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Sample records for infragravity wave contribution

  1. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  2. Infragravity waves across the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Arshad; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of transoceanic Infragravity (IG) wave was investigated using a global spectral wave model together with deep-ocean pressure recorders. IG waves are generated mostly at the shorelines due to non-linear hydrodynamic effects that transfer energy from the main windsea and swell band, with periods of 1 to 25 s, to periods up to 500 s. IG waves are important for the study of near-shore processes and harbor agitation, and can also be a potential source of errors in satellite altimetry measurements. Setting up a global IG model was motivated by the investigation of these errors for the future planned SWOT mission. Despite the fact that the infragravity waves exhibit much smaller vertical amplitudes than the usual high frequency wind-driven waves, of the order of 1 cm in the deep oceans, their propagation throughout the oceans and signature in the wave spectrum can be clearly observed. Using a simplified empirical parameterization of the nearshore source of free IG waves as a function of the incoming wave parameters we extended to WAVEWATCH III model, used so far for windseas and swell, to the IG band, up to periods of 300 s. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled IG energy was well correlated to the DART station records, making it useful to interpret the records of IG waves. Open ocean IG wave records appear dominated by trans-oceanic events with well defined sources concentrated on a few days, usually on West coasts, and affecting the entire ocean basin, with amplitude patterns very similar to those of tsunamis. Three particular IG bursts during 2008 are studied, 2 in the Pacific Ocean and 1 in the North Atlantic. It was observed that the liberated IG waves can travel long distances often crossing whole oceans with negligible dissipation. The IG signatures are clearly observed at sensors along their propagation paths.

  3. Infragravity waves in the deep ocean: An upward revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-07-01

    Ocean infragravity waves are surface gravity waves with periods of several minutes and corresponding wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. When propagating freely in the deep ocean, these waves are typically small, several centimeters at most, so they have been seldom studied. In the context of future wide-swath altimetry missions, these waves need to be better quantified as they have wavelengths that will be resolved by such instruments. Here, we analyze the global climatology and variability of infragravity waves in the deep ocean using data from over 40 open ocean locations, with depths larger than 2000 m. We show that typical infragravity wave heights are higher than previously estimated, with winter-averaged values up to 11 mm off the U.S. West Coast, and typically less than 6 mm in the tropics. The mid to high latitudes exhibit a strong seasonal cycle consistent with the local variability of the wind-waves, while the tropical Pacific has a higher energy level during the Austral winter that does not correlate well with the local wind-waves, suggesting a remote source for the recorded infragravity waves. These infragravity wave energies are expected to be a significant contribution to the error budget for possible measurements of sea level associated to sub-mesoscale currents at horizontal scales around 10 km. Hence, a global numerical model of infragravity waves will likely be necessary for the analysis of the planned Surface Water Ocean Topography mission.

  4. Source regions and reflection of infragravity waves offshore of the U.S.s Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric

    2015-09-01

    Infragravity waves are oceanic surface gravity waves but with wavelengths (tens of km) and periods (>30 s) much longer than wind waves and swell. Mostly studied in shallow water, knowledge of infragravity waves in deep water has remained limited. Recent interest in deep water infragravity waves has been motivated by the error they may contribute to future high-resolution satellite radar altimetry measurements of sea level. Here deep water infragravity waves offshore of the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. were studied using differential pressure gauges which were deployed as part of the Cascadia Initiative array from September 2012 to May 2013. Cross correlation of the records revealed direction of infragravity wave propagation across the array, from which source regions were inferred. The dominant source was found to be the coastline to the east, associated with large wind waves and swell incident on the eastern side of the basin. The source shifted southward during northern-hemisphere summer, and on several days in the record infragravity waves arrived from the western side of the Pacific. Asymmetry of cross-correlation functions for five of these westerly arrivals was used to calculate the ratio of seaward to shoreward propagating energy, and hence estimate the strength of infragravity wave reflection at periods of 100-200 s. Reflection of these remote arrivals from the west appeared to be strong, with a lower bound estimate of r = 0.49 ± 0.29 (reflection coefficient ± standard error) and an upper bound estimate of r = 0.74 ± 0.06. These results suggest that reflection at ocean boundaries may be an important consideration for infragravity waves in the deep ocean.

  5. Relevance of Infragravity Waves in a Wave Dominated Shallow Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, M.; Bertin, X.

    2014-12-01

    Infragravity (IG) waves have received a growing attention over the last decade and they have been shown to partly control dune erosion, barrier breaching, development of seiches in harbors or the circulation on fringing reefs. Although the relevance IG waves in surf and swash zone dynamics is well recognized, their dynamics and effects on tidal inlets and estuaries have not been analyzed. This study investigates the importance of IG waves at Albufeira Lagoon Inlet, a shallow wave-dominated inlet located on the western Coast of Portugal. Water levels and currents were measured synchronously during a two-day field experiment carried out at Albufeira Lagoon Inlet in September 2010. Apart from the tidally induced gravity wave modulations and wave induced setup inside the lagoon, an important IG wave contribution was identified. Low frequency oscillations were noticeable in the free surface elevation records and produced fluctuations of up to 100% in current intensities. While IG waves in the ebb shoal were present during the whole tidal cycle, the absence of IG waves characterized the ebbing tide inside the lagoon. The energy in the IG frequency band gradually increased from low tide to high tide, and disappeared during the ebbing tide. The modeling system Xbeach was applied to hindcast the hydrodynamics during the field experiment period. The model captures the main physics related with the IG wave generation and propagation inside the inlet, and reproduced the IG blocking during the ebb as identified in the measurements. This behavior was explained by the combination of advection and wave blocking induced by opposing tidal currents. Both measurements and numerical results suggested the bound wave release as the dominant mechanism responsible for IG wave generation. The fact that IG waves only propagate at flood tide has strong implications on the sediment balance of the inlet and contribute to inlet infilling under energetic wave conditions. It is expected that IG

  6. The sources of deep ocean infragravity waves observed in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Wayne; Ballu, Valerie; Bertin, Xavier; Karpytchev, Mikhail

    2015-07-01

    Infragravity waves are long-period (25-250 s) ocean surface gravity waves generated in coastal zones through wave-wave interactions or oscillation of the breaking point. Most of the infragravity wave energy is trapped or dissipated near coastlines, but a small percentage escapes into the open oceans. The source of deep ocean infragravity waves is debated, specifically whether they come mostly from regions with strong source waves or from sites with particular morphologies/orientations. We correlate measurements of infragravity waves in the deep North Atlantic Ocean with infragravity wave generation parameters throughout the Atlantic Ocean to find the dominant sources of deep ocean infragravity wave energy in the North Atlantic Ocean. The deep ocean infragravity wave data are from a 5 year deployment of absolute pressure gauges west of the Azores islands (37°N, 35°W) and shorter data sets from seafloor tsunami gauges (DART buoys). Two main sources are identified: one off of the west coast of southern Europe and northern Africa (25°N-40°N) in northern hemisphere winter and the other off the west coast of equatorial Africa (the Gulf of Guinea) in southern hemisphere winter. These regions have relatively weak source waves and weak infragravity wave propagation paths to the main measurement site, indicating that that the site morphology/orientation dominates the creation of deep ocean infragravity waves. Both regions have also been identified as potential sources of global seismological noise, suggesting that the same mechanisms may be behind the generation of deep ocean infragravity waves and global seismological noise in the frequency band from 0.001 to 0.04 Hz.

  7. Evidence for infragravity wave-tide resonance in deep oceans.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Fukao, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Ocean tides are the oscillatory motions of seawater forced by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun with periods of a half to a day and wavelengths of the semi-Pacific to Pacific scale. Ocean infragravity (IG) waves are sea-surface gravity waves with periods of several minutes and wavelengths of several dozen kilometres. Here we report the first evidence of the resonance between these two ubiquitous phenomena, mutually very different in period and wavelength, in deep oceans. The evidence comes from long-term, large-scale observations with arrays of broadband ocean-bottom seismometers located at depths of more than 4,000 m in the Pacific Ocean. This observational evidence is substantiated by a theoretical argument that IG waves and the tide can resonantly couple and that such coupling occurs over unexpectedly wide areas of the Pacific Ocean. Through this resonant coupling, some of ocean tidal energy is transferred in deep oceans to IG wave energy. PMID:20981016

  8. Tidal Variability of Infragravity Waves Over Cape-Associated Shoals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniagua-Arroyave, J. F.; Adams, P. N.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Parra, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Particulate transport at cape-related shoals is generally driven by water circulation that is derived from interactions among tides, waves, and wind. At inner-shelves with alongshore uniform slopes, it has been shown that gravity waves produce offshore-directed transport by means of infragravity (IG) motions. However, the influence of IG waves on the spatial and temporal patterns of particulate transport is not yet understood at cape-related shoals (i.e. inner-shelves characterized by non-uniform bathymetry). To analyze the connection between IG waves and tides, cross-spectral and cross-wavelet analyses were performed on time series data of current profiles and pressure that were measured at both sides of a shoal (east swale and west swale) near Cape Canaveral, Florida. Overall, IG wave heights were coherent with water levels at ~2 cycles/day with a 95% statistical confidence at both locations. However, the coherence at the west swale (closer to shore) was lower than at the east swale. High coherence squared (>0.8) between tidal motions and IG energy could be explained by changes in water depth that produced IG energy losses to sea-swell frequencies during low tide. The 1-m difference in mean depth between east and west locations may explain the difference in coherence as water is not shallow enough at the west swale to produce IG energy losses. This may highlight the sensitivity of IG waves to changes in water depth within this shoal complex. Our results agree with previous studies regarding tidal variability of IG energy in nearshore and inner-shelf environments and could be applied to improve understanding of the role of complicated bathymetry in particulate transport at cape-associated shoals.

  9. Surf zone, infragravity wave energy flux, and runup in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, J. W.; Brodie, K. L.; McNinch, J.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves, currents, and sand levels were observed on a 1.4 km-long cross-shore transect extending from the back beach to ~11 m water depth at Agate Beach, Oregon in Fall 2013. Wave runup and water table fluctuations on this low slope (1:80) beach were measured with a cliff-mounted scanning Lidar and buried pressure sensors. Significant wave heights at an offshore buoy in 128m depth ranged from small (0.5m) to extreme (7.5m), with peak periods between 4-22 seconds. Infragravity frequency (nominally 0.01 Hz) horizontal runup excursions exceeded 100m, and infragravity cross-shore velocity exceeded 3 m/s. Cross-shore patterns of infragravity wave energy flux, observed with seven co-located pressure and current meters, indicate 'proto-saturation' of the inner surfzone in extreme conditions. That is, the intensification of incident wave forcing (e.g. higher energy, longer swell) leads to a wider surfzone and an increase in the shoreward infragravity wave energy seaward of the surfzone, but produces more modest increases in flux in the inner surfzone, and in the runup. Nonlinear energy balances, based on the observations, show transfer of energy from sea-swell to infragravity waves, and vice-versa. The infragravity energy balance closes in cases with low energy incident sea-swell. With more energetic incident waves, there is an unexplained inner surfzone energy sink at the lowest IG frequencies (0.004-0.02 Hz). Ongoing work aims to quantify the effect on infragravity energy balances by infragravity wave breaking and bottom friction. Additionally, the estimates may be degraded by contamination with rotational velocities of surfzone eddies. Whatever the dynamical explanation, infragravity wave runup on a low slope beach in high-energy conditions is limited significantly by dissipation. The slow rate of runup increase suggests nascent, or 'proto' saturation. This work was supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  10. Analysis of infragravity waves using Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (CEEMD) on microtidal and macrotidal beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño Muñoz, Jennifer; Osorio Arias, Andres; Winter, Christian; Didenkulova, Ira; Otero, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infragravity waves are long waves with periods between ~ 20 s and 300 s, these waves may dominate the hydrodynamics in the surf and swash zones, being the main driver of sediment transport and swash elevation (run-up). Data of pressure sensors at different cross-shore positions and camera systems that capture the swash excursion in a micro-tidal beach (Cartagena, Colombia, Caribbean Sea) and a macro-tidal beach (Norderney, Germany, North Sea) were analyzed to study the occurrence and temporal and spatial variability of infragravity waves. We used the Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (CEEMD) to decompose the time series into a finite set of "intrinsic mode functions" (IMFs). This method overcomes limitations of Fourier-based methods for time series analysis (e.g. FFT and wavelet techniques) that assume linear and stationary data. CEEMD was designed to analyze non-linear and non-stationary phenomena (as those in shallow waters), identifying processes with small amplitudes and low energy hidden in the data. A comparison with the Fourier spectrum shows the superiority of CEEMD to describe the behavior of ingragravity waves. Fourier spectra do not show infragravity energy in deeper waters; additionally, in shallow waters the energy of the spectra is spread in the infragravity band differing among sea states, therefore is not possible identifying a characteristic spectrum. On the other hand, with CEEMD the IMFs in the infragravity frequencies are observed in deeper waters, and the energy evolution cross-shore until the swash zone is shown at both beaches; furthermore, CEEMD shows the frequency clustering of the energy, allowing to see the gains or losses of energy at different frequencies. At the micro-tidal beach (Cartagena), infragravity energy is dominant in surf and swash zones for all analyzed sea states, with dominant energy in the IMF of about 100 s of period, showing infragravity wave selection. On the contrary, at the macro-tidal beach (Norderney

  11. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  12. Measurement and imaging of infragravity waves in sea ice using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Andrew R.; Dammann, Dyre O.; Johnson, Mark A.; Eicken, Hajo; Meyer, Franz J.

    2016-06-01

    Using short-temporal baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar, we capture instantaneous images of a persistent field of infragravity waves propagating through sea ice near Barrow, Alaska, during January 2015. We estimate wave amplitudes to be between 1.2 and 1.8 mm. Curvature of wavefronts is consistent with refraction of waves entering shallow water from a source region north of Barrow. A shallow water wave model indicates that the geometry of the wavefronts is relatively insensitive to the source location, but other evidence suggests the waves may have originated in the North Atlantic, making this perhaps the longest observed propagation path for waves through ice. We also note that steepening of the waves entering shallow water can increase the peak strain by an order of magnitude, suggesting that infragravity waves may play a role in determining the location of the landfast ice edge with respect to water depth.

  13. Analysis and numerical modeling of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jérome; Rawat, Arshad

    2013-04-01

    All sea level variations of the order of 1 cm at scales under 30 km are of great interest for the future Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. That satellite should provide high-resolution maps of the sea surface height for analysis of meso to sub-mesoscale currents, but that will require a filtering of all gravity wave motions in the data. Free infragravity waves (FIGWs) are generated and radiate offshore when swells and/or wind seas and their associated bound infragravity waves impact exposed coastlines. Free infragravity waves have dominant periods comprised between 1 and 10 minutes and horizontal wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. Given the length scales of the infragravity waves wavelength and amplitude, the infragravity wave field will can a significant fraction the signal measured by the future SWOT mission. In this study, we analyze the data from recovered bottom pressure recorders of the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) program. This analysis includes data spanning several years between 2006 and 2010, from stations at different latitudes in the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. We present and discuss the following conclusions: (1) The amplitude of free infragravity waves can reach several centimeters, higher than the precision sought for the SWOT mission. (2) The free infragravity signal is higher in the Eastern North Pacific than in the Western North Pacific, possibly due to smaller incident swell and seas impacting the nearby coastlines. (3) Free infragravity waves are higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic, possibly owing to different average continental shelves configurations in the two basins. (4) There is a clear seasonal cycle at the high latitudes North Atlantic and Pacific stations that is much less pronounced or absent at the tropical stations, consistent with the generation mechanism of free infragravity waves. Our numerical model

  14. Analysis of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission, and preliminary results of numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, A.; Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2012-12-01

    All sea level variations of the order of 1 cm at scales under 30 km are of great interest for the future Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. That satellite should provide high-resolution maps of the sea surface height for analysis of meso to sub-mesoscale currents, but that will require a filtering of all gravity wave motions in the data. Free infragravity waves (FIGWs) are generated and radiate offshore when swells and/or wind seas and their associated bound infragravity waves impact exposed coastlines. Free infragravity waves have dominant periods comprised between 1 and 10 minutes and horizontal wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. Given the length scales of the infragravity waves wavelength and amplitude, the infragravity wave field will can a significant fraction the signal measured by the future SWOT mission. In this study, we analyze the data from recovered bottom pressure recorders of the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) program. This analysis includes data spanning several years between 2006 and 2010, from stations at different latitudes in the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. We present and discuss the following conclusions: (1) The amplitude of free infragravity waves can reach several centimeters, higher than the precision sought for the SWOT mission. (2) The free infragravity signal is higher in the Eastern North Pacific than in the Western North Pacific, possibly due to smaller incident swell and seas impacting the nearby coastlines. (3) Free infragravity waves are higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic, possibly owing to different average continental shelves configurations in the two basins. (4) There is a clear seasonal cycle at the high latitudes North Atlantic and Pacific stations that is much less pronounced or absent at the tropical stations, consistent with the generation mechanism of free infragravity waves. Our numerical model

  15. A numerical model for free infragravity waves: Definition and validation at regional and global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Rawat, Arshad; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III is extended from the windsea and swell band to lower frequencies, in order to represent free waves in the infragravity (IG) wave band. This extension is based on an empirical source of IG energy, which is defined along shorelines from the significant wave height and a mean period. The empirical proportionality factor is found to reproduce accurately the variations of free IG wave energy in coastal areas, where it was calibrated, and also has a good skill at global scales. In the open ocean, the model is particularly verified for frequencies in the range 5 to 14 mHz for which ocean bottom records are sensitive to the IG signal. The model captures between 30% and 80% of the variance in IG wave heights, depending on location, and reproduces the mean IG energies within 50%. Where the model reproduces best the IG variability, it can be used to fill in the gaps between recording stations, providing a first view of the global IG wave field. Our first application is the estimation of the surface gravity wave contribution to the surface elevation spectra that will be measured by the Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. The actual contribution of IG waves on measured along-track wavenumber spectra varies with the cross-track averaging method. Typically, the strongest IG signal is expected to occur for wavelengths between 2 and 10 km. For a given region, the spectral level at 10 km wavelength are not very sensitive to the local depth in the range 200 to 5000 m. At this wavelength, and on the east side of all mid-latitude ocean basins, the median spectral density associated to free IG waves is of the order of 0.4 cm2/(cycle/km), equal to the expected quasi-geostrophic signature of surface currents. IG spectra rise above 4 times this level for 16% of the time. Even at 20 km wavelength, spectral levels above 1 cm2/(cycle/km) are likely to occur more that 10% of the time for some oceanic regions.

  16. Modelling Infragravity Waves and Currents across a Fringing Reef: Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongeren, A. R.; Duong Minh, T.; Lowe, R.; Roelvink, J.; Ranasinghe, R.; Symonds, G.

    2010-12-01

    The majority of the world’s coastlines contain submerged reef structures of various types, i.e. tropical coral reefs, relic temperate limestone platforms, and other submerged rock formations. Relatively little research has been conducted to study nearshore hydrodynamic processes that occur in reef environments. A good understanding of these processes is important because waves and wave-induced currents drive sediment transport, nutrient dynamics, and dispersal of larval coral and fish. Through the development of improved hydrodynamic models, the impact of environmental changes and human impacts on reefs may be accurately assessed. However, predictive models have historically been developed and tested using sandy coast environments. There are some important differences with reefs: wave breaking over the reef results in onshore flows with a higher bed friction coefficient, as well as set-up. Recent field studies (e.g., Lowe et al. JPO, 2009a) have shown the transformation of swell energy on reefs, and numerical model studies (Symonds and Black, JCR 2001, Ranasinghe et al., Coastal Eng. 2006, Lowe et al. J. Geoph. Res. 2009b) have shown that the spatial pattern of mean wave heights and mean currents can be qualitatively reproduced. However, the bulk of the measured variability is often in the infragravity frequency band (Pequignet et al. Geoph. Res. Lett., 2009 and Lowe et al., in prep.). The recently developed open-source model XBeach (Roelvink et al, Coastal Eng. 2009) is specifically designed to model these wave motions and associated sediment transport and has been successfully applied to sandy coasts (McCall et al., Coastal Eng. 2010). The objective of this paper is to apply XBeach to simulate infragravity forcing at Ningaloo Reef, a large fringing coral reef located along the northwest coastline of Western Australia. A field experiment at Ningaloo Reef (Western Australia) conducted in June 2009 by Lowe et al (in prep.) specifically aimed at measuring

  17. Swell-generated Set-up and Infragravity Wave Propagation Over a Fringing Coral Reef: Implications for Wave-driven Inundation of Atoll Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheriton, O. M.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Quataert, E.; van Dongeren, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Republic of the Marshall Islands is comprised of 1156 islands on 29 low-lying atolls with a mean elevation of 2 m that are susceptible to sea-level rise and often subjected to overwash during large wave events. A 6-month deployment of wave and tide gauges across two shore-normal sections of north-facing coral reef on the Roi-Namur Island on Kwajalein Atoll was conducted during 2013-2014 to quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on the fringing coral reef. Wave heights and periods on the reef flat were strongly correlated to the water levels. On the fore reef, the majority of wave energy was concentrated in the incident band (5-25 s); due to breaking at the reef crest, however, the wave energy over the reef flat was dominated by infragravity-band (25-250 s) motions. Two large wave events with heights of 6-8 m at 15 s over the fore reef were observed. During these events, infragravity-band wave heights exceeded the incident band wave heights and approximately 1.0 m of set-up was established over the innermost reef flat. This set-up enabled the propagation of large waves across the reef flat, reaching maximum heights of nearly 2 m on the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach. XBEACH models of the instrument transects were able to replicate the incident waves, infragravity waves, and wave-driven set-up across the reef when the hydrodynamic roughness of the reef was correctly parameterized. These events led to more than 3 m of wave-driven run-up and inundation of the island that drove substantial morphological change to the beach face.

  18. Infragravity waves on fringing reefs in the tropical Pacific: Dynamic setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. A.; Yoon, H.

    2016-05-01

    Cross-shore pressure and current observations from four fringing reefs of lengths ranging from 135 to 420 m reveal energetic low-frequency (˜0.001-0.05 Hz) motions. The spatial structure and temporal amplitudes of an empirical orthogonal function analysis of the pressure measurements suggest the dominant low-frequency variability is modal. Incoming and outgoing linear flux estimates also support partially standing modes on the reef flat during energetic events. A cross-covariance analysis suggests that breakpoint forcing excites these partially standing modes, similar to previous findings at other steep reefs. The dynamics of Symonds et al. (1982) with damping are applied to a step reef, with forcing obtained by extending a point break model of Vetter et al. (2010) for breaking wave setup to the low-frequency band using the shoaled envelope of the incident free surface elevation. A one parameter, linear analytical model for the reef flat free surface elevation is presented, which describes between 75% and 97% of the variance of the observed low-frequency shoreline significant wave height for all reefs considered over a range of conditions. The linear model contains a single dimensionless parameter that is the ratio of the inertial to dissipative time scales, and the observations from this study exhibit more low-frequency variability when the dissipative time scale is greater than the inertial time scale for the steep reefs considered.

  19. Experimental investigation of change of energy of infragavity waves in dependence on spectral characteristics of an irregular wind waves in coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykina, Yana; Divinskii, Boris

    2013-04-01

    An infragravity waves are long waves with periods of 20 - 300 s. Most essential influence of infragarvity waves on dynamic processes is in a coastal zone, where its energy can exceed the energy of wind waves. From practical point of view, the infragravity waves are important, firstly, due to their influence on sand transport processes in a coastal zone. For example, interacting with group structure of wind waves the infragravity waves can define position of underwater bars on sandy coast. Secondly, they are responsible on formation of long waves in harbors. Main source of infragravity waves is wave group structure defined by sub-nonlinear interactions of wind waves (Longuet-Higgins, Stewart, 1962). These infragravity waves are bound with groups of wind waves and propagate with wave group velocity. Another type of infragravity waves are formed in a surf zone as a result of migration a wave breaking point (Symonds, et al., 1982). What from described above mechanisms of formation of infragravity waves prevails, till now it is unknown. It is also unknown how energy of infragravity waves depends on energy of input wind waves and how it changes during nonlinear wave transformation in coastal zone. In our work on the basis of the analysis of data of field experiment and numerical simulation a contribution of infragravity waves in total wave energy in depending on integral characteristics of an irregular wave field in the conditions of a real bathymetry was investigated. For analysis the data of field experiment "Shkorpilovtsy-2007" (Black sea) and data of numerical modeling of Boussinesq type equation with extended dispersion characteristics (Madsen et al., 1997) were used. It was revealed that infragravity waves in a coastal zone are defined mainly by local group structure of waves, which permanently changes due to nonlinearity, shoaling and breaking processes. Free infragravity waves appearing after wave breaking exist together with bound infragravity waves. There are

  20. Observations of infragravity motions for reef fringed islands and atolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. A.; Ford, M.

    2012-12-01

    The frequency of flooding events that affect low lying islands and atolls in the Pacific is expected to increase under current sea level rise projections. Infragravity (IG) motions, with periods ranging from approximately 25 to 400 seconds, are an important component of wave driven flooding events for reef fringed islands and atolls. The IG variability during wave events is analyzed and interpreted dynamically from pressure and current observations at four cross-reef transects in the North Pacific Ocean that include sites in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and Guam. The IG motions are shown to depend upon the spectral properties of the incident wave forcing and reef flat characteristics that include reef flat length (ranging from 100m to 450m at the four sites) and total water level due to setup and tides. A small inundation event at one of the sites is shown to occur due to large shoreline infragravity energy.

  1. A Numerical Study of Nonlinear Wave Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, A.; Tissier, M.; Ruessink, G.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear triad interactions redistribute energy among a wave field, which transforms the shape of the incident short waves (f = 0.05 - 2 Hz) and generates energy at infragravity frequencies (f = 0.005-0.05 Hz). Recently, it has been suggested that infragravity energy may dissipate by energy transfers from infragravity frequencies to either the (former) short-wave spectral peak, or through infragravity-infragravity self-interactions that cause the infragravity waves to steepen and to eventually break. To investigate these infragravity dissipation mechanisms, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model. In this study, we first validate the model with the high-resolution GLOBEX laboratory data set and then explore the dependence of the energy transfers, with a focus on infragravity frequencies, on beach slope. Consistent with previous studies we find that SWASH is able to reproduce the transformation and corresponding nonlinear energy transfers of shoreward propagating waves to great detail. Bispectral analysis is used to study the coupling between wave frequencies; nonlinear energy transfers are then quantified using the Boussinesq coupling coefficient. To obtain more detailed insight we divide the nonlinear interactions in four categories based on triads including 1) infragravity frequencies only, 2) two infragravity frequencies and one short-wave frequency, 3) one infragravity frequency and two short-wave frequencies and 4) short-wave frequencies only. Preliminary results suggest that interactions are rather weak on gently beach slopes (1:80) and, in the innermost part of the surf zone, are dominated by infragravity-infragravity interactions. On steeper slopes (1:20), interactions are stronger, but entirely dominated by those involving short-wave frequencies only. The dependence of the transfers on offshore wave conditions and beach shape will be explored too. Funded by NWO.

  2. Effect of wave frequency and directional spread on shoreline runup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guza, R. T.; Feddersen, Falk

    2012-06-01

    Wave breaking across the surf zone elevates the mean water level at the shoreline (setup), and drives fluctuations about the mean (runup). Runup often is divided into sea-swell (0.04-0.3 Hz) and lower frequency infragravity (0.00-0.04 Hz) components. With energetic incident waves, runup is dominated by infragravity frequencies, and total water levels (combined setup and runup) can exceed 3 m, significantly contributing to coastal flooding and erosion. Setup and runup observations on sandy beaches are scattered about empirical parameterizations based on near-shoreline beach slope and deep water wave height and wavelength. Accurate parameterizations are needed to determine flooding and erosion risk to coastal ecosystems and communities. Here, numerical simulations with the Boussinesq wave model funwaveC are shown to statistically reproduce typical empirical setup and runup parameterizations. Furthermore, the model infragravity runup Rs(ig) strongly depends on the incident wave directional and frequency spread (about the mean direction and peak frequency). Realistic directional spread variations change Rs(ig) equivalent to a factor of two variation in incident wave height. The modeled Rs(ig) is shown to vary systematically with a new, non-dimensional spreading parameter that involves peak frequency, frequency spread, and directional spread. This suggests a new parameterization for Rs(ig) potentially useful to predict coastal flooding and erosion.

  3. New calculation of surface wave contributions associated with mie backscattering.

    PubMed

    Inada, H

    1973-07-01

    Diffracted field contributions to backscattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a spherical particle are calculated. The diffracted fields give rise to surface waves in the shadow region and can be evaluated by finding surface wave poles and computing their residues. In order to compute the residues the valid range of the Schobe and Debye asymptotic expansion formulas for the Hankel function is examined. With these asymptotic formulas numerical values of the surface wave complex poles are tabulated. Curves for backscattering cross section due to the first six surface waves are presented as a function of the size parameter kappaa between 5 and 60 for absorbing spheres of refractive index m = 1.61-i0.0025 as well as nonabsorbing spheres with m = 1.60.

  4. Wave Forced Normal Modes on Fringing Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pequignet, A. N.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. M.; Aucan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to assess wave-driven coastal inundation at the shoreline of fringing reefs, pressure and current observations were collected at reefs on Guam (Ipan) and Oahu, Hawaii (Mokuleia) as part of the PILOT (Pacific Island Land-Ocean Typhoon) experiment. Similar to dissipative sandy beaches, nearshore surface elevation at both reefs is dominated by energy in the infragravity frequency band. Coherent infragravity oscillations across the reef tend to occur at discrete frequencies and with standing wave cross-shore structures that are consistent with open basin resonant modes. The modes are forced by swell wave groups, similar to a time-dependent setup. The resonant modes are most apparent during energetic wave events, in part because wave setup over the reef increases the low mode resonant frequencies to a range that is conducive to wave group forcing. Evidence of the excitation of resonant modes during tropical storm Man-Yi at Ipan, Guam is presented.

  5. Essential thalamic contribution to slow waves of natural sleep.

    PubMed

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T; Taylor, Hannah L; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lambert, Régis C; Leresche, Nathalie; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-11

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75-1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm.

  6. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior.

  7. Hydrodynamic wave contributions to combustion instability in rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Irshaid, Esam M. T.

    Experimental measurements suggest that a new source of instability in rocket motors is due to hydrodynamic disturbances. These disturbances, if ignored, could impact our assessment of rocket motor performance. In this work, the corresponding problem of hydrodynamic instability is considered. A mathematical model for these disturbances is carried out by perturbing the continuity and momentum equations. A one dimensional model which represents the wave disturbances in time and space is implemented to quantify the amplification rate, in time or space, and the wave amplitude. The only available measurements of these disturbances arise in cold flow experiments that simulate the gas dynamics in a solid rocket motor and where no real combustion takes place. The reason for cold flow experiments is the difficulty in measuring the hydrodynamic disturbances in real rockets. To gain better understanding of the interaction between hydrodynamic and combustion driven disturbances, a new approach is implemented that accounts for hydrodynamic effects on the combustion instability net system amplitude. In this model the impact of spatial hydrodynamic vortices in solid rocket motors is projected on the net system amplitude calculations. Results show that some factors play a significant role in controlling the hydrodynamic disturbances. These factors include the injection Mach number, chamber aspect ratio, admittance function and the tangential wave number. Here, the influence of each of these factors is examined. Finally, the hydrodynamic energy density is calculated and found to be small in comparison to the vortical-acoustic one.

  8. Maximum Wave Run-up Measured on a Natural Beach Owing to Extreme Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, E. B.; MacMahan, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Unique field data indicative of maximum run-up owing to extreme wave conditions with a 50 year return period are obtained from the distribution of sea-glass on 10-18 m high dunes. The hypothesis that sea-glass is an indicator of maximum run-up is verified by the observations that new sea-glass on a beach is found at the rackline, the highest point of run-up. The source of the sea-glass is a garbage dump on the dune in southern Monterey Bay from 1937-1951. It is estimated that the dump, located on an erosive shoreline, was falling into the ocean by at least 1960, so that the maximum run-up values have a return period of at least 50 years. Various empirical run-up models based both on extensive laboratory and field measurements are assessed to include contributions from sea-swell and infragravity waves, setup and tidal elevation, which are parameterized on wave height and surf parameter, P, which is a function of wave height, period and beach slope. Deep water hindcast waves (1958-2011) refracted to 4m water depth are used as input to the models. Beach and dune slopes averaged over the run-up region from mean water level to the maximum run-up ranged 0.1 - 0.63 (angle of repose). Reasonable comparison with model predicted run-up with distribution of sea-glass on the dune were obtained for P <2 events, but were underpredicted for large P. Large P events are associated with long period swell waves characteristic of the Pacific Ocean that are outside the empirical parameter space from which the model equations were derived, suggesting a possible deficiency in the models.

  9. Spin-electron acoustic waves: The Landau damping and ion contribution in the spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2016-06-01

    Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum kinetics is derived for more detailed research of the spin-electron acoustic waves (SEAWs). This kinetic theory allows us to obtain the spectrum of the SEAWs including the effects of occupation of quantum states more accurately than the quantum hydrodynamic theory. We derive and apply the quantum kinetic theory to calculate the Landau damping of the SEAWs. We consider the contribution of ions dynamics into the SEAW spectrum. We obtain the contribution of ions in the Landau damping in the temperature regime of classic ions. Kinetic analysis for the ion-acoustic, zero sound, and Langmuir waves at the separated spin-up and spin-down electron dynamics is presented as well.

  10. Contribution of evanescent waves to the far field: the atomic point of view.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, A; Bryant, G W

    2000-04-01

    Evanescent modes of the electromagnetic field are seldom invoked in conventional far-field optics, as their contribution far from the source (a few wavelengths) is negligible. Contradicting this fact, in recent theoretical works, based on a particular decomposition of the free-space Green tensor, it has been asserted that evanescent waves do indeed contribute to the far field, where they appear as an additional ~1/r component of the field. We provide an explicit demonstration that evanescent modes do not contribute to the power radiated to the far field by any dipolar source. First we derive an expression for the free-space field susceptibility in which contributions from evanescent and homogeneous modes are separated, and then we use linear response theory to compute the decay rate for an atomic dipole in vacuum.

  11. Separation of Gravitational-Wave and Cosmic-Shear Contributions to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2002-07-01

    Inflationary gravitational waves (GW) contribute to the curl component in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Cosmic shear--gravitational lensing of the CMB--converts a fraction of the dominant gradient polarization to the curl component. Higher-order correlations can be used to map the cosmic shear and subtract this contribution to the curl. Arcminute resolution will be required to pursue GW amplitudes smaller than those accessible by the Planck surveyor mission. The blurring by lensing of small-scale CMB power leads with this reconstruction technique to a minimum detectable GW amplitude corresponding to an inflation energy near 10(sup 15) GeV .

  12. Contribution of higher order terms in electron-acoustic solitary waves with vortex electron distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Hilmi

    2014-12-01

    The basic equations describing the nonlinear electron-acoustic waves in a plasma composed of a cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a trapped/vortex-like distribution, and stationary ions, in the long-wave limit, are re-examined through the use of the modified PLK method. Introducing the concept of strained coordinates and expanding the field variables into a power series of the smallness parameter ɛ, a set of evolution equations is obtained for various order terms in the perturbation expansion. The evolution equation for the lowest order term in the perturbation expansion is characterized by the conventional modified Korteweg-deVries (mKdV) equation, whereas the evolution equations for the higher order terms in the expansion are described by the degenerate(linearized) mKdV equation. By studying the localized traveling wave solution to the evolution equations, the strained coordinate for this order is determined so as to remove possible secularities that might occur in the solution. It is observed that the coefficient of the strained coordinate for this order corresponds to the correction term in the wave speed. The numerical results reveal that the contribution of second order term to the wave amplitude is about 20 %, which cannot be ignored.

  13. Empirical evidence of Rayleigh waves in Norcia (central Italy) and their quantitative contribution to ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Cattaneo, Marco; Bordoni, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Spectral ratio techniques, such as the Horizontal-to-Vertical (HV) and Standard (SSR) may exhibit different trends in specific frequency bands when conducted in alluvial basins. A possible explanation of this discrepancy can be provided by the presence of Rayleigh oscillations, that are considered responsible of an amplification of the vertical component with respect to the horizontal. We propose a new methodology for the identification of Rayleigh waves arrivals, to test on small-size basins. With this procedure, candidate Rayleigh waves are localized in time-frequency domain on an instantaneous polarization plane which is constructed by defining the instantaneous maximum vertical and horizontal spectral amplitudes. Validation of the candidate Rayleigh arrivals is performed by evaluating the instantaneous ellipticity. This step yields to a quantitative measure of the polarization, providing an indicator of the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion. We tested this methodology in the Norcia basin (central Italy) using a 18 selected earthquakes (2.0 < Ml < 5.0) dataset which included seismic events recorded from the L'Aquila sequence (2009). We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology by localizing evidences of Rayleigh wave arrivals immediately from (1 s) up to 30 s after the first S-wave group, even for low-magnitude events (Ml < 3.0). The generation of the detected Rayleigh waves analyzed in time-frequency range, appears to be magnitude-dependent and in function of the location in the basin. Our quantitative estimate of the Rayleigh polarization resulted to be comparable to the HV response value in specific frequency bands, for example in deamplification, demonstrating a plausible connection with Rayleigh oscillations. The authors encourage the usage or implementation of similar procedures conducted in basin studies, in order to determine quantitatively the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion, for a better characterization of the local seismic response.

  14. Contribution of soil moisture in summer heat waves amplitude in MED-CORDEX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéfanon, M.

    2012-04-01

    Contribution of soil moisture in summer heat wave amplitude in MED-CORDEX simulations Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Cindy-Lebeaupin Brossier(1,2), (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) CNRM, France ; Heat waves and droughts are extreme weather events intrinsically linked, through strong coupling between the Earth's energy and water cycles. Their impact in short and medium term can be considerable on our societies in terms of health, socio-economic and ecological damage, as in 2003 in Western Europe or Russia in 2010. They are even more affected by climate change than the average state of the atmosphere and could be more frequent, more intense and more extended in the future. Besides this effect could be enhanced by the fact that Mediterranean, a vulnerable area of important geographic and climatic contrasts, is among the most responsive to global warming. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, land surface-related processes and feedbacks can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. In regional climate models (RCMs) the land surface model (LSM) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere and determine the partitioning of surface fluxes (the relationship of latent heat flux to sensible heat flux). In the frame of the HyMeX and MED-CORDEX programs, two simulations at 20-km grid resolution have been performed over 1989-2008 with 2 different LSMs (RUC and 5-layer diffusive schemes) on a Mediterranean domain. The control simulation (CTL) corresponds to the RUC configuration, whereas experiment with perturbed soil moisture (WET) corresponds to the 5-layer diffusive scheme. CTL is able to correctly simulates temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture, as drought conditions. WET has a high soil moisture value, constant through time and land use dependant. These simulations are inter-compared to provide an estimate of the soil moisture contribution to heat wave amplitude.

  15. Reduced soil moisture contributes to more intense and more frequent heat waves in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zhenyuan; Chen, Li

    2015-09-01

    Heat waves have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to their frequent occurrence. The present study investigates the heat wave intensity and duration in China using daily maximum temperature from 753 weather stations from 1960 to 2010. In addition, its relationships with soil moisture local forcing on the ten-day period and monthly scales in spring and summer are analyzed using soil moisture data from weather stations and ERA40 reanalysis data. And finally, a mechanistic analysis is carried out using CAM5.1 (Community Atmosphere Model, version 5.1) coupled with CLM2 (Community Land Model, version 2). It is found that the heat wave frequency and duration show a sandwich distribution across China, with high occurrence rates in Southeast China and Northwest China, where the maximum frequency and duration exceeded 2.1 times and 9 days per year, respectively. The increasing trends in both duration and intensity occurred to the north of 35°N. The relationships between heat wave frequency in northern China in July (having peak distribution) and soil moisture in the earlier stage (from March to June) and corresponding period (July) are further analyzed, revealing a strong negative correlation in March, June and July, and thus showing that soil moisture in spring and early summer could be an important contributor to heat waves in July via positive subtropical high anomalies. However, the time scales of influence were relatively short in the semi-humid and humid regions, and longer in the arid region. The contribution in the corresponding period took place via positive subtropical high anomalies and positive surface skin temperature and sensible heat flux anomalies.

  16. Lamina-specific contribution of glutamatergic and GABAergic potentials to hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Jan; Draguhn, Andreas; Both, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian hippocampus expresses highly organized patterns of neuronal activity which form a neuronal correlate of spatial memories. These memory-encoding neuronal ensembles form on top of different network oscillations which entrain neurons in a state- and experience-dependent manner. The mechanisms underlying activation, timing and selection of participating neurons are incompletely understood. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms underlying one prominent network pattern called sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R) which are involved in memory consolidation during sleep. We recorded SPW-R with extracellular electrodes along the different layers of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Contribution of glutamatergic excitation and GABAergic inhibition, respectively, was probed by local application of receptor antagonists into s. radiatum, pyramidale and oriens. Laminar profiles of field potentials show that GABAergic potentials contribute substantially to sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations in s. pyramidale. Inhibitory inputs to s. pyramidale and s. oriens are crucial for action potential timing by ripple oscillations, as revealed by multiunit-recordings in the pyramidal cell layer. Glutamatergic afferents, on the other hand, contribute to sharp waves in s. radiatum where they also evoke a fast oscillation at ~200 Hz. Surprisingly, field ripples in s. radiatum are slightly slower than ripples in s. pyramidale, resulting in a systematic shift between dendritic and somatic oscillations. This complex interplay between dendritic excitation and perisomatic inhibition may be responsible for the precise timing of discharge probability during the time course of SPW-R. Together, our data illustrate a complementary role of spatially confined excitatory and inhibitory transmission during highly ordered network patterns in the hippocampus. PMID:25202239

  17. Strong Surface Contribution to the Nonlinear Meissner Effect in d-Wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, A.; Dahm, T.; Schopohl, N.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate that in a d-wave superconductor the bulk nonlinear Meissner effect is dominated by a surface effect due to Andreev bound states at low temperatures. The contribution of this surface effect to the nonlinear response coefficient follows a 1/T3 law with the opposite sign compared to the bulk 1/T behavior. The crossover from bulk dominated behavior to surface dominated behavior occurs at a temperature of T/Tc˜1/κ. We present an approximate analytical calculation, which supports our numerical calculations and provides a qualitative understanding of the effect. The effect can be probed by intermodulation distortion experiments.

  18. Strong surface contribution to the nonlinear Meissner effect in d-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Zare, A; Dahm, T; Schopohl, N

    2010-06-11

    We demonstrate that in a d-wave superconductor the bulk nonlinear Meissner effect is dominated by a surface effect due to Andreev bound states at low temperatures. The contribution of this surface effect to the nonlinear response coefficient follows a 1/T3 law with the opposite sign compared to the bulk 1/T behavior. The crossover from bulk dominated behavior to surface dominated behavior occurs at a temperature of T/Tc∼1/square root(κ). We present an approximate analytical calculation, which supports our numerical calculations and provides a qualitative understanding of the effect. The effect can be probed by intermodulation distortion experiments. PMID:20867262

  19. The gravitational wave contribution to cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the amplitude of mass fluctuations from COBE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic background of primordial gravitational waves may substantially contribute, via the Sachs-Wolfe effect, to the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies recently detected by COBE. This implies a bias in any resulting determination of the primordial amplitude of density fluctuations. We consider the constraints imposed on n is less than 1 ('tilted') power-law fluctuation spectra, taking into account the contribution from both scalar and tensor waves, as predicted by power-law inflation. The gravitational wave contribution to CMB anisotropies generally reduces the required rms level of mass fluctuation, thereby increasing the linear bias parameter, even in models where the spectral index is close to the Harrison-Zel'dovich value n = 1. This 'gravitational wave bias' helps to reconcile the predictions of CDM models with observations on pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion on small scales.

  20. BCS-BEC crossover and nodal-points contribution in p-wave resonance superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Efremov, D. V.

    2009-08-01

    We solve the Leggett equations for BCS-BEC crossover of the resonance p-wave superfluid. We calculate sound velocity, specific heat and the normal density for the BCS domain (μ>0), the BEC domain (μ<0), and for the interesting interpolation point (μ=0) in the 100%-polarized A1 phase in 3D. We are especially interested in the quasiparticle contribution coming from the zeros of the superfluid gap in the A1 phase. We discuss the spectrum of orbital waves and the superfluid hydrodynamics at temperature T →0. In this context we elucidate the difficult problem of the chiral anomaly and mass-current nonconcervation appearing in the BCS domain. We present the different approaches taken to solve this problem. To clarify this problem experimentally we propose an experiment for measurement of the anomalous current in the superfluid A1 phase in the presence of aerogel for He3 and in the presence of Josephson tunneling structures for ultracold gases in magnetic traps.

  1. Surface-Induced Turbulence and Resulting Sand Suspension Beneath Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkkemper, J.; Ruessink, G.

    2014-12-01

    Breaking waves and bores inject large amounts of turbulence into the water column as vortices, which can travel downward and entrain sand from the bed. Coastal evolution models rarely include the effect of this surface-induced turbulence on sand suspension and subsequent transport to predict surf-zone morphodynamics. Here, we analyze turbulence and suspension measurements beneath non-breaking waves and plunging breakers, collected during the field-scale BARDEXII laboratory experiment using a vertical array of 3 ADVs and 7 OBSs. The array was positioned at a single cross-shore location, but, because of changes in wave conditions and water levels, experienced different degrees of wave breaking. Results show a phase-coupling for both turbulence kinetic energy and sand concentration with the short-wave orbital motion during all conditions, with the highest values when the cross-shore velocity is onshore directed. The vertical turbulence flux under plunging breakers also depends on wave phase, with a downward and upward flux during offshore and onshore directed wave orbital motion, respectively. The plunging jet hits the water surface in the wave trough, resulting in a downward turbulence flux during the offshore directed wave orbital motion. The upward flux during the onshore directed wave orbital motion might represent the injected air bubbles rising to the water surface. This upward flux coincides with the peak in suspension, which, accordingly, reaches higher in the water column than beneath non-breaking waves. Besides a phase-coupling with the short-wave orbital motion, turbulence kinetic energy and sand concentration were also modulated on an infragravity timescale, with high values during the offshore directed infragravity flow. The effect of surface-generated turbulence on the direction and magnitude of short- and infragravity-induced cross-shore sand fluxes will also be discussed. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is part

  2. Contribution of human short-wave cones to luminance and motion detection.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J; Stromeyer, C F

    1989-01-01

    1. Human short-wave S cone signals are important for colour vision and here we examine whether the S cone signals also contribute to motion and luminance. 2. Detection was measured with moving patterns that selectively stimulated S cones-violet sine-wave gratings of 1 cycle deg-1 on an intense yellowish field. For rates up to 12 Hz, detection was governed by non-directional mechanisms, possibly of a chromatic nature, as shown by three findings: moving gratings had to be suprathreshold for their direction to be identified; the threshold ratio of counterphase flickering versus moving gratings was low; and direction-selective adaptation was essentially absent. 3. Evidence for less sensitive, directional mechanisms includes the following: at high velocity, the direction of movement of the violet gratings can be identified just slightly above the detection threshold; directional adaptation was strong with a suprathreshold test pattern; velocity was seen veridically for clearly suprathreshold patterns; and a counterphase flickering test, added in spatial-temporal quadrature phase to a similar suprathreshold mask, had identical detection and direction-identification thresholds. 4. Interactions of long-wave L cone and S cone signals in direction-selective mechanisms were measured with an orange counterphase grating and a violet counterphase test, both flickering at the same rate and presented in spatial quadrature phase on the yellowish adapting field. Direction identification thresholds, measured as a function of the temporal phase of two gratings, demonstrated both that the S cone signal lags considerably behind the L cone signal (an effect that strongly varies with S cone light adaptation), and more strikingly, the S cone signal summates with a negative sign and thus is effectively inverted in direction-selective mechanisms. 5. Quantitatively similar temporal phase functions were obtained with uniform violet and orange flicker when a luminance discrimination criterion

  3. Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, P.; Holman, R.A.; Beach, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Because of highly dissipative conditions and strong alongshore gradients in foreshore beach morphology, wave run-up data collected along the central Oregon coast during February 1996 stand in contrast to run-up data currently available in the literature. During a single data run lasting approximately 90 min, the significant vertical run-up elevation varied by a factor of 2 along the 1.6 km study site, ranging from 26 to 61% of the offshore significant wave height, and was found to be linearly dependent on the local foreshore beach slope that varied by a factor of 5. Run-up motions on this high-energy dissipative beach were dominated by infragravity (low frequency) energy with peak periods of approximately 230 s. Incident band energy levels were 2.5 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than the low-frequency spectral peaks and typically 96% of the run-up variance was in the infragravity band. A broad region of the run-up spectra exhibited an f-4 roll off, typical of saturation, extending to frequencies lower than observed in previous studies. The run-up spectra were dependent on beach slope with spectra for steeper foreshore slopes shifted toward higher frequencies than spectra for shallower foreshore slopes. At infragravity frequencies, run-up motions were coherent over alongshore length scales in excess of 1 km, significantly greater than decorrelation length scales on moderate to reflective beaches. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup () at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model ( α in SWASH and γ in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

  5. Identifying Contributing Harmonics in the Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Highly Eccentric EMRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andrew; Stone, Jordan; Ahrens, Sloan; Kennefick, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In the study of gravitational waves emitted from extreme mass ratio inspirals highly eccentric orbits are problematic because of the large number of harmonics, and thus the lengthy computation times that were thought to be inherent to it. The issue however, is made simpler because the spectrum is not that broad and is fairly localized. The true complexity lies in finding the peaks of the largest contributors to accurately describe the complete spectrum, since for any given multipole of the spectrum the position of the peak in the emission is difficult to predict. This project uses two methods of finding the peak harmonic of a given spectrum. The first method uses a skipping algorithm to systematically jump over harmonics with insignificant contributions to the total waveform. Because this method is still not completely efficient, a second method uses a Newtonian order approximation given by Peters and Matthews to give an estimate of the frequency of the actual waveform peak, and then fills in around this harmonics to give the spectrum. The two methods are complementary since the skipping algorithm can be used when the Newtonian estimation fails to find the peak immediately.

  6. Standing wave contributions to the linear interference effect in stratosphere-troposphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt-Meyer, Oliver; Kushner, Paul

    2014-05-01

    A body of literature by Hayashi and others [Hayashi 1973, 1977, 1979; Pratt, 1976] developed a decomposition of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum into standing and travelling waves. These techniques directly decompose the power spectrum—that is, the amplitudes squared—into standing and travelling parts. This, incorrectly, does not allow for a term representing the covariance between these waves. We propose a simple decomposition based on the 2D Fourier transform which allows one to directly compute the variance of the standing and travelling waves, as well as the covariance between them. Applying this decomposition to geopotential height anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere winter, we show the dominance of standing waves for planetary wavenumbers 1 through 3, especially in the stratosphere, and that wave-1 anomalies have a significant westward travelling component in the high-latitude (60N to 80N) troposphere. Variations in the relative zonal phasing between a wave anomaly and the background climatological wave pattern—the "linear interference" effect—are known to explain a large part of the planetary wave driving of the polar stratosphere in both hemispheres. While the linear interference effect is robust across observations, models of varying degrees of complexity, and in response to various types of perturbations, it is not well understood dynamically. We use the above-described decomposition into standing and travelling waves to investigate the drivers of linear interference. We find that the linear part of the wave activity flux is primarily driven by the standing waves, at all vertical levels. This can be understood by noting that the longitudinal positions of the antinodes of the standing waves are typically close to being aligned with the maximum and minimum of the background climatology. We discuss implications for predictability of wave activity flux, and hence polar vortex strength variability.

  7. H-He elastic scattering at low energies: Contribution of nonzero partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports the nonzero partial wave elastic cross sections together with s-wave results for the scattering of an antihydrogen atom off a gaseous helium target at thermal energies (up to 10{sup -2} a.u.). We have used a nonadiabatic atomic orbital method having different basis sets to investigate the system. The consideration of all the significant partial waves (up to J=24) reduces the oscillatory nature present in the individual partial wave cross section. The added elastic cross section is almost constant up to 10{sup -7} a.u. and then decreases steadily and very slowly with increasing energy.

  8. Overly persistent circulation in climate models contributes to overestimated frequency and duration of heat waves and cold spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavcová, Eva; Kyselý, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The study examines links of summer heat waves and winter cold spells in Central Europe to atmospheric circulation and specifically its persistence in an ensemble of regional climate models (RCMs). We analyse 13 RCMs driven by the ERA-40 reanalysis and compare them against observations over reference period 1971-2000. Using objective classification of circulation types and an efficiency coefficient with a block resampling test, we identify circulation types significantly conducive to heat waves and cold spells. We show that the RCMs have a stronger tendency to group together days with very high or low temperature and tend to simulate too many heat waves and cold spells, especially those lasting 5 days and more. Circulation types conducive to heat waves in summer are characterized by anticyclonic, southerly and easterly flow, with increasing importance of warm advection during heat waves. Winter cold spells are typically associated with easterly and anticyclonic flow, and the onset of cold spells tends to be linked to northerly and cyclonic flow with cold advection. The RCMs are generally able to reproduce the links between circulation and heat waves or cold spells, including the radiation-to-advection effect for heat waves and the opposite advection-to-radiation effect for cold spells. They capture relatively well also changes of mean temperature anomalies during sequences of given circulation types, namely the tendency towards temperature increase (decrease) during those types conducive to heat waves (cold spells). Since mean lengths of all circulation supertypes are overestimated in the RCMs, we conclude that the overly persistent circulation in climate models contributes to the overestimated frequency of long heat waves and cold spells. As these biases are rather general among the examined RCMs and similar drawbacks are likely to be manifested in climate model simulations for the twenty-first century, the results also suggest that climate change scenarios for

  9. Standing and Travelling Wave Contributions to the Persistent Ridge-Trough Over North America During Winter 2013/14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt-Meyer, O.; Kushner, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The winter season over North America during 2013/14 was dominated by a persistent ridge-trough that brought warm and dry conditions to the southwestern U.S., and markedly cold temperatures to central and eastern North America [Wang et al., 2014; Hartmann, 2015]. In addition, several cold air outbreaks occurred during the winter season, the strongest of which was around 7 January 2014 and led to minimum daily temperature records being set at many weather stations including Atlanta, Austin, Chicago and New York [Screen et al., in press]. This study uses a novel decomposition of wave variability into standing and travelling components [Watt-Meyer and Kushner, 2015] to diagnose the anomalous circulation of the 2013/14 winter season. This spectral decomposition is an improvement on previous methods because it explicitly accounts for the covariance between standing and travelling waves, and because the real-space components of the signal can be easily reconstructed. An index representing the ridge-trough dipole is computed using mid-tropospheric heights and shown to be well correlated with surface temperatures over central and eastern North America. The contributions to this dipole index from standing waves, westward travelling waves, and eastward travelling waves are calculated. The analysis demonstrates that the cold air outbreak of 7 January 2014 was driven by a synoptic wave of record breaking amplitude intensifying a persistent background amplification of the typical ridge-trough structure seen during North American winter.

  10. Wave-induced seepage and its possible contribution to the formation of pockmarks in the Huanghe (Yellow) River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Hongjun; Zhang, Minsheng; Wang, Xiuhai

    2016-01-01

    Wave-induced seepage and its possible contribution to the formation of pockmarks in the Huanghe (Yellow) River delta were investigated experimentally and numerically. Laboratory experiments were carried out to explore the response of a layered silty seabed with various saturation conditions under cyclic wave loads, in which the pore pressure and seepage-related phenomena were particularly monitored. Numerical models to simulate wave-induced seepage in the seabed were presented and evaluated, then applied to the Huanghe River delta. The experimental results show that the excess pore pressure decreases more rapidly at the surface layer, while the seepage-related phenomena are more pronounced when large cyclic loads are applied and the underlying layer is less saturated. The proposed numerical models were verified by comparing with the experiments. The calculated seepage depth agreed well with the depth of the pockmarks in the Huanghe River delta. The experimental and numerical results and the existing insitu investigations indicate that the wave-induced seepage may be a direct cause of the pockmarks in the Huanghe River delta. Extreme storm waves and the dual-layered structure of hard surface layer and weak underlying layer are essential external and internal factors, respectively. Wave- or current-induced scour and transport are possible contributors to the reformation of pockmarks at a later stage.

  11. Overly persistent circulation in climate models contributes to overestimated frequency and duration of heat waves and cold spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavcova, Eva; Kysely, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The study examines links of summer heat waves and winter cold spells in Central Europe to atmospheric circulation and specifically its persistence in an ensemble of regional climate models (RCMs). We analyse 13 RCMs driven by the ERA-40 reanalysis and compare them against observations over 1971-2000. Using objective classification of circulation types and an efficiency coefficient with a block resampling test, we identify circulation types significantly conducive to heat waves and cold spells. We show that the RCMs have a stronger tendency to group together days with very high or low temperature and tend to simulate too many heat waves and cold spells, especially those lasting 5 days and more. Circulation types conducive to heat waves in summer are characterized by anticyclonic, southerly and easterly flow, with increasing importance of warm advection during heat waves. Winter cold spells are typically associated with easterly and anticyclonic flow, and the onset of cold spells tends to be linked to northerly and cyclonic flow with cold advection. The RCMs are generally able to reproduce the links between circulation and heat waves or cold spells, including the radiation-to-advection effect for heat waves and the opposite advection-to-radiation effect for cold spells. They capture relatively well also changes of mean temperature anomalies during sequences of given circulation types, namely the tendency towards an increase (decrease) of temperature during the types conducive to heat waves (cold spells). Since mean lengths of all circulation supertypes are overestimated in the RCMs, we conclude that the overly persistent circulation in climate models contributes to the overestimated frequency of long heat waves and cold spells. As these biases are rather general among the examined RCMs and similar drawbacks are likely to be manifested in climate model simulations for the 21st century, the results also suggest that climate change scenarios for spells of days with high

  12. Assessing the contributions of surface waves and complex rays to far-field Mie scattering by use of the Debye series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The contributions of complex rays and the secondary radiation shed by surface waves to scattering by a dielectric sphere are calculated in the context of the Debye series expansion of the Mie scattering amplitudes. Also, the contributions of geometrical rays are reviewed and compared with the Debye series. Interference effects between surface waves, complex waves, and geometrical waves are calculated, and the possibility of observing these interference effects is discussed. Experimental data supporting the observation of a surface wave-geometrical pattern is presented.

  13. Modeling the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooijen, A. A.; McCall, R. T.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; van Dongeren, A. R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic vegetation in the coastal zone attenuates wave energy and reduces the risk of coastal hazards, e.g., flooding. Besides the attenuation of sea-swell waves, vegetation may also affect infragravity-band (IG) waves and wave setup. To date, knowledge on the effect of vegetation on IG waves and wave setup is lacking, while they are potentially important parameters for coastal risk assessment. In this study, the storm impact model XBeach is extended with formulations for attenuation of sea-swell and IG waves, and wave setup effects in two modes: the sea-swell wave phase-resolving (nonhydrostatic) and the phase-averaged (surfbeat) mode. In surfbeat mode, a wave shape model is implemented to capture the effect of nonlinear wave-vegetation interaction processes on wave setup. Both modeling modes are verified using data from two flume experiments with mimic vegetation and show good skill in computing the sea-swell and IG wave transformation, and wave setup. In surfbeat mode, the wave setup prediction greatly improves when using the wave shape model, while in nonhydrostatic mode (nonlinear) intrawave effects are directly accounted for. Subsequently, the model is used for a range of coastal geomorphological configurations by varying bed slope and vegetation extent. The results indicate that the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup may be relevant for a range of typical coastal geomorphological configurations (e.g., relatively steep to gentle slope coasts fronted by vegetation).

  14. CONTRIBUTION OF VELOCITY VORTICES AND FAST SHOCK REFLECTION AND REFRACTION TO THE FORMATION OF EUV WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongjuan; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun; Wu, Ning; Lin, Jun

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock at the front of the rope, which then produces a type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast shock touches the bottom boundary, so the Moreton wave lags the type II burst. A secondary echo occurs in the area where reflection of the fast shock encounters the slow-mode shock, and the nearby magnetic field lines are further distorted because of the interaction between the secondary echo and the velocity vortices. Our results indicate that the EUV wave may arise from various processes that are revealed in the new simulations.

  15. Energy transfer between wind waves and low-frequency oscillations on a fringing reef, Ipan, Guam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péquignet, Anne-Christine N.; Becker, Janet M.; Merrifield, Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    Field observations from a Guam fringing reef are used to examine the cross-reef energy exchange between high-frequency sea and swell (SS) and low-frequency infragravity (IG) and far infragravity (fIG) waves. Energetic SS waves (significant wave heights 2-4 m) break at the outer reef, leading to weak (<1 m) conditions on the shallow reef flat. As SS waves shoal on the reef face before breaking, IG and fIG energy fluxes both increase through nonlinear energy transfer from the SS waves. In contrast, through the surf zone, the IG energy flux decreases whereas fIG flux increases. The decrease in IG energy flux through the surf zone is attributed to breaking SS waves working against the incident bound IG wave energy, which dominates breakpoint forced IG waves, yielding a net flux decrease. In contrast, fIG energy flux increases through the surf zone, consistent with breakpoint forcing and the absence of an energetic bound fIG component on the reef face. IG and fIG energy fluxes decay on the shallow reef flat due primarily to frictional dissipation, with tidal modulations attributed to nonlinear conversion and friction. Forcing at fIG frequencies may lead to a normal mode response on the reef with comparable incoming and outgoing fIG energy fluxes at the outer reef flat, depending on water level over the reef flat and the degree of frictional dissipation.

  16. Destructive tsunami-like wave generated by surf beat over a coral reef during Typhoon Haiyan

    PubMed Central

    Roeber, Volker; Bricker, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Storm surges cause coastal inundation due to setup of the water surface resulting from atmospheric pressure, surface winds and breaking waves. Here we show that during Typhoon Haiyan, the setup generated by breaking waves near the fringing-reef-protected town of Hernani, the Philippines, oscillated with the incidence of large and small wave groups, and steepened into a tsunami-like wave that caused extensive damage and casualties. Though fringing reefs usually protect coastal communities from moderate storms, they can exacerbate flooding during strong events with energetic waves. Typical for reef-type bathymetries, a very short wave-breaking zone over the steep reef face facilitates the freeing of infragravity-period fluctuations (surf beat) with little energy loss. Since coastal flood planning relies on phase-averaged wave modelling, infragravity surges are not being accounted for. This highlights the necessity for a policy change and the adoption of phase-resolving wave models for hazard assessment in regions with fringing reefs. PMID:26245839

  17. Destructive tsunami-like wave generated by surf beat over a coral reef during Typhoon Haiyan.

    PubMed

    Roeber, Volker; Bricker, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    Storm surges cause coastal inundation due to setup of the water surface resulting from atmospheric pressure, surface winds and breaking waves. Here we show that during Typhoon Haiyan, the setup generated by breaking waves near the fringing-reef-protected town of Hernani, the Philippines, oscillated with the incidence of large and small wave groups, and steepened into a tsunami-like wave that caused extensive damage and casualties. Though fringing reefs usually protect coastal communities from moderate storms, they can exacerbate flooding during strong events with energetic waves. Typical for reef-type bathymetries, a very short wave-breaking zone over the steep reef face facilitates the freeing of infragravity-period fluctuations (surf beat) with little energy loss. Since coastal flood planning relies on phase-averaged wave modelling, infragravity surges are not being accounted for. This highlights the necessity for a policy change and the adoption of phase-resolving wave models for hazard assessment in regions with fringing reefs. PMID:26245839

  18. Destructive tsunami-like wave generated by surf beat over a coral reef during Typhoon Haiyan.

    PubMed

    Roeber, Volker; Bricker, Jeremy D

    2015-08-06

    Storm surges cause coastal inundation due to setup of the water surface resulting from atmospheric pressure, surface winds and breaking waves. Here we show that during Typhoon Haiyan, the setup generated by breaking waves near the fringing-reef-protected town of Hernani, the Philippines, oscillated with the incidence of large and small wave groups, and steepened into a tsunami-like wave that caused extensive damage and casualties. Though fringing reefs usually protect coastal communities from moderate storms, they can exacerbate flooding during strong events with energetic waves. Typical for reef-type bathymetries, a very short wave-breaking zone over the steep reef face facilitates the freeing of infragravity-period fluctuations (surf beat) with little energy loss. Since coastal flood planning relies on phase-averaged wave modelling, infragravity surges are not being accounted for. This highlights the necessity for a policy change and the adoption of phase-resolving wave models for hazard assessment in regions with fringing reefs.

  19. Channel-Coupling Contribution to the Widths of Decay Nuclear States and to Their Wave Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2004-12-01

    By using the formalism of the quantum theory of fission, the amplitudes of partial decay widths and the asymptotic behavior of the wave function for a decaying nucleus are found with allowance for open-decay-channel coupling not only for fission, but also for the binary decays of nuclei through protonic, alpha-particle, cluster, and other channels.

  20. Contribution of tuned liquid column gas dampers to the performance of offshore wind turbines under wind, wave, and seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargi, Khosrow; Dezvareh, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Amin

    2016-09-01

    The main intention of the present study is to reduce wind, wave, and seismic induced vibrations of jackettype offshore wind turbines (JOWTs) through a newly developed vibration absorber, called tuned liquid column gas damper (TLCGD). Using a Simulink-based model, an analytical model is developed to simulate global behavior of JOWTs under different dynamic excitations. The study is followed by a parametric study to explore efficiency of the TLCGD in terms of nacelle acceleration reduction under wind, wave, and earthquake loads. Study results indicate that optimum frequency of the TLCGD is rather insensitive to excitation type. In addition, while the gain in vibration control from TLCGDs with higher mass ratios is generally more pronounced, heavy TLCGDs are more sensitive to their tuned frequency such that ill-regulated TLCGD with high mass ratio can lead to destructive results. It is revealed that a well regulated TLCGD has noticeable contribution to the dynamic response of the JOWT under any excitation.

  1. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  2. Coherent and incoherent contributions to the carrier-envelope phase control of wave packet localization in quantum double wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, K.; Engel, V.

    2014-05-14

    We study laser excitation processes in a double well potential. The possibility to influence localization via the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a laser pulse is investigated for various situations which differ in the nature of the initial state prior to the laser interactions. In more detail, the CEP-dependence of asymmetries in the case where initially the system is described by localized wave packets, eigenstates, or incoherent mixtures are calculated and interpreted within time-dependent perturbation theory. It is investigated which contributions to the asymmetry exist and how they can be modified to reveal a more or less pronounced CEP-effect.

  3. New constraints on D-state contributions to the trinucleon wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuaridel, B.; Grüebler, W.; König, V.; Elsener, K.; Schmelzbach, P. A.; Bittcher, M.; Singy, D.; Borbély, I.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; D'agostino, M.

    1989-07-01

    Cross-section and polarization data of the 4He(d, 3He) 3H reaction measured at 5 energies have been analysed. The vertex constants for the neutron transfer Gn, the proton transfer Gp and the asymptotic normalization constant Cs2, for the S-state of the 3H wave function have been determined. New constraints on the D- to S-state asymptotic normalization ratio ηt, and η3He for the triton and 3He wave functions are obtained from the tensor analyzing powers. The method of the analytic extrapolation in the angular variable to the transfer poles was used. Implications of this method and its application are discussed. Criteria for the reliability of the results are presented. The result of the analysis is Cs2 = 2.95 ±0.15, ηt = 0.050 ± 0.006 and η3He = 0.035 ± 0.006. The ratio ηt/ η3He shows a significant deviation from unity suggesting a substantial isospin breaking effect.

  4. Contributions to the theory of magnetorotational instability and waves in a rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Tsypin, V. S.; Erokhin, N. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Konovalov, S. V.; Pashitskii, E. A.; Stepanov, A. V.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2008-01-15

    The one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in an ideal plasma is presented. The theory predicts the possibility of MRI for arbitrary {beta}, where {beta} is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure. The kinetic theory of MRI in a collisionless plasma is developed. It is demonstrated that as in the ideal MHD, MRI can occur in such a plasma for arbitrary {beta}. The mechanism of MRI is discussed; it is shown that the instability appears because of a perturbed parallel electric field. The electrodynamic description of MRI is formulated under the assumption that the dispersion relation is expressed in terms of the permittivity tensor; general properties of this tensor are analyzed. It is shown to be separated into the nonrotational and rotational parts. With this in mind, the first step for incorporation of MRI into the general theory of plasma instabilities is taken. The rotation effects on Alfven waves are considered.

  5. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants. PMID:27392205

  6. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants.

  7. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  8. Initial-data contribution to the error budget of gravitational waves from neutron-star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokaros, Antonios; Mundim, Bruno C.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Rezzolla, Luciano; Uryū, Kōji

    2016-08-01

    As numerical calculations of inspiraling neutron-star binaries reach values of accuracy that are comparable with those of black-hole binaries, a fine budgeting of the various sources of error becomes increasingly important. Among such sources, the initial data are normally not accounted for, the rationale being that the error on the initial spacelike hypersurface is always far smaller than the error gained during the evolution. We here consider critically this assumption and perform a comparative analysis of the gravitational waveforms relative to essentially the same physical binary configuration when computed with two different initial-data codes, and then evolved with the same evolution code. More specifically, we consider the evolution of irrotational neutron-star binaries computed either with the pseudospectral code lorene, or with the newly developed finite-difference code cocal; both sets of initial data are subsequently evolved with the high-order-evolution code whiskythc. In this way we find that although global quantities of the system, like the mass and angular momentum, have differences of the order of ≲0.02 % , local quantities, like rest-mass density, extrinsic curvature or angular velocity, show pointwise differences that are much larger, of the order of ≲1 %. These local differences are then responsible for a dephasing in the gravitational waves at the merger time (after approximately three orbits) of ˜1.4 radians. Our results highlight the importance of using initial data that are pointwisely the same when comparative studies are done and physical parameters are estimated.

  9. Lithospheric and asthenospheric contributions to shear-wave splitting observations in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lara S.; Long, Maureen D.; Johnston, Mignon D.; Benoit, Margaret H.

    2012-08-01

    We present observations of both null and non-null SKS splitting from temporary deployments across the southeastern United States in order to evaluate the relative contributions of lithospheric deformation and asthenospheric flow to regional anisotropy. Data for this study come from four temporary broadband seismic deployments: the Appalachian Seismic Transect (AST), the Test Experiment for Eastern North America (TEENA), the South Carolina Earth Physics Project (SCEPP), and the Florida to Edmonton Array (FLED). In general, we find fast directions aligned roughly parallel to absolute plate motion of the North American plate (APM) within and west of the Southern Appalachians, whereas to the southeast, we find a broad area dominated by complex splitting patterns consisting of well-constrained null splitting measurements over a range of backazimuths along with a very small number of resolved non-null measurements. This change in splitting patterns is consistent with a transition from drag induced asthenospheric flow beneath the older sections of the North American continent to vertical or incoherent mantle flow, likely in combination with complex lithospheric anisotropy, beneath the younger accreted terranes to the southeast. In addition to these general patterns, we find a number of non-null splitting measurements that are not aligned with APM, but are instead aligned with prominent magnetic anomalies that may correspond to ancient continental suture zones or faults. This would suggest that in these areas, a strongly anisotropic (but localized) lithospheric fabric dominates over any ambient asthenospheric anisotropic signature. In areas with generally strong APM parallel splitting, this would imply a thick sheared mantle lithosphere whose deformation-induced anisotropy is strong enough to overprint the anisotropy induced by APM, and is aligned with the shallower crustal structures responsible for generating the observed magnetic anomalies. In the southeastern areas

  10. Wave Mode Processing Algorithms, Product Validation and Assimilation Wave Retrievals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collard, Fabrice; Johnsen, Harald; Lotfi, Aouf; Chapron, Bertrand

    2013-03-01

    The fourth SAR oceanography workshop, SEASAR 2012 , entitled "Advances in SAR Oceanography", was held in Tromsø, 18th to 22th June 2012. Among the topics highlighted at SEASAR 2012 were ”Wave mode processing algorithms, product validation and assimilation” and ”Wave retrievals and applications”. The last decade of SAR wave research has brought high level of consensus on the various approaches for deriving wave information from SAR images. The main new achievements have been within advance applications of SAR wave derived information such as;1) the investigation of extreme sea states in intense storms; 2) the study of individual exceptional wave states, such as freak (monster) waves; 3) the extension of numerical wave models in the general context of Earth System modelling, including the improved representation of wave-current interactions, air-sea fluxes, and second-order spectral quantities related to infra-gravity and microseism generation, and; 4) improved assimilation of wave data in NWP models. This paper presents a summary of achievements and way forward within these fields since the previous white paper of SeaSAR2003 (ESA SP-565, 2004).

  11. Multispin-wave contributions to the excitation spectrum of one-dimensional easy-plane antiferromagnets, (CH3)4NMnCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, Peter S.; Reiter, George F.

    1983-02-01

    (CH3)4NMnCl3 (TMMC) is a one-dimensional easy-plane antiferromagnet which, when subjected to a transverse applied magnetic field, is a realization of a sine-Gordon field theory. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments and NMR relaxation measurements have shown that the magnetic excitation spectrum has a ω~0 central peak, which has been associated with the soliton excitations. In this paper we examine the spin-wave contributions to the excitation spectrum. We find multispin-wave excitations that contribute to the central peak. However, we find that these multispin-wave excitations are not in agreement with the experimental data, which require an additional soliton contribution to describe them. The multispin-wave excitations also give rise to inelastic excitation spectra. For most values of the applied field, the anharmonic interactions in TMMC modify the inelastic excitations so as to resemble the sine-Gordon excitations, such as breathers, etc. This resemblance ceases for special values of the applied field which produces a resonance between the inelastic two-spin-wave excitations and the zone-boundary spin wave. This purely anharmonic effect, which has been observed experimentally, is well described by our results.

  12. ζ-FUNCTION Technique for Quantum Cosmology:. the Contributions of Matter Fields to the Hartle-Hawking Wave Function of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Mishakov, I. V.

    We investigate the contributions of matter fields to the Hartle-Hawking wave function of the Universe in the one-loop approximation. The values ζ(0), which describe the scaling behavior of the wave function calculated on the background representing the part of four-dimensional DeSitter sphere, are calculated for scalar, electromagnetic, graviton, spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 fields. The ζ-function technique is used and developed for these calculations. The obtained results can be applied to a detailed investigation of the structure of the Hartle-Hawking wave function.

  13. Wave-Group Resolving vs Wave-Resolving Modeling of Surf and Swash Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, J. A.; McCall, R. T.; Mehvar, S.; Dastgheib, A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling of beach and dune erosion, overwashing and breaching has gained much from inclusion of wave-group related infragravity motions in models such as XBeach (Roelvink et al, 2009). The main assumption in this model is that on the upper beach the incident-band, short waves are to a large extent dissipated, whereas infragravity wave motions have more oomph and are the ones making it to the dune foot and even over it. It is then justified to resolve the variations in short-wave energy and resulting long-wave motions, while parameterizing the short wave motions. This model has been applied successfully in many cases, both lab and field, concerning sandy beaches and dunes. However, as the sand gets coarser and beaches steeper, more and more incident wave energy is found in the swash, and at some point the parameterizations and associated coefficients start dominating the process. For gravel beaches, McCall et al (2014) have made use of a wave-resolving mode of XBeach, which makes use of a one-layer, nonhydrostatic approach developed by Zijlema et al. (2011). They have included a groundwater model and have shown that both the infiltration-exfiltration processes and the incident-band swash are important in getting the swash hydrodynamics on gravel beaches right. This work is continuing with promising results for morphodynamic response during extreme events. At the same time, we are investigating the skill of both approaches for wave runup and overtopping and are testing the morphodynamic behavior of the wave-resolving model in comparison with data and the original XBeach. So far, at the sandy end of the spectrum, both approaches give good and very similar results. In our presentation we will highlight some of these results and will present a sensitivity study where both approaches will be run and compared for a range of coastal profiles, including hard end structures. This will allow us to give clear guidelines for when to use the (much more computer

  14. Wave activity in the tropical tropopause layer in nine reanalysis datasets - A contribution to the SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Sub-seasonal variability including equatorial waves significantly influence the dehydration and transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). This study investigates the wave activity in the TTL in 9 reanalysis datasets, i.e., NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE, ERA-40, ERA-Interim, JRA-25, JRA-55, MERRA, NCEP-CFSR, and 20CR. Analyses are made for temperature and horizontal winds at 100 hPa. Particular focus is placed on equatorial Kelvin waves, mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves, and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The zonal wave number-frequency spectral analysis method is used, with equatorially symmetric-antisymmetric decomposition. The wave activity is defined as the variance, i.e., the power spectral density integrated in a particular zonal wave number-frequency region. It is found that the TTL wave activities show significant difference among the reanalyses, ranging from ~0.7 (for NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE, and 20CR) to ~1.4 (for ERA-Interim, JRA-55, MERRA, and NCEP-CFSR) with respect to the averages from all the reanalyses. It is concluded that the broad range of wave activity found in the different reanalyses decreases our confidence in their validity and in particular their value for validation of model performance in the TTL, thereby limiting our quantitative understanding of the dehydration and transport processes in the TTL. This is a contribution to an emerging project of the Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC), the SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP; http://wwwoa.ees.hokudai.ac.jp/~fuji/s-rip/). The overview and plan of the S-RIP will also be briefly presented.

  15. Development of an Advanced Technique to Correct Along-Track InSAR-Derived Surface Current Fields for Contributions of Wave Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.; Romeiser, R.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of surface current measurements by airborne and spaceborne along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (along-track InSAR) has been demonstrated on a number of occasions. Since the Doppler shifts detected by the radar include contributions of surface wave motions, a correction for these contributions has to be applied, which is often estimated as a mean correction for the entire current field on the basis of a simple theoretical model. In coastal areas and river estuaries with complex current and wave patterns, this approach is not adequate because one has to account for spatial variations in the wave field and in the corresponding corrections for the current field, which can be on the same order of magnitude as the actual surface currents of interest. Here we test the ability of a numerical near-shore hindcast model (Delft3D) to produce a wave field to be used for more appropriate computations of corrections for the along-track InSAR data. Our study was conducted at the mouth of the Columbia River on the West Coast of the U.S. during the spring of 2013. Over the course of the experiment, seven TerraSAR-X along-track InSAR images were acquired as well as a variety of in-situ data sets, such as trajectories of GPS-equipped Lagrangian drifters and velocity profiles from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP). We use the in-situ data to validate our Delft3D model results, and we try to relate spatially varying differences between the measured and simulated surface currents and the TerraSAR-X derived Doppler velocities to the wave spectra obtained from Delft3D and to wave patterns observed in the SAR images. The long-term objective of this work is to derive the wave information and the corresponding velocity corrections from signatures contained in the along-track InSAR data set itself, such that a completely self-consistent correction of along-track InSAR-derived surface current fields for the contributions of spatially varying wave motions

  16. Evaluation of wave runup predictions from numerical and parametric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Wave runup during storms is a primary driver of coastal evolution, including shoreline and dune erosion and barrier island overwash. Runup and its components, setup and swash, can be predicted from a parameterized model that was developed by comparing runup observations to offshore wave height, wave period, and local beach slope. Because observations during extreme storms are often unavailable, a numerical model is used to simulate the storm-driven runup to compare to the parameterized model and then develop an approach to improve the accuracy of the parameterization. Numerically simulated and parameterized runup were compared to observations to evaluate model accuracies. The analysis demonstrated that setup was accurately predicted by both the parameterized model and numerical simulations. Infragravity swash heights were most accurately predicted by the parameterized model. The numerical model suffered from bias and gain errors that depended on whether a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spatial domain was used. Nonetheless, all of the predictions were significantly correlated to the observations, implying that the systematic errors can be corrected. The numerical simulations did not resolve the incident-band swash motions, as expected, and the parameterized model performed best at predicting incident-band swash heights. An assimilated prediction using a weighted average of the parameterized model and the numerical simulations resulted in a reduction in prediction error variance. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to include storm conditions that have not been previously observed. These results indicated that the parameterized predictions of setup may need modification for extreme conditions; numerical simulations can be used to extend the validity of the parameterized predictions of infragravity swash; and numerical simulations systematically underpredict incident swash, which is relatively unimportant under extreme conditions.

  17. Contribution of excitatory chloride conductance in the determination of the direction of traveling waves in an olfactory center.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kirino, Yutaka

    2003-04-01

    Traveling waves have been found in the CNS of vertebrates and invertebrates. In the olfactory center [procerebrum (PC)] of the terrestrial slug Limax, periodic waves travel from the apex to the base with a frequency of approximately 0.7 Hz. The oscillation and propagation of waves have been thought to be mediated by the mutual connections of bursting neurons in the PC. The direction of the wave is Cl(-) dependent, because lowering the Cl(-) concentration in the medium reverses the direction. The bursting neurons have a Cl(-) channel-coupled glutamate receptor (GluClR), and, using a calcium imaging technique, the receptor was found to be excitatory. Activation of the GluClR with its selective agonist ibotenate resulted in an increased frequency of the oscillatory neural activity recorded as a periodic local field potential. Depletion of cytoplasmic Cl(-) with Cl(-)-free saline abolished all of the ibotenate-induced effects. Perforated-patch-clamp recording in single PC neurons revealed a spatial difference in the Cl(-)-dependent periodic depolarizations in the bursting neurons, with a higher amplitude in the apical region. These results suggest the involvement of excitatory GluClRs in the unidirectional propagation of waves in the PC.

  18. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Wave Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2014-06-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale and for commercial arrays for a surge wave energy converter

  19. Skull flexure as a contributing factor in the mechanism of injury in the rat when exposed to a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Bolander, Richard; Mathie, Blake; Bir, Cynthia; Ritzel, David; VandeVord, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    The manner in which energy from an explosion is transmitted into the brain is currently a highly debated topic within the blast injury community. This study was conducted to investigate the injury biomechanics causing blast-related neurotrauma in the rat. Biomechanical responses of the rat head under shock wave loading were measured using strain gauges on the skull surface and a fiber optic pressure sensor placed within the cortex. MicroCT imaging techniques were applied to quantify skull bone thickness. The strain gauge results indicated that the response of the rat skull is dependent on the intensity of the incident shock wave; greater intensity shock waves cause greater deflections of the skull. The intracranial pressure (ICP) sensors indicated that the peak pressure developed within the brain was greater than the peak side-on external pressure and correlated with surface strain. The bone plates between the lambda, bregma, and midline sutures are probable regions for the greatest flexure to occur. The data provides evidence that skull flexure is a likely candidate for the development of ICP gradients within the rat brain. This dependency of transmitted stress on particular skull dynamics for a given species should be considered by those investigating blast-related neurotrauma using animal models. PMID:21735320

  20. Modeling the contributions of Ca2+ flows to spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and cortical spreading depression-triggered Ca2+ waves in astrocyte networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in brain functions through Ca(2+) signals, including Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+) oscillations. Currently the mechanisms of Ca(2+) signals in astrocytes are not fully clear. Here, we present a computational model to specify the relative contributions of different Ca(2+) flows between the extracellular space, the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum of astrocytes to the generation of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations (CASs) and cortical spreading depression (CSD)-triggered Ca(2+) waves (CSDCWs) in a one-dimensional astrocyte network. This model shows that CASs depend primarily on Ca(2+) released from internal stores of astrocytes, and CSDCWs depend mainly on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. It predicts that voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx is able to generate Ca(2+) waves during the process of CSD even after depleting internal Ca(2+) stores. Furthermore, the model investigates the interactions between CASs and CSDCWs and shows that the pass of CSDCWs suppresses CASs, whereas CASs do not prevent the generation of CSDCWs. This work quantitatively analyzes the generation of astrocytic Ca(2+) signals and indicates different mechanisms underlying CSDCWs and non-CSDCWs. Research on the different types of Ca(2+) signals might help to understand the ways by which astrocytes participate in information processing in brain functions.

  1. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2013-09-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Contribution of Thermal and the Specific Effects in Cellular Response to Millimeter Wave Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Habauzit, Denis; Le Quément, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Martin, Catherine; Aubry, Marc; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency radiations constitute a new form of environmental pollution. Among them, millimeter waves (MMW) will be widely used in the near future for high speed communication systems. This study aimed therefore to evaluate the biocompatibility of MMW at 60 GHz. For this purpose, we used a whole gene expression approach to assess the effect of acute 60 GHz exposure on primary cultures of human keratinocytes. Controls were performed to dissociate the electromagnetic from the thermal effect of MMW. Microarray data were validated by RT-PCR, in order to ensure the reproducibility of the results. MMW exposure at 20 mW/cm2, corresponding to the maximum incident power density authorized for public use (local exposure averaged over 1 cm2), led to an increase of temperature and to a strong modification of keratinocyte gene expression (665 genes differentially expressed). Nevertheless, when temperature is artificially maintained constant, no modification in gene expression was observed after MMW exposure. However, a heat shock control did not mimic exactly the MMW effect, suggesting a slight but specific electromagnetic effect under hyperthermia conditions (34 genes differentially expressed). By RT-PCR, we analyzed the time course of the transcriptomic response and 7 genes have been validated as differentially expressed: ADAMTS6, NOG, IL7R, FADD, JUNB, SNAI2 and HIST1H1A. Our data evidenced a specific electromagnetic effect of MMW, which is associated to the cellular response to hyperthermia. This study raises the question of co-exposures associating radiofrequencies and other environmental sources of cellular stress. PMID:25302706

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals the contribution of thermal and the specific effects in cellular response to millimeter wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Habauzit, Denis; Le Quément, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Martin, Catherine; Aubry, Marc; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency radiations constitute a new form of environmental pollution. Among them, millimeter waves (MMW) will be widely used in the near future for high speed communication systems. This study aimed therefore to evaluate the biocompatibility of MMW at 60 GHz. For this purpose, we used a whole gene expression approach to assess the effect of acute 60 GHz exposure on primary cultures of human keratinocytes. Controls were performed to dissociate the electromagnetic from the thermal effect of MMW. Microarray data were validated by RT-PCR, in order to ensure the reproducibility of the results. MMW exposure at 20 mW/cm2, corresponding to the maximum incident power density authorized for public use (local exposure averaged over 1 cm2), led to an increase of temperature and to a strong modification of keratinocyte gene expression (665 genes differentially expressed). Nevertheless, when temperature is artificially maintained constant, no modification in gene expression was observed after MMW exposure. However, a heat shock control did not mimic exactly the MMW effect, suggesting a slight but specific electromagnetic effect under hyperthermia conditions (34 genes differentially expressed). By RT-PCR, we analyzed the time course of the transcriptomic response and 7 genes have been validated as differentially expressed: ADAMTS6, NOG, IL7R, FADD, JUNB, SNAI2 and HIST1H1A. Our data evidenced a specific electromagnetic effect of MMW, which is associated to the cellular response to hyperthermia. This study raises the question of co-exposures associating radiofrequencies and other environmental sources of cellular stress.

  4. Ground motions on rocky, cliffed, and sandy shorelines generated by ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Adam P.; Guza, Robert T.; Dickson, Mark E.; O'Reilly, William C.; Flick, Reinhard E.

    2013-12-01

    We compare ground motions observed within about 100 m of the waterline on eight sites located on shorelines with different morphologies (rock slope, cliff, and sand beaches). At all sites, local ocean waves generated ground motions in the frequency band 0.01-40 Hz. Between about 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, foreshore loading and gravitational attraction from ocean swell and infragravity waves drive coherent, in-phase ground flexing motions mostly oriented cross-shore that decay inland. At higher frequencies between 0.5 and 40 Hz, breaking ocean waves and wave-rock impacts cause ground shaking. Overall, seismic spectral shapes were generally consistent across shoreline sites and usually within a few orders of magnitude despite the diverse range of settings. However, specific site response varied and was influenced by a combination of tide level, incident wave energy, site morphology, ground composition, and signal decay. Flexing and shaking increased with incident wave energy and was often tidally modulated, consistent with a local generation source. Flexing magnitudes were usually larger than shaking, and flexing displacements of several mm were observed during relatively large incident wave conditions (Hs 4-5 m). Comparison with traffic noise and earthquakes illustrate the relative significance of local ocean-generated signals in coastal seismic data. Seismic observations are not a simple proxy for wave-cliff interaction.

  5. Relative contributions of sea surface salinity and temperature to density gradient and tropical instability waves: implications to eddy-mean flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Audrey; Lee, Tong

    2015-04-01

    With their relatively uniform spatial and temporal sampling, satellite observations have revolutionized the estimates of the spatial derivative fields of various oceanic parameters that are not possible to derive from in-situ measurements on a global scale with sufficient spatial resolutions. For examples, the spatial gradients of sea surface height measurements from altimetry provide information about surface geostrophic currents; those of wind stress make possible the estimates of wind stress curl and divergence; those of sea surface temperature and salinity allow detections of thermal and haline fronts. These spatial derivatives fields are critical to the studies of ocean circulation and air-sea interaction. In particular, the spatial gradients of satellite-derived sea surface temperature and salinity (SST and SSS) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study density gradient that is important to energy conversion between the background ocean state and the fluctuating flow field such as eddies and waves through baroclinic instability. In this study, we examine eddy-mean flow interaction in tropical oceans by studying the relations between background density gradient and tropical instability wave (TIW) variability using various satellite-derived SSS and SST products. In the equatorial Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, SSS is found to have equal or larger contribution to the background meridional density gradient. This has important consequence to the density variance associated with the TIWs (a proxy for the extraction of available potential energy from the background ocean state to the TIWs). Not accounting for salinity effect would under-estimate the TIW-related density variance by at least a factor of three.

  6. Reproducibility of arterial stiffness and wave reflections in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the contribution of lung hyperinflation and a comparison of techniques.

    PubMed

    Stone, Ian S; John, Leonette; Petersen, Steffen E; Barnes, Neil C

    2013-11-01

    Significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality exists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arterial stiffness is raised in COPD and may be a mechanistic link. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness has the potential to be a surrogate outcome measure, although no reproducibility data exists in COPD patients. Two studies (23 and 33 COPD patients) were undertaken to 1) assess the Vicorder reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and Augmentation index in COPD; 2) compare it to SphygmoCor; and 3) assess the contribution of lung hyperinflation to measurement variability. There were excellent correlations and good agreement between repeat Vicorder measurements for carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (r = 0.96 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = -0.03 ± 0.36 m/s (p = 0.65); co-efficient of reproducibility = 4.02%; limits of agreement = -0.68-0.75 m/s). Augmentation index significantly correlated (r = 0.736 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = 0.72 ± 4.86% (p = 0.48), however limits of agreement were only 10.42-9.02%, with co-efficient of reproducibility of 27.93%. Comparing devices, Vicorder values were lower but there was satisfactory agreement. There were no correlation between lung hyperinflation (as measured by residual volume percent predicted, total lung capacity percent predicted or the ratio of inspiratory capacity to residual volume) and variability of measurements in either study. In COPD, measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is highly reproducible, not affected by lung hyperinflation and suitable as a surrogate endpoint in research studies. Day-to-day variation in augmentation index highlights the importance of such studies prior to the planning and undertaking of clinical COPD research.

  7. Wave-driven Hydrodynamics for Different Reef Geometries and Roughness Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, G. L.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.

    2013-05-01

    In fringing reef systems where a shallow lagoon is present behind the reef crest, wave breaking appears to dominate circulation, controlling numerous key processes such as the transport and dispersion of larvae, nutrients and sediments. Despite their importance, there is a need for more detailed knowledge on the hydrodynamic processes that take place within the surf zone of these systems and the effects different combinations of geometries and roughness have on them. The present study focuses on the use of two-dimensional (2DV) numerical model simulations and data obtained during a field campaign in Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico to better understand the detailed surf zone processes that occur over a fringing reef. The model used is Cornell Breaking Wave and Structures (COBRAS), which solves Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. Reef geometries implemented in the model include a reef flat and two different reef crests. The effect of roughness on wave setup, radiation stress, mean flows, and cross-shore spectral evolution for the model results was studied using different roughness coefficients (Nikuradse) and a bathymetric profile obtained in the field using the bottom track option of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Field data were also analysed for the configuration and roughness of Puerto Morelos. Model results reveal that for all profiles wave setup increased significantly (~22%) with increasing bed roughness, in agreement with previous findings for sandy beaches.For all wave heights and periods studied, increasing roughness also affected spectral wave evolution across the reef, with a significant reduction in energy, particularly at infragravity frequencies. The presence of a reef crest in the profile resulted in differences in behaviour at infragravity frequencies. For example, preliminary results suggest that there is a shift towards higher frequencies as waves progress into the lagoon when a crest is present, something that does not

  8. Positive Youth Development, Participation in Community Youth Development Programs, and Community Contributions of Fifth-Grade Adolescents: Findings From the First Wave Of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M.; Lerner, Jacqueline V.; Almerigi, Jason B.; Theokas, Christina; Phelps, Erin; Gestsdottir, Steinunn; Naudeau, Sophie; Jelicic, Helena; Alberts, Amy; Ma, Lang; Smith, Lisa M.; Bobek, Deborah L.; Richman-Raphael, David; Christiansen, Elise DiDenti; von Eye, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD), a longitudinal investigation of a diverse sample of 1,700 fifth graders and 1,117 of their parents, tests developmental contextual ideas linking PYD, youth contributions, and participation in community youth development (YD) programs, representing a key ecological asset. Using data from Wave 1 of…

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O6 +x crystals: Unusual Curie behavior and small contributions from charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokanović, I.; Cooper, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of twinned single crystals of YBa2Cu3O6 +x from just above their superconducting transition temperatures to 300 K with magnetic fields of up to 5 T applied parallel and perpendicular to the CuO2 planes at seven values of x . Appropriate analysis allows the relatively small, but still important, Curie terms to be separated from other contributions to the susceptibility. Our data support a picture in which the Curie terms arise from oxygen disorder in the Cu-O chains. This agrees with published work on polycrystalline samples where the sample cooling rate was varied, but here we show that the Curie plots flatten out above 200 K. We identify small effects of charge density wave (CDW) instabilities in the temperature (T ) derivative of the in-plane susceptibility d χa b(T ) /d T and discuss their x dependence. For x =0.67 we make a detailed comparison with published high energy x-ray diffraction data using a minimal model involving Fermi arcs, thereby obtaining values for the CDW energy gap and the Helmholtz free energy in a coherence volume. At 80 and 100 K the latter is comparable with, or smaller than, kBT , respectively, highlighting the probable importance of thermal fluctuations. We note that the effect of the Lorentz force on charge carriers in the Fermi arcs could provide a simple mechanism for enhancing the CDWs in high magnetic fields, as suggested by recent experiments.

  10. Early adenosine release contributes to hypoxia-induced disruption of stimulus-induced sharp wave-ripple complexes in rat hippocampal area CA3.

    PubMed

    Jarosch, Marlene S; Gebhardt, Christine; Fano, Silvia; Huchzermeyer, Christine; Ul Haq, Rizwan; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of hypoxia on sharp wave-ripple complex (SPW-R) activity and recurrent epileptiform discharges in rat hippocampal slices, and the mechanisms underlying block of this activity. Oxygen levels were measured using Clark-style oxygen sensor microelectrodes. In contrast to recurrent epileptiform discharges, oxygen consumption was negligible during SPW-R activity. These network activities were reversibly blocked when oxygen levels were reduced to 20% or less for 3 min. The prolongation of hypoxic periods to 6 min caused reversible block of SPW-Rs during 20% oxygen and irreversible block when 0% oxygen (anoxia) was applied. In contrast, recurrent epileptiform discharges were more resistant to prolonged anoxia and almost fully recovered after 6 min of anoxia. SPW-Rs were unaffected by the application of 1-butyl-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl) urea, a blocker of KATP channels, but they were blocked by activation of adenosine A1 receptors. In support of a modulatory function of adenosine, the amplitude and incidence of SPW-Rs were increased during application of the A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). Interestingly, hypoxia decreased the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents in CA3 pyramidal cells, an effect that was converted into increased frequency by the adenosine A1 agonist DPCPX. In addition, DPCPX also delayed the onset of hypoxia-mediated block of SPW-Rs. Our data suggest that early adenosine release during hypoxia induces a decrease in pre-synaptic glutamate release and that both might contribute to transient block of SPW-Rs during hypoxia/anoxia in area CA3. PMID:25959377

  11. On the long waves disturbing ship operations in Ferrol (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Mario; Iglesias, Gregorio

    2013-04-01

    Long waves may cause significant disturbances for port operations. This paper is concerned with the long wave problems at Ferrol, a port in NW Spain. Long wave periods range between a few tens of seconds to several hours. In shallow water their wavelengths are on the order of hundreds of meters to kilometres. As a result, these waves can match the natural periods of oscillation of semi-enclosed bodies of water like gulfs, bays, fiords, or harbours, resulting in resonant oscillations. During resonance, the vertical displacement of the free surface increases until the energy input is balanced by losses due to friction, flow separation, boundary absorption, and radiation from the mouth (Okihiro et al., 1993). The induced horizontal displacements of the water mass are responsible for the large movements on ships. The non-linear interaction of long and wind waves and the direct atmospheric forcing are the main sources of long waves in the ocean. In the first case, the long waves are also known as infragravity waves and tend to have relatively small periods. In the second case, the atmospheric forced long waves, different mechanisms have been used to explain their generation. Atmospheric disturbances passing over the continental shelf (Sepic et al., 2008) or wind convection cells (de Jong and Battjes, 2004) are two of the causes for these 'meteorological' waves. Whatever their cause, they tend to have relatively large periods and, therefore, a significant potential to excite the first modes of oscillation of harbours. In addition, other different forcing mechanisms can generate long waves, including submerged landslides (Cecioni and Bellotti, 2010) and seisms (Candella et al., 2008). Disturbances to load and unload operations have been reported from 2005 at the Exterior Port of Ferrol (NW Spain). On-site measurements of sea-level oscillations revealed energy peaks possibly related to resonant processes (López et al., 2012; López and Iglesias, 2013). This work is

  12. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.

    2016-05-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04-0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004-0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  13. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheriton, Olivia; Storlazzi, Curt; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04–0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004–0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  14. Higher-order contributions to ion-acoustic solitary waves in a multicomponent plasma consisting of warm ions and two-component nonisothermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.P.; Majumdar, S.R.; Paul, S.N. ||

    1995-05-01

    An integrated form of the governing equations in terms of pseudopotential higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects is obtained by applying the reductive perturbation method for ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless unmagnetized multicomponent plasma having warm ions and two-component nonisothermal electrons. The present method is advantageous because instead of solving an inhomogeneous second-order differential equation at each order, as in the standard procedure, we solve a first-order inhomogeneous equation at each order except at the lowest. The expressions of both Mach number and width of the solitary wave are obtained as a function of the amplitude of the wave for third-order nonlinear and dispersive effects. The variations of potential, width, and Mach number against soliton amplitude are shown graphically, taking into consideration the nonisothermality of two-component electrons in the plasma.

  15. Oceanic lithospheric S wave velocities from the analysis of P wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P wave polarization (apparent P wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half space S wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBS) to derive apparent S wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S wave velocity-depth models by a three step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S wave velocities. The apparent S wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 km and 0.9 km with S wave velocities between 0.7 km s-1 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 km and 10 km with S wave velocities between 3.5 km s-1 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total

  16. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  17. The runup of long waves around piecewise linear bathymetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Utku

    The evolution of waves on beaches is the quintissential problem of coastal engineering. Most practical problems involve directional waveforms with complex spectral distributions. In the last ten years consensus has emerged that certain terminal effects such as coastal flooding and inundation are mainly affected by the infragravity waves, i.e. the long wave part of the incident spectrum. These waves can be described by the shallow-water wave equations, which are also the standard model for tsunamis or tidal waves. Interest in these equations has rekindled because comparisons with both large-scale laboratory data and field data have demonstrated a remarkable and surprising capability to model complex evolution phenomena, and in particular the maximum runup. The maximum runup is arguably the single most important parameter in the design of coastal structures such as seawalls and dikes and for evaluating the inundation potential of tsunamis. A general method for solving developing exact solutions of the shallow-water wave equations is developed for determining the amplification factor of incident long waves as a function of the incident wave characteristics and the topographic variation. This method is then applied to the different ocean topographies composed of linearly varying depth segments and of constant depth segments, also known as composite beaches. Asysmptotic expressions are derived for the runup of solitary waves, and a series of large-scale laboratory experiments was conducted and is described. The analytical results are found in good agreement with the laboratory data for the time histories of free surface elevations and the maximum runup heights. An important result is that the maximum runup on the continental slope and shelf case is governed by the onshore slope, i.e., the slope which includes the initial shoreline, at least for the long waves of tsunami scales. In the last part of the study the evolution of solitary waves around circular islands is

  18. Modeling Motu Profile Response to Varying Wave and Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. C.; Ashton, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The atolls of the Pacific Ocean are low-lying landforms (less than 5m in elevation), typically consisting of reef-building corals often mounted by subaerial islets, or motu, which encircle a central lagoon. These motu, perched atop old coral reefs, typically consist of sand and gravel, and are sometimes anchored by relict geologic features (highstand coral reefs). Despite the vital role these islets play as home to terrestrial ecosystems and human infrastructure, the morphologic processes responsible for their formation and maintenance remain poorly understood. For example, although extreme events are hypothesized as a formation mechanism, motu are found in regions where hurricanes or tropical cyclones rarely occur and across varying storm gradients and frequency tracks. Here we use hydrodynamic and event-based morphodynamic modeling to better understand the role of storm events on the formation and evolution of motu. Using XBeach, a two-dimensional model of infragravity wave propagation and sediment transport, coupled with the coastal wave model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), we simulate the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic impacts of storm events on the nearshore, beach, and backbarrier portions of atolls. We investigate the effect of different representative profile morphology, for example motu height or the distance from the reef edge to the motu, on storm response. We further test the effect of storm intensity and inundation scenarios (i.e. difference in elevated water levels of the lagoon and ocean) on storm hydrodynamics and morphologic change. Model scenarios are informed and compared to basin-wide analysis of the variation of atoll and motu characteristics, such as reef width, motu width, and motu spacing across the Pacific Ocean. Atoll morphologies and storm responses are affected by both geographic location and, locally, the shoreline orientation (compared to storm tracks). Combining these different model scenarios with measured morphometrics allows

  19. Improving Short Wave Breaking Behavior In Surfbeat Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, J.; Daly, C.; Vandongeren, A. R.; van Thiel de Vries, J.; McCall, R.

    2009-12-01

    In present surfzone modeling three approaches are widely applied: short-wave resolving models, ‘surfbeat’ models, which resolve wave energy modulations on the time-scale of wave groups and their associated infragravity waves, and wave averaged models. In all three approaches, wave breaking is a process that is highly schematized and governed by several empirical coefficients. In this presentation we will focus on the breaking process in ‘surfbeat’ models, such as XBeach (Roelvink et al, 2009). These models need to describe the short wave dissipation by breaking as a function of the slowly-varying short wave energy or wave height. The model usually applied is that by Roelvink (1993), which combines a probability that waves are breaking as function of wave heigth over water depth ratio H/h with a bore-type dissipation formulation similar to that by Battjes and Janssen (1978). A drawback of such a formulation is that there is no ‘memory’ in the breaking process, and the amount of breaking instantly varies with the water depth (though the wave height itself does have a memory). For cases with bichromatic waves, or for long-period swell, this does not reflect reality enough: waves that start breaking do not instantly stop breaking once the water depth increases, but continue until some lower threshold is reached. This concept was captured in Dally’s (1992) wave-by-wave approach, where individual waves are tracked in a probabilistic setting. We have now implemented a similar formulation in XBeach, where the property that waves are breaking is tracked; it is switched on when H/h exceeds a first criterion; this property is propagated using an advection equation and when H/h gets below a second criterion breaking is switched off. This formulation can do two things the previous one can’t: maintain groupiness inside the surf zone and have a maximum of wave breaking in the trough after a steep bar, as was observed for instance in Arcilla et al’s (1994) test 1

  20. Researching of sea waves influence on a coastal line transformation (based on field observation results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A.; Kouznetsov, K.; Kurkin, A.; Shevchenko, G.

    2009-04-01

    The long duration registrations of bottom pressure, temperature and meteorological data took place in June - October 2007 on the shelf near 104th - 110th kilometer of interstate road Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk - Okha. Sediment transport and abrasion processes are observed in this place, it is a dangerous factor for road and railroad constructions, it can also be threat for some buildings of Vzmorie town. Distributed network of autonomous pressure gauges was installed for wave structure studying. Gauges were installed in tree lines with 100, 150 and 200 meters far from each other. Gathered data contains information about different wave's regimes under different weather conditions, it's allowed us to make analysis. Different data rows for different wave regimes were taken for analysis. Transformation of wave field along shoreline and opposite was observed. The results of observation are showed that disposition of waves was determined by swell waves with period 8-9 second. Wind waves were weaker than swell waves, conceivably because of big depths in the studied area. Much more interesting results were found in the infragravity waves range (0.5 - 5 min). For example, peaks with period above 150 and 75 seconds are presented in the spectral estimation of record from gauge 23. The same peaks were not observed in other gauges to the North and to the South from 23. However, low frequency peak was much stronger at the storm weather, but 75 seconds peak was stayed non-changed under the different weather conditions. For understanding mechanism of infra-gravitation waves generation group structure of waves were studied. Spectrum characteristics of different data rows for different wave regimes and also for their envelopes were provided. Results of this research allow us to consider that wave packets with common period 7 - 8 seconds make infra-gravitation waves with period above 5 minutes which forcing sediment transport processes. Satellite images of studied place were used in this

  1. Theory of Seismic Noise Excitation by Ocean Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.

    2009-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that seismic noise, recorded in continuous data, will be an important part of seismic data that will be used for seismic structure study. Causes of noise vary from frequency to frequency but the predominant noise, specifically in the microseismic frequency band (about 0.05-0.4 Hz), is now recognized to be ocean waves. The Hum, seismic noise in a lower frequency band about 0.003-0.015 Hz, may also be excited by this mechanism (Webb, 2007). The detailed excitation mechanism of microseisms by ocean waves is attributed to Longuet-Higgins (1950) (which credits earlier study by Miche, 1944) which beautifully explains one critical aspect of data, the double frequency noise peak. Longuet-Higgins (1950) basically showed how nonlinear advection term in the Navier-Stokes equation and the nonlinear term in the kinematic free-surface boundary condition lead to the generation of pressure when there are colliding ocean waves. In this paper, we will show that excitation of seismic noise can be formulated starting from the original nonlinear terms in the equations, basically skipping the intermediate pressure term derived by Longuet-Higgins. The equivalent body-force term by these nonlinear terms can be expressed in a compact formula and may be used to describe seismic wavefields. We will show 1. The equivalent Longuet-Higgins term arises from our approach but it is exact only for low frequencies below 0.1 Hz. At higher frequencies, depending on ocean depth, deviations up to a factor of 5-10 can arise. 2. At low frequencies (<0.005 Hz), a horizontal force term arises whose effects may become larger than pressure variations due to the Longuet-Higgins mechanism. Webb (2007) and Tanimoto (2007) pointed out this term. This term contains azimuthal effects (radiation pattern), as opposed to the isotropic vertical forcing by the Longuett-Higgins mechanism. 3. We also examine the excitation of the toroidal hum (Kurrle and Widmer, 2008). Infragravity waves

  2. The contribution of radio-frequency rectification to field-aligned losses of high-harmonic fast wave power to the divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J. Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A.; Sabbagh, S.

    2015-04-15

    The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) can exhibit a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power along scrape-off layer (SOL) field lines passing in front of the antenna, resulting in bright and hot spirals on both the upper and lower divertor regions. One possible mechanism for this loss is RF sheaths forming at the divertors. Here, we demonstrate that swept-voltage Langmuir probe characteristics for probes under the spiral are shifted relative to those not under the spiral in a manner consistent with RF rectification. We estimate both the magnitude of the RF voltage across the sheath and the sheath heat flux transmission coefficient in the presence of the RF field. Although precise comparison between the computed heat flux and infrared (IR) thermography cannot yet be made, the computed heat deposition compares favorably with the projections from IR camera measurements. The RF sheath losses are significant and contribute substantially to the total SOL losses of HHFW power to the divertor for the cases studied. This work will guide future experimentation on NSTX-U, where a wide-angle IR camera and a dedicated set of coaxial Langmuir probes for measuring the RF sheath voltage directly will quantify the contribution of RF sheath rectification to the heat deposition from the SOL to the divertor.

  3. Movement of boulders and megagravel by storm waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Rónadh; Jahn, Kalle L.; Watkins, Oona G.

    2016-04-01

    to breaking wind waves, infragravity waves, cliff-top bores generated by collapsed vertical jets, or some other mechanism. Given the variability in relief, different dynamics may have operated at different sites.

  4. The Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; VWO Team

    2008-12-01

    Heliophysics wave data are currently not easily searchable by computers, making identifying pertinent wave data features for analyses and cross comparisons difficult and laborious. Since wave data analysis requires specialized knowledge about waves, which spans the spectrum of microphysics to macrophysics, researchers having varied expertise cannot easily use wave data. To resolve these difficulties and to allow wave data to contribute more fully to Heliophysics research, we are developing a Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) whose goal is to enable all Heliophysics wave data to become searchable, understandable and usable by the Heliosphysics community. The VWO objective is to enable search of multiple and distributed wave data (from both active and passive measurements). This presentation provides and overview of the VWO, a new VxO component within the emerging distributed Heliophysics data and model environment.

  5. Making Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClark, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity on waves that addresses the state standards and benchmarks of Michigan. Demonstrates waves and studies wave's medium, motion, and frequency. The activity is designed to address different learning styles. (YDS)

  6. Tracking Ocean Gravity Waves in Real-time: Highlights of Bottom Pressure Data Recorded on Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Gemmrich, Johannes; Davis, Earl; Thomson, Richard; Dewey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two cabled ocean observatories off Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast. The regional NEPTUNE observatory spans the entire Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from the coast across the subduction zone to the hydrothermally active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Segment while the VENUS observatory focuses on coastal processes. Both observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex earth processes. High-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPR) deployed on the NEPTUNE observatory are capable of detecting a wide range of phenomena related to sea level variations. The observatory BPRs provide observations of nano-resolution (with respect to full scale of the instrument) pressure variations which correspond to sub-millimeter scale surface water displacements in several kilometers of water. Detected signals include tides, tsunamis, infragravity waves, swell, wave-induced microseisms, storm surge, and seismic signals. Spectral analysis reveals many of these phenomena with periods ranging from a few seconds to many hours. Dispersion patterns from distant swells are prominent in the swell and microseism bands. By comparing the difference of arrival times between longer period waves, which arrive first, and shorter period waves we can estimate the distance the swells travelled since they were generated. Using this information, swell can be tracked back to specific storms across the Pacific. The presentation will high-light some examples of the mentioned phenomena in the continuous time-series that in some instances are more than seven years long.

  7. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  8. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  9. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  10. Properties of the transformation from the spherical wave expansion to the plane wave expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Breinbjerg, Olav; Frandsen, Aksel

    2008-02-01

    The transformation between the spherical wave expansion (SWE) and the plane wave expansion (PWE) is investigated with respect to a range of its fundamental properties. First, the transformation of individual spherical waves is studied in order to understand how these contribute to the different regions of the plane wave spectrum. Second, the number of spherical waves necessary to accurately determine the PWE over different regions of the spectral domain is investigated. Third, numerical aspects of the transformation are addressed.

  11. Resonant Rossby waves and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Loshkova, O. A.

    1989-01-01

    Large scale transient waves are an essential part of atmospheric dynamics. Some of these waves (like 27 day waves) could have a solar nature. The contribution of the 27 day planetary waves to a total long period spectrum of the atmospheric processes during one solar cycle was investigated. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the 27 day wave has a resonant nature. The real atmospheric processes were investigated. The method of 2-D wave analysis used is described by Krivolutsky. It was concluded that the resonant nature of the 27 day wave is not unicum. There are long periods waves (50 day wave) in stratosphere which belong to the resonant waves, too. It is a very interesting fact for the solar activity-weather problem.

  12. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  13. Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the wave hub experience.

    PubMed

    Witt, M J; Sheehan, E V; Bearhop, S; Broderick, A C; Conley, D C; Cotterell, S P; Crow, E; Grecian, W J; Halsband, C; Hodgson, D J; Hosegood, P; Inger, R; Miller, P I; Sims, D W; Thompson, R C; Vanstaen, K; Votier, S C; Attrill, M J; Godley, B J

    2012-01-28

    Marine renewable energy installations harnessing energy from wind, wave and tidal resources are likely to become a large part of the future energy mix worldwide. The potential to gather energy from waves has recently seen increasing interest, with pilot developments in several nations. Although technology to harness wave energy lags behind that of wind and tidal generation, it has the potential to contribute significantly to energy production. As wave energy technology matures and becomes more widespread, it is likely to result in further transformation of our coastal seas. Such changes are accompanied by uncertainty regarding their impacts on biodiversity. To date, impacts have not been assessed, as wave energy converters have yet to be fully developed. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build a framework of understanding regarding the potential impacts of these technologies, underpinned by methodologies that are transferable and scalable across sites to facilitate formal meta-analysis. We first review the potential positive and negative effects of wave energy generation, and then, with specific reference to our work at the Wave Hub (a wave energy test site in southwest England, UK), we set out the methodological approaches needed to assess possible effects of wave energy on biodiversity. We highlight the need for national and international research clusters to accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent understanding of potential effects-both positive and negative.

  14. Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the wave hub experience.

    PubMed

    Witt, M J; Sheehan, E V; Bearhop, S; Broderick, A C; Conley, D C; Cotterell, S P; Crow, E; Grecian, W J; Halsband, C; Hodgson, D J; Hosegood, P; Inger, R; Miller, P I; Sims, D W; Thompson, R C; Vanstaen, K; Votier, S C; Attrill, M J; Godley, B J

    2012-01-28

    Marine renewable energy installations harnessing energy from wind, wave and tidal resources are likely to become a large part of the future energy mix worldwide. The potential to gather energy from waves has recently seen increasing interest, with pilot developments in several nations. Although technology to harness wave energy lags behind that of wind and tidal generation, it has the potential to contribute significantly to energy production. As wave energy technology matures and becomes more widespread, it is likely to result in further transformation of our coastal seas. Such changes are accompanied by uncertainty regarding their impacts on biodiversity. To date, impacts have not been assessed, as wave energy converters have yet to be fully developed. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build a framework of understanding regarding the potential impacts of these technologies, underpinned by methodologies that are transferable and scalable across sites to facilitate formal meta-analysis. We first review the potential positive and negative effects of wave energy generation, and then, with specific reference to our work at the Wave Hub (a wave energy test site in southwest England, UK), we set out the methodological approaches needed to assess possible effects of wave energy on biodiversity. We highlight the need for national and international research clusters to accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent understanding of potential effects-both positive and negative. PMID:22184674

  15. A global traveling wave on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Schinder, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    The dominant large-scale pattern in the clouds of Venus has been described as a 'Y' or 'Psi' and tentatively identified by earlier workers as a Kelvin wave. A detailed calculation of linear wave modes in the Venus atmosphere verifies this identification. Cloud feedback by infrared heating fluctuations is a plausible excitation mechanism. Modulation of the large-scale pattern by the wave is a possible explanation for the Y. Momentum transfer by the wave could contribute to sustaining the general circulation.

  16. A global traveling wave on venus.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D; Gierasch, P J; Schinder, P J

    1992-05-01

    The dominant large-scale pattern in the clouds of Venus has been described as a "gamma" or "Psi" and tentatively identified by earlier workers as a Kelvin wave. A detailed calculation of linear wave modes in the Venus atmosphere verifies this identification. Cloud feedback by infrared heating fluctuations is a plausible excitation mechanism. Modulation of the large-scale pattern by the wave is a possible explanation for the Y. Momentum transfer by the wave could contribute to sustaining the general circulation.

  17. A global traveling wave on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Schinder, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    The dominant large-scale pattern in the clouds of Venus has been described as a 'Y' or 'Psi' and tentatively identified by earlier workers as a Kelvin wave. A detailed calculation of linear wave modes in the Venus atmosphere verifies this identification. Cloud feedback by infrared heating fluctuations is a plausible excitation mechanism. Modulation of the large-scale pattern by the wave is a possible explanation for the Y. Momentum transfer by the wave could contribute to sustaining the general circulation.

  18. Five Years of Data at the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband Seismic Station (MOBB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, D.; Romanowicz, B.; McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present an overview of the results obtained at MOBB in the past 5.5 years of its continuous operation. In particular we focus on the observations of the long-period ocean surface gravity waves (infragravity waves; 0.002 to 0.05 Hz) and different methods to remove the long-period background and signal-generated noise from the seismic observations. MOBB was installed 40 km offshore in the Monterey Bay at a water depth of 1000 m in April 2002 in collaboration between Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). It is located west of the San Gregorio Fault and represents the first step towards extending the onshore broadband seismic network in northern California westward of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. MOBB comprises a three- component broadband seismometer Guralp CMG-1T, sensitive over a wide frequency range, from 50 Hz to 2.8 mHz (360 s), a water current meter measuring current speed and direction, and a differential pressure gauge. At present, the station is autonomous and the data are on average retrieved every 4 months using MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Work is under way to connect it to the MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cable so that it will contribute continuous real time data to the northern California earthquake monitoring system. Lessons learned from the MOBB deployment as well as noise removal techniques that are specific to the ocean bottom installation will provide us reference for future installations of broadband seismic stations in the oceans. When compared to the quiet land stations, ocean bottom seismic station MOBB shows increased background noise in the band pass of interest for the study of regional and teleseismic signals. This is mainly due to deformation of the seafloor under the pressure forcing by infragravity waves. Also observed is additional signal- generated noise which is due to the reverberations in the shallow sedimentary layers as well as in the

  19. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    López Ariste, A; Collados, M; Khomenko, E

    2013-08-23

    We describe the presence of wave front dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfvén waves, as well as in general magnetoacoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  20. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  1. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  2. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  3. Magnetospheric ULF Waves with an Increasing Amplitude as a Superposition of Two Wave Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochen; Zong, Qiugang; Shi, Quanqi; Tian, Anmin; Sun, Weijie; Wang, Yongfu; Zhou, Xuzhi; Fu, Suiyan; Hartinger, Michael; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in half or one wave cycle. We report on in situ observations of the solar wind dynamic pressure impulses-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We have found six ULF wave events, which were induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3 ~4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We have found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. We suggest that the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field is caused by the superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources.

  4. Probing density waves in fluidized granular media with diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Philip; Reinhold, Steffen; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Density waves are characteristic for fluidized beds and affect measurements on liquidlike dynamics in fluidized granular media. Here the intensity autocorrelation function as obtainable with diffusing-wave spectroscopy is derived in the presence of density waves. The predictions by the derived form of the intensity autocorrelation function match experimental observations from a gas-fluidized bed. The model suggests separability of the contribution from density waves from the contribution by microscopic scatterer displacement to the decay of correlation and thus paves the way for characterizing microscopic particle motions using diffusing-wave spectroscopy as well as heterogeneities in fluidized granular media.

  5. Whirling waves in Interference experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna

    2014-03-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well- known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption, the wave function hypothesis, which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from the wave function hypothesis. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence. I will also describe some ongoing experimental efforts towards testing our theoretical findings.

  6. Longitudinal vortices beneath breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepf, H. M.; Cowen, E. A.; Kimmel, S. J.; Monismith, S. G.

    1995-08-01

    The formation of longitudinal vortices has been observed in a wavy channel flow and appears to be linked to spilling breaking and/or to vertical vorticity generated by a wave instability at the wave maker. Both conditions were present when the wave slope, ak exceeded 0.25. The wave instability produced velocity jets beneath and just downstream of the plunger that could provide the initial perturbation for the CL2 instability mechanism (Faller and Caponi, 1978). The breaker activity could also contribute to the CL2 production mechanism by eliminating the negative, stabilizing shear observed within the wave maker wake and by providing seed perturbations to the vorticity field. As the cells evolved downstream, they were maintained through interaction with the bottom boundary layer. When the vortices were present, both vertical mixing and turbulent kinetic energy were enhanced. Despite some differences in scale these results suggest that Langmuir circulation may produce similar changes in the mixed layer.

  7. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results. PMID:27408830

  8. On the Role of Shock Wave Reflections in Impact Cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoglio, O.

    2015-07-01

    When the downward impact shockwave meets a rock discontinuity, an upward reflected pressure wave is created. When travelling through the crater fill deposits, this wave projects upwards the shattered rocks which so may contribute to the rim creation.

  9. Alfven Waves in Interstellar Gasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1995-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves contribute a significant pressure in both the diffuse interstellar medium and in molecular clouds. Alfvén waves are subject to less damping than compressive MHD waves and are therefore likely to be the dominant mode in astrophysical environments. Provided that the medium in which the waves are propagating is slowly varying, the dynamical effects of ideal MHD waves are governed by equations derived by Dewar. We show that these equations are similar in form to the equations of radiation hydrodynamics to order υ/c, provided that the radiation is nearly isotropic. For the case of Alfvén waves, the pressure due the waves, Pw, is isotropic. Furthermore, Pw is directly observable through the non- thermal line width σnt; for a randomly oriented field, Pw = (3/2)ρσ2nt. In several simple cases, including that in which the Alfvén waves are isotropic, that in which the density is spatially uniform, and that in which the medium undergoes a self-similar contraction or expansion, undamped Alfvén waves behave like a gas with a ratio of specific heats of 3/2; i.e., pressure variations are related to density variations by Δ ln Pw = γwΔ ln ρ with γw = 3/2. In a spatially nonuniform cloud, γw generally depends on position; an explicit expression is given. In the opposite limit of rapid variations, such as in a strong shock, the wave magnetic field behaves like a static field and the wave pressure can increase as fast as ρ2, depending on the orientation of the shock and the polarization of the waves. The jump conditions for a shock in a medium containing MHD waves are given. For strong nonradiative shocks, neither the wave pressure nor the static magnetic field pressure is significant downstream, but for radiative shocks these two pressures can become dominant. Alfvén waves are essential in supporting molecular clouds against gravitational collapse. In a static cloud with a nonuniform density ρ(r), the spatial variation of the wave

  10. Nonlinear chorus wave effects on energetic electrons reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Q.; Fok, M. H.; Zheng, Y.; Lui, A.

    2012-12-01

    Electron energy transport due to nonlinear plasma wave particle interactions are carried out by wave and particles resonating with each other. Many nonlinear wave studies conducted in the past have only considered the main resonance between wave and electrons. However, we have found through test particle simulations that although independent, separate contributions from higher order resonances can be small, but they can have a rather significant impact on the main-order contribution hence the total nonlinear wave effects. Contribution from different orders can interfere with each other hence the overall nonlinear wave effect is significantly different from that of just the major resonance. Therefore in the nonlinear wave particle interaction regime, contribution from different resonant orders is inseparable and contributions from higher order wave-particle resonances should be all included. For the same token, banded plasma waves should be used in nonlinear wave studies instead of assumed monochromatic waves. By including all the essential factors mentioned above, the overall electron transport due to the nonlinear plasma wave effects take the form of diffusion-like rather than advection, which was reported in many previous studies. It is also found that chorus wave induced electron transport is one important mechanism for the formation of electron butterfly pitch angle distribution.

  11. On the improvements to the wave statistics of narrowbanded waves when applied to broadbanded waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guizhen; Cong, Peixiu; Pei, Yuhua

    2006-11-01

    On the basis of the narrowband approximation the joint and marginal probability distribution functions (pdf) of local wave heights and periods of ocean surface waves have been derived and have been taken approximately as those of the crest-to-trough wave heights and zero upcrossing periods. Various correction schemes have been proposed to these pdf's in order to apply them to broadband waves. This paper is devoted to taking a close look at these correction schemes. The relationship between the distributions of the local and the discrete wave heights and periods is derived at first. This derivation provides a precise interpretation to the improvements due to Stansell et al. (2004) and Zheng et al. (2004). The resultant relationship is different from the one deduced by Kitano and Mase (1998), on which their improved wave height distribution rests. The unique analysis of Kitano and Mase (1998) leading to this relationship is inspected and their omission is found. The crest-to-trough wave height distribution proposed by Tayfun (1981) is also examined and found to be reasonable only when the spectral bandwidth is infinitesimal. The wind wave data measured in Bohai China in 1997 is analyzed here. The sensitivities of the measured (as opposed to actual) distributions to smoothing timescale and to sampling rate are explored and comparisons of various theoretical pdf's with the measured distributions are made. It is found that (1) the wave height distribution due to Stansell et al. (2004) and Zheng et al. (2004) in which the contributions of negative phase derivatives are taken into account fits best with the 20 Hz sampled, 5-point smoothed data; (2) neglecting the contributions of negative phase derivatives results in an expression of the probability of exceeding large wave heights which is closest to the 20 Hz sampled, 5 or 9-point smoothed data; (3) the Rayleigh distribution generally agrees well with our data; the discrepancy between it and early observations mainly

  12. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  13. Sediment and Crustal Shear Velocity Structure offshore New Zealand from Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a joint Monte Carlo inversion of teleseismic receiver functions, seafloor compliance, and Rayleigh wave dispersion and apply it here to ocean bottom seismic (OBS) data from offshore New Zealand. With this method we estimate sediment and crustal thickness and shear velocity structure beneath the Bounty Trough and the Tasman Sea flanking the South Island of New Zealand. Teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements provide complementary constraints on shear velocity structure and interface depths beneath seismic stations. At ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations the interpretation of these measurements is complicated by strong sediment reverberations that obscure deeper impedance contrasts such as the Moho. In principle, the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance) can be used to determine shallow shear velocity information. This velocity information can subsequently be used to better model the receiver function reverberations, allowing deeper interfaces of tectonic interest to be resolved. Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. High-frequency (5Hz) receiver functions were estimated using multitaper cross-correlation for events in a 30-90 degree epicentral distance range. Coherence-weighted stacks binned by epicentral distance were produced in the frequency domain to suppress noise. Seafloor compliance was measured using multitaper pressure and acceleration spectra averaged from 120 days of continuous data without large transient events. Seafloor compliance measurements on the order of 10-9 Pa-1 are sensitive to shear velocity structure in the uppermost 5km of the crust and sediments. Rayleigh dispersion measurements were obtained at periods of 6-27s from ambient noise cross correlation. Sediment

  14. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  15. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  16. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  17. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  18. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  19. Jittering waves in rings of pulse oscillators.

    PubMed

    Klinshov, Vladimir; Shchapin, Dmitry; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Nekorkin, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Rings of oscillators with delayed pulse coupling are studied analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The basic regimes observed in such rings are rotating waves with constant interspike intervals and phase lags between the neighbors. We show that these rotating waves may destabilize leading to the so-called jittering waves. For these regimes, the interspike intervals are no more equal but form a periodic sequence in time. Analytic criterion for the emergence of jittering waves is derived and confirmed by the numerical and experimental data. The obtained results contribute to the hypothesis that the multijitter instability is universal in systems with pulse coupling. PMID:27575122

  20. Jittering waves in rings of pulse oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir; Shchapin, Dmitry; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Nekorkin, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Rings of oscillators with delayed pulse coupling are studied analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The basic regimes observed in such rings are rotating waves with constant interspike intervals and phase lags between the neighbors. We show that these rotating waves may destabilize leading to the so-called jittering waves. For these regimes, the interspike intervals are no more equal but form a periodic sequence in time. Analytic criterion for the emergence of jittering waves is derived and confirmed by the numerical and experimental data. The obtained results contribute to the hypothesis that the multijitter instability is universal in systems with pulse coupling.

  1. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  2. Electron wind in strong wave guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, F.

    1985-03-01

    The x-ray activity observed near highly powered wave guide structures is usually caused by local electric discharges originating from discontinuities such as couplers, tuners or bends. In traveling waves electrons are shown to move in the direction of the power flow. Seed electrons can multipactor in a traveling wave, the moving charge pattern is different from the multipactor in a resonant structure and is self-extinguishing. Given sufficient primary sources, the charge density in the wave guide will modify impedance and propagation constant of the wave guide. An estimate is made of the radiation level inside the output wave guide of the SLAC, 50 MW, S-band, klystron. Possible contributions of radiation to window failure are discussed.

  3. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere. PMID:25897091

  4. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere. PMID:25897091

  5. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  6. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    López Ariste, A; Collados, M; Khomenko, E

    2013-08-23

    We describe the presence of wave front dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfvén waves, as well as in general magnetoacoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots. PMID:24010425

  7. BayesWave Analysis for LIGO Detector Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors successfully collected data during the first observing run (O1) September 2015 to January 2016. The Bayesian inference wavelet decomposition algorithm BayesWave uses a phenomenological parameterized model to characterize the data. Among the BayesWave products are reconstructed waveforms and spectral analysis of instrument noise transients (``glitches''). The BayesWave analysis contributes to our understanding of the LIGO instrument and our ability to distinguish instrument glitches from burst sources of gravitational waves. Preliminary BayesWave analysis of the LIGO O1 data will be presented.

  8. Head waves, diving waves, and interface waves at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Ralph A.

    2005-09-01

    Brekhovskikh (1960) summarizes the system of waves that arises from reflection and refraction of spherical waves at the interface between homogeneous solid half-spaces. By eliminating the shear wave potential in one half-space, the system for fluid-solid half-spaces like the seafloor is obtained. There are two cases: one where the shear speed in the bottom is less than the compressional speed in the fluid (soft sediments), and the other where the shear speed in the bottom is greater than the compressional speed in the fluid (hard volcanic basement). This model is the basis for defining interface phenomena such as evanescent waves, head waves, pseudo-Rayleigh waves, and Stoneley/Scholte waves. If a positive gradient is introduced into the compressional and shear sound speeds in the bottom, one obtains diving waves and interference head waves (Cerveny and Ravindra, 1971). There are two types of interface waves: pseudo-Rayleigh waves that are evanescent in the bottom but propagate in the water, and Stoneley/Scholte waves that are evanescent in both media. In multi-interface models there are of course normal modes. In actual seafloors, low speed layers, sound and shear speed gradients, and interface and volume lateral heterogeneities affect the characteristics of propagation and scattering. [Work supported by ONR.

  9. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  10. Wave reflections in the pulmonary arteries analysed with the reservoir-wave model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-07-15

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pressure and flow in the pulmonary circulation yields incident and reflected waves throughout the cardiac cycle, even during diastole. The reservoir-wave model provides an alternative haemodynamic analysis consistent with minimal wave activity during diastole. Pressure and flow in the main pulmonary artery were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading and positive end-expiratory pressure were observed. The reservoir-wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to pressure and flow and once subtracted, resulted in 'excess' quantities, which were treated as wave-related. Wave intensity analysis quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (forward-going waves) and downstream (backward-going waves). In the pulmonary artery, negative reflections of incident waves created by the right ventricle were observed. Overall, the distance from the pulmonary artery valve to this reflection site was calculated to be 5.7 ± 0.2 cm. During 100% O2 ventilation, the strength of these reflections increased 10% with volume loading and decreased 4% with 10 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure. In the pulmonary arterial circulation, negative reflections arise from the junction of lobar arteries from the left and right pulmonary arteries. This mechanism serves to reduce peak systolic pressure, while increasing blood flow.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERLUMINAL STRONG WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  12. Simulation of irregular waves in an offshore wind farm with a spectral wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, S.; Bettencourt, J. H.; Kjerstad, N.

    2011-10-01

    A numerical study of irregular waves in the Norwegian continental shelf wind farm (HAVSUL-II) was conducted using 3rd generation spectral wave models. The study was composed of two parts: the study of the effect of a single windmill monopile in the local incoming wave field using an empirical JONSWAP spectrum, and a wave hindcast study in the wind farm area using realistic incoming wave spectra obtained from large scale simulations for the 1991-1992 winter period. In the single windmill monopile study the SWAN wave model was used, while the hindcast study was conducted by successively nesting from a coarse grid using the WAM model up to a high-resolution (56 m) grid covering 26.2 km 2 of the HAVSUL-II windmill farm using the SWAN model. The effect of a single monopile on incident waves with realistic spectra was also studied. In the single windmill study the monopile was represented as a closed circular obstacle and in the hindcast study it was represented as a dry grid point. The results showed that the single windmill monopile creates a shadow zone in the down wave region with lower significant wave height ( Hs) values and a slight increase of Hs in the up wave region. The effects of the windmill monopile on the wave field were found to be dependent on the directional distribution of the incoming wave spectrum and also on the wave diffraction and reflection. The hindcast study showed that the group of windmill monopiles may contribute to the reduction of the wave energy inside the offshore wind farm and that once the waves enter into the offshore wind farm they experience modifications due to the presence of the windmill monopiles, which cause a blocking of the wave energy propagation resulting in an altered distribution of the Hs field.

  13. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  14. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  15. Mesosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Forcing. 2; Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results from a non-linear, 3D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NSM) which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Our focal point is the mesosphere where wave interactions are playing a dominant role. We discuss planetary waves in the present paper and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides in the companion paper. Without external time dependent energy or momentum sources, planetary waves (PWs) are generated in the model for zonal wavenumbers 1 to 4, which have amplitudes in the mesosphere above 50 km as large as 30 m/s and periods between 2 and 50 days. The waves are generated primarily during solstice conditions, which indicates that the baroclinic instability (associated with the GW driven reversal in the latitudinal temperature gradient) is playing an important role. Results from a numerical experiment show that GWs are also involved directly in generating the PWs. For the zonal wavenumber m = 1, the predominant wave periods in summer are around 4 days and in winter between 6 and 10 days. For m = 2, the periods are in summer and close to 2.5 and 3.5 days respectively For m = 3, 4 the predominant wave periods are in both seasons close to two days. The latter waves have the characteristics of Rossby gravity waves with meridional winds at equatorial latitudes. A common feature of the PWs (m = 1 to 4) generated in summer and winter is that their vertical wavelengths throughout the mesosphere are large which indicates that the waves are not propagating freely but are generated throughout the region. Another common feature is that the PWs propagate preferentially westward in summer and eastward in winter, being launched from the westward and eastward zonal winds that prevail respectively in summer and winter altitudes below 80 km. During spring and fall, for m = 1 and 2 eastward propagating long period PWs are generated that are launched from the smaller

  16. Geometrical versus wave optics under gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2015-06-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely, null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics—rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches—we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  17. Assimilation of ASAR-ENVISAT directional wave spectra in wave model WAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouf, L.; Lefevre, J.-M.; Hauser, D.; Chapron, B.

    2003-04-01

    Better understanding and prediction of sea state are an essential need for many application domains, such as navigation and security of ships, off-shore industrial activities and the survey of the coastal zone... etc. In the framework of SWIMSAT (Surface wave investigations and monitoring from satellite, proposition to spatial mission to European Space Agency), we have shown the significant contribution induced by the assimilation of directional wave spectra in wave model WAM (Aouf et al, 2002). These results can be summarized in one hand by the improvement of the estimation of wave parameters (significant wave height, wave period and direction). In the other hand the duration of the assimilation impact in the forecast period is significantly larger regarding to the assimilation of altimeter data (wave height only). In order to prepare the assimilation scheme for operational use, assimilation tests in wave model WAM are performed with real wave spectra from the radar ASAR of the satellite ENVISAT. In this study, assimilation parameters (estimation of the covariance matrix, cross-assignement and selection of wave trains) are well adapted and the partitioning procedure in the scheme is improved in such a way that the limitation in frequency concerning the observed wave spectra (frequency cut-off of 0.1 Hz) is taken into account. The results show that the assimilation is efficient and works correctly. Furthermore, the root mean square of the analyzed wave parameters (wave height, direction and frequency) is significantly reduced and the impact of the assimilation stays effective in the forecast period. Also it has been shown that the ASAR wave spectra affect much more the low frequency wave parameters (swell). More complete and validated ASAR data will be assimilated and compared with other data sources such as RA2, buoy and RAR as part of VALPARAISO experiment.

  18. Magnetic field contribution to the Lorentz model.

    PubMed

    Oughstun, Kurt E; Albanese, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    The classical Lorentz model of dielectric dispersion is based on the microscopic Lorentz force relation and Newton's second law of motion for an ensemble of harmonically bound electrons. The magnetic field contribution in the Lorentz force relation is neglected because it is typically small in comparison with the electric field contribution. Inclusion of this term leads to a microscopic polarization density that contains both perpendicular and parallel components relative to the plane wave propagation vector. The modified parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities are both nonlinear in the local electric field strength.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of hypersonic shock waves

    PubMed

    Ramos; Mate; Tejeda; Fernandez; Montero

    2000-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is shown to be an efficient diagnostic methodology for the study of hypersonic shock waves. As a test, absolute density and rotational population profiles have been measured across five representative normal shock waves of N2 generated in a free jet, spanning the Mach number range 7.7waves shows a largely bimodal rotational distribution function with additional contribution of scattered molecules, in close analogy with the velocity distribution function known from helium shock waves [G. Pham-Van-Diep et al., Science 245, 624 (1989)]. Quantitative data on invariance trends of density profiles and properties of the wake beyond the shock waves are reported.

  20. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  1. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  2. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  3. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  4. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion.

  5. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  6. Vorticity and Wave Motion in a Compressible Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The impact of an isolated vortex in a compressible Keplerian disk is examined using higher order numerical solutions of the Euler and entropy-conserving Energy equations. The vortex is stretched by the background shear flow with longer lasting anticyclonic vortices persisting for about 10 vortex revolutions. Simultaneously, the vortex emits transient radial waves consisting mainly of axisymmetrical weak shock waves and a slower, nonaxisymmetric Rossby wave. These waves may contribute to certain transient events in protoplanetary disks. The vortex stretching and waves were found to have little long-term feedback on the baseline 'standard solar nebula' disk structure and confirm the extremely stable structure of non self-gravitating disks.

  7. Instability of Wave Trains and Wave Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanin, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, ababanin@swin.edu.au Design criteria in ocean engineering, whether this is one in 50 years or one in 5000 years event, are hardly ever based on measurements, and rather on statistical distributions of relevant metocean properties. Of utmost interest is the tail of distribution, that is rare events such as the highest waves with low probability. Engineers have long since realised that the superposition of linear waves with narrow-banded spectrum as depicted by the Rayleigh distribution underestimates the probability of extreme wave heights and crests, which is a critical shortcoming as far as the engineering design is concerned. Ongoing theoretical and experimental efforts have been under way for decades to address this issue. Typical approach is the treating all possible waves in the ocean or at a particular location as a single ensemble for which some comprehensive solution can be obtained. The oceanographic knowledge, however, now indicates that no single and united comprehensive solution is available. We would expect the probability distributions of wave height to depend on a) whether the waves are at the spectral peak or at the tail; b) on wave spectrum and mean steepness in the wave field; c) on the directional distribution of the peak waves; d) on whether the waves are in deep water, in intermediate depth or in shallow water; e) on wave breaking; f) on the wind, particularly if it is very strong, and on the currents if they have suitable horizontal gradients. Probability distributions in the different circumstances according to these groups of conditions should be different, and by combining them together the inevitable scatter is introduced. The scatter and the accuracy will not improve by increasing the bulk data quality and quantity, and it hides the actual distribution of extremes. The groups have to be separated and their probability

  8. A theory for the radiation of magnetohydrodynamic surface waves and body waves into the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.

    1988-01-01

    The Green's function for the slab coronal hole is obtained explicitly. The Fourier integral representation for the radiated field inside and outside the coronal hole waveguide is obtained. The radiated field outside the coronal hole is calculated using the method of steepest descents. It is shown that the radiated field can be written as the sum of two contributions: (1) a contribution from the integral along the steepest descent path and (2) a contribution from all the poles of the integrand between the path of the original integral and the steepest descent path. The free oscillations of the waveguide can be associated with the pole contributions in the steepest descent representation for the Green's function. These pole contributions are essentially generalized surface waves with a maximum amplitude near the interface which separates the plasma inside the coronal hole from the surrounding background corona. The path contribution to the integral is essentially the power radiated in body waves.

  9. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  10. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  11. Gravitational-wave detection using redshifted 21-cm observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Somnath; Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy

    2009-06-15

    A gravitational-wave traversing the line of sight to a distant source produces a frequency shift which contributes to redshift space distortion. As a consequence, gravitational waves are imprinted as density fluctuations in redshift space. The gravitational-wave contribution to the redshift space power spectrum has a different {mu} dependence as compared to the dominant contribution from peculiar velocities. This, in principle, allows the two signals to be separated. The prospect of a detection is most favorable at the highest observable redshift z. Observations of redshifted 21-cm radiation from neutral hydrogen hold the possibility of probing very high redshifts. We consider the possibility of detecting primordial gravitational waves using the redshift space neutral hydrogen power spectrum. However, we find that the gravitational-wave signal, though present, will not be detectable on superhorizon scales because of cosmic variance and on subhorizon scales where the signal is highly suppressed.

  12. Indian – American contributions to psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by Indian – American psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  13. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  14. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G

    2015-08-07

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method. PMID:26262620

  16. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  17. Wave Meteorology and Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some mountain wave turbulence and operational hazards while soaring. Maps, photographs, and satellite images of the meteorological phenomena are included. Additionally, photographs of aircraft that sustained mountain wave damage are provided.

  18. Traveling Wave Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluger-Bell, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Describes a traveling-wave demonstration that uses inexpensive materials (crepe-paper streamers) and is simple to assemble and perform. Explains how the properties of light waves are illustrated using the demonstration apparatus. (LZ)

  19. P wave {pi}{pi} amplitude from dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Guo, Peng; Battaglieri, M.; De Vita, R.

    2010-08-01

    We solve the dispersion relation for the P-wave {pi}{pi} amplitude. We discuss the role of the left-hand cut vs the Castillejo-Dalitz-Dyson pole contribution and compare the solution with a generic quark model description. We review the generic properties of analytical partial wave scattering and production amplitudes and discuss their applicability and fits of experimental data.

  20. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  1. Waves of Hanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Guillermo

    2003-03-01

    A spatially extended model of the hantavirus infection in deer mice is analyzed. Traveling waves solutions of the infected and susceptible populations are studied in different regimes, controlled by an environmental parameter. The wave of infection is shown to lag behind the wave of susceptible population, and the delay between the two is analyzed numerically and through a piecewise linearization.

  2. Including wave interference in radiative transfer theory for P-SV waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; van Wijk, K.; Snieder, R.

    2010-12-01

    The theory of radiative transfer (RT) has successfully been applied to model the envelopes of high frequency (> 1 Hz) seismic waves in the Earth, attesting to the importance of multiple scattering in this frequency range. An advantage of RT over traditional techniques lies in its ability to separately estimate the mechanisms of intrinsic and scattering attenuation. In addition, RT satisfies energy conservation. However, it is well known that RT ignores the contribution of wave interference; it is for this reason that phenomena such as coherent backscattering are not described within RT. Therefore, RT must be considered an incomplete theory and a more general description of multiple wave scattering must be sought in order to describe the full range of possible wave phenomena in the Earth. By deriving RT from a fundamental level for a one-dimensional layered acoustic medium, we have formulated a new theory, similar to RT, which includes wave interference (Haney and van Wijk, 2007; PRE). The inclusion of wave interference allows localization to be accurately represented in an updated RT theory. The derivation of the new theory also provides insight into the connections between multiple scattering theory and interferometry. Building on this result, we extend the acoustic theory to P-SV waves in a layered elastic medium. The extension highlights the difficulty in accounting for wave interference in the presence of more than one stream of energy (e.g., P- and SV-waves). The new theory enables the issue of equipartitioning of localized elastic energy to be addressed, a topic that has received little attention previously. Predictions of the theory are tested against finite-difference numerical simulations of P-SV waves for an ensemble of randomly layered media. Finally, we comment on the type of seismic data sets suited to observe such interference contributions in practice.

  3. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  4. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  5. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  6. Fundamental physics in space: The French contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon-Hirtz, Sylvie

    2003-08-01

    This paper outlines the space Fundamental Physics projects developped under CNES responsability together with the french scientific community, either in the national french programme or in the french contribution to the ESA programme, mainly: -the MICROSCOPE project which aims at testing the Equivalence Principle between inertial mass and gravitational mass at a high level of precision, on a microsatellite of the MYRIADE series developped by CNES, -the PHARAO cold-atom clock which is part of the ACES project of ESA, located on an external pallett of the International Space Station, together with a swiss H-MASER and a micro-wave link making comparison with ground clocks, aimed at relativistic tests and measurement of universal constants, -the T2L2 optical link allowing to compare ultra-stable and ultra-precise clocks, -a contribution to the AMS spectrometer which searches for cosmic antimatter, on the external part of the International Space Station, -a contribution to the LISA mission of ESA for direct detection and measurement of gravitational waves by interferometry, -ground-based studies on cold-atom interferometers which could be part of the HYPER project submitted to ESA.

  7. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  8. Waves of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G.W.; Charlier, R.H.

    1981-05-01

    Possible means for harnessing the energy contained in ocean waves are considered. Problems associated with the low-grade nature of wave energy and the rate at which wave crests approach are pointed out, and simple devices already in use for the supply of energy to bell buoys, whistle buoys and lighted buoys are noted. Attention is then given to wave energy conversion systems based on the focusing of waves onto a narrow ramp leading to a reservoir from which water is released to power a turbine generator: a slightly submerged circular shell which directs waves into its center cavity where waves act to turn a turbine (the Dam-Atoll), a long vertical pipe with an internal valve allowing water to move in an upward direction (the Isaacs wave-energy pump), a turbine located at the bottom of an open-topped pipe (the Masuda buoy), a completely submerged closed air chamber from which runs a large pipe open to the sea, a wave piston which acts by the compression of air to drive a turbine, a massive structure with upper and lower reservoirs (the Russel rectifier), and devices which consist of floating or submerged objects which transfer wave energy to pumps (the Salter duck and Cockerell raft). It is concluded that although wave-powered generators are not likely to become competitive in the near future or provide more than a small portion of world demand, they may be found useful under special conditions.

  9. Waves of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F. G. W.; Charlier, R. H.

    1981-06-01

    Possible means for harnessing the energy contained in ocean waves are considered. Problems associated with the low-grade nature of wave energy and the rate at which wave crests approach are pointed out, and simple devices already in use for the supply of energy to bell buoys, whistle buoys and lighted buoys are noted. Attention is then given to wave energy conversion systems based on the focusing of waves onto a narrow ramp leading to a reservoir from which water is released to power a turbine generator; a slightly submerged circular shell which directs waves into its center cavity where waves act to turn a turbine (the Dam-Atoll); a long vertical pipe with an internal valve allowing water to move in an upward direction (the Isaacs wave-energy pump); a turbine located at the bottom of an open-topped pipe (the Masuda buoy); a completely submerged closed air chamber from which runs a large pipe open to the sea; a wave piston which acts by the compression of air to drive a turbine; a massive structure with upper and lower reservoirs (the Russel rectifier); and devices which consist of floating or submerged objects which transfer wave energy to pumps (the Salter duck and Cockerell raft.) It is concluded that although wave-powered generators are not likely to become competitive in the near future or provide more than a small portion of world demand, they may be found useful under special conditions.

  10. Teleseismic S wave microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-01

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth’s interior.

  11. Blast wave energy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Thomas E; Tierney, Heidi E; Idzorek, George C; Watt, Robert G; Peterson, Robert R; Peterson, Darrell L; Fryer, Christopher L; Lopez, Mike R; Jones, Michael C; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory A; Bailey, James E

    2008-10-01

    The distance radiation waves that supersonically propagate in optically thick, diffusive media are energy sensitive. A blast wave can form in a material when the initially diffusive, supersonic radiation wave becomes transonic. Under specific conditions, the blast wave is visible with radiography as a density perturbation. [Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056901 (2006)] showed that the time-integrated drive energy can be measured using blast wave positions with uncertainties less than 10% at the Z Facility. In some cases, direct measurements of energy loss through diagnostic holes are not possible with bolometric and x-ray radiometric diagnostics. Thus, radiography of high compression blast waves can serve as a complementary technique that provides time-integrated energy loss through apertures. In this paper, we use blast waves to characterize the energy emerging through a 2.4 mm aperture and show experimental results in comparison to simulations. PMID:19044574

  12. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  13. Experimental and numerical studies on wave breaking characteristics over a fringing reef under monochromatic wave conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-In; Shin, Sungwon; Kim, Young-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Fringing reefs play an important role in protecting the coastal area by inducing wave breaking and wave energy dissipation. However, modeling of wave transformation and energy dissipation on this topography is still difficult due to the unique structure. In the present study, two-dimensional laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the cross-shore variations of wave transformation, setup, and breaking phenomena over an idealized fringing reef with the 1/40 reef slope and to verify the Boussinesq model under monochromatic wave conditions. One-layer and two-layer model configurations of the Boussinesq model were used to figure out the model capability. Both models predicted well (r (2) > 0.8) the cross-shore variation of the wave heights, crests, troughs, and setups when the nonlinearity is not too high (A 0/h 0 < 0.07 in this study). However, as the wave nonlinearity and steepness increase, the one-layer model showed problems in prediction and stability due to the error on the vertical profile of fluid velocity. The results in this study revealed that one-layer model is not suitable in the highly nonlinear wave condition over a fringing reef bathymetry. This data set can contribute to the numerical model verification. PMID:25276853

  14. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  15. EUV Coronal Waves: Atmospheric and Heliospheric Connections and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2015-12-01

    Since their discovery in late 90's by EIT on SOHO, the study EUV coronal waves has been a fascinating andfrequently strongly debated research area. While it seems as ifan overall consensus has been reached about the nurture and nature of this phenomenon,there are still several important questions regarding EUV waves. By focusing on the most recentobservations, we will hereby present our current understanding about the nurture and nature of EUV waves,discuss their connections with other atmospheric and heliospheric phenomena (e.g.,flares and CMEs, Moreton waves, coronal shocks, coronal oscillations, SEP events) and finallyassess their possible energetic contribution to the overall budget of relatederuptive phenomena.

  16. Wave-modified mean exothermic heating in the mesopause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Michael P.; Walterscheid, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    We employ a model of wave-driven OH nightglow fluctuations to calculate the effects of gravity waves on the chemical exothermic heating due to reactions involving odd hydrogen and odd oxygen species in the mesopause region. Using a model based on time means and deviations from those means, it is demonstrated that gravity waves contribute to the time-average exothermic heating. The effect can be significant because the fractional fluctuations in minor species density can be substantially greater than the fractional fluctuation of the major gas density. Our calculations reveal that the waves mitigate the exothermic heating, demonstrating their potential importance in the heat budget of the mesopause region.

  17. Surface waves in three-dimensional electromagnetic composites and their effect on homogenization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Markel, Vadim A; Tsukerman, Igor

    2013-05-01

    Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at the boundaries of periodic composites (electromagnetic/optical metamaterials) depends in general on both bulk and surface waves. We investigate the interplay of these two contributions using three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations and a recently developed non-asymptotic homogenization theory.

  18. Water wave metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjeans, Philippe; Palacios, Carmen; Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    The phenomenon of water wave deviation in a bended wave-guide has been studied experimentally. We propose a theoretical analogy to electromagnetism, from which we derive the mathematical tools to design a water wave-deviator. To obtain the effect of metamaterial in the case of surface waves, one has to design a water-bed consisting of periodic layers of two different heights inclined with a specific angle with respect to the direction of propagation of waves. We designed and built (using rapid prototyping) deviators with progressively increasing angles of bending, and their homologue wave-guides with a flat bottom. The wave elevation was measured with good accuracy in time and in space by an optical method. Results show a good efficiency of the wave-deviator. The wavefront maintains its original inclination once the wave crosses the bend (in contrary to the wave-guide with a flat bottom), however departs from the predicted behavior as the wavefront advances. The analysis of harmonics shows a reduction of backwards reflection and a strong decrease in higher modes excitation after the bend. The results are optimistic and might open new possibilities; ultimately those regarding the cloaking of floating structures which could, in the future, be used for coastal protection.

  19. Gravitational Wave Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2005-02-01

    There is only one experimental proof that gravitational waves exist. With such a limitation, it may seem premature to suggest the possibility that gravitational waves can became a preferred space propulsion technique. The present understanding of the problem indicates that this is not the case. The emission of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources has been confirmed by observation, the respective detection at large distance from the source is difficult and actually we have no confirmation of a successful detection. Therefore the required preliminary discovery has been already made. This opinion is enforced by many different proposals for building the required powerful gravitational wave generators that have recently appeared in the literature and discussed at conferences. It is no longer reasonable to wait for additional confirmation of the existence of gravitational waves to start a program for building generators and testing their possible application to space travel. A vast literature shows that gravitational waves can be employed for space propulsion. Gravitational wave rockets have been proposed, non-linearity of Einstein equations allows the conversion of gravitational waves to a static gravitational field and ``artificial gravity assist'' may become a new way of travelling in space-time. Different approaches to gravitational wave propulsion are reviewed and compared. Gravitational wave propulsion is also compared to traditional rocket propulsion and an undeniable advantage can be demonstrated in terms of efficiency and performance. Testing the predictions will require gravitational wave generators with high power and wavelength short enough for producing high energy densities. Detectors designed for the specific application must be developed, taking into account that non-linearity effects are expected. The study and development of Gravitational wave propulsion is a very challenging endeavor, involving the most complex theories, sophisticated

  20. Magnetospheric ULF waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.; Tian, A.; Sun, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, X.; Fu, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pu, Z.; Hartinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report the in situ observation of the magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes. We examine the magnetospheric responses to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements from April 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012, and find six ULF wave events with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. The amplitudes of ion velocities and magnetic field of these waves continuously increase by 2.1 ˜ 4.4 times during three to six wave cycles. We choose two typical cases to further investigate the cause of this wave amplitude increase. We find that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Interestingly, toroidal mode waves are standing, while compressional and poloidal mode waves are not. Thus, we suspect that the wave amplitude increase may be caused by the superposition of two wave sources. One wave source is the standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse. Additionally, fast mode compressional wave continuously shakes the magnetic field lines. The azimuthal component of this magnetic perturbation is the second wave source. Furthermore, the simple model calculation of superposing two waves match the observations pretty well.

  1. Avicenna's contribution to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A R; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Ibn Sina, known in the West as Avicenna, was the most famous and influential of all the Islamic philosopher-scientists. His most important medical works are the Canon of Medicine medical encyclopedia and a treatise on cardiac drugs. His Canon of Medicine remained the standard text in both the East and West until the 16(th) century. Avicenna's description of cardiac diseases was logically presented perhaps for the first time in the history of medicine. Avicenna was the first to describe carotid sinus hypersensitivity, which presents with vasovagal syncope. He was a pioneer in pulsology and the first correct explanation of pulsation was given by Avicenna, after he refined Galen's theory of the pulse. Besides, he discussed the action of available drugs on the heart in details and mentioned their indications and contraindications. In conclusion, Avicenna made important contributions to cardiology. This article describes some of his contributions in this field. PMID:24678465

  2. Avicenna's contribution to cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.R.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Ibn Sina, known in the West as Avicenna, was the most famous and influential of all the Islamic philosopher-scientists. His most important medical works are the Canon of Medicine medical encyclopedia and a treatise on cardiac drugs. His Canon of Medicine remained the standard text in both the East and West until the 16th century. Avicenna's description of cardiac diseases was logically presented perhaps for the first time in the history of medicine. Avicenna was the first to describe carotid sinus hypersensitivity, which presents with vasovagal syncope. He was a pioneer in pulsology and the first correct explanation of pulsation was given by Avicenna, after he refined Galen's theory of the pulse. Besides, he discussed the action of available drugs on the heart in details and mentioned their indications and contraindications. In conclusion, Avicenna made important contributions to cardiology. This article describes some of his contributions in this field. PMID:24678465

  3. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  4. Stress Generation and Adolescent Depression: Contribution of Interpersonal Stress Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Megan; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined the proposal that ineffective responses to common interpersonal problems disrupt youths' relationships, which, in turn, contributes to depression during adolescence. Youth (86 girls, 81 boys; M age = 12.41, SD = 1.19) and their primary female caregivers participated in a three-wave longitudinal study. Youth completed a…

  5. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  6. Space-time properties of wind-waves: a new look at directional wave distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckler, Fabien; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Benetazzo, Alvise; Fedele, Francesco; Bergamasco, Filippo; Dulov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Few accurate observed directional wave spectra are available in the literature at spatial scales ranging between 0.5 and 5.0 m. These intermediate wave scales, relevant for air-sea fluxes and remote sensing are also expected to feed back on the dominant wave properties through wave generation. These wave scales can be prolifically investigated using the well-known optical stereo methods that provides, from a couple of synchronized images, instantaneous representation of wave elevations over a given sea surface. Thus, two stereo systems (the so-called Wave Acquisition Stereo Systems, WASS) were deployed on top of the deep-water platform at Katsiveli, in the Black Sea, in September 2011 and 2013. From image pairs taken by the couple of synchronized high-resolution cameras, ocean surfaces have been reconstructed by stereo-triangulation. Here we analyze sea states corresponding to mean wind speeds of 11 to 14 m/s, and young wave ages of 0.35 to 0.42, associated to significant wave heights of 0.3 to 0.55m. As a result, four 12 Hz time evolutions of sea surface elevation maps with areas about 10 x 10 m2 have been obtained for sequence durations ranging between 15 and 30 minutes, and carefully validated with nearby capacitance wave gauges. The evolving free surfaces elevations were processed into frequency-wavenumber-direction 3D spectra. We found that wave energy chiefly follows the dispersion relation up to frequency of 1.6Hz and wavenumber of 10 rad/m, corresponding to wavelength of about 0.5 m. These spectra also depict well the energy contribution from non-linear waves, which is quantified and compared to theory. A strong bi-modality of the linear spectra was also observed, with the angle of the two maxima separated by about 160 degrees. Furthermore, spectra also exhibit the bimodality of the non-linear part. Integrated over positive frequencies to obtain wavenumber spectra unambiguous in direction, the bimodality of the spectra is partially hidden by the energy from

  7. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  8. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  9. Internal Waves, Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photograph, taken in sunglint conditions, captures open ocean internal waves which are diffracting around shoals south of the Seychelle islands (4.5S, 55.5E) and recombining to form interference patterns. The clouds to the north of the waves cover two of the Seychelle islands: Silhouette and Mahe. Mahe is the main island of the archipelago. The small rocky island surrounded by reef around which the waves diffract is Platte Island.

  10. Production simulator for wave power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsethaugen, K.

    1994-07-01

    The report gives plans and specifications for a wave power production simulator. The simulator is a computer program that computes how much of the energy in the open ocean that can be converted to usable energy at a site off or onshore. The production of wave power from sea waves is not an easy task. Efforts have been made in several countries to develop devices that can extract energy from the ocean, but very few have so far been successful. During the last 15 years a considerable know-how has been established in Norway on wave energy utilization. Part of this know-how will be included in the proposed production simulator. Evaluation of new devices and new sites can be done in a more comparative and efficient way by this tool. It will contribute to interdisciplinary activity in the field of wave power utilization, and should be applicable for the nonexpert. The simulator consists of several modules, joined together by computer software. The plans so far include purpose, needs and background for the development of a wave power plant simulator and a high level specification of the software and scope of work.

  11. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation.

  12. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  13. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  14. Transient Wave Envelope Elements for Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, R. J.

    1996-04-01

    A novel family of infinite wave envelope elements is described which can be used in conjunction with conventional finite elements to model the transient wave equation in unbounded regions. The elements are obtained by applying an inverse Fourier transformation to a mapped wave envelope formulation in the frequency domain. The discrete transient equations obtained in this way can be applied to two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems without restriction, being valid over a full range of excitation frequencies. The effectiveness and accuracy of the method is demonstrated in application to simple test cases which involve the calculation of transient sound fields generated by pulsating spheres and cylinders excited from rest in an unbounded region. Test solutions are compared to analytic solutions and to finite element solutions obtained by using large computational grids which extend beyond the region influenced by the transient disturbance.

  15. Jesuits' Contribution to Meteorology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udías, Agustín

    1996-10-01

    Starting in the middle of the nineteenth century, as part of their scientific tradition, Jesuits founded a considerable number of meteorological observatories throughout the world. In many countries, Jesuits established and maintained the first meteorological stations during the period from 1860 to 1950. The Jesuits' most important contribution to atmospheric science was their pioneer work related to the study and forecast of tropical hurricanes. That research was carried out at observatories of Belén (Cuba), Manila (Philippines), and Zikawei (China). B. Viñes, M. Decheyrens, J. Aigué, and C.E. Deppermann stood out in this movement.

  16. Examining suicide: imaging's contributions.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    For many people, the death of hope leads inexorably to the conclusion that the only viable solution, the only way to put an end to unendurable pain, is suicide. What leads a person to commit this final, desperate act, and how might we predict, intervene, and prevent suicide? Health care workers, including radiologic technologists, can play an important role in detecting warning signs in patients and in better understanding what factors may lead to suicide. Although certain forms of suicide such as suicide bombings and assisted suicide are beyond its scope, this article explores medical imaging's contributions to the study of this phenomenon.

  17. Genetic and environmental contributions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D

    2000-03-01

    There is a remarkable variability in insulin action in humans. Depending upon the definition of the insulin resistance syndrome, different inheritability/environmental influences on insulin action are reported. The environmental contributions to insulin resistance appear to account for approximately 50% of this syndrome. Obese and sedentary insulin-resistant individuals can see dramatic improvement in insulin sensitivity with weight reduction and fitness training. The degree to which obesity is determined by genetic influences will have a substantial impact on insulin resistance in the Western populations. Familial components also appear to account for approximately 50% of the variation and insulin action (as commonly defined by glucose metabolic effects).

  18. Modal Waves Solved in Complex Wave Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.-J.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for the resolution in complex domain of the ultrasonic modal waves from the characteristic equation of elastic structures. The method is applicable to any numerically available function given explicitly or implicitly. The complex root loci of the modal waves are constructed by varying other parameters. Different situations which can cause the roots searching and following failure are analysed and the corresponding solutions are proposed. The computation examples are given for a three layered adhesive joint and a composite plate.

  19. Gravity waves and turbulence in the middle atmosphere program (GRATMAP): An overview of gravity wave studies during MAP/MAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    Considerable progress was made in understanding gravity waves and their effects in the middle atmosphere during the MAP and MAC periods. During this time, gravity waves were recognized to play a central role in controlling the large scale circulation and the thermal and constituent structure of this region through wave transports of energy and momentum, a significant induced meridional circulation, and through the action of wave induced turbulence. Both theoretical and observational studies also have contributed to the understanding of the gravity wave spectrum, its temporal and spatial variability, and the processes responsible for wave saturation. As a result, the propagation, interactions, and detailed effects of such motions in the middle atmosphere are beginning to be understood. An overview is provided.

  20. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  1. Realization of the cooperation between traveling wave component and standing wave component in thermoacoustic regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Zhou; Qing, Li

    2014-01-01

    The regenerator is the core of a thermoacoustic engine or refrigerator, which consists of smooth or tortuous porous media, such as parallel plates or stainless stacked-screen. Due to regenerator presence, the real acoustic field is neither a pure standing wave nor a pure travelling wave and the thermoacoustic effect is the hybrid effect of the traveling wave component (TWC) and the standing wave component (SWC). To achieve both high efficiency and gain for a given temperature ratio, one has to choose an optimum phase lead Φm of the oscillating pressure relative to velocity in the middle of the regenerator to give the best combination of TWC and SWC. In this paper, based on linear thermoacoustic theory, the phase lead Φm which can make both the traveling wave and the standing wave contribute to the thermoacoustic conversions, are analyzed and optimized. To realize cooperation between TWC and SWC in thermoacoustic regenerator, a mathematical model of a 1/2 wavelength duct with a regenerator driven by double speakers was built, which can provide an appropriate traveling-wave field in the regenerator by changing the driving conditions including amplitude and the phase difference of the driving voltages. According to this, the influence of the acoustic field and the regenerator's structure on the thermoacoustic conversion is analyzed, and the optimum condition for the thermoacoustic conversion is discussed. This work is significant to understand thermoacoustic conversion mechanisms of regenerators in the real acoustic field.

  2. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  3. The 2003 heat wave.

    PubMed

    Sardon, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The July-August 2005 issue of Eurosurveillance focused on the impact on mortality of the 2003 heat wave in Europe, with articles that were based on various methods and looked at different time periods [1]. The subject of this letter is to assess, using a unique methodology, the excess mortality related to the 2003 heat wave across the continent. PMID:17439811

  4. Waves on Ice

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Waves on White: Ice or Clouds?     ... detecting clouds over snow and ice, but also works well over ocean and land. The rippled area on the surface which could have been mistaken ... date:  Dec 16, 2004 Images:  Waves on Ice location:  Antarctica thumbnail:  ...

  5. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  6. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  7. Thermal-Wave Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosencwaig, Allan

    1982-01-01

    Thermal features of and beneath the surface of a sample can be detected and imaged with a thermal-wave microscope. Various methodologies for the excitation and detection of thermal waves are discussed, and several applications, primarily in microelectronics, are presented. (Author)

  8. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  9. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  10. Power from Ocean Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the utilization of surface ocean waves as a potential source of power. Simple and large-scale wave power devices and conversion systems are described. Alternative utilizations, environmental impacts, and future prospects of this alternative energy source are detailed. (BT)

  11. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  12. New contributions to transit-time damping in multidimensional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of two previously unrecognized contributions to transit-time damping in systems of more than one dimension is demonstrated and discussed. It is shown that these contributions cannot be treated by one-dimensional analyses unless it is assumed that the gradient of the field perpendicular to itself always vanishes. Such an assumption is unjustified in general and the new contributions can dominate damping by fast particles in more general situations. Analytic expressions obtained using a Born approximation are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical test-particle calculations of transit-time damping for a variety of field configurations. These configurations include those of a resonance layer and of a spherical wave packet, which approximates a collapsing wave packet in a strongly turbulent plasma. It is found that the fractional power absorption can be strongly enhanced in non-slablike field configurations.

  13. Sculpting Waves (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    In electronics controlling and manipulating flow of charged carriers has led to design of numerous functional devices. In photonics, by analogy, this is done through controlling photons and optical waves. However, the challenges and opportunities are different in these two fields. Materials control waves, and as such they can tailor, manipulate, redirect, and scatter electromagnetic waves and photons at will. Recent development in condensed matter physics, nanoscience, and nanotechnology has made it possible to tailor materials with unusual parameters and extreme characteristics and with atomic precision and thickness. One can now construct structures much smaller than the wavelengths of visible light, thus ushering in unprecedented possibilities and novel opportunities for molding fields and waves at the nanoscale with desired functionalities. At such subwavelength scales, sculpting optical fields and waves provides a fertile ground for innovation and discovery. I will discuss some of the exciting opportunities in this area, and forecast some future directions and possibilities.

  14. Project GlobWave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busswell, Geoff; Ash, Ellis; Piolle, Jean-Francois; Poulter, David J. S.; Snaith, Helen; Collard, Fabrice; Sheera, Harjit; Pinnock, Simon

    2010-12-01

    The ESA GlobWave project is a three year initiative, funded by ESA and CNES, to service the needs of satellite wave product users across the globe. Led by Logica UK, with support from CLS, IFREMER, SatOC and NOCS, the project will provide free access to satellite wave data and products in a common format, both historical and in near real time, from various European and American SAR and altimeter missions. Building on the successes of similar projects for Sea Surface Temperature and ocean colour, the project aims to stimulate increased use and analysis of satellite wave products. In addition to common-format satellite data the project will provide comparisons with in situ measurements, interactive data analysis tools and a pilot spatial wave forecast verification scheme for operational forecast production centres. The project will begin operations in January 2010, with direction from regular structured user consultation.

  15. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  16. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  17. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  18. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  19. Wave - current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugan, I.; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2012-04-01

    The problem of wave interaction with current is still a big challenge in physical oceanography. In spite of numerous numbers of papers devoting to the analysis of the phenomenon some very strong effects are still waiting for its clear description. One of the problems here is the Benjamin-Feir instability in the presence of variable current. Modulation instability is one of the most ubiquitous types of instabilities in nature. In modern nonlinear physics, it is considered as a basic process that classifies the qualitative behavior of modulated waves (``envelope waves'') and may initialize the formation of stable entities such as envelope solitons. We theoretically describe the explosion instability of waves on the adverse blocking current and corresponding frequency downshifting. Waves can be blocked only partly and overpass the opposite current barrier at the lower side band resonance frequency. Theoretical results are compared with available experiments.

  20. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  1. Hydromagnetic waves and cosmic ray diffusion theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.; Voelk, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Pitch angle diffusion of cosmic rays in hydromagnetic wave fields is considered strictly within the quasilinear approximation. It is shown that the popular assumption of an isotropic power spectrum tensor of magnetic fluctuations requires in this case equal forms and magnitudes of Alfven and magnetosonic wave spectra - a situation which is generally unlikely. The relative contributions to the pitch angle diffusion coefficient from the cyclotron resonances and Landau resonance due to the different types of waves are evaluated for a typical situation in the solar wind. Since in this approximation also the Landau resonance does not lead to particle reflections a proper consideration of the nonlinear particle orbits is indeed necessary to overcome the well known difficulties of quasilinear scattering theory for cosmic rays near 90 degrees pitch angle.

  2. THz-wave sensing via pump and signal wave detection interacted with evanescent THz waves.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Takuya; Kaneko, Naoya; Suizu, Koji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2013-09-15

    We report a novel sensing technique that uses an evanescent terahertz (THz) wave, without detecting the THz wave directly. When a THz wave generated by Cherenkov phase matching via difference frequency generation undergoes total internal reflection, the evanescent THz wave is subject to a phase change and an amplitude decrease. The reflected THz wave, under the influence of the sample, interferes with the propagating THz wave and the changing electric field of the THz wave interacts with the electric field of the pump waves. We demonstrate a sensing technique for detecting changes in the electric field of near-infrared light, transcribed from changes in the electric field of a THz wave.

  3. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  4. Standing Waves on a Shoestring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Describes the construction of a wave generator used to review the algebraic relationships of wave motion. Students calculate and measure the weight needed to create tension to generate standing waves at the first eight harmonics. (MDH)

  5. Multisatellite studies of ULF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Kazue

    1988-01-01

    Multisatellite studies of ULF waves are reviewed, with a special emphasis on compressional Pc 5 waves. The observations of the radial extent, azimuthal wave number and the field-aligned standing wave structure of the waves are described. When combined with plasma data, the waves appear to be consistent with drift-mirror waves originating from the pressure anisotropy of the ring current plasma. The most recent observations revealed some features not considered in previous theories of the drift-mirror wave: antisymmetric standing wave structure and rather small pressure anisotropy that can drive the waves to instability. Recent theoretical work shows that these observations can be explained if the coupling of the drift-mirror wave to the shear Alfven wave is properly treated in a realistic magnetic field geometry.

  6. Impact of gravity waves on long-range infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, François; De La Camara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study infrasound propagation in acoustic waveguides that support a finite number of propagating modes. We analyze the effects of gravity waves on these acoustic waveguides. Testing sound propagation in such perturbed fields can potentially be used to improve the gravity wave models. A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the forward-scattering approximation. The wave mode structure is determined by the effective sound speed profile which is strongly affected by gravity wave breaking. The random perturbations are described by a stochastic field predicted by a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves, which is operational in the LMDz climate model. The justification for this approach is two fold. On the one hand, the use of a few monochromatic waves mimics the observations of rather narrow-banded gravity wave packets in the lower stratosphere. On the other hand, the stochastic sampling of the gravity wave field and the random choice of wave properties deals with the inherent unpredictability of mesoscale dynamics from large scale conditions provided by the meteorological reanalysis. The transmitted acoustic signals contain a stable front and a small-amplitude incoherent coda. A general expression for the stable front is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. This approach extract the dominant effects in the acoustic - gravity wave interaction. We present results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to a few saddle-points and how the GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. While some of the characteristics of the stable front can be directly related to that of a few individual gravity waves, it is shown that the amount of the launched gravity waves included in climate models can be estimated using

  7. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  8. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  9. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  10. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  11. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  12. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  13. Atmospheric waves and the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, T.

    1972-01-01

    A review of evidence supporting the existence of atmospheric waves is presented, and a simple, theoretical approach for describing them is shown. Suggestions for gravity wave sources include equatorial and auroral electrojet, auroral and polar substorm heating, atmospheric jet streams, and large oceanic tides. There are reviewed previous studies dealing with the interaction between ionization and atmospheric waves believed to exist at ionospheric heights. These waves include acoustic waves, evanescent waves, and internal atmospheric gravity waves. It is explained that mode analysis, often employed when an increased number of layers is used for a more complete profile, is inapplicable for waves very close to a source.

  14. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  15. Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2008-11-01

    Although low-frequency radio waves of extra-terrestrial origin were known over a century ago, it wasn't until the beginning of the space era fifty years ago that the origin of these waves could be adequately investigated. Since then spacecraft-borne instruments have shown that space plasmas exhibit an almost bewildering variety of wave phenomena, sometimes referred to as the plasma wave zoo. In this talk I will focus on two types of waves that occur in the magnetospheres of the strongly magnetized planets. They are whistler mode emissions and cyclotron maser radiation. Whistler mode emissions are generated in the now famous plasma wave mode known as the whistler mode, and cyclotron maser radiation is emitted mainly in the right-hand polarized free space mode. Both involve a cyclotron resonant interaction and require a perpendicular anisotropy to achieve wave growth. However, the origin of the anisotropy is different in the two cases. Whistler mode emissions occur in planetary radiation belts and are driven by the loss-cone anisotropy imposed by the planet. The resulting waves play a major role in the scattering and loss of radiation belt electrons. In contrast, the cyclotron maser radiation is generated in the auroral regions where parallel electric fields accelerate down-going electrons to high energies. The wave growth is driven by the shell distribution that arises from a combination of the parallel electric field and the magnetic mirror force. The resulting radiation is extremely intense and can be detected at great distances as an escaping radio emission. Both the whistler mode emissions and the cyclotron maser radiation display an amazing amount of fine structure. This structure is thought to be due to nonlinear trapping of the resonant electrons. The exact nonlinear mechanisms involved are still a topic of current study.

  16. Electromagnetic wave scattering by an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannikov, S. S.

    1995-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamics of bilocal fields is used to calculate the triangular Feynman diagrams describing the elastic scattering of a classical electromagnetic wave by an external Coulomb field. The total contribution of the diagrams is nonzero because of the violation of both the Furry theorem (CP or T symmetries) and the Ward identities. The cross section for this scattering process is found for low and high energies. A comparison with Compton scattering and Euler—Heisenberg scattering is given.

  17. Spin Waves in Quasiequilibrium Spin Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Kevin S.; Dahal, Hari P.

    2006-07-28

    Using the Landau Fermi liquid theory we discovered a new propagating transverse spin wave in a paramagnetic system which is driven slightly out of equilibrium without applying an external magnetic field. We find a gapless mode which describes the uniform precession of the magnetization in the absence of a magnetic field. We also find a gapped mode associated with the precession of the spin current around the internal field. The gapless mode has a quadratic dispersion leading to a T{sup 3/2} contribution to the specific heat. These modes significantly contribute to the dynamic structure function.

  18. Shear-wave Velocity Structure and Inter-Seismic Strain Accumulation in the Up-Dip Region of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Similarities to Tohoku?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Wei, M.

    2013-12-01

    The up-dip region of subduction zone thrusts is difficult to study using land-based seismic and geodetic networks, yet documenting its ability to store and release elastic strain is critical for understanding the mechanics of great subduction earthquakes and tsunami generation. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake produced extremely large slip in the shallowest portion of the subduction zone beneath a region of the fore-arc that is comprised of extremely low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments [Tsuru et al. JGR 2012]. The influence of the sediment material properties on the co-seismic slip distribution and tsunami generation can be considerable through both the effects on the dynamic wavefield during the rupture [Kozdon and Dunham, BSSA 2012] and potentially the build up of strain during the inter-seismic period. As part of the 2010-2011 SeaJade experiment [Scherwath et al, EOS 2011], we deployed 10 ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) on the continental slope offshore of Vancouver Island in the region of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. One goal of the experiment is to measure the shear modulus of the sediments lying above the subducting plate using the seafloor compliance technique. Using seafloor acceleration measured by broadband seismometer and seafloor pressure measured by Differential Pressure Gauge (DPG), we estimate the compliance spectrum in the infra-gravity wave band (~0.002-0.04 Hz) at 9 sites following the methodology of Crawford et al. [JGR, 1991]. We calibrated DPG sensitivities using laboratory measurements and by comparing teleseismic Rayleigh arrivals recorded on the seismometer and DPG channels [Webb, pers. comm]. We correct the vertical-component seismometer data for tilt using the procedure of Crawford and Webb [BSSA, 2000], Corrections for the gravitational attraction of the surface gravity waves [Crawford et al., JGR, 1998] are important at frequencies of 0.003-0.006 Hz only. Typically, the coherences are high (>0.7) in the 0.006 to 0.03 Hz range. We invert

  19. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  20. Nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, B. Edward

    2005-09-01

    A theory for nonlinear waves in marine sediments must account for the presence of a granular frame filled with water and possibly gas bubbles. When grains are in full contact, the stress-strain relation for the sediment contains a contribution varying as strain to the power 3/2, referred to as the Hertz force. The quadratic nonlinearity parameter derived from the second pressure derivative with respect to density thus diverges in the limit of small strain. We present a simple nonlinear wave equation model (a variant of the NPE) for compressional waves in marine sediments that avoids Taylor expansion and the problem of diverging nonlinearity parameter. An equation of state for partially consolidated sediments is derived from consolidation test results. Pressure is found to increase with overdensity to the power 5/2, indicating an increase in the number of contacts per grain as density increases. Numerical results for nonlinear compressional waves show agreement with analytic self-similar profiles derived from the nonlinear wave equation. [Work supported by the ONR.

  1. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  2. Scattering effects on lower hybrid wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Parker, R. R.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of edge plasma density fluctuations on the scattering of lower hybrid (LH) waves are studied. Scattering can improve the penetration of LH waves into the plasma core due to the k upshift that occurs through the poloidal field (because the rotation of k induces a finite poloidal mode number). Scattering can also inhibit wave penetration depending on the density fluctuation levels, resulting in enhanced collisional absorption of the waves in the SOL at high density. These two effects might contribute, respectively, to resolving the ``spectral gap'' problem [Bonoli P. T. and R. C. Englade, Phys. Fluids 9 (1986) 2937] and the ``density limit'' in the efficiency of LHCD [Wallace G. et al., Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010) 082508]. The scattering model used is based on the work of Bonoli and Ott [Phys. Fluids 25 (1982) 361] that introduces an electromagnetic wave kinetic equation solved by a Monte Carlo technique. This equation has been implemented in the ray tracing code GENRAY, which explicitly includes the SOL region. A detailed analysis of this scattering model will be presented in comparison with the experimental observations of LHCD for Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

  3. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  4. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  5. Migration of scattered teleseismic body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.; Rondenay, S.

    1999-06-01

    The retrieval of near-receiver mantle structure from scattered waves associated with teleseismic P and S and recorded on three-component, linear seismic arrays is considered in the context of inverse scattering theory. A Ray + Born formulation is proposed which admits linearization of the forward problem and economy in the computation of the elastic wave Green's function. The high-frequency approximation further simplifies the problem by enabling (1) the use of an earth-flattened, 1-D reference model, (2) a reduction in computations to 2-D through the assumption of 2.5-D experimental geometry, and (3) band-diagonalization of the Hessian matrix in the inverse formulation. The final expressions are in a form reminiscent of the classical diffraction stack of seismic migration. Implementation of this procedure demands an accurate estimate of the scattered wave contribution to the impulse response, and thus requires the removal of both the reference wavefield and the source time signature from the raw record sections. An approximate separation of direct and scattered waves is achieved through application of the inverse free-surface transfer operator to individual station records and a Karhunen-Loeve transform to the resulting record sections. This procedure takes the full displacement field to a wave vector space wherein the first principal component of the incident wave-type section is identified with the direct wave and is used as an estimate of the source time function. The scattered displacement field is reconstituted from the remaining principal components using the forward free-surface transfer operator, and may be reduced to a scattering impulse response upon deconvolution of the source estimate. An example employing pseudo-spectral synthetic seismograms demonstrates an application of the methodology.

  6. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  7. EMSL Contribution Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-12-01

    This Contribution Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSL’s workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSL’s long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2

  8. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves.

  9. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves. PMID:24580164

  10. Generating gravity waves with matter and electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P A.

    2008-05-15

    If a homogeneous plane lightlike shell collides head on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  11. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  12. Traveling-wave photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  13. Nonspreading Wave Packets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, M. V.; Balazs, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains properties of the Airy packet that show that quantum wave functions correspond to a family of orbits and not to a single particle. Introducing the Airy packet into elementary quantum mechanics courses is recommended. (HM)

  14. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Thioglycolate poisoning ... Below are symptoms of cold wave lotion poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Mouth irritation Burning and redness of the eyes Possibly serious damage to ...

  15. Heat Wave Safety Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a ... care for heat- related emergencies … ❏ Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes. ❏ ...

  16. Coupled wedge waves.

    PubMed

    Abell, Bradley C; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    The interface between two wedges can be treated as a displacement discontinuity characterized by elastic stiffnesses. By representing the boundary between the two quarter-spaces as a displacement discontinuity, coupled wedge waves were determined theoretically to be dispersive and to depend on the specific stiffness of the non-welded contact between the two wedges. Laboratory experiments on isotropic and anisotropic aluminum confirmed the theoretical prediction that the velocity of coupled wedge waves, for a non-welded interface, ranged continuously from the single wedge wave velocity at low stress to the Rayleigh velocity as the load applied normal to the interface was increased. Elastic waves propagating along the coupled wedges of two quarter-spaces in non-welded contact are found to exist theoretically even when the material properties of the two quarter-spaces are the same.

  17. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  18. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  19. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  20. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  1. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  2. Inventing the Wave Catchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Arthur

    1983-01-01

    Physicists and engineers advance the state of several arts in the design of gravitational-wave detection equipment. Provides background information and discusses the equipment (including laser interferometer), its use, and results of several experimental studies. (JN)

  3. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  4. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results.

  5. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  6. Wave Propagation Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, Kathleen; Petersson, Anders; Nilsson, Stefan; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  7. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  8. Imploding conical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, R. T.; Skews, B. W.; Rubidge, S.; Snow, J.

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of conical shock waves imploding axisymmetrically was first studied numerically by Hornung (J Fluid Mech 409:1-12, 2000) and this prompted a limited experimental investigation into these complex flow patterns by Skews et al. (Shock Waves 11:323-326, 2002). Modification of the simulation boundary conditions, resulting in the loss of self-similarity, was necessary to image the flow experimentally. The current tests examine the temporal evolution of these flows utilising a converging conical gap of fixed width fed by a shock wave impinging at its entrance, supported by CFD simulations. The effects of gap thickness, angle and incident shock strength were investigated. The wave initially diffracts around the outer lip of the gap shedding a vortex which, for strong incident shock cases, can contain embedded shocks. The converging shock at exit reflects on the axis of symmetry with the reflected wave propagating outwards resulting in a triple point developing on the incident wave together with the associated shear layer. This axisymmetric shear layer rolls up into a mushroom-shaped toroidal vortex ring and forward-facing jet. For strong shocks, this deforms the Mach disk to the extent of forming a second triple point with the primary shock exhibiting a double bulge. Separate features resembling the Richtmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were noted in some tests. Aside from the incident wave curvature, the reflection patterns demonstrated correspond well with the V- and DV-types identified by Hornung although type S was not clearly seen, possibly due to the occlusion of the reflection region by the outer diffraction vortex at these early times. Some additional computational work explicitly exploring the limits of the parameter space for such systems has demonstrated the existence of a possible further reflection type, called vN-type, which is similar to the von Neumann reflection for plane waves. It is recommended that the parameter space be

  9. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results. PMID:27415365

  10. Nonlinear Generalized Hydrodynamic Wave Equations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    A set of nonlinear equations for the study of low frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is derived using the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model and is used to study the modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbations. Dust compressibility contributions arising from strong Coulomb coupling effects are found to introduce significant modifications in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  11. Ion-Acoustic Waves in Self-Gravitaing Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anil

    2008-09-07

    The propagation and damping of low frequency ion-acoustic waves in steady state, unmagnetised, self-gravitating dusty plasma are studied taking into account two important damping mechanisms creation damping and Tromso damping. It is found that imaginary part of wave number is independent of frequency in case of creation damping. But when we consider the case of creation and Tromso damping together, an additional contribution to damping appears with the increase in frequency attributed to Tromso effect.

  12. Hadronic production of S-wave and P-wave charmed beauty mesons via heavy quark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.; Yuan, Tzu Chiang

    1995-02-01

    At hadron colliders the dominant production mechanism of ({bar b}c) mesons with large transverse momentum is due to parton fragmentation. The authors compute in a model-independent way the production rates and transverse momentum spectra for S-wave and P-wave ({bar b}c) mesons at the Tevatron via the direct fragmentation of the bottom antiquark as well as the Altarelli-Parisi induced gluon fragmentation. Since all the radially and orbitally excited ({bar b}c) mesons below the BD flavor threshold will cascade into the pseudoscalar ground state B{sub c} through electromagnetic and/or hadronic transitions, they all contribute to the inclusive production of B{sub c}. The contributions of the excited S-wave and P-wave states to the inclusive production of B{sub c} are 58 and 23%, respectively, and hence significant.

  13. Cascading nonlinearities in optical four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgonik, M.; Günter, P.

    1996-03-01

    In a crystal without inversion symmetry there exist two-step indirect contributions to third-order nonlinear optical processes (cascading). Contributions to optical four-wave mixing occur through optical rectification and linear electro-optic effects. In contrast to cascading by second-harmonic generation, which has to satisfy strict phase-matching conditions, optical rectification is always allowed. In polar KNbO3 crystals we measured four-wave mixing in several geometries to evaluate the direct contribution of the third-order polarizabilities and the cascaded contribution. We present a theoretical model and show experimentally that the cascading effect is large and that contributing polarization gratings must be transversely polarized.

  14. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  15. Ocean wave electric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.R.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating electricity from ocean waves. It consists of: 1.) a hollow buoyant duck positioned in the path of waves including a core about the center axis of which the duck rotates, a lower chamber portion having liquid therein and an upper chamber portion having air therein. The air is alternately compressed and expanded by the liquid in the chamber during the rotational motion of the duck caused by waves. A turbine mounted in the upper portion of the duck is driven by the compressed and expanded air. A generator is coupled to the turbine and operated to produce electrical energy and an air bulb; 2.) a spine having a transverse axial shaft anchoring the spine to the ocean floor. The upper portion of the spine engages the duck to maintain the duck in position. The spine has a curved configuration to concentrate and direct wave energy. The spine configuration acts as a scoop to increase the height of wave peaks and as a foil to increase the depth of wave troughs.

  16. Ion acoustic traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Burrows, R. H.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-04-01

    Models for traveling waves in multi-fluid plasmas give essential insight into fully nonlinear wave structures in plasmas, not readily available from either numerical simulations or from weakly nonlinear wave theories. We illustrate these ideas using one of the simplest models of an electron-proton multi-fluid plasma for the case where there is no magnetic field or a constant normal magnetic field present. We show that the traveling waves can be reduced to a single first-order differential equation governing the dynamics. We also show that the equations admit a multi-symplectic Hamiltonian formulation in which both the space and time variables can act as the evolution variable. An integral equation useful for calculating adiabatic, electrostatic solitary wave signatures for multi-fluid plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios is presented. The integral equation arises naturally from a fluid dynamics approach for a two fluid plasma, with a given mass ratio of the two species (e.g. the plasma could be an electron-proton or an electron-positron plasma). Besides its intrinsic interest, the integral equation solution provides a useful analytical test for numerical codes that include a proton-electron mass ratio as a fundamental constant, such as for particle in cell (PIC) codes. The integral equation is used to delineate the physical characteristics of ion acoustic traveling waves consisting of hot electron and cold proton fluids.

  17. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  18. Sea salt CCN contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Jha, V.; Noble, S.

    2011-12-01

    Volatility measurements (Twomey 1971; Hudson and Da 1996) showed that most CCN over the ocean are not NaCl. However, other reports indicate NaCl as a major CCN component. Here we contrast cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral volatility (thermal fractionation) measurements from three aircraft field projects to provide insight into the relative contribution of sea salt. The most remote location, PASE (mid-Pacific), had the highest average CCN concentrations (NCCN) probably because it was the least cloudy whereas the less remote, but more cloudy,RICO(Caribbean)had the lowest average NCCN (Hudson and Noble 2009). In RICO particle concentrations in all size ranges larger than 0.3 micrometers were well correlated with wind speed (R ~ 0.87) but uncorrelated with NCCN (Fig. 1A). Smaller particles in RICO were correlated with NCCN but uncorrelated with wind speed. In PASE only particles larger than 10 micrometers were correlated with wind speed and concentrations in these size ranges were uncorrelated with NCCN. Particles smaller than 10 micrometers in PASE were uncorrelated with wind speed but well correlated with NCCN. In both projects particle concentrations smaller than these respective sizes were highly correlated with NCCN, at all S in PASE but mainly with NCCN at high S in RICO. CCN volatility measurements showed high correlations between refractory NCCN and wind speed, especially for low supersaturation (S) NCCN, and no correlation of volatile NCCN at all S with wind speed. In PASE there was only a weak positive correlation between refractory NCCN and wind and also no correlation between volatile NCCN and wind. These results indicate that in clean maritime air the wind originated component of NCCN can be substantial (i.e., > 30% for wind > 14 m/s) but that in maritime air with higher NCCN the wind derived CCN component is probably less than 10%. The contrast in cloudiness between the two projects was responsible for many of the differences noted between them. A

  19. A survey of electrostatic waves in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Barbosa, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 plasma wave instruments have provided initial observations of electrostatic waves in Saturn's magnetosphere. In general, the emissions at Saturn are similar to those found at earth and Jupiter, although there are significant differences in some of the detailed characteristics. In this paper an overview is presented of the various types of electrostatic waves in the Saturnian magnetosphere, including Langmuir waves and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions. The temporal and spectral character, amplitude, and regions of occurrence for the various classes of emissions are summarized. These characteristics are compared with those of the terrestrial and Jovian counterparts with the goal of understanding how major differences in the magnetospheric configuration might contribute to the observed differences. Finally, the theory of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions is used to gain an insight into the electron distributions and possible wave-particle interactions in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  20. A NEW VIEW OF CORONAL WAVES FROM STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S.; Lin, J.; Zhao, S.; Li, Q.; Chen, P. F.; Chen, H.

    2009-12-10

    On 2007 December 7, there was an eruption from AR 10977, which also hosted a sigmoid. An EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave associated with this eruption was observed by EUVI on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). Using EUVI images in the 171 A and the 195 A passbands from both STEREO A and B, we study the morphology and kinematics of this EIT wave. In the early stages, images of the EIT wave from the two STEREO spacecrafts differ markedly. We determine that the EUV fronts observed at the very beginning of the eruption likely include some intensity contribution from the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Additionally, our velocity measurements suggest that the EIT wave front may propagate at nearly constant velocity. Both results offer constraints on current models and understanding of EIT waves.

  1. Seasonal mean temperature changes control future heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüeso, Daniel; Di Luca, Alejandro; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Increased temperature will result in longer, more frequent, and more intense heat waves. Changes in temperature variability have been deemed necessary to account for future heat wave characteristics. However, this has been quantified only in Europe and North America, while the rest of the globe remains unexplored. Using late century global climate projections, we show that annual mean temperature increases is the key factor defining heat wave changes in most regions. We find that commonly studied areas are an exception rather than the standard and the mean climate change signal generally outweighs any influence from variability changes. More importantly, differences in warming across seasons are responsible for most of the heat wave changes and their consideration relegates the contribution of variability to a marginal role. This reveals that accurately capturing mean seasonal changes is crucial to estimate future heat waves and reframes our interpretation of future temperature extremes.

  2. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-01-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in ‘excess’ quantities which were treated as wave-related. Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)). Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e. pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave. PMID:25015922

  3. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-09-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in 'excess' quantities which were treated as wave-related.Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)).Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e.pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave.

  4. Rain waves-wind waves interaction application to scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharif, C.; Giovanangeli, J. P.; Bliven, L.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of a rain wave pattern by longer waves has been studied. An analytical model taking into account capillarity effects and obliquity of short waves has been developed. Modulation rates in wave number and amplitude have been computed. Experiments were carried out in a wave tank. First results agree with theoretical models, but higher values of modulation rates are measured. These results could be taken into account for understanding the radar response from the sea surface during rain.

  5. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  6. Surface-wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Source processes commonly posed to explain instances of remote dynamic triggering of tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor by surface waves include frictional failure and various modes of fluid activation. The relative potential for Love- and Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses to trigger tectonic tremor through failure on critically stressed thrust and vertical strike-slip faults under the Coulomb-Griffith failure criteria as a function of incidence angle is anticorrelated over the 15- to 30-km-depth range that hosts tectonic tremor. Love-wave potential is high for strike-parallel incidence on low-angle reverse faults and null for strike-normal incidence; the opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. Love-wave potential is high for both strike-parallel and strike-normal incidence on vertical, strike-slip faults and minimal for ~45?? incidence angles. The opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. This pattern is consistent with documented instances of tremor triggered by Love waves incident on the Cascadia mega-thrust and the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California resulting from shear failure on weak faults (apparent friction, ????? 0.2). However, documented instances of tremor triggered by surface waves with strike-parallel incidence along the Nankai megathrust beneath Shikoku, Japan, is associated primarily with Rayleigh waves. This is consistent with the tremor bursts resulting from mixed-mode failure (crack opening and shear failure) facilitated by near-lithostatic ambient pore pressure, low differential stress, with a moderate friction coefficient (?? ~ 0.6) on the Nankai subduction interface. Rayleigh-wave dilatational stress is relatively weak at tectonic tremor source depths and seems unlikely to contribute significantly to the triggering process, except perhaps for an indirect role on the SAF in sustaining tremor into the Rayleigh-wave coda that was initially triggered by Love waves.

  7. Understanding Stokes forces in the wave-averaged equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-05-01

    The wave-averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations describe the dynamics of upper ocean flow interacting with nonbreaking, not steep, surface gravity waves. This paper formulates the wave effects in these equations in terms of three contributions to momentum: Stokes advection, Stokes Coriolis force, and Stokes shear force. Each contribution scales with a distinctive parameter. Moreover, these contributions affect the turbulence energetics differently from each other such that the classification of instabilities is possible accordingly. Stokes advection transfers energy between turbulence and Eulerian mean-flow kinetic energy, and its form also parallels the advection of tracers such as salinity, buoyancy, and potential vorticity. Stokes shear force transfers energy between turbulence and surface waves. The Stokes Coriolis force can also transfer energy between turbulence and waves, but this occurs only if the Stokes drift fluctuates. Furthermore, this formulation elucidates the unique nature of Stokes shear force and also allows direct comparison of Stokes shear force with buoyancy. As a result, the classic Langmuir instabilities of Craik and Leibovich, wave-balanced fronts and filaments, Stokes perturbations of symmetric and geostrophic instabilities, the wavy Ekman layer, and the wavy hydrostatic balance are framed in terms of intuitive physical balances.

  8. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  9. Partial Wave Dispersion Relations: Application to Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of partial wave dispersion relations (DR's) as the way of solving the long-standing problem of correctly incorporating exchange in a valid DR for electron-atom scattering. In particular a method is given for effectively calculating the contribution of the discontinuity and/or poles of the partial wave amplitude which occur in the negative E plane. The method is successfully tested in three cases: (i) the analytically solvable exponential potential, (ii) the Hartree potential, and (iii) the S-wave exchange approximation for electron-hydrogen scattering.

  10. A numerical model for gravity wave dissipation in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.; Cole, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    Two simplified models have been developed for the internal gravity wave dissipation due to viscosity, thermal conduction, and ion-drag in a multilayered, isothermal thermosphere. Both models use the WKB approximation, ray theory, and the time-averaged equations of gravity wave energy conservation. One model uses all the equations appropriate to a dissipative atmosphere, while the other uses the dispersion equation and polarization relations applicable to a nondissipative atmosphere, neglecting the viscous and thermal conduction contributions to the energy flux. Results from these models are compared to each other and to the results obtained by Klostermeyer (1973), using a full-wave model.

  11. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE OSCILLATION OF AN EXPANDING CORONAL LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2011-10-01

    We simulated an expanding loop or slow coronal mass ejection (CME) in the solar corona dimensioned with size parameters taken from real coronal expanding loops observed with the STEREO spacecraft. We find that the loop expands to Sun's size within about one hour, consistent with slow CME observations. At the top of the loop, plasma is being blown off the loop, enabled with the reconnection between the loop's flux rope magnetic field and the radial magnetic field of the Sun, thus yielding feeding material for the formation of the slow solar wind. This mechanism is in accordance with the observed blob formation of the slow solar wind. We find wave packets traveling with local sound speed downward toward the footpoints of the loop, already seen in coronal seismology observations and simulations of stationary coronal loops. Here, we generalize these results for an expanding medium. We also find a reflection of the wave packets, identified as slow magnetoacoustic waves, at the footpoints of the loop. This confirms the formation of standing waves within the coronal loop. In particular, the reflected waves can partly escape the loop top and contribute to the heating of the solar wind. The present study improves our understanding on how loop material can emerge to form blobs, major ingredients of slow CMEs, and how the release of the wave energy stored in slow magnetoacoustic waves, and transported away from the Sun within expanding loops, contributes to the acceleration and formation of the slow solar wind.

  12. Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

  13. Hydromagnetic waves at low latitudes - A symposium review from the fifth IAGA assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the symposium was to bring together investigators with interests in low latitude hydromagnetic waves in order to review the present state of knowledge in this area of magnetospheric physics. Of particular importance is the means by which wave energy is transferred to low latitudes to produce geomagnetic pulsations on the ground. The group of contributed papers reviewed shows that definitive experiments are underway and new theories capable of providing resonant wave energy at low latitudes are being developed. Particular topics covered by the review include solar wind control, wave spectra, array studies of wave parameters, storm time waves, and global wave resonance theory involving the coupling of compressional and transverse waves in the magnetosphere.

  14. Tsunami focusing and leading wave height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Utku

    2016-04-01

    Field observations from tsunami events show that sometimes the maximum tsunami amplitude might not occur for the first wave, such as the maximum wave from the 2011 Japan tsunami reaching to Papeete, Tahiti as a fourth wave 72 min later after the first wave. This might mislead local authorities and give a wrong sense of security to the public. Recently, Okal and Synolakis (2016, Geophys. J. Int. 204, 719-735) discussed "the factors contributing to the sequencing of tsunami waves in the far field." They consider two different generation mechanisms through an axial symmetric source -circular plug; one, Le Mehaute and Wang's (1995, World Scientific, 367 pp.) formalism where irritational wave propagation is formulated in the framework of investigating tsunamis generated by underwater explosions and two, Hammack's formulation (1972, Ph.D. Dissertation, Calif. Inst. Tech., 261 pp., Pasadena) which introduces deformation at the ocean bottom and does not represent an immediate deformation of the ocean surface, i.e. time dependent ocean surface deformation. They identify the critical distance for transition from the first wave being largest to the second wave being largest. To verify sequencing for a finite length source, Okal and Synolakis (2016) is then used NOAA's validated and verified real time forecasting numerical model MOST (Titov and Synolakis, 1998, J. Waterw. Port Coast. Ocean Eng., 124, 157-171) through Synolakis et al. (2008, Pure Appl. Geophys. 165, 2197-2228). As a reference, they used the parameters of the 1 April 2014 Iquique, Chile earthquake over real bathymetry, variants of this source (small, big, wide, thin, and long) over a flat bathymetry, and 2010 Chile and 211 Japan tsunamis over both real and flat bathymetries to explore the influence of the fault parameters on sequencing. They identified that sequencing more influenced by the source width rather than the length. We extend Okal and Synolakis (2016)'s analysis to an initial N-wave form (Tadepalli

  15. Modelling Ocean Surface Waves in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, Lucia; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew; Bertino, Laurent; Williams, Timothy; Nurser, George A. J.

    2015-04-01

    agreement with observations. In addition to our global implementation, the method is currently also tested in the TOPAZ framework (Towards an Operational Prediction system for the North Atlantic European Coastal Zones). We will discuss the two modeling strategies (global 35 km resolution and pan-Arctic 3 km resolution) and analyse model biases. The study contributes to the EU FP7 project 'Ships and Waves Reaching Polar Regions (SWARP)', aimed at developing techniques for sea ice and waves modelling and forecasting in the MIZ in the Arctic. The method will be implemented as part of the EU Global Monitoring and Environmental Security system GMES.

  16. Partial-wave expansions of angular spectra of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2006-11-01

    Focused electromagnetic beams are frequently modeled by either an angular spectrum of plane waves or a partial-wave sum of spherical multipole waves. The connection between these two beam models is explored here. The partial-wave expansion of an angular spectrum containing evanescent components is found to possess only odd partial waves. On the other hand, the partial-wave expansion of an alternate angular spectrum constructed so as to be free of evanescent components contains all partial waves but describes a propagating beam with a small amount of standing-wave component mixed in. A procedure is described for minimizing the standing-wave component so as to more accurately model a purely forward propagating experimental beam.

  17. Partial-wave expansions of angular spectra of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, James A.

    2006-11-01

    Focused electromagnetic beams are frequently modeled by either an angular spectrum of plane waves or a partial-wave sum of spherical multipole waves. The connection between these two beam models is explored here. The partial-wave expansion of an angular spectrum containing evanescent components is found to possess only odd partial waves. On the other hand, the partial-wave expansion of an alternate angular spectrum constructed so as to be free of evanescent components contains all partial waves but describes a propagating beam with a small amount of standing-wave component mixed in. A procedure is described for minimizing the standing-wave component so as to more accurately model a purely forward propagating experimental beam.

  18. Longitudinal shear wave and transverse dilatational wave in solids.

    PubMed

    Catheline, S; Benech, N

    2015-02-01

    Dilatation wave involves compression and extension and is known as the curl-free solution of the elastodynamic equation. Shear wave on the contrary does not involve any change in volume and is the divergence-free solution. This letter seeks to examine the elastodynamic Green's function through this definition. By separating the Green's function in divergence-free and curl-free terms, it appears first that, strictly speaking, the longitudinal wave is not a pure dilatation wave and the transverse wave is neither a pure shear wave. Second, not only a longitudinal shear wave but also a transverse dilatational wave exists. These waves are shown to be a part of the solution known as coupling terms. Their special motion is carefully described and illustrated.

  19. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  20. Bent Marshak Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hammer, J H

    2005-10-11

    Radiation driven heat waves (Marshak Waves) are ubiquitous in astrophysics and terrestrial laser driven high energy density plasma physics (HEDP) experiments. Generally, the equations describing Marshak waves are so nonlinear, that solutions involving more than one spatial dimension require simulation. However, in this paper we show how one may analytically solve the problem of the two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a Marshak wave, bounded by lossy walls, using an asymptotic expansion in a parameter related to the wall albedo and a simplification of the heat front equation of motion. Three parameters determine the nonlinear evolution, a modified Markshak diffusion constant, a smallness parameter related to the wall albedo, and the spacing of the walls. The final nonlinear solution shows that the Marshak wave will be both slowed and bent by the non-ideal boundary. In the limit of a perfect boundary, the solution recovers the original diffusion-like solution of Marshak. The analytic solution will be compared to a limited set of simulation results and experimental data.

  1. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  2. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  3. ULF Wave Electromagnetic Energy Flux into the Ionosphere: Joule Heating Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M.; Moldwin, M.; Zou, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves - such as standing Alfven waves - are one mechanism for coupling the inner magnetosphere to the Earth's ionosphere. For example, they transfer energy from the solar wind or ring current into the Earth's ionosphere via Joule heating. In this study, we use NASA Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite data to investigate the spatial, frequency, and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ULF wave Poynting vector (electromagnetic energy flux) mapped to the ionosphere. We use these measurements to estimate Joule heating rates. We compare these rates to empirical models of Joule heating associated with large scale, static (on ULF wave timescales) current systems, finding that ULF waves usually contribute little to the global, integrated Joule heating rate. However, there are extreme cases when ULF waves make significant contributions to global Joule heating. Finally, we find ULF waves routinely make significant contributions to local Joule heating rates near the noon and midnight local time sectors, where static current systems nominally contribute less to Joule heating; the most important contributions come from lower frequency (<7 mHz) waves.

  4. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  5. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to l0(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross- diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  6. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to 10(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross-diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  7. Sensitivity of wind waves to hurricane wind characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqing; Xie, Lian; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.; Bao, Shaowu

    In this study, the influence of the spatial and temporal variability of hurricane winds, storm translation speed, intensity, and ambient wind field on surface wind waves are investigated by using a third-generation wave model (Simulating WAves Nearshore, or SWAN). The results show that the asymmetric structure of wind-induced wave field is sensitive not only to the asymmetric structure of the hurricane wind field, but also to the variations in the storm translation speed and intensity. The significant wave height (SWH) in the front-right quadrant of the storm rises as storm translation speed increases until it reaches a critical value, then the SWH drops. The opposite occurs in the rear-left quadrant. The total contribution of the hurricane translation speed to the asymmetric structure of the wave field also depends on the intensity of the hurricane. As the intensity of the hurricane increases, the relative significance of the influence of the translation speed on the asymmetric structure of the wave field decreases. Most parametric hurricane wind models can only model symmetric hurricanes and do not include background winds. However, actual hurricanes in nature are not only asymmetric but also imbedded in background winds. Thus, to more properly model hurricane-induced wave field, it is important to consider storm asymmetry, translation speed, intensity, as well as background winds.

  8. On the relative scattering of P- and S-waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, P. E.; Phinney, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a single-scattering approximation, equations for the scattering attenuation coefficients of P-body and S-body waves are derived. The results are discussed in the light of the energy-renormalization approaches of Wu (1980, 1982) and Sato (1982) to seismic wave scattering. Practical methods for calculating the scattering attenuation coefficients for various earth models are emphasized. The conversions of P-waves to S-waves and S-waves to P-waves are included in the theory. The earth models are assumed to be randomly inhomogeneous, with their properties known only through their average-wavenumber power spectra. The power spectra are approximated with piecewise constant functions, each segment of which contributes to the net frequency-dependent scattering attenuation coefficient. The smallest and largest wavenumbers of a segment can be plotted along with the wavevectors of the incident and scattered waves on a wavenumber diagram. This diagram gives a geometric interpretation for the frequency behavior associated with each spectral segment, including a transition peak that is due entirely to the wavenumber limits of the segment. For regions of the earth where the inhomogeneity spectra are concentrated in a band of wavenumbers, it should be possible to observe such a peak in the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. Both the frequency and distance limits on the accuracy of the theoretical results are given.

  9. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  10. Upstream waves at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Weak, about 0.15 nT, narrow band emissions at the proton gyro frequency are observed by the Phobos magnetometer MAGMA, upstream from the bow shock of Mars. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized. They may be associated with the pick up of protons from the Martian hydrogen exosphere. Strong turbulence, similar to that observed at the terrestrial bow shock, is found on occasion in the upstream region when the IMF connects to the bow shock. On two occasions this turbulence occurred when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos. This coincidence raises the possibility that material in the orbits of Phobos interacts with the solar wind in such a way to either affect the direction of the IMF or to cause instabilities in the solar wind plasma. However, since on a third occasion these waves did not occur, these waves may be shock associated rather than Phobos associated.

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  12. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  13. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  14. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  15. Electromagnetic wave test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, R. K.; Stepanek, S. A.

    Electromagnetic wave testing, which represents a relatively new test technique that involves the union of several disciplines (aerothermodynamics, electromagnetics, materials/structures, and advanced diagnostics) is introduced. The essence of this new technique deals with the transmission and possible distortion of electromagnetic waves (RF or IR) as they pass through the bow shock, flow field, and electromagnetic window of a missile flying at hypersonic speeds. Variations in gas density along the optical path can cause significant distortion of the electromagnetic waves and, therefore the missile seeker system may not effectively track the target. Two specific test techniques are described. The first example deals with the combining of a wind tunnel and an RF range while the second example discusses the complexities of evaluating IR seeker system performance.

  16. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  17. CRRES plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Odem, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The CRRES plasma wave experiment is designed to provide information on the plasma wave environment and the total plasma density in the Earth's radiation belts and throughout the CRRES orbit. This information is valuable both for studying the naturally occurring wave-particle interactions affecting the plasma and particle environment in the plasmasphere and magnetosphere as well as for studying the chemical releases. The electric field sensors for this instrument consist of two long electric dipole antennas (about 100 m tip-to-tip), and the magnetic field sensor is a search coil magnetometer mounted at the end of a 6-m boom. The instrument has a 14-channel spectrum analyzer covering the frequency range from 5.6 Hz to 10 kHz, and a 128-step sweep frequency receiver covering the frequency range from 100 Hz to 400 kHz.

  18. Traveling wave tube circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A traveling wave tube (TWT) has a slow wave structure (SWS) which is severed into two or more sections. A signal path, connects the end of an SWS section to the beginning of the following SWS section. The signal path comprises an impedance matching coupler (IMC), followed by an isolator, a variable phase shifter, and a second IMC. The aggregate band pass characteristic of the components in the signal path is chosen to reject, or strongly attenuate, all frequencies outside the desired operating frequency range of the TWT and yet pass, with minimal attenuation in the forward direction, all frequencies within the desired operating frequency range. The isolator is chosen to reject, or strongly attenuate, waves, of all frequencies, which propagate in the backward direction. The aggregate phase shift characteristic of the components in the signal path is chosen to apply signal power to the beginning of the following SWS section with the phase angle yielding maximum efficiency.

  19. Solitary water wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, W.; Guyenne, P.; Hammack, J.; Henderson, D.; Sulem, C.

    2006-05-01

    This article concerns the pairwise nonlinear interaction of solitary waves in the free surface of a body of water lying over a horizontal bottom. Unlike solitary waves in many completely integrable model systems, solitary waves for the full Euler equations do not collide elastically; after interactions, there is a nonzero residual wave that trails the post-collision solitary waves. In this report on new numerical and experimental studies of such solitary wave interactions, we verify that this is the case, both in head-on collisions (the counterpropagating case) and overtaking collisions (the copropagating case), quantifying the degree to which interactions are inelastic. In the situation in which two identical solitary waves undergo a head-on collision, we compare the asymptotic predictions of Su and Mirie [J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980)] and Byatt-Smith [J. Fluid Mech. 49, 625 (1971)], the wavetank experiments of Maxworthy [J. Fluid Mech. 76, 177 (1976)], and the numerical results of Cooker, Weidman, and Bale [J. Fluid Mech. 342, 141 (1997)] with independent numerical simulations, in which we quantify the phase change, the run-up, and the form of the residual wave and its Fourier signature in both small- and large-amplitude interactions. This updates the prior numerical observations of inelastic interactions in Fenton and Rienecker [J. Fluid Mech. 118, 411 (1982)]. In the case of two nonidentical solitary waves, our precision wavetank experiments are compared with numerical simulations, again observing the run-up, phase lag, and generation of a residual from the interaction. Considering overtaking solitary wave interactions, we compare our experimental observations, numerical simulations, and the asymptotic predictions of Zou and Su [Phys. Fluids 29, 2113 (1986)], and again we quantify the inelastic residual after collisions in the simulations. Geometrically, our numerical simulations of overtaking interactions fit into the three categories of Korteweg-deVries two

  20. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  1. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  2. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  3. Human waves in stadiums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, I.; Helbing, D.; Vicsek, T.

    2003-12-01

    Mexican wave first widely broadcasted during the 1986 World Cup held in Mexico, is a human wave moving along the stands of stadiums as one section of spectators stands up, arms lifting, then sits down as the next section does the same. Here we use variants of models originally developed for the description of excitable media to demonstrate that this collective human behaviour can be quantitatively interpreted by methods of statistical physics. Adequate modelling of reactions to triggering attempts provides a deeper insight into the mechanisms by which a crowd can be stimulated to execute a particular pattern of behaviour and represents a possible tool of control during events involving excited groups of people. Interactive simulations, video recordings and further images are available at the webpage dedicated to this work: http://angel.elte.hu/wave.

  4. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  5. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Lan K.; Boardsen, Scott; Moya, Pablo; Stevens, Michael; Alexander, Robert; Vinas, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency (fpc) have been found sporadically in the solar wind from 0.3 to 0.7 AU during MESSENGER spacecraft’s cruise phase. These waves are transverse and circularly polarized, and they propagate in directions quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The wave power decreases quadratically with heliocentric distance, faster than the trend if assuming the conservation of Poynting flux for wave packets, suggesting there is energy dissipation from the waves, which could contribute to the heating and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Although the wave frequency is a few times of fpc in the spacecraft frame, it is a fraction of fpc in the solar wind plasma frame after removing the Doppler shift effect. In this frequency range, the waves can be left-hand (LH) polarized ion cyclotron waves or right-hand (RH) polarized magnetosonic waves. Because the waves are LH or RH polarized in the spacecraft frame with otherwise nearly identical characteristics, they could be due to Doppler shift of a same type of waves or a mixture of waves with intrinsically different polarizations. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting wave events in 2005 using high-cadence magnetic field data from the Wind mission. Statistically, in contrast with general solar wind, the protons at these waves are distributed closer to the proton instability thresholds, while the alpha particles at these waves are distributed further away from the alpha instability thresholds. For selected events of extensive waves, the ion distribution is analyzed in detail. A mixture of temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as proton beam drift are often found in such events. We conduct linear wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments to examine whether these waves can be explained by the local generation of kinetic instabilities such as the LH ion cyclotron, the RH

  6. Ring Current Dynamic in the Presence of EMIC Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of EMIC waves, generated by a positive ion temperature anisotropy on Earth s RC ions is one of the best known examples of wave-particle interaction in the magnetosphere and the most controversial mechanism of RC losses. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons with energy 21 MeV can be removed from the outer RB by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm much faster than by any other loss mechanisms. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves is a very critical part of the NASA LWS program. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch- angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) LHW are included as an additional factor that contributes to saturation process of EMIC waves; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  7. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  8. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  9. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  10. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Shock wave treatment in medicine.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, S K; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. PMID:15933416

  12. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  13. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  14. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  15. Quantum wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeri, M. B.; Putterman, S. J.; Garcia, A.; Roberts, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear quantum kinetic equation for the interaction of sound waves is solved via analytic and numerical techniques. In the classical regime energy cascades to higher frequency (ω) according to the steady-state power law ω-3/2. In the quantum limit, the system prefers a reverse cascade of energy which follows the power law ω-6. Above a critical flux, a new type of spectrum appears which is neither self-similar nor close to equilibrium. This state of nonlinear quantum wave turbulence represents a flow of energy directly from the classical source to the quantum degrees of freedom.

  16. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  17. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  18. Offshore wave energy experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, K.; Scholten, N.C.; Soerensen, K.A. |

    1995-12-31

    This article describes the second phase of the off-shore wave energy experiment, taking place in the Danish part of the North Sea near Hanstholm. The wave power converter is a scale model consisting of a float 2.5 meter in diameter connected by rope to a seabed mounted piston pump installed on 25 meter deep water 2,5 km offshore. The structure, installation procedure results and experience gained during the test period will be presented and compared to calculations based on a computer model.

  19. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  20. Wave Motion Electric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, E. F.; Winkler, R. J.

    1983-12-27

    Set out herein is an electrical generator conformed for installation in a buoy, the generator comprising an inverted pendulum having two windings formed at the free end thereof and aligned to articulate between two end stops each provided with a magnetic circuit. As the loops thus pass through the magnetic circuit, electrical current is induced which may be rectified through a full way rectifier to charge up a storage battery. The buoy itself may be ballasted to have its fundamental resonance at more than double the wave frequency with the result that during each passing of a wave at least two induction cycles occur.

  1. Standing waves braneworlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Mantidze, Irakli; Sakhelashvili, Otari; Shengelia, Tsotne

    2016-05-01

    The class of nonstationary braneworld models generated by the coupled gravitational and scalar fields is reviewed. The model represents a brane in a spacetime with single time and one large (infinite) and several small (compact) spacelike extra dimensions. In some particular cases the model has the solutions corresponding to the bulk gravi-scalar standing waves bounded by the brane. Pure gravitational localization mechanism of matter particles on the node of standing waves, where the brane is placed, is discussed. Cosmological applications of the model is also considered.

  2. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  3. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hideaki; Orihara, Hideo; Sato, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author's laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship's motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process.

  4. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  5. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  6. The role of Biot slow waves in electroseismic wave phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pride, Steven R; Garambois, Stéphane

    2002-02-01

    The electromagnetic fields that are generated as a spherical seismic wave (either P or S) traverses an interface separating two porous materials are numerically modeled both with and without the generation of Biot slow waves at the interface. In the case of an incident fast-P wave, the predicted electric-field amplitudes when slow waves are neglected can easily be off by as much as an order of magnitude. In the case of an incident S wave, the error is much smaller (typically on the order of 10% or less) because not much S-wave energy gets converted into slow waves. In neglecting the slow waves, only six plane waves (reflected and transmitted fast-P, S, and EM waves) are available with which to match the eight continuity conditions that hold at each interface. This overdetermined problem is solved by placing weights on the eight continuity conditions so that those conditions that are most important for obtaining the proper response are emphasized. It is demonstrated that when slow waves are neglected, it is best to also neglect the continuity of the Darcy flow and fluid pressure across an interface. The principal conclusion of this work is that to properly model the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated at an interface by an incident seismic wave, the full Biot theory that allows for generation of slow waves must be employed.

  7. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Lakhina, Gurbax; Remya, Banhu; Lee, Lou

    2016-04-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency and quasicoherency for: electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and plasmaspheric hiss waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively. This will be important for modeling purposes. Perhaps even more important is how coherent waves affect wave-particle interactions. Specific wave examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rate for energetic electrons is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves).

  8. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  9. Generating electromagnetic waves from gravity waves in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P. A.; O'Farrell, S.

    2009-05-15

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys. Rev. D 62, 101501(R) (2000)].

  10. Submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Ward, John (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In an embodiment, a submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver includes a finline ortho-mode transducer comprising thin tapered metallic fins deposited on a thin dielectric substrate to separate a vertically polarized electromagnetic mode from a horizontally polarized electromagnetic mode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  11. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  12. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  13. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  14. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  15. mm-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, H. P.

    1985-07-01

    The present low profile seeker front end's slotted waveguide antenna was primarily developed to investigate the feasibility of the application of standard manufacturing techniques to mm-wave hardware. A dual plane monopulse comparator was constructed to mate with the antenna via integrated packaging techniques. The comparator was fabricated by CAD/CAM milling operations.

  16. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  17. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  18. Waves and Crops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses wave patterns on the surfaces of ripening wheat and barley crops when the wind is moderately strong. Examines the structure of the turbulence over such natural surfaces and conditions under which the crop may be damaged by the wind. (JR)

  19. Oblique detonation wave ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Two conceptual designs of the oblique detonation wave ramjet are presented. The performance is evaluated for stoichiometric hydrogen-air equivalence ratios of phi = 1/3, 2/3 and 1 for a range of flight Mach numbers from 6 to 10.

  20. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  1. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water.

  2. Localized coherence of freak waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifah, Arnida L.; van Groesen, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates in detail a possible mechanism of energy convergence leading to freak waves. We give examples of a freak wave as a (weak) pseudo-maximal wave to illustrate the importance of phase coherence. Given a time signal at a certain position, we identify parts of the time signal with successive high amplitudes, so-called group events, that may lead to a freak wave using wavelet transform analysis. The local coherence of the critical group event is measured by its time spreading of the most energetic waves. Four types of signals have been investigated: dispersive focusing, normal sea condition, thunderstorm condition and an experimental irregular wave. In all cases presented in this paper, it is shown that a high correlation exists between the local coherence and the appearance of a freak wave. This makes it plausible that freak waves can be developed by local interactions of waves in a wave group and that the effect of waves that are not in the immediate vicinity is minimal. This indicates that a local coherence mechanism within a wave group can be one mechanism that leads to the appearance of a freak wave.

  3. Coded excitation plane wave imaging for shear wave motion detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2015-07-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave SNR compared with conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2 to 4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (body mass index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue.

  4. Advances in understanding the gravity wave spectrum during MAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    Prior to MAP, virtually nothing was known about gravity wave spectra in the atmosphere. The development of observational techniques has played a major role in these studies. Radar and lidar have been particularly important since they can measure atmospheric parameters continuously over large height ranges. Some advances made are: (1) The observed fluctuations and power spectra in the free atmosphere are mostly if not entirely due to a superposition of gravity waves, which can be modeled by the Garrett Munk (GM) model; (2) There is no evidence that 2-D turbulence makes a significant contribution to the observed fluctuations. In any case, the agreement between observations and the GM model shows that the 2DT contribution must be relatively small; (3) Spectra versus vertical wave number are saturated at large wave number, with theory and observations indicating that t approximately equals 3; and (4) Vertical velocity fluctuations and spectra measured near rough terrain are strongly contaminated by mountain waves. But over very flat terrain the spectra are dominated by gravity waves at periods shorter than about 6 hours and apparently by synoptic scale velocities at periods longer than 6 hours. Thus it may be possible to study synoptic scale vertical velocities using radars located in very flat terrain.

  5. [Heat waves: health impacts].

    PubMed

    Marto, Natália

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health

  6. Quantum wave packet revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (‘minipackets’ or ‘clones’) is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  7. Selection of Spiral Waves in Excitable Media with a Phase Wave at the Wave Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, V. S.; Oikawa, N.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2011-12-01

    Universal relationships between the medium excitability and the angular velocity and the core radius of rigidly rotating spiral waves in excitable media are derived for situations where the wave front is a trigger wave and the wave back is a phase wave. Two universal limits restricting the region of existence of spiral waves in the parameter space are demonstrated. The predictions of the free-boundary approach are in good quantitative agreement with results from numerical reaction-diffusion simulations performed on the Kessler-Levine model.

  8. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  9. Ion Cyclotron Waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Cowee, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The observation of ion cyclotron waves was generally expected well before Cassini arrived at Titan in 2004, because strong ion cyclotron waves were seen at Io where its atmosphere interacted with the corotating magnetospheric plasma. However, the region of the interaction of the Saturnian magnetospheric plasma with the Titan atmosphere has been quite devoid of ion cyclotron waves. Finally, on pass T63, ion cyclotron waves were seen briefly. More recently, on pass T98, a longer sequence of ion cyclotron waves also occurred. On pass T63, the pick-up ion signature is that of both H+ and H2+, while on pass T98, only H+ ion cyclotron waves are observed. We examine the strength of these waves and their region of occurrence in the light of our previous work on the expected occurrence of these waves.

  10. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  11. Creation of multihole molecular wave packets via strong-field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus; Gonzalez, Leticia; Nichols, Sarah

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate the creation of vibrational wave packets on multiple electronic states of a molecule via strong-field ionization. Furthermore, we show that the relative contribution of the different electronic states depends on the shape of the laser pulse which launches the wave packets.

  12. Manipulating light waves: introduction.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Randy A; Hoover, Brian G; Zalevsky, Zeev; John Caulfield, H

    2008-02-01

    This special Applied Optics issue pays tribute to an extraordinary teacher, scientist, and friend who revolutionized several fields of optics, such as holography, microscopy, and biomedical imaging, by contributing his unique and simplified perspective on complicated phenomena. We thank all the authors who have contributed papers to this special feature as a manifestation of the long and unique career of Emmett Leith.

  13. ULF waves in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazue )

    1991-01-01

    Research efforts in the area of magnetospheric ULF waves in the 1987-1990 period are reviewed. Attention is given to externally excited hydromagnetic waves including field line resonance, the global cavity mode, bow-shock-associated upstream waves, and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. Consideration is given to internally excited Pc 4-5 pulsations and the role of these pulsations in the diffusion of ring-current ions based on the observed properties of the pulsations. 154 refs.

  14. Transient Wave Rotor Performance Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is investigating the wave rotor for use as a core gas generator in future gas turbine engines. The device, which uses gas-dynamic waves to transfer energy directly to and from the working fluid through which the waves travel, consists of a series of constant-area passages that rotate about an axis. Through rotation, the ends of the passages are periodically exposed to various circumferentially arranged ports that initiate the traveling waves within the passages.

  15. Mirages with atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Lehn, W H; Silvester, W K; Fraser, D M

    1994-07-20

    The temperature inversions that produce superior mirages are capable of supporting gravity (buoyancy) waves of very low frequency and long wavelength. This paper describes the optics of single mode gravity waves that propagate in a four-layer atmosphere. Images calculated by ray tracing show that (1) relatively short waves add a fine structure to the basic static mirage, and (2) long waves produce cyclic images, similar to those observed in the field, that display significant variation from a base image.

  16. Change in P wave morphology after convergent atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suvash; Chen, On; Greene, Mary; John, Jinu Jacob; Greenberg, Yisachar; Yang, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Convergent atrial fibrillation ablation involves extensive epicardial as well as endocardial ablation of the left atrium. We examined whether it changes the morphology of the surface P wave. We reviewed electrocardiograms of 29 patients who underwent convergent ablation for atrial fibrillation. In leads V1, II and III, we measured P wave duration, area and amplitude before ablation, and at 1, 3 and 6 months from ablation. After ablation, there were no significant changes in P wave amplitude, area, or duration in leads II and III. There was a significant reduction in the area of the terminal negative deflection of the P wave in V1 from 0.38 mm(2) to 0.13 mm(2) (p = 0.03). There is also an acute increase in the amplitude and duration of the positive component of the P wave in V1 followed by a reduction in both by 6 months. Before ablation, 62.5% of the patients had biphasic P waves in V1. In 6 months, only 39.2% of them had biphasic P waves. Hybrid ablation causes a reduction of the terminal negative deflection of the P wave in V1 as well as temporal changes in the duration and amplitude of the positive component of the P wave in V1. This likely reflects the reduced electrical contribution of the posterior left atrium after ablation as well as anatomical and autonomic remodeling. Recognition of this altered sinus P wave morphology is useful in the diagnosis of atrial arrhythmias in this patient population. PMID:27485559

  17. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  18. Nonlinear wave propagation in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Tiwari, S. K.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Das, A.

    2010-03-15

    The nonlinear propagation of low-frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is studied theoretically in the framework of the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A set of simplified model nonlinear equations are derived from the original nonlinear integrodifferential form of the GH model by employing an appropriate physical ansatz. Using standard perturbation techniques characteristic evolution equations for finite small amplitude waves are then obtained in various propagation regimes. The influence of viscoelastic properties arising from dust correlation contributions on the nature of nonlinear solutions is discussed. The modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbation is also examined and it is shown that dust compressibility contributions influenced by the Coulomb coupling effects introduce significant modification in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  19. Investigation of atmospheric waves on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.; Hinson, David P.

    1994-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report for grant NAGW-2442 of the Neptune Data Analysis Program, which supported research concerning atmospheric dynamics on Neptune. Professor Von R. Eshleman was the principal investigator. David P. Hinson was a Co-Investigator. The grant covered the period 1 March 1991 through 31 August 1994, including a six month no-cost extension. Funding from this grant resulted in publication of one journal article and one book chapter as well as presentation of results at two conferences and in numerous seminars. A complete bibliography is given below. A copy of the journal article is attached along with abstracts from the book chapter and the conference presentations. With support from this grant we extended our analysis and interpretation of the Voyager Project. This research contributed to an improvement in our basic understanding of atmospheric dynamics on Neptune. The highlight was the discovery and characterization of inertio-gravity waves in the troposphere and stratosphere. Results include measures of basic wave properties, such as amplitudes and vertical wavelengths, as well as estimates of the effect of the waves on the photochemistry and momentum balance of the stratosphere. This investigation also yielded a better understanding of the potential of radio occultation experiments for studies of atmospheric waves. At the same time we developed new methods of data analysis for exploiting these capabilities. These are currently being applied to radio occultation data obtained with the Magellan spacecraft to study waves in the atmosphere of Venus. Future planetary missions, such as Mars Global Surveyor and Cassini, will benefit from these accomplishments.

  20. ULTRASONIC MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR SURFACE WAVE AND PLATE WAVE INSPECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2010-02-22

    A complete ultrasonic measurement model for surface and plate wave inspections is obtained, where all the electrical, electromechanical, and acoustic/elastic elements are explicitly described. Reciprocity principles are used to describe the acoustic/elastic elements specifically in terms of an integral of the incident and scattered wave fields over the surface of the flaw. As with the case of bulk waves, if one assumes the incident surface waves or plate waves are locally planar at the flaw surface, the overall measurement model reduces to a very modular form where the far-field scattering amplitude of the flaw appears explicitly.

  1. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Topics included in the WISP science objectives are: (1) VLF wave injection experiments; (2) traveling ionospheric disturbances and atmospheric gravity waves; (3) ionospheric bubbles; and (4) plasma wave physics. Flow charts of the WISP investigation organization, the project life cycle and the instrumentation are given.

  2. Energy in a String Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  3. Cardiac R-wave detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.

    1968-01-01

    Cardiac R wave detector obtains the systolic contraction signal of the human heart and uses it as a reference signal for the heart-assist pump cycle. It processes the electrocardiac signal /QRS wave complex/ of the natural heart in a sequence of operations which essentially elimates all components from the input signal except the R wave.

  4. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  5. The Detection of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David G.

    2005-10-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Waves and Methods for their Detection: 1. Gravitational waves in general relativity D. G. Blair; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair; Part II. Gravitational Wave Detectors: 4. Resonant-bar detectors D. G. Blair; 5. Gravity wave dewars W. O. Hamilton; 6. Internal friction in high Q materials J. Ferreirinko; 7. Motion amplifiers and passive transducers J. P. Richard; 8. Parametric transducers P. J. Veitch; 9. Detection of continuous waves K. Tsubono; 10. Data analysis and algorithms for gravitational wave-antennas G. V. Paalottino; Part III. Laser Interferometer Antennas: 11. A Michelson interferometer using delay lines W. Winkler; 12. Fabry-Perot cavity gravity-wave detectors R. W. P. Drever; 13. The stabilisation of lasers for interferometric gravitational wave detectors J. Hough; 14. Vibration isolation for the test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors N. A. Robertson; 15. Advanced techniques A. Brillet; 16. Data processing, analysis and storage for interferometric antennas B. F. Schutz; 17. Gravitational wave detection at low and very low frequencies R. W. Hellings.

  6. Bayesian analysis on gravitational waves and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xihao

    constraints on the function space that may be reasonably thought to characterize the range of gravitational wave signals. For example, focus attention on the detection of a gravitational wave burst, by which we mean a signal that begins and ends over the course of an observational epoch. The burst may result from a source that we know how to model - e.g., a near-unity mass ratio black hole binary system - or it may be the result of a process, which we have not imagined and, so, have no model for. Similarly, a gravitational wave background resulting from a superposition of a number of weak sources may be difficult to characterize if the number of weak sources is sufficiently large that none can be individually resolved, but not so large that their superposition leads to a reasonably Gaussian distribution. The fourth part develops Bayesian analysis methods that can be used to detect gravitational waves generated from circular-orbit supermassive black hole binaries with a pulsar timing array. PTA response to such gravitational waves can be modeled as the difference between two sinusoidal terms --- the one with a coherent phase among different pulsars called "Earth term" and the other one with incoherent phases among different pulsars called "pulsar term". For gravitational waves from slowly evolving binaries, the two terms in the PTA response model have the same frequency. Previous methods aimed at detecting gravitational waves from circular-orbit binaries ignored pulsar terms in data analysis since those terms were considered to be negligible when averaging over all the pulsars. However, it is found that we can incorporate the contributions of pulsar terms into data analysis in the case of slowly evolving binaries by treating the incoherent phases in pulsar terms as unknown parameters to be marginalized. The final part of this thesis applies Bayesian analysis to search for the evidence of a planetary system around the K0 giant star HD 102103 detected by the Penn State

  7. Dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere medium-scale waves during the southern summer season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Nune, Durga P.

    1987-01-01

    The role of medium-scale waves on three dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere general circulation is examined using data generated by the FGGE analyses of the ECMWF. The momentum and sensible heat transports by the medium-scale waves are discussed. The effects of medium-scale waves on atmospheric circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during the summer, in particular the vacillation of atmospheric energetics, are investigated. The horizontal and vertical structures and the transport properties of this wave regime and their relation to downstream development in the Southern Hemisphere are analyzed. It is observed that medium-scale waves supply about a half of the total eddy transport of sensible heat and momentum; the wave regime contributes to the time average of various energy contents and energetic components of atmospheric motion during the southern summer; and the wave regime is amplified during the developing stages of downstream development.

  8. Infrared and millimeter waves. Volume 14 - Millimeter components and techniques. Part 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Button, K. J.

    Experimental, theoretical and design efforts for millimeter-wave (mm-wave) propagation and integrated circuits (ICs) are discussed in depth. This volume includes contributions on mm-wave IC transducers and planar ICs and subsystems. Various design and analytical approaches taken to produce mm-wave planar antenna arrays are described, along with experimental work on optoelectronic devices to generating mm waves. Analytical tools are defined for investigating mm-wave GaAs IMPATT diodes and evaluating their thermal performance, reliability, and device-circuit interaction properties. Finally, theoretical and experimental results with several prototype low power tunable gyrotrons being developed as coherent millimeter-submillimeter radiation sources are discussed. Low-cost, mass producible solid-state mm-wave devices are being investigated as radiation sources for absorption spectroscopy of materials and radar and communications applications.

  9. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  10. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2010-06-01

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin- 1/2, and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin- 1/2 contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars. PMID:20866534

  11. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2010-06-01

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin- 1/2, and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin- 1/2 contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars.

  12. Reflection and refraction of hydromagnetic waves at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verzariu, P.

    1973-01-01

    Reflection and transmission coefficients of MHD waves are obtained at a stable, plane interface which separates two compressible, perfectly conducting media in relative motion to each other. The coefficients are evaluated for representative conditions of the quiet-time, near-earth magnetopause. The transmission coefficient averaged over a hemispherical distribution of incident waves is found to be 1-2%. Yet the magnitude of the energy flux deposited into the magnetosphere in a day averaged over a hemispherical distribution of waves having amplitudes of say 2-3 gamma, is estimated to be of the order 10 to the 22-nd power erg. Therefore the energy input of MHD waves must contribute significantly to the energy budget of the magnetosphere. The assumption that the boundary surface is a tangential discontinuity with no curvature limits the present theory to hydromagnetic frequencies higher than about .1 Hz.

  13. A ray tracing model of gravity wave propagation and breakdown in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Gravity wave ray tracing and wave packet theory is used to parameterize wave breaking in the mesosphere. Rays are tracked by solving the group velocity equations, and the interaction with the basic state is determined by considering the evolution of the packet wave action density. The ray tracing approach has a number of advantages over the steady state parameterization as the effects of gravity wave focussing and refraction, local dissipation, and wave response to rapid changes in the mean flow are more realistically considered; however, if steady state conditions prevail, the method gives identical results. The ray tracing algorithm is tested using both interactive and noninteractive models of the basic state. In the interactive model, gravity wave interaction with the polar night jet on a beta-plane is considered. The algorithm produces realistic polar night jet closure for weak topographic forcing of gravity waves. Planetary scale waves forced by local transfer of wave action into the basic flow in turn transfer their wave action into the zonal mean flow. Highly refracted rays are also found not to contribute greatly to the climatology of the mesosphere, as their wave action is severely reduced by dissipation during their lateral travel.

  14. Generation of long subharmonic internal waves by surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvildari, Navid; Kaihatu, James M.; Saric, William S.

    2016-10-01

    A new set of Boussinesq equations is derived to study the nonlinear interactions between long waves in a two-layer fluid. The fluid layers are assumed to be homogeneous, inviscid, incompressible, and immiscible. Based on the Boussinesq equations, an analytical model is developed using a second-order perturbation theory and applied to examine the transient evolution of a resonant triad composed of a surface wave and two oblique subharmonic internal waves. Wave damping due to weak viscosity in both layers is considered. The Boussinesq equations and the analytical model are verified. In contrast to previous studies which focus on short internal waves, we examine long waves and investigate some previously unexplored characteristics of this class of triad interaction. In viscous fluids, surface wave amplitudes must be larger than a threshold to overcome viscous damping and trigger internal waves. The dependency of this critical amplitude as well as the growth and damping rates of internal waves on important parameters in a two-fluid system, namely the directional angle of the internal waves, depth, density, and viscosity ratio of the fluid layers, and surface wave amplitude and frequency is investigated.

  15. The wave and wave forecasting in the China Seas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuxiang

    1993-12-31

    The China Seas located at the Southeastern part of the large Eurasia continent, and beside the largest ocean, the Pacific. They are greatly influenced by continent and the ocean. Due to it across the tropical zone, the subtropical zone and the extropical zone, the cold and warm air circulation in Northsouth is a very active exchange. In the summer, the South China Sea and the East China Sea are frequently hit by typhoon waves. In spring and autumn, the bohai sea, the Yellow sea and the East China Seas had series disasters caused by the extropical cyclone wave and the cold air wave. In this paper the time-space distribution and formative cases of wave disaster in the China Seas, and the wave monitoring and prediction system, the wave prediction method, and two automatic systems of numerical wave forecasting are briefly introduced.

  16. The Wave Carpet: An Omnidirectional and Broadband Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.-Reza

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by the strong attenuation of ocean surface waves by muddy seafloors, we have designed, theoretically investigated the performance, and experimentally tested the ``Wave Carpet:'' a mud-resembling synthetic seabed-mounted mat composed of vertically-acting linear springs and generators that can be used as an efficient wave energy absorption device. The Wave Carpet is completely under the water surface hence imposes minimal danger to boats and the sea life (i.e. no mammal entanglement). It is survivable against the high momentum of storm surges and in fact can perform even better under very energetic (e.g. stormy) sea conditions when most existing wave energy devices are needed to shelter themselves by going into an idle mode. In this talk I will present an overview of analytical results for the linear problem, direct simulation of highly nonlinear wave fields, and results of the experimental wave tank investigation.

  17. North Atlantic Ocean drivers of the 2015 European heat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchez, Aurélie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Josey, Simon A.; Hirschi, Joël; Evans, Gwyn

    2016-04-01

    Major European heat waves have occurred on several occasions in the past two decades, including the summer of 2015, with dramatic socioeconomic impacts and in a globally warming world, heat waves are expected to become longer, more frequent and more intense. Nevertheless, our understanding of heat wave causes remains at a basic level, limiting the usefulness of event prediction. We show that 2015 was the most extreme heat wave in central Europe in the past 35 years. We find that the heat wave was preceded by cold mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean surface temperatures, which contributed to its development. In order to explain the genesis of the cold ocean anomaly, we consider surface heat loss, ocean heat content and wind driven upwelling. The anomaly is primarily due to extreme ocean heat loss in the preceding two winters and re-emergent cold ocean water masses. Further analysis indicates that this ocean anomaly was a driver for the 2015 heat wave as it favoured a stationary position of the Jet Stream, which steered Atlantic cyclones away from central Europe towards northern Europe. The cold Atlantic anomaly was also present during the most devastating European heat waves since the 1980s indicating that it is a common factor in the development of these extreme events.

  18. Shock Waves Impacting Composite Material Plates: The Mutual Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    High-performance, fiber-reinforced polymer composites have been extensively used in structural applications in the last 30 years because of their light weight combined with high specific stiffness and strength at a rather low cost. The automotive industry has adopted these materials in new designs of lightweight vehicles. The mechanical response and characterization of such materials under transient dynamic loading caused with shock impact induced by blast is not well understood. Air blast is associated with a fast traveling shock front with high pressure across followed by a decrease in pressure behind due to expansion waves. The time scales associated with the shock front are typically 103 faster than those involved in the expansion waves. Impingement of blast waves on structures can cause a reflection of the wave off the surface of the structure followed by a substantial transient aerodynamic load, which can cause significant deformation and damage of the structure. These can alter the overpressure, which is built behind the reflected shock. In addition, a complex aeroelastic interaction between the blast wave and the structure develops that can induce reverberation within an enclosure, which can cause substantial overpressure through multiple reflections of the wave. Numerical simulations of such interactions are quite challenging. They usually require coupled solvers for the flow and the structure. The present contribution provides a physics-based analysis of the phenomena involved, a critical review of existing computational techniques together with some recent results involving face-on impact of shock waves on thin composite plates.

  19. Observations of gravity waves from satellite and implications for the wave driving of the SAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics at low latitudes in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere is governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. It is known that tropical dynamics has significant influence on the atmosphere over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. For example, QBO and SAO effects are seen in the MLT region, and there is a significant influence of the QBO on surface weather and climate in the Northern Hemisphere during winter. Still, global models have large difficulties in simulating a realistic QBO and SAO. One main uncertainty is the wave driving of these oscillations, in particular the driving by gravity waves (GWs). We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from over three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite data in the stratopause region. These observations are compared with the SAO driving due to planetary waves, as well as the zonal wind tendencies, both determined from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis. HIRDLS satellite observations and ERAI support the general assumption that, due to selective filtering of the GW spectrum by the QBO in the stratosphere, GWs mainly contribute to the SAO momentum budget during SAO eastward wind shear. However, during SAO westward wind shear the GW contribution is usually smaller, and the wave driving is dominated by planetary waves, probably of extratropical origin. Still, we find indications in both satellite observations and ERAI that sometimes GW drag is important also during SAO westward wind shear.

  20. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-11-16

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy.

  1. Full spectrum millimeter-wave modulation.

    PubMed

    Macario, Julien; Yao, Peng; Shi, Shouyuan; Zablocki, Alicia; Harrity, Charles; Martin, Richard D; Schuetz, Christopher A; Prather, Dennis W

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the development of new lithium niobate electro-optic modulator designs and material processing techniques have contributed to support the increasing need for faster optical networks by considerably extending the operational bandwidth of modulators. In an effort to provide higher bandwidths for future generations of networks, we have developed a lithium niobate electro-optic phase modulator based on a coplanar waveguide ridged structure that operates up to 300 GHz. By thinning the lithium niobate substrate down to less than 39 µm, we are able to eliminate substrate modes and observe optical sidebands over the full millimeter-wave spectrum.

  2. Covariance Constraints for Light Front Wave Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.

    2016-06-01

    Light front wave functions (LFWFs) are often utilized to model parton distributions and form factors where their transverse and longitudinal momenta are tied to each other in some manner that is often guided by convenience. On the other hand, the cross talk of transverse and longitudinal momenta is governed by Poincaré symmetry and thus popular LFWF models are often not usable to model more intricate quantities such as generalized parton distributions. In this contribution a closer look to this issue is given and it is shown how to overcome the issue for two-body LFWFs.

  3. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy. PMID:21081919

  4. Wave-wave and wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere measured with Van Allen Probes: cross coupling between wave modes and its effect on radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Cattell, C. A.; Broughton, M.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We will show observations of waveform bursts using the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) burst data on the Van Allen Probes satellites with intermediate frequency waves such as whistler mode, magnetosonic and lower hybrid. These observations show very strong modulation of these waves by lower frequency waves such as EMIC or ULF. We are analyzing the burst data and cross coupling between wave modes to determine how prevalent the cross coupling between wave modes is and under what conditions it occurs. To supplement the EFW data, each satellite is also equipped with a full complement of particle instruments, including the HOPE instrument measuring lower energy (1 eV - 50 keV) particles and MagEIS instruments measuring higher energy (20 keV - 5 MeV) particles. The energy and angular resolution of these detectors are sufficient to resolve the scattering and energization arising from the distinct wave modes, using the signatures in the trapped electron populations predicted by theory for the various mechanisms. Comparison of the burst waveform data with the electron data from HOPE and MagEIS, for times with and without coupling between the wave modes, will allow us to identify how the cross coupling affects electron dynamics in the radiation belts. The significance of wave-particle interactions in the formation and depletion of the radiation belts has long been established, but is still not completely understood. Specifically, pitch angle scattering from waves such as plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron [EMIC] waves near the duskside plasmapause is known to contribute to electron loss from the radiation belts, primarily through precipitation into the atmosphere. Higher frequency waves such as whistler mode chorus and magnetosonic waves observed near the equator in the lower hybrid frequency range are widely believed to be primary means for electron energization. However, these and other competing processes often occur simultaneously, and an accurate model

  5. Shear Wave Generation and Modeling Ground Motion From a Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Underground Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, Arben; Mellors, Robert; Rodgers, Arthur; Vorobiev, Oleg; Ezzedine, Souheil; Matzel, Eric; Ford, Sean; Walter, Bill; Antoun, Tarabay; Wagoner, Jeffery; Pasyanos, Mike; Petersson, Anders; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the excitation and propagation of far-field (epicentral distance larger than 20 m) seismic waves by analyzing and modeling ground motion from an underground chemical explosion recorded during the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada. The far-field recorded ground motion is characterized by complex features, such as large azimuthal variations in P- and S-wave amplitudes, as well as substantial energy on the tangential component of motion. Shear wave energy is also observed on the tangential component of the near-field motion (epicentral distance smaller than 20 m) suggesting that shear waves were generated at or very near the source. These features become more pronounced as the waves propagate away from the source. We address the shear wave generation during the explosion by modeling ground motion waveforms recorded in the frequency range 0.01-20 Hz, at distances of up to 1 km. We used a physics based approach that combines hydrodynamic modeling of the source with anelastic modeling of wave propagation in order to separate the contributions from the source and near-source wave scattering on shear motion generation. We found that wave propagation scattering caused by the near-source geological environment, including surface topography, contributes to enhancement of shear waves generated from the explosion source. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946/ NST11-NCNS-TM-EXP-PD15.

  6. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaret, J.; Béquin, P.; Theocharis, G.; Andreev, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Tournat, V.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  7. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. Wave activated generator

    SciTech Connect

    Neuenschwander, V. L.

    1985-09-03

    A wave activated generator utilizes the principle of providing relative movement between a permanent magnet and a coil to induce an electrical current in the coil. The coil is situated in a static tube anchored to the sea bed by means of a ballast tank at the base of the tube and guy wires extending from the tube. A plunger with permanent magnets is mounted in the tube for vertical reciprocation of the plunger, the plunger projecting outwardly from the upper end of the tube and terminating in a hull-shaped float which rides the water surface and provides vertical reciprocation of the plunger responsive to wave motion in order to move the magnets relative to the coil and generate current in the coil.

  9. Millimeter wave nonreciprocal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group within the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Research Laboratory of Electronics proposed a three year research program aimed at developing coherent magnetic wave signal-processing techniques for microwave energy which may form either the primary signal or else the intermediate frequency (IF) modulation of millimeter wavelength signals-especially at frequencies in the 50-94 GHz. range. Emphasis has been placed upon developing advanced types of signal processors that make use of quasi-optical propagation of electromagnetic and magnetostatic waves propagating in high quality single crystal ferrite thin films. A strong theoretical effort is required in order to establish valid models useful for predicting device performance. We emphasized new filter and circulator designs that employ combinations of the Faraday effect, field displacement nonreciprocity and magnetostatic resonance and periodic structures.

  10. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  11. Supersymmetric string waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bergshoeff, E.A. ); Kallosh, R.; Ortin, T. )

    1993-06-15

    We present plane-wave-type solutions of the lowest-order superstring effective action which have unbroken space-time supersymmetries. They are given by a stringy generalization of the Brinkmann metric, dialton, axion, and gauge fields. Some conspiracy between the metric and the axion field is required. The [alpha][prime] stringy corrections to the effective on-shell action, to the equations of motion (and therefore to the solutions themselves), and to the supersymmetry transformations are shown to vanish for a special class of these solutions that we call supersymmetric string waves (SSW's). In the SSW solutions, there exists a conspiracy not only between the metric and the axion field, but also between the gauge fields and the metric, since the embedding of the spin connection in the gauge group is required.

  12. Waves in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Eugene R

    2009-09-21

    Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic

  13. The interaction between Gravity Waves and Solar Tides: results from 4D Ray Tracing coupled to a Linear Tidal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; fabian, Senf

    2015-04-01

    Internal gravity waves contribute to an important part in the variability of the Stratosphere - Mesosphere - lower - Thermosphere. Numerous General Circulation Model do not present (for exemple) a Quasi-biennale Oscillation. Moreover, Internal gravity waves parameterizations often neglect time and horizontal dependence of the background flow ('column approximation'). Interactions between internal gravity waves and large scale flow, specially Solar tide waves, are studied here. Thermally driven global scaled waves, Solar tides describe the large-scale modulation (at sub-daily period) of all middle atmosphere fields. Gravity waves propagate in a time and spatially varying background flow, composed by a climatological mean, stationary planetary waves and diurnal Solar tides. Global three-dimensional propagation of internal gravity waves is performed by a new W. K. B. gravity wave model (ray tracer scheme), where waves propagate in position-wavenumber phase-space in order to prevent the crossing of rays. Propagation of Solar tides is modeled by linearising a General Circulation Model over a climatological mean and a stationnary planetary waves reference. Gravity wave deposition of momentum and buoyancy are calculated. Characterizing the daily evolution, Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are calculated. They approximately describe the internal gravity wave forcing on the diurnal Solar tides propagation and are so used for it. The extracted diurnal Solar tides are then used for a new computation of the gravity wave fluxes. This is iterated a few times to obtain a converged result on gravity wave deposition and on tidal field. Internal gravity waves are shown to influence both Solar tides amplitude and phase. Seasonal cycle of migrating and non-migrating tidal components is studied, as it is the seasonal cycle of gravity wave deposition. Gravity wave deposition and tidal fields are also obtained under the 'column approximation'. They show a clear

  14. Internal Ocean Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves are waves that travel within the interior of a fluid. The waves propagate at the interface or boundary between two layers with sharp density differences, such as temperature. They occur wherever strong tides or currents and stratification occur in the neighborhood of irregular topography. They can propagate for several hundred kilometers. The ASTER false-color VNIR image off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 60 by 120 kilometers (37.2 by 74.4 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 129.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1

  15. Waves in Space Plasmas Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program is a joint international effort involving instrumentation to be designed and fabricated by funding from NASA and the National Research Council of Canada. The instrumentation, with a tentatively planned payload for 1986, can be used to perturb the plasma with radio waves to solve problems in ionospheric, atmospheric, magnetospheric, and plasma physics. Among the ionospheric and plasma phenomena to be investigated using WISP instrumentation are VLF wave-particle interactions; ELF/VLF propagation; traveling ionospheric disturbances and gravity wave coupling; equatorial plasma bubble phenomena; plasma wave physics such as mode-coupling, dispersion, and instabilities; and plasma physics of the antenna-plasma interactions.

  16. Snell's Law for Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigloher, J.; Decker, M.; Körner, H. S.; Tanabe, K.; Moriyama, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Hata, H.; Madami, M.; Gubbiotti, G.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of Snell's law for magnetostatic spin waves in thin ferromagnetic Permalloy films by imaging incident, refracted, and reflected waves. We use a thickness step as the interface between two media with different dispersion relations. Since the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves in thin ferromagnetic films is anisotropic, deviations from the isotropic Snell's law known in optics are observed for incidence angles larger than 25 ° with respect to the interface normal between the two magnetic media. Furthermore, we can show that the thickness step modifies the wavelength and the amplitude of the incident waves. Our findings open up a new way of spin wave steering for magnonic applications.

  17. Rogue waves in oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    A stochastic model of wave groups is presented to explain the occurrence of exceptionally large waves, usually referred to as rogue waves. The model leads to the description of the non-Gaussian statistics of large waves in oceanic turbulence and to a new asymptotic distribution of their crest heights in a form that generalizes the Tayfun model. The new model explains the unusually large crests observed in flume experiments of narrow-band waves. However, comparisons with realistic oceanic measurements gathered in the North Sea during an intense storm indicate that the generalized model agrees with the original Tayfun distribution.

  18. Wave Engine Topping Cycle Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The performance benefits derived by topping a gas turbine engine with a wave engine are assessed. The wave engine is a wave rotor that produces shaft power by exploiting gas dynamic energy exchange and flow turning. The wave engine is added to the baseline turboshaft engine while keeping high-pressure-turbine inlet conditions, compressor pressure ratio, engine mass flow rate, and cooling flow fractions fixed. Related work has focused on topping with pressure-exchangers (i.e., wave rotors that provide pressure gain with zero net shaft power output); however, more energy can be added to a wave-engine-topped cycle leading to greater engine specific-power-enhancement The energy addition occurs at a lower pressure in the wave-engine-topped cycle; thus the specific-fuel-consumption-enhancement effected by ideal wave engine topping is slightly lower than that effected by ideal pressure-exchanger topping. At a component level, however, flow turning affords the wave engine a degree-of-freedom relative to the pressure-exchanger that enables a more efficient match with the baseline engine. In some cases, therefore, the SFC-enhancement by wave engine topping is greater than that by pressure-exchanger topping. An ideal wave-rotor-characteristic is used to identify key wave engine design parameters and to contrast the wave engine and pressure-exchanger topping approaches. An aerodynamic design procedure is described in which wave engine design-point performance levels are computed using a one-dimensional wave rotor model. Wave engines using various wave cycles are considered including two-port cycles with on-rotor combustion (valved-combustors) and reverse-flow and through-flow four-port cycles with heat addition in conventional burners. A through-flow wave cycle design with symmetric blading is used to assess engine performance benefits. The wave-engine-topped turboshaft engine produces 16% more power than does a pressure-exchanger-topped engine under the specified topping

  19. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of datamore » from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.« less

  20. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  1. Statistics of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient fluctuations: Reduced-parameter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-09-15

    A reduced-parameter (RP) model of quasilinear wave-plasma interactions is used to analyze statistical properties of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient density fluctuations. The probability distribution of wave energies in such a system is shown to have a relatively narrow peak just above the thermal wave level, and a power-law tail at high energies, the latter becoming progressively more evident for increasing characteristic amplitude of the ambient fluctuations. To better understand the physics behind these statistical features of the waves, a simplified model of stochastically driven thermal waves is developed on the basis of the RP model. An approximate analytic solution for stationary statistical distribution of wave energies W is constructed, showing a good agreement with that of the original RP model. The 'peak' and 'tail' features of the wave energy distribution are shown to be a result of contributions of two groups of wave clumps: those subject to either very slow or very fast random variations of total wave growth rate (due to fluctuations of ambient plasma density), respectively. In the case of significant ambient plasma fluctuations, the overall wave energy distribution is shown to have a clear power-law tail at high energies, P(W){proportional_to}W{sup -{alpha}}, with nontrivial exponent 1<{alpha}<2, while for weak fluctuations it is close to the lognormal distribution predicted by pure stochastic growth theory. The model's wave statistics resemble the statistics of plasma waves observed by the Ulysses spacecraft in some interplanetary type III burst sources. This resemblance is discussed qualitatively, and it is suggested that the stochastically driven thermal waves might be a candidate for explaining the power-law tails in the observed wave statistics without invoking mechanisms such as self-organized criticality or nonlinear wave collapse.

  2. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Seismic waves are attenuated by number of factors, including geometrical spreading, scattering on heterogeneities and intrinsic loss due the anelasticity of medium. Contribution of the latter two processes can be derived from the tail part of the seismogram - coda (strictly speaking S-wave coda), as these factors influence the shape and amplitudes of coda. Numerous methods have been developed for estimation of attenuation properties from the decay rate of coda amplitudes. Most of them work with the S-wave coda, some are designed for the P-wave coda (only on teleseismic distances) or for the whole waveforms. We used methods to estimate the 1/Qc - attenuation of coda waves, methods to separate scattering and intrinsic loss - 1/Qsc, Qi and methods to estimate attenuation of direct P and S wave - 1/Qp, 1/Qs. In this study, we analyzed the S-wave coda of local earthquake data recorded in the West Bohemia/Vogtland area. This region is well known thanks to the repeated occurrence of earthquake swarms. We worked with data from the 2011 earthquake swarm, which started late August and lasted with decreasing intensity for another 4 months. During the first week of swarm thousands of events were detected with maximum magnitudes ML = 3.6. Amount of high quality data (including continuous datasets and catalogues with an abundance of well-located events) is available due to installation of WEBNET seismic network (13 permanent and 9 temporary stations) monitoring seismic activity in the area. Results of the single-scattering model show seismic attenuations decreasing with frequency, what is in agreement with observations worldwide. We also found decrease of attenuation with increasing hypocentral distance and increasing lapse time, which was interpreted as a decrease of attenuation with depth (coda waves on later lapse times are generated in bigger depths - in our case in upper lithosphere, where attenuations are small). We also noticed a decrease of frequency dependence of 1/Qc

  3. Water wave energy transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberti, J.

    1980-01-22

    A water wave energy transducer for converting the motion of a water wave into a controlled mechanical movement such as rotational motion suitable for actuating an electrical generator is disclosed. The transducer comprises a float member floatingly moored in a water body having waves and/or tidal movement, such as a seashore. A power gear is rotatably mounted in a swing block on the float with a power shaft extending from the power gear to laterally spaced drive bevel gears mounted for rotation with the power gear. These drive bevel gears are coupled to a transmission on the float comprising one-way drive clutches transmitting rotational energy to the drive shaft of a generator or the like to provide rotational energy on both up and down movement of the float. A rack is pivotally anchored in the water body, extends up through the float and is slideable with respect to the power gear of the swing block, so that movement of the float with respect to the rack will provide rotation of the power gear.

  4. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  5. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  6. Transhorizon propagation of decameter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Yu. K.; Shchelkalin, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Solutions to the problem of the point source field in a spherically layered medium are analyzed. For a three-layer waveguide model, a solution in the form of the Watson integral was used. A consideration of the singularities in the plane of the integration variable made it possible to represent the integral as a superposition of three waves. Two of them are connected with the interaction of the primary spherical wave with the lower convex and upper concave interfaces. The third wave is connected with the alternate action with both interfaces. The fourth wave is caused by the interaction between the primary wave and random inhomogeneities of the external medium (the ionosphere). Here, simulation was carried out based on Green equations. The considered unique data of flight measurements of the point source field strength indicate the efficiency of simulating the transhorizon propagation of decameter waves based on the superposition of all four aforesaid wave packets.

  7. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  8. Tamm-Langmuir surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenitskii, K. Â. Yu.; Koshelev, K. Â. L.; Bogdanov, A. Â. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we develop a theory of surface electromagnetic waves localized at the interface of periodic metal-dielectric structures. We have shown that the anisotropy of plasma frequency in metal layers lifts the degeneracy of plasma oscillations and opens a series of photonic band gaps. This results in appearance of surface waves with singular density of states—we refer to them as Tamm-Langmuir waves. Such naming is natural since we have found that their properties are very similar to the properties of both bulk Langmuir and surface Tamm waves. Depending on the anisotropy parameters, Tamm-Langmuir waves can be either forward or backward waves. Singular density of states and high sensitivity of the dispersion to the anisotropy of the structure makes Tamm-Langmuir waves very promising for potential applications in nanophotonics and biosensing.

  9. Langmuir circulations beneath growing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. R. C.

    2000-11-01

    The instability of a weakly sheared density stratified two dimensional wavy flow to longitudinal vortices is considered. The instability mechanism is Craik-Leibovich type 2, or CL2, and the problem is posited in the context of Langmuir circulations beneath irrotational wind driven surface waves. Of interest is the influence to the instability of growing or decaying waves according to linear theory. The basis for the study is an initial value problem posed by Leibovich & Paolucci (1981) in which the liquid substrate is of semi-infinite extent and the wind driven current is permitted to grow. At zero Richardson number, relative to the solution for neutral waves, it is found that growing waves act to stabilize the instability while decaying waves are destablizing. Furthemore while growing waves act to increase the spanwise wavenumber at onset, decaying waves act to decrease it. The influence of Prandtl and Richardson numbers is also discussed.

  10. S-wave velocity structure of the North China from inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao-peng; Zhu, Liang-bao; Wang, Qing-dong; Zhang, Pan; Yang, Ying-hang

    2014-07-01

    We constructed the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle (10-100 km) beneath the North China based on the teleseismic data recorded by 187 portable broadband stations deployed in this region. The traditional two-step inversion scheme was adopted. Firstly, we measured the interstation fundamental Rayleigh wave phase velocity of 10-60 s and imaged the phase velocity distributions using the Tarantola inversion method. Secondly, we inverted the 1-D S-wave velocity structure with a grid spacing of 0.25° × 0.25° and constructed the 3-D S-wave velocity structure of the North China. The 3-D S-wave velocity model provides valuable information about the destruction mechanism and geodynamics of the North China Craton (NCC). The S-wave velocity structures in the northwestern and southwestern sides of the North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) are obviously different. The southeastern side is high velocity (high-V) while the northeastern side is low velocity (low-V) at the depth of 60-80 km. The upwelling asthenosphere above the stagnated Pacific plate may cause the destruction of the Eastern Block and form the NSGL. A prominent low-V anomaly exists around Datong from 50 to 100 km, which may due to the upwelling asthenosphere originating from the mantle transition zone beneath the Western Block. The upwelling asthenosphere beneath the Datong may also contribute to the destruction of the Eastern Block. The Zhangjiakou-Penglai fault zone (ZPFZ) may cut through the lithosphere and act as a channel of the upwelling asthenosphere. A noticeable low-V zone also exists in the lower crust and upper mantle lid (30-50 km) beneath the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan (BTT) region, which may be caused by the upwelling asthenosphere through the ZPFZ.

  11. ULF wave electromagnetic energy flux into the ionosphere: Joule heating implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Zou, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves—in particular, Alfvén waves-transfer energy into the Earth's ionosphere via Joule heating, but it is unclear how much they contribute to global and local heating rates relative to other energy sources. In this study we use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite data to investigate the spatial, frequency, and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ULF wave Poynting vector (electromagnetic energy flux) mapped to the ionosphere. We use these measurements to estimate Joule heating rates, covering latitudes at or below the nominal auroral oval and below the open/closed field line boundary. We find ULF wave Joule heating rates (integrated over 3-30 mHz frequency band) typically range from 0.001 to 1 mW/m2. We compare these rates to empirical models of Joule heating associated with large-scale, static (on ULF wave timescales) current systems, finding that ULF waves nominally contribute little to the global, integrated Joule heating rate. However, there are extreme cases with ULF wave Joule heating rates of ≥10 mW/m2—in these cases, which are more likely to occur when Kp ≥ 3, ULF waves make significant contributions to the global Joule heating rate. We also find ULF waves routinely make significant contributions to local Joule heating rates near the noon and midnight local time sectors, where static current systems nominally contribute less to Joule heating; the most important contributions come from lower frequency (<7 mHz) waves.

  12. Electromagnetic inhomogeneous waves at planar boundaries: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    In this review paper, we summarize the fundamental properties of inhomogeneous waves at the planar interface between two media. We point out the main differences between the wave types: lateral waves, surface waves, and leaky waves. We analyze each kind of inhomogeneous wave, giving a quasi-optical description and explaining the physical origin of some of their properties.

  13. Generation of rogue waves in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechuga, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rogue waves have been reported as causing damages and ship accidents all over the oceans of the world. For this reason in the past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of their main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this line we are trying to generate them in a water tank. The description of the procedure to do that is the objective of this presentation. After Akhmediev et al. (2011) we use a symmetric spectrum as input on the wave maker to produce waves with a rate(Maximun wave height/ significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77, clearly between the limits of rogue waves. As it was pointed out by Janssen (2003), Onorato et al. (2006) and Kharif, Pelinovsky and Slunyaev (2009) modulation instability is enhanced when waves depart from Gaussian statistics (i.e. big kurtosis) and therefore both numbers enforce the criterion that we are generating genuine rogue waves. The same is confirmed by Shemer (2010) and Dudley et al.(2009) from a different perspective. If besides being symmetrical the spectrum is triangular, following Akhmediev(2011),the generated waves are even more conspicuously rogue waves.

  14. Langmuir waves in semi-relativistic spinless quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. Yu.; Andreev, P. A.; Kuzmenkov, L. S.

    2015-06-01

    Many-particle quantum hydrodynamics based on the Darwin Hamiltonian (the Hamiltonian corresponding to the Darwin Lagrangian) is considered. A force field appearing in the corresponding Euler equation is considered in detail. Contributions from different terms of the Darwin Hamiltonian in the Euler equation are traced. For example, the relativistic correction to the kinetic energy of particles leads to several terms in the Euler equation; these terms have different form. One of them has a form similar to a term appearing from the Darwin term. Hence, the two different mechanisms give analogous contributions in wave dispersion. A microscopic analog of the Biot-Savart law, called the current-current interaction, describing an interaction of moving charges via the magnetic field, is also included in our description. The semi-relativistic generalization of the quantum Bohm potential is obtained. Contribution of the relativistic effects in the spectrum of plasma collective excitations is considered. The contributions of the spin-spin, spin-current, and spin-orbit interactions in this model are considered. The contribution of the spin evolution in the Langmuir wave spectrum is calculated at the propagation of wave perpendicular to the external magnetic field.

  15. Study of Novel Slow Wave Circuit for Miniaturized Millimeter Wave Helical Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Xiaofang; Liao, Li; Yang, Zhonghai; Zeng, Baoqing; Yao, Lieming

    2006-07-01

    Two kinds of novel helical slow wave circuit, supported by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond, are presented. They are applying in miniaturized millimeter wave helical traveling wave tube. Cold test characteristic of these circuits are simulated by MAFIA code. Higher performances are achieved with smaller size, compared with conventional circuit supported by BeO rods. The nonlinear analysis is implemented by Beam and Wave Interaction (BWI) module, which is a part of TWTCAD Integrated Framework. Results have been found to be consistent with the expectation. It should be wider apply in microwave and millimeter wave vacuum electronic devices.

  16. Nonlinear generation of kinetic-scale waves by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves and nonlocal spectral transport in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-04-20

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called 'scalar' ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  17. Gravitational-wave stochastic background from kinks and cusps on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Oelmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X.

    2010-05-15

    We compute the contribution of kinks on cosmic string loops to stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGW). We find that kinks contribute at the same order as cusps to the SBGW. We discuss the accessibility of the total background due to kinks as well as cusps to current and planned gravitational-wave detectors, as well as to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and pulsar timing constraints. As in the case of cusps, we find that current data from interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, are sensitive to areas of parameter space of cosmic string models complementary to those accessible to pulsar, BBN, and CMB bounds.

  18. Small Scale Waves on Venus at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay; Markiewicz, W. J.; Moissl, R.; Titov, D.

    2008-09-01

    On many occasions, the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on Venus Express has observed several small scale waves or wave trains in high northern latitudes ( 70 to 75°) of Venus for the first time. Such waves were not detected earlier due to a combination of spatial resolution, observed region and duration. Wave trains with different characteristics have been seen at all four wavelengths used by the VMC (centered at 365, 513. 935 and 1010nm with 40, 50, 70 and 20 nm) in and are consistently in the same area on multiple consecutive orbits. Many are similar in appearance to ripples with wavelengths 5 to10 km with extents of some tens of km while others appear as thin straight lines, similar to the Circum Equatorial Belts (CEB) seen previously from Mariner 10 and Pioneer Venus missions at low latitudes. These are distinct from the fine scale transverse waves on the spiral bands on Venus which have been observed by both the VMC and the Visible Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS). In appearance and perhaps origins, these wave trains appear to be similar to gravity waves observed on Earth, particularly in the airglow images. Their detection on Venus confirms the existence of an atmospheric layer with a very stable lapse rate seen in the thermal structure data at an altitude of 65 to 67 km. The triggering mechanism for these waves could be horizontal or vertical wind shear. The contribution of these waves to momentum transport is not known, but likely is insignificant. However, this could be an observational limitation due to the combination of the eccentric orbit of Venus Express and the camera capabilities. This work has been made possible from a NASA Participating Scientist Grant NNG06GC68G and with the support provided by the VMC Team.

  19. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  20. Transforming guided waves with metamaterial waveguide cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Ginis, V.; Danckaert, J.; Tassin, P.

    2016-04-01

    Metamaterials make use of subwavelength building blocks to enhance our control on the propagation of light. To determine the required material properties for a given functionality, i.e., a set of desired light flows inside a metamaterial device, metamaterial designs often rely on a geometrical design tool known as transformation optics. In recent years, applications in integrated photonics motivated several research groups to develop two-dimensional versions of transformation optics capable of routing surface waves along graphene-dielectric and metal-dielectric interfaces. Although guided electromagnetic waves are highly relevant to applications in integrated optics, no consistent transformation-optical framework has so far been developed for slab waveguides. Indeed, the conventional application of transformation optics to dielectric slab waveguides leads to bulky three-dimensional devices with metamaterial implementations both inside and outside of the waveguide's core. In this contribution, we develop a transformationoptical framework that still results in thin metamaterial waveguide devices consisting of a nonmagnetic metamaterial core of varying thickness [Phys. Rev. B 93.8, 085429 (2016)]. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of our equivalence relations with three crucial functionalities: a beam bender, a beam splitter and a conformal lens. Our devices perform well on a qualitative (comparison of fields) and quantitative (comparison of transmitted power) level compared to their bulky counterparts. As a result, the geometrical toolbox of transformation optics may lead to a plethora of integrated metamaterial devices to route guided waves along optical chips.

  1. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics. PMID:25314555

  2. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics.

  3. Gravity wave motions and momentum fluxes in the middle atmosphere at Adelaide, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. A.; Fritts, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of gravity wave momentum fluxes in the middle atmosphere using data collected during June 1984 at Adelaide, Australia (35 deg S). The primary objectives were to identify that portion of the gravity wave spectrum that contributes most of the momentum transport and flux divergence and to examine the temporal variability of wave energies and momentum fluxes. The data were obtained with an HF (2 MHz) radar operated in a Doppler configuration with two coplanar off-vertical beams. This technique provides a direct measure of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum due to an arbitrary spectrum of gravity wave and other motions in the plane of the radar beams.

  4. Covariant nucleon wave function with S, D, and P-state components

    SciTech Connect

    Franz Gross, G. Ramalho, M. T. Pena

    2012-05-01

    Expressions for the nucleon wave functions in the covariant spectator theory (CST) are derived. The nucleon is described as a system with a off-mass-shell constituent quark, free to interact with an external probe, and two spectator constituent quarks on their mass shell. Integrating over the internal momentum of the on-mass-shell quark pair allows us to derive an effective nucleon wave function that can be written only in terms of the quark and diquark (quark-pair) variables. The derived nucleon wave function includes contributions from S, P and D-waves.

  5. 75 FR 43799 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ..., the Agency published a proposed rule with request for comments in the Federal Register (75 FR 34388... ``Automatic Contribution Arrangements'' 74 FR 8200, 8206 (February 24, 2009). The TSP must follow applicable....37 Employing Agency Notice Authority: Sec. 102, Pub. L. 111-31, div. B. tit. I, 123 Stat. 1776,...

  6. 75 FR 34388 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... forfeited to the TSP. 26 CFR 1.414(w)-1(d)(2), 72 FR 63144, 63148. After the expiration of the 90-day period... Matching contributions 1600.37 Employing agency notice Authority: Sec. 102, Pub. L. 111-31, div. B. tit....

  7. NONLINEAR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE MEMORY FROM BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Favata, Marc

    2009-05-10

    Some astrophysical sources of gravitational waves can produce a 'memory effect', which causes a permanent displacement of the test masses in a freely falling gravitational-wave detector. The Christodoulou memory is a particularly interesting nonlinear form of memory that arises from the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor's contribution to the distant gravitational-wave field. This nonlinear memory contributes a nonoscillatory component to the gravitational-wave signal at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order in the waveform amplitude. Previous computations of the memory and its detectability considered only the inspiral phase of binary black hole coalescence. Using an 'effective-one-body' (EOB) approach calibrated to numerical relativity simulations, as well as a simple fully analytic model, the Christodoulou memory is computed for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown. The memory will be very difficult to detect with ground-based interferometers, but is likely to be observable in supermassive black hole mergers with LISA out to redshifts z {approx}< 2. Detection of the nonlinear memory could serve as an experimental test of the ability of gravity to 'gravitate'.

  8. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L E Rickard; Smith, Glenn S

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  9. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, L. E. Rickard; Smith, Glenn S.

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  10. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  11. Laboratory Experiment on the Non-Breaking Surface-Wave-Induced Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dejun; Qiao, Fangli

    2015-04-01

    Mixing induced by non-breaking surface waves was investigated in a wave tank by measuring the thermal destratification rate of water column. One experiment without waves and four experiments with waves of amplitude ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 cm and wavelength from 30 to 75 cm were conducted. Water temperature variations at distances from 4 down to 12 cm were measured. In the layer from 4 to 7 cm, the originally dense isothermal lines disperse soon after the waves are generated, while the vertical gradient from 9 to 12 cm is maintained for a relatively long time. The time span during which the water temperature becomes well-mixed changes from about 20 hours without the waves to tens of minutes with the waves, and it decreases with increasing wave amplitude and wavelength. One-dimensional diffusion model with wave-induced mixing parameterization shows consistent results with the measurement. The study demonstrates that the mixing induced by non-breaking waves may add an important contribution to the vertical mixing process in the upper ocean and suggests a way to parameterize wave-induced mixing in numerical ocean models.

  12. Study of a tissue protecting system for clinical applications of underwater shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Applications of underwater shock waves have been extended to various clinical therapies during the past two decades. Besides the successful contribution of extracorporeal shock waves, tissue damage especially to the vasculature has been reported. These side effects are believed to be due to the shock wave-tissue interaction and cavitation. In the present research in order to minimize shock wave induced damage a shock wave attenuating system was designed and studied. The attenuating system consisted of thin gas packed layers immersed in water, which could attenuate more than 90% of shock waves overpressure. Silver azide micro-pellets (10 mg) were ignited by irradiation of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate shock waves. Pressure histories were measured with fiber optic probe and PVDF needle hydrophones. The strength of incident shock waves was changed by adjusting the distance between the pellets and the layers. The whole sequences of the shock wave attenuation due to the interaction of shock waves with the dissipating layers were quantitatively visualized by double exposure holographic interferometry and time resolved high speed photography. The attenuated shock had overpressure less than threshold damage of brain tissue evaluated from histological examination of the rat brain treated by shock waves.

  13. On the climatological probability of the vertical propagation of stationary planetary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Khalil; Braesicke, Peter; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Versick, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a diagnostic tool to assess a climatological framework of the optimal propagation conditions for stationary planetary waves. Analyzing 50 winters using NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data we derive probability density functions (PDFs) of positive vertical wave number as a function of zonal and meridional wave numbers. We contrast this quantity with classical climatological means of the vertical wave number. Introducing a membership value function (MVF) based on fuzzy logic, we objectively generate a modified set of PDFs (mPDFs) and demonstrate their superior performance compared to the climatological mean of vertical wave number and the original PDFs. We argue that mPDFs allow an even better understanding of how background conditions impact wave propagation in a climatological sense. As expected, probabilities are decreasing with increasing zonal wave numbers. In addition we discuss the meridional wave number dependency of the PDFs which is usually neglected, highlighting the contribution of meridional wave numbers 2 and 3 in the stratosphere. We also describe how mPDFs change in response to strong vortex regime (SVR) and weak vortex regime (WVR) conditions, with increased probabilities of the wave propagation during WVR than SVR in the stratosphere. We conclude that the mPDFs are a convenient way to summarize climatological information about planetary wave propagation in reanalysis and climate model data.

  14. Alongshore momentum transfer to the nearshore zone from energetic ocean waves generated by passing hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Ryan P.; Hanson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Wave and current measurements from a cross-shore array of nearshore sensors in Duck, NC, are used to elucidate the balance of alongshore momentum under energetic wave conditions with wide surf zones, generated by passing hurricanes that are close to and far from to the coast. The observations indicate that a distant storm (Hurricane Bill, 2009) with large waves has low variability in directional wave characteristics resulting in alongshore currents that are driven mainly by the changes in wave energy. A storm close to the coast (Hurricane Earl, 2010), with strong local wind stress and combined sea and swell components in wave energy spectra, has high variability in wave direction and wave period that influence wave breaking and nearshore circulation as the storm passes. During both large wave events, the horizontal current shear is strong and radiation stress gradients, bottom stress, wind stress, horizontal mixing, and cross-shore advection contribute to alongshore momentum at different spatial locations across the nearshore region. Horizontal mixing during Hurricane Earl, estimated from rotational velocities, was particularly strong suggesting that intense eddies were generated by the high horizontal shear from opposing wind-driven and wave-driven currents. The results provide insight into the cross-shore distribution of the alongshore current and the connection between flows inside and outside the surf zone during major storms, indicating that the current shear and mixing at the interface between the surf zone and shallow inner shelf is strongly dependent on the distance from the storm center to the coast.

  15. Contributions to cosmic reionization from dark matter annihilation and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwan; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Zavala, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter annihilation or decay could have a significant impact on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we study the potential contribution of dark matter annihilation (s -wave- or p -wave-dominated) or decay to cosmic reionization, via the production of electrons, positrons and photons. We map out the possible perturbations to the ionization and thermal histories of the universe due to dark matter processes, over a broad range of velocity-averaged annihilation cross sections/decay lifetimes and dark matter masses. We have employed recent numerical studies of the efficiency with which annihilation/decay products induce heating and ionization in the intergalactic medium, and in this work extended them down to a redshift of 1 +z =4 for two different reionization scenarios. We also improve on earlier studies by using the results of detailed structure formation models of dark matter haloes and subhaloes that are consistent with up-to-date N -body simulations, with estimates on the uncertainties that originate from the smallest scales. We find that for dark matter models that are consistent with experimental constraints, a contribution of more than 10% to the ionization fraction at reionization is disallowed for all annihilation scenarios. Such a contribution is possible only for decays into electron/positron pairs, for light dark matter with mass mχ≲100 MeV , and a decay lifetime τχ˜1 024- 1 025 s .

  16. Hydrodynamic Performance of a Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen

    2010-11-01

    To harvest energy from ocean waves, a new wave energy converter (WEC) was proposed and tested in a wave tank. The WEC freely floats on the water surface and rides waves. It utilizes its wave-driven angular oscillation to convert the mechanical energy of waves into electricity. To gain the maximum possible angular oscillation of the WEC under specified wave conditions, both floatation of the WEC and wave interaction with the WEC play critical roles in a joint fashion. During the experiments, the submersion condition of the WEC and wave condition were varied. The results were analyzed in terms of the oscillation amplitude, stability, auto-orientation capability, and wave frequency dependency.

  17. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  18. The role of Alfvén wave heating in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2016-07-01

    Observations have shown that magnetohydrodynamic waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in solar prominences. The waves are probably driven by photospheric motions and may transport energy up to prominences suspended in the corona. Dissipation of wave energy can lead to heating of the cool prominence plasma, thereby contributing to the local energy balance within the prominence. Here we discuss the role of Alfvén wave dissipation as a heating mechanism for the prominence plasma. We consider a slab-like quiescent prominence model with a transverse magnetic field embedded in the solar corona. The prominence medium is modeled as a partially ionized plasma composed of a charged ion-electron single fluid and two separate neutral fluids corresponding to neutral hydrogen and neutral helium. Friction between the three fluids acts as a dissipative mechanism for the waves. The heating caused by Alfvén waves incident on the prominence slab is analytically explored. We find that the dense prominence slab acts as a resonant cavity for the waves. The fraction of incident wave energy that is channeled into the slab strongly depends upon the wave period, P. Using typical prominence conditions, we obtain that wave energy trapping and associated heating are negligible when P ≳ 100 s, so that it is unlikely that those waves have a relevant influence on prominence energetics. When 1 s ≲ P ≲ 100 s the energy absorption into the slab shows several sharp and narrow peaks that can reach up to ~100% when the incident wave frequency matches a cavity resonance of the slab. Wave heating is enhanced at those resonant frequencies. Conversely, when P ≲ 1 s cavity resonances are absent, but the waves are heavily damped by the strong dissipation. We estimate that wave heating may compensate for about 10% of radiative losses of the prominence plasma.

  19. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  20. Conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to channel waves in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the mode conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to stratigraphically guided channel waves was discovered in data from a crosswell acoustic experiment conducted between wells penetrating thin coal strata located near Rifle, Colorado. Traveltime moveout observations show that borehole Stoneley waves, excited by a transmitter positioned at substantial distances in one well above and below a coal stratum at 2025 m depth, underwent partial conversion to a channel wave propagating away from the well through the coal. In an adjacent well the channel wave was detected at receiver locations within the coal, and borehole Stoneley waves, arising from a second partial conversion of channel waves, were detected at locations above and below the coal. The observed channel wave is inferred to be the third-higher Rayleigh mode based on comparison of the measured group velocity with theoretically derived dispersion curves. The identification of the mode conversion between borehole and stratigraphically guided waves is significant because coal penetrated by multiple wells may be detected without placing an acoustic transmitter or receiver within the waveguide. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Density wave theory. [interstellar gas dynamics and galactic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The prospect that density waves and galactic shock waves are present on the large scale in disk shaped galaxies has received support in recent years from both theoretical and observational studies. Large-scale galactic shock waves in the interstellar gas are suggested to play an important governing role in star formation, molecule formation, and the degree of development of spiral structure. Through the dynamics of the interstellar gas and the galactic shock-wave phenomenon, a new insight into the physical basis underlying the morphological classification system of galaxies is suggested.

  2. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  3. Comparison of standing-wave and traveling-wave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.

    1986-04-01

    The controversy over the relative advantages of standing-wave and traveling-wave linear accelerators is now in its fourth decade. It has been fed by a considerable body of misinformation. The author hopes in this paper to shed some light on the subject, and expose some of the falsehoods. The discussion is directed toward the question of which structure to use for short pulse high field electron accelerators since it is almost universally accepted that standing-wave structures are appropriate for CW and long pulse accelerators. Three arguments against standing-wave accelerators are discussed and shown to be invalid.

  4. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch.

  5. Midlatitude Rossby wave forcing of equatorial Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biello, J. A.; Kiladis, G. N.; Back, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations strongly suggest that convectively coupled Kelvin waves can be generated by extratropical wave activity. This mechanism is particularly efficient over Australia, where wave activity appears immediately after the extratropical Rossby waves propagate into the region during the Austral winter. This interaction occurs where the zonal wind is strongly sheared both in the meridional and vertical directions. In order to understand this phenomenon the authors study the linear primitive equations in the presence of barotropic and baroclinic shear and the dispersion characteristics of the sheared Matsuno modes are calculated. Depending on the shear strength, the waves are stable or unstable and can be categorized into three groups. First there are the classical Matsuno modes modified by shear. Second there are extratropical "free" Rossby waves. Third, there are Rossby waves meridionally confined to the shear layer - these latter modes can be unstable, or stable and part of the continuous spectrum. In examples where the zonal winds are barotropically and baroclinically stable, we show that a continuous spectrum of Rossby waves exists. If the zonal winds are strong enough, the Rossby waves in the continuous spectrum have an equatorial signature exactly like the Matsuno Kelvin wave - despite the fact that, in these examples, the Matsuno Kelvin wave also exists on its own and that all modes are stable. For stronger shears, these continuous spectrum modes become unstable. Although the appear similar to Sakai's Rossby/Kelvin instability, their existence arises from a completely different phenomenon. The Sakai instability requires the frequency of a stable equatorial Rossby mode to coincide with the stable Kelvin wave frequency in order for the two modes to create a stable/unstable pair. Our results show that unstable Rossby waves need only have their frequencies Doppler shifted to that of the Kelvin wave frequency by the underlying shear in order that they acquire a

  6. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch. PMID:11488494

  7. The effect of wave current interactions on the storm surge and inundation in Charleston Harbor during Hurricane Hugo 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lian; Liu, Huiqing; Peng, Machuan

    The effects of wave-current interactions on the storm surge and inundation induced by Hurricane Hugo in and around the Charleston Harbor and its adjacent coastal regions are examined by using a three-dimensional (3-D) wave-current coupled modeling system. The 3-D storm surge and inundation modeling component of the coupled system is based on the Princeton ocean model (POM), whereas the wave modeling component is based on the third-generation wave model, simulating waves nearshore (SWAN). The results indicate that the effects of wave-induced surface, bottom, and radiation stresses can separately or in combination produce significant changes in storm surge and inundation. The effects of waves vary spatially. In some areas, the contribution of waves to peak storm surge during Hurricane Hugo reached as high as 0.76 m which led to substantial changes in the inundation and drying areas simulated by the storm surge model.

  8. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  9. Ion wave breaking acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Bamberg, K.-U.; Ma, W. J.; Liu, J.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-07-01

    Laser driven ion wave breaking acceleration (IWBA) in plasma wakefields is investigated by means of a one-dimensional (1D) model and 1D/3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. IWBA operates in relativistic transparent plasma for laser intensities in the range of 1020- 1023 W /cm2 . The threshold for IWBA is identified in the plane of plasma density and laser amplitude. In the region just beyond the threshold, self-injection takes place only for a fraction of ions and in a limited time period. This leads to well collimated ion pulses with peaked energy spectra, in particular for 3D geometry.

  10. Astrophysical blast wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Nathan; Geissel, Matthias; Lewis, Sean M; Porter, John L.

    2015-03-01

    The data described in this document consist of image files of shadowgraphs of astrophysically relevant laser driven blast waves. Supporting files include Mathematica notebooks containing design calculations, tabulated experimental data and notes, and relevant publications from the open research literature. The data was obtained on the Z-Beamlet laser from July to September 2014. Selected images and calculations will be published as part of a PhD dissertation and in associated publications in the open research literature, with Sandia credited as appropriate. The authors are not aware of any restrictions that could affect the release of the data.

  11. Spin waves in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A working report is presented in order to document early results of research on the stability of laminar boundary layers. The report shows that constitutive equations for a structured continua may be derived by the technique of reinterpreting velocity in the conventional stress to rate-of-strain relationship so as to account for effects of particle rotation. It is demonstrated that accounting for particle structure even at a molecular level makes the fluid viscoelastic with the ability to propagate vector waves. It is shown that particle structure modifies the basic stability equation for the system, which in turn would alter values for critical Reynolds number.

  12. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  13. Spin Wave Genie

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce the time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.

  14. Spin Wave Genie

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  15. Exercise central (aortic) blood pressure is predominantly driven by forward traveling waves, not wave reflection.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Davies, Justin E; Roberts-Thomson, Phillip; Black, J Andrew; Hughes, Alun D; Sharman, James E

    2013-07-01

    Exercise hypertension independently predicts cardiovascular mortality, although little is known about exercise central hemodynamics. This study aimed to determine the contribution of arterial wave travel and aortic reservoir characteristics to central blood pressure (BP) during exercise. We hypothesized that exercise central BP would be principally related to forward wave travel and aortic reservoir function. After routine diagnostic coronary angiography, invasive pressure and flow velocity were recorded in the ascending aorta via sensor-tipped intra-arterial wires in 10 participants (age, 55±10 years; 70% men) free of coronary artery disease with normal left ventricular function. Measures were recorded at baseline and during supine cycle ergometry. Using wave intensity analysis, dominant wave types throughout the cardiac cycle were identified (forward and backward, compression, and decompression), and aortic reservoir and excess pressure were calculated. Central systolic BP increased significantly with exercise (Δ=19±12 mm Hg; P<0.001). This was associated with increases in systolic forward compression waves (Δ=12×10(6)±17×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P=0.045) and forward decompression waves in late systole (Δ=9×10(6)±6×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P<0.001). Despite significant augmentation in BP (Δ=9±6 mm Hg; P=0.002), reflected waves did not increase in magnitude (Δ=-1×10(6)±3×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P=0.2). Excess pressure rose significantly with exercise (Δ=16±9 mm Hg; P<0.001), and reservoir pressure integral fell (Δ=-5×10(5)±5×10(5) Pa·s; P=0.010). Change in reflection coefficient negatively correlated with change in central systolic BP (r=-0.68; P=0.03). We conclude that elevation of exercise central BP is principally because of increases in aortic forward traveling waves generated by left ventricular ejection. These findings have relevance to understanding central BP waveform morphology and pathophysiology of exercise hypertension.

  16. Plasma waves near the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoppe, M. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Etcheto, J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma waves associated with the magnetosphere from the magnetosheath to the outer magnetosphere are investigated to obtain a clear definition of the boundaries and regions, to characterize the waves observed in these regions, to determine which wave modes are present, and to determine their origin. Emphasis is on high time resolution data and a comparison between measurements by different antenna systems. It is shown that the magnetosheath flux transfer events, the magnetopause current layer, the outer magnetosphere, and the boundary layer can be identified by their magnetic field and plasma wave characteristics, as well as by their plasma and energetic particle signatures. The plasma wave characteristics in the current layer and in the boundary layer are very similar to the features in the flux transfer events, and upon entry into their outer magnetosphere, the plasma wave spectra are dominated by intense electromagnetic chorus bursts and electrostatic emissions.

  17. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations. PMID:23516957

  18. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  19. WINDII atmospheric wave airglow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.T.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Solheim, B.H.; Shepherd, G.G.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary WINDII nighttime airglow wave-imaging data in the UARS rolldown attitude has been analyzed with the goal to survey gravity waves near the upper boundary of the middle atmosphere. Wave analysis is performed on O[sub 2](0,0) emissions from a selected 1[sup 0] x 1[sup 0] oblique view of the airglow layer at approximately 95 km altitude, which has no direct earth background and only an atmospheric background which is optically thick for the 0[sub 2](0,0) emission. From a small data set, orbital imaging of atmospheric wave structures is demonstrated, with indication of large variations in wave activity across land and sea. Comparison ground-based imagery is discussed with respect to similarity of wave variations across land/sea boundaries and future orbital mosaic image construction.

  20. Solitary waves in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1996-07-01

    Since space charge waves on a particle beam exhibit both dispersive and nonlinear character, solitary waves or solitons are possible. Dispersive, nonlinear wave propagation in high current beams is found to be similar to ion-acoustic waves in plasmas with an analogy between Debye screening and beam pipe shielding. Exact longitudinal solitary wave propagation is found for potentials associated with certain transverse distributions which fill the beam pipe. For weak dispersion, the waves satisfy the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, but for strong dispersion they exhibit breaking. More physically realizable distributions which do not fill the beam pipe are investigated and shown to also satisfy a KdV equation for weak dispersion if averaging over rapid transverse motion is physically justified. Scaling laws are presented to explore likely parameter regimes where these phenomena may be observed experimentally.