and brings about the possibility of decision support tools to improve neurocritical care. Although many different approaches to informatics are discussed and considered, here we focus on the Bayesian probabilistic paradigm. It quantifies the uncertainty inherent in neurocritical care instead of ignoring it, and formalizes the natural clinical thought process of updating prior beliefs using incoming patient data. We review this and other opportunities, as well as challenges, for the development and refinement of informatics tools in neurocritical care.

  2. Medical informatics and telemedicine: A vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmer, Terry P.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of medical informatics is to improve care. This requires the commitment and harmonious collaboration between the computer scientists and clinicians and an integrated database. The vision described is how medical information systems are going to impact the way medical care is delivered in the future.

  3. Developing curriculum in nursing informatics in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mantas, J

    1998-06-01

    The NIGHTINGALE Project (NIGHTINGALE Project: HC1109 DGXIII Contract and Technical Annex, European Commission, December 1995) which started on the 1st of January, 1996, after the approval of the European Commission, has a 36 month duration. It is essential in planning and implementing a strategy in training the nursing profession in using and applying healthcare information systems. NIGHTINGALE contributes towards the appropriate use of the developed telematics infrastructure across Europe by educating and training nurses in a harmonious way across Europe in the upcoming field of nursing informatics. NIGHTINGALE develops courseware material based on the curriculum development process using multimedia technologies. Computer based training software packages in nursing informatics will be the basis of the training material and the corresponding courses. CD-ROM based training and reference material will also be provided in the courses whereas the traditional booklets, teaching material and textbooks can also play an adequate role in training. NIGHTINGALE will disseminate all information and courseware material freely to all interested parties through the publications of the proceedings of the conferences, through the establishment of the world wide web (WWW) server in nursing informatics for Europe (http://www.dn.uoa.gr/nightingale), which will become a depository of nursing information knowledge across Europe as well as a dissemination node of nursing informatics throughout the European members states for the benefit and welfare of the European citizen. PMID:9726502

  4. Imaging Informatics: 25 Years of Progress.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, J P; Erickson, B J; Kahn, C E

    2016-01-01

    The science and applications of informatics in medical imaging have advanced dramatically in the past 25 years. This article provides a selective overview of key developments in medical imaging informatics. Advances in standards and technologies for compression and transmission of digital images have enabled Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) and teleradiology. Research in speech recognition, structured reporting, ontologies, and natural language processing has improved the ability to generate and analyze the reports of imaging procedures. Informatics has provided tools to address workflow and ergonomic issues engendered by the growing volume of medical image information. Research in computeraided detection and diagnosis of abnormalities in medical images has opened new avenues to improve patient care. The growing number of medical-imaging examinations and their large volumes of information create a natural platform for "big data" analytics, particularly when joined with high-dimensional genomic data. Radiogenomics investigates relationships between a disease's genetic and gene-expression characteristics and its imaging phenotype; this emerging field promises to help us better understand disease biology, prognosis, and treatment options. The next 25 years offer remarkable opportunities for informatics and medical imaging together to lead to further advances in both disciplines and to improve health. PMID:27362590

  5. Recruitment of Minority Adolescents and Young Adults into Randomised Clinical Trials: Testing the Design of the Technology Enhanced Community Health Nursing (TECH-N) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Trial

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Maria; Chung, Shang-en; Gaydos, Charlotte; Frick, Kevin D.; Anders, Jennifer; Huettner, Steven; Rothman, Richard; Butz, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) disproportionately affects adolescent and young adult (AYA) women and can negatively influence reproductive health trajectories. Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have focused on strategies to improve outpatient adherence or to reduce reproductive morbidity in this population. This paper describes the research methods and preliminary effectiveness of recruitment, retention, and intervention strategies employed in a novel RCT designed to test a technology-enhanced community-health nursing (TECH-N) intervention among urban AYA with PID. Methods AYA women aged 13–25 years were recruited during acute PID visits in outpatient clinics and emergency departments (ED) to participate in this IRB-approved trial. Participants completed an audio-computerized self-interview (ACASI), provided vaginal specimens, and were randomized to standard treatment or the intervention. Intervention participants received text-messaging support for 30 days and a community health nurse (CHN) interventionist performed a home visit with clinical assessment within 5 days after enrollment. All patients received a full course of medications and completed research visits at 14-days (adherence), 30 days and 90 days with by an outreach worker. STI testing performed at the 30-and 90-day visits. Exploratory analyses using descriptive statistics were conducted to examine recruitment, retention, and follow-up data to test the overall design of the intervention. Results In the first 48 months, 64% of 463 patients were eligible for the study and 81.2% of 293 eligible patients were recruited for the study (63.3%); 238 (81.2%) of eligible patients were enrolled. Most participants were African American (95.6%) with a mean age of 18.6 (2.3). Ninety-four percent of individuals assigned to the TECH-N intervention completed the nursing visits. All completed visits have been within the 5-day window and over 90% of patients in both arms have been retained over the 3

  6. Recruitment of Minority Adolescents and Young Adults into Randomised Clinical Trials: Testing the Design of the Technology Enhanced Community Health Nursing (TECH-N) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Trial

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Maria; Chung, Shang-en; Gaydos, Charlotte; Frick, Kevin D.; Anders, Jennifer; Huettner, Steven; Rothman, Richard; Butz, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) disproportionately affects adolescent and young adult (AYA) women and can negatively influence reproductive health trajectories. Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have focused on strategies to improve outpatient adherence or to reduce reproductive morbidity in this population. This paper describes the research methods and preliminary effectiveness of recruitment, retention, and intervention strategies employed in a novel RCT designed to test a technology-enhanced community-health nursing (TECH-N) intervention among urban AYA with PID. Methods AYA women aged 13–25 years were recruited during acute PID visits in outpatient clinics and emergency departments (ED) to participate in this IRB-approved trial. Participants completed an audio-computerized self-interview (ACASI), provided vaginal specimens, and were randomized to standard treatment or the intervention. Intervention participants received text-messaging support for 30 days and a community health nurse (CHN) interventionist performed a home visit with clinical assessment within 5 days after enrollment. All patients received a full course of medications and completed research visits at 14-days (adherence), 30 days and 90 days with by an outreach worker. STI testing performed at the 30-and 90-day visits. Exploratory analyses using descriptive statistics were conducted to examine recruitment, retention, and follow-up data to test the overall design of the intervention. Results In the first 48 months, 64% of 463 patients were eligible for the study and 81.2% of 293 eligible patients were recruited for the study (63.3%); 238 (81.2%) of eligible patients were enrolled. Most participants were African American (95.6%) with a mean age of 18.6 (2.3). Ninety-four percent of individuals assigned to the TECH-N intervention completed the nursing visits. All completed visits have been within the 5-day window and over 90% of patients in both arms have been retained over the 3

  7. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:27563486

  8. Innovative designs for the smart ICU: Part 3: Advanced ICU informatics.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A

    2014-04-01

    This third and final installment of this series on innovative designs for the smart ICU addresses the steps involved in conceptualizing, actualizing, using, and maintaining the advanced ICU informatics infrastructure and systems. The smart ICU comprehensively and electronically integrates the patient in the ICU with all aspects of care, displays data in a variety of formats, converts data to actionable information, uses data proactively to enhance patient safety, and monitors the ICU environment to facilitate patient care and ICU management. The keys to success in this complex informatics design process include an understanding of advanced informatics concepts, sophisticated planning, installation of a robust infrastructure capable of both connectivity and interoperability, and implementation of middleware solutions that provide value. Although new technologies commonly appear compelling, they are also complicated and challenging to incorporate within existing or evolving hospital informatics systems. Therefore, careful analysis, deliberate testing, and a phased approach to the implementation of innovative technologies are necessary to achieve the multilevel solutions of the smart ICU. PMID:24687712

  9. Beyond information access: Support for complex cognitive activities in public health informatics tools.

    PubMed

    Sedig, Kamran; Parsons, Paul; Dittmer, Mark; Ola, Oluwakemi

    2012-01-01

    Public health professionals work with a variety of information sources to carry out their everyday activities. In recent years, interactive computational tools have become deeply embedded in such activities. Unlike the early days of computational tool use, the potential of tools nowadays is not limited to simply providing access to information; rather, they can act as powerful mediators of human-information discourse, enabling rich interaction with public health information. If public health informatics tools are designed and used properly, they can facilitate, enhance, and support the performance of complex cognitive activities that are essential to public health informatics, such as problem solving, forecasting, sense-making, and planning. However, the effective design and evaluation of public health informatics tools requires an understanding of the cognitive and perceptual issues pertaining to how humans work and think with information to perform such activities. This paper draws on research that has examined some of the relevant issues, including interaction design, complex cognition, and visual representations, to offer some human-centered design and evaluation considerations for public health informatics tools. PMID:23569645

  10. Beyond information access: Support for complex cognitive activities in public health informatics tools

    PubMed Central

    Sedig, Kamran; Parsons, Paul; Dittmer, Mark; Ola, Oluwakemi

    2012-01-01

    Public health professionals work with a variety of information sources to carry out their everyday activities. In recent years, interactive computational tools have become deeply embedded in such activities. Unlike the early days of computational tool use, the potential of tools nowadays is not limited to simply providing access to information; rather, they can act as powerful mediators of human-information discourse, enabling rich interaction with public health information. If public health informatics tools are designed and used properly, they can facilitate, enhance, and support the performance of complex cognitive activities that are essential to public health informatics, such as problem solving, forecasting, sense-making, and planning. However, the effective design and evaluation of public health informatics tools requires an understanding of the cognitive and perceptual issues pertaining to how humans work and think with information to perform such activities. This paper draws on research that has examined some of the relevant issues, including interaction design, complex cognition, and visual representations, to offer some human-centered design and evaluation considerations for public health informatics tools. PMID:23569645

  11. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance recovery from mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Bernie M; Leditschke, I Anne; Neeman, Teresa; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients who have been mechanically ventilated, inspiratory muscles remain weak and fatigable following ventilatory weaning, which may contribute to dyspnoea and limited functional recovery. Inspiratory muscle training may improve inspiratory muscle strength and endurance following weaning, potentially improving dyspnoea and quality of life in this patient group. Methods We conducted a randomised trial with assessor-blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Following 48 hours of successful weaning, 70 participants (mechanically ventilated ≥7 days) were randomised to receive inspiratory muscle training once daily 5 days/week for 2 weeks in addition to usual care, or usual care (control). Primary endpoints were inspiratory muscle strength and fatigue resistance index (FRI) 2 weeks following enrolment. Secondary endpoints included dyspnoea, physical function and quality of life, post-intensive care length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Results 34 participants were randomly allocated to the training group and 36 to control. The training group demonstrated greater improvements in inspiratory strength (training: 17%, control: 6%, mean difference: 11%, p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences in FRI (0.03 vs 0.02, p=0.81), physical function (0.25 vs 0.25, p=0.97) or dyspnoea (−0.5 vs 0.2, p=0.22). Improvement in quality of life was greater in the training group (14% vs 2%, mean difference 12%, p=0.03). In-hospital mortality was higher in the training group (4 vs 0, 12% vs 0%, p=0.051). Conclusions Inspiratory muscle training following successful weaning increases inspiratory muscle strength and quality of life, but we cannot confidently rule out an associated increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Trial registration number ACTRN12610001089022, results. PMID:27257003

  12. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    tasks targeted to different cognitive functions can show transfer to a wide range of untrained measures of cognitive performance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT-02367898 PMID:26333022

  13. Recovery from a cycling time trial is enhanced with carbohydrate-protein supplementation vs. isoenergetic carbohydrate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, John M; Noreen, Eric E; Lemon, Peter WR

    2008-01-01

    Background In this study we assessed whether a liquid carbohydrate-protein (C+P) supplement (0.8 g/kg C; 0.4 g/kg P) ingested early during recovery from a cycling time trial could enhance a subsequent 60 min effort on the same day vs. an isoenergetic liquid carbohydrate (CHO) supplement (1.2 g/kg). Methods Two hours after a standardized breakfast, 15 trained male cyclists completed a time trial in which they cycled as far as they could in 60 min (AMex) using a Computrainer indoor trainer. Following AMex, subjects ingested either C+P, or CHO at 10, 60 and 120 min, followed by a standardized meal at 4 h post exercise. At 6 h post AMex subjects repeated the time trial (PMex). Results There was a significant reduction in performance for both groups in PMex versus AMex. However, performance and power decreases between PMex and AMex were significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) with CHO (-1.05 ± 0.44 km and -16.50 ± 6.74 W) vs C+P (-0.30 ± 0.50 km and -3.86 ± 6.47 W). Fat oxidation estimated from RER values was significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) in the C+P vs CHO during the PMex, despite a higher average workload in the C+P group. Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, liquid C+P ingestion immediately after exercise increases fat oxidation, increases recovery, and improves subsequent same day, 60 min efforts relative to isoenergetic CHO ingestion. PMID:19108717

  14. Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Adolescent Marijuana Users: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Denise D.; Roffman, Roger A.; Stephens, Robert S.; Wakana, Kim; Berghuis, James

    2006-01-01

    This study's aims were (a) to investigate the feasibility of a school-based motivational enhancement therapy (MET) intervention in voluntarily attracting adolescents who smoke marijuana regularly but who are not seeking formal treatment and (b) to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention in reducing marijuana use. Ninety-seven adolescents who had…

  15. Enhancing fire department home visiting programs: results of a community intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Andrea C; Shields, Wendy; Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen; Jones, Vanya; Bishai, David; O'Brocki, Raymond; Perry, Elise C; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Tracey, Pat; Parsons, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an enhanced fire department home visiting program on community participation and installation of smoke alarms, and describes the rate of fire and burn hazards observed in homes. Communities were randomly assigned to receive either a standard or enhanced home visiting program. Before implementing the program, 603 household surveys were completed to determine comparability between the communities. During a 1-year intervention period, 171 home visits took place with 8080 homes. At baseline, 60% of homes did not have working smoke alarms on every level, 44% had unsafe water temperatures, and 72% did not have carbon monoxide alarms. Residents in the enhanced community relative to those in the standard community were significantly more likely to let the fire fighters into their homes (75 vs 62%). Among entered homes, those in the enhanced community were significantly more likely to agree to have smoke alarms installed (95 vs 92%), to be left with a working smoke alarm on every level of the home (84 vs 78%), and to have more smoke alarms installed per home visited (1.89 vs 1.74). The high baseline rates of home hazards suggest that fire department home visiting programs should take an "all hazards" approach. Community health workers and community partnerships can be effective in promoting fire departments' fire and life safety goals. Public health academic centers should partner with the fire service to help generate evidence on program effectiveness that can inform decision making about resource allocation for prevention. PMID:23237821

  16. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on education in health and medical informatics.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) agreed on international recommendations in health informatics / medical informatics education. These should help to establish courses, course tracks or even complete programs in this field, to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives concerning education in health and medical informatics (HMI), particularly international activities in educating HMI specialists and the sharing of courseware. The IMIA recommendations centre on educational needs for health care professionals to acquire knowledge and skills in information processing and information and communication technology. The educational needs are described as a three-dimensional framework. The dimensions are: 1) professionals in health care (physicians, nurses, HMI professionals, ...), 2) type of specialisation in health and medical informatics (IT users, HMI specialists) and 3) stage of career progression (bachelor, master, ...). Learning outcomes are defined in terms of knowledge and practical skills for health care professionals in their role (a) as IT user and (b) as HMI specialist. Recommendations are given for courses/course tracks in HMI as part of educational programs in medicine, nursing, health care management, dentistry, pharmacy, public health, health record administration, and informatics/computer science as well as for dedicated programs in HMI (with bachelor, master or doctor degree). To support education in HMI, IMIA offers to award a certificate for high quality HMI education and supports information exchange on programs and courses in HMI through a WWW server of its Working Group on Health and Medical Informatics Education (http://www.imia.org/wg1). PMID:15718686

  17. Technology-Enhanced Stepped Collaborative Care Targeting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbidity After Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zatzick, Douglas; O'Connor, Stephen S; Russo, Joan; Wang, Jin; Bush, Nigel; Love, Jeff; Peterson, Roselyn; Ingraham, Leah; Darnell, Doyanne; Whiteside, Lauren; Van Eaton, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its comorbidities are endemic among injured trauma survivors. Previous collaborative care trials targeting PTSD after injury have been effective, but they have required intensive clinical resources. The present pragmatic clinical trial randomized acutely injured trauma survivors who screened positive on an automated electronic medical record PTSD assessment to collaborative care intervention (n = 60) and usual care control (n = 61) conditions. The stepped measurement-based intervention included care management, psychopharmacology, and psychotherapy elements. Embedded within the intervention were a series of information technology (IT) components. PTSD symptoms were assessed with the PTSD Checklist at baseline prerandomization and again, 1-, 3-, and 6-months postinjury. IT utilization was also assessed. The technology-assisted intervention required a median of 2.25 hours (interquartile range = 1.57 hours) per patient. The intervention was associated with modest symptom reductions, but beyond the margin of statistical significance in the unadjusted model: F(2, 204) = 2.95, p = .055. The covariate adjusted regression was significant: F(2, 204) = 3.06, p = .049. The PTSD intervention effect was greatest at the 3-month (Cohen's effect size d = 0.35, F(1, 204) = 4.11, p = .044) and 6-month (d = 0.38, F(1, 204) = 4.10, p = .044) time points. IT-enhanced collaborative care was associated with modest PTSD symptom reductions and reduced delivery times; the intervention model could potentially facilitate efficient PTSD treatment after injury. PMID:26467327

  18. Enhancing the Transition to Kindergarten: A Randomized Trial to Test the Efficacy of the "Stars" Summer Kindergarten Orientation Program.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Lisa J; Dunning, Rebecca D; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    This randomized trial tested the efficacy of an intensive, four-week summer program designed to enhance low-income children's transition to kindergarten (n's = 60 program children, 40 controls). Administered in four public schools, the program focused on social competence, pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills, school routines, and parental involvement. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that the program significantly improved teachers' ratings of (a) the transition to the social aspect of kindergarten for girls (but not boys); and (b) the transition to kindergarten routines for the subgroup of children who had the same teacher for kindergarten as for the summer program. Findings are discussed in terms of practices and policies for supporting children's transition to school. PMID:21969767

  19. Effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy on Employment Outcomes in Early Schizophrenia: Results From a Two-Year Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eack, Shaun M.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of psychosocial cognitive rehabilitation on employment outcomes in a randomized controlled trial for individuals with early course schizophrenia. Method Early course schizophrenia outpatients (N = 58) were randomly assigned to Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) or an Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) control and treated for two years. Comprehensive data on cognition and employment were collected annually. Results Individuals treated with CET were significantly more likely to be competitively employed, had greater earnings from employment, and were more satisfied with their employment status by the end of treatment compared to EST recipients. Mediator analyses revealed that improvements in both social and non-social cognition mediated the CET effects on employment. Conclusion CET can help facilitate employment in early schizophrenia, by addressing the cognitive impairments that limit functioning in the disorder. Inclusion of cognitive rehabilitation in social work practice can support more optimal functional recovery from schizophrenia. PMID:23885163

  20. Enhancing panic and smoking reduction treatment with d-cycloserine: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smits, Jasper A J; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Lee-Furman, Eunjung; Zvolensky, Michael J; Otto, Michael W; Piper, Megan E; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David

    2016-05-01

    There has been relatively little attention focused on treatment strategies for smokers with panic attacks despite their increased risk of relapse. Panic and Smoking Reduction Treatment (PSRT) integrates standard smoking cessation treatment with an exposure-based intervention targeting the mechanisms underlying panic-smoking relations. Building upon emerging evidence supporting the efficacy of d-cycloserine (DCS) for augmenting exposure-based therapy, we are conducting an initial test of the efficacy of DCS for enhancing PSRT outcomes. Utilizing a randomized, double-blind trial comparing PSRT+DCS to PSRT+placebo, we will obtain initial effect sizes for short-term and long-term smoking cessation outcomes and perform an initial test of putative mechanisms. PMID:27015966

  1. Enhancing positive parent-child interactions and family functioning in a poverty sample: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Negrão, Mariana; Pereira, Mariana; Soares, Isabel; Mesman, Judi

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the attachment-based intervention program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) in a randomized controlled trial with poor families of toddlers screened for professional's concerns about the child's caregiving environment. The VIPP-SD is an evidence-based intervention, but has not yet been tested in the context of poverty. The sample included 43 families with 1- to 4-year-old children: mean age at the pretest was 29 months and 51% were boys. At the pretest and posttest, mother-child interactions were observed at home, and mothers reported on family functioning. The VIPP-SD proved to be effective in enhancing positive parent-child interactions and positive family relations in a severely deprived context. Results are discussed in terms of implications for support services provided to such poor families in order to reduce intergenerational risk transmission. PMID:24972101

  2. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology-enhanced

  3. Enhancing Fire Department Home Visiting Programs: Results of a Community Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gielen, Andrea C.; Shields, Wendy; Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen; Jones, Vanya; Bishai, David; O’Brocki, Raymond; Perry, Elise C.; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Tracey, Pat; Parsons, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the impact of an enhanced fire department home visiting program on community participation and installation of smoke alarms and describes the rate of fire and burn hazards observed in homes. Methods Communities were randomly assigned to receive either a standard or enhanced home visiting program. Prior to implementing the program, 603 household surveys were completed to determine comparability between the communities. During a one year intervention period, 171 home visit events took place with 8,080 homes. Results At baseline, 60% of homes did not have working smoke alarms on every level; 44% had unsafe water temperatures; and 72% did not have CO alarms. Residents in the enhanced community relative to those in the standard community were significantly more likely to let the fire fighters into their homes (75% vs 62%). Among entered homes, those in the enhanced community were significantly more likely to agree to have smoke alarms installed (95% vs 92%), to be left with a working smoke alarm on every level of the home (84% vs 78%) and to have more smoke alarms installed per home visited (1.89 vs 1.74). Conclusions The high baseline rates of home hazards suggest that fire department home visiting programs should take an “all hazards” approach. CHWs and other community partnerships can be effective in promoting fire departments’ fire and life safety goals. Public health academic centers should partner with the fire service to help generate evidence on program effectiveness that can inform decision making about resource allocation for prevention. PMID:23237821

  4. The role of informatics and decision support in utilization management.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jason M; Dighe, Anand S

    2014-01-01

    Information systems provide a critical link between clinical laboratories and the clinicians and patients they serve. Strategic deployment of informatics resources can enable a wide array of utilization initiatives and can substantially improve the appropriateness of test selection and results interpretation. In this article, we review information systems including computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, laboratory information systems (LISs), electronic health records (EHRs), laboratory middleware, knowledge management systems and systems for data extraction and analysis, and describe the role that each can play in utilization management. We also discuss specific utilization strategies that laboratories can employ within these systems, citing examples both from our own institution and from the literature. Finally, we review how emerging applications of decision support technologies may help to further refine test utilization, "personalize" laboratory diagnosis, and enhance the diagnostic value of laboratory testing.

  5. Behavioral Treatment for Marijuana Dependence: Randomized Trial of Contingency Management and Self-Efficacy Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Kadden, Ronald M.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to develop a treatment for marijuana dependence specifically designed to enhance self-efficacy. Method The participants were 215 marijuana-dependent men and women randomized to one of three 9-week outpatient treatments: a condition intended to enhance self-efficacy through successful completion of treatment-related tasks (Mot ivational Enhancement plus Cognitive-Behavioral treatment plus Contingency Management reinforcing completion of treatment homework; MET+CBT+CMHomework); a condition that controlled for all elements except for reinforcement of homework (MET+CBT + Contingency Management reinforcing drug abstinence ; MET+CBT+CMAbstinence); or a Case Management control condition (CaseM). Participants in the two MET+CBT conditions were also asked to complete interactive voice recordings three times per week during treatment to confirm homework completion. Results All patients showed modest improvements over time through 14 months, with few between-treatment effects on outcomes. Latent Class Growth Models, however, indicated that a subsample of patients did extremely well over time. This subsample was more likely to have been treated in the CMAbstinence condition. In turn, this treatment effects appears to have been accounted for by days of continuous abstinence accrued during treatment, and by pre-post increases in self-efficacy. Conclusions The most effective treatments may be those that elicit abstinence while increasing self-efficacy. PMID:23254227

  6. Enhancing the parent-child relationship: a Hong Kong community-based randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Cecilia S; Stewart, Sunita M; Ip, Alison K Y; Lam, Tai Hing

    2014-02-01

    Adolescence is a critical risk period for negative academic and behavioral outcomes, but a strong parent-child relationship can be a powerful protective factor. Our previous pilot of an academic-community agency collaborative randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated initial evidence of benefit for a parenting intervention with preadolescents in Hong Kong. The present RCT assessed the effect of brief training in positive discipline parenting skills on parental satisfaction with the parent-child relationship. A community sample of 461 Hong Kong Chinese parents of children aged 10-13 years were randomized to (a) the Harmony@Home intervention, (b) an attention control, or (c) a third active intervention that shared the control group. Participants were followed for 12 months and multiple methods of assessment were used. Compared with the control group, the Harmony@Home group reported an increase in the primary outcome of satisfaction with the parent-child relationship at 3 months' postintervention. Although results are mixed, this study demonstrates how a culturally adaptive community intervention can improve the parental behaviors that serve as protective factors against negative academic and behavioral outcomes for Chinese adolescents.

  7. Distributed medical informatics education using internet2.

    PubMed Central

    Tidmarsh, Patrica J.; Cummings, Joseph; Hersh, William R.; Freidman, Charles P.

    2002-01-01

    The curricula of most medical informatics training programs are incomplete. We used Internet2-based videoconferencing to expand the educational opportunities of medical informatics students at Oregon Health & Science University and the University of Pittsburgh. Students and faculty in both programs shared extra-curricular research conferences and journal club meetings. A course in Information Retrieval was made available to students in both programs. The conferences, meetings and class were well accepted by participants. A few problems were experienced with the technology, some of which were resolved, and some non-technical challenges to distributing academic conferences, meetings and coursework were also uncovered. We plan to continue our efforts with expanded course and extra-curricular offerings and a more comprehensive evaluation strategy. PMID:12463932

  8. Biodiversity informatics and the plant conservation baseline.

    PubMed

    Paton, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Primary baseline data on taxonomy and species distribution, and its integration with environmental variables, has a valuable role to play in achieving internationally recognised targets for plant diversity conservation, such as the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation. The importance of primary baseline data and the role of biodiversity informatics in linking these data to other environmental variables are discussed. The need to maintain digital resources and make them widely accessible is an additional requirement of institutions who already collect and maintain this baseline data. The lack of resources in many species-rich areas to gather these data and make them widely accessible needs to be addressed if the full benefit of biodiversity informatics on plant conservation is to be realised.

  9. Open source bioimage informatics for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Swedlow, Jason R; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2009-11-01

    Significant technical advances in imaging, molecular biology and genomics have fueled a revolution in cell biology, in that the molecular and structural processes of the cell are now visualized and measured routinely. Driving much of this recent development has been the advent of computational tools for the acquisition, visualization, analysis and dissemination of these datasets. These tools collectively make up a new subfield of computational biology called bioimage informatics, which is facilitated by open source approaches. We discuss why open source tools for image informatics in cell biology are needed, some of the key general attributes of what make an open source imaging application successful, and point to opportunities for further operability that should greatly accelerate future cell biology discovery.

  10. Medical image informatics infrastructure design and applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K; Wong, S T; Pietka, E

    1997-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) is a system integration of multimodality images and health information systems designed for improving the operation of a radiology department. As it evolves, PACS becomes a hospital image document management system with a voluminous image and related data file repository. A medical image informatics infrastructure can be designed to take advantage of existing data, providing PACS with add-on value for health care service, research, and education. A medical image informatics infrastructure (MIII) consists of the following components: medical images and associated data (including PACS database), image processing, data/knowledge base management, visualization, graphic user interface, communication networking, and application oriented software. This paper describes these components and their logical connection, and illustrates some applications based on the concept of the MIII. PMID:9509399

  11. Technology-enhanced program for child disruptive behavior disorders: development and pilot randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Parent, Justin; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Gonzalez, Michelle; Anton, Margaret; Newey, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    Early onset disruptive behavior disorders are overrepresented in low-income families; yet these families are less likely to engage in behavioral parent training (BPT) than other groups. This project aimed to develop and pilot test a technology-enhanced version of one evidence-based BPT program, Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC). The aim was to increase engagement of low-income families and, in turn, child behavior outcomes, with potential cost-savings associated with greater treatment efficiency. Low-income families of 3- to 8-year-old children with clinically significant disruptive behaviors were randomized to and completed standard HNC (n = 8) or Technology-Enhanced HNC (TE-HNC; n = 7). On average, caregivers were 37 years old; 87% were female, and 80% worked at least part-time. More than half (53%) of the youth were boys; the average age of the sample was 5.67 years. All families received the standard HNC program; however, TE-HNC also included the following smartphone enhancements: (a) skills video series, (b) brief daily surveys, (c) text message reminders, (d) video recording home practice, and (e) midweek video calls. TE-HNC yielded larger effect sizes than HNC for all engagement outcomes. Both groups yielded clinically significant improvements in disruptive behavior; however, findings suggest that the greater program engagement associated with TE-HNC boosted child treatment outcome. Further evidence for the boost afforded by the technology is revealed in family responses to postassessment interviews. Finally, cost analysis suggests that TE-HNC families also required fewer sessions than HNC families to complete the program, an efficiency that did not compromise family satisfaction. TE-HNC shows promise as an innovative approach to engaging low-income families in BPT with potential cost-savings and, therefore, merits further investigation on a larger scale. PMID:23924046

  12. Randomized Trial of a Cellular Phone-Enhanced Home Visitation Parenting Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lefever, Jennifer Burke; Bigelow, Kathryn; Borkowski, John; Warren, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although home visiting programs have been documented to improve parenting in high-risk families, their effectiveness is diminished when parents disengage from programs. Cellular phones offer an approach to promoting parent engagement and enhancing parenting outcomes. Our objective was to examine whether mothers in a parenting intervention, Planned Activities Training (PAT), or cellular phone-enhanced version (CPAT) of the intervention would demonstrate greater use of parenting strategies after treatment and at 6 months post-treatment compared with a wait-list control (WLC). METHODS: A sample of 371 low-income mothers and their 3.5- to 5.5-year-old children were randomly assigned to condition and assessed at pre-test, post-intervention, and 6 months post-intervention. Treatment efficacy was evaluated through observations of mother-child interactions as well as maternal interviews about depression, parenting stress, and child behaviors. RESULTS: Mothers receiving PAT and CPAT demonstrated more frequent use of parenting strategies and engaged in more responsive parenting than mothers in the WLC. Mothers receiving CPAT used more PAT parenting strategies than mothers in the other 2 groups and experienced greater reductions in depression and stress. Children of mothers receiving PAT and CPAT demonstrated higher rates of positive engagement, and children of CPAT mothers demonstrated higher levels of adaptive behaviors than children in the WLC. Importantly, changes in parenting, depression, and stress predicted positive child behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: PAT and CPAT conditions improved parenting strategies and child engagement and reduced children’s challenging behaviors. The addition of cellular phones to a home visiting program enhanced maternal responsivity and reduced depression and stress. PMID:24187120

  13. Technology-Enhanced Program for Child Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Development and Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah J.; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Parent, Justin; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Gonzalez, Michelle; Anton, Margaret; Newey, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Early onset Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs) are overrepresented in low-income families; yet, these families are less likely to engage in Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) than other groups. This project aimed to develop and pilot test a technology-enhanced version of one evidence-based BPT program, Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC). The aim was to increase engagement of low-income families and, in turn, child behavior outcomes, with potential cost-savings associated with greater treatment efficiency. Method Low-income families of 3-to-8 year old children with clinically-significant disruptive behaviors were randomized to and completed standard HNC (n =8) or technology-enhanced HNC (TE-HNC) (n = 7). On average, caregivers were 37 years old, female (87%), and most (80%) worked at least part-time. Half (53%) of the youth were boys, average age of the sample was 5.67 years. All families received the standard HNC program; however, TE-HNC also included the following smartphone-enhancements: (1). Skills video series; (2). Brief daily surveys; (3). Text message reminders; (4). Video recording home practice; and (5). Mid-week video calls. Results TE-HNC yielded larger effect sizes than HNC for all engagement outcomes. Both groups yielded clinically significant improvements in disruptive behavior; however, findings suggest that the greater program engagement associated with TE-HNC boosted child treatment outcome. Further evidence for the boost afforded by the technology is revealed in family responses to post-assessment interviews. Finally, cost analysis suggests that TE-HNC families also required fewer sessions than HNC families to complete the program, an efficiency that did not compromise family satisfaction. Conclusions TE-HNC shows promise as an innovative approach to engaging low-income families in BPT with potential cost-savings and, therefore, merits further investigation on a larger scale. PMID:23924046

  14. Technology-enhanced program for child disruptive behavior disorders: development and pilot randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Parent, Justin; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Gonzalez, Michelle; Anton, Margaret; Newey, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    Early onset disruptive behavior disorders are overrepresented in low-income families; yet these families are less likely to engage in behavioral parent training (BPT) than other groups. This project aimed to develop and pilot test a technology-enhanced version of one evidence-based BPT program, Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC). The aim was to increase engagement of low-income families and, in turn, child behavior outcomes, with potential cost-savings associated with greater treatment efficiency. Low-income families of 3- to 8-year-old children with clinically significant disruptive behaviors were randomized to and completed standard HNC (n = 8) or Technology-Enhanced HNC (TE-HNC; n = 7). On average, caregivers were 37 years old; 87% were female, and 80% worked at least part-time. More than half (53%) of the youth were boys; the average age of the sample was 5.67 years. All families received the standard HNC program; however, TE-HNC also included the following smartphone enhancements: (a) skills video series, (b) brief daily surveys, (c) text message reminders, (d) video recording home practice, and (e) midweek video calls. TE-HNC yielded larger effect sizes than HNC for all engagement outcomes. Both groups yielded clinically significant improvements in disruptive behavior; however, findings suggest that the greater program engagement associated with TE-HNC boosted child treatment outcome. Further evidence for the boost afforded by the technology is revealed in family responses to postassessment interviews. Finally, cost analysis suggests that TE-HNC families also required fewer sessions than HNC families to complete the program, an efficiency that did not compromise family satisfaction. TE-HNC shows promise as an innovative approach to engaging low-income families in BPT with potential cost-savings and, therefore, merits further investigation on a larger scale.

  15. Interactive Preventive Health Record to Enhance Delivery of Recommended Care: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Rothemich, Stephen F.; Johnson, Robert E.; Peele, J. Eric; Cunningham, Tina D.; Longo, Daniel R.; Bello, Ghalib A.; Matzke, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Americans receive only one-half of recommended preventive services. Information technologies have been advocated to engage patients. We tested the effectiveness of an interactive preventive health record (IPHR) that links patients to their clinician’s record, explains information in lay language, displays tailored recommendations and educational resources, and generates reminders. METHODS This randomized controlled trial involved 8 primary care practices. Four thousand five hundred patients were randomly selected to receive a mailed invitation to use the IPHR or usual care. Outcomes were measured using patient surveys and electronic medical record data and included IPHR use and service delivery. Comparisons were made between invited and usual-care patients and between users and nonusers among those invited to use the IPHR. RESULTS At 4 and 16 months, 229 (10.2%) and 378 (16.8%) of invited patients used the IPHR. The proportion of patients up-to-date with all services increased between baseline and 16 months by 3.8% among intervention patients (from 11.4% to 15.2%, P <.001) and by 1.5% among control patients (from 11.1% to 12.6%, P = .07), a difference of 2.3% (P = .05). Greater increases were observed among patients who used the IPHR. At 16 months, 25.1% of users were up-to-date with all services, double the rate among nonusers. At 4 months, delivery of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening increased by 19%, 15%, and 13%, respectively, among users. CONCLUSIONS Information systems that feature patient-centered functionality, such as the IPHR, have potential to increase preventive service delivery. Engaging more patients to use systems could have important public health benefits. PMID:22778119

  16. Field trial of a new aeration system for enhancing biodegradation in a biopile.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Cunningham, C J; Pas, Valerie; Philp, J C; Barry, D A; Anderson, P

    2004-01-01

    The influence of a new aeration system on the biopile performance was investigated. The purpose was to increase biodegradation efficiency by optimising airflow through the pile. During a 1-month field trial, the performance of a new system using two perforated vertical pipes with wind-driven turbines was compared with that of a standard pile configuration with two horizontal perforated pipes. Both piles were composed of a similar mix of diesel-contaminated soils, woodchips, compost and NPK fertiliser. Hydrocarbons were recovered using solvent extraction, and determined both gravimetrically and by gas chromatography. Total heterotrophs, pH and moisture content were also assessed. Air pressure measurements were made to compare the efficiency of suction in the pipes. Results at the end of the experiment showed that there was no significant difference between the two piles in the total amount of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The normalised degradation rate was, however, considerably higher in the new system than in the standard one, suggesting that the vertical venting method may have improved the efficiency of the biological reactions in the pile. The pressure measurements showed a significant improvement in the suction produced by the new aeration system. However, many factors other than the airflow (oxygen supply) may influence and limit the biodegradation rates, including moisture content, age of contaminants and the climatic conditions. Additional experiments and modelling need to be carried out to explore further the new aeration method and to develop criteria and guidelines for engineering design of optimal aeration schemes in order to achieve maximum biodegradation in biopiles. PMID:14761751

  17. Field trial of a new aeration system for enhancing biodegradation in a biopile.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Cunningham, C J; Pas, Valerie; Philp, J C; Barry, D A; Anderson, P

    2004-01-01

    The influence of a new aeration system on the biopile performance was investigated. The purpose was to increase biodegradation efficiency by optimising airflow through the pile. During a 1-month field trial, the performance of a new system using two perforated vertical pipes with wind-driven turbines was compared with that of a standard pile configuration with two horizontal perforated pipes. Both piles were composed of a similar mix of diesel-contaminated soils, woodchips, compost and NPK fertiliser. Hydrocarbons were recovered using solvent extraction, and determined both gravimetrically and by gas chromatography. Total heterotrophs, pH and moisture content were also assessed. Air pressure measurements were made to compare the efficiency of suction in the pipes. Results at the end of the experiment showed that there was no significant difference between the two piles in the total amount of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The normalised degradation rate was, however, considerably higher in the new system than in the standard one, suggesting that the vertical venting method may have improved the efficiency of the biological reactions in the pile. The pressure measurements showed a significant improvement in the suction produced by the new aeration system. However, many factors other than the airflow (oxygen supply) may influence and limit the biodegradation rates, including moisture content, age of contaminants and the climatic conditions. Additional experiments and modelling need to be carried out to explore further the new aeration method and to develop criteria and guidelines for engineering design of optimal aeration schemes in order to achieve maximum biodegradation in biopiles.

  18. Medical informatics in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Ball, M J; Douglas, J V

    1998-01-01

    In a period of social transformation, we must reinvent health care. For guidance, we can look to the evolving discipline of medical informatics and to the patterns of investment in the practice arena. A top ranked application need, the computerized patient record (CPR) offers cost savings and supports clinical quality and ambulatory care. In the new millennium, we need to define our values with precision and use technology to achieve quality health care.

  19. Root Cause Analysis and Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard W; Despotou, George

    2016-01-01

    Root Cause Analysis (RCA) is the most widely used system analysis tool for investigating safety related incidents in healthcare. This contribution reviews RCA techniques, using a Health Informatics example, and discusses barriers to their successful uptake by healthcare organisations. It is concluded that a critical assessment to examine the uptake and evaluate the success of RCA, and other safety related techniques, within healthcare is long overdue. PMID:27350485

  20. EVA Communications Avionics and Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carek, David Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing technologies for communications, avionics, and information systems that will significantly enhance extra vehicular activity capabilities to support the Vision for Space Exploration. Several of the ongoing research and development efforts are described within this presentation including system requirements formulation, technology development efforts, trade studies, and operational concept demonstrations.

  1. Health informatics competencies - underpinning e-health.

    PubMed

    Grain, Heather; Hovenga, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    There is a widespread consensus that we have an urgent need to improve our workforce capacity in all aspects associated with the skills and knowledge required for successful e-health and health informatics developments, associated change management and systems implementation strategies. Such activities aim to support various health reform policy initiatives. This paper considers the work being undertaken by many researchers around the globe to define the range of skills and knowledge requirements to suit this purpose. A number of requirements and areas of specialisation are detailed. This is followed by descriptions for competencies in general and more specifically descriptions of a set of high level agreed Health Informatics competencies. Collectively these competencies provide a suitable framework useful for the formal recognition of Health Informatics, including e-health, as a nationally recognised study discipline. Nationally agreed competencies for this discipline enables all education and training efforts to be consistently implemented and to fit with the Australian Qualifications Framework covering both the Vocational Education and Training (VET) and Higher Education sectors.

  2. The Renewed Promise of Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    van Bemmel, J H; McCray, A T

    2016-05-20

    The promise of the field of Medical Informatics has been great and its impact has been significant. In 1999, the Yearbook editors of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) - also the authors of the present paper - sought to assess this impact by selecting a number of seminal papers in the field, and asking experts to comment on these articles. In particular, it was requested whether and how the expectations, represented by these papers, had been fulfilled since their publication several decades earlier. Each expert was also invited to comment on what might be expected in the future. In the present paper, these areas are briefly reviewed again. Where did these early papers have an impact and where were they not as successful as originally expected? It should be noted that the extraordinary developments in computer technology observed in the last two decades could not have been foreseen by these early researchers. In closing, some of the possibilities and limitations of research in medical informatics are outlined in the context of a framework that considers six levels of computer applications in medicine and health care. For each level, some predictions are made for the future, concluded with thoughts on fruitful areas for ongoing research in the field.

  3. Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Additionally, we suggest core source materials and specific learning activities to support pharmacy informatics education. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging changes in the practice model. These changes are facilitated by pharmacy informatics and will inevitably become commonplace in our graduates’ practice environment. PMID:21829267

  4. Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

  5. Establishing a national resource: a health informatics collection to maintain the legacy of health informatics development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beverley; Roberts, Jean; Cooper, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This case study report of the establishment of a national repository of multi-media materials describes the creation process, the challenges faced in putting it into operation and the opportunities for the future. The initial resource has been incorporated under standard library and knowledge management practices. A collaborative action research method was used with active experts in the domain to determine the requirements and priorities for further development. The National Health Informatics Collection (NatHIC) is now accessible and the further issues are being addressed by inclusion in future University and NHS strategic plans. Ultimately the Collection will link with other facilities that contribute to the description and maintenance of effective informatics in support of health globally. The issues raised about the National Health Informatics Collection as established in the UK have resonance with the challenges of capturing the overall historic development of an emerging discipline in any country.

  6. Automated Telephone Calls To Enhance Colorectal Cancer Screening: An Economic Analysis from a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David H.; Feldstein, Adrianne C.; Perrin, Nancy; Rosales, A. Gabriela; Mosen, David M.; Liles, Elizabeth G.; Schneider, Jennifer L.; Lafata, Jennifer E.; Myers, Ronald E.; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has been shown to be a cost-effective intervention, but uncertainty remains over the most cost-effective methods for increasing screening rates. We used data from a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to estimate the cost-effectiveness of an automated telephone intervention from a managed care perspective. Intervention group patients received calls for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) screening. Electronic medical records confirmed whether a patient had completed screening. We searched patient’s electronic medical record for any screening (defined as FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema, or colonoscopy) during follow-up. Intervention costs included project implementation and management, telephone calls, patient identification and tracking. Costs of screening included FOBT (kits, mailing and processing) and any completed screening tests during follow-up. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the cost per additional screen. Results At 6 months average costs per patient in the intervention group were $37 (25% screened) and $34 (19% screened) in the control groups. The ICER at 6 months was $40 per additional screen. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 0.49, 0.84 and 0.99 for willingness to pay thresholds of $40, $100 and $200, respectively. Similar results were seen at 9 months. Screening rates and cost-effectiveness differed by age. A greater increase in FOBT testing was seen for patients aged 70 years and over (45 per 100 intervention, 33 per 100 control) compared with younger patients (25 per 100 intervention, 21 per 100 control). The intervention was dominant (lower costs and greater proportion of patients screened) for patients aged 70 years and over and was $73 per additional screen for younger patients. Discussion A patient-directed, automated phone calling increased screening rates by about 6% and costs by $3 per patient. The ICER we report is less than half what other

  7. A Randomized Trial of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children: Promoting Mindful Attention to Enhance Social-Emotional Resiliency in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Randye J.; Lee, Jennifer; Rosa, Dinelia; Miller, Lisa F.

    2010-01-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for children (MBCT-C) is a manualized group psychotherapy for children ages 9-13 years old, which was developed specifically to increase social-emotional resiliency through the enhancement of mindful attention. Program development is described along with results of the initial randomized controlled trial. We…

  8. Enhancing implementation of tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling guideline among dental providers: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines recommend that healthcare providers ask about each patient's tobacco use, assess the patient's readiness and willingness to stop, document tobacco use habits, advise the patient to stop, assist and help in quitting, and arrange monitoring of progress at follow-up appointments. Adherence to such guidelines, especially among dental providers, is poor. To improve guideline implementation, it is essential to understand factors influencing it and find effective ways to influence those factors. The aim of the present study protocol is to introduce a theory-based approach to diagnose implementation difficulties of TUPAC counselling guidelines among dental providers. Methods Theories of behaviour change have been used to identify key theoretical domains relevant to the behaviours of healthcare providers involved in implementing clinical guidelines. These theoretical domains will inform the development of a questionnaire aimed at assessing the implementation of the TUPAC counselling guidelines among Finnish municipal dental providers. Specific items will be drawn from the guidelines and the literature on TUPAC studies. After identifying potential implementation difficulties, we will design two interventions using theories of behaviour change to link them with relevant behaviour change techniques aiming to improve guideline adherence. For assessing the implementation of TUPAC guidelines, the electronic dental record audit and self-reported questionnaires will be used. Discussion To improve guideline adherence, the theoretical-domains approach could provide a comprehensive basis for assessing implementation difficulties, as well as designing and evaluating interventions. After having identified implementation difficulties, we will design and test two interventions to enhance TUPAC guideline adherence. Using the cluster randomised controlled design, we aim

  9. An Informatics Based Approach to Reduce the Grain Size of Cast Hadfield Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swati; Pathak, Shankha; Sheoran, Sumit; Kela, Damodar H.; Datta, Shubhabrata

    2016-04-01

    Materials Informatics concept using computational intelligence based approaches are employed to bring out the significant alloying additions to achieve grain refinement in cast Hadfield steel. Castings of Hadfield steels used for railway crossings, requires fine grained austenitic structure. Maintaining proper grain size of this component is very crucial in order to achieve the desired properties and service life. This work studies the important variables affecting the grain size of such steels which includes the compositional and processing variables. The computational findings and prior knowledge is used to design the alloy, which is subjected to a few trials to validate the findings.

  10. Negative symptom improvement during cognitive rehabilitation: results from a 2-year trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Greenwald, Deborah P; Hogarty, Susan S; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2013-08-30

    Cognitive rehabilitation has shown beneficial effects on cognition in patients with schizophrenia, which may also help to improve negative symptoms due to overlapping pathophysiology between these two domains. To better understand the possible relationship between these areas, we conducted an exploratory analysis of the effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) on negative symptoms. Early course schizophrenia outpatients (n=58) were randomized to 2 years of CET or an Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) control condition. Results revealed significant and medium-sized (d=0.61) differential improvements favoring CET in overall negative symptoms, particularly social withdrawal, affective flattening, and motor retardation. Neurocognitive improvement was associated with reduced negative symptoms in CET, but not EST patients. No relationships were observed between improvements in emotion processing aspects of social cognition, as measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, and negative symptoms. CET represents an effective cognitive rehabilitation intervention for schizophrenia that may also have benefits to negative symptoms. Future studies specifically designed to examine negative symptoms during the course of cognitive rehabilitation are needed.

  11. Trial for Enhancing Technical Writing Skills to Improve Training Efficiency in Writing Technical Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneda, Michio; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    One of the important undertakings of student in laboratory education practiced in higher educational institutions, such as universities, is the development of technical communication skills based on training in technical writing for preparing not only bachelor‧s and master‧s theses but also papers to be submitted to society journals. However, technical writing is difficult for students who are not trained in writing papers, and it might become a burden for the teaching staff. Considering this situation, we have examined methods that may enhance the technical writing skills of students and also improve the training efficiency of the teaching staff. Specifically, the methods include distributing checklists to students, providing as few corrections as possible using underlines and adding comments when correcting students‧ writings, and instructing students to exchange their writings to check each other‧s work. In this paper, we summarize and analyze the effects of practicing the above methods on the basis of the answers to a questionnaire provided by students.

  12. Effectiveness of enhanced communication therapy in the first four months after stroke for aphasia and dysarthria: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Anne; Patchick, Emma; Young, Alys; Davies, Linda; Vail, Andy; Long, Andrew F; Watkins, Caroline; Wilkinson, Mo; Pearl, Gill; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon; Tyrrell, Pippa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of enhanced communication therapy in the first four months after stroke compared with an attention control (unstructured social contact). Design Externally randomised, pragmatic, parallel, superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment. Setting Twelve UK hospital and community stroke services. Participants 170 adults (mean age 70 years) randomised within two weeks of admission to hospital with stroke (December 2006 to January 2010) whom speech and language therapists deemed eligible, and 135 carers. Interventions Enhanced, agreed best practice, communication therapy specific to aphasia or dysarthria, offered by speech and language therapists according to participants’ needs for up to four months, with continuity from hospital to community. Comparison was with similarly resourced social contact (without communication therapy) from employed visitors. Outcome measures Primary outcome was blinded, functional communicative ability at six months on the Therapy Outcome Measure (TOM) activity subscale. Secondary outcomes (unblinded, six months): participants’ perceptions on the Communication Outcomes After Stroke scale (COAST); carers’ perceptions of participants from part of the Carer COAST; carers’ wellbeing on Carers of Older People in Europe Index and quality of life items from Carer COAST; and serious adverse events. Results Therapist and visitor contact both had good uptake from service users. An average 22 contacts (intervention or control) over 13 weeks were accepted by users. Impairment focused therapy was the approach most often used by the speech and language therapists. Visitors most often provided general conversation. In total, 81/85 of the intervention group and 72/85 of the control group completed the primary outcome measure. Both groups improved on the TOM activity subscale. The estimated six months group difference was not statistically significant, with 0.25 (95% CI –0.19 to 0.69) points in favour of

  13. Does larch arabinogalactan enhance immune function? A review of mechanistic and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dion, Carine; Chappuis, Eric; Ripoll, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The common cold is a viral infection with important economic burdens in Western countries. The research and development of nutritional solutions to reduce the incidence and severity of colds today is a major focus of interest, and larch arabinogalactan seems to be a promising supportive agent. Arabinogalactan has been consumed by humans for thousands of years and is found in a variety of common vegetables as well as in medicinal herbs. The major commercial sources of this long, densely branched, high-molecular-weight polysaccharide are North American larch trees. The aim of this article is to review the immunomodulatory effects of larch arabinogalactan derived from Larix laricina and Larix occidentalis (North American Larix species) and more specifically its role in the resistance to common cold infections. In cell and animal models, larch arabinogalactan is capable of enhancing natural killer cells and macrophages as well as the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In humans a clinical study demonstrated that larch arabinogalactan increased the body's potential to defend against common cold infection. Larch arabinogalactan decreased the incidence of cold episodes by 23 %. Improvements of serum antigen-specific IgG and IgE response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and tetanus vaccination suggesting a B cell dependent mechanism have been reported in vaccination studies with larch arabinogalactan, while the absence of response following influenza vaccination suggests the involvement of a T cell dependent mechanism. These observations suggest a role for larch arabinogalactan in the improvement of cold infections, although the mode of action remains to be further explored. Different hypotheses can be envisaged as larch arabinogalactan can possibly act indirectly through microbiota-dependent mechanisms and/or have a direct effect on the immune system via the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). PMID:27073407

  14. Does larch arabinogalactan enhance immune function? A review of mechanistic and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dion, Carine; Chappuis, Eric; Ripoll, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The common cold is a viral infection with important economic burdens in Western countries. The research and development of nutritional solutions to reduce the incidence and severity of colds today is a major focus of interest, and larch arabinogalactan seems to be a promising supportive agent. Arabinogalactan has been consumed by humans for thousands of years and is found in a variety of common vegetables as well as in medicinal herbs. The major commercial sources of this long, densely branched, high-molecular-weight polysaccharide are North American larch trees. The aim of this article is to review the immunomodulatory effects of larch arabinogalactan derived from Larix laricina and Larix occidentalis (North American Larix species) and more specifically its role in the resistance to common cold infections. In cell and animal models, larch arabinogalactan is capable of enhancing natural killer cells and macrophages as well as the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In humans a clinical study demonstrated that larch arabinogalactan increased the body's potential to defend against common cold infection. Larch arabinogalactan decreased the incidence of cold episodes by 23 %. Improvements of serum antigen-specific IgG and IgE response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and tetanus vaccination suggesting a B cell dependent mechanism have been reported in vaccination studies with larch arabinogalactan, while the absence of response following influenza vaccination suggests the involvement of a T cell dependent mechanism. These observations suggest a role for larch arabinogalactan in the improvement of cold infections, although the mode of action remains to be further explored. Different hypotheses can be envisaged as larch arabinogalactan can possibly act indirectly through microbiota-dependent mechanisms and/or have a direct effect on the immune system via the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT).

  15. Pedometers to enhance physical activity in COPD: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Paula; Espinoza, José; Aguilera, Miguel; Balmaceda, Nicolás; Castro, Ariel; Ruiz, Mauricio; Díaz, Orlando; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Pedometers, which have been used in healthy populations, might also increase physical activity in patients with COPD. COPD patients taking part in a 3-month individualised programme to promote an increase in their daily physical activity were randomised to either a standard programme of physical activity encouragement alone, or a pedometer-based programme. Assessments were performed by investigators blinded to treatment allocation. Change in average 1-week daily step count, 6-min walking distance (6MWD), modified Medical Research Council scale, St George’s respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) and COPD assessment test (CAT) were compared between groups. 102 patients were recruited, of whom 97 completed the programme (pedometer group: n=50; control group: n=47); 60.8% were male with a mean±sd age of 68.7±8.5 years, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 66.1±19.4% and FEV1/forced vital capacity 55.2±9.5%. Both groups had comparable characteristics at baseline. The pedometer group had significantly greater improvements in: physical activity 3080±3254 steps·day−1 versus 138.3±1950 steps·day−1 (p<0.001); SGRQ −8.8±12.2 versus −3.8±10.9 (p=0.01); CAT score −3.5±5.5 versus −0.6±6.6 (p=0.001); and 6MWD 12.4±34.6 versus −0.7±24.4 m (p=0.02) than patients receiving activity encouragement only. A simple physical activity enhancement programme using pedometers can effectively improve physical activity level and quality of life in COPD patients. PMID:25261324

  16. Learning from colleagues about healthcare IT implementation and optimization: lessons from a medical informatics listserv.

    PubMed

    Adams, Martha B; Kaplan, Bonnie; Sobko, Heather J; Kuziemsky, Craig; Ravvaz, Kourosh; Koppel, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Communication among medical informatics communities can suffer from fragmentation across multiple forums, disciplines, and subdisciplines; variation among journals, vocabularies and ontologies; cost and distance. Online communities help overcome these obstacles, but may become onerous when listservs are flooded with cross-postings. Rich and relevant content may be ignored. The American Medical Informatics Association successfully addressed these problems when it created a virtual meeting place by merging the membership of four working groups into a single listserv known as the "Implementation and Optimization Forum." A communication explosion ensued, with thousands of interchanges, hundreds of topics, commentaries from "notables," neophytes, and students--many from different disciplines, countries, traditions. We discuss the listserv's creation, illustrate its benefits, and examine its lessons for others. We use examples from the lively, creative, deep, and occasionally conflicting discussions of user experiences--interchanges about medication reconciliation, open source strategies, nursing, ethics, system integration, and patient photos in the EMR--all enhancing knowledge, collegiality, and collaboration.

  17. Ingestion of High Molecular Weight Carbohydrate Enhances Subsequent Repeated Maximal Power: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jonathan M; Almada, Anthony L; Van Eck, Leighsa E; Shah, Meena; Mitchell, Joel B; Jones, Margaret T; Jagim, Andrew R; Rowlands, David S

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in sports demanding repeat maximal work outputs frequently train concurrently utilizing sequential bouts of intense endurance and resistance training sessions. On a daily basis, maximal work within subsequent bouts may be limited by muscle glycogen availability. Recently, the ingestion of a unique high molecular weight (HMW) carbohydrate was found to increase glycogen re-synthesis rate and enhance work output during subsequent endurance exercise, relative to low molecular weight (LMW) carbohydrate ingestion. The effect of the HMW carbohydrate, however, on the performance of intense resistance exercise following prolonged-intense endurance training is unknown. Sixteen resistance trained men (23±3 years; 176.7±9.8 cm; 88.2±8.6 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 3-way crossover design comprising a muscle-glycogen depleting cycling exercise followed by ingestion of placebo (PLA), or 1.2 g•kg•bw-1 of LMW or HMW carbohydrate solution (10%) with blood sampling for 2-h post-ingestion. Thereafter, participants performed 5 sets of 10 maximal explosive repetitions of back squat (75% of 1RM). Compared to PLA, ingestion of HMW (4.9%, 90%CI 3.8%, 5.9%) and LMW (1.9%, 90%CI 0.8%, 3.0%) carbohydrate solutions substantially increased power output during resistance exercise, with the 3.1% (90% CI 4.3, 2.0%) almost certain additional gain in power after HMW-LMW ingestion attributed to higher movement velocity after force kinematic analysis (HMW-LMW 2.5%, 90%CI 1.4, 3.7%). Both carbohydrate solutions increased post-exercise plasma glucose, glucoregulatory and gut hormones compared to PLA, but differences between carbohydrates were unclear; thus, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Ingestion of a HMW carbohydrate following prolonged intense endurance exercise provides superior benefits to movement velocity and power output during subsequent repeated maximal explosive resistance exercise. This study was registered with

  18. Ingestion of High Molecular Weight Carbohydrate Enhances Subsequent Repeated Maximal Power: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jonathan M.; Almada, Anthony L.; Van Eck, Leighsa E.; Shah, Meena; Mitchell, Joel B.; Jones, Margaret T.; Jagim, Andrew R.; Rowlands, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in sports demanding repeat maximal work outputs frequently train concurrently utilizing sequential bouts of intense endurance and resistance training sessions. On a daily basis, maximal work within subsequent bouts may be limited by muscle glycogen availability. Recently, the ingestion of a unique high molecular weight (HMW) carbohydrate was found to increase glycogen re-synthesis rate and enhance work output during subsequent endurance exercise, relative to low molecular weight (LMW) carbohydrate ingestion. The effect of the HMW carbohydrate, however, on the performance of intense resistance exercise following prolonged-intense endurance training is unknown. Sixteen resistance trained men (23±3 years; 176.7±9.8 cm; 88.2±8.6 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 3-way crossover design comprising a muscle-glycogen depleting cycling exercise followed by ingestion of placebo (PLA), or 1.2 g•kg•bw-1 of LMW or HMW carbohydrate solution (10%) with blood sampling for 2-h post-ingestion. Thereafter, participants performed 5 sets of 10 maximal explosive repetitions of back squat (75% of 1RM). Compared to PLA, ingestion of HMW (4.9%, 90%CI 3.8%, 5.9%) and LMW (1.9%, 90%CI 0.8%, 3.0%) carbohydrate solutions substantially increased power output during resistance exercise, with the 3.1% (90% CI 4.3, 2.0%) almost certain additional gain in power after HMW-LMW ingestion attributed to higher movement velocity after force kinematic analysis (HMW-LMW 2.5%, 90%CI 1.4, 3.7%). Both carbohydrate solutions increased post-exercise plasma glucose, glucoregulatory and gut hormones compared to PLA, but differences between carbohydrates were unclear; thus, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Ingestion of a HMW carbohydrate following prolonged intense endurance exercise provides superior benefits to movement velocity and power output during subsequent repeated maximal explosive resistance exercise. This study was registered with

  19. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics

    PubMed Central

    Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T.; Becich, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics

  20. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T; Becich, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics

  1. Massive Open Online Course for Health Informatics Education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper outlines a new method of teaching health informatics to large numbers of students from around the world through a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Methods The Health Informatics Forum is one of examples of MOOCs through a social networking site for educating health informatics students and professionals. It is running a MOOC for students from around the world that uses creative commons licenced content funded by the US government and developed by five US universities. The content is delivered through narrated lectures with slides that can be viewed online with discussion threads on the forum for class interactions. Students can maintain a professional profile, upload photos and files, write their own blog posts and post discussion threads on the forum. Results The Health Informatics Forum MOOC has been accessed by 11,316 unique users from 127 countries from August 2, 2012 to January 24, 2014. Most users accessed the MOOC via a desktop computer, followed by tablets and mobile devices and 55% of users were female. Over 400,000 unique users have now accessed the wider Health Informatics Forum since it was established in 2008. Conclusions Advances in health informatics and educational technology have both created a demand for online learning material in health informatics and a solution for providing it. By using a MOOC delivered through a social networking platform it is hoped that high quality health informatics education will be able to be delivered to a large global audience of future health informaticians without cost. PMID:24872906

  2. Characteristics of Information Systems and Business Informatics Study Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfert, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade there is an intensive discussion within the Information Systems (IS) and Informatics community about the characteristics and identity of the discipline. Simultaneously with the discussion, there is an ongoing debate on essential skills and capabilities of IS and Business Informatics graduates as well as the profile of IS…

  3. The Recurrence Relations in Teaching Students of Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoev, Valentin P.

    2010-01-01

    The topic "Recurrence relations" and its place in teaching students of Informatics is discussed in this paper. We represent many arguments about the importance, the necessity and the benefit of studying this subject by Informatics students. They are based on investigation of some fundamental books and textbooks on Discrete Mathematics,…

  4. A hypergraphic model of medical informatics: curriculum development guide.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, X.; Pavilcek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Medical informatics, as a descriptive, scientific study, must be mathematically or theoretically described. Is it important to define a model for medical informatics? The answer is worth pursuing. The medical informatics profession stands to benefit three-fold: first, by clarifying the vagueness of the definition of medical informatics, secondly, by identifying the scope and content for educational programs, and, thirdly, by defining career opportunities for its graduates. Existing medical informatics curricula are not comparable. Consequently, the knowledge and skills of graduates from these programs are difficult to assess. The challenge is to promote academics that develops graduates for prospective employers to fulfill the criteria of the health care industry and, simultaneously, compete with computer science programs that produce information technology graduates. In order to meet this challenge, medical informatics programs must have unique curricula that distinguishes its graduates. The solution is to educate students in a comparable manner across the domain of medical informatics. This paper discusses a theoretical model for medical informatics. Images Figure PMID:10566316

  5. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  6. [The Role Development of Informatics Nurse Specialists in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Lee, Ying-Li; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The development of information technology has changed the world and allowed the innovation of nursing-care services. In recent years, the development of nursing informatics in Taiwan has been catching up with international trends and has been regarded positively by the international medical informatics community. The integration of information technology into medical care system has created the new nursing role of "informatics nurse." Although the certification system and job descriptions for these nurses have become increasingly comprehensive in many nations, Taiwan remains in the early development stage in these regards. Taiwan informatics nurses continue to face unclear and inadequately stated role responsibilities and job titles, undefined training requirements, and a lack of a clear qualification / certification system. This paper introduces the role functions and professional growth of informatics nurses and introduces the framework for a certification system in order to give to various medical and paramedical staffs a better understanding of informatics nursing and to recognize the important role played by informatics nurses in the process of healthcare informatics development.

  7. Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

  8. Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

    1995-01-01

    Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

  9. Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

  10. An online guided ACT intervention for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of university students: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Panajiota; Lappalainen, Päivi; Muotka, Joona; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    Stress, anxiety and depression are relatively common problems among university students. This study examined whether an online psychological intervention aiming at enhancing the wellbeing of university students could be an effective and practical alternative for meeting the needs of a university population. University students (N = 68; 85% female; 19-32 years old) were randomly assigned to either a guided seven-week online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). A between-groups pre-post (iACT vs WLC) design with 12-month follow-up for the iACT participants was conducted. The intervention participants were offered two face-to-face meetings, completed online exercises during a five-week period, and received personal weekly written feedback via the website from their randomly assigned, trained student coaches. Waitlist participants were offered the intervention program soon after the post measurements. Results in this small efficacy trial showed that the iACT participants had significantly higher gains in wellbeing (between group, d = 0.46), life satisfaction (d = 0.65), and mindfulness skills (d = 0.49). In addition, iACT participants' self-reported stress (d = 0.54) and symptoms of depression (d = 0.69) were significantly reduced compared to the participants in the control group. These benefits were maintained over a 12-month follow-up period (within iACT group, d = 0.65-0.69, for primary measures). The results suggest that an online-based, coach-guided ACT program with blended face-to-face and online sessions could be an effective and well-accepted alternative for enhancing the wellbeing of university students. PMID:26848517

  11. An online guided ACT intervention for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of university students: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Panajiota; Lappalainen, Päivi; Muotka, Joona; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    Stress, anxiety and depression are relatively common problems among university students. This study examined whether an online psychological intervention aiming at enhancing the wellbeing of university students could be an effective and practical alternative for meeting the needs of a university population. University students (N = 68; 85% female; 19-32 years old) were randomly assigned to either a guided seven-week online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). A between-groups pre-post (iACT vs WLC) design with 12-month follow-up for the iACT participants was conducted. The intervention participants were offered two face-to-face meetings, completed online exercises during a five-week period, and received personal weekly written feedback via the website from their randomly assigned, trained student coaches. Waitlist participants were offered the intervention program soon after the post measurements. Results in this small efficacy trial showed that the iACT participants had significantly higher gains in wellbeing (between group, d = 0.46), life satisfaction (d = 0.65), and mindfulness skills (d = 0.49). In addition, iACT participants' self-reported stress (d = 0.54) and symptoms of depression (d = 0.69) were significantly reduced compared to the participants in the control group. These benefits were maintained over a 12-month follow-up period (within iACT group, d = 0.65-0.69, for primary measures). The results suggest that an online-based, coach-guided ACT program with blended face-to-face and online sessions could be an effective and well-accepted alternative for enhancing the wellbeing of university students.

  12. Does platelet-rich plasma enhance healing in the idiopathic bone cavity? A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, R; Karagah, T; Shahidi, S; Zare, N

    2015-09-01

    The presence of an idiopathic bone cavity (IBC) is usually identified during routine dental radiographic examinations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on bone healing in the idiopathic bone cavity. This was a single-blind randomized clinical trial. Twenty-four subjects were assigned randomly to two groups. Subjects in group 1 received PRP through a buccal window approach, and those in group 2 underwent conventional management via the creation of a window on the buccal wall and curettage of the walls of the defect. Subjects were followed up at 3, 6, and 9 months after the intervention. The amount of bone formation as determined on panoramic radiographs was divided into four categories: stage 1: ≤25% of the defect showed opacity; stage 2: 25-50% of the defect showed opacity; stage 3: 50-75% of the defect showed opacity; and stage 4: >75% of the defect showed opacity. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to the various healing stages at the three time points (P<0.05). When compared with conventional management of the idiopathic bone cavity, the use of PRP may enhance bone formation. PMID:26074365

  13. Clinical informatics: a workforce priority for 21st century healthcare.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan E; Drake, Lesley E; Harris, Julie-Gai B; Watson, Kay; Pohlner, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    This paper identifies the contribution of health and clinical informatics in the support of healthcare in the 21st century. Although little is known about the health and clinical informatics workforce, there is widespread recognition that the health informatics workforce will require significant expansion to support national eHealth work agendas. Workforce issues including discipline definition and self-identification, formal professionalisation, weaknesses in training and education, multidisciplinarity and interprofessional tensions, career structure, managerial support, and financial allocation play a critical role in facilitating or hindering the development of a workforce that is capable of realising the benefits to be gained from eHealth in general and clinical informatics in particular. As well as the national coordination of higher level policies, local support of training and allocation of sufficient position hours in appropriately defined roles by executive and clinical managers is essential to develop the health and clinical informatics workforce and achieve the anticipated results from evolving eHealth initiatives.

  14. The Impact of Imaging Informatics Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Liao, Geraldine J; Nagy, Paul G; Cook, Tessa S

    2016-08-01

    Imaging informatics (II) is an area within clinical informatics that is particularly important in the field of radiology. Provider groups have begun employing dedicated radiologist-informaticists to bridge medical, information technology and administrative functions, and academic institutions are meeting this demand through formal II fellowships. However, little is known about how these programs influence graduates' careers and perceptions about professional development. We electronically surveyed 26 graduates from US II fellowships and consensus leaders in the II community-many of whom were subspecialty diagnostic radiologists (68%) employed within academic institutions (48%)-about the perceived impact of II fellowships on career development and advancement. All graduates felt that II fellowship made them more valuable to employers, with the majority of reporting ongoing II roles (78%) and continued used of competencies (61%) and skills (56%) gained during fellowship in their current jobs. Other key benefits included access to mentors, protected time for academic work, networking opportunities, and positive impacts of annual compensation. Of respondents without II fellowship training, all would recommend fellowships to current trainees given the ability to gain a "still rare" but "essential skill set" that is "critical for future leaders in radiology" and "better job opportunities." While some respondents felt that II fellowships needed further formalization and standardization, most (85%) disagreed with requiring a 2-year II fellowship in order to qualify for board certification in clinical informatics. Instead, most believed that fellowships should be integrated with clinical residency or fellowship training while preserving formal didactics and unstructured project time. More work is needed to understand existing variations in II fellowship training structure and identify the optimal format for programs targeted at radiologists.

  15. The Impact of Imaging Informatics Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Liao, Geraldine J; Nagy, Paul G; Cook, Tessa S

    2016-08-01

    Imaging informatics (II) is an area within clinical informatics that is particularly important in the field of radiology. Provider groups have begun employing dedicated radiologist-informaticists to bridge medical, information technology and administrative functions, and academic institutions are meeting this demand through formal II fellowships. However, little is known about how these programs influence graduates' careers and perceptions about professional development. We electronically surveyed 26 graduates from US II fellowships and consensus leaders in the II community-many of whom were subspecialty diagnostic radiologists (68%) employed within academic institutions (48%)-about the perceived impact of II fellowships on career development and advancement. All graduates felt that II fellowship made them more valuable to employers, with the majority of reporting ongoing II roles (78%) and continued used of competencies (61%) and skills (56%) gained during fellowship in their current jobs. Other key benefits included access to mentors, protected time for academic work, networking opportunities, and positive impacts of annual compensation. Of respondents without II fellowship training, all would recommend fellowships to current trainees given the ability to gain a "still rare" but "essential skill set" that is "critical for future leaders in radiology" and "better job opportunities." While some respondents felt that II fellowships needed further formalization and standardization, most (85%) disagreed with requiring a 2-year II fellowship in order to qualify for board certification in clinical informatics. Instead, most believed that fellowships should be integrated with clinical residency or fellowship training while preserving formal didactics and unstructured project time. More work is needed to understand existing variations in II fellowship training structure and identify the optimal format for programs targeted at radiologists. PMID:26831474

  16. Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

  17. Development of a medical informatics data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cai

    2006-01-01

    This project built a medical informatics data warehouse (MedInfo DDW) in an Oracle database to analyze medical information which has been collected through Baylor Family Medicine Clinic (FCM) Logician application. The MedInfo DDW used Star Schema with dimensional model, FCM database as operational data store (ODS); the data from on-line transaction processing (OLTP) were extracted and transferred to a knowledge based data warehouse through SQLLoad, and the patient information was analyzed by using on-line analytic processing (OLAP) in Crystal Report.

  18. Informatics solutions for high-throughput proteomics.

    PubMed

    Topaloglou, Thodoros

    2006-06-01

    The success of mass-spectrometry-based proteomics as a method for analyzing proteins in biological samples is accompanied by challenges owning to demands for increased throughput. These challenges arise from the vast volume of data generated by proteomics experiments combined with the heterogeneity in data formats, processing methods, software tools and databases that are involved in the translation of spectral data into relevant and actionable information for scientists. Informatics aims to provide answers to these challenges by transferring existing solutions from information management to proteomics and/or by generating novel computational methods for automation of proteomics data processing.

  19. [Standards in Medical Informatics: Fundamentals and Applications].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Obando, Fernando; Camacho Sánchez, Jhon

    2013-09-01

    The use of computers in medical practice has enabled novel forms of communication to be developed in health care. The optimization of communication processes is achieved through the use of standards to harmonize the exchange of information and provide a common language for all those involved. This article describes the concept of a standard applied to medical informatics and its importance in the development of various applications, such as computational representation of medical knowledge, disease classification and coding systems, medical literature searches and integration of biological and clinical sciences.

  20. How can we improve informatics education for German nurses? Statements derived from the first German nursing informatics summer school.

    PubMed

    Bürkle, T; Schrader, U

    1999-01-01

    For German nurses it is difficult to join training in health informatics besides their professional activity. The authors have successfully established a German nursing informatics summer school in shape of a 5 day intensive curriculum which they offer to German nurses during the summer holidays. The summer school introduces nurses into health informatics and nursing informatics. It targets interested nursing staff, nurse executives, and nurse teachers. It promotes self learning abilities for continued self education of the participants. One of its goals is to enable participants to formulate their own requirements in health information processing and to influence system design and system introduction. The paper presents the curriculum, talks about first experiences, and demonstrates the results of an evaluation among the participants. Conclusions are drawn in a set of statements on informatics education of nurses.

  1. Qualitative methods used in medical informatics research: a 12-year review.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyi; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2008-11-06

    Qualitative methodology is gaining popularity in medical informatics research. We performed a systematic review of published studies, between 1994 and 2005, in two major medical informatics journals: JAMIA and International Journal of Medical Informatics (IJMI). The goal is to describe the emerging trends of using qualitative methodology in medical informatics research and to access the methodological quality of these qualitative studies.

  2. Bayesian Analysis of the Pattern Informatics Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, N.; Tiampo, K.; Klein, W.; Rundle, J.

    2007-12-01

    The pattern informatics (PI) [Rundle et al., 2000; Tiampo et al., 2002; Holliday et al., 2005] is a technique that uses phase dynamics in order to quantify temporal variations in seismicity patterns. This technique has shown interesting results for forecasting earthquakes with magnitude greater than or equal to 5 in southern California from 2000 to 2010 [Rundle et al., 2002]. In this work, a Bayesian approach is used to obtain a modified updated version of the PI called Bayesian pattern informatics (BPI). This alternative method uses the PI result as a prior probability and models such as ETAS [Ogata, 1988, 2004; Helmstetter and Sornette, 2002] or BASS [Turcotte et al., 2007] in order to obtain the likelihood. Its result is similar to the one obtained by the PI: the determination of regions, known as hotspots, that are most susceptible to the occurrence of events with M=5 and larger during the forecast period. As an initial test, retrospective forecasts for the southern California region from 1990 to 2000 were made with both the BPI and the PI techniques, and the results are discussed in this work.

  3. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  4. Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

  5. The new informatics of national healthcare reform.

    PubMed

    Manderscheid, R W; Henderson, M J

    1994-01-01

    The President's Health Security Act has succeeded in attracting America's attention. Several of its initiatives have been well-publicized and hotly debated in Congress. The act also includes a number of implications for healthcare informatics, and devotes an entire chapter to this subject, although this area has not received as much publicity. Every behavioral healthcare provider's information system would be significantly affected by enactment of the Health Security Act. Selected forms and data elements for the management and delivery of behavioral healthcare services would need to be standardized. Organizations of behavioral healthcare providers, managed care companies and purchasers would increasingly share selected patient and subscriber information in aggregated form, for a variety of purposes. As a result, tougher laws to protect patient data privacy will likely be forthcoming. The following article gives an overview of the informatics needs of the soon-to-be reformed American healthcare system, into which behavioral healthcare will be integrated. As part of the larger system, behavioral healthcare services and information systems will need to comply with the same guidelines and requirements, outlined below, as other healthcare providers. Preparation to meet the information demands of the evolving healthcare system will require adaptation of existing computerized information systems, utilization of new technology, consultation with the system's major shareholders and attention to continuous quality improvement processes.

  6. The molecular medicine informatics model (MMIM).

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Marienne; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence; Colman, Peter; Merriel, Robert; Rafael, Naomi; Georgeff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 a major collaboration in Melbourne, Australia successfully implemented a major medical informatics infrastructure. The convergence of life sciences, healthcare, and information technology is now driving research into the fundamentals of disease causation and toward tailoring individualized treatment. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM) is a 'virtual' research repository of clinical, laboratory and genetic data sets. Integrated data, physically located within independent hospital and research organisations can be searched and queried seamlessly via a federated data integrator. Researchers must gain authorisation to access data, and obtain permission from the data owners before the data can be accessed. The legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of this health data have been addressed so data complies with privacy requirements. The MMIM platform also record links individual cases across multiple institutions and multiple clinical specialties. Significant research outcomes in epilepsy and colorectal cancer have already been enabled by the MMIM research platform. The infrastructure of MMIM enables discovery research to be accessible via the Web with security, intellectual property and privacy addressed.

  7. Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches

    PubMed Central

    Embi, Peter J.; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

    Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

  8. Consortium for oral health-related informatics: improving dental research, education, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stark, Paul C; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M; Walji, Muhammad F; Stewart, Denice C L; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R; Willis, George P; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J

    2010-10-01

    Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come.

  9. Consortium for oral health-related informatics: improving dental research, education, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stark, Paul C; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M; Walji, Muhammad F; Stewart, Denice C L; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R; Willis, George P; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J

    2010-10-01

    Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come. PMID:20930236

  10. Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics: Improving Dental Research, Education, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Paul C.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R.; Willis, George P.; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come. PMID:20930236

  11. Seasonal foraging responses of beavers to sodium-enhanced foods: An experimental assessment with field feeding trials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strules, Jennifer; Destefano, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Salt drive is a seasonal phenomenon common to several classes of wild herbivores. Coincident with shifts of nutrient quality when plants resume growth in the spring, sodium is secondarily lost as surplus potassium is excreted. The beaver (Castor canadensis) is an herbivore whose dietary niche closely follows that of other herbivores that are subject to salt drive, but no published studies to date have assessed the likelihood of its occurrence. To quantify if beavers experience seasonal salt drive, we designed a field experiment to measure the foraging responses of beavers to sodium-enhanced foods. We used sodium-treated (salted) and control (no salt) food items (aspen [Populus tremuloides] and pine [Pinus spp.] sticks) during monthly feeding trials at beaver-occupied wetlands. If conventional ontogeny of salt drive was operant, we expected to observe greater utility of sodium-treated food items by beavers in May and June. Further, if water lilies (Nymphaea spp. and Nuphar spp.) supply beavers with sodium to meet dietary requirements as is widely speculated, we expected foraging responses to sodium-treated food items at wetlands where water lilies were absent to be greater than at wetlands where water lily was present. Aspen was selected by beavers in significantly greater amounts than pine. There was no difference between the mean percent consumed of salted and control aspen sticks by beavers at lily and non-lily wetlands, and no differences in temporal consumption associated with salted or control pine sticks at either wetland type. Salted pine was consumed in greater amounts than unsalted pine. We propose that the gastrointestinal or renal physiology of beavers may preclude solute loss, thereby preventing salt drive.

  12. Chapter 1 Common Data Elements and Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics System for TBI Research.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased attention to traumatic brain injury (TBI), there remains no specific treatment and available interventions focus rather on the prevention of secondary injury. One of the reasons posited for the lack of a successful therapy is the amalgamation of various types of injuries under the same severity category in clinical trials. Informatics approaches have been suggested as a means to develop an improved classification system for TBI. As a result of federal interagency efforts, common data elements (CDEs) for TBI have now been developed. Further, the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics System (FITBIR) has been created and is now available for TBI researchers to both add and retrieve data. This chapter will discuss the goals, development, and evolution of the CDEs and FITBIR and discuss how these tools can be used to support TBI research. A specific exemplar using the CDEs and lessons learned from working with the CDEs and FITBIR are included to aid future researchers.

  13. Consumer health informatics: a consensus description and commentary from American Medical Informatics Association members.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, T. K.; Chang, B. L.; Brown, S.; Kukafka, R.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although interest in Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) has increased, a consensus definition of CHI does not yet exist. PURPOSE: To conduct a hypothesis-generating survey of AMIA members regarding definition and research agenda for CHI. METHODS: We solicited participation among AMIA members in an Internet-based survey focusing on issues related to a definition of CHI. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-five AMIA members responded. Participants indicated a broad spectrum of topics important to CHI including "self-help for disease management" and "patient access to their own medical records." CHI research was felt to rely heavily on public health methods such as epidemiology and outcomes research, a paradigm shift from traditional medical informatics. Responses indicated a perceived lack of funding and need for further research in CHI. CONCLUSIONS: A working definition should emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of CHI, include consumer input into CHI design, and focus on public health approaches to evaluation. PMID:11825193

  14. Nursing Informatics Competencies for Emerging Professionals: International Leaders Panel.

    PubMed

    Pruinelli, Lisiane

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a cursory review of the competencies necessary for acquire a successful career in a competitive job market, the panel will bring together leaders from renowned academic, successful health corporations, and international leaders in nursing informatics to the table for discussion, dialogue, and make recommendations. Panelists will reflect on their experiences within the different types of informatics organizations and present some of the current challenges when educating skillful professionals. The panel will provide personal experiences, thoughts, and advice on the competencies development in nursing informatics from their lens.

  15. The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueyi I.

    2012-01-01

    Improving healthcare quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of healthcare reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and “meaningful use (MU)” of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

  16. Gap Analysis of Biomedical Informatics Graduate Education Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Ritko, Anna L.; Odlum, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Graduate training in biomedical informatics (BMI) is evolving rapidly. BMI graduate programs differ in informatics domain, delivery method, degrees granted, as well as breadth and depth of curricular competencies. Using the current American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) definition of BMI core competencies as a framework, we identified and labeled course offerings within graduate programs. From our qualitative analysis, gaps between defined competencies and curricula emerged. Topics missing from existing graduate curricula include community health, translational and clinical research, knowledge representation, data mining, communication and evidence-based practice. PMID:24551403

  17. Nursing Informatics Beyond 2020; An Interactive Workshop Exploring Our Futures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    This interactive workshop will reflect on and update participants' views on possible future scenarios for the development of health and nursing informatics. The NI2006 Post Congress Conference discussed the future nature and scope of nursing informatics, nursing and healthcare, as viewed from likely developments between 2006 and 2020 [1]. Brief synposes from the NI2006 conference will be presented, with summaries of speakers' views on changes and progress since. Workshop participants will discuss major themes and changes, with a view to updating views on possible futures for nursing, healthcare and informatics.

  18. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2016-07-12

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  19. Brief Report: Enhancement of Patient Recruitment in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials Using a Multi‐Biomarker Disease Activity Score as an Inclusion Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Bolce, Rebecca; Hambardzumyan, Karen; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F.; Sasso, Eric H.; Hwang, C. C.; Segurado, Oscar G.; Geborek, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials often exclude patients who have low C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels, which slows enrollment into the trial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high Multi‐Biomarker Disease Activity (MBDA) scores (>44) in RA patients with low CRP levels (≤10 mg/liter) could be used as a complement to CRP levels >10 mg/liter to enhance patient recruitment without affecting clinical trial outcomes. Methods We evaluated patients from the Swedish Pharmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial, which did not include any selection criteria for CRP levels. Clinical outcomes were assessed after 3 months of methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy in MTX‐naive RA patients (n = 220) and after 3–10 months of add‐on therapy in patients who were incomplete responders to MTX alone (MTX‐IR) (n = 127). Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 1 year in all patients. Within each cohort, the outcomes were compared between patients with a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at the start of the respective treatment interval versus those with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter. Results Patients with both a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at baseline had clinical and radiographic outcomes that were comparable to those in patients with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter at baseline. This broadened definition of the inclusion criteria identified an additional 24% of patients in the MTX‐naive cohort and 47% in the MTX‐IR cohort. Conclusion Patient recruitment into RA clinical trials may be substantially enhanced, without any decrease in clinical and radiographic outcomes, by using as an inclusion criterion “a CRP level of >10 mg/liter and/or an MBDA score of >44.” PMID:26213309

  20. WE-G-9A-01: Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C; Miller, R; Sloan, J; Wu, Q; Howell, R

    2014-06-15

    The construction of databases and support software to enable routine and systematic aggregation, analysis and reporting of patient outcomes data is emerging as an important area. “How have results for our patients been affected by the improvements we have made in our practice and in the technologies we use?” To answer this type of fundamental question about the overall pattern of efficacy observed, it is necessary to systematically gather and analyze data on all patients treated within a clinic. Clinical trials answer, in great depth and detail, questions about outcomes for the subsets of patients enrolled in a given trial. However, routine aggregation and analysis of key treatment parameter data and outcomes information for all patients is necessary to recognize emergent patterns that would be of interest from a public health or practice perspective and could better inform design of clinical trials or the evolution of best practice principals. To address these questions, Radiation Oncology outcomes databases need to be constructed to enable combination essential data from a broad group of data types including: diagnosis and staging, dose volume histogram metrics, patient reported outcomes, toxicity metrics, performance status, treatment plan parameters, demographics, DICOM data and demographics. Developing viable solutions to automate aggregation and analysis of this data requires multidisciplinary efforts to define nomenclatures, modify clinical processes and develop software and database tools requires detailed understanding of both clinical and technical issues. This session will cover the developing area of Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics. Learning Objectives: Audience will be able to speak to the technical requirements (software, database, web services) which must be considered in designing an outcomes database. Audience will be able to understand the content and the role of patient reported outcomes as compared to traditional toxicity measures

  1. An Informatics-based Chronic Disease Practice

    PubMed Central

    Nordyke, Robert A.; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    1998-01-01

    The authors present the case study of a 35-year informatics-based single subspecialty practice for the management of patients with chronic thyroid disease. This extensive experience provides a paradigm for the organization of longitudinal medical information by integrating individual patient care with clinical research and education. The kernel of the process is a set of worksheets easily completed by the physician during the patient encounter. It is a structured medical record that has been computerized since 1972, enabling analysis of different groups of patients to answer questions about chronic conditions and the effects of therapeutic interventions. The recording process and resulting studies severe as an important vehicle for medical education about the nuances of clinical practice. The authors suggest ways in which computerized medical records can become an integral part of medical practice, rather than a luxury or novelty. PMID:9452988

  2. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    PubMed

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work.

  3. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    PubMed

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work. PMID:27030221

  4. Farm animal genomics and informatics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Fadiel, Ahmed; Anidi, Ifeanyi; Eichenbaum, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    Farm animal genomics is of interest to a wide audience of researchers because of the utility derived from understanding how genomics and proteomics function in various organisms. Applications such as xenotransplantation, increased livestock productivity, bioengineering new materials, products and even fabrics are several reasons for thriving farm animal genome activity. Currently mined in rapidly growing data warehouses, completed genomes of chicken, fish and cows are available but are largely stored in decentralized data repositories. In this paper, we provide an informatics primer on farm animal bioinformatics and genome project resources which drive attention to the most recent advances in the field. We hope to provide individuals in biotechnology and in the farming industry with information on resources and updates concerning farm animal genome projects. PMID:16275782

  5. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  6. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  7. Eco-informatics and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, J.B.; Wilson, T.; Borning, A.; Delcambre, L.; Bowker, G.; Frame, M.; Schnase, J.; Sonntag, W.; Fulop, J.; Hert, C.; Hovy, E.; Jones, J.; Landis, E.; Schweik, C.; Brandt, L.; Gregg, V.; Spengler, S.

    2006-01-01

    This project highlight reports on the 2004 workshop [1], as well as follow-up activities in 2005 and 2006, regarding how informatics tools can help manage natural resources and decide policy. The workshop was sponsored jointly by sponsored by the NSF, NBII, NASA, and EPA, and attended by practitioners from government and non-government agencies, and university researchers from the computer, social, and ecological sciences. The workshop presented the significant information technology (IT) problems that resource managers face when integrating ecological or environmental information to make decisions. These IT problems fall into five categories: data presentation, data gaps, tools, indicators, and policy making and implementation. To alleviate such problems, we recommend informatics research in four IT areas, as defined in this abstract and our final report: modeling and simulation, data quality, information integration and ontologies, and social and human aspects. Additionally, we recommend that funding agencies provide infrastructure and some changes in funding habits to assure cycles of innovation in the domain were addressed. Follow-on activities to the workshop subsequent to dg.o 2005 included: an invited talk presenting workshop results at DILS 2005, publication of the workshop final report by the NBII [1], and a poster at the NBII All Hands Meeting (Oct. 2005). We also expect a special issue of the JIIS to appear in 2006 that addresses some of these questions. As we go to press, no solicitation by funding agencies has as yet been published, but various NASA and NBII, and NSF cyber-infrastructure and DG research efforts now underway address the above issues.

  8. The cancer translational research informatics platform

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Patrick; Dash, Rajesh C; Chilukuri, Ram; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Johnson, Kimberly; Annechiarico, Robert; Cuticchia, A Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the pressing need for the creation of applications that facilitate the aggregation of clinical and molecular data, most current applications are proprietary and lack the necessary compliance with standards that would allow for cross-institutional data exchange. In line with its mission of accelerating research discoveries and improving patient outcomes by linking networks of researchers, physicians, and patients focused on cancer research, caBIG (cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid™) has sponsored the creation of the caTRIP (Cancer Translational Research Informatics Platform) tool, with the purpose of aggregating clinical and molecular data in a repository that is user-friendly, easily accessible, as well as compliant with regulatory requirements of privacy and security. Results caTRIP has been developed as an N-tier architecture, with three primary tiers: domain services, the distributed query engine, and the graphical user interface, primarily making use of the caGrid infrastructure to ensure compatibility with other tools currently developed by caBIG. The application interface was designed so that users can construct queries using either the Simple Interface via drop-down menus or the Advanced Interface for more sophisticated searching strategies to using drag-and-drop. Furthermore, the application addresses the security concerns of authentication, authorization, and delegation, as well as an automated honest broker service for deidentifying data. Conclusion Currently being deployed at Duke University and a few other centers, we expect that caTRIP will make a significant contribution to further the development of translational research through the facilitation of its data exchange and storage processes. PMID:19108734

  9. Applications of medical informatics in antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Evans, R S; Pestotnik, S L

    1994-01-01

    The Infectious Disease Society of America is concerned about the excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics in U.S. hospitals. Applications of Medical Informatics can help improve the use of antibiotics and help improve patient care by monitoring and managing enormous amounts of patient information. Monitoring the duration of every antibiotic ordered in the hospital or keeping tract of the antibiotic susceptibilities for five years are examples of tasks better performed by computers. The impact of computers in medicine is seen by some as disappointing. The computer revolution has not had the impact in medicine experienced by other areas. The acceptance and use of computers by medicine will be evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In 1979, the MYCIN project demonstrated that the computer could aid physicians in the selection of antibiotics. However, MYCIN was never clinically used because physicians were require to enter all patient information into the computer. The development of computerized medical records is an essential step to further the development and implementation of computer-aided decision support. The science of Medical Informatics is still relatively new but is emerging as a distinct academic field. A few hospitals are now installing information systems and have determined that these systems will play an essential role in their ability to survive into the next century. The telephone and the automobile have been recognized as two of the most important tools for improving medical care during the past 100 years. People could more readily get medical care and the time to transmit medical information was greatly reduced through physician use of the telephone and automobile. The computer is a tool that can be used to help physicians manage the great amount of medical information being generated every day. The computer can also alert the physician of patient conditions that need attention. However, it is the physician who must use and apply the

  10. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM).

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Marienne; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence; Colman, Peter; Merriel, Robert; Rafael, Naomi; Georgeff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, a major collaboration in Melbourne Australia successfully completed implementing a major medical informatics infrastructure - this is now being used for discovery research and has won significant expansion funding for 2006 - 2009. The convergence of life sciences, healthcare, and information technology is now driving research into the fundamentals of disease causation. Key to enabling this is collating data in sufficient numbers of patients to ensure studies are adequately powered. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM) is a 'virtual' research repository of clinical, laboratory and genetic data sets. Integrated data, physically located within independent hospital and research organisations can be searched and queried seamlessly via a federated data integrator. Researchers must gain authorisation to access data, and inform/obtain permission from the data owners, before the data can be accessed. The legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of this health data have been addressed so data complies with privacy requirements. The MMIM platform has also solved the issue of record linking individual cases and integrating data sources across multiple institutions and multiple clinical specialties. Significant research outcomes already enabled by the MMIM research platform include epilepsy seizure analyses for responders / non responders to therapy; sensitivity of faecal occult blood testing for asymptomatic colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas over a 25-year experience in colorectal cancer screening; subsite-specific colorectal cancer in diabetic and non diabetic patients; and the influence of language spoken on colorectal cancer diagnosis, management and outcomes. Ultimately the infrastructure of MMIM enables discovery research to be accessible via the Web with security, intellectual property and privacy addressed.

  11. Climate Informatics: Accelerating Discovering in Climate Science with Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; McQuade, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The goal of climate informatics, an emerging discipline, is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the field's remaining challenges. Given the impact of climate change, understanding the climate system is an international priority. The goal of climate informatics is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the remaining challenges.

  12. Excellence in Computational Biology and Informatics — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    9th Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Scientific Workshop. Excellence in Computational Biology and Informatics: Sponsored by the EDRN Data Sharing Subcommittee Moderator: Daniel Crichton, M.S., NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  13. Developing a Capstone Course within a Health Informatics Program

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, Gary; Cata, Teuta; Cole, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing development of a health informatics capstone program in a Midwest university from the hiring of a program coordinator to the development of a capstone course, through initial student results. University health informatics programs require a strong academic program to be successful but also require a spirited program coordinator to manage resources and organize an effective capstone course. This is particularly true of health informatics master's programs that support health industry career fields, whereby employers can locate and work with a pool of qualified applicants. The analysis of students’ logs confirms that students’ areas of focus and concern are consistent with course objectives and company work requirements during the work-study portion of the student capstone project. The article further discusses lessons learned and future improvements to be made in the health informatics capstone course. PMID:22783150

  14. Directions and opportunities in health informatics in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Thornton, K

    1994-06-01

    The social changes, and changes in perceptions of the effectiveness of health care in British Columbia have resulted in a large number of recommendations in the report of the British Columbia Royal Commission on Health Care and Costs. Many of these recommendations have implications for health informatics. The British Columbia Government, in outlining a response, foresees a major change in the emphases of health care, which will involve four major areas of health informatics: network evolution, automation of the patient record, outcome- and other quality-related databases, and consumer health education. These themes are discussed, in the light of the opinions of academics, health care providers, and the health-informatics industry. The themes must be intercalated into the health informatics curriculum, to equip graduates for the challenges of B.C.'s changing health care system.

  15. A short history of medical informatics in bosnia and herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2014-02-01

    The health informatics profession in Bosnia and Herzegovina has relatively long history. Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data, thirty years from the establishment of Society for Medical Informatics BiH, twenty years from the establishment of the Scientific journal "Acta Informatica Medica (Acta Inform Med", indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central Scopus, Embase, etc.), twenty years on from the establishment of the first Cathedra for Medical Informatics on Biomedical Faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, ten years on from the introduction of the method of "Distance learning" in medical curriculum. The author of this article is eager to mark the importance of the above mentioned Anniversaries in the development of Health informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina and have attempted, very briefly, to present the most significant events and persons with essential roles throughout this period.

  16. SWOT Analysis on Medical Informatics and Development Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Han, Zhongdong; Ma, Hua

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at clarifying the strategic significance of developing medical informatics, conducting SWOT analysis on this discipline and hence establishing the strategic objectives and focal points for its development.

  17. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates.

  18. An Interdisciplinary Online Course in Health Care Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To design an interdisciplinary course in health care informatics that enables students to: (1) understand how to incorporate technology into the provision of safe, effective and evidence-based health care; (2) make decisions about the value and ethical application of specific technologies; and (3) appreciate the perspectives and roles of patients and providers when using technology in care. Design An online, interdisciplinary elective course using a distributive learning model was created. Standard courseware was used to manage teaching and to facilitate student/instructor interactions. Interactive, multimedia lectures were developed using Internet communication software. Assessment Upon completion of the course, students demonstrated competency in identifying, analyzing, and applying informatics appropriately in diverse health settings. Conclusion Online education using multimedia software technology is effective in teaching students about health informatics and providing an innovative opportunity for interdisciplinary learning. In light of the growing need for efficient health care informatics training, additional study of this methodology is warranted. PMID:17619643

  19. A Short History of Medical Informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    The health informatics profession in Bosnia and Herzegovina has relatively long history. Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data, thirty years from the establishment of Society for Medical Informatics BiH, twenty years from the establishment of the Scientific journal “Acta Informatica Medica (Acta Inform Med”, indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central Scopus, Embase, etc.), twenty years on from the establishment of the first Cathedra for Medical Informatics on Biomedical Faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, ten years on from the introduction of the method of “Distance learning” in medical curriculum. The author of this article is eager to mark the importance of the above mentioned Anniversaries in the development of Health informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina and have attempted, very briefly, to present the most significant events and persons with essential roles throughout this period. PMID:24648621

  20. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

  1. Antecedents of the People and Organizational Aspects of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Riley, Robert T.; Blyth, Andrew J. C.; Southon, Gray; Dixon, Bradley J.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract People and organizational issues are critical in both implementing medical informatics systems and in dealing with the altered organizations that new systems often create. The people and organizational issues area—like medical informatics itself—is a blend of many disciplines. The academic disciplines of psychology, sociology, social psychology, social anthropology, organizational behavior and organizational development, management, and cognitive sciences are rich with research with significant potential to ease the introduction and on-going use of information technology in today's complex health systems. These academic areas contribute research data and core information for better understanding of such issues as the importance of and processes for creating future direction; managing a complex change process; effective strategies for involving individuals and groups in the informatics effort; and effectively managing the altered organization. This article reviews the behavioral and business referent disciplines that can potentially contribute to improved implementations and on-going management of change in the medical informatics arena. PMID:9067874

  2. Representation of medical informatics in the wikipedia and its perspectives.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Udo

    2005-01-01

    A wiki is a technique for collaborative development of documents on the web. The Wikipedia is a comprehensive free online encyclopaedia based on this technique which has gained increasing popularity and quality. This paper's work explored the representation of Medical Informatics in the Wikipedia by a search of specific and less specific terms used in Medical Informatics and shows the potential uses of wikis and the Wikipedia for the specialty. Test entries into the Wikipedia showed that the practical use of the so-called WikiMedia software is convenient. Yet Medical Informatics is not represented sufficiently since a number of important topics is missing. The Medical Informatics communities should consider a more systematic use of these techniques for disseminating knowledge about the specialty for the public as well as for internal and educational purposes. PMID:16160349

  3. Health professionals' views of informatics education: findings from the AMIA 1999 spring conference.

    PubMed

    Staggers, N; Gassert, C A; Skiba, D J

    2000-01-01

    Health care leaders emphasize the need to include information technology and informatics concepts in formal education programs, yet integration of informatics into health educational programs has progressed slowly. The AMIA 1999 Spring Congress was held to address informatics educational issues across health professions, including the educational needs in the various health professions, goals for health informatics education, and implementation strategies to achieve these goals. This paper presents the results from AMIA work groups focused on informatics education for non-informatics health professionals. In the categories of informatics needs, goals, and strategies, conference attendees suggested elements in these areas: educational responsibilities for faculty and students, organizational responsibilities, core computer skills and informatics knowledge, how to learn informatics skills, and resources required to implement educational strategies. PMID:11062228

  4. TU-F-BRD-01: Biomedical Informatics for Medical Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M; Kalet, I; McNutt, T; Smith, W

    2014-06-15

    Biomedical informatics encompasses a very large domain of knowledge and applications. This broad and loosely defined field can make it difficult to navigate. Physicists often are called upon to provide informatics services and/or to take part in projects involving principles of the field. The purpose of the presentations in this symposium is to help medical physicists gain some knowledge about the breadth of the field and how, in the current clinical and research environment, they can participate and contribute. Three talks have been designed to give an overview from the perspective of physicists and to provide a more in-depth discussion in two areas. One of the primary purposes, and the main subject of the first talk, is to help physicists achieve a perspective about the range of the topics and concepts that fall under the heading of 'informatics'. The approach is to de-mystify topics and jargon and to help physicists find resources in the field should they need them. The other talks explore two areas of biomedical informatics in more depth. The goal is to highlight two domains of intense current interest--databases and models--in enough depth into current approaches so that an adequate background for independent inquiry is achieved. These two areas will serve as good examples of how physicists, using informatics principles, can contribute to oncology practice and research. Learning Objectives: To understand how the principles of biomedical informatics are used by medical physicists. To put the relevant informatics concepts in perspective with regard to biomedicine in general. To use clinical database design as an example of biomedical informatics. To provide a solid background into the problems and issues of the design and use of data and databases in radiation oncology. To use modeling in the service of decision support systems as an example of modeling methods and data use. To provide a background into how uncertainty in our data and knowledge can be

  5. Materials informatics: a journey towards material design and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yuzuru

    2016-06-28

    Materials informatics has been gaining popularity with the rapid development of computational materials science. However, collaborations between information science and materials science have not yet reached the success. There are several issues which need to be overcome in order to establish the field of materials informatics. Construction of material big data, implementation of machine learning, and platform design for materials discovery are discussed with potential solutions. PMID:27292550

  6. Materials informatics: a journey towards material design and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yuzuru

    2016-06-28

    Materials informatics has been gaining popularity with the rapid development of computational materials science. However, collaborations between information science and materials science have not yet reached the success. There are several issues which need to be overcome in order to establish the field of materials informatics. Construction of material big data, implementation of machine learning, and platform design for materials discovery are discussed with potential solutions.

  7. Enhancement of Self-Monitoring in a Web-Based Weight Loss Program by Extra Individualized Feedback and Reminders: Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hutchesson, Melinda Jane; Tan, Chor Yin; Morgan, Philip; Callister, Robin

    2016-01-01

    , including additional individualized feedback and reminders, are effective in enhancing self-monitoring behaviors in a Web-based weight loss program. ClinicalTrial Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000197033; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=335159 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6gCQdj21G) PMID:27072817

  8. Geo-Informatics in India: Major Milestones and Present Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Karnatak, H.; Raju, P. L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Geo-informatics has emerged globally as a useful tool to address spatial problems with significant societal implications that require integrative and innovative approaches for analysis, modelling, managing, and archiving of extensive and diverse data sets. Breakneck technological development and availability of satellite based data and information services in public domain along with real time geo-data n through participatory approaches, in the two last decades have led to a sea-change in our know-how of our natural resources and their effective management at various levels. It has led to a realization that every phenomena and requirement in our day to day life has some spatial, or geographic component that can be predicted and governed more effectively through geoinformatics tool. India also has come a long way in effective utilization of geoinformatics for various applications. This quantum leap owes its foundation in a humble beginning about half century back and almost parallel developments in the country's space programme to a current level where it touches almost all areas of life and living. Though geoinformatics technology (GIT) is believed to reach satisfactory level in the country, Indian geospatial community faces critical challenges with respect to research, education and training along with enhanced the access to the stakeholders and mobilization of the workforce, that are crucial in further penetration of this technology in context to India's development. In this paper we have critically reviewed milestones of GI development and its current utilization status in Indian context.

  9. Health informatics and the delivery of care to older people.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sabine; Hägglund, Maria

    2009-07-20

    In the light of an aging society, effective delivery of healthcare will be more dependent on different technological solutions supporting the decentralization of healthcare, higher patient involvement and increased societal demands. The aim of this article is therefore, to describe the role of health informatics in the care of elderly people and to give an overview of the state of the art in this field. Based on a review of the existing scientific literature, 29 review articles from the last 15 years and 119 original articles from the last 5 years were selected and further analysed. Results show that review articles cover the fields of information technology in the home environment, integrated health information systems, public health systems, consumer health informatics and non-technology oriented topics such as nutrition, physical behaviour, medication and the aging process in general. Articles presenting original data can be divided into 5 major clusters: information systems and decision support, consumer health informatics, emerging technologies, home telehealth, and informatics methods. Results show that health informatics in elderly care is an expanding field of interest but we still do lack knowledge about the elderly person's needs of technology and how it should best be designed. Surprisingly, few studies cover gender differences related to technology use. Further cross-disciplinary research is needed that relates informatics and technology to different stages of the aging process and that evaluates the effects of technical solutions. PMID:19487092

  10. Study Design for the IMMEDIATE (Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency Care) Trial: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Intravenous Glucose, Insulin, and Potassium (GIK) for Acute Coronary Syndromes in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Selker, Harry P.; Beshansky, Joni R.; Griffith, John L.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Udelson, James E.; Rashba, Eric J.; Ruthazer, Robin; Sheehan, Patricia R.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves D.; Atkins, James M.; Sayah, Assaad J.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Rackley, Charles E.; Opie, Lionel H.; Lambrew, Costas T.; Cobb, Leonard A.; MacLeod, Bruce A.; Ingwall, Joanne S.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Apstein, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental studies suggest that metabolic myocardial support by intravenous (IV) glucose, insulin, and potassium (GIK) reduces ischemia-induced arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, mortality, progression from unstable angina pectoris (UAP) to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and MI size. However, trials of hospital administration of IV GIK to patients with ST elevation MI (STEMI) have generally not shown favorable effects, possibly due to the GIK intervention taking place many hours after ischemic symptom onset. A trial of GIK used in the very first hours of ischemia has been needed, consistent with the timing of benefit seen in experimental studies. Objective The Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care (IMMEDIATE) Trial tested whether, if given very early, GIK could have the impact seen in experimental studies. Accordingly, distinct from prior trials, IMMEDIATE tested the impact of GIK 1) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), rather than only AMI or STEMI, and 2) administered in prehospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings, rather than later, in hospitals, following emergency department evaluation. Design IMMEDIATE was an EMS-based randomized placebo-controlled clinical effectiveness trial conducted in 13 cities across the US which enrolled 911 participants. Eligible were patients age 30 or older for whom a paramedic performed a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)to evaluate chest pain or other symptoms suggestive of ACS for whom electrocardiograph-based ACI-TIPI (acute cardiac ischemia time-insensitive predictive instrument) indicated a > 75% probability of ACS, and/or the TPI (thrombolytic predictive instrument) indicated presence of a STEMI, or if local criteria for STEMI notification of receiving hospitals were met. Prehospital IV GIK or placebo was started immediately. Pre-specified were the primary endpoint of progression of ACS to infarction, and as major secondary endpoints

  11. Cluster randomized adaptive implementation trial comparing a standard versus enhanced implementation intervention to improve uptake of an effective re-engagement program for patients with serious mental illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons with serious mental illness (SMI) are disproportionately burdened by premature mortality. This disparity is exacerbated by poor continuity of care with the health system. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) developed Re-Engage, an effective population-based outreach program to identify veterans with SMI lost to care and to reconnect them with VA services. However, such programs often encounter barriers getting implemented into routine care. Adaptive designs are needed when the implementation intervention requires augmentation within sites that do not initially respond to an initial implementation intervention. This protocol describes the methods used in an adaptive implementation design study that aims to compare the effectiveness of a standard implementation strategy (Replicating Effective Programs, or REP) with REP enhanced with External Facilitation (enhanced REP) to promote the uptake of Re-Engage. Methods/Design This study employs a four-phase, two-arm, longitudinal, clustered randomized trial design. VA sites (n = 158) across the United States with a designated Re-Engage provider, at least one Veteran with SMI lost to care, and who received standard REP during a six-month run-in phase. Subsequently, 88 sites with inadequate uptake were stratified at the cluster level by geographic region (n = 4) and VA regional service network (n = 20) and randomized to REP (n = 49) vs. enhanced REP (n = 39) in phase two. The primary outcome was the percentage of veterans on each facility outreach list documented on an electronic web registry. The intervention was at the site and network level and consisted of standard REP versus REP enhanced by external phone facilitation consults. At 12 months, enhanced REP sites returned to standard REP and 36 sites with inadequate participation received enhanced REP for six months in phase three. Secondary implementation outcomes included the percentage of veterans contacted directly by site

  12. A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

  13. An exploration of nursing informatics competency and satisfaction related to network education.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juin-Shu; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Jiang, Wey-Wen; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2007-03-01

    The rapid development of computer technology has driven the growth of the Internet, which has made access to daily services more timely and convenient. Network education strategies for long-distance nursing education are increasingly being implemented to overcome distance barriers and allow nurses to obtain more knowledge. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the informatics competency of nurses and their satisfaction regarding network education as well as to explore related factors. A total of 218 nurses answered an online questionnaire after completing 4 hours of network education at their appropriate clinical level. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to analyze data. Study results found that nurses who took computer training less than 3 hours per week, were unable to connect to a network, or held an associate degree as their highest level of education achieved a lower nursing informatics competency than those who were older, were certified at an N4 clinical level, had previous online training experience or attended 4 or more course hours each week. Those who participated in the network education course more than 4 hours per week and owned their own computers were more satisfied with network education. Nurses who had higher nursing informatics competency were also more satisfied with network education. Network education not only enhances learners' computer competency but also improves learning satisfaction. By promoting network education and improving nurses' hardware/software skills and knowledge, nurses can use networks to access learning resources. Healthcare institutions should also enhance their computer infrastructures, and increase the interest of nurses to learn and apply network skills in clinical practice.

  14. A Small-Scale Randomized Efficacy Trial of Carescapes: Enhancing Children's Social Development in Child Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Smolkowski, Keith; Marquez, Brion; Taylor, Ted K.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of the child care environment and caregiver practices can potentially have significant, lasting impact on children's social development. This study involves the development and a small-scale efficacy trial of the Carescapes program, a video-based training program that focuses on promoting positive social development in young children…

  15. Enhancing the Application and Evaluation of a Discrete Trial Intervention Package for Eliciting First Words in Preverbal Preschoolers with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiouri, Ioanna; Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen; Paul, Rhea

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention package including a discrete trial program (Rapid Motor Imitation Antecedent Training (Tsiouri and Greer, "J Behav Educat" 12:185-206, 2003) combined with parent education for eliciting first words in children with ASD who had little or no spoken language. Evaluation of the approach…

  16. The Methods Behind 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Informatics Needs and Capacity of Local Health Departments (LHDs) survey is the most recent comprehensive source of quantitative data on LHD informatics. Conducted by the National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO), this is the third nationally representative quantitative study of LHD informatics since 2009. The previous 2 comprehensive quantitative assessments were conducted by NACCHO in 2009-2010 and 2011. Given that public health informatics is rapidly evolving, the 2015 Informatics survey is a much-needed country-wide assessment of the current informatics needs and capacities of LHDs. This article outlines detailed methodology used in the 2015 Informatics survey, including instrument development, pretesting, sampling design and sample size, survey administration, and sampling weights. A 9-member advisory committee representing federal, state, and local health agency representatives guided the design and implementation of this study. The survey instrument was organized into 6 topic areas: demographics, physical infrastructure, skills and capacity available, public health workforce development needs, electronic health records, and health information exchange. The instrument was pretested with a sample of 20 LHDs and subsequently pilot-tested with 30 LHDs. The survey was administered via the Qualtrics survey software to the sample of 650 LHDs, selected using stratified random sampling. The survey was fielded for approximately 8 weeks and 324 usable responses were received, constituting a response rate of 50%. Statistical weights were developed to account for 3 factors: (a) disproportionate response rate by population size (using 7 population strata), (b) oversampling of LHDs with larger population sizes, and (c) sampling rather than a census approach. PMID:27684627

  17. From Bed to Bench: Bridging from Informatics Practice to Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, C.U.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In 2009, Applied Clinical Informatics (ACI) – focused on applications in clinical informatics – was launched as a companion journal to Methods of Information in Medicine (MIM). Both journals are official journals of the International Medical Informatics Association. Objectives To explore which congruencies and interdependencies exist in publications from theory to practice and from practice to theory and to determine existing gaps. Major topics discussed in ACI and MIM were analyzed. We explored if the intention of publishing companion journals to provide an information bridge from informatics theory to informatics practice and vice versa could be supported by this model. In this manuscript we will report on congruencies and interdependences from practice to theory and on major topics in MIM. Methods Retrospective, prolective observational study on recent publications of ACI and MIM. All publications of the years 2012 and 2013 were indexed and analyzed. Results Hundred and ninety-six publications were analyzed (ACI 87, MIM 109). In MIM publications, modelling aspects as well as methodological and evaluation approaches for the analysis of data, information, and knowledge in biomedicine and health care were frequently raised – and often discussed from an interdisciplinary point of view. Important themes were ambient-assisted living, anatomic spatial relations, biomedical informatics as scientific discipline, boosting, coding, computerized physician order entry, data analysis, grid and cloud computing, health care systems and services, health-enabling technologies, health information search, health information systems, imaging, knowledge-based decision support, patient records, signal analysis, and web science. Congruencies between journals could be found in themes, but with a different focus on content. Interdependencies from practice to theory, found in these publications, were only limited. Conclusions Bridging from informatics theory to

  18. Cardiovascular Health Informatics: Risk Screening and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Craig J.; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S.; Poon, Carmen C. Y.; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient. PMID:22997187

  19. Informatics critical to public health surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhaji, Parsa; Zhang, Jiajie; Smith, Jack W.; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, Samuel W.; Lillibridge, Scott R.

    2003-09-01

    Public health surveillance is the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data regarding a health-related event for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health by effective response management and coordination. As new pressures for early detection of disease outbreaks have arisen, particularly for outbreaks of possible bioterrorism (BT) origin, and as electronic health data have become increasingly available, so has the demand for public health situation awareness systems. Although these systems are valuable for early warning of public health emergencies, there remains the cost of developing and managing such large and complex systems and of investigating inevitable false alarms. Whether these systems are dependable and cost effective enough and can demonstrate a significant and indispensable role in detection or prevention of mass casualty events of BT origin remains to be proven. This article will focus on the complexities of design, analysis, implementation and evaluation of public health surveillance and situation awareness systems and, in some cases, will discuss the key technologies being studied in Center for Biosecurity Informatics Research at University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston.

  20. Lost and found in behavioral informatics.

    PubMed

    Haendel, Melissa A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2012-01-01

    From early anatomical lesion studies to the molecular and cellular methods of today, a wealth of technologies have provided increasingly sophisticated strategies for identifying and characterizing the biological basis of behaviors. Bioinformatics is a growing discipline that has emerged from the practical needs of modern biology, and the history of systematics and ontology in data integration and scientific knowledge construction. This revolution in biology has resulted in a capability to couple the rich molecular, anatomical, and psychological assays with advances in data dissemination and integration. However, behavioral science poses unique challenges for biology and medicine, and many unique resources have been developed to take advantage of the strategies and technologies of an informatics approach. The collective developments of this diverse and interdisciplinary field span the fundamentals of database development and data integration, ontology development, text mining, genetics, genomics, high-throughput analytics, image analysis and archiving, and numerous others. For the behavioral sciences, this provides a fundamental shift in our ability to associate and dissociate behavioral processes and relate biological and behavioral entities, thereby pinpointing the biological basis of behavior.

  1. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. Objective: To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Methods: Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Results: Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Conclusion: Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field. PMID:27684621

  2. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics. First Revision.

    PubMed

    Mantas, John; Ammenwerth, Elske; Demiris, George; Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold; Hersh, William; Hovenga, Evelyn; Lun, K C; Marin, Heimar; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Wright, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) agreed on revising the existing international recommendations in health informatics/medical informatics education. These should help to establish courses, course tracks or even complete programs in this field, to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives concerning education in biomedical and health informatics (BMHI), particularly international activities in educating BMHI specialists and the sharing of courseware. Method: An IMIA task force, nominated in 2006, worked on updating the recommendations' first version. These updates have been broadly discussed and refined by members of IMIA's National Member Societies, IMIA's Academic Institutional Members and by members of IMIA's Working Group on Health and Medical Informatics Education. Results and Conclusions: The IMIA recommendations center on educational needs for health care professionals to acquire knowledge and skills in information processing and information and communication technology. The educational needs are described as a three-dimensional framework. The dimensions are: 1) professionals in health care (e.g. physicians, nurses, BMHI professionals), 2) type of specialization in BMHI (IT users, BMHI specialists), and 3) stage of career progression (bachelor, master, doctorate). Learning outcomes are defined in terms of knowledge and practical skills for health care professionals in their role a) as IT user and b) as BMHI specialist. Recommendations are given for courses/course tracks in BMHI as part of educational programs in medicine, nursing, health care management, dentistry, pharmacy, public health, health record administration, and informatics/computer science as well as for dedicated programs in BMHI (with bachelor, master or doctor degree). To support education in BMHI, IMIA offers to award a certificate for high-quality BMHI education. It supports information

  3. Capacity building in e-health and health informatics: a review of the global vision and informatics educational initiatives of the American Medical Informatics Association.

    PubMed

    Detmer, D E

    2010-01-01

    Substantial global and national commitment will be required for current healthcare systems and health professional practices to become learning care systems utilizing information and communications technology (ICT) empowered by informatics. To engage this multifaceted challenge, a vision is required that shifts the emphasis from silos of activities toward integrated systems. Successful systems will include a set of essential elements, e.g., a sufficient ICT infrastructure, evolving health care processes based on evidence and harmonized to local cultures, a fresh view toward educational preparation, sound and sustained policy support, and ongoing applied research and development. Increasingly, leaders are aware that ICT empowered by informatics must be an integral part of their national and regional visions. This paper sketches out the elements of what is needed in terms of objectives and some steps toward achieving them. It summarizes some of the progress that has been made to date by the American and International Medical Informatics Associations working separately as well as collaborating to conceptualize informatics capacity building in order to bring this vision to reality in low resource nations in particular.

  4. Enhancing the application and evaluation of a discrete trial intervention package for eliciting first words in preverbal preschoolers with ASD.

    PubMed

    Tsiouri, Ioanna; Schoen Simmons, Elizabeth; Paul, Rhea

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention package including a discrete trial program (Rapid Motor Imitation Antecedent Training (Tsiouri and Greer, J Behav Educat 12:185-206, 2003) combined with parent education for eliciting first words in children with ASD who had little or no spoken language. Evaluation of the approach includes specific intervention targets and functional spoken language outcomes (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). Results suggest that RMIA, with parent training, catalyzes development of verbal imitation and production for some children. Three of five participants acquired word production within the DTT framework and achieved milestones of early functional spoken language use (Tager-Flusberg et al., J Speech Lang Hear Res 52:643-652, 2009). The implications of these findings for understanding the role of discrete trial approaches to language intervention are discussed. PMID:21918912

  5. Enhancing Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Research Within the National Clinical Trials Network: Rationale, Progress, and Emerging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aaron R; Nichols, Craig R; Freyer, David R

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (AYAO, including patients 15-39 years of age) is an emerging discipline in the field of cancer treatment and research. Poorer survival outcomes for this population and characteristic age-related challenges in care have called attention to the need for increased AYAO research. This chapter outlines pressing questions and reviews recent progress in AYAO research within the current organizational structure of the federal clinical trials enterprise, emphasizing how the United States National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) has created novel opportunities for collaborative AYAO research among the pediatric and adult NCTN groups. Potential strategies for expanding AYAO research, both within the NCTN and with other partners in the federal and advocacy domains are identified. PMID:26433555

  6. The Program SI! intervention for enhancing a healthy lifestyle in preschoolers: first results from a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unhealthy lifestyles contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk factors, whose incidence is increasing among children and adolescents. The Program SI! is a long-term, multi-target behavioral intervention to promote healthy lifestyle habits in children through the school environment. The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of this intervention in its first phase, preschoolers. Methods Cluster-randomized controlled trial in public schools in the city of Madrid, Spain. A total 24 schools, including 2062 children (3–5 years), 1949 families, and 125 teachers participated in the study. Schools were assigned to their usual school curriculum or to engage in an additional multi-component intervention (Program SI!). The primary outcome of this trial is 1-school year changes from baseline in scores for children’s knowledge, attitudes and habits (KAH). Secondary outcomes are 1-school year changes from baseline in scores for knowledge, attitudes, and habits among parents, teachers, and the school environment. Results After 1-school year, our results indicate that the Program SI! intervention increases children’s KAH scores, both overall (3.45, 95% CI, 1.84-5.05) and component-specific (Diet: 0.93, 95% CI, 0.12-1.75; Physical activity: 1.93, 95% CI, 1.17-2.69; Human body: 0.65, 95% CI, 0.07-1.24) score. Conclusions The Program SI! is demonstrated as an effective and feasible strategy for increasing knowledge and improving lifestyle attitudes and habits among very young children. Trial registration NCT01579708, Evaluation of the Program SI! for Preschool Education: A School-Based Randomized Controlled Trial (Preschool-SI!). PMID:24359285

  7. Visibility of medical informatics regarding bibliometric indices and databases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The quantitative study of the publication output (bibliometrics) deeply influences how scientific work is perceived (bibliometric visibility). Recently, new bibliometric indices and databases have been established, which may change the visibility of disciplines, institutions and individuals. This study examines the effects of the new indices on the visibility of Medical Informatics. Methods By objective criteria, three sets of journals are chosen, two representing Medical Informatics and a third addressing Internal Medicine as a benchmark. The availability of index data (index coverage) and the aggregate scores of these corpora are compared for journal-related (Journal impact factor, Eigenfactor metrics, SCImago journal rank) and author-related indices (Hirsch-index, Egghes G-index). Correlation analysis compares the dependence of author-related indices. Results The bibliometric visibility depended on the research focus and the citation database: Scopus covers more journals relevant for Medical Informatics than ISI/Thomson Reuters. Journals focused on Medical Informatics' methodology were negatively affected by the Eigenfactor metrics, while the visibility profited from an interdisciplinary research focus. The correlation between Hirsch-indices computed on citation databases and the Internet was strong. Conclusions The visibility of smaller technology-oriented disciplines like Medical Informatics is changed by the new bibliometric indices and databases possibly leading to suitably changed publication strategies. Freely accessible author-related indices enable an easy and adequate individual assessment. PMID:21496230

  8. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  9. Clinical informatics: a workforce priority for 21st century healthcare.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan E; Drake, Lesley E; Harris, Julie-Gai B; Watson, Kay; Pohlner, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    This paper identifies the contribution of health and clinical informatics in the support of healthcare in the 21st century. Although little is known about the health and clinical informatics workforce, there is widespread recognition that the health informatics workforce will require significant expansion to support national eHealth work agendas. Workforce issues including discipline definition and self-identification, formal professionalisation, weaknesses in training and education, multidisciplinarity and interprofessional tensions, career structure, managerial support, and financial allocation play a critical role in facilitating or hindering the development of a workforce that is capable of realising the benefits to be gained from eHealth in general and clinical informatics in particular. As well as the national coordination of higher level policies, local support of training and allocation of sufficient position hours in appropriately defined roles by executive and clinical managers is essential to develop the health and clinical informatics workforce and achieve the anticipated results from evolving eHealth initiatives. PMID:21612722

  10. Informatics in the care of patients: ten notable challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Altman, R B

    1997-01-01

    What is medical informatics, and why should practicing physicians care about it? Medical informatics is the study of the concepts and conceptual relationships within biomedical information and how they can be harnessed for practical applications. In the past decade, the field has exploded as health professionals recognize the importance of strategic information management and the inadequacies of traditional tools for information storage, retrieval, and analysis. At the same time that medical informatics has established a presence within many academic and industrial research facilities, its goals and methods have become less clear to practicing physicians. In this article, I outline 10 challenges in medical informatics that provide a framework for understanding developments in the field. These challenges have been divided into those relating to infrastructure, specific performance, and evaluation. The primary goals of medical informatics, as for any other branch of biomedical research, are to improve the overall health of patients by combining basic scientific and engineering insights with the useful application of these insights to important problems. PMID:9109328

  11. The integration of informatics content in baccalaureate and graduate nursing education: a status report.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kathleen; McGonigle, Dee; Hebda, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Many experts, professional organizations, landmark reports, and nurse executives have called for a nursing workforce that demonstrates informatics competencies. However, surprisingly, gaps in the integration of informatics into nursing curriculum and development of informatics competencies among nurses remain. To obtain a clearer picture of the current status of the integration of informatics content into baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, the authors discuss their assessment of a 2012 published list of the top online schools of nursing in the United States.

  12. Use of IRIS image-enhancement facilities on digital images by radiologists during a clinical trial at the Ottawa Civic Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coristine, Marjorie; Goldberg, Morris; Beeton, Carolyn; Dillon, Richard F.; Tombaugh, Jo W.; Belanger, Garry; Ahuja, J.

    1990-07-01

    The Integrated Radiological Information System (IRIS) supports the capture and distribution of digitized x-ray images and voice reports in the form of " electronic" patient folders which can be accessed at physician workstations throughout the hospital. Each workstation has an image screen to display documents and x-ray images a control screen to access patient folders and a hands-free telephone to dictate and play back reports and enable consultation between radiologist and clinician workstations. A seven week clinical trial of IRIS was conducted at the Ottawa Civic Hospital during April and May 1989. The system operated to process cases from the Department of Emergency Medicine weekday afternoons. Observers recorded for each case how radiologists used the system. After the trial radiologists participated in an extensive debriefing interview during which they were asked to complete a number of rating scales addressing the following issues: 1) willingness to diagnose by tissue type and by type of pathology 2) seriousness of problems due to system limitations 3) the perceived usefulness of enhancement capabilities and measurement tools. Overall the system was found to be acceptable by the radiologists. There was some concern about diagnosis in soft tissue regions. Most of the system features were regarded as acceptable but there were areas which needed improvement. The suggested improvements are described where applicable. The enhancement facilities and the means of using the facilities were acceptable overall. 426 /

  13. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement versus CBT for co-occurring substance dependence, traumatic stress, and psychiatric disorders: Proximal outcomes from a pragmatic randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia; Tronnier, Christine D; Graves, Rebecca; Kelley, Karen

    2016-02-01

    In many clinical settings, there is a high comorbidity between substance use disorders, psychiatric disorders, and traumatic stress. Novel therapies are needed to address these co-occurring issues efficiently. The aim of the present study was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) to group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) for previously homeless men residing in a therapeutic community. Men with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, as well as extensive trauma histories, were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of group treatment with MORE (n = 64), CBT (n = 64), or TAU (n = 52). Study findings indicated that from pre-to post-treatment MORE was associated with modest yet significantly greater improvements in substance craving, post-traumatic stress, and negative affect than CBT, and greater improvements in post-traumatic stress and positive affect than TAU. A significant indirect effect of MORE on decreasing craving and post-traumatic stress by increasing dispositional mindfulness was observed, suggesting that MORE may target these issues via enhancing mindful awareness in everyday life. This pragmatic trial represents the first head-to-head comparison of MORE against an empirically-supported treatment for co-occurring disorders. Results suggest that MORE, as an integrative therapy designed to bolster self-regulatory capacity, may hold promise as a treatment for intersecting clinical conditions.

  14. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement versus CBT for co-occurring substance dependence, traumatic stress, and psychiatric disorders: Proximal outcomes from a pragmatic randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia; Tronnier, Christine D; Graves, Rebecca; Kelley, Karen

    2016-02-01

    In many clinical settings, there is a high comorbidity between substance use disorders, psychiatric disorders, and traumatic stress. Novel therapies are needed to address these co-occurring issues efficiently. The aim of the present study was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) to group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) for previously homeless men residing in a therapeutic community. Men with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, as well as extensive trauma histories, were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of group treatment with MORE (n = 64), CBT (n = 64), or TAU (n = 52). Study findings indicated that from pre-to post-treatment MORE was associated with modest yet significantly greater improvements in substance craving, post-traumatic stress, and negative affect than CBT, and greater improvements in post-traumatic stress and positive affect than TAU. A significant indirect effect of MORE on decreasing craving and post-traumatic stress by increasing dispositional mindfulness was observed, suggesting that MORE may target these issues via enhancing mindful awareness in everyday life. This pragmatic trial represents the first head-to-head comparison of MORE against an empirically-supported treatment for co-occurring disorders. Results suggest that MORE, as an integrative therapy designed to bolster self-regulatory capacity, may hold promise as a treatment for intersecting clinical conditions. PMID:26701171

  15. Phosphatidylcholine supplementation in pregnant women consuming moderate-choline diets does not enhance infant cognitive function: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial123

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barbara Davis; Fischer, Leslie M; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Reznick, J Steven; Zeisel, Steven H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Choline is essential for fetal brain development, and it is not known whether a typical American diet contains enough choline to ensure optimal brain development. Objective: The study was undertaken to determine whether supplementing pregnant women with phosphatidylcholine (the main dietary source of choline) improves the cognitive abilities of their offspring. Design: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 140 pregnant women were randomly assigned to receive supplemental phosphatidylcholine (750 mg) or a placebo (corn oil) from 18 wk gestation through 90 d postpartum. Their infants (n = 99) were tested for short-term visuospatial memory, long-term episodic memory, language development, and global development at 10 and 12 mo of age. Results: The women studied ate diets that delivered ∼360 mg choline/d in foods (∼80% of the recommended intake for pregnant women, 65% of the recommended intake for lactating women). The phosphatidylcholine supplements were well tolerated. Groups did not differ significantly in global development, language development, short-term visuospatial memory, or long-term episodic memory. Conclusions: Phosphatidylcholine supplementation of pregnant women eating diets containing moderate amounts of choline did not enhance their infants’ brain function. It is possible that a longer follow-up period would reveal late-emerging effects. Moreover, future studies should determine whether supplementing mothers eating diets much lower in choline content, such as those consumed in several low-income countries, would enhance infant brain development. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00678925. PMID:23134891

  16. Design of the Value of Imaging in Enhancing the Wellness of Your Heart (VIEW) Trial and the Impact of Uncertainty on Power

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosius, Walter T.; Polonsky, Tamar S.; Greenland, Philip; Goff, David C.; Perdue, Letitia H.; Fortmann, Stephen P.; Margolis, Karen L.; Pajewski, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although observational evidence has suggested that the measurement of CAC may improve risk stratification for cardiovascular events and thus help guide the use of lipid-lowering therapy, this contention has not been evaluated within the context of a randomized trial. The Value of Imaging in Enhancing the Wellness of Your Heart (VIEW) trial is proposed as a randomized study in participants at low intermediate risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD) events to evaluate whether coronary artery calcium (CAC) testing leads to improved patient outcomes. Purpose To describe the challenges encountered in designing a prototypical screening trial and to examine the impact of uncertainty on power. Methods The VIEW trial was designed as an effectiveness clinical trial to examine the benefit of CAC testing to guide therapy on a primary outcome consisting of a composite of non-fatal myocardial infarction, probable or definite angina with revascularization, resuscitated cardiac arrest, non-fatal stroke (not transient ischemic attack (TIA)), CHD death, stroke death, other atherosclerotic death, or other cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Many critical choices were faced in designing the trial, including: (1) the choice of primary outcome, (2) the choice of therapy, (3) the target population with corresponding ethical issues, (4) specifications of assumptions for sample size calculations, and (5) impact of uncertainty in these assumptions on power/sample size determination. Results We have proposed a sample size of 30,000 (800 events) which provides 92.7% power. Alternatively, sample sizes of 20,228 (539 events), 23,138 (617 events) and 27,078 (722 events) provide 80, 85, and 90% power. We have also allowed for uncertainty in our assumptions by computing average power integrated over specified prior distributions. This relaxation of specificity indicates a reduction in power, dropping to 89.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 89.8 to 89.9) for a sample size of 30

  17. Programmatic Role of Education Libraries in Informatics to Support Preservice Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: The management, processing, and transformation of information constitute central tasks in education. Education informatics intersects the theories and practices of both informatics and education. In particular, informatics aids in the systematic incorporation of technology as educational stakeholders represent, process, and…

  18. An Analysis of Educational Informatization Level of Students, Teachers, and Parents: In Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JaMee; Lee, WonGyu

    2011-01-01

    Korea is recognized as one of the most advanced countries in terms of informatization. The development of informatization has impacted education, and education informatization has contributed to the improvement of teaching in the classroom. Accordingly, education informatiozation is one of the paramount pedagogical issues in South Korea. This…

  19. 77 FR 38294 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Medical Informatics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Cause for Medical Informatics AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: AHRQ has delisted Medical Informatics as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO...(a)(3)(iii)(C) which found that Medical Informatics failed to have, within every 24-month...

  20. Interpreting concept learning in cognitive informatics and granular computing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiyu

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive informatics and granular computing are two emerging fields of study concerning information and knowledge processing. A central notion to this processing is information and knowledge granularity. Concepts, as the basic units of thought underlying human intelligence and communication, may play a fundamental role when integrating the results from the two fields in terms of information and knowledge coding, representation, communication, and processing. While cognitive informatics focuses on information processing in the abstract, in machines, and in the brain, granular computing models such processing at multiple levels of granularity. In this paper, we examine a conceptual framework for concept learning from the viewpoints of cognitive informatics and granular computing. Within the framework, we interpret concept learning based on a layered model of knowledge discovery.

  1. The Question Concerning Narration of Self in Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Botin, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Narration is central, even crucial, when it comes to embracing the whole individual, continuity of care, and responsible (ethical) handling of the technological construction of the self that takes place in health informatics. This paper will deal with the role of narratives in the construction of health informatics platforms and how different voices should have space for speech on these platforms. Theoretically the paper takes an outset in the actant model for narratives by the French-Lithuanian theorist of linguistics and literature A.-J. Greimas and post-phenomenological readings of human-technology interactions. The main assumption is that certain interactions and voices are absent from the construction of health informatics platforms, because regarded as outside the text of computational and medical practice and expertise. This has implications for what concerns meaning and understanding regarding both the actual users (physicians and medical staff) and excluded users (patients and citizens). PMID:26262544

  2. The informatics imperative in veterinary medicine: collaboration across disciplines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Layne M; Ames, Trevor R; Jacko, Julie A; Watson, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    Information and data management are essential to support the collaborative and interdisciplinary pursuits of an academic veterinary medicine enterprise, ranging from research conducted by individual investigators, education processes, clinical care, and outreach to administration and management. Informatics is an academic discipline that focuses on the creation, management, storage, retrieval, and use of information and data and how technology can be applied to improve access to and use of these resources. In this article, we discuss the challenges in integrating informatics across a large academic enterprise from a veterinary medicine point of view. As a case study, we describe an example program of informatics at the University of Minnesota designed to support interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:21805929

  3. Enhancing Patient-Provider Communication With the Electronic Self-Report Assessment for Cancer: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donna L.; Blumenstein, Brent A.; Halpenny, Barbara; Wolpin, Seth; Fann, Jesse R.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Bush, Nigel; Karras, Bryant T.; Lober, William B.; McCorkle, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported cancer symptoms and quality-of-life issues (SQLIs) have been promoted as essential to a comprehensive assessment, efficient and efficacious methods have not been widely tested in clinical settings. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of the Electronic Self-Report Assessment–Cancer (ESRA-C) on the likelihood of SQLIs discussed between clinicians and patients with cancer in ambulatory clinic visits. Secondary objectives included comparison of visit duration between groups and usefulness of the ESRA-C as reported by clinicians. Patients and Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 660 patients with various cancer diagnoses and stages at two institutions of a comprehensive cancer center. Patient-reported SQLIs were automatically displayed on a graphical summary and provided to the clinical team before an on-treatment visit (n = 327); in the control group, no summary was provided (n = 333). SQLIs were scored for level of severity or distress. One on-treatment clinic visit was audio recorded for each participant and then scored for discussion of each SQLI. We hypothesized that problematic SQLIs would be discussed more often when the intervention was delivered to the clinicians. Results The likelihood of SQLIs being discussed differed by randomized group and depended on whether an SQLI was first reported as problematic (P = .032). Clinic visits were similar with regard to duration between groups, and clinicians reported the summary as useful. Conclusion The ESRA-C is the first electronic self-report application to increase discussion of SQLIs in a US randomized clinical trial. PMID:21282548

  4. Enhanced implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines may improve treatment quality, but the uptake of guideline recommendations is often incomplete and slow. Recently new low back pain guidelines are being launched in Denmark. The guidelines are considered to reduce personal and public costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether a complex, multifaceted implementation strategy of the low back pain guidelines will reduce secondary care referral and improve patient outcomes compared to the usual simple implementation strategy. Methods/design In a two-armed cluster randomised trial, 100 general practices (clusters) and 2,700 patients aged 18 to 65 years from the North Denmark region will be included. Practices are randomly allocated 1:1 to a simple or a complex implementation strategy. Intervention practices will receive a complex implementation strategy, including guideline facilitator visits, stratification tools, and quality reports on low back pain treatment. Primary outcome is referral to secondary care. Secondary outcomes are pain, physical function, health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction with care and treatment outcome, employment status, and sick leave. Primary and secondary outcomes pertain to the patient level. Assessments of outcomes are blinded and follow the intention-to-treat principle. Additionally, a process assessment will evaluate the degree to which the intervention elements will be delivered as planned, as well as measure changes in beliefs and behaviours among general practitioners and patients. Discussion This study provides knowledge concerning the process and effect of an intervention to implement low back pain guidelines in general practice, and will provide insight on essential elements to include in future implementation strategies in general practice. Trial registration Registered as NCT01699256 on ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:24139140

  5. From classification to epilepsy ontology and informatics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D

    2012-07-01

    The 2010 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminology commission report proposed a much needed departure from previous classifications to incorporate advances in molecular biology, neuroimaging, and genetics. It proposed an interim classification and defined two key requirements that need to be satisfied. The first is the ability to classify epilepsy in dimensions according to a variety of purposes including clinical research, patient care, and drug discovery. The second is the ability of the classification system to evolve with new discoveries. Multidimensionality and flexibility are crucial to the success of any future classification. In addition, a successful classification system must play a central role in the rapidly growing field of epilepsy informatics. An epilepsy ontology, based on classification, will allow information systems to facilitate data-intensive studies and provide a proven route to meeting the two foregoing key requirements. Epilepsy ontology will be a structured terminology system that accommodates proposed and evolving ILAE classifications, the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NIH/NINDS) Common Data Elements, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) systems and explicitly specifies all known relationships between epilepsy concepts in a proper framework. This will aid evidence-based epilepsy diagnosis, investigation, treatment and research for a diverse community of clinicians and researchers. Benefits range from systematization of electronic patient records to multimodal data repositories for research and training manuals for those involved in epilepsy care. Given the complexity, heterogeneity, and pace of research advances in the epilepsy domain, such an ontology must be collaboratively developed by key stakeholders in the epilepsy community and experts in knowledge engineering and computer science. PMID:22765502

  6. Mapping the Materials Genome through Combinatorial Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Krishna

    2012-02-01

    The recently announced White House Materials Genome Initiative provides an exciting challenge to the materials science community. To meet that challenge one needs to address a critical question, namely what is the materials genome? Some guide on how to the answer this question can be gained by recognizing that a ``gene'' is a carrier of information. In the biological sciences, discovering how to manipulate these genes has generated exciting discoveries in fundamental molecular biology as well as significant advances in biotechnology. Scaling that up to molecular, cellular length scales and beyond, has spawned from genomics, fields such as proteomics, metabolomics and essentially systems biology. The ``omics'' approach requires that one needs to discover and track these ``carriers of information'' and then correlate that information to predict behavior. A similar challenge lies in materials science, where there is a diverse array of modalities of materials ``discovery'' ranging from new materials chemistries and molecular arrangements with novel properties, to the development and design of new micro- and mesoscale structures. Hence to meaningfully adapt the spirit of ``genomics'' style research in materials science, we need to first identify and map the ``genes'' across different materials science applications On the experimental side, combinatorial experiments have opened a new approach to generate data in a high throughput manner, but without a clear way to link that to models, the full value of that data is not realized. Hence along with experimental and computational materials science, we need to add a ``third leg'' to our toolkit to make the ``Materials Genome'' a reality, the science of Materials Informatics. In this presentation we provide an overview of how information science coupled to materials science can in fact achieve the goal of mapping the ``Materials Genome''.

  7. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) informatics platform

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Gerry; McKenna, Kevin; Mays, Vickie; Carpenter, Alan; Miller, Kevin; Williams, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative network of 27 epilepsy centers throughout the U.S., Australia, and Argentina, with the objective of collecting detailed phenotypic and genetic data on a large number of epilepsy participants. The goals of EPGP are (1) to perform detailed phenotyping on 3750 participants with specific forms of non-acquired epilepsy and 1500 parents without epilepsy, (2) to obtain DNA samples on these individuals, and (3) to ultimately genotype the samples in order to discover novel genes that cause epilepsy. To carry out the project, a reliable and robust informatics platform was needed for standardized electronic data collection and storage, data quality review, and phenotypic analysis involving cases from multiple sites. Methods EPGP developed its own suite of web-based informatics applications for participant tracking, electronic data collection (using electronic case report forms/surveys), data management, phenotypic data review and validation, specimen tracking, electroencephalograph and neuroimaging storage, and issue tracking. We implemented procedures to train and support end-users at each clinical site. Results Thus far, 3780 study participants have been enrolled and 20,957 web-based study activities have been completed using this informatics platform. Over 95% of respondents to an end-user satisfaction survey felt that the informatics platform was successful almost always or most of the time. Conclusions The EPGP informatics platform has successfully and effectively allowed study management and efficient and reliable collection of phenotypic data. Our novel informatics platform met the requirements of a large, multicenter research project. The platform has had a high level of end-user acceptance by principal investigators and study coordinators, and can serve as a model for new tools to support future large scale, collaborative research projects collecting extensive

  8. Emotional and uncontrolled eating styles and chocolate chip cookie consumption. A controlled trial of the effects of positive mood enhancement.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sally Ann; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Warner, Lisa; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The study tested the effects of positive mood enhancement on chocolate chip cookie consumption in the context of emotional and uncontrolled eating styles. The relationship between emotional eating style and chocolate chip cookie intake was assumed to be mediated by uncontrolled eating style. Further, it was hypothesized that the effectiveness of the positive mood enhancement may be more salient among those who have effective control of their eating. In this experimental study, respondents (N=106, 70% women, aged 16-45 years old) were assigned by means of cluster randomization to the control or positive mood enhancement condition (a comedy movie clip). Compared to the control condition, positive mood enhancement resulted in consuming on average 53.86 kcal less. Relationships between emotional eating style and cookie intake were mediated by uncontrolled eating. Moderated mediation analysis indicated that the effect of a mediator (uncontrolled eating) on cookie intake was moderated by the group assignment. Positive mood enhancement resulted in eating on average 3.3 cookies less among individuals with a more controlled eating style. By contrast, among those who presented uncontrolled eating, positive mood enhancement led to consuming an average of 1.7 cookies more.

  9. Healthcare Informatics Schemata: A Paradigm Shift over Time.

    PubMed

    Erdley, W Scott

    2016-01-01

    The schemata "A paradigm shift over time©" (Sackett & Erdley, 2006) a graphic model, visualizes development and progression of informatics in health over time. The model portrays information technology trends, from computers as resource through computational ubiquity, and the shift to social networking and e-Health. The discrepancy between "real" and "proposed" suggests gaps involving issues such as value, interoperability and ontology requiring attention, development and ultimately adoption, hinging on a universal standards framework. The workshop objective is to review previous and current models of healthcare informatics to springboard revisions of the schemata for current and future use. PMID:27332341

  10. Theoretical Foundations for Evidence-Based Health Informatics: Why? How?

    PubMed

    Scott, Philip J; Georgiou, Andrew; Hyppönen, Hannele; Craven, Catherine K; Rigby, Michael; Brender McNair, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    A scientific approach to health informatics requires sound theoretical foundations. Health informatics implementation would be more effective if evidence-based and guided by theories about what is likely to work in what circumstances. We report on a Medinfo 2015 workshop on this topic jointly organized by the EFMI Working Group on Assessment of Health Information Systems and the IMIA Working Group on Technology Assessment and Quality Development. We discuss the findings of the workshop and propose an approach to consolidate empirical knowledge into testable middle-range theories. PMID:27577457

  11. Geo-spatial Informatics in International Public Health Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Madeleine J; Honey, Michelle L L; Krzyzanowski, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes results of an undergraduate nursing informatics experience. Students applied geo-spatial methods to community assessments in two urban regions of New Zealand and the United States. Students used the Omaha System standardized language to code their observations during a brief community assessment activity and entered their data into a mapping program developed in Esri ArcGIS Online, a geographic information system. Results will be displayed in tables and maps to allow comparison among the communities. The next generation of nurses can employ geo-spatial informatics methods to contribute to innovative community assessment, planning and policy development.

  12. Geo-spatial Informatics in International Public Health Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Madeleine J; Honey, Michelle L L; Krzyzanowski, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes results of an undergraduate nursing informatics experience. Students applied geo-spatial methods to community assessments in two urban regions of New Zealand and the United States. Students used the Omaha System standardized language to code their observations during a brief community assessment activity and entered their data into a mapping program developed in Esri ArcGIS Online, a geographic information system. Results will be displayed in tables and maps to allow comparison among the communities. The next generation of nurses can employ geo-spatial informatics methods to contribute to innovative community assessment, planning and policy development. PMID:27332443

  13. About the Beginnings of Medical Informatics in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Roger France, Francis

    2014-01-01

    The term “Informatics” was created in 1962 from two words, information and automatic, and covers all techniques, information concepts and applications of computers. Among them, medicine is the field where we will describe some factors of development in Europe since the late sixties. It took some time for obtaining the acceptance of this new terminology worldwide, but today medical informatics is a well defined discipline which had a tremendous development last decades. This paper tries to recall the context and events from the beginning of medical informatics in Europe. PMID:24648614

  14. MEAL-BASED ENHANCEMENT OF PROTEIN QUALITY AND QUANTITY DURING WEIGHT LOSS IN OBESE OLDER ADULTS WITH MOBILITY LIMITATIONS: RATIONALE AND DESIGN FOR THE MEASUR-UP TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Shelley R.; Starr, Kathryn N. Porter; Mauceri, Luisa; Orenduff, Melissa; Granville, Esther; Ocampo, Christine; Payne, Martha E.; Pieper, Carl F.; Bales, Connie W.

    2015-01-01

    Obese older adults with even modest functional limitations are at a disadvantage for maintaining their independence into late life. However, there is no established intervention for obesity in older individuals. The Measuring Eating, Activity and Strength: Understanding the Response --Using Protein (MEASUR-UP) trial is a randomized controlled pilot study of obese women and men aged ≥60 years with mild to moderate functional impairments. Changes in body composition (lean and fat mass) and function (Short Physical Performance Battery) in an enhanced protein weight reduction (Protein) arm will be compared to those in a traditional weight loss (Control) arm. The Protein intervention is based on evidence that older adults achieve optimal rates of muscle protein synthesis when consuming about 25-30 grams of high quality protein per meal; these participants will consume −30 g of animal protein at each meal via a combination of provided protein (beef) servings and diet counseling. This trial will provide information on the feasibility and efficacy of enhancing protein quantity and quality in the context of a weight reduction regimen and determine the impact of this intervention on body weight, functional status, and lean muscle mass. We hypothesize that the enhancement of protein quantity and quality in the Protein arm will result in better outcomes for function and/or lean muscle mass than in the Control arm. Ultimately, we hope our findings will help identify a safe weight loss approach that can delay or prevent late life disability by changing the trajectory of age-associated functional impairment associated with obesity. PMID:25461495

  15. Meal-based enhancement of protein quality and quantity during weight loss in obese older adults with mobility limitations: rationale and design for the MEASUR-UP trial.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Shelley R; Porter Starr, Kathryn N; Mauceri, Luisa; Orenduff, Melissa; Granville, Esther; Ocampo, Christine; Payne, Martha E; Pieper, Carl F; Bales, Connie W

    2015-01-01

    Obese older adults with even modest functional limitations are at a disadvantage for maintaining their independence into late life. However, there is no established intervention for obesity in older individuals. The Measuring Eating, Activity, and Strength: Understanding the Response - Using Protein (MEASUR-UP) trial is a randomized controlled pilot study of obese women and men aged ≥60 years with mild to moderate functional impairments. Changes in body composition (lean and fat mass) and function (Short Physical Performance Battery) in an enhanced protein weight reduction (Protein) arm will be compared to those in a traditional weight loss (Control) arm. The Protein intervention is based on evidence that older adults achieve optimal rates of muscle protein synthesis when consuming about 25-30 g of high quality protein per meal; these participants will consume ~30 g of animal protein at each meal via a combination of provided protein (beef) servings and diet counseling. This trial will provide information on the feasibility and efficacy of enhancing protein quantity and quality in the context of a weight reduction regimen and determine the impact of this intervention on body weight, functional status, and lean muscle mass. We hypothesize that the enhancement of protein quantity and quality in the Protein arm will result in better outcomes for function and/or lean muscle mass than in the Control arm. Ultimately, we hope our findings will help identify a safe weight loss approach that can delay or prevent late life disability by changing the trajectory of age-associated functional impairment associated with obesity. PMID:25461495

  16. Development and evaluation of an enhanced diabetes prevention program with psychosocial support for urban American Indians and Alaska natives: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Lisa G; Vasquez, Jan J; Naderi, Ramin; Jeffery, Nicole; Hedlin, Haley; Qin, FeiFei; LaFromboise, Teresa; Megginson, Nancy; Pasqua, Craig; Flores, Orena; McClinton-Brown, Rhonda; Evans, Jill; Stafford, Randall S

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is highly prevalent, affecting over 25 million adults in the US, yet it can be effectively prevented through lifestyle interventions, including the well-tested Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) adults, the majority of whom live in urban settings, are more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, prevalent mental health issues and psychosocial stressors may facilitate progression to diabetes and hinder successful implementation of lifestyle interventions for AIAN adults. This 2-phased study first engaged community stakeholders to develop culturally-tailored strategies to address mental health concerns and psychosocial stressors. Pilot testing (completed) refined those strategies that increase engagement in an enhanced DPP for urban AIAN adults. Second, the enhanced DPP will be compared to a standard DPP in a randomized controlled trial (ongoing) with a primary outcome of body mass index (BMI) and a secondary outcome of quality of life (QoL) over 12months. Obese self-identified AIAN adults residing in an urban setting with one or more components of the metabolic syndrome (excluding waist circumference) will be randomized to the enhanced or standard DPP (n=204). We hypothesize that addressing psychosocial barriers within a culturally-tailored DPP will result in clinical (BMI) and superior patient-centered (QoL) outcomes as compared to a standard DPP. Exploratory outcomes will include cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g., waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose) and health behaviors (e.g., diet, physical activity). Results of this trial may be applicable to other urban AIAN or minority communities or even diabetes prevention in general.

  17. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus the health-enhancement program (HEP) for adults with treatment-resistant depression: a randomized control trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability in the developed world, yet broadly effective treatments remain elusive. Up to 40% of patients with depression are unresponsive to at least two trials of antidepressant medication and thus have “treatment-resistant depression” (TRD). There is an urgent need for cost-effective, non-pharmacologic, evidence-based treatments for TRD. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is an effective treatment for relapse prevention and residual depression in major depression, but has not been previously studied in patients with TRD in a large randomized trial. Methods/Design The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MBCT is an effective augmentation of antidepressants for adults with MDD who failed to respond to standard pharmacotherapy. MBCT was compared to an active control condition, the Health-Enhancement Program (HEP), which incorporates physical activity, functional movement, music therapy and nutritional advice. HEP was designed as a comparator condition for mindfulness-based interventions to control for non-specific effects. Originally investigated in a non-clinical sample to promote stress reduction, HEP was adapted for a depressed population for this study. Individuals age 18 and older with moderate to severe TRD, who failed to respond to at least two trials of antidepressants in the current episode, were recruited to participate. All participants were taking antidepressants (Treatment as usual; TAU) at the time of enrollment. After signing an informed consent, participants were randomly assigned to either MBCT or HEP condition. Participants were followed for 1 year and assessed at weeks 1–7, 8, 24, 36, and 52. Change in depression severity, rate of treatment response and remission after 8 weeks were the primary outcomes measured by the clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Severity Rating (HAM-D) 17-item scale. The participant-rated Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomology

  18. Nursing Informatics Pioneers Continue to Influence the Profession: A Sustainable Impact.

    PubMed

    Newbold, Susan K; Brixey, Juliana J

    2016-01-01

    The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) established the Nursing Informatics History Project to recognize the pioneers of nursing informatics. Fundamental to the pioneers was dissemination of knowledge. The purpose of this review was to identify contributions to the field of nursing informatics as peer-reviewed manuscripts for the years 2010-2015 and indexed in PubMed. Results indicate that many of the pioneers continue to have manuscripts indexed in PubMed. It is anticipated this project will be extended to identify other types of contributions made by the pioneers in the advancement of nursing informatics.

  19. Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions

    PubMed Central

    King, Samuel B.; Lapidus, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to “Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics,” a 2004 survey of informatics programs. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Results: Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Conclusions: Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Implications: Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself. PMID:25552939

  20. Enhanced disease surveillance through private health care sector cooperation in Karachi, Pakistan: experience from a vaccine trial.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Imran; Sahito, Shah Muhammad; Khan, Mohammad Javed; Wassan, Shafi Mohammad; Shaikh, Abdul Wahab; Maheshwari, Ashok Kumar; Acosta, Camilo J.; Galindo, Claudia M.; Ochiai, Rion Leon; Rasool, Shahid; Peerwani, Sheeraz; Puri, Mahesh K.; Ali, Mohammad; Zafar, Afia; Hassan, Rumina; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Clemens, John D.; Nizami, Shaikh Qamaruddin; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In research projects such as vaccine trials, accurate and complete surveillance of all outcomes of interest is critical. In less developed countries where the private sector is the major health-care provider, the private sector must be included in surveillance systems in order to capture all disease of interest. This, however, poses enormous challenges in practice. The process and outcome of recruiting private practice clinics for surveillance in a vaccine trial are described. METHODS: The project started in January 2002 in two urban squatter settlements of Karachi, Pakistan. At the suggestion of private practitioners, a phlebotomy team was formed to provide support for disease surveillance. Children who had a reported history of fever for more than three days were enrolled for a diagnosis. RESULTS: Between May 2003 and April 2004, 5540 children younger than 16 years with fever for three days or more were enrolled in the study. Of the children, 1312 (24%) were seen first by private practitioners; the remainder presented directly to study centres. In total, 5329 blood samples were obtained for microbiology. The annual incidence of Salmonella typhi diagnosed by blood culture was 407 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 368-448) per 100 000/year and for Salmonella paratyphi A was 198 (95% CI, 171-227) per 100 000/year. Without the contribution of private practitioners, the rates would have been 240 per 100 000/year (95% CI, 211-271) for S. typhi and 114 (95% CI, 94-136) per 100 000/year for S. paratyphi A. CONCLUSION: The private sector plays a major health-care role in Pakistan. Our experience from a surveillance and burden estimation study in Pakistan indicates that this objective is possible to achieve but requires considerable effort and confidence building. Nonetheless, it is essential to include private health care providers when attempting to accurately estimate the burden of disease in such settings. PMID:16501718

  1. A randomized exploratory trial of an α-7 nicotinic receptor agonist (TC-5619) for cognitive enhancement in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Dunbar, Geoffrey; Segreti, Anthony C; Girgis, Ragy R; Seoane, Frances; Beaver, Jessica S; Duan, Naihua; Hosford, David A

    2013-05-01

    This exploratory trial was conducted to test the effects of an alpha7 nicotinic receptor partial agonist, TC-5619, on cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms in subjects with schizophrenia. In the United States and India, 185 outpatients (18-60 years; male 69%; 46% tobacco users) with schizophrenia treated with quetiapine or risperidone monotherapy were randomized to 12 weeks of placebo (n=91) or TC-5619 (n=94; orally once daily 1 mg day 1 to week 4, 5 mg week 4 to 8, and 25 mg week 8 to 12). The primary efficacy outcome measure was the Groton Maze Learning Task (GMLT; executive function) of the CogState Schizophrenia Battery (CSB). Secondary outcome measures included: CSB composite score; Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS); Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-I); CGI-severity (CGI-S); and Subject Global Impression-Cognition. GMLT statistically favored TC-5619 (P=0.036) in this exploratory trial. SANS also statistically favored TC-5619 (P=0.030). No other secondary outcome measure demonstrated a drug effect in the total population; there was a statistically significant drug effect on working memory in tobacco users. The results were typically stronger in favor of TC-5619 in tobacco users and occasionally better in the United States than in India. TC-5619 was generally well tolerated with no clinically noteworthy safety findings. These results support the potential benefits of TC-5619 and alpha7 nicotinic receptor partial agonists for cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

  2. Family-Based Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Enhancing Physical Activity and Motor Competence in 4–7-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Arto; Pesola, Arto Juhani; Heikkinen, Risto; Sääkslahti, Arja Kaarina; Finni, Taija

    2015-01-01

    Little is known of how to involve families in physical activity (PA) interventions for children. In this cluster randomized controlled trial, we recruited families with four- to seven-year-old children to participate in a year-long study where parents in the intervention group families (n = 46) received tailored counseling to increase children’s PA. Structured PA was not served. Control group families (n = 45) did not receive any counseling. PA in all children (n = 91; mean age 6.16 ± 1.13 years at the baseline) was measured by accelerometers at the baseline and after three, six, nine and 12 months. Motor competence (MC) (n = 89) was measured at the baseline and after six and 12 months by a KTK (KörperkoordinationsTest für Kinder) and throwing and catching a ball (TCB) protocols. The effect of parental counseling on study outcomes was analyzed by a linear mixed-effects model fit by REML and by a Mann-Whitney U test in the case of the TCB. As season was hypothesized to affect counseling effect, an interaction of season on the study outcomes was examined. The results show significant decrease of MVPA in the intervention group when compared to the control group (p < .05). The TCB showed a nearly significant improvement at six months in the intervention group compared to the controls (p = .051), but not at 12 months. The intervention group had a steadier development of the KTK when the interaction of season was taken into account. In conclusion, more knowledge of family constructs associating with the effectiveness of counseling is needed for understanding how to enhance PA in children by parents. However, a hypothesis may be put forward that family-based counseling during an inactive season rather than an active season may provide a more lasting effect on the development of KTK in children. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN28668090 PMID:26502183

  3. Behavioral Informatics and Computational Modeling in Support of Proactive Health Management and Care.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B; Korhonen, Ilkka; Gordon, Christine M; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-12-01

    Health-related behaviors are among the most significant determinants of health and quality of life. Improving health behavior is an effective way to enhance health outcomes and mitigate the escalating challenges arising from an increasingly aging population and the proliferation of chronic diseases. Although it has been difficult to obtain lasting improvements in health behaviors on a wide scale, advances at the intersection of technology and behavioral science may provide the tools to address this challenge. In this paper, we describe a vision and an approach to improve health behavior interventions using the tools of behavioral informatics, an emerging transdisciplinary research domain based on system-theoretic principles in combination with behavioral science and information technology. The field of behavioral informatics has the potential to optimize interventions through monitoring, assessing, and modeling behavior in support of providing tailored and timely interventions. We describe the components of a closed-loop system for health interventions. These components range from fine grain sensor characterizations to individual-based models of behavior change. We provide an example of a research health coaching platform that incorporates a closed-loop intervention based on these multiscale models. Using this early prototype, we illustrate how the optimized and personalized methodology and technology can support self-management and remote care. We note that despite the existing examples of research projects and our platform, significant future research is required to convert this vision to full-scale implementations.

  4. Ten years of international collaboration in biomedical informatics and beyond: the AMAUTA program in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne; Garcia, Patricia J; Holmes, King K; Kimball, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    Well-trained people are urgently needed to tackle global health challenges through information and communication technologies. In this report, AMAUTA, a joint international collaborative training program between the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia and the University of Washington, which has been training Peruvian health professionals in biomedical and health informatics since 1999, is described. Four short-term courses have been organized in Lima, offering training to more than 200 graduate-level students. Long-term training to masters or doctorate level has been undertaken by eight students at the University of Washington. A combination of short-term and long-term strategies was found to be effective for enhancing institutional research and training enterprise. The AMAUTA program promoted the development and institution of informatics research and training capacity in Peru, and has resulted in a group of trained people playing important roles at universities, non-government offices, and the Ministry of Health in Peru. At present, the hub is being extended into Latin American countries, promoting South-to-South collaborations. PMID:20595317

  5. Behavioral Informatics and Computational Modeling in Support of Proactive Health Management and Care

    PubMed Central

    Jimison, Holly B.; Korhonen, Ilkka; Gordon, Christine M.; Saranummi, Niilo

    2016-01-01

    Health-related behaviors are among the most significant determinants of health and quality of life. Improving health behavior is an effective way to enhance health outcomes and mitigate the escalating challenges arising from an increasingly aging population and the proliferation of chronic diseases. Although it has been difficult to obtain lasting improvements in health behaviors on a wide scale, advances at the intersection of technology and behavioral science may provide the tools to address this challenge. In this paper, we describe a vision and an approach to improve health behavior interventions using the tools of behavioral informatics, an emerging transdisciplinary research domain based on system-theoretic principles in combination with behavioral science and information technology. The field of behavioral informatics has the potential to optimize interventions through monitoring, assessing, and modeling behavior in support of providing tailored and timely interventions. We describe the components of a closed-loop system for health interventions. These components range from fine grain sensor characterizations to individual-based models of behavior change. We provide an example of a research health coaching platform that incorporates a closed-loop intervention based on these multiscale models. Using this early prototype, we illustrate how the optimized and personalized methodology and technology can support self-management and remote care. We note that despite the existing examples of research projects and our platform, significant future research is required to convert this vision to full-scale implementations. PMID:26441408

  6. Learning from colleagues about healthcare IT implementation and optimization: lessons from a medical informatics listserv.

    PubMed

    Adams, Martha B; Kaplan, Bonnie; Sobko, Heather J; Kuziemsky, Craig; Ravvaz, Kourosh; Koppel, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Communication among medical informatics communities can suffer from fragmentation across multiple forums, disciplines, and subdisciplines; variation among journals, vocabularies and ontologies; cost and distance. Online communities help overcome these obstacles, but may become onerous when listservs are flooded with cross-postings. Rich and relevant content may be ignored. The American Medical Informatics Association successfully addressed these problems when it created a virtual meeting place by merging the membership of four working groups into a single listserv known as the "Implementation and Optimization Forum." A communication explosion ensued, with thousands of interchanges, hundreds of topics, commentaries from "notables," neophytes, and students--many from different disciplines, countries, traditions. We discuss the listserv's creation, illustrate its benefits, and examine its lessons for others. We use examples from the lively, creative, deep, and occasionally conflicting discussions of user experiences--interchanges about medication reconciliation, open source strategies, nursing, ethics, system integration, and patient photos in the EMR--all enhancing knowledge, collegiality, and collaboration. PMID:25486893

  7. Behavioral Informatics and Computational Modeling in Support of Proactive Health Management and Care.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B; Korhonen, Ilkka; Gordon, Christine M; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-12-01

    Health-related behaviors are among the most significant determinants of health and quality of life. Improving health behavior is an effective way to enhance health outcomes and mitigate the escalating challenges arising from an increasingly aging population and the proliferation of chronic diseases. Although it has been difficult to obtain lasting improvements in health behaviors on a wide scale, advances at the intersection of technology and behavioral science may provide the tools to address this challenge. In this paper, we describe a vision and an approach to improve health behavior interventions using the tools of behavioral informatics, an emerging transdisciplinary research domain based on system-theoretic principles in combination with behavioral science and information technology. The field of behavioral informatics has the potential to optimize interventions through monitoring, assessing, and modeling behavior in support of providing tailored and timely interventions. We describe the components of a closed-loop system for health interventions. These components range from fine grain sensor characterizations to individual-based models of behavior change. We provide an example of a research health coaching platform that incorporates a closed-loop intervention based on these multiscale models. Using this early prototype, we illustrate how the optimized and personalized methodology and technology can support self-management and remote care. We note that despite the existing examples of research projects and our platform, significant future research is required to convert this vision to full-scale implementations. PMID:26441408

  8. Ten years of international collaboration in biomedical informatics and beyond: the AMAUTA program in Peru.

    PubMed

    Curioso, Walter H; Fuller, Sherrilynne; Garcia, Patricia J; Holmes, King K; Kimball, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    Well-trained people are urgently needed to tackle global health challenges through information and communication technologies. In this report, AMAUTA, a joint international collaborative training program between the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia and the University of Washington, which has been training Peruvian health professionals in biomedical and health informatics since 1999, is described. Four short-term courses have been organized in Lima, offering training to more than 200 graduate-level students. Long-term training to masters or doctorate level has been undertaken by eight students at the University of Washington. A combination of short-term and long-term strategies was found to be effective for enhancing institutional research and training enterprise. The AMAUTA program promoted the development and institution of informatics research and training capacity in Peru, and has resulted in a group of trained people playing important roles at universities, non-government offices, and the Ministry of Health in Peru. At present, the hub is being extended into Latin American countries, promoting South-to-South collaborations. PMID:20595317

  9. Enhancing Educators' Skills for Promoting Critical Thinking in Their Classroom Discourses: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gul, Raisa B.; Khan, Shehla; Ahmed, Azra; Cassum, Shanaz; Saeed, Tanveer; Parpio, Yasmin; Schopflocher, Donald; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The literature reveals that educators find it challenging to foster critical thinking (CT) in their students if they have not learned how to use CT in their educational system or training. This paper reports findings from a national research project that was undertaken to enhance the educators' ability to promote CT in their teaching…

  10. An Exploratory Trial of the Effectiveness of an Enhanced Consultative Approach to Delivering Speech and Language Intervention in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mecrow, Carol; Beckwith, Jennie; Klee, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background: Increased demand for access to specialist services for providing support to children with speech, language and communication needs prompted a local service review of how best to allocate limited resources. This study arose as a consequence of a wish to evaluate the effectiveness of an enhanced consultative approach to delivering speech…

  11. Informatics Teaching from the Students' Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahorec, Jan; Haskova, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Branches of science and technical/engineering study have for a long time been the less favoured disciplines and students have not been interested in studying them. Informatics/computer education, based on its character, belongs to these disciplines, but on the contrary it belongs rather to the group of popular school subjects. The paper presents…

  12. A solo hospital librarian's experience in clinical informatics.

    PubMed

    Miles, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    This column reviews some of a solo librarian's experiences that led to involvement with the hospital Clinical Informatics Team. This included work on the electronic health record (EHR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system, development of order sets, and participation in the Physician Technology Committee.

  13. Designing Biomedical Informatics Infrastructure for Clinical and Translational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Paz Lillo, Ariel Isaac

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) rests largely on information flowing smoothly at multiple levels, in multiple directions, across multiple locations. Biomedical Informatics (BI) is seen as a backbone that helps to manage information flows for the translation of knowledge generated and stored in silos of basic science into bedside…

  14. Informatics, Development, and Education: The Case of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrakis, Vasilios; Yuan-tu, Liu

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of computers and new information technology in developing countries focuses on China. Highlights include information technology as a tool for national development or as a tool for dependency; Chinese informatics policy; computers in Chinese secondary education; the development of educational software; teacher training; and computer…

  15. Evaluating consumer informatics: learning from health campaign research.

    PubMed

    Logan, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    This paper suggests that some conceptual models used in health communication campaigns as well as the "uses and gratifications" approach might be successfully integrated into the evaluation of consumer informatics. These models and tools are especially pertinent when the desired outcomes of media health interventions are therapeutic changes in public knowledge, motivations, attitudes and patient behavior PMID:15360992

  16. An Informatics Approach to Establishing a Sustainable Public Health Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriseman, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-01-01

    This work involved the analysis of a public health system, and the design, development and deployment of enterprise informatics architecture, and sustainable community methods to address problems with the current public health system. Specifically, assessment of the Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS) was instrumental in…

  17. Pre-School Teachers' Informatics and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja; Pecaric, Dilda

    2006-01-01

    The life and activities of every man in the period of transition from the second into the third millennium have been marked by epochal changes which appear as the consequence of scientific and technological revolution dominated by highly developed information and communication technology. Informatics and information education based on information…

  18. Informatics and Telematics in Health. Present and Potential Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This report focuses on technical issues associated with informatics--a term covering all aspects of the development and operations of information systems, the supporting computer methodology and technology, and the supporting telecommunications links. The first of six chapters discusses the purpose of the report together with basic assumptions…

  19. A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

  20. Mapping nursing program activities to nursing informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kamas; Kapsandoy, Seraphine; Macintosh, Christopher; Wyckoff, Anastasis

    2008-11-06

    In order to facilitate the incorporation of Informatics competencies into nursing curricula, this group analyzed the course content of three BSN level nursing classes and correlated appropriate competencies to the course content. The two main areas of focus were competencies already used and competencies easily incorporated.

  1. Improving the Evaluation Model for the Lithuanian Informatics Olympiads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupiene, Jurate

    2010-01-01

    The Lithuanian Informatics Olympiads (LitIO) is a problem solving programming contest for students in secondary education. The work of the student to be evaluated is an algorithm designed by the student and implemented as a working program. The current evaluation process involves both automated (for correctness and performance of programs with the…

  2. Score Calculation in Informatics Contests Using Multiple Criteria Decision Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupiene, Jurate

    2011-01-01

    The Lithuanian Informatics Olympiad is a problem solving contest for high school students. The work of each contestant is evaluated in terms of several criteria, where each criterion is measured according to its own scale (but the same scale for each contestant). Several jury members are involved in the evaluation. This paper analyses the problem…

  3. Building blocks for a clinical imaging informatics environment.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Marc D; Warnock, Max; Daly, Mark; Toland, Christopher; Meenan, Chris; Nagy, Paul G

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 20 years, imaging informatics has been driven by the widespread adoption of radiology information and picture archiving and communication and speech recognition systems. These three clinical information systems are commonplace and are intuitive to most radiologists as they replicate familiar paper and film workflow. So what is next? There is a surge of innovation in imaging informatics around advanced workflow, search, electronic medical record aggregation, dashboarding, and analytics tools for quality measures (Nance et al., AJR Am J Roentgenol 200:1064-1070, 2013). The challenge lies in not having to rebuild the technological wheel for each of these new applications but instead attempt to share common components through open standards and modern development techniques. The next generation of applications will be built with moving parts that work together to satisfy advanced use cases without replicating databases and without requiring fragile, intense synchronization from clinical systems. The purpose of this paper is to identify building blocks that can position a practice to be able to quickly innovate when addressing clinical, educational, and research-related problems. This paper is the result of identifying common components in the construction of over two dozen clinical informatics projects developed at the University of Maryland Radiology Informatics Research Laboratory. The systems outlined are intended as a mere foundation rather than an exhaustive list of possible extensions.

  4. School Subject Informatics (Computer Science) in Russia: Educational Relevant Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khenner, Evgeniy; Semakin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with some aspects of studying Informatics in Russian schools. Those aspects are part of the "third dimension" of the Darmstadt model (they are also projected on the other two dimensions of this model) and include evolution of the subject, regulatory norms conforming to the Federal Educational Standards, the learning…

  5. The Integration of Nursing Informatics in Delaware Nursing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a conversion to electronic health records (EHRs) in an effort to improve patient care, access, and efficiency. The goal, which has been supported by federal initiatives, is to meaningfully use informatics to improve the safety and quality of patient care as a major force in improving healthcare. How nurses…

  6. An Abridged History of Medical Informatics Education in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hasman, Arie; Mantas, John; Zarubina, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    This contribution presents the development of medical informatics education in Europe. It does not discuss all developments that took place. Rather it discerns several themes that indicate the progress in the field, starting from the initiation phase to the final quality control phase. PMID:24648617

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of enhancing resilience in human service professionals using a retreat-based Mindfulness with Metta Training Program: a randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Aileen M; Ford, Lucas; Klaassen, Frances

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of a brief Mindfulness with Metta Training Program (MMTP), targeting the enhancement of mindfulness and self-compassion in a retreat format, as a means of increasing resilience in human services professionals. In this randomised control trial, 44 human services professionals were randomly allocated either to a MMTP retreat group or to a control group. Following the MMTP intervention, no significant differences between the retreat and control groups were found on resilience, mindfulness and self-compassion variables. However, significant improvements were observed over time for the retreat group for mindfulness and self-compassion at one and four months and for resilience at four-months post MMTP intervention. The results of this pilot study show that MMTP in a retreat format is a promising method of increasing resilience, mindfulness and self-compassion in human services professionals.

  8. Perioperative Standard Oral Nutrition Supplements Versus Immunonutrition in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Resection in an Enhanced Recovery (ERAS) Protocol: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial (SONVI Study).

    PubMed

    Moya, Pedro; Soriano-Irigaray, Leticia; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Garcea, Alessandro; Blasco, Olga; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Brugiotti, Carlo; Miranda, Elena; Arroyo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    To compare immunonutrition versus standard high calorie nutrition in patients undergoing elective colorectal resection within an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) program.Despite progress in recent years in the surgical management of patients with colorectal cancer (ERAS programs), postoperative complications are frequent. Nutritional supplements enriched with immunonutrients have recently been introduced into clinical practice. However, the extent to which the combination of ERAS protocols and immunonutrition benefits patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery is unknown.The SONVI study is a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial with 2 parallel treatment groups receiving either the study product (an immune-enhancing feed) or the control supplement (a hypercaloric hypernitrogenous supplement) for 7 days before colorectal resection and 5 days postoperatively.A total of 264 patients were randomized. At baseline, both groups were comparable in regards to age, sex, surgical risk, comorbidity, and analytical and nutritional parameters. The median length of the postoperative hospital stay was 5 days with no differences between the groups. A decrease in the total number of complications was observed in the immunonutrition group compared with the control group, primarily due to a significant decrease in infectious complications (23.8% vs. 10.7%, P = 0.0007). Of the infectious complications, wound infection differed significantly between the groups (16.4% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.0008). Other infectious complications were lower in the immunonutrition group but were not statistically significantly different.The implementation of ERAS protocols including immunonutrient-enriched supplements reduces the complications of patients undergoing colorectal resection.This study is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02393976. PMID:27227930

  9. Perioperative Standard Oral Nutrition Supplements Versus Immunonutrition in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Resection in an Enhanced Recovery (ERAS) Protocol: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial (SONVI Study).

    PubMed

    Moya, Pedro; Soriano-Irigaray, Leticia; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Garcea, Alessandro; Blasco, Olga; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Brugiotti, Carlo; Miranda, Elena; Arroyo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    To compare immunonutrition versus standard high calorie nutrition in patients undergoing elective colorectal resection within an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) program.Despite progress in recent years in the surgical management of patients with colorectal cancer (ERAS programs), postoperative complications are frequent. Nutritional supplements enriched with immunonutrients have recently been introduced into clinical practice. However, the extent to which the combination of ERAS protocols and immunonutrition benefits patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery is unknown.The SONVI study is a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial with 2 parallel treatment groups receiving either the study product (an immune-enhancing feed) or the control supplement (a hypercaloric hypernitrogenous supplement) for 7 days before colorectal resection and 5 days postoperatively.A total of 264 patients were randomized. At baseline, both groups were comparable in regards to age, sex, surgical risk, comorbidity, and analytical and nutritional parameters. The median length of the postoperative hospital stay was 5 days with no differences between the groups. A decrease in the total number of complications was observed in the immunonutrition group compared with the control group, primarily due to a significant decrease in infectious complications (23.8% vs. 10.7%, P = 0.0007). Of the infectious complications, wound infection differed significantly between the groups (16.4% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.0008). Other infectious complications were lower in the immunonutrition group but were not statistically significantly different.The implementation of ERAS protocols including immunonutrient-enriched supplements reduces the complications of patients undergoing colorectal resection.This study is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02393976.

  10. Mathematical Approach to Bio-Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keiko; Ohya, Masanori

    2008-03-01

    In research for life we first need to align the sequences in order to compare several different genes or amino acid sequences. When the number of sequences being compared becomes too large, such alignment takes a very long time. Therefore, we have made an attempt to establish this alignment using quantum algorithms (e.g.,[5,6]). We discuss one of such algorithms here. In future, we plan to use our findings in research on classification and change in living organisms such as HIV, and to link it to the introduction of markers for observing changes in disease progression (see [16-22] for trials along this line). We in this paper explain some of our trials by means of coding theory and entropic chaos degree.

  11. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of hybridoma technology, dating back to 1975, monoclonal antibodies have become an irreplaceable diagnostic and therapeutic tool for a wide array of human diseases. During the last 15 years, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved by FDA for cancer therapy. These mAbs are designed to (1) activate the immune system against tumor cells, (2) inhibit cancer cell-intrinsic signaling pathways, (3) bring toxins in the close proximity of cancer cells, or (4) interfere with the tumor-stroma interaction. More recently, major efforts have been made for the development of immunostimulatory mAbs that either enhance cancer-directed immune responses or limit tumor- (or therapy-) driven immunosuppression. Some of these antibodies, which are thought to facilitate tumor eradication by initiating or sustaining a tumor-specific immune response, have already entered clinical trials. In this Trial Watch, we will review and discuss the clinical progress of the most important mAbs that are have entered clinical trials after January 2008. PMID:22720209

  12. Using the Internet to Teach Health Informatics: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Alec; Gillies, John

    2001-01-01

    Background It is becoming increasingly important for health professionals to have an understanding of health informatics. Education in this area must support not only undergraduate students but also the many workers who graduated before informatics education was available in the undergraduate program. To be successful, such a program must allow currently-employed students with significant work and family commitments to enroll. Objectives The aim was to successfully create and teach a distance program in health informatics for the New Zealand environment. Methods Our students are primarily health professionals in full time employment. About 50% are doctors, about 25% nurses, and the rest include dentists, physiotherapists, and medical managers. Course material was delivered via the World Wide Web and CD-ROM. Communication between students and faculty, both synchronous and asynchronous, was carried out via the Internet. Results We have designed and taught a postgraduate Diploma of Health Informatics program using the Internet as a major communication medium. The course has been running since July 1998 and the first 10 students graduated in July 2000. About 45 students are currently enrolled in the course; we have had a dropout rate of 15% and a failure rate of 5%. Comparable dropout figures are hard to obtain, but a recent review has suggested that failure-to-complete rates of 30% to 33% may be expected. Conclusions Internet technology has provided an exciting educational challenge and opportunity. Providing a web-based health informatics course has not been without its frustrations and problems, including software compatibility issues, bandwidth limitations, and the rapid change in software and hardware. Despite these challenges, the use of Internet technology has been interesting for both staff and students, and a worthwhile alternative for delivering educational material and advice to students working from their own homes. PMID:11720968

  13. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Bosch, Walter R; Curran, Walter J; Followill, David S; Galvin, James M; Hanusik, Richard; King, Steven R; Knopp, Michael V; Laurie, Fran; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Michalski, Jeff M; Saltz, Joel H; Schnall, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Lawrence; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; Urie, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy, and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real-time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial. PMID:23508883

  14. A randomized controlled trial of a brief motivational enhancement for non-treatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users.

    PubMed

    de Gee, Elisabeth A; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E E; Bransen, Els; de Jonge, Jannet M; Schippers, Gerard M

    2014-09-01

    Evidence for negative effects of early-onset cannabis use has led to a need for effective interventions targeting adolescent cannabis users. A randomized controlled trial of an Australian two-session intervention based on motivational interviewing (the ACCU, or Weed-Check in Dutch) was replicated in a larger Dutch sample of 119 non-treatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users. Outcome measures at the 3-month follow-up were quantity and frequency of cannabis use, symptoms of dependence, stage of change, and psychosocial functioning. Changes in all measures were in the expected direction, yet not significant. In moderation analyses, heavier cannabis users at baseline receiving the Weed-Check had greater reductions in cannabis use than those in the control condition. These results suggest that the Weed-Check might be beneficial for heavier cannabis-using adolescents. Further research is needed to confirm these results in a sample of adolescent heavy cannabis users and to examine the relationship between MI skills of prevention workers and outcome.

  15. Enhancing kidney function with thrombolytic therapy following donation after cardiac death: a multicenter quasi-blinded prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; Goldfarb, David A; Rabets, John C; Sanchez, Edmund Q; Lebovitz, Daniel J; Schulak, James A; Fung, John J; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2015-12-01

    Kidneys from donors after cardiac death (DCD) are at risk for inferior outcomes, possibly due to microthrombi and additional warm ischemia. We describe an organ procurement organization-wide trial utilizing thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) during machine pulsatile perfusion (MPP). A kidney from each recovered kidney pair was prospectively randomized to receive tPA (50 mg Alteplase) or no tPA (control) in the MPP perfusate. From 2011 to 2013, 24 kidneys were placed with enrolled recipients from 19 DCD kidney donors. There were no significant differences for absolute values of flow or resistance while undergoing MPP between the groups, nor rates of achieving discrete flow and resistance targets. While there was a trend toward lower creatinine and higher glomerular filtration rates in the tPA group at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, these differences were not significant. Delayed graft function (DGF) rates were 41.7% in the tPA group vs. 58.4% in the control group (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.10-2.59, p = 0.68). Death-censored graft survival was similar between the groups. In this pilot study, encouraging trends are seen in kidney allograft function independent of MPP parameters following DCD kidney transplantation for those kidneys receiving thrombolytic tPA and MPP, compared with standard MPP.

  16. Mobilizing citizen effort to enhance environmental outcomes: a randomized controlled trial of a door-to-door recycling campaign.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Sarah; John, Peter; Liu, Hanhua; Nomura, Hisako

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a randomized controlled trial to test whether doorstep canvassing can raise participation in kerbside recycling. Existing research shows that canvassing can confront negative attitudes, increase understanding and resolve structural obstacles, but there is less known about the longitudinal effects of such interventions, which may fall away over time. 194 streets in Trafford, in the North West of England, UK were randomly assigned into a treatment and a control group. All households in the treatment group were visited by canvassers who were trained to promote and encourage recycling. Recycling participation rates for all households were measured by observing bin set out rates over a three-week period. Measurement was done before and after the canvassing campaign and then again three months later to see if the intervention had been effective in raising participation rates. Random-effects multilevel regression models, controlling for baseline recycling, street size, deprivation and size of ethnic minority population, show that the canvassing raised recycling participation rates for the treatment group compared to the control group, but there was a decline in the impact of the intervention over time. The intervention was more effective on streets with low levels of recycling at baseline.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of a brief motivational enhancement for non-treatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users.

    PubMed

    de Gee, Elisabeth A; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E E; Bransen, Els; de Jonge, Jannet M; Schippers, Gerard M

    2014-09-01

    Evidence for negative effects of early-onset cannabis use has led to a need for effective interventions targeting adolescent cannabis users. A randomized controlled trial of an Australian two-session intervention based on motivational interviewing (the ACCU, or Weed-Check in Dutch) was replicated in a larger Dutch sample of 119 non-treatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users. Outcome measures at the 3-month follow-up were quantity and frequency of cannabis use, symptoms of dependence, stage of change, and psychosocial functioning. Changes in all measures were in the expected direction, yet not significant. In moderation analyses, heavier cannabis users at baseline receiving the Weed-Check had greater reductions in cannabis use than those in the control condition. These results suggest that the Weed-Check might be beneficial for heavier cannabis-using adolescents. Further research is needed to confirm these results in a sample of adolescent heavy cannabis users and to examine the relationship between MI skills of prevention workers and outcome. PMID:24969735

  18. Impact of Informatics on School Education Systems: National Strategies for the Introduction of Informatics into Schools: Nonsystematic, but Still Systematic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    The introduction of informatics into the national school curriculum in Japan requires changes to educational policy, curricula, methods, facilities, etc. Although the basic functions of the school--i.e., to transmit the culture and to cultivate competencies that will allow a future society to develop--remain unchanged, new technologies change the…

  19. Kaatsu training to enhance physical function of older adults with knee osteoarthritis: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Buford, Thomas W.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Manini, Todd M.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Vincent, Kevin R.; Wu, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages, efficacious interventions are needed to manage pain and maintain physical function among older adults with osteoarthritis (OA). Skeletal muscle weakness is a primary contributory factor to pain and functional decline among persons with OA, thus interventions are needed that improve muscle strength. High-load resistance exercise is the best-known method of improving muscle strength; however high-compressive loads commonly induce significant joint pain among persons with OA. Thus interventions with low-compressive loads are needed which improve muscle strength while limiting joint stress. This study is investigating the potential of an innovative training paradigm, known as Kaatsu, for this purpose. Kaatsu involves performing low-load exercise while externally-applied compression partially restricts blood flow to the active skeletal muscle. The objective of this randomized, single-masked pilot trial is to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of chronic Kaatsu training for improving skeletal muscle strength and physical function among older adults. Participants aged ≥ 60 years with physical limitations and symptomatic knee OA will be randomly assigned to engage in a 3-month intervention of either (1) center-based, moderate-load resistance training, or (2) Kaatsu training matched for overall workload. Study dependent outcomes include the change in 1) knee extensor strength, 2) objective measures of physical function, and 3) subjective measures of physical function and pain. This study will provide novel information regarding the therapeutic potential of Kaatsu training while also informing about the long-term clinical viability of the paradigm by evaluating participant safety, discomfort, and willingness to continually engage in the intervention. PMID:26111922

  20. PearlTrees web-based interface for teaching informatics in the radiology residency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licurse, Mindy Y.; Cook, Tessa S.

    2014-03-01

    Radiology and imaging informatics education have rapidly evolved over the past few decades. With the increasing recognition that future growth and maintenance of radiology practices will rely heavily on radiologists with fundamentally sound informatics skills, the onus falls on radiology residency programs to properly implement and execute an informatics curriculum. In addition, the American Board of Radiology may choose to include even more informatics on the new board examinations. However, the resources available for didactic teaching and guidance most especially at the introductory level are widespread and varied. Given the breadth of informatics, a centralized web-based interface designed to serve as an adjunct to standardized informatics curriculums as well as a stand-alone for other interested audiences is desirable. We present the development of a curriculum using PearlTrees, an existing web-interface based on the concept of a visual interest graph that allows users to collect, organize, and share any URL they find online as well as to upload photos and other documents. For our purpose, the group of "pearls" includes informatics concepts linked by appropriate hierarchal relationships. The curriculum was developed using a combination of our institution's current informatics fellowship curriculum, the Practical Imaging Informatics textbook1 and other useful online resources. After development of the initial interface and curriculum has been publicized, we anticipate that involvement by the informatics community will help promote collaborations and foster mentorships at all career levels.

  1. Postcards from the imaging informatics road. Despite policy complexities, diagnostic imaging informatics makes progress on multiple fronts.

    PubMed

    Hagland, Mark

    2011-11-01

    The current strategic landscape for imaging informatics is one filled with great contrasts and paradoxes. On the one hand, because imaging informatics was not explicitly addressed in Stage 1 of the meaningful use requirements under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act/Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (ARRA-HITECH) legislation, it instantly lost some of the environment of turbo-charged energy characterized by areas that were directly addressed by the HITECH Act, such as quality data reporting, care management, and of course, core electronic health record (EHR) development. On the other hand, an interesting combination of factors--rapidly advancing technology, the expansion of the image archiving concept across different medical specialties, and the inclusion of diagnostic image-sharing as one element in the development of health information exchange (HIE) arrangements nationwide--is nonetheless pushing imaging informatics forward towards new innovations. The five articles below provide readers with different glimpses of the path ahead for imaging informatics. The first presents a look at the current policy and reimbursement landscape. Each of the four subsequent articles delve into different aspects of innovation, from a process developed at a public hospital to improve and speed up the diagnostic process for trauma patients, to a radiology-specific financial analytics solution in the group practice setting, to an advance in cardiology information systems, to a self-developed federated image viewing platform at one of the nation's largest integrated health systems. Each of those initiatives is very different; yet it is clear that a great deal of innovation is taking place across the US. healthcare system when it comes to imaging informatics. With a landscape filled with uncertainties and potential policy, reimbursement, and industry shifts in the offing, CIOs, CMIOs, and other healthcare IT leaders will need to think very

  2. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  3. A randomized controlled trial of enhanced cleaning to reduce contamination of healthcare worker gowns and gloves with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Aaron S; Shardell, Michelle; Johnson, J Kristie; Thom, Kerri A; Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Netzer, Giora; Amr, Sania; Morgan, Daniel J; Harris, Anthony D

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE. To determine whether enhanced daily cleaning would reduce contamination of healthcare worker (HCW) gowns and gloves with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB). DESIGN. A cluster-randomized controlled trial. SETTING. Four intensive care units (ICUs) in an urban tertiary care hospital. PARTICIPANTs. ICU rooms occupied by patients colonized with MRSA or MDRAB. INTERVENTION. Extra enhanced daily cleaning of ICU room surfaces frequently touched by HCWs. RESULTS. A total of 4,444 cultures were collected from 132 rooms over 10 months. Using fluorescent dot markers at 2,199 surfaces, we found that 26% of surfaces in control rooms were cleaned and that 100% of surfaces in experimental rooms were cleaned (P < .001). The mean proportion of contaminated HCW gowns and gloves following routine care provision and before leaving the rooms of patients with MDRAB was 16% among control rooms and 12% among experimental rooms (relative risk, 0.77 [95% confidence interval, 0.28-2.11]; P = .23). For MRSA, the mean proportions were 22% and 19%, respectively (relative risk, 0.89 [95% confidence interval, 0.50-1.53]; P = .16). DISCUSSION. Intense enhanced daily cleaning of ICU rooms occupied by patients colonized with MRSA or MDRAB was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in contamination of HCW gowns and gloves after routine patient care activities. Further research is needed to determine whether intense environmental cleaning will lead to significant reductions and fewer infections.

  4. OSIRIS, an entirely in-house developed drug discovery informatics system.

    PubMed

    Sander, Thomas; Freyss, Joel; von Korff, Modest; Reich, Jacqueline Renée; Rufener, Christian

    2009-02-01

    We present OSIRIS, an entirely in-house developed drug discovery informatics system. Its components cover all information handling aspects from compound synthesis via biological testing to preclinical development. Its design principles are platform and vendor independence, a consistent look and feel, and complete coverage of the drug discovery process by custom tailored applications. These include electronic laboratory notebook applications for biology and chemistry, tools for high-throughput and secondary screening evaluation, chemistry-aware data visualization, physicochemical property prediction, 3D-pharmacophore comparisons, interactive modeling, computing grid based ligand-protein docking, and more. Most applications are developed in Java and are built on top of a Java library layer that provides reusable cheminformatics functionality and GUI components such as chemical editors, structure canonicalization, substructure search, combinatorial enumeration, enhanced stereo perception, force field minimization, and conformation generation.

  5. Informatics systems to assess and apply clinical research on dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Anusavice, K J

    2003-12-01

    Dental biomaterials are used clinically for one or more of the following purposes: to restore function, to enhance esthetics, and to prevent or arrest demineralization of tooth structure. Studies of the clinical performance of restorations and prostheses made from these materials have generally focused on quality assessment and survival statistics. Data from these studies should provide probabilities of specific treatment outcomes that are useful for practicing dentists. However, the utility of these data is limited by the lack of national and international standards for assessing these clinical outcomes. Standardized approaches toward clinical informatics and treatment-decision analysis are urgently needed to minimize the variability of clinical outcomes reported in publications associated with direct and indirect restorative materials used for dental restorations and prostheses.

  6. Vision for Data and Informatics in the Future Materials Innovation Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalidindi, Surya R.; Medford, Andrew J.; McDowell, David L.

    2016-08-01

    The high cost and time typically expended in the successful deployment of new materials into high-performance commercial products is attributable to multiple factors. The most significant of these include the heavy reliance on experiments, the persisting disconnect between multiscale experiments and multiscale models, the lack of a broadly accessible data and knowledge infrastructure that can support the implementation of a holistic systems approach, and the lack of a suitable framework for facilitating and enhancing the critically needed cross-disciplinary collaborations. The emerging discipline of materials data science and informatics (MDSI) promises to address these key technology gaps. The potential benefits to the materials innovation enterprise that could accrue from an aggressive adoption of the novel concepts and toolsets offered by MDSI are examined. A specific vision is expounded for the role of MDSI in bridging the large gap that exists between the multiscale materials experiments and the multiscale materials models.

  7. Comparing group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with enhanced usual care for adolescents with functional somatic syndromes: a study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Kallesøe, Karen Hansen; Schröder, Andreas; Wicksell, Rikard K; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are common in adolescents, characterised by severe disability and reduced quality of life. Behavioural treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has shown promising results in children and adolescents with FSS, but has focused on specific syndromes such as functional pain. The current study will compare the efficacy of group-based ACT with that of enhanced usual care (EUC) in adolescents with a range of FSS operationalised by the unifying construct of multiorgan bodily distress syndrome (BDS). Methods and analysis A total of 120 adolescents aged 15–19 and diagnosed with multiorgan BDS, of at least 12 months duration, will be assessed and randomised to either: (1) EUC: a manualised consultation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and individualised treatment plan or (2) manualised ACT-based group therapy plus EUC. The ACT programme consists of 9 modules (ie, 27 hours) and 1 follow-up meeting (3 hours). The primary outcome is physical health, assessed by an Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) aggregate score 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include self-reported symptom severity, symptom interference, depression and anxiety, illness worry, perceived stress and global improvement; as well as objective physical activity and bodily stress response measured by heart rate variability, hair cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers. Process measures are illness perception, illness-related behaviour and psychological flexibility. Ethics and dissemination The study is conducted in accordance with Helsinki Declaration II. Approval has been obtained from the Science Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region and the Danish Data Protection. The results will be sought to be published according to the CONSORT statement in peer-reviewed journals. Discussion This is one of the first larger randomised clinical trials evaluating the effect of a group-based intervention for adolescents with a

  8. Results of the Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial: A Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention in Overweight or Obese Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Cheryl L.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Byers, Tim E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Elias, Anthony; Krontiras, Helen; Liu, Jingxia; Naughton, Michael; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Wyatt, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obesity increases risk for all-cause and breast cancer mortality and comorbidities in women who have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is the largest weight loss intervention trial among survivors of breast cancer to date. Methods In this multicenter trial, 692 overweight/obese women who were, on average, 2 years since primary treatment for early-stage breast cancer were randomly assigned to either a group-based behavioral intervention, supplemented with telephone counseling and tailored newsletters, to support weight loss or a less intensive control intervention and observed for 2 years. Weight and blood pressure were measured at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Longitudinal mixed models were used to analyze change over time. Results At 12 months, mean weight loss was 6.0% of initial weight in the intervention group and 1.5% in the control group (P < .001). At 24 months, mean weight loss in the intervention and control groups was 3.7% and 1.3%, respectively (P < .001). Favorable effects of the intervention on physical activity and blood pressure were observed. The weight loss intervention was more effective among women older than 55 years than among younger women. Conclusion A behavioral weight loss intervention can lead to clinically meaningful weight loss in overweight/obese survivors of breast cancer. These findings support the need to conduct additional studies to test methods that support sustained weight loss and to examine the potential benefit of intentional weight loss on breast cancer recurrence and survival. PMID:26282657

  9. Improving educational achievement and anaemia of school children: design of a cluster randomised trial of school-based malaria prevention and enhanced literacy instruction in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Improving the health of school-aged children can yield substantial benefits for cognitive development and educational achievement. However, there is limited experimental evidence on the benefits of school-based malaria prevention or how health interventions interact with other efforts to improve education quality. This study aims to evaluate the impact of school-based malaria prevention and enhanced literacy instruction on the health and educational achievement of school children in Kenya. Design A factorial, cluster randomised trial is being implemented in 101 government primary schools on the coast of Kenya. The interventions are (i) intermittent screening and treatment of malaria in schools by public health workers and (ii) training workshops and support for teachers to promote explicit and systematic literacy instruction. Schools are randomised to one of four groups: receiving either (i) the malaria intervention alone; (ii) the literacy intervention alone; (iii) both interventions combined; or (iv) control group where neither intervention is implemented. Children from classes 1 and 5 are randomly selected and followed up for 24 months. The primary outcomes are educational achievement and anaemia, the hypothesised mediating variables through which education is affected. Secondary outcomes include malaria parasitaemia, school attendance and school performance. A nested process evaluation, using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussion and a stakeholder analysis will investigate the community acceptability, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of the interventions. Discussion Across Africa, governments are committed to improve health and education of school-aged children, but seek clear policy and technical guidance as to the optimal approach to address malaria and improved literacy. This evaluation will be one of the first to simultaneously evaluate the impact of health and education interventions in the improvement of educational achievement

  10. Would Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment Adhere to and Benefit from a Structured Lifestyle Activity Intervention to Enhance Cognition?: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Linda Chiu-wa; Chan, Wai Chi; Leung, Tony; Fung, Ada Wai-tung; Leung, Edward Man-fuk

    2015-01-01

    Structured lifestyle activity interventions were not associated with changes in everyday functioning, albeit with some improvements in cognitive scores across time. Higher adherence was associated with greater improvement in cognitive scores. Factors to enhance adherence should be specially considered in the design of psychosocial interventions for older adults with cognitive decline. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ChiCTR-TRC-11001359 PMID:25826620

  11. Targeted versus tailored multimedia patient engagement to enhance depression recognition and treatment in primary care: randomized controlled trial protocol for the AMEP2 study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression in primary care is common, yet this costly and disabling condition remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Persisting gaps in the primary care of depression are due in part to patients’ reluctance to bring depressive symptoms to the attention of their primary care clinician and, when depression is diagnosed, to accept initial treatment for the condition. Both targeted and tailored communication strategies offer promise for fomenting discussion and reducing barriers to appropriate initial treatment of depression. Methods/design The Activating Messages to Enhance Primary Care Practice (AMEP2) Study is a stratified randomized controlled trial comparing two computerized multimedia patient interventions --- one targeted (to patient gender and income level) and one tailored (to level of depressive symptoms, visit agenda, treatment preferences, depression causal attributions, communication self-efficacy and stigma)--- and an attention control. AMEP2 consists of two linked sub-studies, one focusing on patients with significant depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] scores ≥ 5), the other on patients with few or no depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 < 5). The first sub-study examined effectiveness of the interventions; key outcomes included delivery of components of initial depression care (antidepressant prescription or mental health referral). The second sub-study tracked potential hazards (clinical distraction and overtreatment). A telephone interview screening procedure assessed patients for eligibility and oversampled patients with significant depressive symptoms. Sampled, consenting patients used computers to answer survey questions, be randomized, and view assigned interventions just before scheduled primary care office visits. Patient surveys were also collected immediately post-visit and 12 weeks later. Physicians completed brief reporting forms after each patient’s index visit. Additional data were obtained from

  12. Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert; Sallah, David

    Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery. However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care delivery, (ii) identifies and explains the difference between health informatics (HI) and managing knowledge (KM) in relation to informatics business strategy and (iii) elaborates the role of information communication technology (ICT) KM environment. This Chapter further examines how KM can be used to improve health service informatics costs, and identifies the factors that could affect its implementation and explains some of the reasons driving the development of electronic health record systems. This will assist in avoiding higher costs and errors, while promoting the continued industrialisation of KM delivery across health care communities.

  13. A study of the informatics literacy of clinical nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Chen, Rai-Fu; Chang, Li-Hui; Hsiao, Ju-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the essential components for informatics literacy for clinical nurses working in Taiwanese hospitals. We developed a framework to explore the critical informatics literacy factors that clinical nurses should understand to be proficient in performing their professional duties. Survey methodology was used and the participants were senior administrators of nursing and other personnel in charge of implementing nursing information systems for 84 regional hospitals and medical centers. A total of 50 valid questionnaires was returned, with a 59.5% response rate. In summary, the results of the Taiwanese study are divided into three factors: informatics knowledge, informatics skills, and computer attitudes. A total of 58 questions was used for the measurement of initial nursing informatics literacy, and 49 items were considered to be the most required informatics literacy skills specifically for clinical nurses.

  14. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  15. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade. PMID:27332175

  16. It's Just (Academic) Business: A Use Case in Improving Informatics Operations with Business Intelligence.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Leslie D; Zabarovskaya, Connie; Uhlmansiek, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Academic biomedical informatics cores are beholden to funding agencies, institutional administration, collaborating researchers, and external agencies for ongoing funding and support. Services provided and translational research outcomes are increasingly important to monitor, report and analyze, to demonstrate value provided to the organization and the greater scientific community. Thus, informatics operations are also business operations. As such, adopting business intelligence practices offers an opportunity to improve the efficiency of evaluation efforts while fulfilling reporting requirements. Organizing informatics development documentation, service requests, and work performed with adaptable tools have greatly facilitated these and related business activities within our informatics center. Through the identification and measurement of key performance indicators, informatics objectives and results are now quickly and nimbly assessed using dashboards. Acceptance of the informatics operation as a business venture and the adoption of business intelligence strategies has allowed for data-driven decision making, faster corrective action, and greater transparency for interested stakeholders.

  17. It's Just (Academic) Business: A Use Case in Improving Informatics Operations with Business Intelligence.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Leslie D; Zabarovskaya, Connie; Uhlmansiek, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Academic biomedical informatics cores are beholden to funding agencies, institutional administration, collaborating researchers, and external agencies for ongoing funding and support. Services provided and translational research outcomes are increasingly important to monitor, report and analyze, to demonstrate value provided to the organization and the greater scientific community. Thus, informatics operations are also business operations. As such, adopting business intelligence practices offers an opportunity to improve the efficiency of evaluation efforts while fulfilling reporting requirements. Organizing informatics development documentation, service requests, and work performed with adaptable tools have greatly facilitated these and related business activities within our informatics center. Through the identification and measurement of key performance indicators, informatics objectives and results are now quickly and nimbly assessed using dashboards. Acceptance of the informatics operation as a business venture and the adoption of business intelligence strategies has allowed for data-driven decision making, faster corrective action, and greater transparency for interested stakeholders. PMID:26306252

  18. Operationalizing the TANIC and NICA-L3/L4 Tools to Improve Informatics Competencies.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Carolyn; McGonigle, Dee; Hunter, Kathy; Hebda, Toni; Hill, Taryn; Lamblin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Two tools were developed for nurses to self-assess different levels of informatics competencies. The TANIC is used for all nurses to self-assess; the NICA-L3/L4 is a tool for the informatics nurse specialist (INS) to self-assess skill levels. There are 167 informatics items in the TANIC and 178 advanced informatics items in the NICA-L3/L4. These tools were piloted; the results presented here. Based on the evaluation, the tools have been integrated into informatics courses at the BSN and MSN programs at Chamberlain College of Nursing, and presented in two AACN webinars and other national conferences. Numerous requests have been honored to provide the tools for other schools of nursing to use in their courses, including DNP programs. Other requests include those from CNIOs and managers to include in their job descriptions for informatics nurses. PMID:27332209

  19. Effectiveness of a pharmacist-led drug counseling on enhancing antihypertensive adherence and blood pressure control: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Liu, Kirin Q L; Wang, Harry H X; Lee, Catherine L S; Kwan, Mandy W M; Lee, Ken W S; Cheung, Yu; Lee, Gabrielle K Y; Morisky, Donald E; Griffiths, Sian M

    2013-07-01

    Adherence to antihypertensive medications represents a crucial success factor for optimal blood pressure (BP) control in clinical practice. This study evaluated whether an additional pharmacist-led medication counseling could achieve better optimal BP control and enhance compliance. In a designated family clinic in a region with similar resident characteristics to Hong Kong, patients taking ≥ one antihypertensive agent with suboptimal compliance were randomly allocated to a brief 3-minute drug advice (control; n = 161) or pharmacist counseling (intervention; n = 113). The two groups were compared by repeated measure ANOVA at 3-months and 6-months with BP control and medication compliance as outcome variables, respectively. The proportions of patients having optimal compliance increased from 0% to 41.1% at 3 months and 61.9% at 6 months (P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having optimal BP control improved from 64.1% at baseline to 74.0% at 3 months and 74.5% at 6 months (P = 0.023). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the changes of BP control and compliance levels. This study implied that even a brief 3-minute drug advice might lead to improved BP levels among patients on antihypertensive medications in general practice, but did not demonstrate additional effects by pharmacist counseling.

  20. Parenting Enhancement, Interpersonal Psychotherapy to Reduce Depression in Low-Income Mothers of Infants and Toddlers: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beeber, Linda S.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Canuso, Regina; Lewis, Virginia; Hall, Helen Wilde

    2013-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms and clinical depression are highly prevalent in low-income mothers and negatively affect their infants and toddlers. Objectives To test interpersonal psychotherapy combined with parenting enhancement on depressive symptoms and parenting behavior, compared with usual care. Method Mothers (n = 226) of Early Head Start infants and toddlers from the southeastern and northeastern United States were randomized to the intervention delivered in-home by psychiatric mental health advanced practice nurses or usual care delivered by generalist nurses. Rigorous clinical depressive symptom and depression assessments and videotaped, coded mother-child interactions were used as baseline and 14-, 22-, and 26-week postintervention measures. Results Both the intervention and control groups had significantly reduced Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores at each subsequent time point compared to baseline (p < .0001). However, only mothers receiving the intervention showed a significant increase in positive involvement with their child, as measured by closeness, positive affect, affection, and warm touch at T4 (t = 2.22, df = 156, p < .03). Discussion Both intervention and control conditions resulted in symptom reduction, but only the intervention mothers showed significant interaction changes with their child, an essential step in reducing the negative child outcomes associated with maternal depressive symptoms. Results suggest that a combination of generalist and specialist nurses could be used to treat depressive symptoms in these mothers. Further study with longer postintervention observation is needed to see if, over time, the intervention led to longer-lasting symptom reduction. PMID:23458906

  1. Brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Prieto, Antonio; Mayas, Julia; Toril, Pilar; Pita, Carmen; Ponce de León, Laura; Reales, José M; Waterworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Age-related cognitive and brain declines can result in functional deterioration in many cognitive domains, dependency, and dementia. A major goal of aging research is to investigate methods that help to maintain brain health, cognition, independent living and wellbeing in older adults. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 20 1-h non-action video game training sessions with games selected from a commercially available package (Lumosity) on a series of age-declined cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing. Two groups of healthy older adults participated in the study, the experimental group who received the training and the control group who attended three meetings with the research team along the study. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. All participants were assessed individually before and after the intervention, or a similar period of time, using neuropsychological tests and laboratory tasks to investigate possible transfer effects. The results showed significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group, in processing speed (choice reaction time), attention (reduction of distraction and increase of alertness), immediate and delayed visual recognition memory, as well as a trend to improve in Affection and Assertivity, two dimensions of the Wellbeing Scale. Visuospatial working memory (WM) and executive control (shifting strategy) did not improve. Overall, the current results support the idea that training healthy older adults with non-action video games will enhance some cognitive abilities but not others.

  2. Brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Prieto, Antonio; Mayas, Julia; Toril, Pilar; Pita, Carmen; Ponce de León, Laura; Reales, José M.; Waterworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Age-related cognitive and brain declines can result in functional deterioration in many cognitive domains, dependency, and dementia. A major goal of aging research is to investigate methods that help to maintain brain health, cognition, independent living and wellbeing in older adults. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 20 1-h non-action video game training sessions with games selected from a commercially available package (Lumosity) on a series of age-declined cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing. Two groups of healthy older adults participated in the study, the experimental group who received the training and the control group who attended three meetings with the research team along the study. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. All participants were assessed individually before and after the intervention, or a similar period of time, using neuropsychological tests and laboratory tasks to investigate possible transfer effects. The results showed significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group, in processing speed (choice reaction time), attention (reduction of distraction and increase of alertness), immediate and delayed visual recognition memory, as well as a trend to improve in Affection and Assertivity, two dimensions of the Wellbeing Scale. Visuospatial working memory (WM) and executive control (shifting strategy) did not improve. Overall, the current results support the idea that training healthy older adults with non-action video games will enhance some cognitive abilities but not others. PMID:25352805

  3. Medical informatic research management in academia - the Danish setting.

    PubMed

    Kjær Andersen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The condition that the Danish universities have been subject to severe changes through the last decade has had huge consequences for management of research at the level of a discipline as Medical Informatics. The presentation pinpoints some of the instruments, which is on top of the management agenda in the new academic reality in Denmark. Performance contracts, organizational structure, general management, research constraints, ranking and performance issues, economy linked to production, ownership, and incitements are issues affecting the way research are done. The issue of effective research management is to navigate in this reality, ensure inspiration and influx from other environments dealing with medical informatics problems, in theory as well as in praxis - and shield the individual researcher from emerging bureaucracy, leaving room for creativity.

  4. Introducing guidelines for good evaluation practice in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Brender, Jytte; Ammenwerth, Elske; Talmon, Jan; de Keizer, Nicolette; Rigby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Good evaluation practice guidelines have been developed through a consensus making process by a core team and the health informatics community. A set of 60 issues has been identified that is relevant for planning, implementation and execution of an evaluation study in the health informatics domain. These issues cover all phases of an evaluation study: Study exploration, first study design, operationalization of methods, detailed study design, execution and finalization of an evaluation study. Issues of risk management and project control are also addressed in the guidelines. Through application of these guidelines the general validity and generalization of evaluation studies are likely to be increased, since these guidelines aim at avoiding a number of omissions, pitfalls and risks. PMID:19745455

  5. Nutrition Informatics Applications in Clinical Practice: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    North, Jennifer C.; Jordan, Kristine C.; Metos, Julie; Hurdle, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition care and metabolic control contribute to clinical patient outcomes. Biomedical informatics applications represent a way to potentially improve quality and efficiency of nutrition management. We performed a systematic literature review to identify clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry systems used to manage nutrition care. Online research databases were searched using a specific set of keywords. Additionally, bibliographies were referenced for supplemental citations. Four independent reviewers selected sixteen studies out of 364 for review. These papers described adult and neonatal nutrition support applications, blood glucose management applications, and other nutrition applications. Overall, results indicated that computerized interventions could contribute to improved patient outcomes and provider performance. Specifically, computer systems in the clinical setting improved nutrient delivery, rates of malnutrition, weight loss, blood glucose values, clinician efficiency, and error rates. In conclusion, further investigation of informatics applications on nutritional and performance outcomes utilizing rigorous study designs is recommended. PMID:26958233

  6. Nanoinformatics: new challenges for biomedical informatics at the nano level.

    PubMed

    De La Iglesia, Diana; Chiesa, Stefano; Kern, Josipa; Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Potamias, George; Moustakis, Vassilis; Mitchell, Joyce A

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decades Nanotechnology has promised to advance science and technology in many areas. Within medicine, Nanomedicine promises to deliver new methods for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. As the amount of available information is rapidly growing, new Biomedical Informatics approaches have to be developed to satisfy the increasing demand on data and knowledge management. In 2007, a new sub-discipline, already named "Nanoinformatics", was created with support from the US National Science Foundation. In Europe, a project named ACTION-Grid was launched in 2008 with support from the European Commission to analyze the challenges and agenda for developing Nanoinformatics as a discipline related to Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Informatics. For MIE 2009, members of this consortium proposed a workshop to discuss the scientific and strategic issues associated with this topic. Nanoinformatics aims to create a bridge between Nanomedicine and Information Technology applying computational methods to manage the information created in the nanomedical domain.

  7. Panel: Alternative Careers for Biomedical Informatics PhDs.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Sorani, Marco; Maker, Monya; Torrance, Andrew; Horvitz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The number of doctoral training programs in informatics increases every year, however not every doctoral candidate wishes to pursue a traditional career in academia. In addition, the knowledge and skills acquired through scientific training at the doctoral level can be valuable, even critical, for a number of career paths outside of academic research and teaching. This panel will present a diverse set of alternative career paths for which graduates of Informatics programs would be well suited, including patent law, research in industry, academic administration, and scientific journalism. Panelists will describe their own respective backgrounds and career paths, a day in the life in their current position, and how their training prepared them for their jobs. They will also touch on insights gained and lessons learned in exploring the professional landscape through non-traditional paths.

  8. Optimizing Digital Health Informatics Interventions Through Unobtrusive Quantitative Process Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Gude, Wouter T; van der Veer, Sabine N; de Keizer, Nicolette F; Coiera, Enrico; Peek, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Health informatics interventions such as clinical decision support (CDS) and audit and feedback (A&F) are variably effective at improving care because the underlying mechanisms through which these interventions bring about change are poorly understood. This limits our possibilities to design better interventions. Process evaluations can be used to improve this understanding by assessing fidelity and quality of implementation, clarifying causal mechanisms, and identifying contextual factors associated with variation in outcomes. Coiera describes the intervention process as a series of stages extending from interactions to outcomes: the "information value chain". However, past process evaluations often did not assess the relationships between those stages. In this paper we argue that the chain can be measured quantitatively and unobtrusively in digital interventions thanks to the availability of electronic data that are a by-product of their use. This provides novel possibilities to study the mechanisms of informatics interventions in detail and inform essential design choices to optimize their efficacy. PMID:27577453

  9. Eco-informatics for decision makers advancing a research agenda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, J.B.; Wilson, T.; Brandt, L.; Gregg, V.; Spengler, S.; Borning, A.; Delcambre, L.; Bowker, G.; Frame, M.; Fulop, J.; Hert, C.; Hovy, E.; Jones, J.; Landis, E.; Schnase, J.L.; Schweik, C.; Sonntag, W.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Resource managers often face significant information technology (IT) problems when integrating ecological or environmental information to make decisions. At a workshop sponsored by the NSF and USGS in December 2004, university researchers, natural resource managers, and information managers met to articulate IT problems facing ecology and environmental decision makers. Decision making IT problems were identified in five areas: 1) policy, 2) data presentation, 3) data gaps, 4) tools, and 5) indicators. To alleviate those problems, workshop participants recommended specific informatics research in modeling and simulation, data quality, information integration and ontologies, and social and human aspects. This paper reports the workshop findings, and briefly compares these with research that traditionally falls under the emerging eco-informatics rubric. ?? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005.

  10. Evolving National Strategy Driving Nursing Informatics in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Honey, Michelle; Westbrooke, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    An update to the New Zealand Health Strategy identifying direction and priorities for health services is underway. Three specific areas have implications for nursing informatics and link to education and practice: best use of technology and information, fostering and spreading innovation and quality improvements, and building leaders and capability for the future. An emphasis on prevention and wellness means nursing needs to focus on health promotion and the role of consumers is changing with access to their on-line information a major focus. As the modes of delivery for services such as telehealth and telenursing changes, nurses are increasingly working independently and utilizing information and communication technologies to collaborate with the health team. New Zealand, and other countries, need strong nursing leadership to sustain the nursing voice in policy and planning and ensure nurses develop the required informatics skills. PMID:27332187

  11. Genetics, biometrics and the informatization of the body.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Irma

    2007-01-01

    "Genetics" is a term covering a wide set of theories, practices, and technologies, only some of which overlap with the practices and technologies of biometrics. In this paper some current technological developments relating to biometric applications of genetics will be highlighted. Next, the author will elaborate the notion of the informatization of the body, by means of a brief philosophical detour on the dualisms of language and reality, words and things. In the subsequent sections she will then draw out some of the questions relevant to the purposes of Biometrics Identification Technology Ethics (BITE), and discuss the ethical problems associated with the informatization of the body. There are, however some problems and limitations to the currently dominant ethical discourse to deal with all things ethical in relation to information technology in general, and biometrics or genetics in particular. The final section will discuss some of these meta-problems.

  12. Using RSS feeds to track open source radiology informatics projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Paul; Daly, Mark; Warnock, Michael; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2005-04-01

    There are over 40 open source projects in the field of radiology informatics. Because these are organized and written by volunteers, the development speed varies greatly from one project to the next. To keep track of updates, users must constantly check in on each project's Web page. Many projects remain dormant for years, and ad hoc checking becomes both an inefficient and unreliable means of determining when new versions are available. The result is that most end users track only a few projects and are unaware when others that may be more germane to their interests leapfrog in development. RSS feeds provide a machine readable XML format to track software project updates. Currently only 8 of the 40 projects provide RSS feeds for automatic propagation of news updates. We have a built a news aggregation engine around open source projects in radiology informatics.

  13. Social care informatics - the missing partner in ehealth.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Michael; Hill, Penny; Koch, Sabine; Kärki, Jarmo

    2009-01-01

    To the individual, social care can be an essential part of maintaining health, as is reflected by the WHO definition of health as being one of wellbeing. However, health informatics currently narrowly restricts itself to health organizations' activities. Digital records in social care are increasing, raising the need to recognize the area of social care informatics. This new domain needs support and nurture, whilst the delivery of social and related care needs to be harmonized with healthcare delivery. In turn, this raises important new issues as to how to best support the citizen, especially when they are dependent, including issues of information sharing, service co-ordination, sharing of meaning and objectives, and of respect for autonomy. PMID:19745313

  14. A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J D; Allison, T C; Bittner, S; Didier, B; Frenklach, M; Green, Jr., W H; Ho, Y; Hewson, J; Koegler, W; Lansing, C; Leahy, D; Lee, M; McCoy, R; Minkoff, M; Nijsure, S; von Laszewski, G; Montoya, D; Pancerella, C; Pinzon, R; Pitz, W J; Rahn, L A; Ruscis, B; Schuchardt, K; Stephan, E; Wagner, A; Windus, T; Yang, C

    2005-05-11

    The Collaboratory for Multi-scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics-based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information to support a systems-based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research. An open source multi-scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to the emerging concept of knowledge grids including provenance tracking and lightweight federation of data and application resources into cross-scale information flows. The CMCS portal is currently in use by a number of high-profile pilot groups and is playing a significant role in enabling their efforts to improve and extend community maintained chemical reference information.

  15. Nanoinformatics: new challenges for biomedical informatics at the nano level.

    PubMed

    De La Iglesia, Diana; Chiesa, Stefano; Kern, Josipa; Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Potamias, George; Moustakis, Vassilis; Mitchell, Joyce A

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decades Nanotechnology has promised to advance science and technology in many areas. Within medicine, Nanomedicine promises to deliver new methods for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. As the amount of available information is rapidly growing, new Biomedical Informatics approaches have to be developed to satisfy the increasing demand on data and knowledge management. In 2007, a new sub-discipline, already named "Nanoinformatics", was created with support from the US National Science Foundation. In Europe, a project named ACTION-Grid was launched in 2008 with support from the European Commission to analyze the challenges and agenda for developing Nanoinformatics as a discipline related to Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Informatics. For MIE 2009, members of this consortium proposed a workshop to discuss the scientific and strategic issues associated with this topic. Nanoinformatics aims to create a bridge between Nanomedicine and Information Technology applying computational methods to manage the information created in the nanomedical domain. PMID:19745461

  16. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  17. The pathology informatics curriculum wiki: Harnessing the power of user-generated content

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Gudewicz, Thomas M.; Dighe, Anand S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The need for informatics training as part of pathology training has never been so critical, but pathology informatics is a wide and complex field and very few programs currently have the resources to provide comprehensive educational pathology informatics experiences to their residents. In this article, we present the “pathology informatics curriculum wiki”, an open, on-line wiki that indexes the pathology informatics content in a larger public wiki, Wikipedia, (and other online content) and organizes it into educational modules based on the 2003 standard curriculum approved by the Association for Pathology Informatics (API). Methods and Results: In addition to implementing the curriculum wiki at http://pathinformatics.wikispaces.com, we have evaluated pathology informatics content in Wikipedia. Of the 199 non-duplicate terms in the API curriculum, 90% have at least one associated Wikipedia article. Furthermore, evaluation of articles on a five-point Likert scale showed high scores for comprehensiveness (4.05), quality (4.08), currency (4.18), and utility for the beginner (3.85) and advanced (3.93) learners. These results are compelling and support the thesis that Wikipedia articles can be used as the foundation for a basic curriculum in pathology informatics. Conclusions: The pathology informatics community now has the infrastructure needed to collaboratively and openly create, maintain and distribute the pathology informatics content worldwide (Wikipedia) and also the environment (the curriculum wiki) to draw upon its own resources to index and organize this content as a sustainable basic pathology informatics educational resource. The remaining challenges are numerous, but largest by far will be to convince the pathologists to take the time and effort required to build pathology informatics content in Wikipedia and to index and organize this content for education in the curriculum wiki. PMID:20805963

  18. A novel algorithm to enhance P300 in single trials: application to lie detection using F-score and SVM.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junfeng; Tian, Hongjun; Yang, Yong; Yu, Xiaolin; Li, Chenhong; Rao, Nini

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of lie detection methods based on P300 potentials has drawn much interest in recent years. We presented a novel algorithm to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of P300 and applied it in lie detection to increase the classification accuracy. Thirty-four subjects were divided randomly into guilty and innocent groups, and the EEG signals on 14 electrodes were recorded. A novel spatial denoising algorithm (SDA) was proposed to reconstruct the P300 with a high SNR based on independent component analysis. The differences between the proposed method and our/other early published methods mainly lie in the extraction and feature selection method of P300. Three groups of features were extracted from the denoised waves; then, the optimal features were selected by the F-score method. Selected feature samples were finally fed into three classical classifiers to make a performance comparison. The optimal parameter values in the SDA and the classifiers were tuned using a grid-searching training procedure with cross-validation. The support vector machine (SVM) approach was adopted to combine with an F-score because this approach had the best performance. The presented model F-score_SVM reaches a significantly higher classification accuracy for P300 (specificity of 96.05%) and non-P300 (sensitivity of 96.11%) compared with the results obtained without using SDA and compared with the results obtained by other classification models. Moreover, a higher individual diagnosis rate can be obtained compared with previous methods, and the presented method requires only a small number of stimuli in the real testing application.

  19. A novel algorithm to enhance P300 in single trials: application to lie detection using F-score and SVM.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junfeng; Tian, Hongjun; Yang, Yong; Yu, Xiaolin; Li, Chenhong; Rao, Nini

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of lie detection methods based on P300 potentials has drawn much interest in recent years. We presented a novel algorithm to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of P300 and applied it in lie detection to increase the classification accuracy. Thirty-four subjects were divided randomly into guilty and innocent groups, and the EEG signals on 14 electrodes were recorded. A novel spatial denoising algorithm (SDA) was proposed to reconstruct the P300 with a high SNR based on independent component analysis. The differences between the proposed method and our/other early published methods mainly lie in the extraction and feature selection method of P300. Three groups of features were extracted from the denoised waves; then, the optimal features were selected by the F-score method. Selected feature samples were finally fed into three classical classifiers to make a performance comparison. The optimal parameter values in the SDA and the classifiers were tuned using a grid-searching training procedure with cross-validation. The support vector machine (SVM) approach was adopted to combine with an F-score because this approach had the best performance. The presented model F-score_SVM reaches a significantly higher classification accuracy for P300 (specificity of 96.05%) and non-P300 (sensitivity of 96.11%) compared with the results obtained without using SDA and compared with the results obtained by other classification models. Moreover, a higher individual diagnosis rate can be obtained compared with previous methods, and the presented method requires only a small number of stimuli in the real testing application. PMID:25365325

  20. A Novel Algorithm to Enhance P300 in Single Trials: Application to Lie Detection Using F-Score and SVM

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junfeng; Tian, Hongjun; Yang, Yong; Yu, Xiaolin; Li, Chenhong; Rao, Nini

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of lie detection methods based on P300 potentials has drawn much interest in recent years. We presented a novel algorithm to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of P300 and applied it in lie detection to increase the classification accuracy. Thirty-four subjects were divided randomly into guilty and innocent groups, and the EEG signals on 14 electrodes were recorded. A novel spatial denoising algorithm (SDA) was proposed to reconstruct the P300 with a high SNR based on independent component analysis. The differences between the proposed method and our/other early published methods mainly lie in the extraction and feature selection method of P300. Three groups of features were extracted from the denoised waves; then, the optimal features were selected by the F-score method. Selected feature samples were finally fed into three classical classifiers to make a performance comparison. The optimal parameter values in the SDA and the classifiers were tuned using a grid-searching training procedure with cross-validation. The support vector machine (SVM) approach was adopted to combine with an F-score because this approach had the best performance. The presented model F-score_SVM reaches a significantly higher classification accuracy for P300 (specificity of 96.05%) and non-P300 (sensitivity of 96.11%) compared with the results obtained without using SDA and compared with the results obtained by other classification models. Moreover, a higher individual diagnosis rate can be obtained compared with previous methods, and the presented method requires only a small number of stimuli in the real testing application. PMID:25365325

  1. Discussion of "Biomedical informatics: we are what we publish".

    PubMed

    Geissbuhler, A; Hammond, W E; Hasman, A; Hussein, R; Koppel, R; Kulikowski, C A; Maojo, V; Martin-Sanchez, F; Moorman, P W; Moura, L A; de Quirós, F G B; Schuemie, M J; Smith, B; Talmon, J

    2013-01-01

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Biomedical Informatics: We Are What We Publish", written by Peter L. Elkin, Steven H. Brown, and Graham Wright. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the Elkin et al. paper. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor. PMID:24310397

  2. BIKMAS-II: A Knowledge Management System for Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    López-Alonso, V.; Moreno, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.; Maojo, V.; Martín-Sanchez, F.

    2002-01-01

    We present here BIKMAS II - Biomedical Informatics Knowledge Management System- a system that allows to efficiently process and filter scientific information. The system aids and assists in some common tasks carried out in a Biomedical research unit. We have designed BIKMAS-II as a modular system that can be easily adapted to the different information sources and biomedical domains and that has been implemented with an algorithm to discard, to store and to select what to do with the information.

  3. People and ideas in medical informatics - a half century review.

    PubMed

    van Bemmel, J H

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Reviewing the onset and the rapid changes to make realistic predictions on the future of medical informatics. METHODS. Pointing to the contributions of the early pioneers, who had their roots in other disciplines and by illustrating that from the onset an interdisciplinary approach was characteristic for our field. RESULTS. Some of the reasons for the changes in medical informatics are that nobody was able to predict the advent of the personal computer in the 1970s, the world-wide web in 1991, and the public start of the Internet in 1992, but foremost that nobody expected that it was not primarily the hardware or the software, but human factors that would be crucial for successful applications of computers in health care. In the past sometimes unrealistic expectations were held, such as on the impact of medical decision-support systems, or on the overly optimistic contributions of electronic health records. Although the technology is widely available, some applications appear to be far more complex than expected. Health care processes can seldom be fully standardized. Humans enter at least in two very different roles in the loop of information processing: as subjects conducting care - the clinicians - and as subjects that are the objects of care - the patients. CONCLUSIONS. Medical informatics lacks a specific methodology; methods are borrowed from adjacent disciplines such as physics, mathematics and, of course, computer science. Human factors play a major role in applying computers in health care. Everyone pursuing a career in biomedical informatics needs to be very aware of this. It is to be expected that the quality of health care will increasingly be assessed by computer systems to fulfill the requirements of medical evidence.

  4. Medical students' perspectives on biomedical informatics learning objectives

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephanie J.; Sheng, Xiaoming; Mitchell, Joyce A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore medical student perspectives regarding the importance of biomedical informatics learning objectives to career development, and the amount of emphasis that should be placed on content associated with these objectives in the curriculum. Methods A Web-based survey was e-mailed to 405 students enrolled at the University of Utah, School of Medicine in spring 2008. Respondents rated the importance of biomedical informatics learning objectives using a five-point Likert-type scale, and indicated whether this content should be given a minimal, moderate or large amount of emphasis. ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test were conducted to determine differences in perceived importance and desired emphasis by academic year. Results A total of 259 medical students submitted a survey for an overall response rate of 63.9%. Learning objectives associated with the physician role of Clinician received the highest overall rating (mean = 3.29 ± 0.47). Objectives for the physician roles of Clinician, Life-long Learner and Manager received higher ratings than the Educator/Communicator and Researcher roles in terms of both perceived importance and amount of emphasis. Student ratings of importance varied significantly by academic year, with third-year students consistently assigning lower ratings to learning objectives for the Educator/Communicator, Researcher and Manager roles compared to students in some other years. Conclusions Study results suggest that biomedical informatics content is desired by medical students at the University of Utah. Study findings are being used to inform efforts to integrate biomedical informatics content into the curriculum and may assist other medical schools seeking to incorporate similar content.

  5. Trends in biomedical informatics: most cited topics from recent years

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Eui; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical informatics is a young, highly interdisciplinary field that is evolving quickly. It is important to know which published topics in generalist biomedical informatics journals elicit the most interest from the scientific community, and whether this interest changes over time, so that journals can better serve their readers. It is also important to understand whether free access to biomedical informatics articles impacts their citation rates in a significant way, so authors can make informed decisions about unlock fees, and journal owners and publishers understand the implications of open access. The topics and JAMIA articles from years 2009 and 2010 that have been most cited according to the Web of Science are described. To better understand the effects of free access in article dissemination, the number of citations per month after publication for articles published in 2009 versus 2010 was compared, since there was a significant change in free access to JAMIA articles between those years. Results suggest that there is a positive association between free access and citation rate for JAMIA articles. PMID:22180873

  6. Trends in biomedical informatics: most cited topics from recent years.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Eui; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical informatics is a young, highly interdisciplinary field that is evolving quickly. It is important to know which published topics in generalist biomedical informatics journals elicit the most interest from the scientific community, and whether this interest changes over time, so that journals can better serve their readers. It is also important to understand whether free access to biomedical informatics articles impacts their citation rates in a significant way, so authors can make informed decisions about unlock fees, and journal owners and publishers understand the implications of open access. The topics and JAMIA articles from years 2009 and 2010 that have been most cited according to the Web of Science are described. To better understand the effects of free access in article dissemination, the number of citations per month after publication for articles published in 2009 versus 2010 was compared, since there was a significant change in free access to JAMIA articles between those years. Results suggest that there is a positive association between free access and citation rate for JAMIA articles. PMID:22180873

  7. Supporting the Emergence of Dental Informatics with an Online Community

    PubMed Central

    Spallek, H.; Irwin, J. Y.; Schleyer, T.; Butler, B. S.; Weiss, P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. As an emerging field, dental informatics faces many challenges and barriers to establishing itself as a full-fledged discipline; these include the small number of geographically dispersed DI researchers as well as the lack of DI professional societies and DI-specific journals. E-communities have the potential to overcome these obstacles by bringing researchers together at a resources hub and giving them the ability to share information, discuss topics, and find collaborators. In this paper, we discuss our assessment of the information needs of individuals interested in DI and discuss their expectations for an e-community so that we can design an optimal electronic infrastructure for the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The 256 survey respondents indicated they prefer electronic resources over traditional print material to satisfy their information needs. The most frequently expected benefits from participation in the DIOC were general information (85% of respondents), peer networking (31.1%), and identification of potential collaborators and/or research opportunities (23.2%). We are currently building the DIOC electronic infrastructure: a searchable publication archive and the learning center have been created, and the people directory is underway. Readers are encouraged to access the DIOC Website at www.dentalinformatics.com and initiate a discussion with the authors of this paper. PMID:18271498

  8. A national education strategy to develop nursing informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M

    2000-01-01

    Advances in the sophistication of information and communication technologies offer nursing practitioners opportunities for better information management, more complete documentation of their work, and knowledge development to support evidence-based nursing practice. However, a nursing culture that recognizes and adopts the contributions of technology to practice is required to take advantage of these opportunities. The nature of this change suggests a shift in emphasis from specialists in Nursing Informatics (NI) to NI being integrated into all four domains of nursing practice. The magnitude of change required on individual, organizational and professional levels points to the need for Nursing Informatics education strategies on a national level. Recognizing the role and history of NI specialists, defining NI and the required NI competencies are necessary first steps in developing such a plan. Expanding and adapting the educational infrastructure required to support this initiative follows. A working committee at the national level with representatives from a number of stakeholder groups is currently working on a National Nursing Informatics Project to address these issues. This article summarizes key points of an initial discussion paper.

  9. Trends in biomedical informatics: automated topic analysis of JAMIA articles.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Chao; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Hyeon-Eui; Sun, Jimeng; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical Informatics is a growing interdisciplinary field in which research topics and citation trends have been evolving rapidly in recent years. To analyze these data in a fast, reproducible manner, automation of certain processes is needed. JAMIA is a "generalist" journal for biomedical informatics. Its articles reflect the wide range of topics in informatics. In this study, we retrieved Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and citations of JAMIA articles published between 2009 and 2014. We use tensors (i.e., multidimensional arrays) to represent the interaction among topics, time and citations, and applied tensor decomposition to automate the analysis. The trends represented by tensors were then carefully interpreted and the results were compared with previous findings based on manual topic analysis. A list of most cited JAMIA articles, their topics, and publication trends over recent years is presented. The analyses confirmed previous studies and showed that, from 2012 to 2014, the number of articles related to MeSH terms Methods, Organization & Administration, and Algorithms increased significantly both in number of publications and citations. Citation trends varied widely by topic, with Natural Language Processing having a large number of citations in particular years, and Medical Record Systems, Computerized remaining a very popular topic in all years.

  10. Multimodality monitoring: informatics, integration data display and analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J Michael; De Georgia, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The goal of multimodality neuromonitoring is to provide continuous, real-time assessment of brain physiology to prevent, detect, and attenuate secondary brain injury. Clinical informatics deals with biomedical data, information, and knowledge including their acquisition, storage, retrieval, and optimal use for clinical decision-making. An electronic literature search was conducted for English language articles describing the use of informatics in the intensive care unit setting from January 1990 to August 2013. A total of 64 studies were included in this review. Clinical informatics infrastructure should be adopted that enables a wide range of linear and nonlinear analytical methods be applied to patient data. Specific time epochs of clinical interest should be reviewable. Analysis strategies of monitor alarms may help address alarm fatigue. Ergonomic data display that present results from analyses with clinical information in a sensible uncomplicated manner improve clinical decision-making. Collecting and archiving the highest resolution physiologic and phenotypic data in a comprehensive open format data warehouse is a crucial first step toward information management and two-way translational research for multimodality monitoring. The infrastructure required is largely the same as that needed for telemedicine intensive care applications, which under the right circumstances improves care quality while reducing cost. PMID:25208675

  11. Big Data: Are Biomedical and Health Informatics Training Programs Ready?

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, W.; Ganesh, A. U. Jai

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The growing volume and diversity of health and biomedical data indicate that the era of Big Data has arrived for healthcare. This has many implications for informatics, not only in terms of implementing and evaluating information systems, but also for the work and training of informatics researchers and professionals. This article addresses the question: What do biomedical and health informaticians working in analytics and Big Data need to know? Methods We hypothesize a set of skills that we hope will be discussed among academic and other informaticians. Results The set of skills includes: Programming - especially with data-oriented tools, such as SQL and statistical programming languages; Statistics - working knowledge to apply tools and techniques; Domain knowledge - depending on one’s area of work, bioscience or health care; and Communication - being able to understand needs of people and organizations, and articulate results back to them. Conclusions Biomedical and health informatics educational programs must introduce concepts of analytics, Big Data, and the underlying skills to use and apply them into their curricula. The development of new coursework should focus on those who will become experts, with training aiming to provide skills in “deep analytical talent” as well as those who need knowledge to support such individuals. PMID:25123740

  12. Supporting the emergence of dental informatics with an online community.

    PubMed

    Spallek, H; Irwin, J Y; Schleyer, T; Butler, B S; Weiss, P M

    2007-07-01

    Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. As an emerging field, dental informatics faces many challenges and barriers to establishing itself as a full-fledged discipline; these include the small number of geographically dispersed DI researchers as well as the lack of DI professional societies and DI-specific journals. E-communities have the potential to overcome these obstacles by bringing researchers together at a resources hub and giving them the ability to share information, discuss topics, and find collaborators. In this paper, we discuss our assessment of the information needs of individuals interested in DI and discuss their expectations for an e-community so that we can design an optimal electronic infrastructure for the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The 256 survey respondents indicated they prefer electronic resources over traditional print material to satisfy their information needs. The most frequently expected benefits from participation in the DIOC were general information (85% of respondents), peer networking (31.1%), and identification of potential collaborators and/or research opportunities (23.2%). We are currently building the DIOC electronic infrastructure: a searchable publication archive and the learning center have been created, and the people directory is underway. Readers are encouraged to access the DIOC Website at www.dentalinformatics.com and initiate a discussion with the authors of this paper.

  13. Citation analysis in journal rankings: medical informatics in the library and information science literature.

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanatham, R

    1998-01-01

    Medical informatics is an interdisciplinary field. Medical informatics articles will be found in the literature of various disciplines including library and information science publications. The purpose of this study was to provide an objectively ranked list of journals that publish medical informatics articles relevant to library and information science. Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Social Science Citation Index were used to identify articles published on the topic of medical informatics and to identify a ranked list of journals. This study also used citation analysis to identify the most frequently cited journals relevant to library and information science. PMID:9803294

  14. Citation analysis in journal rankings: medical informatics in the library and information science literature.

    PubMed

    Vishwanatham, R

    1998-10-01

    Medical informatics is an interdisciplinary field. Medical informatics articles will be found in the literature of various disciplines including library and information science publications. The purpose of this study was to provide an objectively ranked list of journals that publish medical informatics articles relevant to library and information science. Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Social Science Citation Index were used to identify articles published on the topic of medical informatics and to identify a ranked list of journals. This study also used citation analysis to identify the most frequently cited journals relevant to library and information science.

  15. Towards Implementing a Global Competency-Based Nursing and Clinical Informatics Curriculum: Applying the TIGER Initiative.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Ursula; Ball, Marion; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Chang, Polun; Wilson, Marisa; Anderson, Christel

    2016-01-01

    This workshop will review the history of the TIGER initiative in order to set the framework for an understanding of international informatics competencies. We will include a description of clinical nursing informatics programs in 37 countries as well as the results of a recent survey of nursing competencies in order to further discussions of internationally agreed-upon competency definitions. These two surveys will provide the basis for developing a consensus regarding the integration of core competencies into informatics curriculum developments. Expected outcomes include building consensus on core competencies and developing plans toward implementing intra- and inter-professional informatics competencies across disciplines globally. PMID:27332333

  16. A prospective trial of customized adherence enhancement plus long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication in homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Levin, Jennifer; Ramirez, Luis F.; Hahn, David Y.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bialko, Christopher S.; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Fuentes-Casiano, Edna; Williams, Tiffany D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment non-adherence in people with schizophrenia is associated with relapse and homelessness. Building upon the usefulness of long-acting medication, and our work in psychosocial interventions to enhance adherence, we conducted a prospective uncontrolled trial of customized adherence enhancement (CAE) plus long-acting injectable antipsychotic (LAI) using haloperidol decanoate in 30 homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Methods Participants received monthly CAE and LAI (CAE-L) for 6 months. Primary outcomes were adherence as measured by the Tablets Routine Questionnaire (TRQ) and housing status. Secondary outcomes included psychiatric symptoms, functioning, side effects, and hospitalizations. Results Mean age of participants was 41.8 years (SD 8.6), mainly minorities (90% African-American) and mainly single/never married (70%). Most (97%) had past or current substance abuse, and had been incarcerated (97%). Ten individuals (33%) terminated the study prematurely. CAE-L was associated with good adherence to LAI (76% at 6 months) and dramatic improvement in oral medication adherence, which changed from missing 46% of medication at study enrollment to missing only 10% at study end (p = 0.03). There were significant improvements in psychiatric symptoms (p<.001) and functioning (p<.001). Akathisia was a major side effect with LAI. Conclusion While interpretation of findings must be tempered by the methodological limitations, CAE-L appears to be associated with improved adherence, symptoms, and functioning in homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Additional research is needed on effective and practical approaches to improving health outcomes for homeless people with serious mental illness. PMID:24434094

  17. Enhancing the Emotional and Social Skills of the Youth to Promote their Wellbeing and Positive Development: A Systematic Review of Universal School-based Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sancassiani, Federica; Pintus, Elisa; Holte, Arne; Paulus, Peter; Moro, Maria Francesca; Cossu, Giulia; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Lindert, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Background: The acquisition of social and emotional skills is associated with positive youth development, character education, healthy lifestyle behaviours, reduction in depression and anxiety, conduct disorders, violence, bullying, conflict, and anger. School-based interventions aimed to enhance these skills go beyond a problem-focused approach to embrace a more positive view of health; they could also improve the youth’s wellbeing. Aim: To describe the main features and to establish the effectiveness of universal school-based RCTs for children and the youth, aimed to promote their psychosocial wellbeing, positive development, healthy lifestyle behaviours and/or academic performance by improving their emotional and social skills. Methods: Systematic review by searching for relevant papers in PubMed/Medline with the following key words: “mental health” OR “wellbeing” OR “health promotion” OR “emotional learning” OR “social learning” OR “emotional and social learning” OR “positive youth development” OR “life skills” OR “life skills training” AND “school”. Interval was set from January 2000 to April 2014. Results: 1,984 papers were identified through the search. Out of them 22 RCTs were included. While most interventions were characterized by a whole-school approach and SAFE practices, few studies only used standardized measures to assess outcomes, or had collected follow-up data after ≥ 6 months. The results of all these trials were examined and discussed. Conclusion: Universal school-based RCTs to enhance emotional and social skills showed controversial findings, due to some methodological issues mainly. Nevertheless they show promising outcomes that are relatively far-reaching for children and youth wellbeing and therefore are important in the real world. PMID:25834626

  18. Enhancing Neurobehavioral Gains with the Aid of Games and Exercise (ENGAGE): Initial open trial of a novel early intervention fostering the development of preschoolers' self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Healey, Dione M; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Poor self-regulation during the preschool years predicts a wide array of adverse adult outcomes and, as such, is an important treatment target. We assessed the efficacy of a novel early intervention aimed at fostering the development of preschoolers' self-regulation. Enhancing Neurobehavioral Gains with the Aid of Games and Exercise (ENGAGE) involves parents and children playing a wide range of games targeting self-regulation on a daily basis over a 5-week period. Twenty-five New Zealand families, in whom parents identified their children as difficult to manage, took part in this study. Parent hyperactivity, aggression, and attention problems ratings on the BASC-2 were used to assess improvements in behavioral self-regulation, and subtests of the Stanford Binet-5 and NEPSY-2 were used to assess improvements in cognitive control. Improvements in parent-rated hyperactivity, aggression, and attention problems were maintained throughout the 12-month follow-up. In addition, improvements were found in two neurocognitive areas associated with self-regulation. While more rigorous randomized controlled trials are necessary, ENGAGE shows promise as a novel intervention for developing self-regulation in at-risk preschoolers.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of MMFS-01, a Synapse Density Enhancer, for Treating Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guosong; Weinger, Jason G.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xue, Feng; Sadeghpour, Safa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cognitive impairment is a major problem in elderly, affecting quality of life. Pre-clinical studies show that MMFS-01, a synapse density enhancer, is effective at reversing cognitive decline in aging rodents. Objective: Since brain atrophy during aging is strongly associated with both cognitive decline and sleep disorder, we evaluated the efficacy of MMFS-01 in its ability to reverse cognitive impairment and improve sleep. Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-designed trial in older adult subjects (age 50–70) with cognitive impairment. Subjects were treated with MMFS-01 (n = 23) or placebo (n = 21) for 12 weeks and cognitive ability, sleep quality, and emotion were evaluated. Overall cognitive ability was determined by a composite score of tests in four major cognitive domains. Results: With MMFS-01 treatment, overall cognitive ability improved significantly relative to placebo (p = 0.003; Cohen’s d = 0.91). Cognitive fluctuation was also reduced. The study population had more severe executive function deficits than age-matched controls from normative data and MMFS-01 treatment nearly restored their impaired executive function, demonstrating that MMFS-01 may be clinically significant. Due to the strong placebo effects on sleep and anxiety, the effects of MMFS-01 on sleep and anxiety could not be determined. Conclusions: The current study demonstrates the potential of MMFS-01 for treating cognitive impairment in older adults. PMID:26519439

  20. Enhancing Neurobehavioral Gains with the Aid of Games and Exercise (ENGAGE): Initial open trial of a novel early intervention fostering the development of preschoolers' self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Healey, Dione M; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Poor self-regulation during the preschool years predicts a wide array of adverse adult outcomes and, as such, is an important treatment target. We assessed the efficacy of a novel early intervention aimed at fostering the development of preschoolers' self-regulation. Enhancing Neurobehavioral Gains with the Aid of Games and Exercise (ENGAGE) involves parents and children playing a wide range of games targeting self-regulation on a daily basis over a 5-week period. Twenty-five New Zealand families, in whom parents identified their children as difficult to manage, took part in this study. Parent hyperactivity, aggression, and attention problems ratings on the BASC-2 were used to assess improvements in behavioral self-regulation, and subtests of the Stanford Binet-5 and NEPSY-2 were used to assess improvements in cognitive control. Improvements in parent-rated hyperactivity, aggression, and attention problems were maintained throughout the 12-month follow-up. In addition, improvements were found in two neurocognitive areas associated with self-regulation. While more rigorous randomized controlled trials are necessary, ENGAGE shows promise as a novel intervention for developing self-regulation in at-risk preschoolers. PMID:24735230

  1. Impacts of an Enhanced Family Health and Sexuality Module of the HealthTeacher Middle School Curriculum: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Mindy E.; Cook, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the impacts of an enhanced version of the Family Life and Sexuality Module of the HealthTeacher middle school curriculum. Methods. We conducted a cluster randomized trial of Chicago, Illinois, middle schools. We randomly assigned schools to a treatment group that received the intervention during the 2010–2011 school year or a control group that did not. The primary analysis sample included 595 students (7 schools) in the treatment group and 594 students (7 schools) in the control group. Results. Students in the treatment schools reported greater exposure to information on reproductive health topics such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs; 78% vs 60%; P < .01), abstinence (64% vs 37%; P < .01), and birth control (45% vs 29%; P < .01). They also reported higher average scores on an index of knowledge of contraceptive methods and STI transmission (0.5 vs 0.3; P = .02). We found no statistically significant differences in rates of sexual intercourse (12% vs 12%; P = .99), oral sex (12% vs 9%; P = .18), or other intermediate outcomes. Conclusions. The program had modest effects when tested among Chicago middle school students. PMID:27689479

  2. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    trials require careful consideration when developing interim data monitoring plans, and trial sponsors, investigators, and data monitoring committees should agree on a plan before trial inception. Finally, special expertise, such as an informatics, may be helpful on data monitoring committees for some pragmatic clinical trials. Patient representatives may provide particularly valuable insights in the monitoring process.

  3. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Colditz, Graham A.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p<0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25–45 kg/m2) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, −3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] −6.10, –0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm −2.72 (95 % CI −5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, −1.64 (95 % CI −3.13, –0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time. PMID:26518022

  4. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Colditz, Graham A; Rock, Cheryl L; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p < 0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25-45 kg/m(2)) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, -3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] -6.10, -0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm -2.72 (95 % CI -5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, -1.64 (95 % CI -3.13, -0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time.

  5. Study on psychoeducation enhancing results of adherence in patients with schizophrenia (SPERA-S): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to pharmacotherapy negatively affects the course and the outcome of schizophreniaspectrum psychoses, enhancing the risk of relapse. Falloon and coworkers developed a Psychoeducation Program aimed at improving communication and problem-solving abilities in patients and their families. This study set out to evaluate changes in adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses, by comparing one group exposed to the Falloon Psychoeducation Program (FPP) with another group exposed to family supportive therapy with generic information on the disorders. Methods 340 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and related disorders according to standardized criteria from 10 participating units distributed throughout the Italian National Health System (NHS), will be enrolled with 1:1 allocation by the method of blocks of randomized permutations. Patients will be reassessed at 6, 12 and 18 months after start of treatment (duration: 6 months). The primary objective is to evaluate changes in adherence to pharmacotherapy after psychoeducation. Adherence will be assessed at three-month intervals by measuring blood levels of the primary prescribed drug using high pressure liquid chromatography, and via the Medication Adherence Questionnaire and a modified version of the Adherence Interview. Secondary objectives are changes in the frequency of relapse and readmission, as the main indicator of the course of the disorder. Enrolled patients will be allocated to the FPP (yes/no) randomly, 1:1, in a procedure controlled by the coordinating unit; codes will be masked until the conclusion of the protocol (or the occurrence of a severe negative event). The raters will be blind to treatment allocation and will be tested for blinding after treatment completion. Intention-to-treat will be applied in considering the primary and secondary outcomes. Multiple imputations will be applied to integrate the missing data. The study started

  6. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Colditz, Graham A; Rock, Cheryl L; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p < 0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25-45 kg/m(2)) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, -3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] -6.10, -0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm -2.72 (95 % CI -5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, -1.64 (95 % CI -3.13, -0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time. PMID:26518022

  7. Quantum Bio-Informatics II From Quantum Information to Bio-Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, L.; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    The problem of quantum-like representation in economy cognitive science, and genetics / L. Accardi, A. Khrennikov and M. Ohya -- Chaotic behavior observed in linea dynamics / M. Asano, T. Yamamoto and Y. Togawa -- Complete m-level quantum teleportation based on Kossakowski-Ohya scheme / M. Asano, M. Ohya and Y. Tanaka -- Towards quantum cybernetics: optimal feedback control in quantum bio informatics / V. P. Belavkin -- Quantum entanglement and circulant states / D. Chruściński -- The compound Fock space and its application in brain models / K. -H. Fichtner and W. Freudenberg -- Characterisation of beam splitters / L. Fichtner and M. Gäbler -- Application of entropic chaos degree to a combined quantum baker's map / K. Inoue, M. Ohya and I. V. Volovich -- On quantum algorithm for multiple alignment of amino acid sequences / S. Iriyama and M. Ohya --Quantum-like models for decision making in psychology and cognitive science / A. Khrennikov -- On completely positive non-Markovian evolution of a d-level system / A. Kossakowski and R. Rebolledo -- Measures of entanglement - a Hilbert space approach / W. A. Majewski -- Some characterizations of PPT states and their relation / T. Matsuoka -- On the dynamics of entanglement and characterization ofentangling properties of quantum evolutions / M. Michalski -- Perspective from micro-macro duality - towards non-perturbative renormalization scheme / I. Ojima -- A simple symmetric algorithm using a likeness with Introns behavior in RNA sequences / M. Regoli -- Some aspects of quadratic generalized white noise functionals / Si Si and T. Hida -- Analysis of several social mobility data using measure of departure from symmetry / K. Tahata ... [et al.] -- Time in physics and life science / I. V. Volovich -- Note on entropies in quantum processes / N. Watanabe -- Basics of molecular simulation and its application to biomolecules / T. Ando and I. Yamato -- Theory of proton-induced superionic conduction in hydrogen-bonded systems

  8. Deconstruction of Socio-Technical Information Systems with Virtual Exploration Environments as a Method of Teaching Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magenheim, Johann S.

    The working group Didactics of Informatics at the University of Paderborn (Germany) develops and evaluates a multimedia exploration platform for information systems (MEPIS) to the needs of teaching and learning informatics at secondary schools. This paper describes the basic ideas within a system-oriented approach of didactics of informatics and…

  9. Which Way with Informatics in High Schools in the Netherlands? The Dutch Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Diepen, Nico; Perrenet, Jacob; Zwaneveld, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Informatics is currently being taught in high schools all over the world. In the Dutch curriculum, computer literacy is taught in the lower grades as a compulsory subject, Informatics is taught as an elective in the higher grades of some schools. As a follow-up to the outline of Grgurina and Tolboom (2008), the discussion about the future of…

  10. Management and Evaluation of a Pan-Canadian Graduate Training Program in Health Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Marilynne; Lau, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Eight Canadian universities partnered to establish a Collaborative Health Informatics PhD/Postdoc Strategic Training Program (CHPSTP). The 6-year goal was to increase research capacity in health informatics in Canada. Three cohorts of 20 trainees participated in the training, which included online Research Learning Experiences, annual face-to-face…

  11. The Role of Computer Science and Computing Skills in a Medical Informatics Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan L.; Logan, Judith R.; Hersh, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Graduates of medical informatics educational programs hold a variety of jobs that require various skills and conceptual understanding. Some degree of technical knowledge is usually expected of these workers. We examine the evolution of the computer science portion of a medical informatics curriculum and report on a survey of recent graduates providing feedback regarding the usefulness of various aspects of that curriculum.

  12. Education for Health Information Professionals: Perspectives from Health Informatics in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Prudence W.; Roderer, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    While interest and activity in health informatics continues to increase worldwide, concerns about the most appropriate educational preparation for practice also arise. Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field that pursues effective use of data, information and knowledge to support effective decision making; in the health field, those…

  13. Mathematique et Informatique, Aspect Didactique (Mathematics and Informatics, the Didactic Aspect).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pochon, Luc-Olivier

    Both mathematics and informatics share common characteristics. Several didacticians propose therefore to define didactic situations permitting learners to "co-construct" knowledge of mathematics and informatics. In this document, the idea is resumed and a certain number of "functional structures" are proposed. These sets of problems take on a…

  14. Building a Culture of Health Informatics Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A New Frontier.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Alshammari, Riyad; Almutairi, Mariam; Jamal, Amr; Alshoaib, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurship and innovation within the health informatics (HI) scientific community are relatively sluggish when compared to other disciplines such as computer science and engineering. Healthcare in general, and specifically, the health informatics scientific community needs to embrace more innovative and entrepreneurial practices. In this paper, we explore the concepts of innovation and entrepreneurship as they apply to the health informatics scientific community. We also outline several strategies to improve the culture of innovation and entrepreneurship within the health informatics scientific community such as: (I) incorporating innovation and entrepreneurship in health informatics education; (II) creating strong linkages with industry and healthcare organizations; (III) supporting national health innovation and entrepreneurship competitions; (IV) creating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship within healthcare organizations; (V) developing health informatics policies that support innovation and entrepreneurship based on internationally recognized standards; and (VI) develop an health informatics entrepreneurship ecosystem. With these changes, we conclude that embracing health innovation and entrepreneurship may be more readily accepted over the long-term within the health informatics scientific community.

  15. Building a Culture of Health Informatics Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A New Frontier.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Alshammari, Riyad; Almutairi, Mariam; Jamal, Amr; Alshoaib, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurship and innovation within the health informatics (HI) scientific community are relatively sluggish when compared to other disciplines such as computer science and engineering. Healthcare in general, and specifically, the health informatics scientific community needs to embrace more innovative and entrepreneurial practices. In this paper, we explore the concepts of innovation and entrepreneurship as they apply to the health informatics scientific community. We also outline several strategies to improve the culture of innovation and entrepreneurship within the health informatics scientific community such as: (I) incorporating innovation and entrepreneurship in health informatics education; (II) creating strong linkages with industry and healthcare organizations; (III) supporting national health innovation and entrepreneurship competitions; (IV) creating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship within healthcare organizations; (V) developing health informatics policies that support innovation and entrepreneurship based on internationally recognized standards; and (VI) develop an health informatics entrepreneurship ecosystem. With these changes, we conclude that embracing health innovation and entrepreneurship may be more readily accepted over the long-term within the health informatics scientific community. PMID:26153003

  16. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.

  17. Informatics competencies pre-and post-implementation of a Palm-based student clinical log and informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Sheets Cook, Sarah; Curtis, Lesly; Soupios, Michael; Curran, Christine

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and evaluation of a two-part approach to achieving informatics competencies: 1) Palm-based student clinical log for documentation of patient encounters; and 2) informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum. Using a repeated-measures, non-equivalent control group design, self-reported informatics competencies were rated using a survey instrument based upon published informatics competencies for beginning nurses. For the class of 2002, scores increased significantly in all competencies from admission to graduation. Using a minimum score of 3 on a scale of 1=not competent and 5=expert to indicate competence, the only area in which it was not achieved was Computer Skills: Education. For 2001 graduates, Computer Skills: Decision Support was also below 3. There were no significant differences in competency scores between 2001 and 2002 graduates. Computer Skills: Decision Support neared significance. Subsequently, the approaches were refined for implementation in the class of 2003.

  18. Post-trial dopaminergic modulation of conditioned catalepsy: A single apomorphine induced increase/decrease in dopaminergic activation immediately following a conditioned catalepsy response can reverse/enhance a haloperidol conditioned and sensitized catalepsy response.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas Rangel; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; Santos, Breno Garone; Silva, Jade Leal Loureiro; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-09-15

    Haloperidol can induce catalepsy and this drug effect can be conditioned as well as sensitized to contextual cues. We used a paired/unpaired Pavlovian conditioning protocol to establish haloperidol catalepsy conditioned and sensitized responses. Groups of rats were given 10 daily catalepsy tests following administration of vehicle (n=24) or haloperidol (1.0mg/kg) either paired (n=18) or unpaired (n=18) to testing. Subsequently, testing for conditioning was conducted and conditioning and sensitization of catalepsy were observed selectively in the paired group. Immediately following a second test for catalepsy conditioning, the groups were subdivided into 4 vehicle groups, 3 unpaired haloperidol groups and 3 paired haloperidol groups and were given one of three post-trial treatments (vehicle, 0.05mg/kg or 2.0mg/kg apomorphine). One day later the conditioned catalepsy test 3 was carried out and on the next day, a haloperidol challenge test was performed. The post-trial apomorphine treatments had major effects on the paired groups upon both conditioning and the haloperidol challenge test. The low dose apomorphine post-trial treatment enhanced both the conditioned and the haloperidol sensitized catalepsy responses. The high dose apomorphine post-trial treatment eliminated conditioned catalepsy and eliminated the initial acute catalepsy response to haloperidol that was induced in the vehicle control groups. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of conditioned drug cues to modification by increases/decreases in activity of the dopamine system in the immediate post-trial interval after a conditioning trial. This demonstration that post-trial dopaminergic drug treatments can modify conditioned drug behavior has broad implications for conditioned drug effects.

  19. Neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated on a phase Ib trial evaluating topotecan by convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Jennifer A.; Dave, Amie N.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Sands, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative, invasive tumors that are resistant to conventional treatment, and disease progression is often accompanied by physical and mental debilitation. Neurocognitive functioning (NCF) and quality of life (QoL) were evaluated as part of a prospective phase Ib dose-escalation study of topotecan by convection-enhanced delivery (CED) for adult patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods Sixteen patients were enrolled, and NCF and QoL were evaluated using the Cognitive Stability Index and SF-36 at baseline and monthly for 4 months post treatment. Descriptive analyses included the reliable change index for serial evaluations and correlations for associations between outcome variables and age, tumor volume, total topotecan dose, and treatment effect. Results Individual classifications of response to treatment indicated that a majority of patients reported stable scores over the follow-up period. Demographic and treatment-related variables were not associated with outcomes. Baseline processing speed scores were invalid for 6 subjects. Higher rates of valid scores were observed on subsequent administrations. Conclusions As the first study to use CED of any kind to evaluate the impact of CED on NCF or QoL, there was no evidence of severe detriment to either outcome. Long-term evaluation is necessary to track changes in NCF and QoL related to disease progression. Invalid scores suggest that computer-based assessments may not be suitable for all patients with malignant gliomas, especially those with cognitive deficits secondary to their disease. Future trials should include a wider range of sensitive measures to assess the impact of CED on patient NCF and QoL. PMID:26034621

  20. Randomized controlled trial of motivational enhancement therapy with nontreatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users: a further test of the teen marijuana check-up.

    PubMed

    Walker, Denise D; Stephens, Robert; Roffman, Roger; Demarce, Josephine; Lozano, Brian; Towe, Sheri; Berg, Belinda

    2011-09-01

    Cannabis use adversely affects adolescents and interventions that are attractive to adolescents are needed. This trial compared the effects of a brief motivational intervention for cannabis use with a brief educational feedback control and a no-assessment control. Participants were randomized into one of three treatment conditions: Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), Educational Feedback Control (EFC), or Delayed Feedback Control (DFC). Those who were assigned to MET and EFC were administered a computerized baseline assessment immediately following randomization and completed assessments at the 3- and 12-month follow-up periods. Participants in the DFC condition were not assessed until the 3-month follow-up. Following the completion of treatment sessions, all participants were offered up to four optional individual treatment sessions aimed at cessation of cannabis use. The research was conducted in high schools in Seattle, Washington. The participant s included 310 self-referred adolescents who smoked cannabis regularly. The main outcome measures included days of cannabis use, associated negative consequences, and engagement in additional treatment. At the 3-month follow-up, participants in both the MET and EFC conditions reported significantly fewer days of cannabis use and negative consequences compared to those in the DFC. The frequency of cannabis use was less in MET relative to EFC at 3 months, but it did not translate to differences in negative consequences. Reductions in use and problems were sustained at 12 months, but there were no differences between MET and EFC interventions. Engagement in additional treatment was minimal and did not differ by condition. Brief interventions can attract adolescent cannabis users and have positive impacts on them, but the mechanisms of the effects are yet to be identified.

  1. Does Consumption of LC Omega-3 PUFA Enhance Cognitive Performance in Healthy School-Aged Children and throughout Adulthood? Evidence from Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stonehouse, Welma

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain (LC) omega-3 PUFA derived from marine sources may play an important role in cognitive performance throughout all life stages. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the dominant omega-3 in the brain, is a major component of neuronal cell membranes and affects various neurological pathways and processess. Despite its critical role in brain function, human’s capacity to synthesize DHA de novo is limited and its consumption through the diet is important. However, many individuals do not or rarely consume seafood. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the current evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) in healthy school-aged children, younger and older adults to determine whether consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA improves cognitive performance and to make recommendations for future research. Current evidence suggests that consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA, particularly DHA, may enhance cognitive performance relating to learning, cognitive development, memory and speed of performing cognitive tasks. Those who habitually consume diets low in DHA, children with low literacy ability and malnourished and older adults with age-related cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment seem to benefit most. However, study design limitations in many RCTs hamper firm conclusions. The measurement of a uniform biomarker, e.g., % DHA in red blood cells, is essential to establish baseline DHA-status, to determine targets for cognitive performance and to facilitate dosage recommendations. It is recommended that future studies be at least 16 weeks in duration, account for potential interaction effects of gender, age and apolipoprotein E genotype, include vegan/vegetarian populations, include measures of speed of cognitive performance and include brain imaging technologies as supportive information on working mechanisms of LC omega-3 PUFA. PMID:25054550

  2. Does consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA enhance cognitive performance in healthy school-aged children and throughout adulthood? Evidence from clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stonehouse, Welma

    2014-07-01

    Long-chain (LC) omega-3 PUFA derived from marine sources may play an important role in cognitive performance throughout all life stages. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the dominant omega-3 in the brain, is a major component of neuronal cell membranes and affects various neurological pathways and processess. Despite its critical role in brain function, human's capacity to synthesize DHA de novo is limited and its consumption through the diet is important. However, many individuals do not or rarely consume seafood. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the current evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) in healthy school-aged children, younger and older adults to determine whether consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA improves cognitive performance and to make recommendations for future research. Current evidence suggests that consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA, particularly DHA, may enhance cognitive performance relating to learning, cognitive development, memory and speed of performing cognitive tasks. Those who habitually consume diets low in DHA, children with low literacy ability and malnourished and older adults with age-related cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment seem to benefit most. However, study design limitations in many RCTs hamper firm conclusions. The measurement of a uniform biomarker, e.g., % DHA in red blood cells, is essential to establish baseline DHA-status, to determine targets for cognitive performance and to facilitate dosage recommendations. It is recommended that future studies be at least 16 weeks in duration, account for potential interaction effects of gender, age and apolipoprotein E genotype, include vegan/vegetarian populations, include measures of speed of cognitive performance and include brain imaging technologies as supportive information on working mechanisms of LC omega-3 PUFA. PMID:25054550

  3. Does consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA enhance cognitive performance in healthy school-aged children and throughout adulthood? Evidence from clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stonehouse, Welma

    2014-07-22

    Long-chain (LC) omega-3 PUFA derived from marine sources may play an important role in cognitive performance throughout all life stages. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the dominant omega-3 in the brain, is a major component of neuronal cell membranes and affects various neurological pathways and processess. Despite its critical role in brain function, human's capacity to synthesize DHA de novo is limited and its consumption through the diet is important. However, many individuals do not or rarely consume seafood. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the current evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) in healthy school-aged children, younger and older adults to determine whether consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA improves cognitive performance and to make recommendations for future research. Current evidence suggests that consumption of LC omega-3 PUFA, particularly DHA, may enhance cognitive performance relating to learning, cognitive development, memory and speed of performing cognitive tasks. Those who habitually consume diets low in DHA, children with low literacy ability and malnourished and older adults with age-related cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment seem to benefit most. However, study design limitations in many RCTs hamper firm conclusions. The measurement of a uniform biomarker, e.g., % DHA in red blood cells, is essential to establish baseline DHA-status, to determine targets for cognitive performance and to facilitate dosage recommendations. It is recommended that future studies be at least 16 weeks in duration, account for potential interaction effects of gender, age and apolipoprotein E genotype, include vegan/vegetarian populations, include measures of speed of cognitive performance and include brain imaging technologies as supportive information on working mechanisms of LC omega-3 PUFA.

  4. Enhancing Father Engagement and Interparental Teamwork in an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention: A Randomized-Controlled Trial of Outcomes and Processes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Tenille J; Keown, Louise J; Sanders, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the outcomes and process in a positive parenting program adapted to enhance father engagement and teamwork. A randomized control trial of the Group Triple P Program with additional father-relevant content was conducted with 42 families of children with conduct problems aged between 3 to 8years. Families were allocated to either the intervention or waitlist condition. Assessments of child behavior, self- and partner-reported parenting, and the interparental relationship were conducted at T1 (pre), T2 (post), and T3 (6-month follow-up). Observations were used to examine fathers' and mothers' unique and shared contributions to group process during participation in parenting group sessions. Following program completion (T2) intervention group fathers and mothers reported significantly fewer child behavior problems, dysfunctional parenting practices, and interparental conflict about child-rearing than waitlist parents. Intervention group mothers also reported increased parenting confidence and rated their partners as showing significantly fewer dysfunctional parenting practices. Intervention effects were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Observational data showed that fathers and mothers made similar contributions during the group sessions. The most frequent types of contributions were asking questions and sharing information with other parents about implementing parenting strategies. The key differences between parents were fathers' more frequent use of humor and mothers' more frequent sharing of personal stories and reporting co-parenting cooperation. The levels of session attendance and program satisfaction were high for both fathers and mothers. Findings highlight the potential benefits of efforts to engage both fathers and mothers for program adherence, satisfaction, and effectiveness.

  5. Developing Informatics Tools and Strategies for Consumer-centered Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Logan, Robert; Smith, Catherine Arnott; Leroy, Gondy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2008-01-01

    As the emphasis on individuals' active partnership in health care grows, so does the public's need for effective, comprehensible consumer health resources. Consumer health informatics has the potential to provide frameworks and strategies for designing effective health communication tools that empower users and improve their health decisions. This article presents an overview of the consumer health informatics field, discusses promising approaches to supporting health communication, and identifies challenges plus direction for future research and development. The authors' recommendations emphasize the need for drawing upon communication and social science theories of information behavior, reaching out to consumers via a range of traditional and novel formats, gaining better understanding of the public's health information needs, and developing informatics solutions for tailoring resources to users' needs and competencies. This article was written as a scholarly outreach and leadership project by members of the American Medical Informatics Association's Consumer Health Informatics Working Group. PMID:18436895

  6. Developing informatics tools and strategies for consumer-centered health communication.

    PubMed

    Keselman, Alla; Logan, Robert; Smith, Catherine Arnott; Leroy, Gondy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2008-01-01

    As the emphasis on individuals' active partnership in health care grows, so does the public's need for effective, comprehensible consumer health resources. Consumer health informatics has the potential to provide frameworks and strategies for designing effective health communication tools that empower users and improve their health decisions. This article presents an overview of the consumer health informatics field, discusses promising approaches to supporting health communication, and identifies challenges plus direction for future research and development. The authors' recommendations emphasize the need for drawing upon communication and social science theories of information behavior, reaching out to consumers via a range of traditional and novel formats, gaining better understanding of the public's health information needs, and developing informatics solutions for tailoring resources to users' needs and competencies. This article was written as a scholarly outreach and leadership project by members of the American Medical Informatics Association's Consumer Health Informatics Working Group.

  7. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  8. Leveraging biomedical informatics for assessing plasticity and repair in primate spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Jessica L.; Haefeli, Jenny; Salegio, Ernesto A.; Liu, Aiwen W.; Guandique, Cristian F.; Stück, Ellen D.; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah C.; Zdunowski, Sharon; Brock, John H.; Roy, Roland R.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Courtine, Gregoire; Havton, Leif A; Steward, Oswald; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tuzynski, Mark H.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Ferguson, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent preclinical advances highlight the therapeutic potential of treatments aimed at boosting regeneration and plasticity of spinal circuitry damaged by spinal cord injury (SCI). With several promising candidates being considered for translation into clinical trials, the SCI community has called for a non-human primate model as a crucial validation step to test efficacy and validity of these therapies prior to human testing. The present paper reviews the previous and ongoing efforts of the California Spinal Cord Consortium (CSCC), a multidisciplinary team of experts from 5 University of California medical and research centers, to develop this crucial translational SCI model. We focus on the growing volumes of high resolution data collected by the CSCC, and our efforts to develop a biomedical informatics framework aimed at leveraging multidimensional data to monitor plasticity and repair targeting recovery of hand and arm function. Although the main focus of many researchers is the restoration of voluntary motor control, we also describe our ongoing efforts to add assessments of sensory function, including pain, vital signs during surgery, and recovery of bladder and bowel function. By pooling our multidimensional data resources and building a unified database infrastructure for this clinically relevant translational model of SCI, we are now in a unique position to test promising therapeutic strategies’ efficacy on the entire syndrome of SCI. We review analyses highlighting the intersection between motor, sensory, autonomic and pathological contributions to the overall restoration of function. PMID:25451131

  9. A decadal view of biodiversity informatics: challenges and priorities.

    PubMed

    Hardisty, Alex; Roberts, Dave; Addink, Wouter; Aelterman, Bart; Agosti, Donat; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Ariño, Arturo H; Arvanitidis, Christos; Backeljau, Thierry; Bailly, Nicolas; Belbin, Lee; Berendsohn, Walter; Bertrand, Nic; Caithness, Neil; Campbell, David; Cochrane, Guy; Conruyt, Noël; Culham, Alastair; Damgaard, Christian; Davies, Neil; Fady, Bruno; Faulwetter, Sarah; Feest, Alan; Field, Dawn; Garnier, Eric; Geser, Guntram; Gilbert, Jack; Grosche; Grosser, David; Hardisty, Alex; Herbinet, Bénédicte; Hobern, Donald; Jones, Andrew; de Jong, Yde; King, David; Knapp, Sandra; Koivula, Hanna; Los, Wouter; Meyer, Chris; Morris, Robert A; Morrison, Norman; Morse, David; Obst, Matthias; Pafilis, Evagelos; Page, Larry M; Page, Roderic; Pape, Thomas; Parr, Cynthia; Paton, Alan; Patterson, David; Paymal, Elisabeth; Penev, Lyubomir; Pollet, Marc; Pyle, Richard; von Raab-Straube, Eckhard; Robert, Vincent; Roberts, Dave; Robertson, Tim; Rovellotti, Olivier; Saarenmaa, Hannu; Schalk, Peter; Schaminee, Joop; Schofield, Paul; Sier, Andy; Sierra, Soraya; Smith, Vince; van Spronsen, Edwin; Thornton-Wood, Simon; van Tienderen, Peter; van Tol, Jan; Tuama, Éamonn Ó; Uetz, Peter; Vaas, Lea; Vignes Lebbe, Régine; Vision, Todd; Vu, Duong; De Wever, Aaike; White, Richard; Willis, Kathy; Young, Fiona

    2013-04-15

    Biodiversity informatics plays a central enabling role in the research community's efforts to address scientific conservation and sustainability issues. Great strides have been made in the past decade establishing a framework for sharing data, where taxonomy and systematics has been perceived as the most prominent discipline involved. To some extent this is inevitable, given the use of species names as the pivot around which information is organised. To address the urgent questions around conservation, land-use, environmental change, sustainability, food security and ecosystem services that are facing Governments worldwide, we need to understand how the ecosystem works. So, we need a systems approach to understanding biodiversity that moves significantly beyond taxonomy and species observations. Such an approach needs to look at the whole system to address species interactions, both with their environment and with other species.It is clear that some barriers to progress are sociological, basically persuading people to use the technological solutions that are already available. This is best addressed by developing more effective systems that deliver immediate benefit to the user, hiding the majority of the technology behind simple user interfaces. An infrastructure should be a space in which activities take place and, as such, should be effectively invisible.This community consultation paper positions the role of biodiversity informatics, for the next decade, presenting the actions needed to link the various biodiversity infrastructures invisibly and to facilitate understanding that can support both business and policy-makers. The community considers the goal in biodiversity informatics to be full integration of the biodiversity research community, including citizens' science, through a commonly-shared, sustainable e-infrastructure across all sub-disciplines that reliably serves science and society alike.

  10. A decadal view of biodiversity informatics: challenges and priorities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity informatics plays a central enabling role in the research community's efforts to address scientific conservation and sustainability issues. Great strides have been made in the past decade establishing a framework for sharing data, where taxonomy and systematics has been perceived as the most prominent discipline involved. To some extent this is inevitable, given the use of species names as the pivot around which information is organised. To address the urgent questions around conservation, land-use, environmental change, sustainability, food security and ecosystem services that are facing Governments worldwide, we need to understand how the ecosystem works. So, we need a systems approach to understanding biodiversity that moves significantly beyond taxonomy and species observations. Such an approach needs to look at the whole system to address species interactions, both with their environment and with other species. It is clear that some barriers to progress are sociological, basically persuading people to use the technological solutions that are already available. This is best addressed by developing more effective systems that deliver immediate benefit to the user, hiding the majority of the technology behind simple user interfaces. An infrastructure should be a space in which activities take place and, as such, should be effectively invisible. This community consultation paper positions the role of biodiversity informatics, for the next decade, presenting the actions needed to link the various biodiversity infrastructures invisibly and to facilitate understanding that can support both business and policy-makers. The community considers the goal in biodiversity informatics to be full integration of the biodiversity research community, including citizens’ science, through a commonly-shared, sustainable e-infrastructure across all sub-disciplines that reliably serves science and society alike. PMID:23587026

  11. Web-Enhanced Tobacco Tactics With Telephone Support Versus 1-800-QUIT-NOW Telephone Line Intervention for Operating Engineers: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Waltje, Andrea H; Ronis, David L; Noonan, Devon; Hong, OiSaeng; Richardson, Caroline R; Meeker, John D

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel interventions tailored to blue collar workers are needed to reduce the disparities in smoking rates among occupational groups. Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and usage of the Web-enhanced “Tobacco Tactics” intervention targeting operating engineers (heavy equipment operators) compared to the “1-800-QUIT-NOW” telephone line. Methods Operating engineers (N=145) attending one of 25 safety training sessions from 2010 through 2012 were randomized to either the Tobacco Tactics website with nurse counseling by phone and access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line, which provided an equal number of phone calls and NRT. The primary outcome was self-reported 7-day abstinence at 30-day and 6-month follow-up. The outcomes were compared using chi-square tests, t tests, generalized mixed models, and logistic regression models. Results The average age was 42 years and most were male (115/145, 79.3%) and white (125/145, 86.2%). Using an intent-to-treat analysis, the Tobacco Tactics website group showed significantly higher quit rates (18/67, 27%) than the 1-800-QUIT NOW group (6/78, 8%) at 30-day follow-up (P=.003), but this difference was no longer significant at 6-month follow-up. There were significantly more positive changes in harm reduction measures (quit attempts, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and nicotine dependence) at both 30-day and 6-month follow-up in the Tobacco Tactics group compared to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW group. Compared to participants in the 1-800-QUIT NOW group, significantly more of those in the Tobacco Tactics website group participated in the interventions, received phone calls and NRT, and found the intervention helpful. Conclusions The Web-enhanced Tobacco Tactics website with telephone support showed higher efficacy and reach than the 1-800-QUIT-NOW intervention. Longer counseling sessions may be needed to improve 6-month cessation rates. Trial

  12. Building nursing informatics courses on the Web.

    PubMed

    Dounavis, P; Karistinou, E; Mantas, J

    1998-01-01

    The Information Technology is rapidly being integrated into Educational Institutions and Health Care Environments. Although the use of computer for education and training is not new to the academic society, further prospects are available through the use of emerging technologies as the Multimedia and the World Wide Web. In today's rapidly changing healthcare environment, the need for high quality, cost effective education for employees, consumers, and students is gaining increased attention. The development of customised computer-based training programs has long been beyond the capabilities or financial resources of most healthcare organisations; however, with recent advancements in technology, this situation is rapidly changing. The Nurses represent the greater part of the Health Care Professionals thus the education of this group is of outmost importance for the health-care environments. The World Wide Web can be used as an educational tool in order to have better-educated Nurses not only by supporting the Academic institutions but also by providing Distance Learning Education covering new aspects of the Nursing Science. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of the ways in which the emerging technologies of Multimedia and the World Wide Web can enhance the learning process, and also provide education at a distance. PMID:10179616

  13. Medical Informatics in Croatia – a Historical Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

    2014-01-01

    A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

  14. Information and informatics literacies of first-year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Bouquin, Daina R.; Tmanova, Lyubov L.; Wright, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The study evaluated medical students' familiarity with information literacy and informatics during the health sciences library orientation. Methods A survey was fielded at the start of the 2013 school year. Results Seventy-two of 77 students (94%) completed the survey. Over one-half (57%) expected to use library research materials and services. About half (43%) expected to use library physical space. Students preferred accessing biomedical research on laptops and learning via online-asynchronous modes. Conclusions The library identified areas for service development and outreach to medical students and academic departments. PMID:26512221

  15. Characterizing Consumer Health Informatics in Low and Middle Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Kutun, Tugba; Föller-Nord, Miriam; Wetter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Consumer Health Informatics (ConsHI) involves patients in health care through ICT, with Low and Middle Income Countries recently entering the field. Compelling successes and complete failures call for the identification of success factors. Of 1092 automatically retrieved articles, 85 were classified as ConsHI. Their service characteristics and the economic and societal factors of the countries of origin were classified. Descriptive statistics were applied in the search for clusters of features that together appear as driving factors. Most factors (financial endowment, number of languages spoken etc) showed no or paradoxical effects. Societal maturity and low population density appear as enabling factors. PMID:26262275

  16. Developing an evidence-based public health informatics course*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinyu; Xie, Yue; Pan, Xuequn; Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Whipple, Jessica; Azadbakht, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the need to develop a public health informatics (PHI) introductory course and determine contents of such a course. Methods Community assessments employing focus group interviews and an online survey were utilized to determine course need and content. Results Results revealed a need to provide PHI training to graduate public health students and suggested broad course content requirements. Results indicated lack of awareness of libraries and librarians as sources of public health information. Conclusions A graduate PHI course was developed and delivered. Additionally, implementation of a subject guide increased the library's profile. PMID:26512219

  17. Information technology challenges of biodiversity and ecosystems informatics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnase, J.L.; Cushing, J.; Frame, M.; Frondorf, A.; Landis, E.; Maier, D.; Silberschatz, A.

    2003-01-01

    Computer scientists, biologists, and natural resource managers recently met to examine the prospects for advancing computer science and information technology research by focusing on the complex and often-unique challenges found in the biodiversity and ecosystem domain. The workshop and its final report reveal that the biodiversity and ecosystem sciences are fundamentally information sciences and often address problems having distinctive attributes of scale and socio-technical complexity. The paper provides an overview of the emerging field of biodiversity and ecosystem informatics and demonstrates how the demands of biodiversity and ecosystem research can advance our understanding and use of information technologies.

  18. The Brazilian health informatics and information policy: building the consensus.

    PubMed

    Leão, Beatriz F; Costa, Cláudio G; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Bandarra, Ernani B; Gonçalves, Sibele F; Bretas Jr, Nilo; Ferla, Alcindo

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of the Brazilian Health Information Policy. The Introduction gives an overview of the health informatics scenario in the country and the motivation for the definition of a national policy for the area. The process adopted and the strategies to reach consensus among the different players of the healthcare arena are discussed. The interface with the national health card project and the standards already established are also depicted. The current document and the strategies so far proposed are presented with their respective time table and goals. At the end, a comparison with other national initiatives is drawn. PMID:15361004

  19. Inventory of research methods for librarianship and informatics

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    This article defines and describes the rich variety of research designs found in librarianship and informatics practice. Familiarity with the range of methods and the ability to make distinctions between those specific methods can enable authors to label their research reports correctly. The author has compiled an inventory of methods from a variety of disciplines, but with attention to the relevant applications of a methodology to the field of librarianship. Each entry in the inventory includes a definition and description for the particular research method. Some entries include references to resource material and examples. PMID:14762467

  20. The informatics core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative project has brought together geographically distributed investigators, each collecting data on the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The quantity and diversity of the imaging, clinical, cognitive, biochemical, and genetic data acquired and generated throughout the study necessitated sophisticated informatics systems to organize, manage, and disseminate data and results. We describe, here, a successful and comprehensive system that provides powerful mechanisms for processing, integrating, and disseminating these data not only to support the research needs of the investigators who make up the Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative cores, but also to provide widespread data access to the greater scientific community for the study of Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20451873