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Sample records for infrared fluorescnce-based bacteriophage

  1. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed.

  2. Bacteriophage assembly.

    PubMed

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  3. Lytic bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  4. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better.

  5. Bacteriophage prehistory

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Abedon, Cameron; Thomas, Anne; Mazure, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    We identified 30 actual or presumptive “bacteriophage” references dating between the years 1895 and 1917 and have further explored one of the oldest: Hankin's 1896 study of a bactericidal action associated with the waters of the Ganges and Jumna rivers in India. As Hankin's work took place approximately 20 years prior to the actual discovery of bacteriophages, no claims were made as to a possible phage nature of the phenomenon. Here we suggest that it may be imprudent to assume nevertheless that it represents an early observation of phagemediated bactericidal activity. Our principal argument is that the antibacterial aspect of these river waters was able to retain full potency following “heating” for one-half hour in hermetically sealed tubes, where heating in “open” tubes resulted in loss of antibacterial activity. We also suggest that environmental phage counts would have had to have been unusually high—greater than 106/ml impacting a single host strain—to achieve the rates of bacterial loss that Hankin observed. PMID:22164351

  6. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  7. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  8. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, David R.; Parracho, Helena M. R. T.; Walker, James; Sharp, Richard; Hughes, Gavin; Werthén, Maria; Lehman, Susan; Morales, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce) enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  9. Bacteriophage therapy against Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youqiang; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yang; Pei, Jiangsen; Yao, Su; Cheng, Chi

    2015-02-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are a class of gram-negative facultative anaerobic rods, which can cause a variety of diseases, such as bacteremia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, lower respiratory tract infections, skin and soft-tissue infections, urinary tract infections, intra-abdominal infections and ophthalmic infections, in humans, poultry, animals and fish. Disease caused by Enterobacteriaceae cause the deaths of millions of people every year, resulting in enormous economic loss. Drug treatment is a useful and efficient way to control Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, with the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance has been found in growing number of Enterobacteriaceae infections and, as such, there is an urgent need to find new methods of control. Bacteriophage therapy is an efficient alternative to antibiotics as it employs a different antibacterial mechanism. This paper summarizes the history of bacteriophage therapy, its bacterial lytic mechanisms, and the studies that have focused on Enterobacteriaceae and bacteriophage therapy.

  10. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  11. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  12. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  13. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  14. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  15. BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY AND CAMPYLOBACTER

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The book chapter reports efforts to exploit Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages to reduce the numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli colonizing poultry and contaminating poultry meat products. Controlling campylobacters in poultry represents one of the greatest challenges to the agriculture a...

  16. [RATIONAL ASPECTS OF BACTERIOPHAGES USE].

    PubMed

    Vakarina, A A; Kataeva, L V; Karpukhina, N F

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of existing aspects of bacteriophage use and study features of their lytic activity by using various techniques. Effect of monophages and associated bacteriophages (staphylococci, piopolyvalent and piocombined, intestiphage, pneumonia klebsiella and polyvalent klebsiella produced by "Microgen") was studied with 380 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 279 cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae in liquid and solid nutrient media. From patients with intestinal disorder, sensitivity was analyzed to 184 strains of Salmonella genus bacteria 18 serological variants to salmonella bacteriophages, 137 strains of Escherichia coli (lactose-negative, hemolytic), as well as some members of OKA groups (21 serovars) to coli-proteic and piopolyvalent bacteriophages. Lytic ability of the piobacteriophage against Klebsiella and Proteus genus bacteria was determined. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to staphylococcus bacteriophage in 71.6% of cases and to piobacteriophage--in 86.15% of cases. A 100% lytic ability of salmonella bacteriophage against Salmonella spp. was established. Sensitivity of E. coli of various serogroups to coli-proteic and piobacteriophage was 66 - 100%. Klebsiella, Proteus genus bacteria were sensitive to piobacteriophage in only 35% and 43.15% of cases, respectively. A more rational use of bacteriophages is necessary: development of a technique, evaluation of sensitivity of bacteria to bacteriophage, introduction of corrections into their production (expansion of bacteriophage spectra, determination and indication of their concentration in accompanying documents).

  17. Bacteriophages of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage play many varied roles in microbial ecology and evolution. This chapter collates a vast body of knowledge and expertise on Yersinia pestis phages, including the history of their isolation and classical methods for their isolation and identification. The genomic diversity of Y. pestis phage and bacteriophage islands in the Y. pestis genome are also discussed because all phage research represents a branch of genetics. In addition, our knowledge of the receptors that are recognized by Y. pestis phage, advances in phage therapy for Y. pestis infections, the application of phage in the detection of Y. pestis, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) sequences of Y. pestis from prophage DNA are all reviewed here.

  18. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  19. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  20. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  1. [Possibilities of bacteriophage therapy].

    PubMed

    Skurnik, Mikael; Kiljunen, Saija

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens has increased, and new therapies are urgently needed. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses infecting and killing bacteria, are the most abundant organisms on earth. In nature there are several specific phages for every bacterium, controlling bacterial numbers and maintaining ecological balance. Phage therapy, i.e., treating bacterial infections with phages, offers an alternative complementary to antibiotics as phages infect and kill also multi-resistant bacteria. Phages possess narrow host specificity, each phage infecting only a few bacterial species or strains. Thereby phages do not harm the normal microbiota as antibiotics do. We aim to begin clinical trials of phage therapy in Finland.

  2. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  3. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry.

  4. Jumbo Bacteriophages: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages with genomes larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages, and are rarely isolated by conventional methods. These phages are designated “jumbo” owing to their most notable features of a large phage virion and large genome size. However, in addition to these, jumbo phages also exhibit several novel characteristics that have not been observed for phages with smaller genomes, which differentiate jumbo phages in terms of genome organization, virion structure, progeny propagation, and evolution. In this review, we summarize available reports on jumbo phages and discuss the differences between jumbo phages and small-genome phages. We also discuss data suggesting that jumbo phages might have evolved from phages with smaller genomes by acquiring additional functional genes, and that these additional genes reduce the dependence of the jumbo phages on the host bacteria. PMID:28352259

  5. Bacteriophages of Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J. J.; Svircev, A. M.; Smith, R.; Castle, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Fifty bacteriophage isolates of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight, were collected from sites in and around the Niagara region of southern Ontario and the Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario. Forty-two phages survived the isolation, purification, and storage processes. The majority of the phages in the collection were isolated from the soil surrounding trees exhibiting fire blight symptoms. Only five phages were isolated from infected aerial tissue in pear and apple orchards. To avoid any single-host selection bias, six bacterial host strains were used in the initial isolation and enrichment processes. Molecular characterization of the phages with a combination of PCR and restriction endonuclease digestions showed that six distinct phage types, described as groups 1 to 6, were recovered. Ten phage isolates were related to the previously characterized E. amylovora PEa1, with some divergence of molecular markers between phages isolated from different sites. A study of the host ranges of the phages revealed that certain types were unable to efficiently lyse some E. amylovora strains and that some isolates were able to lyse the epiphytic bacterium Pantoea agglomerans. Representatives from the six molecular groups were studied by electron microscopy to determine their morphology. The phages exhibited distinct morphologies when examined by an electron microscope. Group 1 and 2 phages were tailed and contractile, and phages belonging to groups 3 to 6 had short tails or openings with thin appendages. Based on morphotypes, the bacteriophages of E. amylovora were placed in the order Caudovirales, in the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae. PMID:12676693

  6. Differential bacteriophage mortality on exposure to copper.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J

    2011-10-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water.

  7. Bacteriophage typing of Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed

    Pruneda, R C; Farmer, J J

    1977-01-01

    A bacteriophage-typing schema was developed for differentiating strains of Shigella sonnei. Sixty-seven bacteriophages were obtained from other collections, and 36 bacteriophages were isolated from sewage. From these 103 bacteriophages, a provisional set of 12 was chosen by computer analysis as being the most sensitive in differentiating strains of S. sonnei isolated in the United States. The provisional schema was used to type 265 strains from different geographical areas. It divided them into 87 different lysis patterns, and all 265 strains were typable. Smooth and rough colonial variants of the same strain had different lysis patterns, so the technique was standardized to type rough colonies only. Reproducibility was difficult to obtain until all conditions were carefully standardized. Changes in results were noted even on different lot numbers of Trypticase soy agar, which was defined as the standard medium. So that the medium would not be a variable, 100 pounds (ca 453.5 kg) of the same lot number was purchased. Bacteriophage typing was very useful in differentiating strains, and work should continue on establishing a standarized schema.

  8. THE ELECTRICAL CHARGE OF BACTERIOPHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, A. P.; Ritter, R. C.; Smith, S. P.

    1929-01-01

    1. Two types of cataphoresis apparatus for determining, under aseptic conditions, the charge carried by biologically active substances, such as Bacteriophage are described. One cell depends upon the electrophoresis of particles into agar and their subsequent re-suspension in a fluid medium for testing purposes. This cell has certain advantages when employed in connection with agents of small dimensions ordinarily inactivated by prolonged exposure to required test conditions. 2. Several separate races of anti-coli Bacteriophage have been found to bear a negative charge within a range of H-ion concentrations from pH. 9.0 to pH. 3.4. At pH. 3.35 and below, the lytic particles migrate through agar to the cathode. It is likely that the reversal in direction of migration is due to the assumption of a positive charge by the Bacteriophage corpuscle. PMID:19869660

  9. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  10. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  11. Bacteriophage therapy in animal production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concerns over the consequences of bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the use of antibiotics in animal production have led to an increase in research on alternatives to antibiotics. Bacteriophages kill bacteria, are natural, safe, plentiful, self replicating, self limiting, can be used to spec...

  12. Bacteriophages in dairy products: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Mc Grath, Stephen; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2007-04-01

    Since the time bacteriophages were first identified as a major cause of fermentation failure in the dairy industry, researchers have been struggling to develop strategies to exclude them from the dairy environment. Over 70 years of research has led to huge improvements in the consistency and quality of fermented dairy products, while also facilitating an appreciation of the beneficial properties of bacteriophages with respect to dairy product development. With specific reference to Lactococcus lactis and cheese production, this review outlines some recently reported novel methods aimed at limiting the bacteriophage infection as well as highlighting some beneficial aspects of bacteriophage activity.

  13. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol".

  14. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  15. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for molecular experimentation has long been an area of difficulty. Many of the traditional laboratory techniques for strain construction are laborious and hampered by poor efficiency. The ability to move chromosomal genetic markers and plasmids using bacteriophage transduction has greatly increased the speed and ease of S. epidermidis studies. These molecular genetic advances have advanced the S. epidermidis research field beyond a select few genetically tractable strains and facilitated investigations of clinically relevant isolates. PMID:24222465

  16. Bacteriophage: laboratorial diagnosis and phage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joas L. Da; Hirata, Rosario D.C.; Hirata, Mario H.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been researched as a new alternative to antibiotics. These viruses inject their genetic material into bacteria and use their host machinery to multiply themselves. The research of bacteriophages in Brazil will certainly provide low-cost treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria, new microbiological diagnosis and advantages for the Brazilian food industry. PMID:24031398

  17. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  18. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. PMID:24143096

  19. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  20. Programming Bacteriophages by Swapping Their Specificity Determinants.

    PubMed

    Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2015-12-01

    Bacteriophages, bacteria's natural enemies, may serve as potent antibacterial agents. Their specificity for certain bacterial sub-species limits their effectiveness, but allows selective targeting of bacteria. Lu and colleagues present a platform for such targeting through alteration of bacteriophages' host specificity by swapping specificity domains in their host-recognition ligand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The future of bacteriophage biology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Allan

    2003-06-01

    After an illustrious history as one of the primary tools that established the foundations of molecular biology, bacteriophage research is now undergoing a renaissance in which the primary focus is on the phages themselves rather than the molecular mechanisms that they explain. Studies of the evolution of phages and their role in natural ecosystems are flourishing. Practical questions, such as how to use phages to combat human diseases that are caused by bacteria, how to eradicate phage pests in the food industry and what role they have in the causation of human diseases, are receiving increased attention. Phages are also useful in the deeper exploration of basic molecular and biophysical questions.

  2. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  3. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials.

  4. The next generation of bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Timothy K; Koeris, Michael S

    2011-10-01

    Bacteriophage therapy for bacterial infections is a concept with an extensive but controversial history. There has been a recent resurgence of interest into bacteriophages owing to the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and virulent bacterial pathogens. Despite these efforts, bacteriophage therapy remains an underutilized option in Western medicine due to challenges such as regulation, limited host range, bacterial resistance to phages, manufacturing, side effects of bacterial lysis, and delivery. Recent advances in biotechnology, bacterial diagnostics, macromolecule delivery, and synthetic biology may help to overcome these technical hurdles. These research efforts must be coupled with practical and rigorous approaches at academic, commercial, and regulatory levels in order to successfully advance bacteriophage therapy into clinical settings.

  5. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  6. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  7. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  8. [Spontaneous bacteriophage induction in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    PubMed

    Besaeva, S G; Mikhaĭlov, A A; Petrova, T M; Tur, A I; Bystrova, E V

    1987-01-01

    The production of temperate bacteriophages was studied in the process of batch cultivation of three Bacillus thuringiensis lysogenic strains. Phage titres were determined using an indicator culture (IPM-1148). The growth of bacteriophages was induced when thermoactivated spores germinated. Some cells (1.10(-3)-2.10(-3)) underwent lysis without their division. The subsequent lytic cycles occurred in the actively growing culture. Phage titres ceased to rise before the exponential growth phase was over.

  9. Taking Bacteriophage Therapy Seriously: A Moral Argument

    PubMed Central

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need. PMID:24868534

  10. Taking bacteriophage therapy seriously: a moral argument.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Scheres, Jacques; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel; Ceulemans, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need.

  11. Characterization and purification of bacteriophages using chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Kurt; Shen, Hong; Lute, Scott; Pérez, Jessica Soto; Frey, Douglas D

    2008-10-17

    The technique of chromatofocusing was applied to the characterization and purification of three bacteriophages that are routinely used for testing virus filters: phiX174, PR772, and PP7. Chemically well-defined eluent buffers were used, instead of the more commonly used chromatofocusing polyampholyte buffers. Chromatographic column packings were selected to minimize band broadening by confining bacteriophage adsorption solely to the exterior particle surface. Under the conditions used it was determined that bacteriophages could be made to focus into narrow bands in a retained pH gradient with recoveries of live phage that ranged from 15 to nearly 100% as determined by a plaque-forming assay. Retention times and apparent isoelectric point data were obtained for samples consisting either of purified bacteriophage, or samples consisting of crude preparations of bacteriophages containing host cell impurities. Isoelectric point estimates were obtained using modified, previously described models. The results obtained suggest that chromatofocusing is a simple and rapid method for obtaining approximate isoelectric points for bacteriophages and probably other types of viruses. It is also likely a useful method for purifying these materials.

  12. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  13. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Donovan, David M; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can access the peptidoglycan and destroy these organisms when applied externally, making them interesting antimicrobial candidates, particularly in light of increasing bacterial drug resistance. This article reviews the modular structure of these enzymes, in which cell wall binding and catalytic functions are separated, as well as their mechanism of action, lytic activity and potential as antimicrobials. It particularly focuses on molecular engineering as a means of optimizing endolysins for specific applications, highlights new developments that may render these proteins active against Gram-negative and intracellular pathogens and summarizes the most recent applications of endolysins in the fields of medicine, food safety, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23030422

  14. Tradeoffs in bacteriophage life histories.

    PubMed

    Keen, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on the planet, yet most classical principles of evolutionary biology and ecology were not developed with viruses in mind. Here, the concept of biological tradeoffs, a fundamental tenet of life history theory, is examined in the context of bacteriophage biology. Specifically, several important parameters of phage life histories-replication, persistence, host range, and adsorption-are evaluated for tradeoffs. Available data indicate that replication rate is strongly negatively correlated with both persistence and host range, suggesting that the well-documented tradeoff in macroorganisms between offspring production and offspring quality also applies to phages. The biological tradeoffs that appear to characterize viruses' life histories have potential importance for viral evolution, ecology, and pathogenesis.

  15. Incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Bacteriophages and Other Vibrio Bacteriophages in Marine Samples †

    PubMed Central

    Baross, John A.; Liston, John; Morita, Richard Y.

    1978-01-01

    Vibrio bacteriophages were isolated by enrichment from 177 of 643 samples of marine molluscan shellfish, crustaceans, seawater, and sediments. The predominant bacteriophage types isolated were specific for some strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A high frequency of phage isolations was also observed with strains of agar-digesting vibrios (21 of 56) and psychrophilic vibrios (14 of 72) that were originally isolated from non-shellfish growing areas. No bacteriophages were isolated against V. alginolyticus and only rarely for V. anguillarum even though these were the two most abundant species found in near-shore environments. No V. cholerae phages were isolated. It was also determined from quantitative studies on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) obtained from two environments in Washington and Oregon that the titers of V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages increased with increasing seasonal water temperatures and that this was proportional to the increase in numbers of mesophilic vibrios and not with the incidence of V. parahaemolyticus. Titers of V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages occasionally exceeded 106 per g of oyster during the summer months. Specific V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages were also isolated from market seafoods and other marine samples that originated in cold environments where no mesophilic vibrios are expected to be found. The possibility that V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages originate from Vibrio spp. other than V. parahaemolyticus and the role of these bacteriophages in the ecology of marine vibrios are discussed. PMID:727781

  16. [Research advance on bacteriophage therapy in bacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Pei, Jingliang; Fu, Yurong

    2013-11-01

    Bacteriophage is a bacterium dependent virus. It has unique advantages in the treatment of bacterial infection, especially infection caused by drug-resistant bacteria. Its metabolic kinetics and route of administration are the current research focus. Bacteriophage lytic enzyme, as a new therapeutic method, has more advantages than active bacteriophage. This review is focused on the recent progress in bacteriophage research, including the mechanism of bacteria lysis, the route of administration, the application of genetic engineering, etc.

  17. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria -specific bacteriophage...) bacteriophages (phages) specific against L. monocytogenes. (2) Each phage is deposited at, and assigned an...

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. Copyright © 2016 Bollivar et al.

  19. Characterization of Temperate Bacteriophages of Bacillus subtilis by the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRI: Evidence for Three Different Temperate Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G. A.; Williams, M. T.; Baney, H. W.; Young, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages of Bacillus subtilis were characterized according to host range and digestion of the bacteriophage genome by endonuclease EcoRI. The three bacteriophages, φ3T, SPO2, and φ105, were all heteroimmune, and the DNA digests showed dissimilar patterns by agarose-ethidium bromide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:4213607

  20. Bacteriophages and Bacterial Plant Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R. P.; Hill, Colin; O’Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Losses in crop yields due to disease need to be reduced in order to meet increasing global food demands associated with growth in the human population. There is a well-recognized need to develop new environmentally friendly control strategies to combat bacterial crop disease. Current control measures involving the use of traditional chemicals or antibiotics are losing their efficacy due to the natural development of bacterial resistance to these agents. In addition, there is an increasing awareness that their use is environmentally unfriendly. Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, have received increased research interest in recent years as a realistic environmentally friendly means of controlling bacterial diseases. Their use presents a viable control measure for a number of destructive bacterial crop diseases, with some phage-based products already becoming available on the market. Phage biocontrol possesses advantages over chemical controls in that tailor-made phage cocktails can be adapted to target specific disease-causing bacteria. Unlike chemical control measures, phage mixtures can be easily adapted for bacterial resistance which may develop over time. In this review, we will examine the progress and challenges for phage-based disease biocontrol in food crops. PMID:28163700

  1. Bacteriophage-Based Pathogen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven

    Considered the most abundant organism on Earth, at a population approaching 1031, bacteriophage, or phage for short, mediate interactions with myriad bacterial hosts that has for decades been exploited in phage typing schemes for signature identification of clinical, food-borne, and water-borne pathogens. With over 5,000 phage being morphologically characterized and grouped as to susceptible host, there exists an enormous cache of bacterial-specific sensors that has more recently been incorporated into novel bio-recognition assays with heightened sensitivity, specificity, and speed. These assays take many forms, ranging from straightforward visualization of labeled phage as they attach to their specific bacterial hosts to reporter phage that genetically deposit trackable signals within their bacterial hosts to the detection of progeny phage or other uniquely identifiable elements released from infected host cells. A comprehensive review of these and other phage-based detection assays, as directed towards the detection and monitoring of bacterial pathogens, will be provided in this chapter.

  2. Bacteriophages and Bacterial Plant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R P; Hill, Colin; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Losses in crop yields due to disease need to be reduced in order to meet increasing global food demands associated with growth in the human population. There is a well-recognized need to develop new environmentally friendly control strategies to combat bacterial crop disease. Current control measures involving the use of traditional chemicals or antibiotics are losing their efficacy due to the natural development of bacterial resistance to these agents. In addition, there is an increasing awareness that their use is environmentally unfriendly. Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, have received increased research interest in recent years as a realistic environmentally friendly means of controlling bacterial diseases. Their use presents a viable control measure for a number of destructive bacterial crop diseases, with some phage-based products already becoming available on the market. Phage biocontrol possesses advantages over chemical controls in that tailor-made phage cocktails can be adapted to target specific disease-causing bacteria. Unlike chemical control measures, phage mixtures can be easily adapted for bacterial resistance which may develop over time. In this review, we will examine the progress and challenges for phage-based disease biocontrol in food crops.

  3. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Brodetsky, Anna M.; Romig, W. R.

    1965-01-01

    Brodetsky, Anna M. (University of California, Los Angeles), and W. R. Romig. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis bacteriophages. J. Bacteriol. 90:1655–1663. 1965.—A group of six phages, SP5, SP6, SP7, SP8, SP9, and SP13, which use the Marburg strain of Bacillus subtilis as host was characterized. These phages, referred to as group 1, were examined for the following properties: host range, plaque morphology, stability, adsorption kinetics, one-step growth characteristics, calcium requirements, serum neutralization, thermal inactivation, and inactivation by ultraviolet irradiation. Five unrelated B. subtilis phages, SP3, SP10, PBS1, SP alpha, and SP beta, were included in the studies. When first isolated, none of the group 1 phages was able to replicate efficiently on B. subtilis SB19, a mutant of the “transforming” B. subtilis 168. Host range mutants capable of growth in SB19 were isolated for all of the group 1 phages except SP13, and are designated the “star” phages (SP5* through SP9*). For characterization, SB19 was used as host for the star phages, and another B. subtilis mutant, 168B, was host for SP13. PMID:4955056

  4. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  5. Bacteriophages and their application in food safety.

    PubMed

    García, P; Martínez, B; Obeso, J M; Rodríguez, A

    2008-12-01

    In recent years it has become widely recognized that bacteriophages have several potential applications in the food industry. They have been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health, as biopreservatives in food and as tools for detecting pathogenic bacteria throughout the food chain. Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect and lyse bacterial cells. Consequently, they display two unique features relevant in and suitable for food safety. Namely, their safe use as they are harmless to mammalian cells and their high host specificity that allows proper starter performance in fermented products and keeps the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. In this review, we examine the promising uses of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens and the drawbacks on which more research is needed to further exploit these biological entities.

  6. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  7. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials. PMID:27148173

  8. Evidence for a lineage of virulent bacteriophages that target Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Timms, Andrew R; Cambray-Young, Joanna; Scott, Andrew E; Petty, Nicola K; Connerton, Phillippa L; Clarke, Louise; Seeger, Kathy; Quail, Mike; Cummings, Nicola; Maskell, Duncan J; Thomson, Nicholas R; Connerton, Ian F

    2010-03-30

    Our understanding of the dynamics of genome stability versus gene flux within bacteriophage lineages is limited. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the use of bacteriophages as 'therapeutic' agents; a prerequisite for their use in such therapies is a thorough understanding of their genetic complement, genome stability and their ecology to avoid the dissemination or mobilisation of phage or bacterial virulence and toxin genes. Campylobacter, a food-borne pathogen, is one of the organisms for which the use of bacteriophage is being considered to reduce human exposure to this organism. Sequencing and genome analysis was performed for two Campylobacter bacteriophages. The genomes were extremely similar at the nucleotide level (> or = 96%) with most differences accounted for by novel insertion sequences, DNA methylases and an approximately 10 kb contiguous region of metabolic genes that were dissimilar at the sequence level but similar in gene function between the two phages. Both bacteriophages contained a large number of radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) genes, presumably involved in boosting host metabolism during infection, as well as evidence that many genes had been acquired from a wide range of bacterial species. Further bacteriophages, from the UK Campylobacter typing set, were screened for the presence of bacteriophage structural genes, DNA methylases, mobile genetic elements and regulatory genes identified from the genome sequences. The results indicate that many of these bacteriophages are related, with 10 out of 15 showing some relationship to the sequenced genomes. Two large virulent Campylobacter bacteriophages were found to show very high levels of sequence conservation despite separation in time and place of isolation. The bacteriophages show adaptations to their host and possess genes that may enhance Campylobacter metabolism, potentially advantaging both the bacteriophage and its host. Genetic conservation has been shown to extend to other

  9. Bacteriophage lysis: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R

    1992-01-01

    Bacteriophage lysis involves at least two fundamentally different strategies. Most phages elaborate at least two proteins, one of which is a murein hydrolase, or lysin, and the other is a membrane protein, which is given the designation holin in this review. The function of the holin is to create a lesion in the cytoplasmic membrane through which the murein hydrolase passes to gain access to the murein layer. This is necessary because phage-encoded lysins never have secretory signal sequences and are thus incapable of unassisted escape from the cytoplasm. The holins, whose prototype is the lambda S protein, share a common organization in terms of the arrangement of charged and hydrophobic residues, and they may all contain at least two transmembrane helical domains. The available evidence suggests that holins oligomerize to form nonspecific holes and that this hole-forming step is the regulated step in phage lysis. The correct scheduling of the lysis event is as much an essential feature of holin function as is the hole formation itself. In the second strategy of lysis, used by the small single-stranded DNA phage phi X174 and the single-stranded RNA phage MS2, no murein hydrolase activity is synthesized. Instead, there is a single species of small membrane protein, unlike the holins in primary structure, which somehow causes disruption of the envelope. These lysis proteins function by activation of cellular autolysins. A host locus is required for the lytic function of the phi X174 lysis gene E. Images PMID:1406491

  10. Toward modern inhalational bacteriophage therapy: nebulization of bacteriophages of Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Laleh; Seed, Kimberley D; Dennis, Jonathan J; Finlay, Warren H

    2008-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections have renewed interest in finding substitute methods of treatment. The purpose of the present in vitro study was to investigate the possibility of respiratory delivery of a Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteriophage by nebulized aerosol administration. Bacteriophages in isotonic saline were aerosolized with Pari LC star and eFlow nebulizers, at titers with mean value (standard deviation) of 2.15 x 10(8) (1.63 x 10(8)) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/mL in 2.5-mL nebulizer fills. The breathing pattern of an adult was simulated using a pulmonary waveform generator. During breath simulation, the size distributions of the nebulized aerosol were measured using phase doppler anemometry (PDA). Efficiency of nebulizer delivery was subsequently determined by collection of aerosol on low resistance filters and measurement of bacteriophage titers. These filter titers were used as input data to a mathematical lung deposition model to predict regional deposition of bacteriophages in the lung and initial bacteriophage titers in the liquid surface layer of each conducting airway generation. The results suggest that BCC bacteriophages can be nebulized successfully within a reasonable delivery time and predicted titers in the lung indicate that this method may hold potential for treatment of bacterial lung infections common among cystic fibrosis patients.

  11. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx) across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential. PMID:22799768

  12. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Kazukiyo

    The development of the molecular biology of bacteriophage such as T4, lambda and filamentous phages was described and the process that the fundamental knowledge obtained in this field has subsequently led us to the technology of phage display was introduced.

  13. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  14. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  15. An undergraduate laboratory activity demonstrating bacteriophage specificity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mary E; Gyure, Ruth A

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay) to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G) was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students' use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50). Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01) and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002). At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51).

  16. STUDIES ON THE PURIFICATION OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    PubMed

    Kalmanson, G; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1939-11-20

    A simple method of concentrating and purifying bacteriophage has been described. The procedure consisted essentially in collecting the active agent on a reinforced collodion membrane of a porosity that would just retain all the active agent and permit extraneous material to pass through. Advantage was taken of the fact that B. coli will proliferate and regenerate bacteriophage in a completely diffusible synthetic medium with ammonia as the only source of nitrogen, which permitted the purification of the bacteriophage by copious washing. The material thus obtained was concentrated by suction and after thorough washing possessed all the activity of the original filtrate. It was labile, losing its activity in a few days on standing, and was quickly and completely inactivated upon drying. This material contained approximately 15 per cent of nitrogen and with 2 or 3 mg. samples of inactive dry residue it was possible to obtain positive protein color tests. The concentrated and purified bacteriophage has about 10(-14) mg. of nitrogen, or 6 x 10(-17) gm. of protein per unit of lytic activity. Assuming that each unit of activity represents a molecule, the calculated maximum average molecular weight would be approximately 36,000,000, and on the assumption of a spherical shape of particles and a density of 1.3, the calculated radius would be about 22 millimicra. By measurement of the diffusion rate, the average radius of particle of the fraction of the purified bacteriophage which diffuses most readily through a porous plate was found to be of the order of magnitude of 9 millimicra, or of a calculated molecular weight of 2,250,000. Furthermore, when this purified bacteriophage was fractionated by forcing it through a thin collodion membrane, which permits the passage of only the smaller particles, it was possible to demonstrate in the ultrafiltrate active particles of about 2 millimicra in radius, and of a calculated molecular weight of 25,000. It was of interest to apply

  17. Use of wide-host-range bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella on poultry products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages used to treat infections are typically amplified in a pathogenic host. However, this practice introduces the risk of administering any remaining bacteriophage-resistant pathogen during bacteriophage application if separate techniques are less than perfect. In this study, bacteriopha...

  18. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang-Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook; Kim, Chuntae; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  19. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb) bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1) Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2) Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection). (3) The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection). (4) The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1) determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2) find the environmental conditions that select for the

  20. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of an Aeromonas punctata Bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Kai, Cheng; Denglan, Zhang; Jingxuan, Deng; Yijun, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    An Aeromonas punctata bacteriophage, named as DH1, was isolated from East Lake, Wuhan city, China. Morphologically, phage DH1 showed a typical Myoviridae structure consisting of an isometric head (50 nm in diameter) and a visible tail. The bacteriophage had a latent period of about 90 minutes and an average burst size of about 125 PFU•Cell(-1). Restriction enzyme pattern of the bacteriophage's genome showed that the genome is a double-stranded DNA and about 34kb in size. The sequenced genomic fragments showed highly similarities to gp04 and gp16 sequence of other Myoviridae bacteriophages at protein level.

  2. A first step toward liposome-mediated intracellular bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Nieth, Anita; Verseux, Cyprien; Barnert, Sabine; Süss, Regine; Römer, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria presents a severe challenge to medicine and public health. While bacteriophage therapy is a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, the general inability of bacteriophages to penetrate eukaryotic cells limits their use against resistant bacteria, causing intracellular diseases like tuberculosis. Bacterial vectors show some promise in carrying therapeutic bacteriophages into cells, but also bring a number of risks like an overload of bacterial antigens or the acquisition of virulence genes from the pathogen. As a first step in the development of a non-bacterial vector for bacteriophage delivery into pathogen-infected cells, we attempted to encapsulate bacteriophages into liposomes. Here we report effective encapsulation of the model bacteriophage λeyfp and the mycobacteriophage TM4 into giant liposomes. Furthermore, we show that liposome-associated bacteriophages are taken up into eukaryotic cells more efficiently than free bacteriophages. These are important milestones in the development of an intracellular bacteriophage therapy that might be useful in the fight against multi-drug-resistant intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  3. Functional relationship between bacteriophages G4 and phi X174.

    PubMed Central

    Borrias, W E; Hagenaar, M; Van Den Brekel, R; Kühlemeijer, C; Weisbeek, P J

    1979-01-01

    Mutants of bacteriophage G4 were isolated and characterized, and their mutations were mapped. They constitute six different genes, namely, A, B, E, F, G, and H. The functional relationship with bacteriophage phi X174 was determined by complementation experiments using amber mutants of phi X and amber mutants of G4. Bacteriophage phi X was able to use the products of G4 genes E, F, G, and H. In bacteriophage G4, however, only the phi X gene H product was functional. Images PMID:480475

  4. Tailed bacteriophages: the order caudovirales.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, H W

    1998-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages have a common origin and constitute an order with three families, named Caudovirales. Their structured tail is unique. Tailed phages share a series of high-level taxonomic properties and show many facultative features that are unique or rare in viruses, for example, tail appendages and unusual bases. They share with other viruses, especially herpesviruses, elements of morphogenesis and life-style that are attributed to convergent evolution. Tailed phages present three types of lysogeny, exemplified by phages lambda, Mu, and P1. Lysogeny appears as a secondary property acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Amino acid sequence alignments (notably of DNA polymerases, integrases, and peptidoglycan hydrolases) indicate frequent events of horizontal gene transfer in tailed phages. Common capsid and tail proteins have not been detected. Tailed phages possibly evolved from small protein shells with a few genes sufficient for some basal level of productive infection. This early stage can no longer be traced. At one point, this precursor phage became perfected. Some of its features were perfect enough to be transmitted until today. It is tempting to list major present-day properties of tailed phages in the past tense to construct a tentative history of these viruses: 1. Tailed phages originated in the early Precambrian, long before eukaryotes and their viruses. 2. The ur-tailed phage, already a quite evolved virus, had an icosahedral head of about 60 nm in diameter and a long non-contractile tail with sixfold symmetry. The capsid contained a single molecule of dsDNA of about 50 kb, and the tail was probably provided with a fixation apparatus. Head and tail were held together by a connector. a. The particle contained no lipids, was heavier than most viruses to come, and had a high DNA content proportional to its capsid size (about 50%). b. Most of its DNA coded for structural proteins. Morphopoietic genes clustered at one end of the genome, with head

  5. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  6. Inflammation boosts bacteriophage transfer between Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Bakkeren, Erik; Cornuault, Jeffrey K; Moor, Kathrin; Hausmann, Annika; Sellin, Mikael E; Loverdo, Claude; Aertsen, Abram; Ackermann, Martin; De Paepe, Marianne; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-03-17

    Bacteriophage transfer (lysogenic conversion) promotes bacterial virulence evolution. There is limited understanding of the factors that determine lysogenic conversion dynamics within infected hosts. A murine Salmonella Typhimurium (STm) diarrhea model was used to study the transfer of SopEΦ, a prophage from STm SL1344, to STm ATCC14028S. Gut inflammation and enteric disease triggered >55% lysogenic conversion of ATCC14028S within 3 days. Without inflammation, SopEΦ transfer was reduced by up to 10(5)-fold. This was because inflammation (e.g., reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, hypochlorite) triggers the bacterial SOS response, boosts expression of the phage antirepressor Tum, and thereby promotes free phage production and subsequent transfer. Mucosal vaccination prevented a dense intestinal STm population from inducing inflammation and consequently abolished SopEΦ transfer. Vaccination may be a general strategy for blocking pathogen evolution that requires disease-driven transfer of temperate bacteriophages.

  7. Bacteriophage ecology in environmental biotechnology processes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2011-06-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria are an integral part of any environmental biotechnology process (EBP). Therefore, factors controlling bacterial abundance, activity, and community composition are central to the understanding of such processes. Among these factors, top-down control by bacteriophage predation has so far received very limited attention. With over 10(8) particles per ml, phage appear to be the most numerous biological entities in EBP. Phage populations in EBP appear to be highly dynamic and to correlate with the population dynamics of their hosts and genomic evidence suggests bacteria evolve to avoid phage predation. Clearly, there is much to learn regarding bacteriophage in EBP before we can truly understand the microbial ecology of these globally important systems.

  8. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  9. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display.

    PubMed

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-11-14

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In 'competitive phage display' bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins.

  11. Drugs against superbugs: private lessons from bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial genomics has provided a plethora of potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery, however, success in the hunt for new antibiotics will hinge on selecting targets with the highest potential. A recent paper by Liu and coworkers describes a new approach to target selection that uncovers strategies used by bacteriophage to disable bacteria. The method uses key phage proteins to identify and validate vulnerable targets and exploits them further in the identification of new antibacterial leads.

  12. Isolation of Bacteriophages Active Against Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Sylvia G.; Hunter, Donald H.

    1967-01-01

    Five distinct bacteriophages have been isolated from strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Filtrates with titers of 10−4 to 10−6 were produced with a modified Swanstrom and Adams semisolid agar procedure, employing Eugonbroth with added agar and an incubation temperature of 30 C. Of 49 strains of N. meningitidis (groups B and C), 25 were lysed by one or more of the phages, but there was no lysis of other Neisseria and Mima polymorpha strains. Images PMID:4990042

  13. Microneedle-mediated transdermal bacteriophage delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Elizabeth; Garland, Martin J.; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Bambury, Eoin; O’Dea, John; Migalska, Katarzyna; Gorman, Sean P.; McCarthy, Helen O.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in bacteriophages as therapeutic agents has recently been reawakened. Parenteral delivery is the most routinely-employed method of administration. However, injection of phages has numerous disadvantages, such as the requirement of a health professional for administration and the possibility of cross-contamination. Transdermal delivery offers one potential means of overcoming many of these problems. The present study utilized a novel poly (carbonate) (PC) hollow microneedle (MN) device for the transdermal delivery of Escherichia coli-specific T4 bacteriophages both in vitro and in vivo. MN successfully achieved bacteriophage delivery in vitro across dermatomed and full thickness skin. A concentration of 2.67 × 106 PFU/ml (plaque forming units per ml) was detected in the receiver compartment when delivered across dermatomed skin and 4.0 × 103 PFU/ml was detected in the receiver compartment when delivered across full thickness skin. An in vivo study resulted in 4.13 × 103 PFU/ml being detected in blood 30 min following initial MN-mediated phage administration. Clearance occurred rapidly, with phages being completely cleared from the systemic circulation within 24 h, which was expected in the absence of infection. We have shown here that MN-mediated delivery allows successful systemic phage absorption. Accordingly, bacteriophage-based therapeutics may now have an alternative route for systemic delivery. Once fully-investigated, this could lead to more widespread investigation of these interesting therapeutic viruses. PMID:22750416

  14. Genomic impact of CRISPR immunization against bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Stahl, Buffy; Chavichvily, Isabelle; Damange, Florian; Romero, Dennis A; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) together with CAS (RISPR-associated) genes form the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which provides sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. Immunity is acquired by the integration of short stretches of invasive DNA as novel 'spacers' into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, these immune markers are transcribed and generate small non-coding interfering RNAs that specifically guide nucleases for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Among the four CRISPR-Cas systems present in Streptococcus thermophilus, CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 have the ability to readily acquire new spacers following bacteriophage or plasmid exposure. In order to investigate the impact of building CRISPR-encoded immunity on the host chromosome, we determined the genome sequence of a BIM (bacteriophage-insensitive mutant) derived from the DGCC7710 model organism, after four consecutive rounds of bacteriophage challenge. As expected, active CRISPR loci evolved via polarized addition of several novel spacers following exposure to bacteriophages. Although analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed a variety of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and INDELs (insertions/deletions), most of the in silico differences were not validated by Sanger re-sequencing. In addition, two SNPs and two small INDELs were identified and tracked in the intermediate variants. Overall, building CRISPR-encoded immunity does not significantly affect the genome, which allows the maintenance of important functional properties in isogenic CRISPR mutants. This is critical for the development and formulation of sustainable and robust next-generation starter cultures with increased industrial lifespans.

  15. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Adsorption of bacteriophages on clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Puls, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and φX-174) on clays (hectorite, saponite, kaolinite, and clay fraction of samples collected from a landfill site). The thermodynamic study not only determines the feasibility of the process but also provides information on the relative magnitudes of the different forces under a particular set of conditions. The total free energy of interaction during sorption of bacteriophages on clays (ΔG) has been assumed to be the summation of ΔGH (ΔG due to hydrophobic interactions) and ΔGEL (ΔG due to electrostatic interactions). The magnitude of ΔGH was determined from the different interfacial tensions (γ) present in the system, while ΔGEL was calculated from ζ-potentials of the colloidal particles. Calculated results show that surface hydrophobicities of the selected sorbents and sorbates dictate sorption. Among the selected bacteriophages, maximum sorption was observed with T-2, while hectorite has the maximum sorption capacity. Experimental results obtained from the batch adsorption studies also corroborated those obtained from the theoretical study.

  17. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum.

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Zhang, H; Wang, R

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 2 bacteriophages of Salmonella Pullorum were isolated using an enrichment protocol and the double agar layer method. They were named PSPu-95 and PSPu-4-116, respectively, against clinical isolates of Salmonella Pullorum SPu-95 and SPu-116. The host ranges of the 2 bacteriophages were determined by performing spot tests with 20 bacteria strains. Both bacteriophages had wide host ranges. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 had a lytic effect on 17 of the 20 isolates (85%), and PSPu-4-116 produced a lytic effect on 14 isolates (70%) and was the only bacteriophage that produced a clear plaque on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the bacteriophages belonged to the order Caudovirales. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 was a member of the family Siphoviridae, but bacteriophage PSPu-4-116 belonged to the family Myoviridae. Both had a double-stranded DNA, which was digested with HindIII or EcoRI, that was estimated to be 58.3 kbp (PSPu-95) and 45.2 kbp (PSPu-4-116) by 1% agar electrophoresis. One-step growth kinetics showed that the latent periods were all less than 20 min, and the burst size was 77.5 pfu/cell for PSPu-95 and 86 pfu/cell for PSPu-4-116. The bacteriophages were able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 10, and they were able to survive in a treatment of 70°C for 60 min. The characterizations of these 2 bacteriophages were helpful in establishing a basis for adopting the most effective bacteriophage to control bacteria in the poultry industry.

  18. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy.

  19. Bacteriophage P70: unique morphology and unrelatedness to other Listeria bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Schmuki, Martina M; Erne, Doris; Loessner, Martin J; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen, and its bacteriophages find many uses in detection and biocontrol of its host. The novel broad-host-range virulent phage P70 has a unique morphology with an elongated capsid. Its genome sequence was determined by a hybrid sequencing strategy employing Sanger and PacBio techniques. The P70 genome contains 67,170 bp and 119 open reading frames (ORFs). Our analyses suggest that P70 represents an archetype of virus unrelated to other known Listeria bacteriophages.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Mosaic Bacteriophage, Waukesha92

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, A. Brooke; Carter, Brandon; Langouet Astrie, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of a mosaic bacteriophage, Waukesha92, which was isolated from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis as the host organism. This temperate Myoviridae bacteriophage has similarities to phages SpaA1 and BceA1 and the Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pBMB165. PMID:25146131

  1. Potential of Bacteriophage to Prevent and Treat Poultry Diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophage are viruses plentiful in nature that kill bacteria, and represent a safe alternative to antibiotics. Bacteriophage lytic to Escherichia coli were isolated from municipal waste water treatment and poultry processing plants. This E. coli isolate is pathogenic to poultry, causing a sev...

  2. Expression of a bioactive bacteriophage endolysin in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has led to an increased interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments, such as bacteriophage, bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) and antimicrobial peptides. In our study, the antimicrobial activity of the CP933 en...

  3. Genomic diversity of bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum can potentially be used to prevent and control outbreaks of this bacterium in salmonid aquaculture. However, the application of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge on their genetic composition. To explore the diversity of F. pyschrophilum bacteriophages, we have analyzed the complete genome sequences of 17 phages isolated from two distant geographic areas (Denmark and Chile), including the previously characterized temperate bacteriophage 6H. Phage genome size ranged from 39 302 to 89 010 bp with a G+C content of 27%-32%. None of the bacteriophages isolated in Denmark contained genes associated with lysogeny, whereas the Chilean isolates were all putative temperate phages and similar to bacteriophage 6H. Comparative genome analysis showed that phages grouped in three different genetic clusters based on genetic composition and gene content, indicating a limited genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum-specific bacteriophages. However, amino acid sequence dissimilarity (25%) was found in putative structural proteins, which could be related to the host specificity determinants. This study represents the first analysis of genomic diversity and composition among bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen F. psychrophilum and discusses the implications for the application of phages in disease control. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Seven Bacteriophages Isolated from the Female Urinary Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Malki, Kema; Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Garretto, Andrea; Bruder, Katherine; Watkins, Siobhan C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has debunked the myth that urine is sterile, having uncovered bacteria within the bladders of healthy individuals. However, the identity, diversity, and putative roles of bacteriophages in the bladder are unknown. We report the draft genome sequences of seven bacteriophages isolated from microbial communities from adult female bladders. PMID:27881533

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sheflo, Michael A; Gardner, Adam V; Merrill, Bryan D; Fisher, Joshua N B; Lunt, Bryce L; Breakwell, Donald P; Grose, Julianne H; Burnett, Sandra H

    2013-11-14

    Paenibacillus larvae is a pathogen of honeybees that causes American foulbrood (AFB). We isolated bacteriophages from soil containing bee debris collected near beehives in Utah. We announce five high-quality complete genome sequences, which represent the first completed genome sequences submitted to GenBank for any P. larvae bacteriophage.

  6. Critical Evaluation of Bacteriophage to Prevent and Treat Colibacillosis in Poultry.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophage are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. Bacteriophage do not infect animal and plant cells making them a potentially safe alternative to antibiotics. We have conducted research on the efficacy of bacteriophage to both prevent and treat colibacillosis in poultry. Bacteriophage lyt...

  7. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    PubMed

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  8. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  9. Effectiveness of bacteriophages in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Saussereau, E; Vachier, I; Chiron, R; Godbert, B; Sermet, I; Dufour, N; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Carrié, F; Molinari, N; Debarbieux, L

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriophages have been shown to be effective for treating acute infections of the respiratory tract caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in animal models, but no evidence has yet been presented of their activity against pathogens in complex biological samples from chronically infected patients. We assessed the efficacy of a cocktail of ten bacteriophages infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa following its addition to 58 sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients collected at three different hospitals. Ten samples that did not contain P. aeruginosa were not analysed further. In the remaining 48 samples, the addition of bacteriophages led to a significant decrease in the levels of P. aeruginosa strains, as shown by comparison with controls, taking two variables (time and bacteriophages) into account (p = 0.024). In 45.8% of these samples, this decrease was accompanied by an increase in the number of bacteriophages. We also tested each of the ten bacteriophages individually against 20 colonies from each of these 48 samples and detected bacteriophage-susceptible bacteria in 64.6% of the samples. An analysis of the clinical data revealed no correlation between patient age, sex, duration of P. aeruginosa colonization, antibiotic treatment, FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) and the efficacy of bacteriophages. The demonstration that bacteriophages infect their bacterial hosts in the sputum environment, regardless of the clinical characteristics of the patients, represents a major step towards the development of bacteriophage therapy to treat chronic lung infections. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  10. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  11. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  12. A mechanical model of bacteriophage DNA ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Rahul; Ghosal, Sandip

    2017-08-01

    Single molecule experiments on bacteriophages show an exponential scaling for the dependence of mobility on the length of DNA within the capsid. It has been suggested that this could be due to the ;capstan mechanism; - the exponential amplification of friction forces that result when a rope is wound around a cylinder as in a ship's capstan. Here we describe a desktop experiment that illustrates the effect. Though our model phage is a million times larger, it exhibits the same scaling observed in single molecule experiments.

  13. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  14. Bacteriophage-Mediated Dispersal of Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms ▿

    PubMed Central

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Payne, Robert J. H.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria in their natural environments frequently exist as mixed surface-associated communities, protected by extracellular material, termed biofilms. Biofilms formed by the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni may arise in the gastrointestinal tract of animals but also in water pipes and other industrial situations, leading to their possible transmission into the human food chain either directly or via farm animals. Bacteriophages are natural predators of bacteria that usually kill their prey by cell lysis and have potential application for the biocontrol and dispersal of target bacteria in biofilms. The effects of virulent Campylobacter specific-bacteriophages CP8 and CP30 on C. jejuni biofilms formed on glass by strains NCTC 11168 and PT14 at 37°C under microaerobic conditions were investigated. Independent bacteriophage treatments (n ≥ 3) led to 1 to 3 log10 CFU/cm2 reductions in the viable count 24 h postinfection compared with control levels. In contrast, bacteriophages applied under these conditions effected a reduction of less than 1 log10 CFU/ml in planktonic cells. Resistance to bacteriophage in bacteria surviving bacteriophage treatment of C. jejuni NCTC 11168 biofilms was 84% and 90% for CP8 and CP30, respectively, whereas bacteriophage resistance was not found in similarly recovered C. jejuni PT14 cells. Dispersal of the biofilm matrix by bacteriophage was demonstrated by crystal violet staining and transmission electron microscopy. Bacteriophage may play an important role in the control of attachment and biofilm formation by Campylobacter in situations where biofilms occur in nature, and they have the potential for application in industrial situations leading to improvements in food safety. PMID:21441325

  15. The role of bacteriophages in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Graça; Silva, Maria Daniela; Peddey, Mark; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-10-01

    The human periodontium health is commonly compromised by chronic inflammatory conditions and has become a major public health concern. Dental plaque, the precursor of periodontal disease, is a complex biofilm consisting mainly of bacteria, but also archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses. Viruses that specifically infect bacteria - bacteriophages - are most common in the oral cavity. Despite this, their role in the progression of periodontal disease remains poorly explored. This review aims to summarize how bacteriophages interact with the oral microbiota, their ability to increase bacterial virulence and mediate the transfer of resistance genes and suggests how bacteriophages can be used as an alternative to the current periodontal disease therapies.

  16. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1

    PubMed Central

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions. PMID:26272557

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions.

  19. Bacteriophage therapy in implant-related infections: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cengiz; Colak, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Banu Coskun; Ersoz, Gulden; Kutateladze, Mzia; Gozlugol, Mehmet

    2013-01-16

    Implant-related infections with bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics represent one of the major problems in orthopaedic surgery. It was our hypothesis that local application of bacteriophages, which are bacteria-destroying viruses, would be effective against biofilm-forming bacteria. An implant-related infection model was created using methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in forty-eight rats and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in another forty-eight rats. Each group was divided into four subgroups; one subgroup received a bacterium-specific bacteriophage (Sb-1 in the MRSA group and PAT14 in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa group), one received antibiotic for fourteen days (20 mg/kg/day teicoplanin in the MRSA group, and 120 mg/kg/day imipenem + cilastatin and 25 mg/kg/day amikacin in the Pseudomonas group), one received antibiotic and bacteriophage, and one received no treatment. Animals receiving bacteriophage therapy were injected locally with 107 bacteriophages in a 0.1-mL suspension on three consecutive days. All animals were killed on the fifteenth day after initiation of treatment, and the tibia was excised. Results were assessed with use of microbiology, light microscopy, and electron microscopy. In the MRSA group, the antibiotic administration significantly decreased the number of colony-forming units per subject in quantitative cultures (control subgroup, 50,586; bacteriophage, 30,788; antibiotic, 17,165; antibiotic + bacteriophage, 5000; p = 0.004 for the comparison of the latter group with the control). Biofilm was absent only in the antibiotic + bacteriophage subgroup. In the Pseudomonas group, the number of colony-forming units per subject in quantitative cultures was significantly lower in each treatment subgroup compared with the control subgroup (control subgroup, 14,749; bacteriophage, 6484 [p = 0.016]; antibiotic, 2619 [p = 0.01]; antibiotic + bacteriophage, 1705 [p < 0.001]). The value in the antibiotic + bacteriophage subgroup was also

  20. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  1. Modeling tailed bacteriophage adsorption: Insight into mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    The process of a bacteriophage attaching to its host cell is a combination of physical diffusion, biochemical surface interactions, and reaction-induced conformational changes in receptor proteins. Local variations in the physico-chemical properties of the medium, the phage׳s mode of action, and the physiology of the host cell also all influence adsorption kinetics. These characteristics can affect a specific phage׳s binding capabilities and the susceptibility of the host cell to phage attack. Despite the complexity of this process, describing adsorption kinetics of a population of bacteriophages binding to a culture of cells has been accomplished with relatively simple equations governed by the laws of mass-action. Many permutations and modifications to the basic set of reactions have been suggested through the years. While no single solution emerges as a universal answer, this review provides the fundamentals of current phage adsorption modeling and will guide researchers in the selection of valid, appropriate models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Making temporal maps using bacterial luciferase: Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Broza, Rachel; Verkin, Ekaterina

    2004-06-01

    A method for making temporal maps in bacteria, plasmids and bacteriophages is described. A cassette containing both the genes for bacterial luciferase and kanamycin resistance can be introduced at precise sites. The technique involves clonging followed by genetic recombination. The result is formation of structures that have the luciferase genes in place of the normal DNA and this allows the very precise measurement of transcription/translation of the substituted regions. Very low levels of transcription as well as the kinetics of induction can be easily ascertained. As a specific demonstration of this general method, the technique was used with bacteriophage λ, one of the best known organisms. By measuring light emission, the expression of luciferase was followed after induction for both early and late genes. The exact timing of initial expression of genes was also determined by sampling at very short intervals. The results show that the early genes express almost without delay implying that the function of the N antitermination system is not temporal regulation.

  3. Bacteriophage therapy in children: facts and prospects.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Wojciech; Miedzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Data from the World Health Organization confirm a decrease in the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. The spread of bacteria resistant to several groups of antibiotics creates more problems in the treatment of various diseases, especially in children. It is possible that pharmacological agents may prove to be ineffective in curing infections caused by resistant pathogens, and this could lead to a post-antibiotic era. It is necessary to extend the arsenal of the available therapeutic tools. Bacteriophages have long been used therapeutically and prophylactically in children. In the beginnings of phage therapy, enthusiasm prevailed over the rational methods used in contemporary controlled studies. Many people dealing with phages described cases of successful therapy, but did not conduct comparative studies. Nevertheless, phage administration seems to be safe, even in children after intravenous administration. The therapeutic and prophylactic application of phages is now experiencing a renaissance of interest. The authors' own recent analysis demonstrated the cost effectiveness of phages over antibiotic especially in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. It can be concluded that the results of the therapeutic and prophylactic application of phages against multi-drug resistant pathogens are encouraging. It seems clear that bacteriophages need further evaluation regarding the control of bacterial infection in children.

  4. Immobilization of bacteriophages on modified silica particles.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Rebecca; Anany, Hany; Gross, Isabelle; Bhayani, Rahul; Griffiths, Mansel; Brook, Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Bacteriophages are selective anti-bacterial agents, which are receiving increasing acceptance by regulatory agencies for use both in the food industry and in clinical settings for biocontrol. While immobilized phage could be particularly useful to create antimicrobial surfaces, current immobilization strategies require chemical bioconjugation to surfaces or more difficult processes involving modification of their head proteins to express specific binding moieties, for example, biotin or cellulose binding domains; procedures that are both time and money intensive. We report that morphologically different bacteriophages, active against a variety of food-borne bacteria: Escherichia coli; Salmonella enterica; Listeria monocytogenes; and Shigella boydii, will effectively physisorb to silica particles, prepared by silica surface modification with poly(ethylene glycol), carboxylic acid groups, or amines. The phages remain infective to their host bacteria while adsorbed on the surface of the silica particles. The number of infective phage bound to the silica is enhanced by the presence of ionic surfaces, with greater surface charge - to a maximum - correlating with greater concentration of adsorbed phage. Above the maximum charge concentration, the number of active phage drops.

  5. Bacteriophages and Their Role in Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sillankorva, Sanna M.; Oliveira, Hugo; Azeredo, Joana

    2012-01-01

    The interest for natural antimicrobial compounds has increased due to alterations in consumer positions towards the use of chemical preservatives in foodstuff and food processing surfaces. Bacteriophages fit in the class of natural antimicrobial and their effectiveness in controlling bacterial pathogens in agro-food industry has led to the development of different phage products already approved by USFDA and USDA. The majority of these products are to be used in farm animals or animal products such as carcasses, meats and also in agricultural and horticultural products. Treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases and ultimately promote safe environments in animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. This is an overview of recent work carried out with phages as tools to promote food safety, starting with a general introduction describing the prevalence of foodborne pathogens and bacteriophages and a more detailed discussion on the use of phage therapy to prevent and treat experimentally induced infections of animals against the most common foodborne pathogens, the use of phages as biocontrol agents in foods, and also their use as biosanitizers of food contact surfaces. PMID:23316235

  6. A bacteriophages journey through the human body.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The human body is colonized by a diverse collective of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The smallest entity of this microbial conglomerate are the bacterial viruses. Bacteriophages, or phages for short, exert significant selective pressure on their bacterial hosts, undoubtedly influencing the human microbiome and its impact on our health and well-being. Phages colonize all niches of the body, including the skin, oral cavity, lungs, gut, and urinary tract. As such our bodies are frequently and continuously exposed to diverse collections of phages. Despite the prevalence of phages throughout our bodies, the extent of their interactions with human cells, organs, and immune system is still largely unknown. Phages physically interact with our mucosal surfaces, are capable of bypassing epithelial cell layers, disseminate throughout the body and may manipulate our immune system. Here, I establish the novel concept of an "intra-body phageome," which encompasses the collection of phages residing within the classically "sterile" regions of the body. This review will take a phage-centric view of the microbiota, human body, and immune system with the ultimate goal of inspiring a greater appreciation for both the indirect and direct interactions between bacteriophages and their mammalian hosts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Understanding Bacteriophage Specificity in Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Koskella, Britt; Meaden, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Studying the coevolutionary dynamics between bacteria and the bacteriophage viruses that infect them is critical to understanding both microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning. Phages can play a key role in shaping bacterial population dynamics and can significantly alter both intra- and inter-specific competition among bacterial hosts. Predicting how phages might influence community stability and apparent competition, however, requires an understanding of how bacteria-phage interaction networks evolve as a function of host diversity and community dynamics. Here, we first review the progress that has been made in understanding phage specificity, including the use of experimental evolution, we then introduce a new dataset on natural bacteriophages collected from the phyllosphere of horse chestnut trees, and finally we highlight that bacterial sensitivity to phage is rarely a binary trait and that this variation should be taken into account and reported. We emphasize that there is currently insufficient evidence to make broad generalizations about phage host range in natural populations, the limits of phage adaptation to novel hosts, or the implications of phage specificity in shaping microbial communities. However, the combination of experimental and genomic approaches with the study of natural communities will allow new insight to the evolution and impact of phage specificity within complex bacterial communities. PMID:23478639

  8. Forces during Bacteriophage DNA Packaging and Ejection

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prashant K.; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Grayson, Paul D.; Squires, Todd M.; Kondev, Jané; Phillips, Rob

    2005-01-01

    The conjunction of insights from structural biology, solution biochemistry, genetics, and single-molecule biophysics has provided a renewed impetus for the construction of quantitative models of biological processes. One area that has been a beneficiary of these experimental techniques is the study of viruses. In this article we describe how the insights obtained from such experiments can be utilized to construct physical models of processes in the viral life cycle. We focus on dsDNA bacteriophages and show that the bending elasticity of DNA and its electrostatics in solution can be combined to determine the forces experienced during packaging and ejection of the viral genome. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the effect of fluid viscosity and capsid expansion on the forces experienced during packaging. Finally, we present a model for DNA ejection from bacteriophages based on the hypothesis that the energy stored in the tightly packed genome within the capsid leads to its forceful ejection. The predictions of our model can be tested through experiments in vitro where DNA ejection is inhibited by the application of external osmotic pressure. PMID:15556983

  9. Enteroviruses and Bacteriophages in Bathing Waters

    PubMed Central

    Mocé-Llivina, Laura; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure for detecting and counting enteroviruses based on the VIRADEN method applied to 10 liters of seawater was examined. It improved the efficiency of detection by taking into account both the number of positive isolations and numbers found with traditional methods. It was then used to quantify viruses in bathing waters. A number of bacterial indicators and bacteriophages were also tested. Cultivable enteroviruses were detected in 55% of the samples, most of which complied with bacteriological criteria. In contrast, viral genomes were only detected in 20% of the samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Somatic coliphages outnumbered all other indicators. F-specific RNA phages were detected in only 15% of the samples, whereas phages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were detected in 70% of samples. A numerical relationship between the numbers of enteroviruses and the numbers of enterococci and somatic coliphages was observed. In situ inactivation experiments showed that viruses persisted significantly longer than the bacterial indicators. Only somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides persisted longer than the viruses. These results explain the numbers of enteroviruses and indicators in bathing waters attending the numbers usually found in sewage in the area. Somatic coliphages show a very good potential to predict the risk of viruses being present in bathing waters. PMID:16269717

  10. [TL, the new bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its application for the search of halo-producing bacteriophages].

    PubMed

    Pleteneva, E A; Burkal'tseva, M V; Shaburova, O V; Krylov, S V; Pechnikova, E V; Sokolova, O S; Krylov, V N

    2011-01-01

    The properties of new virulent bacteriophage TL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belonging to the family Podoviridae (genome size of 46 kb) were investigated. This bacteriophage is capable of lysogenizing the bacterial lawn in halo zones around negative colonies (NC) of other bacteriophages. TL forms large NC, that are hardly distinguishable on the lawn of P. aeruginisa PAO1. At the same time, on the lawns of some phage-resistant PAO1 mutants, as well as on those produced by a number of clinical isolates, TL forms more transparent NC. It is suggested that more effective growth of the bacteriophage TL NC is associated with the differences in outer lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer of the cell walls of different bacterial strains, as well as of the bacteria inside and outside of the halos. This TL property was used to optimize selection of bacteriophages producing halos around NC on the lawn of P. aeruginosa PAO1. As a result, a group of bacteriophages differing in the patterns of interaction between their halos and TL bacteriophage, as well as in some characters was identified. Taking into consideration the importance of cell-surfaced structures of P. aeruginosa in manifestation of virulence and pathogenicity, possible utilization of specific phage enzymes, polysacchadide depolymerases, for more effective treatment of P. aeruginosa infections is discussed.

  11. Stabilization of T4 bacteriophage at acidic and basic pH by adsorption on paper.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Abigail; Greene, Melissa; Kimmelshue, Chad; Cademartiri, Rebecca

    2017-09-05

    Bacteriophages find applications in agriculture, medicine, and food safety. Many of these applications can expose bacteriophages to stresses that inactivate them including acidic and basic pH. Bacteriophages can be stabilized against these stresses by materials including paper, a common material in packaging and consumer products. Combining paper and bacteriophages creates antibacterial materials, which can reduce the use of antibiotics. Here we show that adsorption on paper protects T4, T5, and T7 bacteriophage from acidic and basic pH. We added bacteriophages to filter paper functionalized with carboxylic acid (carboxyl methyl cellulose) or amine (chitosan) groups, and exposed them to pH from 5.6 to 14. We determined the number of infective bacteriophages after exposure directly on the paper. All papers extended the lifetime of infective bacteriophage by at least a factor of four with some papers stabilizing bacteriophages for up to one week. The degree of stabilization depended on five main factors (i) the family of the bacteriophage, (ii) the charge of the paper and bacteriophages, (iii) the location of the bacteriophages within the paper, (iv) the ability of the paper to prevent bacteriophage-bacteriophage aggregation, and (v) the sensitivity of the bacteriophage proteins to the tested pH. Even when adsorbed on paper the bacteriophages were able to remove E. coli in milk. Choosing the right paper modification or material will protect bacteriophages adsorbed on that material against detrimental pH and other environmental challenges increasing the range of applications of bacteriophages on materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial bacteriophage-derived proteins and therapeutic applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics have the remarkable power to control bacterial infections. Unfortunately, widespread use, whether regarded as prudent or not, has favored the emergence and persistence of antibiotic resistant strains of human pathogenic bacteria, resulting in a global health threat. Bacteriophages (pha...

  13. Bacteria vs. Bacteriophages: Parallel Evolution of Immune Arsenals.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad A B; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Z; Wu, Qin; Sattar, Adeel; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction-modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies.

  14. Bacteriophages as indicators of fecal pollution and enteric virus removal.

    PubMed

    McMinn, Brian R; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Korajkic, Asja

    2017-03-17

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport, due to their closer morphological and biological properties. Based on a review of published data, we summarize densities of coliphages (F+ and somatic), Bacteroides spp. and enterococci bacteriophages (phages) in individual human waste, raw wastewater, ambient fresh and marine waters and removal through wastewater treatment processes utilizing traditional treatments. We also provide comparisons with FIB and enteric viruses whenever possible. Lastly, we examine fate and transport characteristics in the aquatic environment and provide an overview of the environmental factors affecting their survival. In summary, concentrations of bacteriophages in various sources were consistently lower than FIB, but more reflective of infectious enteric virus levels. Overall, our investigation indicates that bacteriophages may be adequate viral surrogates, especially in built systems, such as wastewater treatment plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacteria vs. Bacteriophages: Parallel Evolution of Immune Arsenals

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Muhammad A. B.; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Z.; Wu, Qin; Sattar, Adeel; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction–modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies. PMID:27582740

  16. Bacteriophages as potential new therapeutics to replace or supplement antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Mzia; Adamia, Revaz

    2010-12-01

    Over recent decades, a growing body of literature has validated the use of bacteriophages for therapy and prophylaxis in the war against drug-resistant bacteria. Today, much more is known about bacteriophages than in the 1930s when phage therapy first appeared and began to spread to many countries. With rapid dissemination of multi-drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, the interest in alternative remedies to antibiotics, including bacteriophage treatments, is gaining new ground. Based on recent experience and current results of bacteriophage applications against bacterial infections in countries where this alternative therapy is approved, many scientists and companies have come to believe that the use of phages for treating and preventing bacterial diseases will be successful.

  17. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  18. Bacteriophage-based nanoprobes for rapid bacteria separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juhong; Duncan, Bradley; Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Rotello, Vincent M.; Nugen, Sam R.

    2015-10-01

    The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying concentrations were determined. The results indicated a similar bacteria capture efficiency between the two nanoprobes.The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying

  19. Bacteriophages as indicators of faecal pollution and enteric ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport due to their closer morphological and biological properties compared to FIB. Based on a meta-analysis of published data, we summarize concentrations of coliphages (F+ and somatic), Bacteroides spp. and enterococci bacteriophages (phages) in human waste, non-human waste, fresh and marine waters as well as removal through wastewater treatment processes. We also provide comparisons with FIB and enteric viruses whenever possible. Lastly, we examine fate and transport characteristics in the environment and provide an overview of the methods available for detection and enumeration of bacteriophages. In summary, concentrations of FIB bacteriophages in various sources were consistently lower than FIB, but more reflective of infectious enteric virus levels. Our investigation supports use of bacteriophages as viral surrogates especially for wastewater treatment processes, while additional research is needed to clarify their utility as indicators of viral fate and transport in the ambient water. Describes concentrations and removal through environmental and engineered systems of bacteriophages, fecal indicator bacteria and viral pathogens.

  20. Simulated hatchery system to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Raghu Patil, J; Desai, Srividya Narayanamurthy; Roy, Panchali; Durgaiah, Murali; Saravanan, R Sanjeev; Vipra, Aradhana

    2014-12-02

    Vibriosis caused by luminous Vibrio harveyi commonly contributes to poor survival in shrimp hatcheries and aquaculture ponds. Lytic bacteriophages pathogenic for V. harveyi are currently being investigated as an alternative to antibiotics to prevent vibriosis. Here, 8 bacteriophages were isolated from oysters and clams using V. harveyi strains as baiting hosts. Among these bacteriophages, 1 strain (VHP6b) identified as broadly pathogenic for 27 V. harveyi strains examined was further characterized by electron microscopy and genome sequence analysis. Phage VHP6b possessed a tail and morphology consistent with it being a member of the family Siphoviridae, and its genome and proteome were most closely related to the Vibrio phages SSP02 and MAR10. An integrase gene essential for lysogeny was not evident. The ability of bacteriophage VHP6b to protect shrimp postlarvae against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi strain VH6 was demonstrated in a model system designed to simulate typical hatchery conditions. Bacteriophage treatment improved survival of postlarvae by 40 to 60% under these conditions, so therapies based on this or other bacteriophages may be useful in shrimp hatcheries.

  1. The Pasteurella multocida toxin is encoded within a lysogenic bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, Gillian D; Bevir, Thomas; Lax, Alistair J

    2004-01-01

    Toxigenic strains of Pasteurella multocida produce a 146 kDa toxin (PMT) that acts as a potent mitogen. Sequence analysis of the structural gene for PMT, toxA, previously suggested it was horizontally acquired, because it had a low G + C content relative to the P. multocida genome. To address this, the sequence of DNA flanking toxA was determined. The sequence analysis showed the presence of homologues to bacteriophage tail protein genes and a bacteriophage antirepressor, suggesting that the toxin gene resides within a prophage. In addition to phage genes, the toxA flanking DNA contained a homologue of a restriction/modification system that was shown to be functional. The presence of a bacteriophage was demonstrated in spent medium from toxigenic P. multocida isolates. Its production was increased by mitomycin C addition, a treatment that is known to induce the lytic cycle of many temperate bacteriophages. The genomes of bacteriophages from three different toxigenic P. multocida strains had similar but not identical restriction profiles, and were approximately 45-50 kb in length. The prophages from two of these had integrated at the same site in the chromosome, in a tRNA gene. Southern blot analysis confirmed that these bacteriophages contained the toxA gene.

  2. Bacteriophages may bias outcome of bacterial enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-08-01

    Enrichment cultures are widely used for the isolation of bacteria in clinical, biotechnological, and environmental studies. However, competition, relative growth rates, or inhibitory effects may alter the outcome of enrichment cultures, causing the phenomenon known as enrichment bias. Bacteriophages are a major component in many microbial systems, and it abounds in natural settings. This abundance means that bacteriophages are likely to be present in many laboratory enrichment cultures. Our hypothesis was that bacteriophages present in the sample might bias the enriched subpopulation, since it can infect and lyse the target bacteria during the enrichment step once the bacteria reach a given density. Here we show that the presence of bacteriophages in Salmonella and Shigella enrichment cultures produced a significant reduction (more than 1 log unit) in the number of these bacteria compared with samples in which bacteriophages had been reduced by filtration through 0.45-microm non-protein-binding membranes. Furthermore, our data indicate that the Salmonella biotypes isolated after the enrichment culture change if bacteriophages are present, thus distorting the results of the analysis.

  3. Bacteriophages May Bias Outcome of Bacterial Enrichment Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R.; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Enrichment cultures are widely used for the isolation of bacteria in clinical, biotechnological, and environmental studies. However, competition, relative growth rates, or inhibitory effects may alter the outcome of enrichment cultures, causing the phenomenon known as enrichment bias. Bacteriophages are a major component in many microbial systems, and it abounds in natural settings. This abundance means that bacteriophages are likely to be present in many laboratory enrichment cultures. Our hypothesis was that bacteriophages present in the sample might bias the enriched subpopulation, since it can infect and lyse the target bacteria during the enrichment step once the bacteria reach a given density. Here we show that the presence of bacteriophages in Salmonella and Shigella enrichment cultures produced a significant reduction (more than 1 log unit) in the number of these bacteria compared with samples in which bacteriophages had been reduced by filtration through 0.45-μm non-protein-binding membranes. Furthermore, our data indicate that the Salmonella biotypes isolated after the enrichment culture change if bacteriophages are present, thus distorting the results of the analysis. PMID:16085813

  4. Head Proteins from T-Even Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Gerald L.; Cummings, Donald J.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophage capsid proteins were separated on 6% agarose columns by use of 6 m guanidine hydrochloride containing 5 mm dithiothreitol both to dissociate and to elute the proteins. The head capsids of T2H, T4B, T4B01, T4D, and T6r+ contained at least three structural proteins with molecular weights of 40,000, 18,000, and 11,000 daltons, amounting to 76, 2, and 8%, respectively, of the total capsid protein. On the other hand, T2L head capsids contained only two structural proteins with molecular weights of 40,000 and 18,000 daltons (81 and 2.5%, respectively, of the total protein). A discussion of the possible role of these structural head proteins and a T-even phage head model suggesting a structural arrangement of the 40,000 dalton subunit are presented. Images PMID:5438109

  5. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  6. Bacteriophages as biocontrol agents in food.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J A; Billington, C; Carey-Smith, G; Greening, G

    2005-02-01

    Bacteriophages possess attributes that appear to be attractive to those searching for novel ways to control foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms. These phages have a history of safe use, can be highly host specific, and replicate in the presence of a host. Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes and various spoilage organisms have responded to phage control on some foods. However, the use of phages as biocontrol agents is complicated by factors such as an apparent requirement for a threshold level of host before replication can proceed and by suboptimal performance, at best, at temperatures beneath the optimum for the host. This review is a summary of the information on these issues and includes brief descriptions of alternative phage-based strategies for control of foodborne pathogens.

  7. Bacteriophage lambda: Early pioneer and still relevant.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid-1950s to mid-1980s was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives has continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle.

  8. Bacteriophage gene targeting vectors generated by transplacement.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, C; Woltjen, K; Mansergh, F C; Ishidate, K; Rancourt, D E

    2002-10-01

    A rate-determining step in gene targeting is the generation of the targeting vector. We have developed bacteriophage gene targeting vectorology, which shortens the timeline of targeting vector construction. Using retro-recombination screening, we can rapidly isolate targeting vectors from an embryonic stem cell genomic library via integrative and excisive recombination. We have demonstrated that recombination can be used to introduce specific point mutations or unique restriction sites into gene targeting vectors via transplacement. Using the choline/ethanolamine kinase alpha and beta genes as models, we demonstrate that transplacement can also be used to introduce specifically a neo resistance cassette into a gene targeting phage. In our experience, the lambdaTK gene targeting system offers considerable flexibility and efficiency in TV construction, which makes generating multiple vectors in one week's time possible.

  9. Engineering of filamentous bacteriophage for protein sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasino, Michael

    Methods of high throughput, sensitive and cost effective quantification of proteins enables personalized medicine by allowing healthcare professionals to better monitor patient condition and response to treatment. My doctoral research has attempted to advance these methods through the use of filamentous bacteriophage (phage). These bacterial viruses are particularly amenable to both genetic and chemical engineering and can be produced efficiently in large amounts. Here, I discuss several strategies for modifying phage for use in protein sensing assays. These include the expression of bio-orthogonal conjugation handles on the phage coat, the incorporation of specific recognition sequences within the phage genome, and the creation of antibody-phage conjugates via a photo-crosslinking non-canonical amino acid. The physical and chemical characterization of these engineered phage and the results of their use in modified protein sensing assays will be presented.

  10. Structure and function of bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is the most well-studied member of Myoviridae, the most complex family of tailed phages. T4 assembly is divided into three independent pathways: the head, the tail and the long tail fibers. The prolate head encapsidates a 172 kbp concatemeric dsDNA genome. The 925 Å-long tail is surrounded by the contractile sheath and ends with a hexagonal baseplate. Six long tail fibers are attached to the baseplate’s periphery and are the host cell’s recognition sensors. The sheath and the baseplate undergo large conformational changes during infection. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided structural information on protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid interactions that regulate conformational changes during assembly and infection of Escherichia coli cells. PMID:25517898

  11. Innate and acquired bacteriophage-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    We recently described a novel, non-host-derived, phage-mediated immunity active at mucosal surfaces, the main site of pathogen entry in metazoans. In that work, we showed that phage T4 adheres to mucus glycoproteins via immunoglobulin-like domains displayed on its capsid. This adherence positions the phage in mucus surfaces where they are more likely to encounter and kill bacteria, thereby benefiting both the phage and its metazoan host. We presented this phage-metazoan symbiosis based on an exclusively lytic model of phage infection. Here we extend our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model to consider the undoubtedly more complex dynamics in vivo. We hypothesize how mucus-adherent phages, both lytic and temperate, might impact the commensal microbiota as well as protect the metazoan epithelium from bacterial invasion. We suggest that BAM may provide both an innate and an acquired antimicrobial immunity. PMID:24228227

  12. Why Be Temperate: Lessons from Bacteriophage λ.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Many pathogens have evolved the ability to induce latent infections of their hosts. The bacteriophage λ is a classical model for exploring the regulation and the evolution of latency. Here, I review recent experimental studies on phage λ that identify specific conditions promoting the evolution of lysogenic life cycles. In addition, I present specific adaptations of phage λ that allow this virus to react plastically to variations in the environment and to reactivate its lytic life cycle. All of these different examples are discussed in the light of evolutionary epidemiology theory to disentangle the different evolutionary forces acting on temperate phages. Understanding phage λ adaptations yield important insights into the evolution of latency in other microbes, including several life-threatening human pathogens.

  13. Bacteriophage: A Model System for Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANO, CARL S.; YOUNG, MATTHEW W.; PATTERSON, ROBIN R.

    2002-01-01

    Although bacteriophage provided a useful model system for the development of molecular biology, its simplicity, accessibility, and familiarity have not been fully exploited in the classroom. We describe a student-centered laboratory course in which student teams selected phage from sewage samples and characterized the phage in a semester-long project that modeled real-life scientific research. The course used an instructional approach that included active learning, collaboration, and learning by inquiry. Cooperative student teams had primary responsibility for organizing the content of the course, writing to learn using a journal article format, involving the entire group in shared laboratory responsibilities, and applying knowledge to the choice of new experiments. The results of student evaluations indicated a high level of satisfaction with the course. Our positive experience with this course suggests that phage provides an attractive model system for an active-learning classroom. PMID:23653543

  14. A suggested new bacteriophage genus: "Viunalikevirus".

    PubMed

    Adriaenssens, Evelien M; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Anany, Hany; Blasdel, Bob; Connerton, Ian F; Goulding, David; Griffiths, Mansel W; Hooton, Steven P; Kutter, Elizabeth M; Kropinski, Andrew M; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Maes, Martine; Pickard, Derek; Ryu, Sangryeol; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shahrbabak, S Sabouri; Toribio, Ana L; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-10-01

    We suggest a bacteriophage genus, "Viunalikevirus", as a new genus within the family Myoviridae. To date, this genus includes seven sequenced members: Salmonella phages ViI, SFP10 and ΦSH19; Escherichia phages CBA120 and PhaxI; Shigella phage phiSboM-AG3; and Dickeya phage LIMEstone1. Their shared myovirus morphology, with comparable head sizes and tail dimensions, and genome organization are considered distinguishing features. They appear to have conserved regulatory sequences, a horizontally acquired tRNA set and the probable substitution of an alternate base for thymine in the DNA. A close examination of the tail spike region in the DNA revealed four distinct tail spike proteins, an arrangement which might lead to the umbrella-like structures of the tails visible on electron micrographs. These properties set the suggested genus apart from the recently ratified subfamily Tevenvirinae, although a significant evolutionary relationship can be observed.

  15. A Hypothesis for Bacteriophage DNA Packaging Motors

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis is presented that bacteriophage DNA packaging motors have a cycle comprised of bind/release thermal ratcheting with release-associated DNA pushing via ATP-dependent protein folding. The proposed protein folding occurs in crystallographically observed peptide segments that project into an axial channel of a protein 12-mer (connector) that serves, together with a coaxial ATPase multimer, as the entry portal. The proposed cycle begins when reverse thermal motion causes the connector’s peptide segments to signal the ATPase multimer to bind both ATP and the DNA molecule, thereby producing a dwell phase recently demonstrated by single-molecule procedures. The connector-associated peptide segments activate by transfer of energy from ATP during the dwell. The proposed function of connector/ATPase symmetry mismatches is to reduce thermal noise-induced signaling errors. After a dwell, ATP is cleaved and the DNA molecule released. The activated peptide segments push the released DNA molecule, thereby producing a burst phase recently shown to consist of four mini-bursts. The constraint of four mini-bursts is met by proposing that each mini-burst occurs via pushing by three of the 12 subunits of the connector. If all four mini-bursts occur, the cycle repeats. If the mini-bursts are not completed, a second cycle is superimposed on the first cycle. The existence of the second cycle is based on data recently obtained with bacteriophage T3. When both cycles stall, energy is diverted to expose the DNA molecule to maturation cleavage. PMID:21994710

  16. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  17. Systematic mutation of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Rennell, D; Bouvier, S E; Hardy, L W; Poteete, A R

    1991-11-05

    Amber mutations were introduced into every codon (except the initiating AUG) of the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene. The amber alleles were introduced into a bacteriophage P22 hybrid, called P22 e416, in which the normal P22 lysozyme gene is replaced by its T4 homologue, and which consequently depends upon T4 lysozyme for its ability to form a plaque. The resulting amber mutants were tested for plaque formation on amber suppressor strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Experiments with other hybrid phages engineered to produce different amounts of wild-type T4 lysozyme have shown that, to score as deleterious, a mutation must reduce lysozyme activity to less than 3% of that produced by wild-type P22 e416. Plating the collection of amber mutants covering 163 of the 164 codons of T4 lysozyme, on 13 suppressor strains that each insert a different amino acid substitutions at every position in the protein (except the first). Of the resulting 2015 single amino acid substitutions in T4 lysozyme, 328 were found to be sufficiently deleterious to inhibit plaque formation. More than half (55%) of the positions in the protein tolerated all substitutions examined. Among (N-terminal) amber fragments, only those of 161 or more residues are active. The effects of many of the deleterious substitutions are interpretable in light of the known structure of T4 lysozyme. Residues in the molecule that are refractory to replacements generally have solvent-inaccessible side-chains; the catalytic Glu11 and Asp20 residues are notable exceptions. Especially sensitive sites include residues involved in buried salt bridges near the catalytic site (Asp10, Arg145 and Arg148) and a few others that may have critical structural roles (Gly30, Trp138 and Tyr161).

  18. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, and Weissella

    PubMed Central

    Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Vogensen, Finn K.

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc (Ln.), Weissella, and Oenococcus form a group of related genera of lactic acid bacteria, which once all shared the name Leuconostoc. They are associated with plants, fermented vegetable products, raw milk, dairy products, meat, and fish. Most of industrially relevant Leuconostoc strains can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore, bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process. Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using electron microscopy belong to the Siphoviridae family and differ in morphological details. Hybridization and comparative genomic studies of Leuconostoc phages suggest that they can be divided into several groups, however overall diversity of Leuconostoc phages is much lower as compared to, e.g., lactococcal phages. Several fully sequenced genomes of Leuconostoc phages have been deposited in public databases. Lytic phages of Leuconostoc can be divided into two host species-specific groups with similarly organized genomes that shared very low nucleotide similarity. Phages of dairy Leuconostoc have rather limited host-ranges. The receptor binding proteins of two lytic Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages have been identified. Molecular tools for detection of dairy Leuconostoc phages have been developed. The rather limited data on phages of Oenococcus and Weissella show that (i) lysogeny seems to be abundant in Oenococcus strains, and (ii) several phages infecting Weissella cibaria are also able to productively infect strains of other Weissella species and even strains of the genus

  19. Characterization of the endolysin from the Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage VD13

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophage infecting bacteria produce endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases) to lyse the host cell from within and release nascent bacteriophage particles. Recombinant endolysins can also lyse Gram-positive bacteria when added exogenously. As a potential alternative to antibiotics, we cloned and...

  20. Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from p...

  1. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  2. Bacteriophage cocktail for biocontrol of Salmonella in dried pet food.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Serena; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Charbonneau, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Human salmonellosis has been associated with contaminated pet foods and treats. Therefore, there is interest in identifying novel approaches for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination within pet food manufacturing environments. The use of lytic bacteriophages shows promise as a safe and effective way to mitigate Salmonella contamination in various food products. Bacteriophages are safe, natural, highly targeted antibacterial agents that specifically kill bacteria and can be targeted to kill food pathogens without affecting other microbiota. In this study, we show that a cocktail containing six bacteriophages had a broadspectrum activity in vitro against a library of 930 Salmonella enterica strains representing 44 known serovars. The cocktail was effective against 95% of the strains in this tested library. In liquid culture dose-ranging experiments, bacteriophage cocktail concentrations of ≥10(8) PFU/ml inactivated more than 90% of the Salmonella population (10(1) to 10(3) CFU/ml). Dried pet food inoculated with a mixture containing equal proportions of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis (ATCC 4931), Montevideo (ATCC 8387), Senftenberg (ATCC 8400), and Typhimurium (ATCC 13311) and then surface treated with the six-bacteriophage cocktail (≥2.5 ± 1.5 × 10(6) PFU/g) achieved a greater than 1-log (P < 0.001) reduction compared with the phosphate-buffered saline-treated control in measured viable Salmonella within 60 min. Moreover, this bacteriophage cocktail reduced natural contamination in samples taken from an undistributed lot of commercial dried dog food that tested positive for Salmonella. Our results indicate that bacteriophage biocontrol of S. enterica in dried pet food is technically feasible.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. ...

  4. 76 FR 66187 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter Michiganensis Subspecies Michiganensis; Exemption From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... humans (Refs. 1 through 8). Bacteriophage are obligate parasites of bacteria, which means they attach to, infect, and reproduce in bacteria, and are host-specific for bacteria, with specific bacteriophage... through 11). As such, bacteriophage do not attack other beneficial bacteria. In addition, there is no...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  6. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  7. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  9. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  10. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1307 - Bacteriophage of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies michiganensis; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bacteriophage of Clavibacter... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1307 Bacteriophage of... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lytic bacteriophage...

  12. Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-1017 TITLE: Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a...COVERED 28 September 2010 – 27 September 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined...invasive alternative, my research involves the chemical modification and subsequent use of filamentous bacteriophage targeting specific breast cancer

  13. STUDIES ON THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN COMPONENTS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS BACTERIOPHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen I.

    1962-01-01

    The cell walls of Staphylococcus aureus are capable of inactivating S. aureus bacteriophage. Furthermore, the cell walls isolated from S. aureus of a given phage type inactivate a variety of different staphylococcal bacteriophages. Under the conditions employed neither the isolated mucopeptide nor teichoic acid components of the cell walls act as bacteriophage receptor. PMID:14476346

  14. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  15. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  16. Characterization of T-Even Bacteriophage Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, A. R.; Chapman, V. A.; DeLong, S. S.; Stone, K. R.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophages were grown and purified in bulk quantities. The protein coats were disrupted into their component substructures by treatment with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Tail fibers and tubes were purified on glycerol-CsCl-D2O gradients and examined with respect to sedimentation properties, subunit molecular weights, amino acid composition, isoelectric points, and morphology. It was found that intact tail fibers had a sedimentation coefficient of 12 to 13S and that dissociated fibers consisted of three classes of proteins having molecular weights of 150 K ± 10, 42 K ± 4, and 28 K ± 3 daltons. A model was constructed in which the 150-K subunit folded back on itself twice to give a three-stranded rope. Each 150-K subunit then represented a half-fiber and it was proposed that the role of the 42- and 28-K subunits was to hold each half-fiber together as well as serve as a possible link with other substructures. Isoelectric point studies also indicated that there were three different proteins with pI values of 3.5, 5.7, and 8.0. Amino acid analyses indicated that fibers had a composition distinct from other phage substructures. In addition, a striking difference was noted in the content of tryptophan among the phages examined. T4B had three to five times more tryptophan than did T2L, T2H, T4D, and T6. Intact tail tubes had an S20,w of 31 to 38S and dissociated tubes consisted of three proteins of molecular weights 57 K ± 5, 38 K ± 4, and 25 K ± 3 daltons. Based on degradation studies with DMSO, it was proposed that these three proteins were arranged in a helical array yielding the tube structure. Isoelectric point studies indicated that there were three major proteins in the tube whose pI values were 5.1, 5.7, and 8.5. No significant differences were observed in the amino acid content of tubes obtained from all the T-even bacteriophages. Images PMID:5497900

  17. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  18. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummings, Nicola J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  19. Bacteriophages as an alternative strategy for fighting biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Parasion, Sylwia; Kwiatek, Magdalena; Gryko, Romuald; Mizak, Lidia; Malm, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microbes to form biofilms is an important element of their pathogenicity, and biofilm formation is a serious challenge for today's medicine. Fighting the clinical complications associated with biofilm formation is very difficult and linked to a high risk of failure, especially in a time of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial species most commonly isolated from biofilms include coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. The frequent failure of antibiotic therapy led researchers to look for alternative methods and experiment with the use of antibacterial factors with a mechanism of action different from that of antibiotics. Experimental studies with bacteriophages and mixtures thereof, expressing lytic properties against numerous biofilm-forming bacterial species showed that bacteriophages may both prevent biofilm formation and contribute to eradication of biofilm bacteria. A specific role is played here by phage depolymerases, which facilitate the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and thus the permeation of bacteriophages into deeper biofilm layers and lysis of the susceptible bacterial cells. Much hope is placed in genetic modifications of bacteriophages that would allow the equipping bacteriophages with the function of depolymerase synthesis. The use of phage cocktails prevents the development of phage-resistant bacteria.

  20. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-03-26

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage.

  1. Bacteriophage therapy for safeguarding animal and human health: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ruchi; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Amit; Rahal, Anu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of bacteriophages at the beginning of the 19th century their contribution to bacterial evolution and ecology and use in a variety of applications in biotechnology and medicine has been recognized and understood. Bacteriophages are natural bacterial killers, proven as best biocontrol agents due to their ability to lyse host bacterial cells specifically thereby helping in disease prevention and control. The requirement of such therapeutic approach is straight away required in view of the global emergence of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) strains of bacteria and rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics in both animals and humans along with increasing food safety concerns including of residual antibiotic toxicities. Phage typing is a popular tool to differentiate bacterial isolates and to identify and characterize outbreak-associated strains of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia and Listeria. Numerous methods viz. plaque morphology, ultracentrifugation in the density gradient of CsCl2, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) have been found to be effective in detection of various phages. Bacteriophages have been isolated and recovered from samples of animal waste products of different livestock farms. High titer cocktails of broad spectrum lytic bacteriophages are usually used for clinical trial for assessing their therapeutic efficacy against antibiotic unresponsive infections in different animals. Bacteriophage therapy also helps to fight various bacterial infections of poultry viz. colibacillosis, salmonellosis and listeriosis. Moreover, the utility of phages concerning biosafety has raised the importance to explore and popularize the therapeutic dimension of this promising novel therapy which forms the topic of discussion of the present review.

  2. Potential impact of environmental bacteriophages in spreading antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-06-01

    The idea that bacteriophage transduction plays a role in the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is gaining momentum. Such transduction might be vital in horizontal transfer from environmental to human body-associated biomes and here we review many lines of evidence supporting this notion. It is well accepted that bacteriophages are the most abundant entities in most environments, where they have been shown to be quite persistent. This fact, together with the ability of many phages to infect bacteria belonging to different taxa, makes them suitable vehicles for gene transfer. Metagenomic studies confirm that substantial percentages of the bacteriophage particles present in most environments contain bacterial genes, including mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistance genes. When specific genes of resistance to antibiotics are detected by real-time PCR in the bacteriophage populations of different environments, only tenfold lower numbers of these genes are observed, compared with those found in the corresponding bacterial populations. In addition, the antibiotic resistance genes from these bacteriophages are functional and generate resistance to the bacteria when these genes are transfected. Finally, reports about the transduction of antibiotic resistance genes are on the increase.

  3. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB–PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13152.001 PMID:26978792

  4. Bacteriophages and its applications: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonika; Chatterjee, Soumya; Datta, Sibnarayan; Prasad, Rishika; Dubey, Dharmendra; Prasad, Rajesh Kumar; Vairale, Mohan G

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages (or phages), the most abundant viral entity of the planet, are omni-present in all the ecosystems. On the basis of their unique characteristics and anti-bacterial property, phages are being freshly evaluated taxonomically. Phages replicate inside the host either by lytic or lysogenic mode after infecting and using the cellular machinery of a bacterium. Since their discovery by Twort and d'Herelle in the early 1900s, phage became an important agent for combating pathogenic bacteria in clinical treatments and its related research gained momentum. However, due to recent emergence of bacterial resistance on antibiotics, applications of phage (phage therapy) become an inevitable option of research. Phage particles become popular as a biotechnological tool and treatment of pathogenic bacteria in a range of applied areas. However, there are few concerns over the application of phage-based solutions. This review deals with the updated phage taxonomy (ICTV 2015 Release and subsequent revision) and phage biology and the recent development of its application in the areas of biotechnology, biosensor, therapeutic medicine, food preservation, aquaculture diseases, pollution remediation, and wastewater treatment and issues related with limitations of phage-based remedy.

  5. Hurdles in bacteriophage therapy: deconstructing the parameters.

    PubMed

    Tsonos, Jessica; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Briers, Yves; De Greve, Henri; Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre; Lavigne, Rob

    2014-07-16

    Bacterial infections in animals impact our food production, leading to economic losses due to food rejection and the need for preventive and curative measures. Since the onset of the antibiotic era, the rise of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is causing scares in health care and food producing facilities worldwide. In the search of new therapeutics, re-evaluation of bacteriophage (phage) therapy, using naturally occurring bacterial viruses to tackle infections, is gaining interest. Many studies report about phage therapy success, showing the value and power of these natural viruses. Although phages carry some interesting traits and their basic biology is now well understood, this review argues that phage therapy has not revealed all of its secrets and many parameters remain understudied, making the outcome of phage therapy highly variable depending on the disease incidence. These difficulties include poorly understood mechanisms of phage penetration and distribution throughout the body, the variable expression and accessibility of phage receptors on the bacterial host in in vivo conditions and the unusual (non-linear) phage pharmacokinetics. These parameters are not easily measured in realistic in vivo settings, but are nevertheless important hurdles to overcome the high variability of phage therapy trials. This critical approach is in accordance with Goethe's statement; "Difficulties increase the nearer we get to the goal". However, since the importance of the goal itself also rises, both difficulties and goal justify the need for additional in depth research in this domain.

  6. Diffusion of bacteriophages through artificial biofilm models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    The simple two-chamber diffusion method was improved to study the diffusion properties of bacteriophage (phage) T4 through a model biofilm agarose gel membrane (AGM) embedded with dead host Escherichia coli K12 cells. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(app) ) of phage T4 was calculated to be 2.4 × 10(-12) m(2) /s in 0.5% AGM, which was lower than the coefficient of 4.2 × 10(-12) m(2) /s in 0.5% AGM without host cells. The phage adsorption process by dead host cells slowed the apparent phage diffusion. The Langmuir adsorption equation was used to simulate phage adsorption under different multiplicity of infections (MOIs); the maximum adsorbed phage MOI was calculated to be 417 PFU/CFU, and the Langmuir adsorption constant K(L) was 6.9 × 10(-4) CFU/PFU. To evaluate the effects of phage proliferation on diffusion, a simple syringe-based biofilm model was developed. The phage was added into this homogenous biofilm model when the host cells were in an exponential growth phase, and the apparent diffusion coefficient was greatly enhanced. We concluded that D(app) of phages through biofilms could be distinctly affected by phage adsorption and proliferation, and that the idea of D(app) and these methods can be used to study diffusion properties through real biofilms. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  7. Genome of Bacteriophage P1†

    PubMed Central

    Łobocka, Małgorzata B.; Rose, Debra J.; Plunkett, Guy; Rusin, Marek; Samojedny, Arkadiusz; Lehnherr, Hansjörg; Yarmolinsky, Michael B.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    P1 is a bacteriophage of Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. It lysogenizes its hosts as a circular, low-copy-number plasmid. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequences of two strains of a P1 thermoinducible mutant, P1 c1-100. The P1 genome (93,601 bp) contains at least 117 genes, of which almost two-thirds had not been sequenced previously and 49 have no homologs in other organisms. Protein-coding genes occupy 92% of the genome and are organized in 45 operons, of which four are decisive for the choice between lysis and lysogeny. Four others ensure plasmid maintenance. The majority of the remaining 37 operons are involved in lytic development. Seventeen operons are transcribed from σ70 promoters directly controlled by the master phage repressor C1. Late operons are transcribed from promoters recognized by the E. coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme in the presence of the Lpa protein, the product of a C1-controlled P1 gene. Three species of P1-encoded tRNAs provide differential controls of translation, and a P1-encoded DNA methyltransferase with putative bifunctionality influences transcription, replication, and DNA packaging. The genome is particularly rich in Chi recombinogenic sites. The base content and distribution in P1 DNA indicate that replication of P1 from its plasmid origin had more impact on the base compositional asymmetries of the P1 genome than replication from the lytic origin of replication. PMID:15489417

  8. M13 bacteriophage production for large-scale applications.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher M; Barker, Natalie; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Perkins, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Bacteriophage materials have the potential to revolutionize medicine, energy production and storage, agriculture, solar cells, optics and many other fields. To fulfill these needs, this study examined critical process parameters during phage propagation to increase phage production capability. A representative scale-down system was created in tube spin reactors to allow parallel experimentation with single- and multi-variable analysis. Temperature, harvest time, media composition, feed regime, bacteriophage, and bacteria concentration were analyzed in the scale-down system. Temperature, media composition, and feeding regimens were found to affect phage production more than other factors. Temperature affected bacterial growth and phage production inversely. Multi-variate analysis identified an optimal parameter space which provided a significant improvement over the base line method. This method should be useful in scaled production of bacteriophage for biotechnology.

  9. Bacteriophage typing of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Proteus morganii.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W C; Jeffries, C D

    1974-01-01

    A bacteriphage typing scheme for differentiating Proteus isolated from clinical specimens was developed. Twenty-one distinct patterns of lysis were seen when 15 bacteriophages isolated on 8 Proteus mirabilis, 1 P. vulgaris, and 1 P. morganii were used to type 162 of 189 (85.7%) P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates. Seven phages isolated on 3 P. morganii were used to type 13 of 19 (68.4%) P. morganii isolates. Overall, 84.1% of the 208 isolates were lysed by at least 1 phage at routine test dilution (RTD) or 1,000 x RTD. Fifty isolates, retyped several weeks after the initial testing, showed no changes in lytic patterns. The phages retained their titers after storage at 4 C for several months. A computer analysis of the data showed that there was no relationship between the source of the isolate and bacteriophage type. This bacteriophage typing system may provide epidemiological information on strains involved in human infections.

  10. Antibacterial bioagents based on principles of bacteriophage biology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Bettina M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophages were discovered almost a century ago. With the advent of antibiotics, the use of bacteriophages for treatment of infections fell out of favor in Western medicine. In light of the rise of antibiotic resistance, phages and their products (lysins) are rediscovered as antibacterial bioagents. This overview summarizes principles of phage biology and their translation for therapeutic and preventive applications. Examples are presented to highlight their therapeutic promise for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infections including multidrug-resistant organisms in humans and animals, and their use as decontaminants of food supplies and environments. Besides research on the in vivo behavior of phages and lysins, dialogues between researchers and regulatory agencies are necessary to publish guidelines for bacteriophage manufacturing and formulation for human use. Only well-designed, double-blind randomized controlled trials will determine if phages and lysins are safe and effective adjuncts or alternatives to antibiotic therapy for infections with multidrug-resistant organisms.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage for Klebsiella pneumoniae C3.

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J M; Jofre, J T

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriophage FC3-1 is one of several specific bacteriophages of Klebsiella pneumoniae C3 isolated in our laboratory. Unlike receptors for other Klebsiella phages, the bacteriophage FC3-1 receptor was shown to be lipopolysaccharide, specifically the polysaccharide fraction (O-antigen and core region). We concluded that capsular polysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, and lipid A were not involved in phage binding. Mutants resistant to this phage were isolated and were found to be devoid of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen by several criteria but to contain capsular material serologically identical to that of the wild type. The polysaccharide fraction was concluded to be the primary phage receptor, indicating that it is available to the phage. Images PMID:3888963

  12. Bacteriophages active against Bacteroides fragilis in sewage-polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Tartera, C; Jofre, J

    1987-01-01

    Twelve strains of different Bacteroides species were tested for their efficiency of detection of bacteriophages from sewage. The host range of several isolated phages was investigated. The results indicated that there was a high degree of strain specificity. Then, by using Bacteroides fragilis HSP 40 as the host, which proved to be the most efficient for the detection of phages, feces from humans and several animal species and raw sewage, river water, water from lagoons, seawater, groundwater, and sediments were tested for the presence of bacteriophages that were active against B. fragilis HSP 40. Phages were detected in feces of 10% of the human fecal samples tested and was never detected in feces of the other animal species studied. Moreover, bacteriophages were always recovered from sewage and sewage-polluted samples of waters and sediments, but not from nonpolluted samples. The titers recovered were dependent on the degree of pollution in analyzed waters and sediments. PMID:3662510

  13. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  14. Considerations for using bacteriophages for plant disease control

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey B.; Vallad, Gary E.; Iriarte, Fanny B.; Obradović, Aleksa; Wernsing, Mine H.; Jackson, Lee E.; Balogh, Botond; Hong, Jason C.; Momol, M.Timur

    2012-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages as an effective phage therapy strategy faces significant challenges for controlling plant diseases in the phyllosphere. A number of factors must be taken into account when considering phage therapy for bacterial plant pathogens. Given that effective mitigation requires high populations of phage be present in close proximity to the pathogen at critical times in the disease cycle, the single biggest impediment that affects the efficacy of bacteriophages is their inability to persist on plant surfaces over time due to environmental factors. Inactivation by UV light is the biggest factor reducing bacteriophage persistence on plant surfaces. Therefore, designing strategies that minimize this effect are critical. For instance, application timing can be altered: instead of morning or afternoon application, phages can be applied late in the day to minimize the adverse effects of UV and extend the time high populations of phage persist on leaf surfaces. Protective formulations have been identified which prolong phage viability on the leaf surface; however, UV inactivation continues to be the major limiting factor in developing more effective bacteriophage treatments for bacterial plant pathogens. Other strategies, which have been developed to potentially increase persistence of phages on leaf surfaces, rely on establishing non-pathogenic or attenuated bacterial strains in the phyllosphere that are sensitive to the phage(s) specific to the target bacterium. We have also learned that selecting the correct phages for disease control is critical. This requires careful monitoring of bacterial strains in the field to minimize development of bacterial strains with resistance to the deployed bacteriophages. We also have data that indicate that selecting the phages based on in vivo assays may also be important when developing use for field application. Although bacteriophages have potential in biological control for plant disease control, there are major

  15. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Genome sequence of Streptococcus mutans bacteriophage M102.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Jan R

    2007-10-01

    Bacteriophage M102 is a lytic phage specific for serotype c strains of Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries. In this study, the complete genome sequence of M102 was determined. The genome is 31,147 bp in size and contains 41 ORFs. Most of the ORFs encoding putative phage structural proteins show similarity to those from bacteriophages from Streptococcus thermophilus. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the M102 genome contains an unusual lysis cassette, which encodes a holin and two lytic enzymes.

  17. Molecular and chemical engineering of bacteriophages for potential medical applications.

    PubMed

    Hodyra, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in molecular engineering has contributed to the great progress of medicine. However, there are still difficult problems constituting a challenge for molecular biology and biotechnology, e.g. new generation of anticancer agents, alternative biosensors or vaccines. As a biotechnological tool, bacteriophages (phages) offer a promising alternative to traditional approaches. They can be applied as anticancer agents, novel platforms in vaccine design, or as target carriers in drug discovery. Phages also offer solutions for modern cell imaging, biosensor construction or food pathogen detection. Here we present a review of bacteriophage research as a dynamically developing field with promising prospects for further development of medicine and biotechnology.

  18. Bacteriophage inspired antibiotics discovery against infection involved biofilm.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiangyu; Li, Wu; Zheng, Fei; Xie, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm profoundly influences the fate of bacteria within and the outcome of related infection, and is closely associated with antibiotics resistance and bacterial persistence. Bacteriophages represent a new promising alternative to combat biofilm-related infection. The interplay between phages and biofilms is complex. Some phages or their components can inhibit the host bacteria biofilm via diverse mechanisms, while other phages can facilitate the host biofilm formation through phage-mediated lysis and extracellular DNA release. In this paper, we summarize the role of bacteriophages in the biofilm formation, and the application of phages to the control of bacterial persisters and infectious biofilms, in particular, the phage-inspired antibiotics discovery.

  19. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Collins, James J [Newton, MA; Kobayashi, Hideki [Yokohama, JP; Kearn, Mads [Ottawa, CA; Araki, Michihiro [Minatoku, JP; Friedland, Ari [Boston, MA; Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-05-22

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  20. Norovirus and FRNA bacteriophage determined by RT-qPCR and infectious FRNA bacteriophage in wastewater and oysters.

    PubMed

    Flannery, John; Keaveney, Sinéad; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Doré, William

    2013-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV), the leading cause of adult non-bacterial gastroenteritis can be commonly detected in wastewater but the extent of NoV removal provided by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is unclear. We monitored a newly commissioned WWTP with UV disinfection on a weekly basis over a six month period for NoV using RT-qPCR and for FRNA bacteriophage GA using both RT-qPCR (total concentration) and a plaque assay (infectious concentration). Mean concentrations of NoV GI and GII in influent wastewater were reduced by 0.25 and 0.41 log10 genome copies 100 ml(-1), respectively by the WWTP. The mean concentration of total FRNA bacteriophage GA was reduced by 0.35 log genome copies 100 ml(-1) compared to a reduction of infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA of 2.13 log PFU 100 ml(-1). A significant difference between concentrations of infectious and total FRNA bacteriophage GA was observed in treated, but not in untreated wastewaters. We conclude that RT-qPCR in isolation underestimates the reduction of infectious virus during wastewater treatment. We further compared the concentrations of infectious virus in combined sewer overflow (CSO) and UV treated effluents using FRNA bacteriophage GA. A greater percentage (98%) of infectious virus is released in CSO discharges than UV treated effluent (44%). Following a CSO discharge, concentrations of NoV GII and infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA in oysters from less than the limit of detection to 3150 genome copies 100 g(-1) and 1050 PFU 100 g(-1) respectively.

  1. Novel bacteriophages containing a genome of another bacteriophage within their genomes.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Maud M; Reavy, Brian; Makarova, Kira S; Cock, Peter J; Hopkins, David W; Torrance, Lesley; Koonin, Eugene V; Taliansky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A novel bacteriophage infecting Staphylococus pasteuri was isolated during a screen for phages in Antarctic soils. The phage named SpaA1 is morphologically similar to phages of the family Siphoviridae. The 42,784 bp genome of SpaA1 is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with 3' protruding cohesive ends. The SpaA1 genome encompasses 63 predicted protein-coding genes which cluster within three regions of the genome, each of apparently different origin, in a mosaic pattern. In two of these regions, the gene sets resemble those in prophages of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki str. T03a001 (genes involved in DNA replication/transcription, cell entry and exit) and B. cereus AH676 (additional regulatory and recombination genes), respectively. The third region represents an almost complete genome (except for the short terminal segments) of a distinct bacteriophage, MZTP02. Nearly the same gene module was identified in prophages of B. thuringiensis serovar monterrey BGSC 4AJ1 and B. cereus Rock4-2. These findings suggest that MZTP02 can be shuttled between genomes of other bacteriophages and prophages, leading to the formation of chimeric genomes. The presence of a complete phage genome in the genome of other phages apparently has not been described previously and might represent a 'fast track' route of virus evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Another phage (BceA1) nearly identical in sequence to SpaA1, and also including the almost complete MZTP02 genome within its own genome, was isolated from a bacterium of the B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group. Remarkably, both SpaA1 and BceA1 phages can infect B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, but only one of them, SpaA1, can infect S. pasteuri. This finding is best compatible with a scenario in which MZTP02 was originally contained in BceA1 infecting Bacillus spp, the common hosts for these two phages, followed by emergence of SpaA1 infecting S. pasteuri.

  2. Bacteriophages and their enzymes in biofilm control.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Although free-swimming planktonic bacteria historically have been the typical focus of microbiological studies, the natural state of many or most bacteria is one where they instead are associated with surfaces and/or each other. For many pathogenic as well as nuisance bacteria, including biofouling bacteria, it consequently is within the context of this biofilm state that antibacterial strategies must be implemented. For reasons that are not fully understood, however, biofilm-associated bacteria tend to be less susceptible to treatments with standard chemical antibacterial agents than are planktonic bacteria, and this appears to be especially an issue with the use of less-harsh agents such as antibiotics. Within a variety of contexts the development of less- or selectively toxic antibacterial agents capable of clearing biofilms therefore would be welcome. In this review we consider the use of three categories of such agents as anti-biofilm antibacterials. These are lytic viruses of bacteria, that is, bacteriophages, effecting phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (a.k.a., phage therapy); purified phage-encoded enzymes that digest bacterial cell-wall material (endolysins or simply lysins); and a second category of phage-encoded enzymes that digest the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that are particularly notable components of bacterial biofilms (EPS depolymerases). These agents have been shown to reduce the bacterial density of a diversity of biofilms and, in many cases, tend to be lacking in inherent toxicity against the tissues of animals. Here we consider these phage-based anti-biofilm strategies with emphasis on ecological aspects of their action and with particular consideration of EPS depolymerases.

  3. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  4. My Life with Bacteriophage φ29

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    This article is a survey of my scientific work over 52 years. During my postdoctoral stay in Severo Ochoa's laboratory, I determined the direction of reading of the genetic message, and I discovered two proteins that I showed to be involved in the initiation of protein synthesis. The work I have done in Spain with bacteriophage φ29 for 45 years has been very rewarding. I can say that I was lucky because I did not expect that φ29 would give so many interesting results, but I worked hard, with a lot of dedication and enthusiasm, and I was there when the luck arrived. I would like to emphasize our work on the control of φ29 DNA transcription and, in particular, the finding for the first time of a protein covalently linked to the 5′-ends of φ29 DNA that we later showed to be the primer for the initiation of phage DNA replication. Very relevant was the discovery of the φ29 DNA polymerase, with its properties of extremely high processivity and strand displacement capacity, together with its high fidelity. The φ29 DNA polymerase has become an ideal enzyme for DNA amplification, both rolling-circle and whole-genome linear amplification. I am also very proud of the many brilliant students and collaborators with whom I have worked over the years and who have become excellent scientists. This Reflections article is not intended to be the end of my scientific career. I expect to work for many years to come. PMID:23124207

  5. Viscoelastic properties of semiflexible filamentous bacteriophage fd.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F G; Hinner, B; Sackmann, E; Tang, J X

    2000-10-01

    The cytoskeletal protein filament F-actin has been treated in a number of recent studies as a model physical system for semiflexible filaments. In this work, we studied the viscoelastic properties of entangled solutions of the filamentous bacteriophage fd as an alternative to F-actin with similar physical parameters. We present both microrheometric and macrorheometric measurements of the viscoelastic storage and loss moduli, G'(f ) and G"(f ), respectively, in a frequency range 0.01

  6. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : VII. ON THE PARTICULATE NATURE OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    PubMed

    Bronfenbrenner, J

    1927-04-30

    When filtrates of lysed cultures (bacteriophage) are subjected to prolonged dialysis under osmotic pressure against water, the presence of the lytic agent can be detected outside the membrane only during the first few days. The residue remaining inside the membrane contains the bulk of the original lytic agent, and yet it is no longer capable of diffusing into the outer solution. The interruption of diffusion is shown not to be due to any alteration in the permeability of the membrane. Moreover, the residue fails to diffuse through a fresh membrane of similar permeability, while the dialyzed portion of the phage passes quantitatively through a new membrane. When ultrafiltration under pressure was substituted for dialysis, the residue on the filter could be washed repeatedly with water without giving off into the filtrate any more active agent. However, if broth was substituted for water, a renewed diffusion of the active agent resulted. These results are interpreted as indicating that the colloidal particles present in the lytic filtrates (and apparently endowed with properties of bacteriophage) do not represent autonomous units of the active agent, but merely serve as a vehicle on which the agent is adsorbed. The vary in size within limits wide enough to permit fractionation by means of ultrafiltration. When the coarser particles retained by the ultrafilter are washed with broth, some of the active agent is detached from its coarse vehicle particles. The agent, now more highly dispersed, is capable of passing the filter which held it back previously. Preparation of a simple ultrafilter used in these experiments is given in detail.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Bacteriophage Eldridge

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, Alexandra M.; Eldridge, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the complete genome sequence of the unique bacteriophage Eldridge, isolated from soil using Bacillus megaterium as the host organism, was determined. Eldridge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 242 genes and is unique when compared to phage sequences in GenBank. PMID:27103735

  8. Gamma-Ray Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Conkling, Mark A.; Grunau, John A.; Drake, John W.

    1976-01-01

    137Cs-gamma irradiation of bacteriophage T4 induces large deletions plus a variety of types of point mutations. All mutations arise with single-hit kinetics, and all by a misrepair process. The estimated point mutation rate is 1.5 x 10-9 per locus per rad. PMID:1269910

  9. Lytic bacteriophages: Potential interventions against enteric bacterial pathogens on produce.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-04-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes.

  10. Ribonucleotides Covalently Linked to Deoxyribonucleic Acid in T4 Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Speyer, J. F.; Chao, J.; Chao, L.

    1972-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 was grown in the presence of labeled uridine. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the phage was shown to contain covalently attached ribonucleotides. The label appears not to be internal in the DNA strands. Presumably, it is at the ends of the DNA strands and this may be related to DNA initiation. PMID:4564585

  11. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita

    2014-11-15

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer.

  12. BACTERIOPHAGE TRANSPORT IN SANDY SOIL AND FRACTURED TUFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage transport was investigated in laboratory column experiments using sandy soil, a controlled field study in a sandy wash, and laboratory experiments using fractured rock. In the soil columns, the phage MS-2 exhibited significant dispersion and was excluded from 35 to ...

  13. Natural mummification of the human gut preserves bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2016-01-01

    The natural mummification process of the human gut represents a unique opportunity to study the resulting microbial community structure and composition. While results are providing insights into the preservation of bacteria, fungi, pathogenic eukaryotes and eukaryotic viruses, no studies have demonstrated that the process of natural mummification also results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA. We characterized the gut microbiome of three pre-Columbian Andean mummies, namely FI3, FI9 and FI12, and found sequences homologous to viruses. From the sequences attributable to viruses, 50.4% (mummy FI3), 1.0% (mummy FI9) and 84.4% (mummy FI12) were homologous to bacteriophages. Sequences corresponding to the Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, Podoviridae and Microviridae families were identified. Predicted putative bacterial hosts corresponded mainly to the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and included Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Vibrio, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and Yersinia. Predicted functional categories associated with bacteriophages showed a representation of structural, replication, integration and entry and lysis genes. The present study suggests that the natural mummification of the human gut results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA, representing an opportunity to elucidate the ancient phageome and to hypothesize possible mechanisms of preservation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on bacteriophages used as viral indicators.

    PubMed

    Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Jofre, Juan; MariemYahya; Mendez, Javier; Barkallah, Insaf; Hamdi, Moktar

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the susceptibility of indicator bacteriophages towards γ-radiation to evaluate their appropriateness as viral indicators for water quality control. The effects of γ-radiation on naturally occurring somatic coliphages, F-specific coliphages and Escherichia coli were examined in raw sewage and sewage sludge. As well, the effects of radiation on bacteriophages ΦX174 and MS2, and E. coli all grown in the laboratory and seeded in distilled water, autoclaved raw sewage and a 1% peptone solution were evaluated. The inactivation of E. coli was fairly similar in all matrices. In contrast, inactivation of bacteriophages was significantly greater in distilled water than in the other matrices. These results showed the great influence of the matrix characteristics on virus inactivation. Somatic coliphages in raw sewage and sewage sludge and ΦX174 in autoclaved sewage were inactivated similarly and were far more resistant than F-specific coliphages, MS2 and E. coli. As well, F-specific RNA bacteriophages in raw sewage and sewage sludge and MS2 in autoclaved sewage were inactivated similarly and were more resistant than E. coli. In contrast, MS2 was more susceptible to γ-radiation than E. coli in distilled water. Our results showed that ΦX174 is a suitable indicator for estimating virus inactivation by γ-irradiation and corroborate the use of somatic coliphages to survey the viral quality of treated water and sludges.

  15. Use of bacteriophages in controlling E. coli in leafy vegetables

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages are viruses that can infect and lys (kill) bacteria. These viruses are not harmful to humans and are present in the environment and many foods. Enterohemmorhagic E. coli (EHEC), like E. coli O157:H7, have been associated with contaminated bagged leafy green commodities. Outbreaks o...

  16. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  17. Bacteriophages and Diffusion of β-lactamase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; García, Aurora; Miró, Elisenda; Mirelis, Beatriz; Prats, Guillem; Jofre, Juan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the presence of various β-lactamase genes within the bacteriophages in sewage. Results showed the occurrence of phage particles carrying sequences of blaOXA-2, blaPSE-1 or blaPSE-4 and blaPSE-type genes. Phages may contribute to the spread of some β-lactamase genes. PMID:15207070

  18. BACTERIOPHAGE TRANSPORT IN SANDY SOIL AND FRACTURED TUFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage transport was investigated in laboratory column experiments using sandy soil, a controlled field study in a sandy wash, and laboratory experiments using fractured rock. In the soil columns, the phage MS-2 exhibited significant dispersion and was excluded from 35 to ...

  19. Bacteriophages as enteric viral indicators in bivalve mollusc management.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Kate R; Torok, Valeria A; Turnbull, Alison R

    2017-08-01

    Human enteric viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are spread by a variety of routes including faecal-oral transmission. Contaminated bivalve shellfish are regularly implicated in foodborne viral disease outbreaks internationally. Traditionally indicator bacteria, the coliforms and Escherichia coli, have been used to detect faecal pollution in growing waters and shellfish. However, studies have established that they are inadequate as indicators of the risk of human enteric viruses. Bacteriophages have been identified as potential indicators or surrogates for human enteric viruses due to their similarities in morphology, behaviour in water environments and resistance to disinfectant treatments. The somatic coliphages, male-specific RNA coliphages (FRNA coliphages) and the bacteriophages of Bacteroides are the groups recognised as most suitable for water and shellfish testing. In this review, we discuss the rationale and supporting evidence for the application of bacteriophages as surrogates for human enteric viruses in shellfish under a variety of conditions. There is some evidence to support the validity of using bacteriophage levels to indicate viral risk in shellfish in highly contaminated sites and following adverse sewage events. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of Bacteriophage 933W Repressor DNA Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J.; Samorodnitsky, Daniel; Rosati, Rayna C.; Koudelka, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that 933W repressor apparently does not cooperatively bind to adjacent sites on DNA and that the relative affinities of 933W repressor for its operators differ significantly from that of any other lambdoid bacteriophage. These findings indicate that the operational details of the lysis-lysogeny switch of bacteriophage 933W are unique among lambdoid bacteriophages. Since the functioning of the lysis-lysogeny switch in 933W bacteriophage uniquely and solely depends on the order of preference of 933W repressor for its operators, we examined the details of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. To identify the specificity determinants, we first created a molecular model of the 933W repressor-DNA complex and tested the predicted protein-DNA interactions. These results of these studies provide a picture of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. We also show that, opposite of what is normally observed for lambdoid phages, 933W operator sequences have evolved in such a way that the presence of the most commonly found base sequences at particular operator positions serves to decrease, rather than increase, the affinity of the protein for the site. This finding cautions against assuming that a consensus sequence derived from sequence analysis defines the optimal, highest affinity DNA binding site for a protein. PMID:22509323

  1. Factors Affecting Survival of Bacteriophage on Tomato Leaf Surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated p...

  2. Isolation of an Lc-specific Escherichia coli bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Fralick, J A; Diedrich, D L; Casey-Wood, S

    1990-01-01

    We isolated an OmpF-specific bacteriophage whose host range mutant, SQ108h2, requires the presence of the Lc porin for its attachment and which can be used to screen or select for Lc-defective mutants among Escherichia coli K-12 strains lysogenic for the PA-2 converting phage. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1689719

  3. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words “narrow” and especially “broad” when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  4. Bacteriophage significantly reduces Listeria monocytogenes on raw salmon fillet tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have demonstrated the antilisterial activity of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) bacteriophage LISTEX P100 (phage P100) on the surface of raw salmon fillet tissue against Listeria monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b. In a broth model system, phage P100 completely inhibited L. monocytogenes gro...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Jessica L.; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  6. Bacteriophages as indicators of faecal pollution and enteric virus removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport due to their closer morphological and biological properties compared to FIB. Based on a meta-analysis of published data, we summarize con...

  7. Environmental Augmentation with Bacteriophage Prevents Colibacillosis in Broiler Chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria. They are plentiful in nature, are safe having no known activity to human or animal cells, and are an attractive alternative to antibiotics. The objectives of this research were to establish an experimental model of colibacillosis induced by indirect e...

  8. Bacteriophage for prophylaxis and therapy in cattle, poultry, and pigs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The successful use of virulent (lytic) bacteriophages (phages) in preventing and treating neonatal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in calves, lambs and pigs has prompted investigation of other applications phage therapy in food animals. While results have been very variable, some indica...

  9. Salmonella Enteritidis bacteriophage candidates for phage therapy of poultry.

    PubMed

    Sillankorva, S; Pleteneva, E; Shaburova, O; Santos, S; Carvalho, C; Azeredo, J; Krylov, V

    2010-04-01

    Salmonella is a worldwide foodborne pathogen causing acute enteric infections in humans. In the recent years, the use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a possible tool to combat this zoonotic pathogen in poultry farms. This work aims to isolate and perform comparative studies of a group of phages active against a collection of specific Salmonella Enteritidis strains from Portugal and England. Also, suitable phage candidates for therapy of poultry will be selected. The Salm. Enteritidis strains studied were shown to have a significantly high occurrence of defective (cryptic) prophages; however, no live phages were found in the strains. Bacteriophages isolated from different environments lysed all except one of the tested Salm. Enteritidis strains. The bacteriophages studied were divided into different groups according to their genetic homology, RFLP profiles and phenotypic features, and most of them showed no DNA homology with the bacterial hosts. The bacteriophage lytic efficacy proved to be highly dependent on the propagation host strain. Despite the evidences shown in this work that the Salm. Enteritidis strains used did not produce viable phages, we have confirmed that some phages, when grown on particular hosts, behaved as complexes of phages. This is most likely because of the presence of inactive phage-related genomes (or their parts) in the bacterial strains which are capable of being reactivated or which can recombine with lytic phages. Furthermore, changes of the bacterial hosts used for maintenance of phages must be avoided as these can drastically modify the parameters of the phage preparations, including host range and lytic activity. This work shows that the optimal host and growth conditions must be carefully studied and selected for the production of each bacteriophage candidate for animal therapy.

  10. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the bacteriophage P22 portal protein.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Gino; Moore, Sean D; Prevelige, Peter E; Johnson, John E

    2002-07-01

    Portal proteins are components of large oligomeric dsDNA pumps connecting the icosahedral capsid of tailed bacteriophages to the tail. Prior to the tail attachment, dsDNA is actively pumped through a central cavity formed by the subunits. We have studied the portal protein of bacteriophage P22, which is the largest connector characterized among the tailed bacteriophages. The molecular weight of the monomer is 82.7 kDa, and it spontaneously assembles into an oligomeric structure of approximately 1.0 MDa. Here we present a preliminary biochemical and crystallographic characterization of this large macromolecular complex. The main difficulties related to the crystallization of P22 portal protein lay in the intrinsic dynamic nature of the portal oligomer. Recombinant connectors assembled from portal monomers expressed in Escherichia coli form rings of different stoichiometry in solution, which cannot be separated on the basis of their size. To overcome this intrinsic heterogeneity we devised a biochemical purification that separates different ring populations on the basis of their charge. Small ordered crystals were grown from drops containing a high concentration of the kosmotropic agent tert-butanol and used for data collection. A preliminary crystallographic analysis to 7.0-A resolution revealed that the P22 portal protein crystallized in space group I4 with unit cell dimensions a=b=409.4A, c=260.4A. This unit cell contains a total of eight connectors. Analysis of the noncrystallographic symmetry by the self-rotation function unambiguously confirmed that bacteriophage P22 portal protein is a dodecamer with a periodicity of 30 degrees. The cryo-EM reconstruction of the dodecahedral bacteriophage T3 portal protein will be used as a model to initiate phase extension and structure determination.

  11. Diverse Temperate Bacteriophage Carriage in Clostridium difficile 027 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nale, Janet Y.; Shan, Jinyu; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Fawley, Warren N.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 can be classified into subtypes, but it unknown if these differ in terms of severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). Genomic studies of C. difficile 027 strains have established that they are rich in mobile genetic elements including prophages. This study combined physiological studies, electron microscopy analysis and molecular biology to determine the potential role of temperate bacteriophages in disease and diversity of C. difficile 027. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced prophages from 91 clinical C. difficile 027 isolates and used transmission electron microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterise the bacteriophages present. We established a correlation between phage morphology and subtype. Morphologically distinct tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae were identified in 63 and three isolates, respectively. Dual phage carriage was observed in four isolates. In addition, there were inducible phage tail-like particles (PT-LPs) in all isolates. The capacity of two antibiotics mitomycin C and norfloxacin to induce prophages was compared and it was shown that they induced specific prophages from C. difficile isolates. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses was designed to examine molecular diversity of C. difficile myoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid gene sequences from eight ribotypes showed that all sequences found in the ribotype 027 isolates were identical and distinct from other C. difficile ribotypes and other bacteria species. Conclusion/Significance A diverse set of temperate bacteriophages are associated with C. difficile 027. The observed correlation between phage carriage and the subtypes suggests that temperate bacteriophages contribute to the diversity of C. difficile 027 and may play a role in severity of disease associated with this ribotype. The capsid gene can be used as a tool to identify C. difficile

  12. Assessment of drinking water quality using indicator bacteria and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Javier; Audicana, Ana; Cancer, Mercedes; Isern, Anna; Llaneza, Julian; Moreno, Belén; Navarro, Mercedes; Tarancón, M Lluisa; Valero, Fernando; Ribas, Ferran; Jofre, Juan; Lucena, Francisco

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial indicators and bacteriophages suggested as potential indicators of water quality were determined by public laboratories in water from springs, household water wells, and rural and metropolitan water supplies in north-eastern Spain. Indicator bacteria were detected more frequently than bacteriophages in springs, household water wells and rural water supplies. In contrast, positive bacteriophage detections were more numerous than those of bacteria in metropolitan water supplies. Most of the metropolitan water supply samples containing indicators had concentrations of chlorine below 0.1 mg l(-1), their indicator loads resembling more closely those of rural water supplies than any other samples taken from metropolitan water supplies. The number of samples from metropolitan water supplies containing more than 0.1 mg l(-1) of chlorine that contained phages clearly outnumbered those containing indicator bacteria. Some association was observed between rainfall and the presence of indicators. Sediments from service reservoirs and water from dead ends in the distribution network of one of the metropolitan water supplies were also tested. Bacterial indicators and phages were detected in a higher percentage than in samples of tap water from the same network. Additionally, indicator bacteria were detected more frequently than bacteriophages in sediments of service reservoirs and water from dead end samples. We conclude that naturally occurring indicator bacteria and bacteriophages respond differently to chlorination and behave differently in drinking water distribution networks. Moreover, this study has shown that testing for the three groups of phages in routine laboratories is easy to implement and feasible without the requirement for additional material resources for the laboratories.

  13. DNA packaging intermediates of bacteriophage Φ174

    PubMed Central

    Music, Cynthia L; Cheng, R Holland; Bowen, Zorina; McKenna, Robert; Rossmann, Michael G; Baker, Timothy S; Incardona, Nino L

    2014-01-01

    Background Like many viruses, bacteriophage ΦX174 packages its I)NA genome into a procapsid that is assembled from structural intermediates and scaffolding proteins. The procapsid contains the structural proteins F, G and H, as well as the scaffolding proteins B and D. Provirions are formed by packaging of DNA together with the small internal J proteins, while losing at least some of the B scaffolding proteins. Eventually, loss of the I) scaffolding proteins and the remaining B proteins leads to the formation of mature virions. Results ΦX174 108S 'procapsids' have been purified in milligram quantities by removing 114S (mature virion) and 70S (abortive capsid) particles from crude lysates by differential precipitation with polyethylene glycol. 132S 'provirions' were purified on sucrose gradients in the presence of EDTA. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to obtain reconstructions of procapsids and provirions. Although these are very similar to each other, their structures differ greatly from that of the virion. The F and G proteins, whose atomic structures in virions were previously determined from X-ray crystallography, were fitted into the cryo-EM reconstructions. This showed that the pentamer of G proteins on each five-fold vertex changes its conformation only slightly during DNA packaging and maturation, whereas major tertiary and quaternary structural changes occur in the F protein. The procapsids and provirions were found to contain 120 copies of the I) protein arranged as tetramers on the twofold axes. IDNA might enter procapsids through one of the 30 Å diameter holes on the icosahedral three-fold axes. Conclusions Combining cryo-EM image reconstruction and X-ray crystallography has revealed the major conformational changes that can occur in viral assembly. The function of the scaffolding proteins may be, in part, to support weak interactions between the structural proteins in the procapsids and to cover surfaces that are subsequently required for

  14. T4 bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles for E. coli capturing: Influence of bacteriophage loading, temperature and tryptone.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the use of bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles (Fe3O4) for the rapid capturing and isolation of Escherichia coli. The investigation of T4 bacteriophage adsorption to silane functionalised Fe3O4 with amine (NH2), carboxylic (COOH) and methyl (CH3) surface functional groups reveals the domination of net electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in governing bacteriophage adsorption. The bare Fe3O4 and Fe3O4-NH2 with high T4 loading captured 3-fold more E. coli (∼70% capturing efficiency) compared to the low loading T4 on Fe3O4-COOH, suggesting the significance of T4 loading in E. coli capturing efficiency. Importantly, it is further revealed that E. coli capture is highly dependent on the incubation temperature and the presence of tryptone in the media. Effective E. coli capturing only occurs at 37°C in tryptone-containing media with the absence of either conditions resulted in poor bacteria capture. The incubation temperature dictates the capturing ability of Fe3O4/T4, whereby T4 and E. coli need to establish an irreversible binding that occurred at 37°C. The presence of tryptophan-rich tryptone in the suspending media was also critical, as shown by a 3-fold increase in E. coli capture efficiency of Fe3O4/T4 in tryptone-containing media compared to that in tryptone-free media. This highlights for the first time that successful bacteria capturing requires not only an optimum tailoring of the particle's surface physicochemical properties for favourable bacteriophage loading, but also an in-depth understanding of how factors, such as temperature and solution chemistry influence the subsequent bacteriophage-bacteria interactions.

  15. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  16. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  17. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    EXPERIMENTAL Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm– Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care Akhil K. Seth, M.D...efficacy of a species-specific bacteriophage against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm– infected wounds using a validated, quantitative, rabbit ear model. Methods...Bacteriophages can be an effective topical therapy against S. au- reus biofilm– infected wounds in the setting of a deficient (mutant) or disrupted

  18. The isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages from free range and indoor poultry.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jane; Barton, Mary D; Heuzenroeder, Michael W

    2013-02-22

    Six hundred and sixty one samples - primarily fresh chicken faeces - were processed to isolate wild type Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages, via overlay agar methods using C. jejuni NCTC 12662. The aims of this study were to isolate and purify bacteriophages and then test for their ability to lyse field strains of C. jejuni in vitro. Of all samples processed, 130 were positive for bacteriophages. A distinct difference was observed between samples from different poultry enterprises. No bacteriophages could be isolated from indoor broilers. The majority of bacteriophages were isolated from free range poultry - both broilers and egg layers. Bacteriophages were purified and then selected for characterization based on their ability to produce clear lysis on plaque assay, as opposed to turbid plaques. Two hundred and forty one C. jejuni field isolates were tested for sensitivity to the bacteriophages. Lysis was graded subjectively and any minimal lysis was excluded. Using this system, 59.0% of the C. jejuni isolates showed significant sensitivity to at least one bacteriophage. The sensitivity to individual bacteriophages ranged from 10.0% to 32.5% of the C. jejuni isolates. Five bacteriophages were examined by electron microscopy and determined to belong to the Myoviridae family. The physical size, predicted genetic composition and genome size of the bacteriophages correlated well with other reported Campylobacter bacteriophages. The reasons for the observed difference between indoor broilers and free range poultry is unknown, but are postulated to be due to differences in the Campylobacter population in birds under different rearing conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  20. Bacteriophage-Resistant Mutants in Yersinia pestis: Identification of Phage Receptors and Attenuation for Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-28

    case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage- resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can... bacteriophage therapy . Methodology/Principal Findings: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed...cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a

  1. Controlling nanostructures of mesoporous silica fibers by supramolecular assembly of genetically modifiable bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chuanbin; Wang, Fuke; Cao, Binrui

    2012-06-25

    A useful virus: The synthesis of a new family of mesoporous silica fibers is reported. Monodisperse filamentous bacteriophages self-assembled into highly ordered hexagonal lattices that were used as templates for the formation of silica nanostructures. Removal of the bacteriophage assembly through calcination led to the formation of mesoporous silica fibers with pore structures precisely defined by the bacteriophage assembly (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Characterization of Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophages and their genomic relationships to firmicute bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Bryan D; Grose, Julianne H; Breakwell, Donald P; Burnett, Sandra H

    2014-08-30

    Paenibacillus larvae is a Firmicute bacterium that causes American Foulbrood, a lethal disease in honeybees and is a major source of global agricultural losses. Although P. larvae phages were isolated prior to 2013, no full genome sequences of P. larvae bacteriophages were published or analyzed. This report includes an in-depth analysis of the structure, genomes, and relatedness of P. larvae myoviruses Abouo, Davis, Emery, Jimmer1, Jimmer2, and siphovirus phiIBB_Pl23 to each other and to other known phages. P. larvae phages Abouo, Davies, Emery, Jimmer1, and Jimmer2 are myoviruses with ~50 kbp genomes. The six P. larvae phages form three distinct groups by dotplot analysis. An annotated linear genome map of these six phages displays important identifiable genes and demonstrates the relationship between phages. Sixty phage assembly or structural protein genes and 133 regulatory or other non-structural protein genes were identifiable among the six P. larvae phages. Jimmer1, Jimmer2, and Davies formed stable lysogens resistant to superinfection by genetically similar phages. The correlation between tape measure protein gene length and phage tail length allowed identification of co-isolated phages Emery and Abouo in electron micrographs. A Phamerator database was assembled with the P. larvae phage genomes and 107 genomes of Firmicute-infecting phages, including 71 Bacillus phages. Phamerator identified conserved domains in 1,501 of 6,181 phamilies (only 24.3%) encoded by genes in the database and revealed that P. larvae phage genomes shared at least one phamily with 72 of the 107 other phages. The phamily relationship of large terminase proteins was used to indicate putative DNA packaging strategies. Analyses from CoreGenes, Phamerator, and electron micrograph measurements indicated Jimmer1, Jimmer2, Abouo and Davies were related to phages phiC2, EJ-1, KC5a, and AQ113, which are small-genome myoviruses that infect Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium

  3. Methods for generation of reporter phages and immobilization of active bacteriophages on a polymer surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Bruce Michael (Inventor); Perry, Lynda Louise (Inventor); Morgan, Mark Thomas (Inventor); Kothapalli, Aparna (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Novel reporter bacteriophages are provided. Provided are compositions and methods that allow bacteriophages that are used for specific detection or killing of E. coli 0157:H7 to be propagated in nonpathogenic E. coli, thereby eliminating the safety and security risks of propagation in E. coli 0157:H7. Provided are compositions and methods for attaching active bacteriophages to the surface of a polymer in order to kill target bacteria with which the phage comes into contact. Provided are modified bacteriophages immobilized to a surface, which capture E. coli 0157:H7 and cause the captured cells to emit light or fluorescence, allowing detection of the bacteria in a sample.

  4. Bacteriophage-based synthetic biology for the study of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery, bacteriophages have contributed enormously to our understanding of molecular biology as model systems. Furthermore, bacteriophages have provided many tools that have advanced the fields of genetic engineering and synthetic biology. Here, we discuss bacteriophage-based technologies and their application to the study of infectious diseases. New strategies for engineering genomes have the potential to accelerate the design of novel phages as therapies, diagnostics, and tools. Though almost a century has elapsed since their discovery, bacteriophages continue to have a major impact on modern biological sciences, especially with the growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria and interest in the microbiome. PMID:24997401

  5. Application of bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella attachment and biofilms on hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2017-02-23

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of bacteriophage treatment for reducing Salmonella attachment and biofilms on hard surfaces. Bacteriophages (n = 6) were selected for bacteriophage treatment based on host ranges against Salmonella isolates (n = 10) obtained from rendering plants. The effectiveness of bacteriophage treatment (104-108 PFU/mL) was initially evaluated against strong Salmonella biofilm formers in 96-well microplate. Then, the bacteriophage treatment (109 PFU/mL) was applied for 7 d to reduce Salmonella attached to the stainless steel surfaces under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The inhibition of biofilm formation and reduction of pre-formed biofilm in 96-well microplate with bacteriophage treatment reached up to 90 and 66%, respectively. Under laboratory conditions, bacteriophage treatment reduced up to 2.9 and 3.0 log CFU/cm2 of attachment and slightly formed biofilm of selected top 10 Salmonella strains and an avirulent Salmonella Typhimurium strain 8243, respectively, as compared with reductions of 3.4, 1.4, and 3.0 log CFU/cm2 of S. Typhimurium strain 8243 in summer, fall/winter, and spring seasons under greenhouse conditions, respectively. Clearly, bacteriophages were effective on reducing Salmonella attachment and biofilms formed on hard surfaces under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The use of bacteriophages on hard surfaces may have merits in reducing the likelihood of finished rendered products being recontaminated with Salmonella in rendering plants.

  6. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from uteri of postpartum dairy cows to antibiotic and environmental bacteriophages. Part I: Isolation and lytic activity estimation of bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, R C; Santos, T M A; Gilbert, R O; Caixeta, L S; Teixeira, L M; Bicalho, M L S; Machado, V S

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate bacteriophages from environmental samples of 2 large commercial dairy farms using Escherichia coli isolated from the uteri of postpartum Holstein dairy cows as hosts. A total of 11 bacteriophage preparations were isolated from manure systems of commercial dairy farms and characterized for in vitro antimicrobial activity. In addition, a total of 57 E. coli uterine isolates from 5 dairy cows were phylogenetically grouped by triplex PCR. Each E. coli bacterial host from the uterus was inoculated with their respective bacteriophage preparation at several different multiplicities of infections (MOI) to determine minimum inhibitory MOI. The effect of a single dose (MOI=10(2)) of bacteriophage on the growth curve of all 57 E. coli isolates was assessed using a microplate technique. Furthermore, genetic diversity within and between the different bacteriophage preparations was assessed by bacteriophage purification followed by DNA extraction, restriction, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Phylogenetic grouping based on triplex PCR showed that all isolates of E. coli belonged to phylogroup B1. Bacterial growth was completely inhibited at considerably low MOI, and the effect of a single dose (MOI=10(2)) of bacteriophage preparations on the growth curve of all 57 E. coli isolates showed that all bacteriophage preparations significantly decreased the growth rate of the isolates. Bacteriophage preparation 1230-10 had the greatest antimicrobial activity and completely inhibited the growth of 71.7% (n=57) of the isolates. The combined action of bacteriophage preparations 1230-10, 6375-10, 2540-4, and 6547-2, each at MOI=10(2), had the broadest spectrum of action and completely inhibited the growth (final optical density at 600 nm

  7. Bacteriophages as Weapons Against Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in the food industry is often attributed to the presence of biofilms in processing plants. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria attached to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric material. Their extreme resistance to cleaning and disinfecting processes is related to a unique organization, which implies a differential bacterial growth and gene expression inside the biofilm. The impact of biofilms on health, and the economic consequences, has promoted the development of different approaches to control or remove biofilm formation. Recently, successful results in phage therapy have boosted new research in bacteriophages and phage lytic proteins for biofilm eradication. In this regard, this review examines the environmental factors that determine biofilm development in food-processing equipment. In addition, future perspectives for the use of bacteriophage-derived tools as disinfectants are discussed. PMID:27375566

  8. Structure of the Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophage R17

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Cesar; Granboulan, Nicole; Franklin, Richard M.

    1966-01-01

    Vasquez, Cesar (Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, Villejuif, Seine, France), Nicole Granboulan, and Richard M. Franklin. Structure of the ribonucleic acid bacteriophage R17. J. Bacteriol. 92:1779–1786. 1966.—The morphology of bacteriophage R17 was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained virions. The hexagonal shape, the presence of a maximum of 10 units at the periphery, and especially the observation of central fivefold points of symmetry with neighboring five and six coordinated units indicated icosahedral symmetry with 32 morphological units. Although the exact shape of the polyhedron could not be specified, the number of morphological units agreed with the chemically estimated number of structural units. Images PMID:5958109

  9. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  10. Bacteriophages and their implications on future biotechnology: a review.

    PubMed

    Haq, Irshad Ul; Chaudhry, Waqas Nasir; Akhtar, Maha Nadeem; Andleeb, Saadia; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2012-01-10

    Recently it has been recognized that bacteriophages, the natural predators of bacteria can be used efficiently in modern biotechnology. They have been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics for many antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. Phages can be used as biocontrol agents in agriculture and petroleum industry. Moreover phages are used as vehicles for vaccines both DNA and protein, for the detection of pathogenic bacterial strain, as display system for many proteins and antibodies. Bacteriophages are diverse group of viruses which are easily manipulated and therefore they have potential uses in biotechnology, research, and therapeutics. The aim of this review article is to enable the wide range of researchers, scientists, and biotechnologist who are putting phages into practice, to accelerate the progress and development in the field of biotechnology.

  11. How long can bacteriophage λ change its mind?

    PubMed Central

    Semsey, Szabolcs; Campion, Christopher; Mohamed, Abdu; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2015-01-01

    A key event in the lifecycle of a temperate bacteriophage is the choice between lysis and lysogeny upon infection of a susceptible host cell. In a recent paper, we showed that a prolonged period exists after the decision to lysogenize, during which bacteriophage λ can abandon the initial decision, and instead develop lytically, as a response to the accumulation of the late lytic regulatory protein Q. Here, we present evidence that expression of Q does not induce replication of λ DNA, suggesting that the DNA to be packaged into the resulting phage progeny was already present at the time of the initial decision to lysogenize. We summarize our findings in a working model of the key determinants of the duration of the post-decision period during which it is possible for the infected cell to switch from the lysogeny decision to successful lytic development. PMID:26459429

  12. Accumulation of enteric bacteriophage in fresh water sediments.

    PubMed

    Skraber, Sylvain; Schijven, Jack; Italiaander, Ronald; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2009-09-01

    Our study aimed to assess the accumulation of bacteriophages in sandy and clayey fresh water sediments. All of the 24 natural fresh water sediments were positive for somatic and F-specific phages, though their concentrations in the overlying water were undetectable in 1 and 11 samples, respectively, out of 24, corresponding to 4 and 46% for somatic and F-specific phages, respectively. Based on the sediment-to-water ratios, F-specific phages accumulate over 100 times more than the somatic coliphages in clayey sediments. Inactivation of bacteriophages in clayey and sandy sediments over a 1-month period at 15 degrees C was negligible. Our data suggest that persistence of deposited viruses in fresh water sediments leads to accumulation and the findings call for additional investigations on the fate of entrapped pathogenic viruses.

  13. Bacteriophages and their implications on future biotechnology: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that bacteriophages, the natural predators of bacteria can be used efficiently in modern biotechnology. They have been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics for many antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. Phages can be used as biocontrol agents in agriculture and petroleum industry. Moreover phages are used as vehicles for vaccines both DNA and protein, for the detection of pathogenic bacterial strain, as display system for many proteins and antibodies. Bacteriophages are diverse group of viruses which are easily manipulated and therefore they have potential uses in biotechnology, research, and therapeutics. The aim of this review article is to enable the wide range of researchers, scientists, and biotechnologist who are putting phages into practice, to accelerate the progress and development in the field of biotechnology. PMID:22234269

  14. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  15. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages – viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  16. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Molecular Genetics of Bacteriophage: The Work of Norton Zinder

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1966, Norton Zinder and Joshua Lederberg discovered that Salmonella could exchange genes via bacteriophages. They named this phenomenon “genetic transduction.” This discovery set Zinder on a lifelong journey researching bacteriophage. In the two Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) Classic papers reprinted here, Zinder and Nina Fedoroff present their findings on the phage f2 replicase. Properties of the Phage f2 Replicase. I. Optimal Conditions for Replicase Activity and Analysis of the Polynucleotide Product Synthesized in Vitro (Fedoroff, N. V., and Zinder, N. D. (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 4577–4585) Properties of the Phage f2 Replicase. II. Comparative Studies on the Ribonucleic Acid-dependent and Poly(C)-dependent Activities of the Replicase (Fedoroff, N. V., and Zinder, N. D. (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 4586–4592) PMID:21830328

  18. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of 38 Gordonia sp. Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Matthew T.; Bonilla, J. Alfred; Dejong, Randall; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos; Klyczek, Karen K.; Russell, Daniel A.; Wertz, John T.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the genome sequences of 38 newly isolated bacteriophages using Gordonia terrae 3612 (ATCC 25594) and Gordonia neofelifaecis NRRL59395 as bacterial hosts. All of the phages are double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) tail phages with siphoviral morphologies, with genome sizes ranging from 17,118 bp to 93,843 bp and spanning considerable nucleotide sequence diversity. PMID:28057748

  20. Genome Sequences of Gordonia terrae Bacteriophages Phinally and Vivi2

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kaitlyn C.; Arora, Charu; Bortz, Michael E.; Burnet, George; Conover, David H.; D’Incau, Gina M.; Ghobrial, Jonathan A.; Jonas, Audrey L.; Migdal, Emily J.; Rote, Nicole L.; German, Brian A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Mezghani, Nadia; Schafer, Claire E.; Thompson, Paige K.; Ulbrich, Megan C.; Yu, Victor J.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages Phinally and Vivi2 were isolated from soil from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, using host Gordonia terrae 3612. The Phinally and Vivi2 genomes are 59,265 bp and 59,337 bp, respectively, and share sequence similarity with each other and with GTE6. Fewer than 25% of the 87 to 89 putative genes have predictable functions. PMID:27540050

  1. Bacteriophage-based tools: recent advances and novel applications

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Lisa; Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Bolton, Declan; Coffey, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect bacterial hosts, and since their discovery over a century ago they have been primarily exploited to control bacterial populations and to serve as tools in molecular biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent diverse advances in the field of phage research, going beyond bacterial control using whole phage, to areas including biocontrol using phage-derived enzybiotics, diagnostics, drug discovery, novel drug delivery systems and bionanotechnology. PMID:27990274

  2. Genome Sequences of Five Streptomyces Bacteriophages Forming Cluster BG.

    PubMed

    Donegan-Quick, Richard; Gibbs, Zane A; Amaku, Patricia O; Bernal, Joshua T; Boyd, Dana A M; Burr, Angela R; Coelho, Rainna E; Dossou, Akpedje S; Henry, Ryan M; Huynh, Mai; Kanani-Hendijani, Thalia A; Martinez, Guillermina; McClendon-Moss, Tianeaka O; Orozco, Sergio; San Martin, Johnny M; Stoddart, Kaitlyn E; Stringer, Madison M; Villegas, Rachel L; Nayek, Subhayu; Suri, Nikita; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Hughes, Lee E

    2017-07-13

    Cluster BG of the actinobacteriophage was formed upon discovery of five novel bacteriophages isolated by enrichment from their host, Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus strain ATCC 10137. Four members of this cluster (BabyGotBac, Maih, TP1605, and YDN12) share over 89% average nucleotide identity, while the other (Xkcd426) has only 72% similarity to other cluster members. Copyright © 2017 Donegan-Quick et al.

  3. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote–microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. PMID:28100665

  4. Bacteriophages as vehicles of the resistome in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rolain, Jean Marc; Fancello, Laura; Desnues, Christelle; Raoult, Didier

    2011-11-01

    Environmental microbial communities and human microbiota represent a huge reservoir of mobilizable genes, the 'mobilome', including a pool of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance, the 'resistome'. Whole-genome sequencing of bacterial genomes from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has demonstrated that bacteriophages contribute significantly to bacterial genome alterations, and metagenomic analysis of respiratory tract DNA viral communities has revealed the presence of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance in bacteriophages of CF patients. CF airways should now be considered as the site of complex microbiota, where bacteriophages are vehicles for the adaptation of bacteria to this specific environment and for the emergence and selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria with chimeric repertoires. As phages are already known to be mobilized during chronic infection of the lungs of patients with CF, it seems particularly important to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of phage induction to prevent the spread of virulence and/or antimicrobial resistance determinants within the CF population as well as in the community. Such a modern point of view may be a seminal reflection for clinical practice in the future since current antimicrobial therapy guidelines in the context of CF may lead to the emergence of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance.

  5. Bacteriophages for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Harper, D R; Enright, M C

    2011-07-01

    Bacteriophages were first identified in 1915 and were used as antimicrobial agents from 1919 onwards. Despite apparent successes and widespread application, early users did not understand the nature of these agents and their efficacy remained controversial. As a result, they were replaced in the west by chemical antibiotics once these became available. However, bacteriophages remained a common therapeutic approach in parts of Eastern Europe where they are still in use. Increasing levels of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are now driving demand for novel therapeutic approaches. In cases where antibiotic options are limited or nonexistent, the pressure for new agents is greatest. One of the most prominent areas of concern is multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a prominent member of this class and is the cause of damaging infections that can be resistant to successful treatment with conventional antibiotics. At the same time, it exhibits a number of properties that make it a suitable target for bacteriophage-based approaches, including growth in biofilms that can hydrolyse following phage infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa provides a striking example of an infection where clinical need and the availability of a practical therapy coincide.

  6. Host adaption to the bacteriophage carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, Kelly J; Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Connerton, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    The carrier state of the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni represents an alternative life cycle whereby virulent bacteriophages can persist in association with host bacteria without commitment to lysogeny. Host bacteria exhibit significant phenotypic changes that improve their ability to survive extra-intestinal environments, but exhibit growth-phase-dependent impairment in motility. We demonstrate that early exponential phase cultures become synchronised with respect to the non-motile phenotype, which corresponds with a reduction in their ability to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. Comparative transcriptome analyses (RNA-seq) identify changes in gene expression that account for the observed phenotypes: downregulation of stress response genes hrcA, hspR and per and downregulation of the major flagellin flaA with the chemotactic response signalling genes cheV, cheA and cheW. These changes present mechanisms by which the host and bacteriophage can remain associated without lysis, and the cultures survive extra-intestinal transit. These data provide a basis for understanding a critical link in the ecology of the Campylobacter bacteriophage.

  7. Isolation of Actinomyces bacteriophage from human dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Tylenda, C A; Calvert, C; Kolenbrander, P E; Tylenda, A

    1985-07-01

    Human dental plaque samples were screened for the presence of bacteriophage for Actinomyces viscosus and Streptococcus sanguis. None of the 336 samples yielded phage for S. sanguis, but 10 contained virulent actinomyces phage. A high host cell specificity was observed in that one phage isolate infected only A. viscosus T14V, eight phage isolates infected only A. viscosus MG-1, and one infected both strains. None was capable of productively infecting various other actinomyces strains that represented the six actinomyces coaggregation groups. Because phage-containing samples occurred randomly in this survey, no correlation between the individual collecting the samples, dental clinic, or type of patient and the presence of phage in the sample was noted. Examination of one of the samples that yielded phage for the presence of a natural host strain for that particular phage resulted in the isolation of two strains which were identified as A. viscosus serotype II and Actinomyces naeslundii serotype I. This is the first report of an A. naeslundii host strain and actinomyces bacteriophage of human dental plaque origin. The finding of both phage and host strains in the same dental plaque sample along with the observation of high host cell specificity by these phage provide indicators that support an active role for actinomyces bacteriophage in oral microbial ecology. The use of these freshly isolated phage as probes to study actinomyces coaggregation properties is discussed.

  8. Production of tunable nanomaterials using hierarchically assembled bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hun; Warner, Christopher M; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Barnes, Eftihia; Poda, Aimee R; Perkins, Edward J; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale fabrication of precisely defined nanostructures with tunable functions is critical to the exploitation of nanoscience and nanotechnology for production of electronic devices, energy generators, biosensors, and bionanomedicines. Although self-assembly processes have been developed to exploit biological molecules for functional materials, the resulting nanostructures and functions are still very limited, and scalable synthesis is far from being realized. Recently, we have established a bacteriophage-based biomimetic process, called 'self-templating assembly'. We used bacteriophage as a nanofiber model system to exploit its liquid crystalline structure for the creation of diverse hierarchically organized structures. We have also demonstrated that genetic modification of functional peptides of bacteriophage results in structures that can be used as soft and hard tissue-regenerating materials, biosensors, and energy-generating materials. Here, we describe a comprehensive protocol to perform genetic engineering of phage, liter-scale amplification, purification, and self-templating assembly, and suggest approaches for characterizing hierarchical phage nanostructures using optical microscopy, atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also discuss sources of contamination, common mistakes during the fabrication process, and quality-control measures to ensure reproducible material production. The protocol takes ∼8-10 d to complete.

  9. A Bacteriophage-Related Chimeric Marine Virus Infecting Abalone

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Cai, Guiqin; Lin, Qiying; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2010-01-01

    Marine viruses shape microbial communities with the most genetic diversity in the sea by multiple genetic exchanges and infect multiple marine organisms. Here we provide proof from experimental infection that abalone shriveling syndrome-associated virus (AbSV) can cause abalone shriveling syndrome. This malady produces histological necrosis and abnormally modified macromolecules (hemocyanin and ferritin). The AbSV genome is a 34.952-kilobase circular double-stranded DNA, containing putative genes with similarity to bacteriophages, eukaryotic viruses, bacteria and endosymbionts. Of the 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), eight ORF-encoded proteins have identifiable functional homologues. The 4 ORF products correspond to a predicted terminase large subunit and an endonuclease in bacteriophage, and both an integrase and an exonuclease from bacteria. The other four proteins are homologous to an endosymbiont-derived helicase, primase, single-stranded binding (SSB) protein, and thymidylate kinase, individually. Additionally, AbSV exhibits a common gene arrangement similar to the majority of bacteriophages. Unique to AbSV, the viral genome also contains genes associated with bacterial outer membrane proteins and may lack the structural protein-encoding ORFs. Genomic characterization of AbSV indicates that it may represent a transitional form of microbial evolution from viruses to bacteria. PMID:21079776

  10. Bacteriophage-insensitive mutants for high quality Crescenza manufacture

    PubMed Central

    Chirico, Donatella; Gorla, Arianna; Verga, Viola; Pedersen, Per D.; Polgatti, Eliseo; Cava, Antonio; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium used as starter culture for the manufacture of fermented dairy products. For the production of Crescenza and other soft cheeses, Sacco has developed and provides dairies with three different defined blends of S. thermophilus strains. Each blend contains two different S. thermophilus strains. The strains were selected based on their unique technological properties as well as different phage profiles. Analysis of 133 whey samples collected in 2009–2010 from Italian dairies showed a high prevalence (about 50%) of bacteriophage attacks on the blend ST020. More specifically, the strain S. thermophilus ST1A was found to be the preferred target of the bacteriophages. A bacteriophage insensitive mutant (BIM5) of the phage-sensitive strain ST1A was successfully developed and used to substitute strain ST1A in the Crescenza starter culture ST020. The strain BIM5 showed identical technological and industrial traits as those of the phage-sensitive strain ST1A. The improved resistance of the modified Crescenza starter culture ST020R was confirmed at Italian dairies, and its effectiveness monitored on 122 whey samples collected in 2011–2012. Compared to the previous values (2009–2010), the use of the phage-hardened blend ST020R allowed reducing of frequency of phage attacks from about 50 to less than 5% of the whey samples investigated. PMID:24834065

  11. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder.

  12. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  13. Derivation of a restriction map of bacteriophage T3 DNA and comparison with the map of bacteriophage T7 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J N; Dembinski, D R; McAllister, W T

    1980-01-01

    The DNA of bacteriophage T3 was characterized by cleavage with seven restriction endonucleases. AvaI, XbaI, BglII, and HindIII each cut T3 DNA at 1 site, KpnI cleaved it at 2 sites, MboI cleaved it at 9 sites, and HpaI cleaved it at 17 sites. The sizes of the fragments produced by digestion with these enzymes were determined by using restriction fragments of T7 DNA as molecular weight standards. As a result of this analysis, the size of T3 DNA was estimated to be 38.74 kilobases. The fragments were ordered with respect to each other and to the genetic map to produce a restriction map of T3 DNA. The location and occurrence of the restriction sites in T3 DNA are compared with those in the DNA of the closely related bacteriophage T7. Images PMID:6251266

  14. Infrared Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Jet Propulsion Laboratory Technical Support Package (TSP) describing a technique for processing data from an infrared radiometer assisted a manufacturer of laminates for printed circuit boards. To reduce emissions and lower the cost of producing prepreg (a continuous glass cloth, or web, impregnated with epoxy resin and partially cured by applying heat), Norplex Oak switched to infrared treating towers. The TSP confirmed the company's computer prediction of heat flux patterns, provided information that allowed the company to modify infrared treaters for consistency, and furnished a basis for development of optimal heater placements. The treaters are now successfully operating at increased speeds with improved product consistency.

  15. A review of current methods using bacteriophages in live animals, food and animal products intended for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ian R

    2016-11-01

    Bacteriophages are utilised in the food industry as biocontrol agents to reduce the load of bacteria, and thus reduce potential for human infection. This review focuses on current methods using bacteriophages within the food chain. Limitations of research will be discussed, and the potential for future food-based bacteriophage research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1).

    PubMed

    Richards, A B; Renshaw, H W; Sneed, L W

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  17. Why Infrared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses applications of techniques developed for the remote sensing of infrared radiation. In addition to military applications, remote sensing has become important in collecting environmental data and detecting ecological problems. (JR)

  18. Why Infrared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses applications of techniques developed for the remote sensing of infrared radiation. In addition to military applications, remote sensing has become important in collecting environmental data and detecting ecological problems. (JR)

  19. Infrared astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B.T.; Matthews, K.

    1981-03-01

    Several observational programs in infrared astronomy are described and significant findings are briefly discussed. The near infrared work concentrates largely on the use of the 5 m Hale telescope in spectroscopic and photometric studies of extragalactic sources. Observations of the P alpha line profile in a low redshift quasar, X-ray bursters, reflection nebula, and cataclysmic variables are included. Millimeter continuum observations of dust emission from quasars and galactic molecular clouds are also discussed. Finally, improvements to instrumentation are reported.

  20. [Determination of a Spectrum of Lytic Activity of Bacteriophages by the Method of Acoustic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Guliy, O I; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Shikhabudinov, A M; Dykman, L A; Staroverov, S A; Karavaeva, O A; Pavliy, S A; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The changes in the electro-acoustic parameters of cell suspension due to the interaction of cells with bacteriophages both in a pure. culture and in the presence of extraneous microflora were investigated. It has been found that the specific changes in the electroacoustic parameters of cell suspension under the action of bacteriophage occur only in microbial cells which are sensitive to the bacteriophage studied. It has been established that a sensor unit allows of distinguishing a situation when the bacterial cells are infected with specific bacteriophages of the control experiments and a situation with no introduction of infection. An approximate criterion of the presence of specific interactions of bacteriophages and cells in suspension was developed. In accordance with this criterion the change in electrical impedance of the sensor unit must not be less than - 1%. In control experiments a standard microbiological technique, plating the cells infected with bacteriophages on solid nutrient medium, was used. For the first time the possibility of using the method of electroacoustic analysis for determination of a spectrum of lytic activity of bacteriophages was shown. The results obtained may be used for development of a new express method for determining the sensitivity to bacteriophages of the microbial cells.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Lytic Bacteriophage LZ35 Infecting Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhonghe; Huang, Honglan; Wu, Xiaolin; Hao, Yuchong

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteriophages infecting A. baumannii can be used as effective agents to control these infections. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the lytic bacteriophage LZ35 infecting A. baumannii isolates. PMID:27856573

  2. The Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage CPV1 Virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents. P...

  3. Polymer-based delivery systems for support and delivery of bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alyssa Marie

    One of the most urgent problems in the fields of medicine and agriculture is the decreasing effectiveness of antibiotics. Once a miracle drug, antibiotics have recently become associated with the creation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The main limitations of these treatments include lack of both adaptability and specificity. To overcome these shortcomings of current antibiotic treatments, there has been a renewed interest in bacteriophage research. Bacteriophages are naturally-occurring viruses that lyse bacteria. They are highly specific, with each bacteriophage type lysing a narrow range of bacteria strains. Bacteriophages are also ubiquitous biological entities, populating environments where bacterial growth is supported. Just as humans are exposed to bacteria in their daily lives, we are exposed to bacteriophages as well. To use bacteriophages in practical applications, they must be delivered to the site of an infection in a controlled-release system. Two systems were studied to observe their support of bacteriophage lytic activity, as well as investigate the possibility of controlling bacteriophage release rates. First, hydrogels were studied, using crosslinking and blending techniques to achieve a range of release profiles. Second, polyanhydride microparticles were studied, evaluating release rates as a function of monomer chemistries.

  4. Genotyping Staphylococcus aureus allows one to identify bacteriophages harboring unknow endolysins.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background and Objectives. The search of new bacteriophage endolysins is important in view of the ability of staphylococci to acquire resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Most known genomes of Staphylococcus aureus strains contain two or more temperate bacteriophages. For example, the chromosome...

  5. Prevalence of Broad-Host-Range Lytic Bacteriophages of Sphaerotilus natans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ellen C.; Schrader, Holly S.; Rieland, Brenda; Thompson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kit W.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.

    1998-01-01

    Two bacteriophage collections were examined with regard to their ability to form plaques on multiple bacterial host species. Nine of 10 phages studied were found to be broad-host-range bacteriophages. These phages fell into two groups. Group 1, the SN series, was isolated from sewage treatment plant samples with Sphaerotilus natans ATCC 13338 as a host. The DNAs of these bacteriophages contained modified bases and were insensitive to cleavage by type I and II restriction endonucleases. The efficiency of plating of these bacteriophages was changed only slightly on the alternate host. Group 2, the BHR series, was isolated by a two-host enrichment protocol. These bacteriophages were sensitive to restriction, and their efficiency of plating was dramatically reduced on the alternate host. Our results suggest that a multiple-host enrichment protocol may be more effective for the isolation of broad-host-range bacteriophages by avoiding the selection bias inherent in single-host methods. At least two of the broad-host-range bacteriophages mediated generalized transduction. We suggest that broad-host-range bacteriophages play a key role in phage ecology and gene transfer in nature. PMID:9464396

  6. Predicting bacteriophage proteins located in host cell with feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Feng-Biao; Huang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage is a virus that can infect a bacterium. The fate of an infected bacterium is determined by the bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell. Thus, reliably identifying bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell is extremely important to understand their functions and discover potential anti-bacterial drugs. Thus, in this paper, a computational method was developed to recognize bacteriophage proteins located in host cells based only on their amino acid sequences. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was proposed to optimize the feature set. Using a jackknife cross-validation, our method can discriminate between bacteriophage proteins located in a host cell and the bacteriophage proteins not located in a host cell with a maximum overall accuracy of 84.2%, and can further classify bacteriophage proteins located in host cell cytoplasm and in host cell membranes with a maximum overall accuracy of 92.4%. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the method, we built a web server called PHPred (〈http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PHPred〉). We believe that the PHPred will become a powerful tool to study bacteriophage proteins located in host cells and to guide related drug discovery.

  7. Intestinal colonization by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli supports long-term bacteriophage replication in mice.

    PubMed

    Maura, Damien; Morello, Eric; du Merle, Laurence; Bomme, Perrine; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2012-08-01

    Bacteriophages have been known to be present in the gut for many years, but studies of relationships between these viruses and their hosts in the intestine are still in their infancy. We isolated three bacteriophages specific for an enteroaggregative O104:H4 Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain responsible for diarrhoeal diseases in humans. We studied the replication of these bacteriophages in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of gut colonization. Each bacteriophage was able to replicate in vitro in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Each bacteriophage individually reduced biofilms formed on plastic pegs and a cocktail of the three bacteriophages was found to be more efficient. The cocktail was also able to infect bacterial aggregates formed on the surface of epithelial cells. In the mouse intestine, bacteriophages replicated for at least 3 weeks, provided the host was present, with no change in host levels in the faeces. This model of stable and continuous viral replication provides opportunities for studying the long-term coevolution of virulent bacteriophages with their hosts within a mammalian polymicrobial ecosystem.

  8. Ultrastructure and Viral Metagenome of Bacteriophages from an Anaerobic Methane Oxidizing Methylomirabilis Bioreactor Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gambelli, Lavinia; Cremers, Geert; Mesman, Rob; Guerrero, Simon; Dutilh, Bas E.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; van Niftrik, Laura

    2016-01-01

    With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale bioreactors can experience setbacks due to, for example, bacteriophage blooms. By shaping microbial communities through mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and metabolic reprogramming, bacteriophages are important players in most ecosystems. Here, we analyzed an infected Methylomirabilis sp. bioreactor enrichment culture using (advanced) electron microscopy, viral metagenomics and bioinformatics. Electron micrographs revealed four different viral morphotypes, one of which was observed to infect Methylomirabilis cells. The infected cells contained densely packed ~55 nm icosahedral bacteriophage particles with a putative internal membrane. Various stages of virion assembly were observed. Moreover, during the bacteriophage replication, the host cytoplasmic membrane appeared extremely patchy, which suggests that the bacteriophages may use host bacterial lipids to build their own putative internal membrane. The viral metagenome contained 1.87 million base pairs of assembled viral sequences, from which five putative complete viral genomes were assembled and manually annotated. Using bioinformatics analyses, we could not identify which viral genome belonged to the Methylomirabilis- infecting bacteriophage, in part because the obtained viral genome sequences were novel and unique to this reactor system. Taken together these results show that new bacteriophages can be detected in anaerobic cultivation systems and that the effect of bacteriophages on the microbial community in these systems is a topic for further study. PMID:27877158

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  10. THE GENOME SEQUENCE OF BACTERIOPHAGE CpV1 LYTIC FOR CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostri-dium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. We have established a collection of 30 bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens. These were isolated from s...

  11. Inactivation of recombinant bacteriophage lambda by use of chemical agents and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ewan M; Wright, Harry; Lennon, Kelly-Anne; Craik, Vicki A; Clark, Jason R; March, John B

    2012-04-01

    Several approaches for the inactivation of bacteriophage lambda, including UV germicidal irradiation (UVGI) and the chemical agents Virkon-S, Chloros, Decon-90, and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), were compared. Virkon, NaOH, and UVGI caused a ≥7-log(10) reduction in phage titers. This study successfully describes several methods with potential for bacteriophage inactivation in industrial settings.

  12. Inactivation of Recombinant Bacteriophage Lambda by Use of Chemical Agents and UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ewan M.; Wright, Harry; Lennon, Kelly-Anne; Craik, Vicki A.; Clark, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Several approaches for the inactivation of bacteriophage lambda, including UV germicidal irradiation (UVGI) and the chemical agents Virkon-S, Chloros, Decon-90, and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), were compared. Virkon, NaOH, and UVGI caused a ≥7-log10 reduction in phage titers. This study successfully describes several methods with potential for bacteriophage inactivation in industrial settings. PMID:22327583

  13. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yannan; Mi, Zhiqiang; Niu, Wenkai; An, Xiaoping; Yuan, Xin; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Yong; Feng, Yuzhong; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xianglilan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Fan, Hang; Peng, Fan; Li, Puyuan; Tong, Yigang; Bai, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms and develop antibiotic resistance makes it difficult to control infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, we explored the potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms. The potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms was assessed by performing electron microscopy, live/dead bacterial staining, crystal violet staining and by determining adenosine triphosphate release. The bacteriophage inhibited the formation of and disrupted preformed A. baumannii biofilms. Results of disinfection assay showed that the lytic bacteriophage lysed A. baumannii cells suspended in blood or grown on metal surfaces. These results suggest the potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms.

  15. Bacteriophages as anti-infective agents: recent developments and regulatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-05-01

    The biennial meeting on 'Exploiting Bacteriophages for Bioscience, Biotechnology and Medicine', held in London, UK, on 20 January 2012, and chaired by George Salmond (University of Cambridge, UK) hosted over 50 participants representing 13 countries. The highly multidisciplinary meeting covered a diverse range of topics, reflecting the current expansion of interest in this field, including the use of bacteriophages as the source of biochemical reagents for molecular biology, bacteriophages for the treatment of human and animal diseases, bacteriophage-based diagnostics and therapeutic delivery technologies and necessity for, and regulatory challenges associated with, robust clinical trials of phage-based therapeutics. This report focuses on a number of presentations from the meeting relating to cutting-edge research on bacteriophages as anti-infective agents.

  16. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  17. Assembly of bacteriophage T7. Dimensions of the bacteriophage and its capsids.

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, R M; Serwer, P; Ross, M J

    1981-01-01

    The dimensions of bacteriophage T7 and T7 capsids have been investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering. Phage T7 behaves like a sphere of uniform density with an outer radius of 301 +/- 2 A (excluding the phage tail) and a calculated volume for protein plus nucleic acid of 1.14 +/- 0.05 x 10(-16) ml. The outer radius determined for T7 phage in solution is approximately 30% greater than the radius measured from electron micrographs, which indicates that considerable shrinkage occurs during preparation for electron microscopy. Capsids that have a phagelike envelope and do not contain DNA were obtained from lysates of T7-infected Escherichia coli (capsid II) and by separating the capsid component of T7 phage from the phage DNA by means of temperature shock (capsid IV). In both cases the peak protein density is at a radius of 275 A; the outer radius is 286 +/- 4 A, approximately 5% smaller than the envelope of T7 phage. The thickness of the envelope of capsid II is 22 +/- 4 A, consistent with the thickness of protein estimated to be 23 +/- 5 A in whole T7 phage, as seen on electron micrographs in which the internal DNA is positively stained. The volume in T7 phage available to package DNA is estimated to be 9.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(-17) ml. The packaged DNA adopts a regular packing with 23.6 A interplanar spacing between, DNA strands. The angular width of the 23.6 A reflection shows that the mean DNA-DNA spacing throughout the phage head is 27.5 +/- less than 2.2 A. A T7 precursor capsid (capsid I) expands when pelleted for x-ray scattering in the ultracentrifuge to essentially the same outer dimensions as for capsids II and IV. This expansion of capsid I can be prevented by fixing with glutaraldehyde; fixed capsid I has peak density at a radius of 247 A, 10% less than capsid II or IV. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7326332

  18. Infrared Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Diatek Corporation, San Diego, CA and the Jet Propulsion Lab developed the Diatek Model 7000 aural thermometer which weighs only eight ounces, and measures temperature in less than two seconds using infrared astronomy technology to measure the amount of infrared energy emitted by the eardrum (the same way temperature of stars and planets is measured). This method avoids contact with mucous membranes, virtually eliminating the possibility of cross infection, and permits temperature measurement of newborn, critically ill, or incapacitated patients. Diatek Corporation was purchased by Welch Allyn Inc. The Diatek Model 7000 is now marketed as SureTemp.

  19. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  20. Infrared Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Earth objects emit natural radiation invisible to the unaided human eye, but visible to infrared scanning devices such as the device developed by Inframetrics, Inc. Such devices serve a number of purposes ranging from detection of heat loss in buildings for energy conservation measures, to examining heat output of industrial machinery for trouble shooting and preventive maintenance. Representative of system is Model 525, a small, lightweight field instrument that scans infrared radiation and translates its findings to a TV picture of the temperature pattern in the scene being viewed. An accessory device permits viewing the thermal radiation in color.

  1. Induced structural defects in T-even bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D J; Chapman, V A; De Long, S S; Mondale, L

    1967-02-01

    Multiple aberrant substructures of T-even bacteriophage particles occurred when amino acid analogues or antimetabolites were present during phage growth. Certain aberrant substructures were induced by specific analogues or antimetabolites. In particular, it was observed by electron microscopy that l-canavanine, an arginine analogue, gave rise to polyheads; l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, a proline analogue, gave rise to polytail tubes; and 1,2,4-trizaole-3-alanine, a histidine analogue, proflavine, and actinomycin D all gave rise to small heads. These aberrant substructures were similar to those reported earlier with conditional lethal mutants (amber) of T4D in a restrictive host.

  2. Induced Structural Defects in T-Even Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Chapman, V. A.; De Long, S. S.; Mondale, L.

    1967-01-01

    Multiple aberrant substructures of T-even bacteriophage particles occurred when amino acid analogues or antimetabolites were present during phage growth. Certain aberrant substructures were induced by specific analogues or antimetabolites. In particular, it was observed by electron microscopy that l-canavanine, an arginine analogue, gave rise to polyheads; l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, a proline analogue, gave rise to polytail tubes; and 1,2,4-trizaole-3-alanine, a histidine analogue, proflavine, and actinomycin D all gave rise to small heads. These aberrant substructures were similar to those reported earlier with conditional lethal mutants (amber) of T4D in a restrictive host. Images PMID:5623954

  3. An ecological study of bacteriophages of Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Zachary, A

    1978-03-01

    Effects of temperature and anaerobic conditions on the replication of two bacteriophages, nt-1 and nt-6, of the estuarine bacterium Vibrio natriegens were studied. Reduction in temperature resulted in longer latent periods and reduced burst sizes for both phages. Replication under anaerobic conditions resulted in longer latent periods; however, phage nt-6 had a reduced burst size, whereas phage nt-1 had an increased burst size, resulting in a rate of phage production nearly equal to that observed under aerobic conditions. Therefore the distribution of the phages in marsh areas could be influenced by temperature and anaerobiosis.

  4. Back to the future: bacteriophages as promising therapeutic tools.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Calap, P; Georgel, P; Bahram, S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), natural predators of bacteria, are becoming increasingly attractive in medical and pharmaceutical applications. After their discovery almost a century ago, they have been particularly instrumental in the comprehension of basic molecular biology and genetics processes. The more recent emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria requires novel therapeutic strategies, and phages are being (re)considered as promising potential antibacterial tools. Furthermore, phages are also used for other purposes, e.g. vaccine production, gene/drug carriers, bacterial detection and typing. These new alternative approaches using phages are of major interest and have allowed unexpected developments, from the decipherment of fundamental biological processes to potential clinical applications.

  5. PROPERTIES OF A BACTERIOPHAGE DERIVED FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI K235

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, Margeris A.; Hutton, John J.

    1963-01-01

    A temperate bacteriophage was isolated from the colicinogenic strain of Escherichia coli K235 and characterized. This phage, termed PK, is related to P2 virus morphologically, serologically, and, possibly, genetically and it bears no relationship to the T-even phages. It was also demonstrated that PK virus and colicine K differ both in their host range and in their immunological specificity, and that PK prophage does not induce the colicinogenesis in its host bacterium. It was concluded that the formation of colicine K. and PK phage in E. coli K235 are controlled by different genetic determinants. PMID:14029160

  6. Morphology manipulation of M13 bacteriophage template for nanostructure assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo-Duc, Tam-Triet; Zaman, Mohammed S.; Moon, Chung-Hee; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-08-01

    A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage was used as a model system to explore templating of inorganic material on geometrically transformed viruses . Gold-binding filamentous phage were converted to spheroid form with a short chloroform treatment, and the resulting morphology was investigated with electron microscopy. Binding studies revealed that spheroid-shaped gold-binding phage preserved its affinity for gold. Spheroids adhered to a planar substrate assembled clusters or rings of gold nanoparticles. This gold-binding phage served as a demonstration of a highly shape-modifiable viral-template for inorganic materials.

  7. Recovery of temperate Desulfovibrio vulgaris bacteriophage on anovel host strain

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; Stolyar, S.S.; Pinel, N.; Yen, H.C.; He, Z.; Zhou,J.; Wall, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-04-02

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain DePue) closelyrelated to Desulfovibrio vulgaris ssp. vulgaris strain Hildenborough wasisolated from the sediment of a heavy-metal impacted lake usingestablished techniques. Although few physiological differences betweenstrains DePue and Hildenborough were observed, pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis (PFGE) revealed a significant genome reduction in strainDePue. Comparative whole-genome microarray and PCR analyses demonstratedthat the absence of genes annotated in the Hildenborough genome as phageor phage-related contributed to the significant genome reduction instrain DePue. Two morphotypically distinct temperate bacteriophage fromstrain Hildenborough were recovered using strain DePue as a host forplaque isolation.

  8. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection.

  9. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription.

  10. Bacteriophages: an underestimated role in human and animal health?

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Marianne; Leclerc, Marion; Tinsley, Colin R.; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches applied to viruses have highlighted their prevalence in almost all microbial ecosystems investigated. In all ecosystems, notably those associated with humans or animals, the viral fraction is dominated by bacteriophages. Whether they contribute to dysbiosis, i.e., the departure from microbiota composition in symbiosis at equilibrium and entry into a state favoring human or animal disease is unknown at present. This review summarizes what has been learnt on phages associated with human and animal microbiota, and focuses on examples illustrating the several ways by which phages may contribute to a shift to pathogenesis, either by modifying population equilibrium, by horizontal transfer, or by modulating immunity. PMID:24734220

  11. Bacteriophage association of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type C.

    PubMed Central

    Goshorn, S C; Schlievert, P M

    1989-01-01

    A gene encoding streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type C (SPE C) was isolated from bacteriophage DNA derived from Streptococcus pyogenes CS112. The gene, designated speC2, was shown to reside near the phage attachment site of phage CS112. A restriction endonuclease map of the CS112 phage was generated, and the location and orientation of the speC2 gene were determined. Hybridization analyses of eight SPE C-producing strains revealed restriction fragment length polymorphism of the speC gene-containing DNA fragments and further showed that each speC was linked to a common CS112 phage-derived DNA fragment. Images PMID:2566595

  12. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pranjol, Md Zahidul Islam; Hajitou, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration. PMID:25606974

  13. Bacteriophages: an underestimated role in human and animal health?

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Marianne; Leclerc, Marion; Tinsley, Colin R; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches applied to viruses have highlighted their prevalence in almost all microbial ecosystems investigated. In all ecosystems, notably those associated with humans or animals, the viral fraction is dominated by bacteriophages. Whether they contribute to dysbiosis, i.e., the departure from microbiota composition in symbiosis at equilibrium and entry into a state favoring human or animal disease is unknown at present. This review summarizes what has been learnt on phages associated with human and animal microbiota, and focuses on examples illustrating the several ways by which phages may contribute to a shift to pathogenesis, either by modifying population equilibrium, by horizontal transfer, or by modulating immunity.

  14. Making Bacteriophage DNA into a Movie for Panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Victor; Grondin, Yohann

    2011-12-01

    To satisfy the urge to communicate with another species, distant from our own in space or time, we explore the advantages of using the nucleic acid within a bacteriophage to encode a message and suggest how this might be achieved. We list some of the technical difficulties that need to be overcome and describe some of the advantages as a message-bearing medium that phage such as T5 possess. These advantages include those of stability in certain environments and DNA packed in a regular way within the capsid. We raise questions that would need to be answered and that would require close collaborations across the disciplines.

  15. Virulent Bacteriophages Can Target O104:H4 Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Maura, Damien; Galtier, Matthieu; Le Bouguénec, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    In vivo bacteriophage targeting of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was assessed using a mouse intestinal model of colonization with the O104:H4 55989Str strain and a cocktail of three virulent bacteriophages. The colonization model was shown to mimic asymptomatic intestinal carriage found in humans. The addition of the cocktail to drinking water for 24 h strongly decreased ileal and weakly decreased fecal 55989Str concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These decreases in ileal and fecal bacterial concentrations were only transient, since 55989Str concentrations returned to their original levels 3 days later. These transient decreases were independent of the mouse microbiota, as similar results were obtained with axenic mice. We studied the infectivity of each bacteriophage in the ileal and fecal environments and found that 55989Str bacteria in the mouse ileum were permissive to all three bacteriophages, whereas those in the feces were permissive to only one bacteriophage. Our results provide the first demonstration that bacterial permissivity to infection with virulent bacteriophages is not uniform throughout the gut; this highlights the need for a detailed characterization of the interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages in vivo for the further development of phage therapy targeting intestinal pathogens found in the gut of asymptomatic human carriers. PMID:23006754

  16. Bacteriophages to reduce gut carriage of antibiotic resistant uropathogens with low impact on microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Matthieu; De Sordi, Luisa; Maura, Damien; Arachchi, Harindra; Volant, Stevenn; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) worldwide, causing over 150 million clinical cases annually. There is currently no specific treatment addressing the asymptomatic carriage in the gut of UPEC before they initiate UTIs. This study investigates the efficacy of virulent bacteriophages to decrease carriage of gut pathogens. Three virulent bacteriophages infecting an antibiotic-resistant UPEC strain were isolated and characterized both in vitro and in vivo. A new experimental murine model of gut carriage of E. coli was elaborated and the impact of virulent bacteriophages on colonization levels and microbiota diversity was assessed. A single dose of a cocktail of the three bacteriophages led to a sharp decrease in E. coli levels throughout the gut. We also observed that microbiota diversity was much less affected by bacteriophages than by antibiotics. Therefore, virulent bacteriophages can efficiently target UPEC strains residing in the gut, with potentially profound public health and economic impacts. These results open a new area with the possibility to manipulate specifically the microbiota using virulent bacteriophages, which could have broad applications in many gut-related disorders/diseases and beyond. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins.

  18. Virulent bacteriophages can target O104:H4 enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Maura, Damien; Galtier, Matthieu; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    In vivo bacteriophage targeting of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was assessed using a mouse intestinal model of colonization with the O104:H4 55989Str strain and a cocktail of three virulent bacteriophages. The colonization model was shown to mimic asymptomatic intestinal carriage found in humans. The addition of the cocktail to drinking water for 24 h strongly decreased ileal and weakly decreased fecal 55989Str concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These decreases in ileal and fecal bacterial concentrations were only transient, since 55989Str concentrations returned to their original levels 3 days later. These transient decreases were independent of the mouse microbiota, as similar results were obtained with axenic mice. We studied the infectivity of each bacteriophage in the ileal and fecal environments and found that 55989Str bacteria in the mouse ileum were permissive to all three bacteriophages, whereas those in the feces were permissive to only one bacteriophage. Our results provide the first demonstration that bacterial permissivity to infection with virulent bacteriophages is not uniform throughout the gut; this highlights the need for a detailed characterization of the interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages in vivo for the further development of phage therapy targeting intestinal pathogens found in the gut of asymptomatic human carriers.

  19. Predicting In Vivo Efficacy of Therapeutic Bacteriophages Used To Treat Pulmonary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Marine; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The potential of bacteriophage therapy to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria has now been well established using various animal models. While numerous newly isolated bacteriophages have been claimed to be potential therapeutic candidates on the basis of in vitro observations, the parameters used to guide their choice among billions of available bacteriophages are still not clearly defined. We made use of a mouse lung infection model and a bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to compare the activities in vitro and in vivo of a set of nine different bacteriophages (PAK_P1, PAK_P2, PAK_P3, PAK_P4, PAK_P5, CHA_P1, LBL3, LUZ19, and PhiKZ). For seven bacteriophages, a good correlation was found between in vitro and in vivo activity. While the remaining two bacteriophages were active in vitro, they were not sufficiently active in vivo under similar conditions to rescue infected animals. Based on the bioluminescence recorded at 2 and 8 h postinfection, we also define for the first time a reliable index to predict treatment efficacy. Our results showed that the bacteriophages isolated directly on the targeted host were the most efficient in vivo, supporting a personalized approach favoring an optimal treatment. PMID:24041900

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Gang; Lim, Jeong-A; Song, Yu-Rim; Heu, Sunggi; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Koh, Young Jin; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Owing to the prohibition of agricultural antibiotic use in major kiwifruit-cultivating countries, alternative methods need to be developed to manage this disease. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically infect target bacteria and have recently been reconsidered as potential biological control agents for bacterial pathogens owing to their specificity in terms of host range. In this study, we isolated bacteriophages against P. syringae pv. actinidiae from soils collected from kiwifruit orchards in Korea and selected seven bacteriophages for further characterization based on restriction enzyme digestion patterns of genomic DNA. Among the studied bacteriophages, two belong to the Myoviridae family and three belong to the Podoviridae family, based on morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The host range of the selected bacteriophages was confirmed using 18 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, including the Psa2 and Psa3 groups, and some were also effective against other P. syringae pathovars. Lytic activity of the selected bacteriophages was sustained in vitro until 80 h, and their activity remained stable up to 50°C, at pH 11, and under UV-B light. These results indicate that the isolated bacteriophages are specific to P. syringae species and are resistant to various environmental factors, implying their potential use in control of bacterial canker disease in kiwifruits.

  1. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Morello, Eric; Saussereau, Emilie; Maura, Damien; Huerre, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2011-02-15

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose) administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose) resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  2. Pulmonary Bacteriophage Therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Strains: First Steps Towards Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Eric; Saussereau, Emilie; Maura, Damien; Huerre, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy—the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria—is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose) administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose) resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections. PMID:21347240

  3. Effects of bacteriophage on the quality and shelf life of Paralichthys olivaceus during chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Lin, Hong; Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Wang, Jingxue; Kong, Linghong

    2014-06-01

    The microbiological spoilage of fishery foods is mainly due to specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), with Shewanella putrefaciens being the SSO of most chilled marine fish. Bacteriophages have shown excellent capability to control micro-organisms. The aim of this study was to determine a specific bacteriophage to prevent spoilage by reducing SSO (S. putrefaciens) levels in the marine fish Paralichthys olivaceus (olive flounder) under chilled storage. Chilled flounder fillets were inoculated with S. putrefaciens and treated with different concentrations of bacteriophage Spp001 ranging from 10(4) to 10(8) plaque-forming units (pfu) mL(-1) . Bacterial growth (including total viable count and SSO) of the bacteriophage-treated groups was significantly inhibited compared with that of the negative control group (P < 0.05). Sensory evaluation and biochemical parameters revealed that the bacteriophage could extend the shelf life of chilled flounder fillets (from <4 to 14 days) with good esthetic quality, even at low temperature (4 °C). Furthermore, bacteriophage concentrations of 10(6) and 10(8) pfu mL(-1) were more effective than the chemical preservative potassium sorbate (5 g L(-1) ). The bacteriophage Spp001 offered effective biocontrol of S. putrefaciens under chilled conditions, retaining the quality characteristics of spiked fish fillets, and thus could be a potential candidate for use in chilled fish fillet biopreservation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Characterization of the first double-stranded RNA bacteriophage infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuhui; Lu, Shuguang; Shen, Wei; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Mengyu; Tan, Yinling; Li, Gang; Li, Ming; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Le, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are widely distributed in the biosphere and play a key role in modulating microbial ecology in the soil, ocean, and humans. Although the role of DNA bacteriophages is well described, the biology of RNA bacteriophages is poorly understood. More than 1900 phage genomes are currently deposited in NCBI, but only 6 dsRNA bacteriophages and 12 ssRNA bacteriophages genome sequences are reported. The 6 dsRNA bacteriophages were isolated from legume samples or lakes with Pseudomonas syringae as the host. Here, we report the first Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage phiYY with a three-segmented dsRNA genome. phiYY was isolated from hospital sewage in China with the clinical P. aeruginosa strain, PAO38, as a host. Moreover, the dsRNA phage phiYY has a broad host range, which infects 99 out of 233 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from four provinces in China. This work presented a detailed characterization of the dsRNA bacteriophage infecting P. aeruginosa. PMID:27934909

  5. Infrared Thermometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefers, John

    2006-01-01

    An infrared (IR) thermometer lab offers the opportunity to give science students a chance to measure surface temperatures, utilizing off-the-shelf technology. Potential areas of study include astronomy (exoplanets), electromagnetic spectrum, chemistry, evaporation rates, anatomy, crystal formation, and water or liquids. This article presents one…

  6. Infrared Thermometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefers, John

    2006-01-01

    An infrared (IR) thermometer lab offers the opportunity to give science students a chance to measure surface temperatures, utilizing off-the-shelf technology. Potential areas of study include astronomy (exoplanets), electromagnetic spectrum, chemistry, evaporation rates, anatomy, crystal formation, and water or liquids. This article presents one…

  7. Infrared telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Hendricks, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the Infrared Telescope for Spacelab 2 is discussed. The design, development, and testing required to interface a stationary superfluid helium dewar with a scanning cryostate capable of operating in the zero-g environment in the space shuttle bay is described.

  8. Bacteriophage transport through a fining-upwards sedimentary sequence: laboratory experiments and simulation.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Raymond; Cornaton, Fabien; Hunkeler, Daniel; Rossi, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    A column containing four concentric layers of progressively finer-grained glass beads (graded column) was used to study the transport of the bacteriophage T7 in water flowing parallel to layering through a fining-upwards (FU) sedimentary structure. By passing a pulse of T7, and a conservative solute tracer upwards through a column packed with a single bead size (uniform column), the capacity of each bead type to attenuate the bacteriophage was determined. Solute and bacteriophage responses were modelled using an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation, with first-order kinetic deposition simulating bacteriophage attenuation. Resulting deposition constants for different flow velocities indicated that filtration theory-determined values differed from experimentally determined values by less than 10%. In contrast, the responses of solute and bacteriophage tracers passing upwards through graded columns could not be reproduced with a single analytical solution. However, a flux-weighted summation of four one-dimensional advective-dispersive analytical terms approximated solute breakthrough curves. The prolonged tailing observed in the resulting curve resembled that typically generated from field-based tracer test data, reflecting the potential importance of textural heterogeneity in the transport of dissolved substances in groundwater. Moreover, bacteriophage deposition terms, determined from filtration theory, reproduced the T7 breakthrough curve once desorption and inactivation on grain surfaces were incorporated. To evaluate the effect of FU sequences on mass transport processes in more detail, bacteriophage passage through sequences resembling those sampled from a FU bed in a fluvioglacial gravel pit were carried out using an analogous approach to that employed in the laboratory. Both solute and bacteriophage breakthrough responses resembled those generated from field-based test data and in the graded column experiments. Comparisons with the results

  9. Dehydration of bacteriophages in electrospun nanofibers: effect of excipients in polymeric solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Charmaine K. W.; Senecal, Kris; Senecal, Andre; Nugen, Sam R.

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses capable of infecting and lysing target bacterial cells; as such they have potential applications in agriculture for decontamination of foods, food contact surfaces and food rinse water. Although bacteriophages can retain infectivity long-term using lyophilized storage, the process of freeze-drying can be time consuming and expensive. In this study, electrospinning was used for dehydrating bacteriophages in polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions with addition of excipients (sodium chloride, magnesium sulfate, Tris-HCl, sucrose) in deionized water. The high voltage dehydration reduced the infectivity of bacteriophages following electrospinning, with the damaging effect abated with addition of storage media (SM) buffer and sucrose. SM buffer and sucrose also provided the most protection over extended storage (8 weeks; 20 °C 1% relative humidity) by mitigating environmental effects on the dried bacteriophages. Magnesium sulfate however provided the least protection due to coagulation effects of the ion, which can disrupt the native conformation of the bacteriophage protein coat. Storage temperatures (20 °C, 4 °C and -20 °C 1% relative humidity) had a minimal effect while relative humidity had substantial effect on the infectivity of bacteriophages. Nanofibers stored in higher relative humidity (33% and 75%) underwent considerable damage due to extensive water absorption and disruption of the fibers. Overall, following storage of nanofiber mats for eight weeks at ambient temperatures, high infective phage concentrations (106-107 PFU ml-1) were retained. Therefore, this study provided valuable insights on preservation and dehydration of bacteriophages by electrospinning in comparison to freeze drying and liquid storage, and the influence of excipients on the viability of bacteriophages.

  10. Optimizing the European regulatory framework for sustainable bacteriophage therapy in human medicine.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Jennes, Serge; Zizi, Martin; Lavigne, Rob; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    For practitioners at hospitals seeking to use natural (not genetically modified, as appearing in nature) bacteriophages for treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections (bacteriophage therapy), Europe's current regulatory framework for medicinal products hinders more than it facilitates. Although many experts consider bacteriophage therapy to be a promising complementary (or alternative) treatment to antibiotic therapy, no bacteriophage-specific framework for documentation exists to date. Decades worth of historical clinical data on bacteriophage therapy (from Eastern Europe, particularly Poland, and the former Soviet republics, particularly Georgia and Russia, as well as from today's 27 EU member states and the US) have not been taken into account by European regulators because these data have not been validated under current Western regulatory standards. Consequently, applicants carrying out standard clinical trials on bacteriophages in Europe are obliged to initiate clinical work from scratch. This paper argues for a reduced documentation threshold for Phase 1 clinical trials of bacteriophages and maintains that bacteriophages should not be categorized as classical medicinal products for at least two reasons: (1) such a categorization is scientifically inappropriate for this specific therapy and (2) such a categorization limits the marketing authorization process to industry, the only stakeholder with sufficient financial resources to prepare a complete dossier for the competent authorities. This paper reflects on the current regulatory framework for medicines in Europe and assesses possible regulatory pathways for the (re-)introduction of bacteriophage therapy in a way that maintains its effectiveness and safety as well as its inherent characteristics of sustainability and in situ self-amplification and limitation.

  11. TIME-DEPENDENT INFRARED STUDIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFRARED RESEARCH, TIME , INFRARED PHENOMENA, INFRARED RADIATION, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, HIGH ALTITUDE, SOLAR ATMOSPHERE, TRANSMISSIONS(MECHANICAL), VIBRATION, QUANTUM THEORY, CALIBRATION, INFRARED SCANNING.

  12. Structural aberrations in T-even bacteriophage. IX. Effect of mixed infection on the production of giant bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, D J; Chapman, V A; DeLong, S S

    1977-01-01

    To date, the production of T-even bacteriophage with giant heads has been achieved in two ways: (i) by use of canavanine-arginine treatment of Escherichia coli B cultures infected by wild-type bacteriophage (Cummings and Bolin, Bacteriol. Rev. 40:314-359, 1976; Cummings et al., Virology 54:245-261, 1973), which give a size distribution of giants that is phage specific (Cummings et al., Virology 54:245-261, 1973); and (ii) by infection with certain missense mutants of T4D gene 23 (Doermann et al., J. Virol. 12:374-385, 1973; ICN-UCLA Symposium on Molecular Biology, p. 243-285, 1973) or temperature-sensitive mutants of gene 24 (Aebi et al., J. Supramol. Struct. 2:253-275, 1974; Biljenga et al., J. Mol. Biol. 103:469-498, 1976). We now report the effect of mixed infection with several mutants of T4D on both the production and the size of giant bacteriophage. We found that gene 24 mutant is a critical partner for the production of giants. Infection using T4.24 mutants together with either T4.23 mutants, T4B+ or T6+ led to the formation of giants with heads 10- to 14-fold longer than normal-length heads. Infection with amber 24-bypass 24 double mutants of T4D led to the production of giants when gene 23 mutant was used to co-infect. Addition of canavanine to the co-infected cultures could alter the size distribution of giants, depending on which phage were used to coinfect. Gene 22 mutants had a modifying effect on these results. In the absence of canavanine co-infection with gene 22 mutants prevented the production of giants, and in the presence of canavanine giants of 1.5 to 5 head lengths were found. We have interpreted these results to mean that critical concentrations of gene products 22, 23, and 24 interact to control head length in T-even bacteriophage. Images PMID:864836

  13. Use of bacteriophage to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination and fouling in Jet A aviation fuel.

    PubMed

    Bojanowski, Caitlin L; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Robinson, Jayne B

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the use of bacteriophages to prevent growth and/or biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was investigated in microcosms containing Jet A aviation fuel as the carbon source. Bacteriophages were found to be effective at preventing biofilm formation but did not always prevent planktonic growth in the microcosms. This result was at odds with experiments conducted in nutrient-rich medium, demonstrating the necessity to test antimicrobial and antifouling strategies under conditions as near as possible to the 'real world'. The success of the bacteriophages at preventing biofilm formation makes them potential candidates as antifouling agents for fuel systems.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage BC-611 Specifically Infecting Enterococcus faecalis Strain NP-10011

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tomohiro; Sakka, Makiko; Hayashi, Atsushi; Shimada, Takashi; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections in humans and animals and is also an important bacterium for dairy and probiotic supplement production. Therefore, bacteriophages infecting E. faecalis may be useful for phage therapy against multidrug-resistant strains or may threaten industrial fermentation. We isolated a virulent Siphoviridae bacteriophage, BC-611, specifically infecting E. faecalis strain NP-10011 but not infecting other E. faecalis strains or other enterococci. Although the genome sequence of BC-611 resembled that of enterococcal bacteriophage SAP6, BC-611 was marked by its narrow host specificity. PMID:22879611

  15. Ultrastructure of Escherichia coli Cells Infected with Bacteriophage R17

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Richard M.; Granboulan, Nicole

    1966-01-01

    Franklin, Richard M. (Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, Villejuif, Seine, France), and Nicole Granboulan. Ultrastructure of Escherichia coli cells infected with bacteriophage R17. J. Bacteriol. 91:834–848. 1966—Ultrastructural changes in Escherichia coli cells infected with ribonucleic acid (RNA) bacteriophage R17 were studied under conditions of one-step growth. No morphological alterations were seen during the latent period. During the period of rapid viral synthesis, a fibrillar lesion surrounded by ribonucleoprotein particles was observed in a polar region. Late in infection, paracrystalline arrays of virions were found in over 90% of the cells. When protein synthesis was blocked by in over 90% of the cells. When protein synthesis was blocked by chloramphenicol at 20 min postinfection, allowing continued viral RNA synthesis without production of coat protein, a dense fibrillar area appeared in a paranuclear region. Cytochemical studies were done on cells embedded in hydroxypropyl methacrylate, a water-miscible embedding agent. The paracrystalline arrays of virions were digested after extensive treatment with either pepsin or ribonuclease. Shorter digestion with the pepsin resulted in better definition of the crystal regions. The fibrillar area found in chloramphenicol-treated cells was digested by ribonuclease but not by pepsin, and was also resistant to lead extraction. This region probably represents a pool of virus-specific RNA. Images PMID:5327373

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Bacteriophage Preying an Antifungal Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi-Midani, Aryan; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jung, Sang Bong; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Several Bacillus species were isolated from rice field soils, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that Bacillus cereus was the most abundant. A strain named BC1 showed antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Bacteriophages infecting strain BC1 were isolated from the same soil sample. The isolated phage PK16 had an icosahedral head of 100 ± 5 nm and tail of 200 ± 5 nm, indicating that it belonged to the family Myoviridae. Analysis of the complete linear dsDNA genome revealed a 158,127-bp genome with G + C content of 39.9% comprising 235 open reading frames as well as 19 tRNA genes (including 1 pseudogene). Blastp analysis showed that the proteins encoded by the PK16 genome had the closest hits to proteins of seven different bacteriophages. A neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree based on the major capsid protein showed a robust clustering of phage PK16 with phage JBP901 and BCP8-2 isolated from Korean fermented food. PMID:27904467

  17. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Neve, Horst; Hammer, Karin; Jacobsen, Susanne; Pedersen, Per D; Sørensen, Søren J; Heller, Knut J; Vogensen, Finn K

    2014-04-17

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides strains. The phages have dsDNA genomes with sizes ranging from 25.7 to 28.4 kb. Comparative genomics analysis helped classify the 9 phages into two classes, which correlates with the host species. High percentage of similarity within the classes on both nucleotide and protein levels was observed. Genome comparison also revealed very high conservation of the overall genomic organization between the classes. The genes were organized in functional modules responsible for replication, packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis and regulation and modification, respectively. No lysogeny modules were detected. To our knowledge this report provides the first comparative genomic work done on Leuconostoc dairy phages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacteriophages and Their Immunological Applications against Infectious Threats

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Jacopo; Ferro, Mattia; Burioni, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage therapy dates back almost a century, but the discovery of antibiotics led to a rapid decline in the interests and investments within this field of research. Recently, the novel threat of multidrug-resistant bacteria highlighted the alarming drop in research and development of new antibiotics: 16 molecules were discovered during 1983–87, 10 new therapeutics during the nineties, and only 5 between 2003 and 2007. Phages are therefore being reconsidered as alternative therapeutics. Phage display technique has proved to be extremely promising for the identification of effective antibodies directed against pathogens, as well as for vaccine development. At the same time, conventional phage therapy uses lytic bacteriophages for treatment of infections and recent clinical trials have shown great potential. Moreover, several other approaches have been developed in vitro and in vivo using phage-derived proteins as antibacterial agents. Finally, their use has also been widely considered for public health surveillance, as biosensor phages can be used to detect food and water contaminations and prevent bacterial epidemics. These novel approaches strongly promote the idea that phages and their proteins can be exploited as an effective weapon in the near future, especially in a world which is on the brink of a “postantibiotic era.” PMID:28484722

  19. Chemostat culture systems support diverse bacteriophage communities from human feces.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Ly, Melissa; Daigneault, Michelle C; Brown, Ian H L; McDonald, Julie A K; Bonilla, Natasha; Vercoe, Emma Allen; Pride, David T

    2015-11-09

    Most human microbiota studies focus on bacteria inhabiting body surfaces, but these surfaces also are home to large populations of viruses. Many are bacteriophages, and their role in driving bacterial diversity is difficult to decipher without the use of in vitro ecosystems that can reproduce human microbial communities. We used chemostat culture systems known to harbor diverse fecal bacteria to decipher whether these cultures also are home to phage communities. We found that there are vast viral communities inhabiting these ecosystems, with estimated concentrations similar to those found in human feces. The viral communities are composed entirely of bacteriophages and likely contain both temperate and lytic phages based on their similarities to other known phages. We examined the cultured phage communities at five separate time points over 24 days and found that they were highly individual-specific, suggesting that much of the subject-specificity found in human viromes also is captured by this culture-based system. A high proportion of the community membership is conserved over time, but the cultured communities maintain more similarity with other intra-subject cultures than they do to human feces. In four of the five subjects, estimated viral diversity between fecal and cultured communities was highly similar. Because the diversity of phages in these cultured fecal communities have similarities to those found in humans, we believe these communities can serve as valuable ecosystems to help uncover the role of phages in human microbial communities.

  20. Plant viral and bacteriophage delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patricia; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-07-18

    Nucleic acid therapeutics have emerged as a powerful method for treatment of many diseases. However, the challenge lies in safe and efficient delivery of nucleic acids to their target site, as they need to cross various extracellular and intracellular barriers. Mammalian viruses have initially been favored for delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics, but safety concerns regarding their immunogenicity and potential of integration have fueled the search for alternative delivery strategies. For example, chemistry and bioengineering have led to advances in the use of nonviral vectors composed of lipids and other polymers; nevertheless, the synthetic systems often do not match the efficiency achieved using the biological systems. More recently, researchers have turned toward the development of plant viruses and bacteriophages and virus-like particles as an alternative or complementary approach. These systems unite the properties of both the viral and nonviral systems and as such are a new exciting avenue toward nucleic acid delivery. This review highlights the benefits of plant viral and bacteriophage delivery of nucleic acids and provides a summary of the current progress in research in this field. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-09-09

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not.

  2. Heavy ion induced double strand breaks in bacteria and bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micke, U.; Schäfer, M.; Anton, A.; Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.

    DNA damage induced by heavy ions in bacterial cells and bacteriophages such as Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Bacteriophage Tl were investigated by analyzing the double strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA. This kind of lesion is considered as one of the main reasons for lethal events. To analyze double strand breaks in long molecules of DNA - up to some Mbp in length - the technique of pulse field agarose gel electrophoresis has been used. This allows the detection of one double strand break per genome. Cell lysis and DNA isolation were performed in small agarose blocks directly. This procedure secured minimum DNA destruction by shearing forces. After running a gel, the DNA was stained with ethidium bromide. The light intensity of ethidium bromide fluorescence for both the outcoming (running) DNA and the remaining intact DNA were measured by scanning. The mean number of double strand breaks was calculated by determining the quotient of these intensities. Strand break induction after heavy ion and X-ray irradiation was compared.

  3. REDOR NMR Characterization of DNA Packaging in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is a large-tailed E. coli virus whose capsid is 120 × 86 nm. ATP-driven DNA packaging of the T4 capsid results in the loading of a 171-kb genome in less than 5 minutes during viral infection. We have isolated 50-mg quantities of uniform 15N and [ε-15N]lysine-labeled bacteriophage T4. We have also introduced 15NH4+ into filled, unlabeled capsids from synthetic medium by exchange. We have examined lyo- and cryoprotected lyophilized T4 using 15N{31P} and 31P{15N} rotational-echo double resonance. The results of these experiments have shown that: (i) packaged DNA is in an unperturbed duplex B-form conformation; (ii) the DNA phosphate negative charge is balanced by lysyl amines (3.2%), polyamines (5.8%), and monovalent cations (40%); and (iii) 11% of lysyl amines, 40% of –NH2 groups of polyamines, and 80% of monovalent cations within the lyophilized T4 capsid, are involved in the DNA charge balance. The NMR evidence suggests that DNA enters the T4 capsid in a charge-unbalanced state. We propose that electrostatic interactions may provide free energy to supplement the nanomotor-driven T4 DNA packaging. PMID:18703073

  4. Langevin Dynamics Simulations of Genome Packing in Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Forrey, Christopher; Muthukumar, M.

    2006-01-01

    We use Langevin dynamics simulations to study the process by which a coarse-grained DNA chain is packaged within an icosahedral container. We focus our inquiry on three areas of interest in viral packing: the evolving structure of the packaged DNA condensate; the packing velocity; and the internal buildup of energy and resultant forces. Each of these areas has been studied experimentally, and we find that we can qualitatively reproduce experimental results. However, our findings also suggest that the phage genome packing process is fundamentally different than that suggested by the inverse spool model. We suggest that packing in general does not proceed in the deterministic fashion of the inverse-spool model, but rather is stochastic in character. As the chain configuration becomes compressed within the capsid, the structure, energy, and packing velocity all become dependent upon polymer dynamics. That many observed features of the packing process are rooted in condensed-phase polymer dynamics suggests that statistical mechanics, rather than mechanics, should serve as the proper theoretical basis for genome packing. Finally we suggest that, as a result of an internal protein unique to bacteriophage T7, the T7 genome may be significantly more ordered than is true for bacteriophage in general. PMID:16617089

  5. Putative link between Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage serotype and community association.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, D H; Saberesheikh, S; Kearns, A M; Saunders, N A

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans can be broadly separated into 3 groups: healthcare-associated (HA), community-associated (CA), and livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. Initially based on epidemiological features, division into these classes is becoming increasingly problematic. The sequencing of S. aureus genomes has highlighted variations in their accessory components, which likely account for differences in pathogenicity and epidemicity. In particular, temperate bacteriophages have been regarded as key players in bacterial pathogenesis. Bacteriophage-associated Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes (luk-PV) are regarded as epidemiological markers of the CA-MRSA due to their high prevalence in CA strains. This paper describes the development and application of a partial composite S. aureus virulence-associated gene microarray. Epidemic, pandemic, and sporadic lineages of UK HA and CA S. aureus were compared. Phage structural genes linked with CA isolates were identified and in silico analysis revealed these to be correlated with phage serogroup. CA strains predominantly carried a PVL-associated phage either of the A or Fb serogroup, whilst HA strains predominantly carried serogroup Fa or B phages. We speculate that carriage of a serogroup A/Fb PVL-associated phage rather than the luk-PV genes specifically is correlated with CA status.

  6. THE MORTALITY OF BACTERIOPHAGE CONTAINING ASSIMILATED RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, A. D.; Kamen, M. D.; Kennedy, J. W.; Gest, H.

    1951-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 containing assimilated radioactive phosphorus is inactivated at a rate proportional to the specific radioactivity of the constituent phosphorus. The beta radiation from the phosphorus makes a negligible contribution to this effect. The inactivation is therefore a direct consequence of the nuclear reaction, which kills the phage with an efficiency of about 1/12. Several phages related to T4 behave similarly. When radioactive phage is grown from a seed of non-radioactive phage, all of the phage progeny are subject to killing by radioactive decay. The phage is killed by beta radiation from P32 with an efficiency of about 1/100 per ionization within the particle volume. Bacteriophage T4 and its relatives contain about 500,000 atoms of phosphorus per infective particle. Virtually all this phosphorus is adsorbed to bacteria with the specificity characteristic of the infective particles, and none of it can be removed from the particles by the enzyme desoxyribonuclease. The phosphorus content per particle, together with the published data on analytical composition, indicates a particle diameter close to 110 mµ for the varieties of phage studied. PMID:14824499

  7. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not. PMID:26371010

  8. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  9. Infrared floodlight

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Robert E.; English, George J.

    1986-08-05

    An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

  10. Infrared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, I.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Infrared arrays are small electronic imaging devices subdivided into a grid or `array' of picture elements, or pixels, each of which is made of a material sensitive to photons (ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION) with wavelengths much longer than normal visible light. Typical dimensions of currently available devices are about 27-36 mm square, and formats now range from 2048×2048 pixels for the near-infra...

  11. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  12. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay [Albuquerque, NM; Hayat, Majeed M [Albuquerque, NM; Tyo, J Scott [Tucson, AZ; Jang, Woo-Yong [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  13. Stability and in vitro DNA packaging of bacteriophages: effects of dextrans, sugars, and polyols

    SciTech Connect

    Serwer, P.; Masker, W.E.; Allen, J.L.

    1983-02-01

    Attempts were made to increase the efficiency of infectious particle formation during the in vitro assembly of bacteriophage T7 from procapsids and DNA. It was found that dextrans and some smaller, related compounds (sucrose and sorbitol) increase this efficiency by a factor of 8 to 50. Dextrans also inhibited elevated temperature-induced emptying of DNA from bacteriophages T7, P22, and T4, suggesting that the stimulation of assembly is caused, at least in part, by the stabilization of packaged DNA in capsids. The data indicated that the sugars and polyols can slow DNA emptying from bacteriophages at elevated temperature whether they permeate the bacteriophage capsid or not. In contrast, the data suggested that permeation of some particle, probably a capsid, results in inhibition of in vitro T7 assembly.

  14. Improved bacteriophage genome data is necessary for integrating viral and bacterial ecology.

    PubMed

    Bibby, Kyle

    2014-02-01

    The recent rise in "omics"-enabled approaches has lead to improved understanding in many areas of microbial ecology. However, despite the importance that viruses play in a broad microbial ecology context, viral ecology remains largely not integrated into high-throughput microbial ecology studies. A fundamental hindrance to the integration of viral ecology into omics-enabled microbial ecology studies is the lack of suitable reference bacteriophage genomes in reference databases-currently, only 0.001% of bacteriophage diversity is represented in genome sequence databases. This commentary serves to highlight this issue and to promote bacteriophage genome sequencing as a valuable scientific undertaking to both better understand bacteriophage diversity and move towards a more holistic view of microbial ecology.

  15. Isolation of Bacteriophages of the Marine Bacterium Beneckea natriegens from Coastal Salt Marshes1

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens were isolated from coastal marshes where they were limited to brackish and marine waters. The phages were widely distributed and morphologically diverse in the marshes. Images PMID:4133830

  16. [The challenge of controlling foodborne diseases: bacteriophages as a new biotechnological tool].

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Denisse; Galarce, Nicolás; Borie, Consuelo

    2015-12-01

    Foodborne diseases are an increasing public health issue, in which bacterial pathogens have a transcendental role. To face this situation, the food industry has implemented several control strategies, using in the last decade some biotechnological tools, such as direct application of bacteriophages on food, to effectively control bacterial pathogens. Their bactericidal and safe properties to humans and animals have been widely described in the literature, being nowadays some bacteriophage-based products commercially available. Despite this, there are so many factors that can interfere in their biocontrol effectiveness on food, therefore is essential to consider these factors before their application. Thus, the optimal bacterial reduction will be achieved, which would produce a safer food. This review discusses some factors to consider in the use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens, including historical background, taxonomy and biological description of bacteriophages, and also advantages, disadvantages, and considerations of food applications.

  17. Genome Sequences of Two Bacillus cereus Group Bacteriophages, Eyuki and AvesoBmore

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages isolated on Bacillus thuringiensis show similarity to previously sequenced phages and provide evidence of the mosaicism of phage genomes. PMID:26472840

  18. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages specific to the channel catfish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primary cause of mortality in channel catfish raised commercially in aquaculture farms. Additional treatment and diagnostic regimes are needed for this enteric pathogen, motivating the discovery and characterization of bacteriophages spe...

  20. M13 Bacteriophage-Based Self-Assembly Structures and Their Functional Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Chuntae; Park, Geun-Tae; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Y; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the assembly of basic structural building blocks in a systematic and orderly fashion is an emerging issue in various areas of science and engineering such as physics, chemistry, material science, biological engineering, and electrical engineering. The self-assembly technique, among many other kinds of ordering techniques, has several unique advantages and the M13 bacteriophage can be utilized as part of this technique. The M13 bacteriophage (Phage) can easily be modified genetically and chemically to demonstrate specific functions. This allows for its use as a template to determine the homogeneous distribution and percolated network structures of inorganic nanostructures under ambient conditions. Inexpensive and environmentally friendly synthesis can be achieved by using the M13 bacteriophage as a novel functional building block. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of M13 bacteriophage self-assembly structures and the future of this technology. PMID:26146494

  1. Bacterial sensing of bacteriophages in communities: the search for the Rosetta stone.

    PubMed

    Debarbieux, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    Billions of years of evolution have resulted in microbial viruses and their hosts communicating in such a way that neither of these antagonists can dominate the other definitively. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying this dialog, initially in bacteriophages, rapidly identified several of the ways in which bacteria resist bacteriophage infections and bacteriophages defeat bacterial defenses. From an ecological perspective, recent data have raised many questions about the dynamic interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages, the densities of which, in complex microbial populations, are only beginning to be investigated. The next challenge will be determining how the dialog between microbial viruses and their hosts modulates complex ecosystems, such as those found in healthy humans or infected patients.

  2. M13 Bacteriophage-Based Self-Assembly Structures and Their Functional Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Chuntae; Park, Geun-Tae; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Y; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-06-01

    Controlling the assembly of basic structural building blocks in a systematic and orderly fashion is an emerging issue in various areas of science and engineering such as physics, chemistry, material science, biological engineering, and electrical engineering. The self-assembly technique, among many other kinds of ordering techniques, has several unique advantages and the M13 bacteriophage can be utilized as part of this technique. The M13 bacteriophage (Phage) can easily be modified genetically and chemically to demonstrate specific functions. This allows for its use as a template to determine the homogeneous distribution and percolated network structures of inorganic nanostructures under ambient conditions. Inexpensive and environmentally friendly synthesis can be achieved by using the M13 bacteriophage as a novel functional building block. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of M13 bacteriophage self-assembly structures and the future of this technology.

  3. The gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) is located in bacteriophage T12.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, C R; Ferretti, J J

    1984-01-01

    The infection of Streptococcus pyogenes T25(3) with the temperate bacteriophage T12 results in the conversion of the nontoxigenic strain to type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) production. Although previous research has established that integration of the bacteriophage genome into the host chromosome is not essential for exotoxin production, the location of the gene on the bacteriophage or bacterial chromosome had not been determined. In the present investigation, recombinant DNA techniques were used to determine whether the gene specifying type A streptococcal exotoxin (speA) production is located on the bacteriophage chromosome. Bacteriophage T12 was obtained from S. pyogenes T25(3)(T12) by induction with mitomycin C, and after isolation of bacteriophage DNA by phenol-chloroform extraction, the DNA was digested with restriction enzymes and ligated with Escherichia coli plasmid pHP34 or the Streptococcus-E. coli shuttle vector pSA3. Transformation of E. coli HB101 with the recombinant molecules allowed selection of E. coli clones containing bacteriophage T12 genes. Immunological assays with specific antibody revealed the presence of type A streptococcal exotoxin in sonicates of E. coli transformants. Subcloning experiments localized the speA gene to a 1.7-kilobase segment of the bacteriophage T12 genome flanked by SalI and HindIII sites. Introduction of the pSA3 vector containing the speA gene into Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) resulted in transformants that secreted the type A exotoxin. Immunological analysis showed that the type A streptococcal exotoxin produced by E. coli and S. sanguis transformants was identical to the type A exotoxin produced by S. pyogenes T25(3)(T12). Southern blot hybridizations with the cloned fragment confirmed its presence in the bacteriophage T12 genome and its absence in the T25(3) nonlysogen. Therefore, the gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin is located in the bacteriophage genome, and conversion of S. pyogenes T

  4. The Tripartite Associations between Bacteriophage, Wolbachia, and Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Marshall, Michelle L; Fry, Adam J; Kim, Ulandt; Wernegreen, Jennifer J

    2006-01-01

    By manipulating arthropod reproduction worldwide, the heritable endosymbiont Wolbachia has spread to pandemic levels. Little is known about the microbial basis of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) except that bacterial densities and percentages of infected sperm cysts associate with incompatibility strength. The recent discovery of a temperate bacteriophage (WO-B) of Wolbachia containing ankyrin-encoding genes and virulence factors has led to intensifying debate that bacteriophage WO-B induces CI. However, current hypotheses have not considered the separate roles that lytic and lysogenic phage might have on bacterial fitness and phenotype. Here we describe a set of quantitative approaches to characterize phage densities and its associations with bacterial densities and CI. We enumerated genome copy number of phage WO-B and Wolbachia and CI penetrance in supergroup A- and B-infected males of the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We report several findings: (1) variability in CI strength for A-infected males is positively associated with bacterial densities, as expected under the bacterial density model of CI, (2) phage and bacterial densities have a significant inverse association, as expected for an active lytic infection, and (3) CI strength and phage densities are inversely related in A-infected males; similarly, males expressing incomplete CI have significantly higher phage densities than males expressing complete CI. Ultrastructural analyses indicate that approximately 12% of the A Wolbachia have phage particles, and aggregations of these particles can putatively occur outside the Wolbachia cell. Physical interactions were observed between approximately 16% of the Wolbachia cells and spermatid tails. The results support a low to moderate frequency of lytic development in Wolbachia and an overall negative density relationship between bacteriophage and Wolbachia. The findings motivate a novel phage density model of CI in which lytic phage repress Wolbachia

  5. Effect of a genetically engineered bacteriophage on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Justine Monnerat; Buttaro, Bettina; Zhang, Hongming; Liss, Nadia; Sassone, Luciana; Stevens, Roy

    2016-11-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is associated with failed endodontic cases and nosocomial infections. E. faecalis can form biofilms, penetrate dentinal tubules and survive in root canals with scarce nutritional supplies. These properties can make E. faecalis resistant to conventional endodontic disinfection therapy. Furthermore, treatment may be complicated by the fact that many E. faecalis strains are resistant to antibiotics. A potential alternative to antibiotic therapy is phage therapy. ϕEf11 is a temperate phage that infects strains of E. faecalis. It was previously sequenced and genetically engineered to modify its properties in order to render it useful as a therapeutic agent in phage therapy. In the current study, we have further genetically modified the phage to create phage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)(PnisA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bacteriophage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)(PnisA), to disrupt biofilms of two Enterococcus faecalis strains: JH2-2 (vancomycin-sensitive) and V583 (vancomycin-resistant). 24h static biofilms of E. faecalis strains JH2-2(pMSP3535 nisR/K) and V583 (pMSP3535nisR/K), formed on cover slips, were inoculated with bacteriophage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)(PnisA). After 24 and 48h incubation, the bacterial biomass was imaged by confocal microscopy and viable cells were quantified by colony forming unit measurement. The results showed a 10-100-fold decrease in viable cells (CFU/biofilm) after phage treatment, which was consistent with comparisons of treated and untreated biofilm images visualized as max projections of the Z-series. The biomass of both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis biofilms is markedly reduced following infection by bacteriophage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)(PnisA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of regulated clinical trials in the development of bacteriophage therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Parracho, Helena Mrt; Burrowes, Ben H; Enright, Mark C; McConville, Malcolm L; Harper, David R

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is now recognized as a major, global threat to human health and the need for the development of novel antibacterial therapies has become urgent. Lytic bacteriophages (phages) targeting individual bacterial pathogens have therapeutic potential as an alternative or adjunct to antibiotic use. Bacteriophage therapy has been used for decades, but clinical trials in this field are rare, leaving many questions unanswered as to its effectiveness for many infectious diseases. As a consequence bacteriophage therapy is not used or accepted in most parts of the world. The increasing need for new antimicrobial therapies is driving the development of bacteriophage therapies for a number of diseases but these require the successful completion of large-scale clinical trials in accordance with US FDA or European EMA guidelines. Bacteriophages are considered as biological agents by regulatory authorities and they are managed by biological medicinal products guidelines for European trials and guidelines of the division of vaccines and related product applications in the USA. Bacteriophage therapy is typically an 'active' treatment requiring multiplication in the bacterial host and therefore the factors that govern its success are different from those of conventional antibiotics. From the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic points of view, time of treatment, dosage depending on the site of infection and the composition of the bacteriophage formulation (single vs multiple strains) need careful consideration when designing clinical trials. Scientific evidence regarding inflammatory effects, potential for gene transfer and phage resistance, need to be evaluated through such trials. However purity, stability and sterility of preparations for human use can be addressed through Good Manufacturing Practises to reduce many potential safety concerns. In this review we discuss the potential for the development of bacteriophage therapy in the context of critical aspects of

  7. The role of regulated clinical trials in the development of bacteriophage therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Parracho, Helena MRT; Burrowes, Ben H; Enright, Mark C; McConville, Malcolm L; Harper, David R

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is now recognized as a major, global threat to human health and the need for the development of novel antibacterial therapies has become urgent. Lytic bacteriophages (phages) targeting individual bacterial pathogens have therapeutic potential as an alternative or adjunct to antibiotic use. Bacteriophage therapy has been used for decades, but clinical trials in this field are rare, leaving many questions unanswered as to its effectiveness for many infectious diseases. As a consequence bacteriophage therapy is not used or accepted in most parts of the world. The increasing need for new antimicrobial therapies is driving the development of bacteriophage therapies for a number of diseases but these require the successful completion of large-scale clinical trials in accordance with US FDA or European EMA guidelines. Bacteriophages are considered as biological agents by regulatory authorities and they are managed by biological medicinal products guidelines for European trials and guidelines of the division of vaccines and related product applications in the USA. Bacteriophage therapy is typically an ‘active’ treatment requiring multiplication in the bacterial host and therefore the factors that govern its success are different from those of conventional antibiotics. From the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic points of view, time of treatment, dosage depending on the site of infection and the composition of the bacteriophage formulation (single vs multiple strains) need careful consideration when designing clinical trials. Scientific evidence regarding inflammatory effects, potential for gene transfer and phage resistance, need to be evaluated through such trials. However purity, stability and sterility of preparations for human use can be addressed through Good Manufacturing Practises to reduce many potential safety concerns. In this review we discuss the potential for the development of bacteriophage therapy in the context of critical aspects

  8. Method for Growth and Purification of Bacteriophage 643 on Streptococcus lactis ML3.

    PubMed

    Lyttle, D J; Petersen, G B

    1984-07-01

    The yield of bacteriophage 643 was increased by infecting cultures of Streptococcus lactis ML3 in late-log phase growth, harvesting the infected cells, and suspending them in fresh, phosphate-buffered minimal medium. The cells lysed after this treatment and produced high titers of bacteriophage. The phage particles were dissociated from debris by 2 M NaCl and purified by differential and CsCl band centrifugation.

  9. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  10. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  11. Relationship of Bacteriophages to the Toxigenicity of Clostridium botulinum and Closely Related Organisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    CLOSTRIDIUM NOVYI TYPE A BY BACTERIOPHAGES C. botulinum and C. novyi are pathogenic anaerobes that are characterized by their ability to produce powerful...A-., Ij7L.oI..I-C.C= RELATIONSHIP OF BACTERIOPHAGES TO THE TOXIGENICITY OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM AND CLOSELY RELATED ORGANISMS M. W. Eklund F. T...specific neurotoxins, the species Clostridium botulinum is divided into types A through G. Even though the different toxin types represent a heterogenous

  12. Bacteriophage T5 gene A2 protein alters the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, C E

    1984-01-01

    Evidence for changes in Escherichia coli envelope structure caused by the bacteriophage T5 gene A2 protein was obtained by the use of mutant bacteriophages, envelope fractionation procedures, electrophoretic analysis, and in vitro binding studies with purified gene A2 protein. The results suggested that the T5 gene A2 protein perturbs the host envelope as it functions to promote DNA transfer. Images PMID:6389511

  13. Adding pieces to the puzzle: New insights into bacteriophage diversity from integrated research-education programs.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the dark matter of the biological universe: the population is vast and replete with novel genes whose function is unknown. The genomic insights such as the mosaic architecture gleaned from perhaps 2,000 currently sequenced bacteriophage genomes is far from representative of the total number phage particles in the biosphere - about 10ˆ31. The recent comparative analysis of 627 mycobacteriophages isolated on Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 is the most extensive examination yet in pursuit of this question.

  14. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF. PMID:26213462

  15. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668) and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669). Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains.

  16. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668) and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669). Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains. PMID:26413062

  17. Bacteriophages as indicators of human and animal faecal contamination in raw and treated wastewaters from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Yahya, M; Hmaied, F; Jebri, S; Jofre, J; Hamdi, M

    2015-05-01

    We aimed at quantifying bacteriophages in raw and treated wastewaters of human and animal origin in Tunisia to assess their usefulness for tracking the origin of faecal pollution and in the follow-up of effectiveness of water treatments process. The concentrations of bacteriophages in wastewater samples were determined by double layer agar technique. Somatic coliphages and F-specific RNA bacteriophages were present in all types of samples in high concentrations. The values of Escherichia coli were variable depending on geographical location. On the other hand, bacteriophages infecting strain GA17 were detected preferably when human faecal contamination was occurred. Bacteriophages appear as a feasible and widely applicable manner to detect faecal contamination in Tunisia. On the other hand, phages infecting GA17 could be good markers for tracking the origin of faecal pollution in the area studied. The reuse of treated wastewaters can be a solution to meet the needs of water in the geographical area of study. Bacteriophages seem to predict differently the presence of faecal contamination in water than bacterial indicators. Consequently, they can be a valuable additional tool to improve water resources management for minimizing health risks. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Access to bacteriophage therapy: discouraging experiences from the human cell and tissue legal framework.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, G; Huys, I; De Vos, D; De Coninck, A; Roseeuw, D; Kets, E; Vanderkelen, A; Draye, J P; Rose, T; Jennes, S; Ceulemans, C; Pirnay, J P

    2016-02-01

    Cultures of human epithelial cells (keratinocytes) are used as an additional surgical tool to treat critically burnt patients. Initially, the production environment of keratinocyte grafts was regulated exclusively by national regulations. In 2004, the European Tissues and Cells Directive 2004/23/EC (transposed into Belgian Law) imposed requirements that resulted in increased production costs and no significant increase in quality and/or safety. In 2007, Europe published Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 on Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products. Overnight, cultured keratinocytes became (arguably) 'Advanced' Therapy Medicinal Products to be produced as human medicinal products. The practical impact of these amendments was (and still is) considerable. A similar development appears imminent in bacteriophage therapy. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that can be used for tackling the problem of bacterial resistance development to antibiotics. Therapeutic natural bacteriophages have been in clinical use for almost 100 years. Regulators today are framing the (re-)introduction of (natural) bacteriophage therapy into 'modern western' medicine as biological medicinal products, also subject to stringent regulatory medicinal products requirements. In this paper, we look back on a century of bacteriophage therapy to make the case that therapeutic natural bacteriophages should not be classified under the medicinal product regulatory frames as they exist today. It is our call to authorities to not repeat the mistake of the past.

  19. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  20. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status.

    PubMed

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF.

  1. [Determination of Azospirillum Brasilense Cells With Bacteriophages via Electrooptical Analysis of Microbial Suspensions].

    PubMed

    Gulii, O I; Karavayeva, O A; Pavlii, S A; Sokolov, O I; Bunin, V D; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The dependence-of changes in the electrooptical properties of Azospirillum brasilense cell suspension Sp7 during interaction with bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7 on the number and time of interactions was studied. Incubation of cells with bacteriophage significantly changed the electrooptical signal within one minute. The selective effect of bacteriophage ΦAb on 18 strains of bacteria of the genus Azospirillum was studied: A. amazonense Ami4, A. brasilense Sp7, Cd, Sp107, Sp245, Jm6B2, Brl4, KR77, S17, S27, SR55, SR75, A. halopraeferans Au4, A. irakense KBC1, K A3, A. lipoferum Sp59b, SR65 and RG20a. We determined the limit of reliable determination of microbial cells infected with bacteriophage: - 10(4) cells/mL. The presence of foreign cell cultures of E. coli B-878 and E. coli XL-1 did not complicate the detection of A brasilense Sp7 cells with the use of bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7. The results demonstrated that bacteriophage (ΦAb-Sp7 can be used for the detection of Azospirillum microbial cells via t electrooptical analysis of cell suspensions.

  2. Genotypic and Phenotypic Diversity among Induced, stx2-Carrying Bacteriophages from Environmental Escherichia coli Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Aljaro, Cristina; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan; Blanch, Anicet R.

    2009-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (stx2) gene-carrying bacteriophages have been shown to convert Escherichia coli strains to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). In this study, 79 E. coli strains belonging to 35 serotypes isolated from wastewaters of both human and animal origin were examined for the presence of stx2-carrying bacteriophages in their genomes. The lytic cycle of the bacteriophages was induced by mitomycin, and the bacteriophage fraction was isolated and used for morphological and genetic characterization. The induced bacteriophages showed morphological diversity, as well as restriction fragment length polymorphism variation, in the different strains belonging to different serotypes. The ability to infect new hosts was highly variable, although most of the induced phages infected Shigella sonnei host strain 866. In summary, in spite of carrying either the same or different stx2 variants and in spite of the fact that they were isolated from strains belonging to the same or different serotypes, the induced bacteriophages were highly variable. The high level of diversity and the great infectious capacity of these phages could enhance the spread of the stx2 gene and variants of this gene among different bacterial populations in environments to which humans may be exposed. PMID:19011056

  3. Surface-immobilization of chromatographically purified bacteriophages for the optimized capture of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Ravendra; Singh, Amit; Arya, Sunil K; Beadle, Bernadette; Glass, Nick; Tanha, Jamshid; Szymanski, Christine M; Evoy, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages offer interesting alternatives to antibodies for the specific capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria onto biosensing surfaces. Procedures for the optimal chemical immobilization of lytic bacteriophages onto surfaces are presented. More specifically, the removal of lysate contaminants from bacteriophage suspensions by size exclusion chromatography significantly increases the resultant planar surface density of immobilized bacteriophages. E. coli T4 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium P22 phage systems seem to undergo highly heterogeneous adsorption to the surface, possibly explaining the observed phage clustering at higher surface densities. The T4 phage and its E. coli host were initially employed as a model system where we discovered an optimal planar surface density of phages for best bacterial capture: 18.9 ± 0.8 phages/μm(2) capturing 18.0 ± 0.3 bacteria/100 μm(2). Phage surface clustering ultimately limits the T4 phage-immobilized surface's ability to specifically capture its host bacteria. Nevertheless, this is to our knowledge the largest surface capture density of E. coli reported using intact T4 bacteriophages. Two additional purified bacteriophage systems (P22 and Campylobacter jejuni phage NCTC 12673) were then similarly studied for their ability to capture their corresponding host bacteria (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni respectively) on a surface.

  4. Surface-immobilization of chromatographically purified bacteriophages for the optimized capture of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Ravendra; Singh, Amit; Arya, Sunil K.; Beadle, Bernadette; Glass, Nick; Tanha, Jamshid; Szymanski, Christine M.; Evoy, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages offer interesting alternatives to antibodies for the specific capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria onto biosensing surfaces. Procedures for the optimal chemical immobilization of lytic bacteriophages onto surfaces are presented. More specifically, the removal of lysate contaminants from bacteriophage suspensions by size exclusion chromatography significantly increases the resultant planar surface density of immobilized bacteriophages. E. coli T4 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium P22 phage systems seem to undergo highly heterogeneous adsorption to the surface, possibly explaining the observed phage clustering at higher surface densities. The T4 phage and its E. coli host were initially employed as a model system where we discovered an optimal planar surface density of phages for best bacterial capture: 18.9 ± 0.8 phages/μm2 capturing 18.0 ± 0.3 bacteria/100 μm2. Phage surface clustering ultimately limits the T4 phage-immobilized surface’s ability to specifically capture its host bacteria. Nevertheless, this is to our knowledge the largest surface capture density of E. coli reported using intact T4 bacteriophages. Two additional purified bacteriophage systems (P22 and Campylobacter jejuni phage NCTC 12673) were then similarly studied for their ability to capture their corresponding host bacteria (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni respectively) on a surface. PMID:22666653

  5. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage lytic for Desulfovibrio salexigens, a salt-requiring, sulfate-reducing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Araki, Michio )

    1989-03-01

    A bacteriophage that lysed Desulfovibrio salexigens cells was isolated from marine sediments and preliminarily characterized by electron microscopy and electrophoretic analysis of structural proteins and genomic nucleic acid. The bacteriophage had an icosahedral head and a long flexible tail, and the buoyant density of the bacteriophage particles was 1.468 g/ml in cesium chloride. The particles consisted of a double-stranded DNA molecule about 33 kilobase pairs long and at least 11 structural proteins.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Bacteriophage Lytic for Desulfovibrio salexigens, a Salt-Requiring, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Araki, Michio

    1989-01-01

    A bacteriophage that lysed Desulfovibrio salexigens cells was isolated from marine sediments and preliminarily characterized by electron microscopy and electrophoretic analysis of structural proteins and genomic nucleic acid. The bacteriophage had an icosahedral head and a long flexible tail, and the buoyant density of the bacteriophage particles was 1.468 g/ml in cesium chloride. The particles consisted of a double-stranded DNA molecule about 33 kilobase pairs long and at least 11 structural proteins. Images PMID:16347872

  7. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  8. Bacteriophage-nanocomposites: an easy and reproducible method for the construction, handling, storage and transport of conjugates for deployment of bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ian R; Illsley, Matthew; Korobeinyk, Alina V; Whitby, Raymond L D

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this work was proof of concept to develop a novel, cost effective protocol for the binding of bacteriophages to a surface without loss of function, after storage in various media. The technology platform involved covalently bonding bacteriophage 13 (a Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage) to two magnetised multiwalled carbon nanotube scaffolds using a series of buffers; bacteriophage-nanotube (B-N) conjugates were efficacious after storage at 20 °C for six weeks. B-N conjugates were added to human cell culture in vitro for 9 days without causing necrosis and apoptosis. B-N conjugates were frozen (-20 °C) in cell culture media for several weeks, after which recovery from the human cell culture medium was possible using a simple magnetic separation technique. The retention of viral infective potential was demonstrated by subsequent spread plating onto lawns of susceptible P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the human cell culture medium revealed the production of interleukins by the human fibroblasts upon exposure to the bacteriophage. One day after exposure, IL-8 levels transitorily increased between 60 and 100 pg/mL, but this level was not found on any subsequent days, suggesting an initial but not long lasting response. This paper outlines the development of a method to deliver antimicrobial activity to a surface that is small enough to be combined with other materials. To our knowledge at time of publication, this is the first report of magnetically coupled bacteriophages specific to human pathogens which can be recovered from test systems, and could represent a novel means to conditionally deploy antibacterial agents into living eukaryotic systems without the risks of some antibiotic therapies.

  9. Bacteriophage-induced Inhibition of Host Functions 1

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Richard J.; Bose, Subir K.

    1968-01-01

    The kinetics of degradation of bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) after infection of Escherichia coli with T4D, ultraviolet-irradiated T4D, and two amber mutants, N122 and N94, was studied by zone sedimentation through linear glycerol gradients. Within 5 min after infection with any of the bacteriophages, breakdown of host genome was evident. The first product was a high-molecular-weight material (50S to 70S) and further degradation appeared to occur in discrete steps. Rapid and extensive breakdown of bacterial DNA was seen after infection with am N122 and T4D. Infection with ultraviolet-irradiated phage or with am N94 resulted in an accumulation of high-molecular-weight material. These results suggest that the observed degradation of host DNA begins early and requires sequential action of several phage-induced endo- as well as exodeoxyribonucleases. PMID:4911847

  10. Genomic characterization of six novel Bacillus pumilus bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Laura; Lins, Bridget; Barrett, Jonathan; Montgomery, Andrew; Trapani, Stephanie; Schindler, Anne; Christie, Gail E; Cresawn, Steven G; Temple, Louise

    2013-09-01

    Twenty-eight bacteriophages infecting the local host Bacillus pumilus BL-8 were isolated, purified, and characterized. Nine genomes were sequenced, of which six were annotated and are the first of this host submitted to the public record. The 28 phages were divided into two groups by sequence and morphological similarity, yielding 27 cluster BpA phages and 1 cluster BpB phage, which is a BL-8 prophage. Most of the BpA phages have a host range restricted to distantly related strains, B. pumilus and B. simplex, reflecting the complexities of Bacillus taxonomy. Despite isolation over wide geographic and temporal space, the six cluster BpA phages share most of their 23 functionally annotated protein features and show a high degree of sequence similarity, which is unique among phages of the Bacillus genera. This is the first report of B. pumilus phages since 1981. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling the Morphology of Organic Crystals with Filamentous Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Cho, Whirang; Liu, Xiaomeng; Forrest, James; Fowler, Jeffrey D; Furst, Eric M

    2015-07-29

    The preparation of thiamethoxam (TMX) organic crystals with high morphological uniformity was achieved by controlled aggregation-driven crystallization of primitive TMX crystals and phage using the filamentous M13 bacteriophage. The development of a regular, micrometer-sized, tetragonal-bipyramidal crystal structure was dependent on the amount of phage present. The phage appears to affect the supersaturation driving force for crystallization. The phage adsorption isotherm to TMX was well-fitted by the Satake-Yang model, which suggests a cooperative binding between neighboring phages as well as a binding of phage with the TMX crystal surface. This study shows the potential of phage additives to control the morphology and morphological uniformity of organic crystals.

  12. Capstan Friction Model for DNA Ejection from Bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophages infect cells by attaching to the outer membrane and injecting their DNA into the cell. The phage DNA is then transcribed by the cell’s transcription machinery. A number of physical mechanisms by which DNA can be translocated from the phage capsid into the cell have been identified. A fast ejection driven by the elastic and electrostatic potential energy of the compacted DNA within the viral capsid appears to be used by most phages, at least to initiate infection. In recent in vitro experiments, the speed of DNA translocation from a λ phage capsid has been measured as a function of ejected length over the entire duration of the event. Here, a mechanical model is proposed that is able to explain the observed dependence of exit velocity on ejected length, and that is also consistent with the accepted picture of the geometric arrangement of DNA within the viral capsid.

  13. Order reduction for a model of marine bacteriophage evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliarini, Silvia; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    A typical mechanistic model of viral evolution necessary includes several time scales which can differ by orders of magnitude. Such a diversity of time scales makes analysis of these models difficult. Reducing the order of a model is highly desirable when handling such a model. A typical approach applied to such slow-fast (or singularly perturbed) systems is the time scales separation technique. Constructing the so-called quasi-steady-state approximation is the usual first step in applying the technique. While this technique is commonly applied, in some cases its straightforward application can lead to unsatisfactory results. In this paper we construct the quasi-steady-state approximation for a model of evolution of marine bacteriophages based on the Beretta-Kuang model. We show that for this particular model the quasi-steady-state approximation is able to produce only qualitative but not quantitative fit.

  14. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  15. Analysis of Early Promoters of the Bacillus Bacteriophage GA-1

    PubMed Central

    Horcajadas, José A.; Meijer, Wilfried J. J.; Rojo, Fernando; Salas, Margarita

    2001-01-01

    Bacteriophage GA-1, which infects Bacillus sp. strain G1R, is evolutionarily related to phage φ29, which infects Bacillus subtilis. We report the characterization of several GA-1 promoters located at either end of its linear genome. Some of them are unique for GA-1 and drive the expression of open reading frames that have no counterparts in the genome of φ29 or related phages. These unique promoters are active at early infection times and are repressed at late times. In vitro transcription reactions revealed that the purified GA-1-encoded protein p6 represses the activity of these promoters, although the amount of p6 required to repress transcription was different for each promoter. The level of protein p6 produced in vivo increases rapidly during the first stage of the infection cycle. The protein p6 concentration may serve to modulate the expression of these early promoters as infection proceeds. PMID:11698389

  16. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  18. Bacteriophage T4 deoxynucleotide kinase: gene cloning and enzyme purification.

    PubMed Central

    Brush, G S; Bhatnagar, S K; Bessman, M J

    1990-01-01

    Gene 1 of bacteriophage T4 has been cloned into a lambda pL expression vector, resulting in the overproduction of deoxynucleotide kinase. A procedure that includes affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue F3GA-agarose has been used to purify milligram quantities of enzymes from a 2-liter culture. The enzyme has been partially characterized in vitro and in vivo, and it appears to be identical to the deoxynucleotide kinase isolated from T4-infected Escherichia coli. These results prove the earlier contention that the phosphorylation of three dissimilar deoxynucleotides (5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidylate, dTMP, and dGMP), to the exclusion of most others, is catalyzed by a single protein. Images PMID:2160930

  19. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  20. Natural solution to antibiotic resistance: bacteriophages 'The Living Drugs'.

    PubMed

    Jassim, Sabah A A; Limoges, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics have been a panacea in animal husbandry as well as in human therapy for decades. The huge amount of antibiotics used to induce the growth and protect the health of farm animals has lead to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to the drug's effects. Today, many researchers are working with bacteriophages (phages) as an alternative to antibiotics in the control of pathogens for human therapy as well as prevention, biocontrol, and therapy in animal agriculture. Phage therapy and biocontrol have yet to fulfill their promise or potential, largely due to several key obstacles to their performance. Several suggestions are shared in order to point a direction for overcoming common obstacles in applied phage technology. The key to successful use of phages in modern scientific, farm, food processing and clinical applications is to understand the common obstacles as well as best practices and to develop answers that work in harmony with nature.

  1. Characterization of a thermophilic bacteriophage of Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Marks, Timothy J; Hamilton, Paul T

    2014-10-01

    GBK2 is a bacteriophage, isolated from a backyard compost pile, that infects the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus. GBK2 has a circularly permuted genome of 39,078 bp with a G+C content of 43 %. Annotation of the genome reveals 62 putative open reading frames (ORFs), 25 of which (40.3 %) show homology to known proteins and 37 of which (59.7 %) are proteins with unknown functions. Twelve of the identified ORFs had the greatest homology to genes from the phage SPP1, a phage that infects the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. The overall genomic arrangement of GBK2 is similar to that of SPP1, with the majority of GBK2 SPP1-like genes coding for proteins involved in DNA replication and metabolism.

  2. Application of bacteriophages for detection of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of food products presents a challenge for the food industry and poses a high risk for the consumer. Despite increasing awareness and improved hygiene measures, foodborne pathogens remain a threat for public health, and novel methods for detection of these organisms are needed. Bacteriophages represent ideal tools for diagnostic assays because of their high target cell specificity, inherent signal-amplifying properties, easy and inexpensive production, and robustness. Every stage of the phage lytic multiplication cycle, from the initial recognition of the host cell to the final lysis event, may be harnessed in several ways for the purpose of bacterial detection. Besides intact phage particles, phage-derived affinity molecules such as cell wall binding domains and receptor binding proteins can serve for this purpose. This review provides an overview of existing phage-based technologies for detection of foodborne pathogens, and highlights the most recent developments in this field, with particular emphasis on phage-based biosensors.

  3. Bacteriophage SPO1 development: defects in a gene 31 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Sarachu, A N; Añón, M C; Grau, O

    1978-01-01

    SPO1 temperature-sensitive mutant ts14-1, located in cistron 31, has a DD (DNA synthesis-delayed) phenotype at 37 degrees C and produces progeny in a stretched program. At 44 degrees C it behaves as a DO (DNA synthesis-defective) mutant and shuts off the viral RNA synthesis about 10 min after infection. The thermal sensitivity of this mutant is due to the inactivity of gp-31 (the product of gene 31) at 44 degrees C. However, gp-31 is synthesized at that temperature and partly recovers its activity at 37 degrees C. Only 5 min at the permissive temperature is enough to trigger the continuation of the phage program and to produce progeny. The partial defect at 37 degrees C and the expansion of the middle program together with the pleiotropic defects at the nonpermissive temperature could be suitable for the study of the controls involved in bacteriophage development. PMID:100606

  4. Enzymatic characterization of a lysin encoded by bacteriophage EL.

    PubMed

    Tafoya, Diana A; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Herrera, Nadia; Molugu, Sudheer K; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriophage EL is a virus that specifically attacks the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This phage carries a large genome that encodes for its own chaperonin which presumably facilitates the proper folding of phage proteins independently of the host chaperonin system. EL also encodes a lysin enzyme, a critical component of the lytic cycle that is responsible for digesting the peptidoglycan layer of the host cell wall. Previously, this lysin was believed to be a substrate of the chaperonin encoded by phage EL. In order to characterize the activity of the EL lysin, and to determine whether lysin activity is contingent on chaperonin-mediated folding, a series of peptidoglycan hydrolysis activity assays were performed. Results indicate that the EL-encoded lysin has similar enzymatic activity to that of the Gallus gallus lysozyme and that the EL lysin folds into a functional enzyme in the absence of phage chaperonin and should not be considered a substrate.

  5. The Distribution of Crossovers along Unreplicated Lambda Bacteriophage Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Franklin W.; McMilin, Kenneth D.; Stahl, Mary M.; Crasemann, Jean M.; Lam, Stephen

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of crossovers along unreplicated chromosomes of bacteriophage lambda has been examined by determining the density distributions and genotypes of particles in the progenies of crosses of density-labeled by ordinary parents in the presence of genetic blocks to replication. The Red and Rec systems combined produce crossovers primarily near the ends (especially the right end) of the chromosome. Removal of the generalized lambda recombination functions by red and gam mutations results in loss of these terminal crossovers; coupled with this loss is a disappearance of the differential dependence of recombination frequencies in terminal and central intervals on DNA synthesis. Removal of the bacterial system by a recA mutation results in severe depression of crossing over among unreplicated phage, with the few recombinants produced by the lambda system occurring near the right end. PMID:4416166

  6. Heat Induced Capsid Disassembly and DNA Release of Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangyun

    2012-01-01

    Successive structural changes of bacteriophage upon heating were characterized with quantitative experimental methods. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, differential scanning calorimetry measurements first established that the protein capsid of phage melts at 87°C and its genomic DNA melts at 91°C. Interestingly, prior to the capsid melting, DNA was found to escape out of the capsid and subject to DNase digestion above 68°C, as concluded from light scattering, UV absorption, and electron microscopy studies. Further investigations indicated distinct temperature-dependent behaviors of the three phage proteins. Around 68°C, disruption of the tail first occurs and leads to the escape of DNA; above the capsid melting temperature of 87°C, the auxiliary protein gpD of the phage head remains soluble in solution and resists centrifugal sedimentation, whereas the major capsid protein gpE is easily precipitated and likely exists as aggregates. PMID:22808062

  7. Filamentous bacteriophage: biology, phage display and nanotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Rakonjac, Jasna; Bennett, Nicholas J; Spagnuolo, Julian; Gagic, Dragana; Russel, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage, long and thin filaments that are secreted from the host cells without killing them, have been an antithesis to the standard view of head-and-tail bacterial killing machines. Episomally replicating filamentous phage Ff of Escherichia coli provide the majority of information about the principles and mechanisms of filamentous phage infection, episomal replication and assembly. Chromosomally- integrated "temperate" filamentous phage have complex replication and integration, which are currently under active investigation. The latter are directly or indirectly implicated in diseases caused by bacterial pathogens Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria meningitidis. In the first half of the review, both the Ff and temperate phage are described and compared. A large section of the review is devoted to an overview of phage display technology and its applications in nanotechnology.

  8. Application of bacteriophages for detection of foodborne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of food products presents a challenge for the food industry and poses a high risk for the consumer. Despite increasing awareness and improved hygiene measures, foodborne pathogens remain a threat for public health, and novel methods for detection of these organisms are needed. Bacteriophages represent ideal tools for diagnostic assays because of their high target cell specificity, inherent signal-amplifying properties, easy and inexpensive production, and robustness. Every stage of the phage lytic multiplication cycle, from the initial recognition of the host cell to the final lysis event, may be harnessed in several ways for the purpose of bacterial detection. Besides intact phage particles, phage-derived affinity molecules such as cell wall binding domains and receptor binding proteins can serve for this purpose. This review provides an overview of existing phage-based technologies for detection of foodborne pathogens, and highlights the most recent developments in this field, with particular emphasis on phage-based biosensors. PMID:24533229

  9. Bacteriophages--potential for application in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Withey, S; Cartmell, E; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T

    2005-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and lyse bacteria. Interest in the ability of phages to control bacterial populations has extended from medical applications into the fields of agriculture, aquaculture and the food industry. Here, the potential application of phage techniques in wastewater treatment systems to improve effluent and sludge emissions into the environment is discussed. Phage-mediated bacterial mortality has the potential to influence treatment performance by controlling the abundance of key functional groups. Phage treatments have the potential to control environmental wastewater process problems such as: foaming in activated sludge plants; sludge dewaterability and digestibility; pathogenic bacteria; and to reduce competition between nuisance bacteria and functionally important microbial populations. Successful application of phage therapy to wastewater treatment does though require a fuller understanding of wastewater microbial community dynamics and interactions. Strategies to counter host specificity and host cell resistance must also be developed, as should safety considerations regarding pathogen emergence through transduction.

  10. Bacteriophages and genetic mobilization in sewage and faecally polluted environments

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacteriophages are one of the most abundant entities on the planet and are present in high concentrations within humans and animals, mostly in the gut. Phages that infect intestinal bacteria are released by defecation and remain free in extra‐intestinal environments, where they usually persist for longer than their bacterial hosts. Recent studies indicate that a large amount of the genetic information in bacterial genomes and in natural environments is of phage origin. In addition, metagenomic analysis reveals that a substantial number of bacterial genes are present in viral DNA in different environments. These facts support the belief that phages can play a significant role in horizontal gene transfer between bacteria. Bacteriophages are known to transfer genes by generalized and specialized transduction and indeed there are some examples of phages found in the environment carrying and transducing genes of bacterial origin. A successful transduction in the environment requires certain conditions, e.g. phage and bacterial numbers need to exceed certain threshold concentrations, the bacteria need to exist in an infection‐competent physiological state, and lastly, the physical conditions in the environment (pH, temperature, etc. of the supporting matrix) have to be suitable for phage infection. All three factors are reviewed here, and the available information suggests: (i) that the number of intestinal bacteria and phages in faecally contaminated environments guarantees bacteria–phage encounters, (ii) that transduction to intestinal bacteria in the environment is probable, and (iii) that transduction is more frequent than previously thought. Therefore, we suggest that phage‐mediated horizontal transfer between intestinal bacteria, or between intestinal and autochthonous bacteria in extra‐intestinal environments, might take place and that its relevance for the emergence of new bacterial strains and potential pathogens should not be ignored. PMID

  11. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  12. Bacteriophages and genetic mobilization in sewage and faecally polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan

    2011-11-01

    Bacteriophages are one of the most abundant entities on the planet and are present in high concentrations within humans and animals, mostly in the gut. Phages that infect intestinal bacteria are released by defecation and remain free in extra-intestinal environments, where they usually persist for longer than their bacterial hosts. Recent studies indicate that a large amount of the genetic information in bacterial genomes and in natural environments is of phage origin. In addition, metagenomic analysis reveals that a substantial number of bacterial genes are present in viral DNA in different environments. These facts support the belief that phages can play a significant role in horizontal gene transfer between bacteria. Bacteriophages are known to transfer genes by generalized and specialized transduction and indeed there are some examples of phages found in the environment carrying and transducing genes of bacterial origin. A successful transduction in the environment requires certain conditions, e.g. phage and bacterial numbers need to exceed certain threshold concentrations, the bacteria need to exist in an infection-competent physiological state, and lastly, the physical conditions in the environment (pH, temperature, etc. of the supporting matrix) have to be suitable for phage infection. All three factors are reviewed here, and the available information suggests: (i) that the number of intestinal bacteria and phages in faecally contaminated environments guarantees bacteria-phage encounters, (ii) that transduction to intestinal bacteria in the environment is probable, and (iii) that transduction is more frequent than previously thought. Therefore, we suggest that phage-mediated horizontal transfer between intestinal bacteria, or between intestinal and autochthonous bacteria in extra-intestinal environments, might take place and that its relevance for the emergence of new bacterial strains and potential pathogens should not be ignored.

  13. Bacteriophage significantly reduces Listeria monocytogenes on raw salmon fillet tissue.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated the antilisterial activity of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) bacteriophage LISTEX P100 (phage P100) on the surface of raw salmon fillet tissue against Listeria monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b. In a broth model system, phage P100 completely inhibited L. monocytogenes growth at 4 degrees Celsius for 12 days, at 10 degrees Celsius for 8 days, and at 30 degrees Celsius for 4 days, at all three phage concentrations of 10(4), 10(6), and 10(8) PFU/ml. On raw salmon fillet tissue, a higher phage concentration of 10(8) PFU/g was required to yield 1.8-, 2.5-, and 3.5-log CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes from its initial loads of 2, 3, and 4.5 log CFU/g at 4 or 22 degrees Celsius. Over the 10 days of storage at 4 degrees Celsius, L. monocytogenes growth was inhibited by phage P100 on the raw salmon fillet tissue to as low as 0.3 log CFU/g versus normal growth of 2.6 log CFU/g in the absence of phage. Phage P100 remained stable on the raw salmon fillet tissue over a 10-day storage period, with only a marginal loss of 0.6 log PFU/g from an initial phage treatment of 8 log PFU/g. These findings illustrate that the GRAS bacteriophage LISTEX P100 is listericidal on raw salmon fillets and is useful in quantitatively reducing L. monocytogenes.

  14. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products.

    PubMed

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 10(9) phages mL(-1). When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage

  15. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    PubMed Central

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J. Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages mL-1. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored – rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage accumulations

  16. Occurrence and numbers of bacteriophages and bacterial indicators in faeces of yellow-legged seagull (Larus cachinnans).

    PubMed

    Muniesa, M; Jofre, J; Lucena, F

    1999-12-01

    Faeces from feral populations of yellow-legged seagulls from the northern coastal area of Catalonia (North-eastern Spain) contained variable amounts of faecal coliforms, faecal streptococci, somatic coliphages, F-specific bacteriophages and Bacteroides fragilis bacteriophages. Occurrence and numbers of bacterial indicators and bacteriophages in the faeces of yellow-legged seagulls are in the ranges described in the faeces of different animals. The ratios between numbers of bacterial indicators and numbers of bacteriophages are much higher in faeces of seagulls than in treated or raw sewage contributed by out-falls of the same area.

  17. Infrared Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The heating units shown in the accompanying photos are Panelbloc infrared heaters, energy savers which burn little fuel in relation to their effective heat output. Produced by Bettcher Manufacturing Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, Panelblocs are applicable to industrial or other facilities which have ceilings more than 12 feet high, such as those pictured: at left the Bare Hills Tennis Club, Baltimore, Maryland and at right, CVA Lincoln- Mercury, Gaithersburg, Maryland. The heaters are mounted high above the floor and they radiate infrared energy downward. Panelblocs do not waste energy by warming the surrounding air. Instead, they beam invisible heat rays directly to objects which absorb the radiation- people, floors, machinery and other plant equipment. All these objects in turn re-radiate the energy to the air. A key element in the Panelbloc design is a coating applied to the aluminized steel outer surface of the heater. This coating must be corrosion resistant at high temperatures and it must have high "emissivity"-the ability of a surface to emit radiant energy. The Bettcher company formerly used a porcelain coating, but it caused a production problem. Bettcher did not have the capability to apply the material in its own plant, so the heaters had to be shipped out of state for porcelainizing, which entailed extra cost. Bettcher sought a coating which could meet the specifications yet be applied in its own facilities. The company asked The Knowledge Availability Systems Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a NASA Industrial Applications Center (IAC), for a search of NASA's files

  18. The Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Nasal Colonization in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C; Carney, Jennifer; van Nes, Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a potential approach for the control of MRSA colonization to minimize the—often occupational—exposure of humans. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of bacteriophage treatment on porcine nasal colonization with MRSA in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. The effectiveness of a bacteriophage combination of phage K*710 and P68 was assessed in vitro by incubating them with MRSA V0608892/1 (ST398) measuring the OD600 hourly. To study the in vivo effect, bacteriophages were administered in a gel developed for human application, which contain 109 plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL (K and P68 in a 19.25:1 ratio) for 5 days to piglets (N = 8) that were experimentally colonized with the MRSA strain. Eight piglets experimentally colonized were used as a negative control. The MRSA strain was also used to colonize porcine nasal mucosa explants and bacteriophages were applied to assess the ex vivo efficacy of treatment. Bacteriophages were effective in vitro. In vivo, sixteen piglets were colonized with MRSA but the number of CFU recovered after the application of the bacteriophages in 8 piglets was not reduced compared to the control animals (approx. 105 CFU/swab). In the ex vivo model, 108 CFU were used to establish colonization with MRSA; a reduction of colonization was not observed after application of bacteriophages. However, application of mupirocin both in vivo and ex vivo resulted in a near eradication of MRSA. In conclusion: i) The MRSA strain was killed in the presence of the bacteriophages phage K*710 and P68 in vitro. ii) Bacteriophages did not reduce porcine nasal colonization in vivo or ex vivo. Physiological in vivo and ex vivo conditions may explain these observations. Efficacy

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. Material and Methods The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. Conclusions The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed

  20. The Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Nasal Colonization in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Koen M; Tulinski, Pawel; Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C; Carney, Jennifer; van Nes, Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a potential approach for the control of MRSA colonization to minimize the-often occupational-exposure of humans. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of bacteriophage treatment on porcine nasal colonization with MRSA in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. The effectiveness of a bacteriophage combination of phage K*710 and P68 was assessed in vitro by incubating them with MRSA V0608892/1 (ST398) measuring the OD600 hourly. To study the in vivo effect, bacteriophages were administered in a gel developed for human application, which contain 109 plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL (K and P68 in a 19.25:1 ratio) for 5 days to piglets (N = 8) that were experimentally colonized with the MRSA strain. Eight piglets experimentally colonized were used as a negative control. The MRSA strain was also used to colonize porcine nasal mucosa explants and bacteriophages were applied to assess the ex vivo efficacy of treatment. Bacteriophages were effective in vitro. In vivo, sixteen piglets were colonized with MRSA but the number of CFU recovered after the application of the bacteriophages in 8 piglets was not reduced compared to the control animals (approx. 105 CFU/swab). In the ex vivo model, 108 CFU were used to establish colonization with MRSA; a reduction of colonization was not observed after application of bacteriophages. However, application of mupirocin both in vivo and ex vivo resulted in a near eradication of MRSA. i) The MRSA strain was killed in the presence of the bacteriophages phage K*710 and P68 in vitro. ii) Bacteriophages did not reduce porcine nasal colonization in vivo or ex vivo. Physiological in vivo and ex vivo conditions may explain these observations. Efficacy in the ex vivo

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    PubMed

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing bacteriophages

  2. Genomic and proteomic characterization of SuMu, a Mu-like bacteriophage infecting Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis, the causative agent of Glässer’s disease, is prevalent in swine herds and clinical signs associated with this disease are meningitis, polyserositis, polyarthritis, and bacterial pneumonia. Six to eight week old pigs in segregated early weaning herds are particularly susceptible to the disease. Insufficient colostral antibody at weaning or the mixing of pigs with heterologous virulent H. parasuis strains from other farm sources in the nursery or grower-finisher stage are considered to be factors for the outbreak of Glässer’s disease. Previously, a Mu-like bacteriophage portal gene was detected in a virulent swine isolate of H. parasuis by nested polymerase chain reaction. Mu-like bacteriophages are related phyologenetically to enterobacteriophage Mu and are thought to carry virulence genes or to induce host expression of virulence genes. This study characterizes the Mu-like bacteriophage, named SuMu, isolated from a virulent H. parasuis isolate. Results Characterization was done by genomic comparison to enterobacteriophage Mu and proteomic identification of various homologs by mass spectrometry. This is the first report of isolation and characterization of this bacteriophage from the Myoviridae family, a double-stranded DNA bacteriophage with a contractile tail, from a virulent field isolate of H. parasuis. The genome size of bacteriophage SuMu was 37,151 bp. DNA sequencing revealed fifty five open reading frames, including twenty five homologs to Mu-like bacteriophage proteins: Nlp, phage transposase-C-terminal, COG2842, Gam-like protein, gp16, Mor, peptidoglycan recognition protein, gp29, gp30, gpG, gp32, gp34, gp36, gp37, gpL, phage tail tube protein, DNA circulation protein, gpP, gp45, gp46, gp47, COG3778, tail fiber protein gp37-C terminal, tail fiber assembly protein, and Com. The last open reading frame was homologous to IS1414. The G + C content of bacteriophage SuMu was 41.87% while its H. parasuis host genome

  3. Genomic and proteomic characterization of SuMu, a Mu-like bacteriophage infecting Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Zehr, Emilie S; Tabatabai, Louisa B; Bayles, Darrell O

    2012-07-23

    Haemophilus parasuis, the causative agent of Glässer's disease, is prevalent in swine herds and clinical signs associated with this disease are meningitis, polyserositis, polyarthritis, and bacterial pneumonia. Six to eight week old pigs in segregated early weaning herds are particularly susceptible to the disease. Insufficient colostral antibody at weaning or the mixing of pigs with heterologous virulent H. parasuis strains from other farm sources in the nursery or grower-finisher stage are considered to be factors for the outbreak of Glässer's disease. Previously, a Mu-like bacteriophage portal gene was detected in a virulent swine isolate of H. parasuis by nested polymerase chain reaction. Mu-like bacteriophages are related phyologenetically to enterobacteriophage Mu and are thought to carry virulence genes or to induce host expression of virulence genes. This study characterizes the Mu-like bacteriophage, named SuMu, isolated from a virulent H. parasuis isolate. Characterization was done by genomic comparison to enterobacteriophage Mu and proteomic identification of various homologs by mass spectrometry. This is the first report of isolation and characterization of this bacteriophage from the Myoviridae family, a double-stranded DNA bacteriophage with a contractile tail, from a virulent field isolate of H. parasuis. The genome size of bacteriophage SuMu was 37,151 bp. DNA sequencing revealed fifty five open reading frames, including twenty five homologs to Mu-like bacteriophage proteins: Nlp, phage transposase-C-terminal, COG2842, Gam-like protein, gp16, Mor, peptidoglycan recognition protein, gp29, gp30, gpG, gp32, gp34, gp36, gp37, gpL, phage tail tube protein, DNA circulation protein, gpP, gp45, gp46, gp47, COG3778, tail fiber protein gp37-C terminal, tail fiber assembly protein, and Com. The last open reading frame was homologous to IS1414. The G + C content of bacteriophage SuMu was 41.87% while its H. parasuis host genome's G + C content was

  4. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  5. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1982-10-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  6. Removal of MS2, Qβ and GA bacteriophages during drinking water treatment at pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Boudaud, Nicolas; Machinal, Claire; David, Fabienne; Fréval-Le Bourdonnec, Armelle; Jossent, Jérôme; Bakanga, Fanny; Arnal, Charlotte; Jaffrezic, Marie Pierre; Oberti, Sandrine; Gantzer, Christophe

    2012-05-15

    The removal of MS2, Qβ and GA, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, potential surrogates for pathogenic waterborne viruses, was investigated during a conventional drinking water treatment at pilot scale by using river water, artificially and independently spiked with these bacteriophages. The objective of this work is to develop a standard system for assessing the effectiveness of drinking water plants with respect to the removal of MS2, Qβ and GA bacteriophages by a conventional pre-treatment process (coagulation-flocculation-settling-sand filtration) followed or not by an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane (complete treatment process). The specific performances of three UF membranes alone were assessed by using (i) pre-treated water and (ii) 0.1 mM sterile phosphate buffer solution (PBS), spiked with bacteriophages. These UF membranes tested in this work were designed for drinking water treatment market and were also selected for research purpose. The hypothesis serving as base for this study was that the interfacial properties for these three bacteriophages, in terms of electrostatic charge and the degree of hydrophobicity, could induce variations in the removal performances achieved by drinking water treatments. The comparison of the results showed a similar behaviour for both MS2 and Qβ surrogates whereas it was particularly atypical for the GA surrogate. The infectious character of MS2 and Qβ bacteriophages was mostly removed after clarification followed by sand filtration processes (more than a 4.8-log reduction) while genomic copies were removed at more than a 4.0-log after the complete treatment process. On the contrary, GA bacteriophage was only slightly removed by clarification followed by sand filtration, with less than 1.7-log and 1.2-log reduction, respectively. After the complete treatment process achieved, GA bacteriophage was removed with less than 2.2-log and 1.6-log reduction, respectively. The effectiveness of the three UF membranes tested in terms of

  7. Infrared heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-11-01

    The transfer of energy by radiation whose limits lie between 1 mm and 400 mm is indicated. The radiation used lies practically completely in the infrared region. Its use therefore depends on the thermal radiation laws (black body or integral receiver laws). These laws were derived mathematically in accordance with the properties of an ideal body, the so-called ""integral receiver'' (formerly black body). According to definition this integral receiver has the property of absorbing completely all incident electromagnetic radiation. From these the following laws were deduced: (1) All bodies with a temperature above absolute zero emit a radiation. (2) The energy emitted by the integral receiver is proportional to the 4th power of the absolute temperature. (3) The emission theoretically comprizes the whole radiation. (4) The radiation comprizing the emission spectrum does not transport the same amount of energy at every wavelength.

  8. Isolation, characterization, and application of bacteriophages for Salmonella spp. biocontrol in pigs.

    PubMed

    Albino, Luiz A A; Rostagno, Marcos H; Húngaro, Humberto M; Mendonça, Regina C S

    2014-08-01

    Foodborne illness due to Salmonella-contaminated pork products is an important public health problem, causing significant economic losses worldwide. The use of bacteriophages is a potential intervention tool that has attracted interest for the control of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of Salmonella in commercial pig farms and to isolate specific autochthonous bacteriophages against Salmonella Typhimurium, to characterize them and to evaluate their lytic capacity against Salmonella Typhimurium in vivo and in vitro. Salmonella was isolated on 50% (4/8) of the farms, with serotype Typhimurium being the most prevalent, detected in 48.2% of samples (13/27). The isolated Salmonella Typhimurium bacteriophages belong to the Podoviridae family, were active against serotypes Abony, Enteritidis, Typhi, and Typhimurium, but not against serotypes Arizonae, Cholerasuis, Gallinarum, and Pullorum. In in vitro tests, bacteriophage at 10(7) PFU/mL and 10(9) PFU/mL significantly reduced (p<0.05) Salmonella Typhimurium counts in 1.6 and 2.5 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, respectively, after 24 h. Before the in vivo treatment with bacteriophages, Salmonella was identified in 93.3% (28/30) of the fecal samples from the pigs inoculated with 10(6) CFU/mL, and only in 56.6% (17/30) after the treatment consisting of oral administration of the pool of the bacteriophages after the fasting period, simulating a common preslaughter practice. These results indicate that the pool of bacteriophages administered was capable of reducing the colonization of Salmonella in pigs.

  9. Attenuation and colloidal mobilization of bacteriophages in natural sediments under anoxic as compared to oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Klitzke, Sondra; Schroeder, Jendrik; Selinka, Hans-Christoph; Szewzyk, Regine; Chorus, Ingrid

    2015-06-15

    Redox conditions are known to affect the fate of viruses in porous media. Several studies report the relevance of colloid-facilitated virus transport in the subsurface, but detailed studies on the effect of anoxic conditions on virus retention in natural sediments are still missing. Therefore, we investigated the fate of viruses in natural flood plain sediments with different sesquioxide contents under anoxic conditions by considering sorption to the solid phase, sorption to mobilized colloids, and inactivation in the aqueous phase. Batch experiments were conducted under oxic and anoxic conditions at pH values between 5.1 and 7.6, using bacteriophages MS2 and PhiX174 as model viruses. In addition to free and colloid-associated bacteriophages, dissolved and colloidal concentrations of Fe, Al and organic C as well as dissolved Ca were determined. Results showed that regardless of redox conditions, bacteriophages did not adsorb to mobilized colloids, even under favourable charge conditions. Under anoxic conditions, attenuation of bacteriophages was dominated by sorption over inactivation, with MS2 showing a higher degree of sorption than PhiX174. Inactivation in water was low under anoxic conditions for both bacteriophages with about one log10 decrease in concentration during 16 h. Increased Fe/Al concentrations and a low organic carbon content of the sediment led to enhanced bacteriophage removal under anoxic conditions. However, even in the presence of sufficient Fe/A-(hydr)oxides on the solid phase, bacteriophage sorption was low. We presume that organic matter may limit the potential retention of sesquioxides in anoxic sediments and should thus be considered for the risk assessment of virus breakthrough in the subsurface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    PubMed

    Pallavali, Roja Rani; Degati, Vijaya Lakshmi; Lomada, Dakshayani; Reddy, Madhava C; Durbaka, Vijaya Raghava Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS), Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100%) were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence, our results suggest

  11. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Pallavali, Roja Rani; Degati, Vijaya Lakshmi; Lomada, Dakshayani; Reddy, Madhava C.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS), Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100%) were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence, our results suggest

  12. Bacteriophage therapy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-infected wounds: a new approach to chronic wound care.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew R; Nguyen, Khang T; Agnew, Sonya P; Dumanian, Zari; Galiano, Robert D; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A; Hong, Seok J

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms, which are critical mediators of chronic wounds, remain difficult to treat with traditional methods. Bacteriophage therapy against biofilm has not been rigorously studied in vivo. The authors evaluate the efficacy of a species-specific bacteriophage against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-infected wounds using a validated, quantitative, rabbit ear model. Six-millimeter dermal punch wounds in New Zealand rabbit ears were inoculated with wild-type or mutant, biofilm-deficient S. aureus. In vivo biofilm was established and maintained using procedures from our previously published wound biofilm model. Wounds were left untreated, or treated every other day with topical S. aureus-specific bacteriophage, sharp débridement, or both. Histologic wound healing and viable bacterial count measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were performed following harvest. Wild-type S. aureus biofilm wounds demonstrated no differences in healing or viable bacteria following bacteriophage application or sharp débridement alone. However, the combination of both treatments significantly improved all measured wound healing parameters (p < 0.05) and reduced bacteria counts (p = 0.03), which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Bacteriophage treatment of biofilm-deficient S. aureus mutant wounds alone also resulted in similar trends for both endpoints (p < 0.05). Bacteriophages can be an effective topical therapy against S. aureus biofilm-infected wounds in the setting of a deficient (mutant) or disrupted (débridement) biofilm structure. Combination treatment aimed at disturbing the extracellular biofilm matrix, allowing for increased penetration of species-specific bacteriophages, represents a new and potentially effective approach to chronic wound care. These results establish principles for biofilm therapy that may be applied to several different clinical and surgical problems.

  13. Significance of the Bacteriophage Treatment Schedule in Reducing Salmonella Colonization of Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Bardina, Carlota; Spricigo, Denis A.; Cortés, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella remains the major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide, with chickens known to be the main reservoir for this zoonotic pathogen. Among the many approaches to reducing Salmonella colonization of broilers, bacteriophage offers several advantages. In this study, three bacteriophages (UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) obtained from our collection that exhibited a broad host range against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were characterized with respect to morphology, genome size, and restriction patterns. A cocktail composed of the three bacteriophages was more effective in promoting the lysis of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium cultures than any of the three bacteriophages alone. In addition, the cocktail was able to lyse the Salmonella enterica serovars Virchow, Hadar, and Infantis. The effectiveness of the bacteriophage cocktail in reducing the concentration of S. Typhimurium was tested in two animal models using different treatment schedules. In the mouse model, 50% survival was obtained when the cocktail was administered simultaneously with bacterial infection and again at 6, 24, and 30 h postinfection. Likewise, in the White Leghorn chicken specific-pathogen-free (SPF) model, the best results, defined as a reduction of Salmonella concentration in the chicken cecum, were obtained when the bacteriophage cocktail was administered 1 day before or just after bacterial infection and then again on different days postinfection. Our results show that frequent treatment of the chickens with bacteriophage, and especially prior to colonization of the intestinal tract by Salmonella, is required to achieve effective bacterial reduction over time. PMID:22773654

  14. Stability and activity of an Enterobacter aerogenes-specific bacteriophage under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Verthé, K; Possemiers, S; Boon, N; Vaneechoutte, M; Verstraete, W

    2004-09-01

    A bacteriophage, designated UZ1 and showing lytic activity against a clinically important strain (BE1) of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hospital sewage. The stability and lytic activity against this strain under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions was evaluated. After addition of bacteriophage UZ1 to a liquid feed at gastric pH 2, the phage was immediately inactivated and could not be recovered. However, by use of an antacid to neutralize stomach acidity, no significant changes in phage titer were observed after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C. After supplementing pancreatic juice and further incubation for 4 h, the phage titer remained stable. The persistence of UZ1 in a mixed microbial ecosystem that was representative for the large intestine was monitored using an in vitro simulation of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem. A pulse administration of bacteriophage UZ1 at a concentration of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml to reactor 3 (which simulates the ascending colon) showed that, in the absence of the host, bacteriophage UZ1 persisted for 13 days in the simulated colon, while the theoretical washout was calculated at 16 days. To assess its lytic activity in an intestinal microbial ecosystem, a green fluorescent protein (gfp)-labeled E. aerogenes BE1 strain was constructed and gfp-specific primers were designed in order to quantify the host strain using real-time PCR. It was observed that bacteriophage UZ1 was able to replicate and showed lytic activity against E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp in an intestinal microbial ecosystem. Indeed, after 17 h a 2 log unit reduction of E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp was measured as compared with the assay without bacteriophage UZ1, while the phage titer increased by 2 log units at an initial multiplicity of infection of 0.07 PFU/colony-forming unit. This is the first report of an in vitro model to study bacteriophage activity in the complex intestinal microbial community.

  15. Use of a bacteriophage cocktail to control Salmonella in food and the food industry.

    PubMed

    Spricigo, Denis Augusto; Bardina, Carlota; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2013-07-15

    The use of lytic bacteriophages for the biocontrol of food-borne pathogens in food and in the food industry is gaining increasing acceptance. In this study, the effectiveness of a bacteriophage cocktail composed of three different lytic bacteriophages (UAB_Phi 20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) was determined in four different food matrices (pig skin, chicken breasts, fresh eggs, and packaged lettuce) experimentally contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. A significant bacterial reduction (>4 and 2 log/cm(2) for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, respectively; p≤0.005) was obtained in pig skin sprayed with the bacteriophage cocktail and then incubated at 33 °C for 6h. Significant decreases in the concentration of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis were also measured in chicken breasts dipped for 5 min in a solution containing the bacteriophage cocktail and then refrigerated at 4 °C for 7 days (2.2 and 0.9 log10 cfu/g, respectively; p≤0.0001) as well as in lettuce similarly treated for 60 min at room temperature (3.9 and 2.2 log10 cfu/g, respectively; p≤0.005). However, only a minor reduction of the bacterial concentration (0.9 log10 cfu/cm(2) of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium; p≤0.005) was achieved in fresh eggs sprayed with the bacteriophage cocktail and then incubated at 25 °C for 2 h. These results show the potential effectiveness of this bacteriophage cocktail as a biocontrol agent of Salmonella in several food matrices under conditions similar to those used in their production.

  16. Soil-based systemic delivery and phyllosphere in vivo propagation of bacteriophages: Two possible strategies for improving bacteriophage persistence for plant disease control.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Fanny B; Obradović, Aleksa; Wernsing, Mine H; Jackson, Lee E; Balogh, Botond; Hong, Jason A; Momol, M Timur; Jones, Jeffrey B; Vallad, Gary E

    2012-10-01

    Soil-based root applications and attenuated bacterial strains were evaluated as means to enhance bacteriophage persistence on plants for bacterial disease control. In addition, the systemic nature of phage applied to tomato roots was also evaluated. Several experiments were conducted applying either single phages or phage mixtures specific for Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas perforans or X. euvesicatoria to soil surrounding tomato plants and measuring the persistence and translocation of the phages over time. In general, all phages persisted in the roots of treated plants and were detected in stems and leaves; although phage level varied and persistence in stems and leaves was at a much lower level compared with persistence in roots. Bacterial wilt control was typically best if the phage or phage mixtures were applied to the soil surrounding tomatoes at the time of inoculation, less effective if applied 3 days before inoculation, and ineffective if applied 3 days after inoculation. The use of an attenuated X. perforans strain was also evaluated to improve the persistence of phage populations on tomato leaf surfaces. In greenhouse and field experiments, foliar applications of an attenuated mutant X. perforans 91-118:∆OPGH strain prior to phage applications significantly improved phage persistence on tomato foliage compared with untreated tomato foliage. Both the soil-based bacteriophage delivery and the use of attenuated bacterial strains improved bacteriophage persistence on respective root and foliar tissues, with evidence of translocation with soil-based bacteriophage applications. Both strategies could lead to improved control of bacterial pathogens on plants.

  17. Genomics of Three New Bacteriophages Useful in the Biocontrol of Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Bardina, Carlota; Colom, Joan; Spricigo, Denis A.; Otero, Jennifer; Sánchez-Osuna, Miquel; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella is the principal pathogen related to food-borne diseases throughout the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance has adversely affected human health and has encouraged the search for alternative antimicrobial agents. The advances in bacteriophage therapy highlight their use in controlling a broad spectrum of food-borne pathogens. One requirement for the use of bacteriophages as antibacterials is the characterization of their genomes. In this work, complete genome sequencing and molecular analyses were carried out for three new virulent Salmonella-specific bacteriophages (UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) able to infect a broad range of Salmonella strains. Sequence analysis of the genomes of UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 bacteriophages did not evidence the presence of known virulence-associated and antibiotic resistance genes, and potential immunoreactive food allergens. The UAB_Phi20 genome comprised 41,809 base pairs with 80 open reading frames (ORFs); 24 of them with assigned function. Genome sequence showed a high homology of UAB_Phi20 with Salmonella bacteriophage P22 and other P22likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family, including ST64T and ST104. The DNA of UAB_Phi78 contained 44,110 bp including direct terminal repeats (DTR) of 179 bp and 58 putative ORFs were predicted and 20 were assigned function. This bacteriophage was assigned to the SP6likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family based on its high similarity not only with SP6 but also with the K1-5, K1E, and K1F bacteriophages, all of which infect Escherichia coli. The UAB_Phi87 genome sequence consisted of 87,669 bp with terminal direct repeats of 608 bp; although 148 ORFs were identified, putative functions could be assigned to only 29 of them. Sequence comparisons revealed the mosaic structure of UAB_Phi87 and its high similarity with bacteriophages Felix O1 and wV8 of E. coli with respect to genetic content and functional organization. Phylogenetic analysis of large

  18. Isolation of a Novel Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Serotype b Bacteriophage Capable of Lysing Bacteria within a Biofilm▿†

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Mario; Vinés, Enrique D.; Montt, Camilo; Fernández, Jorge; Delgado, José Manuel; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Bittner, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    A bacteriophage specific for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b, able to kill the bacterium within a biofilm, was isolated. Random mutagenesis of this phage rendered a bacteriophage able to kill 99% of the bacteria within a biofilm. This is the first report of a biocontrol experiment against A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:21378052

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Bacteriophage phiJLA23 Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Amarillas, Luis; Chaidez, Cristobal; Lugo, Yadira

    2013-01-01

    The bacteriophage phiJLA23 was isolated from an animal feces sample and lytic activity was demonstrated against the Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain. We report the complete nucleotide sequence of bacteriophage phiJLA23, information which may be useful for determining whether this phage is a candidate for biocontrol or another biotechnological application. PMID:23469347

  20. Biotinylation of environmentally isolated Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) – specific bacteriophages for biosensor and biocontrol applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Like common bacteriophages, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteriophages are viruses that recognize and bind to specific bacterial host (STEC) for propagation. They co-exist with STEC hosts, which cause epidemic food and waterborne illnesses, but may act as host populations limiting ...

  1. Occurrence of bacteriophages infecting Aeromonas, Enterobacter, and Klebsiella in water and association with contamination sources in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wangkahad, Bencharong; Bosup, Suchada; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee

    2015-06-01

    The co-residence of bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts in humans, animals, and environmental sources directed the use of bacteriophages to track the origins of the pathogenic bacteria that can be found in contaminated water. The objective of this study was to enumerate bacteriophages of Aeromonas caviae (AecaKS148), Enterobacter sp. (EnspKS513), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (KlpnKS648) in water and evaluate their association with contamination sources (human vs. animals). Bacterial host strains were isolated from untreated wastewater in Bangkok, Thailand. A double-layer agar technique was used to detect bacteriophages. All three bacteriophages were detected in polluted canal samples, with likely contamination from human wastewater, whereas none was found in non-polluted river samples. AecaKS148 was found to be associated with human fecal sources, while EnspKS513 and KlpnKS648 seemed to be equally prevalent in both human and animal fecal sources. Both bacteriophages were also present in polluted canals that could receive contamination from other fecal sources or the environment. In conclusion, all three bacteriophages were successfully monitored in Bangkok, Thailand. This study provided an example of bacteriophages for potential use as source identifiers of pathogen contamination. The results from this study will assist in controlling sources of pathogen contamination, especially in developing countries.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Bacteriophage phiJLA23 Isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Amarillas, Luis; Chaidez, Cristobal; Lugo, Yadira; León-Félix, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The bacteriophage phiJLA23 was isolated from an animal feces sample and lytic activity was demonstrated against the Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain. We report the complete nucleotide sequence of bacteriophage phiJLA23, information which may be useful for determining whether this phage is a candidate for biocontrol or another biotechnological application.

  3. Method of administration affects the ability of bacteriophage to prevent colibacillosis in 1-day-old broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria. They are plentiful in nature with no known activity to human or animal cells, making them an attractive alternative to antibiotics. The objective of this research was to determine if a coarse or a fine spray of bacteriophage would prevent colibacillos...

  4. Comparison of Five Bacteriophages as Models for Viral Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  5. Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Anand, Taruna; Bera, Bidhan Ch; Vaid, Rajesh K; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, Thachamvally; Virmani, Nitin; Hussain, Mubarik; Singh, Raj K; Tripathi, Bhupendra N

    2016-12-01

    The ecosystem is continuously exposed to a wide variety of antimicrobials through waste effluents, agricultural run-offs and animal-related and anthropogenic activities, which contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The contamination of ecosystems with ARGs may create increased opportunities for their transfer to naive microbes and eventually lead to entry into the human food chain. Transduction is a significant mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in natural environments, which has traditionally been underestimated as compared to transformation. We explored the presence of ARGs in environmental bacteriophages in order to recognize their contribution in the spread of ARGs in environmental settings. Bacteriophages were isolated against environmental bacterial isolates, purified and bulk cultured. They were characterized, and detection of ARG and intI genes including blaTEM, blaOXA-2, intI1, intI2, intI3, tetA and tetW was carried out by PCR. This study revealed the presence of various genes [tetA (12.7 %), intI1 (10.9 %), intI2 (10.9 %), intI3 (9.1 %), tetW (9.1 %) and blaOXA-2 (3.6 %)] and blaTEM in a significantly higher proportion (30.9 %). blaSHV, blaOXA-1, tetO, tetB, tetG, tetM and tetS were not detected in any of the phages. Soil phages were the most versatile in terms of ARG carriage. Also, the relative abundance of tetA differed significantly vis-à-vis source. The phages from organized farms showed varied ARGs as compared to the unorganized sector, although blaTEM ARG incidences did not differ significantly. The study reflects on the role of phages in dissemination of ARGs in environmental reservoirs, which may provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant resistance mechanisms.

  6. Comparison of five bacteriophages as models for viral aerosol studies.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  7. Automated classification of tailed bacteriophages according to their neck organization.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Anne; Tavares, Paulo; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Guérois, Raphaël; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2014-11-27

    The genetic diversity observed among bacteriophages remains a major obstacle for the identification of homologs and the comparison of their functional modules. In the structural module, although several classes of homologous proteins contributing to the head and tail structure can be detected, proteins of the head-to-tail connection (or neck) are generally more divergent. Yet, molecular analyses of a few tailed phages belonging to different morphological classes suggested that only a limited number of structural solutions are used in order to produce a functional virion. To challenge this hypothesis and analyze proteins diversity at the virion neck, we developed a specific computational strategy to cope with sequence divergence in phage proteins. We searched for homologs of a set of proteins encoded in the structural module using a phage learning database. We show that using a combination of iterative profile-profile comparison and gene context analyses, we can identify a set of head, neck and tail proteins in most tailed bacteriophages of our database. Classification of phages based on neck protein sequences delineates 4 Types corresponding to known morphological subfamilies. Further analysis of the most abundant Type 1 yields 10 Clusters characterized by consistent sets of head, neck and tail proteins. We developed Virfam, a webserver that automatically identifies proteins of the phage head-neck-tail module and assign phages to the most closely related cluster of phages. This server was tested against 624 new phages from the NCBI database. 93% of the tailed and unclassified phages could be assigned to our head-neck-tail based categories, thus highlighting the large representativeness of the identified virion architectures. Types and Clusters delineate consistent subgroups of Caudovirales, which correlate with several virion properties. Our method and webserver have the capacity to automatically classify most tailed phages, detect their structural module, assign a

  8. Structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 head

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid is an elongated icosahedron, 120 nm long and 86 nm wide, and is built with three essential proteins; gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice, gp24*, which forms pentamers at eleven of the twelve vertices, and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. The past twenty years of research has greatly elevated the understanding of phage T4 head assembly and DNA packaging. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as that found in phage HK97 and several other icosahedral bacteriophages. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the E. coli chaperone GroEL and the phage coded gp23-specific chaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two non-essential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. The structure of Soc shows two capsid binding sites which, through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, reinforce the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been extensively used in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens including those from HIV, Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and FMDV. The structure of Ip1*, one of the components of the core, has been determined, which provided insights on how IPs protect T4 genome against the E. coli nucleases that degrade hydroxymethylated and glycosylated T4 DNA. Extensive mutagenesis combined with the atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17 elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. Cryo-EM structure of the T4 packaging machine showed a pentameric motor assembled with gp17 subunits on the portal vertex. Single molecule optical tweezers and fluorescence studies showed that the T4 motor packages DNA at a rate of up to 2000 bp

  9. Bacteriophage therapy to combat bacterial infections in poultry.

    PubMed

    Wernicki, Andrzej; Nowaczek, Anna; Urban-Chmiel, Renata

    2017-09-16

    Infections in poultry are an economic and health problem in Europe and worldwide. The most common infections are associated with salmonellosis, colibacillosis, campylobacteriosis, and others. The prevalence of Campylobacter-positive poultry flocks in European countries varies from 18% to 90%. In the United States, the prevalence of infected flocks is nearly 90%. A similar percentage of infection has been noted for salmonellosis (about 75-90%) and E. coli (90-95%). The occurence of Clostridium perfringens is a major problem for the poultry industry, with some estimates suggesting colonization of as many as 95% of chickens, resulting in clinical or subclinical infections. In the US, annual economic losses due to Salmonella infections run from $1.188 billion to over $11.588 billion, based on an estimated 1.92 million cases. Similar costs are observed in the case of other types of infections. In 2005 economic losses in the the poultry industry due to mortalities reached 1,000,000 USD.Infections caused by these pathogens, often through poultry products, are also a serious public health issue.The progressive increase in the number of multi-drug resistant bacteria and the complete ban on the use of antibiotics in livestock feed in the EU, as well as the partial ban in the US, have led to the growth of research on the use of bacteriophages to combat bacterial infections in humans and animals.The high success rate and safety of phage therapy in comparison with antibiotics are partly due to their specificity for selected bacteria and the ability to infect only one species, serotype or strain. This mechanism does not cause the destruction of commensal bacterial flora. Phages are currently being used with success in humans and animals in targeted therapies for slow-healing infections. They have also found application in the US in eliminating pathogens from the surface of foods of animal and plant origin. At a time of growing antibiotic resistance in bacteria and the resulting

  10. Bacteriophages as vehicles for gene delivery into mammalian cells: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-10-01

    The identification of more efficient gene delivery vehicles (GDVs) is essential to fulfill the expectations of clinical gene therapy. Bacteriophages, due to their excellent safety profile, extreme stability under a variety of harsh environmental conditions and the capability for being genetically manipulated, have drawn a flurry of interest to be applied as a newly arisen category of gene delivery platforms. The incessant evolutionary interaction of bacteriophages with human cells has turned them into a part of our body's natural ecosystem. However, these carriers represent several barriers to gene transduction of mammalian cells. The lack of evolvement of specialized machinery for targeted cellular internalization, endosomal, lysosomal and proteasomal escape, cytoplasmic entry, nuclear localization and intranuclear transcription poses major challenges to the expression of the phage-carried gene. In this review, we describe pros and cons of bacteriophages as GDVs, provide an insight into numerous barriers that bacteriophages face for entry into and subsequent trafficking inside mammalian cells and elaborate on the strategies used to bypass these barriers. Tremendous genetic flexibility of bacteriophages to undergo numerous surface modifications through phage display technology has proven to be a turning point in the uncompromising efforts to surmount the limitations of phage-mediated gene expression. The revelatory outcomes of the studies undertaken within the recent years have been promising for phage-mediated gene delivery to move from concept to reality.

  11. FRNA Bacteriophages as Viral Indicators of Faecal Contamination in Mexican Tropical Aquatic Systems.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Hernandez, Luis Jose Rene; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mazari-Hiriart, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    A particular challenge to water safety in populous intertropical regions is the lack of reliable faecal indicators to detect microbiological contamination of water, while the numerical relationships of specific viral indicators remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the numerical relationships of FRNA-bacteriophage genotypes, adenovirus 41, and human adenoviruses (HADV) in Mexican surface water systems to assess sewage contamination. We studied the presence of HADV, HADV41 and FRNA bacteriophage genotypes in water samples and quantified by qPCR and RT-qPCR. Virus and water quality indicator variances, as analyzed by principal component analysis and partial least squared regression, followed along the major percentiles of water faecal enterococci. FRNA bacteriophages adequately deciphered viral and point source water contamination. The strongest correlation for HADV was with FRNA bacteriophage type II, in water samples higher than the 50th percentiles of faecal enterococci, thus indicating urban pollution. FRNA bacteriophage genotypes I and III virus indicator performances were assisted by their associations with electrical conductivity and faecal enterococci. In combination, our methods are useful for inferring water quality degradation caused by sewage contamination. The methods used have potential for determining source contamination in water and, specifically, the presence of enteric viruses where clean and contaminated water have mixed.

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages specific to hydrogen-sulfide-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chao; Heringa, Spencer; Singh, Randhir; Kim, Jinkyung; Jiang, Xiuping

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize bacteriophages specific to hydrogen-sulfide-producing bacteria (SPB) from raw animal materials, and to develop a SPB-specific bacteriophage cocktail for rendering application. Meat, chicken offal, and feather samples collected from local supermarkets and rendering processing plants were used to isolate SPB (n = 142). Bacteriophages (n = 52) specific to SPB were isolated and purified from the above samples using 18 of those isolated SPB strains as hosts. The host ranges of bacteriophages against 5 selected SPB strains (Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii, and Hafnia alvei) were determined. Electron microscopy observation of 9 phages selected for the phage cocktail revealed that 6 phages belonged to the family of Siphoviridae and 3 belonged to the Myoviridae family. Restriction enzyme digestion analysis with endonuclease DraI detected 6 distinguished patterns among the 9 phages. Phage treatment prevented the growth of SPB for up to 10 h with multiplicity of infection ratios of 1, 10, 100, and 1000 in tryptic soy broth at 30 °C, and extended the lag phase of SPB growth for 2 h at 22 °C with multiplicities of infection of 10, 100, and 1000. These results suggest that the selected bacteriophage cocktail has a high potential for phage application to control SPB in raw animal materials destined for the rendering process.

  13. FRNA Bacteriophages as Viral Indicators of Faecal Contamination in Mexican Tropical Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Avalos, Carlos; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mazari-Hiriart, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    A particular challenge to water safety in populous intertropical regions is the lack of reliable faecal indicators to detect microbiological contamination of water, while the numerical relationships of specific viral indicators remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the numerical relationships of FRNA-bacteriophage genotypes, adenovirus 41, and human adenoviruses (HADV) in Mexican surface water systems to assess sewage contamination. We studied the presence of HADV, HADV41 and FRNA bacteriophage genotypes in water samples and quantified by qPCR and RT-qPCR. Virus and water quality indicator variances, as analyzed by principal component analysis and partial least squared regression, followed along the major percentiles of water faecal enterococci. FRNA bacteriophages adequately deciphered viral and point source water contamination. The strongest correlation for HADV was with FRNA bacteriophage type II, in water samples higher than the 50th percentiles of faecal enterococci, thus indicating urban pollution. FRNA bacteriophage genotypes I and III virus indicator performances were assisted by their associations with electrical conductivity and faecal enterococci. In combination, our methods are useful for inferring water quality degradation caused by sewage contamination. The methods used have potential for determining source contamination in water and, specifically, the presence of enteric viruses where clean and contaminated water have mixed. PMID:28114378

  14. Characterization and formulation into solid dosage forms of a novel bacteriophage lytic against Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teagan L; Petrovski, Steve; Hoyle, Dannielle; Chan, Hiu Tat; Lock, Peter; Tucci, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    To isolate and characterize bacteriophage lytic for the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella oxytoca and their formulation into a range of solid dosage forms for in-vitro testing. We report the isolation, genomic and functional characterization of a novel bacteriophage lytic for Klebsiella oxytoca, which does not infect the closely related Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteriophage was formulated into suppositories and troches and shown to be released and lyse underlying Klebsiella oxytoca bacteria in an in-vitro model. These bacteriophage formulations were stable for at least 49 days at 4°C. The successful in-vitro assay of these formulations here suggests that they could potentially be tested in-vivo to determine whether such a therapeutic approach could modulate the gut microbiome, and control Klebsiella oxytoca overgrowth, during antibiotic therapy regimes. This study reports a novel bacteriophage specific for Klebsiella oxytoca which can be formulated into solid dosage forms appropriate for potential delivery in testing as a therapy to modulate gut microbiome during antibiotic therapies.

  15. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Jaime H.; Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J.; Bilen, Marcos F.; Jesus, Monica R.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Palermo, Marina S.; Ferreira, Rita C.C.; Servat, Esteban G.; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Ferreira, Luis C.S; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter 1,2. Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS), we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases. PMID:25580222

  16. Bacteriophage immobilized graphene electrodes for impedimetric sensing of bacteria (Staphylococcus arlettae).

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K; Mehta, Jyotsana; Mohanta, Girish C; Deep, Akash

    2016-07-15

    Bacteriophages are a class of viruses that specifically infect and replicate within a bacterium. They possess inherent affinity and specificity to the particular bacterial cells. This property of bacteriophages makes them an attractive biorecognition element in the field of biosensor development. In this work, we report the use of an immobilized bacteriophage for the development of a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for Staphylococcus arlettae, bacteria from the pathogenic family of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The specific bacteriophages were covalently immobilized on the screen-printed graphene electrodes. Thus, the fabricated bacteriophage biosensor displayed quantitative response for the target bacteria (S. arlettae) for a broad detection range (2.0-2.0 × 10(6) cfu). A fast response time (2 min), low limit of detection (2 cfu), specificity, and stability over a prolonged period (3 months) are some of the important highlights of the proposed sensor. The practical utility of the developed sensor has been demonstrated by the analysis of S. arlettae in spiked water and apple juice samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Minor Flagellin of Campylobacter jejuni (FlaB) Confers Defensive Properties against Bacteriophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Lukas; Connerton, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    A screen of bacteriophages infecting a panel of Campylobacter jejuni PT14 gene knock-out mutants identified a role for the minor flagellin encoded by the flaB gene, in the defense of the host against CP8unalikevirus bacteriophage CP_F1 infection. Inactivation of the flaB gene resulted in an increase in the susceptibility of PT14 cultures to infection by CP_F1 and an increase in bacteriophage yields. Infection of wild type PT14 with CP_F1 produces turbid plaques in bacterial lawns, from which 78% of the resistant isolates recovered exhibit either attenuation or complete loss of motility. CP_F1 produces clear plaques on the flaB mutant with no regrowth in the lysis zones. Complementation of the mutant restored overgrowth and the development of resistance at the expense of motility. Further analyses revealed an increase in bacteriophage adsorption constant of nearly 2-fold and burst-size 3-fold, relative to the wild type. Motility analysis showed no major reduction in swarming motility in the flaB mutant. Thus, we propose a new role for FlaB in the defense of campylobacters against bacteriophage infection. PMID:27965643

  18. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Jaime H; Del Cogliano, Manuel E; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J; Bilen, Marcos F; Jesus, Monica R; Luiz, Wilson B; Palermo, Marina S; Ferreira, Rita C C; Servat, Esteban G; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Ferreira, Luis C S; Bentancor, Leticia V

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter (1,2). Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS), we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2 HNH endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Likui; Xu, Dandan; Huang, Yanchao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Rui, Mianwen; Wan, Ting; Zheng, Xin; Shen, Yulong; Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Kesen; Gong, Yong

    2017-01-01

    HNH endonucleases in bacteriophages play a variety of roles in the phage lifecycle as key components of phage DNA packaging machines. The deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage Geobacillus virus E2 (GVE2) encodes an HNH endonuclease (GVE2 HNHE). Here, the crystal structure of GVE2 HNHE is reported. This is the first structural study of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from a thermophilic bacteriophage. Structural comparison reveals that GVE2 HNHE possesses a typical ββα-metal fold and Zn-finger motif similar to those of HNH endonucleases from other bacteriophages, apart from containing an extra α-helix, suggesting conservation of these enzymes among bacteriophages. Biochemical analysis suggests that the alanine substitutions of the conserved residues (H93, N109 and H118) in the HNH motif of GVE2 HNHE abolished 94%, 60% and 83% of nicking activity, respectively. Compared to the wild type enzyme, the H93A mutant displayed almost the same conformation while the N108A and H118A mutants had different conformations. In addition, the wild type enzyme was more thermostable than the mutants. In the presence of Mn2+ or Zn2+, the wild type enzyme displayed distinct DNA nicking patterns. However, high Mn2+ concentrations were needed for the N109A and H118A mutants to nick DNA while Zn2+ inactivated their nicking activity. PMID:28211904

  20. Characterization and formulation into solid dosage forms of a novel bacteriophage lytic against Klebsiella oxytoca

    PubMed Central

    Petrovski, Steve; Hoyle, Dannielle; Chan, Hiu Tat; Lock, Peter; Tucci, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aim To isolate and characterize bacteriophage lytic for the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella oxytoca and their formulation into a range of solid dosage forms for in-vitro testing. Methods and results We report the isolation, genomic and functional characterization of a novel bacteriophage lytic for Klebsiella oxytoca, which does not infect the closely related Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteriophage was formulated into suppositories and troches and shown to be released and lyse underlying Klebsiella oxytoca bacteria in an in-vitro model. These bacteriophage formulations were stable for at least 49 days at 4°C. Conclusions The successful in-vitro assay of these formulations here suggests that they could potentially be tested in-vivo to determine whether such a therapeutic approach could modulate the gut microbiome, and control Klebsiella oxytoca overgrowth, during antibiotic therapy regimes. Significance and impact of the study This study reports a novel bacteriophage specific for Klebsiella oxytoca which can be formulated into solid dosage forms appropriate for potential delivery in testing as a therapy to modulate gut microbiome during antibiotic therapies. PMID:28817689

  1. Genes from the exo-xis region of λ and Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages influence lysogenization and prophage induction.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Łoś, Joanna M; Barańska, Sylwia; Łepek, Krzysztof; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Łoś, Marcin; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2013-11-01

    The exo-xis region, present in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages, contains highly conserved genes of largely unknown functions. In this report, using bacteriophage λ and Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophage ϕ24Β, we demonstrate that the presence of this region on a multicopy plasmid results in impaired lysogenization of Escherichia coli and delayed, while more effective, induction of prophages following stimulation by various agents (mitomycin C, hydrogen peroxide, UV irradiation). Spontaneous induction of λ and ϕ24Β prophages was also more efficient in bacteria carrying additional copies of the corresponding exo-xis region on plasmids. No significant effects of an increased copy number of genes located between exo and xis on both efficiency of adsorption on the host cells and lytic development inside the host cell of these bacteriophages were found. We conclude that genes from the exo-xis region of lambdoid bacteriophages participate in the regulation of lysogenization and prophage maintenance.

  2. Enhanced recovery of airborne T3 coliphage and Pasteurella pestis bacteriophage by means of a presampling humidification technique.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M T; Warren, J C

    1969-05-01

    This paper reports a series of experiments in which two methods of collecting airborne bacteriophage particles were compared. A standard aerosol sampler, the AGI-30, was evaluated for its competence in measuring the content of bacteriophage aerosols. It was used alone or with a prewetting or humidification device (humidifier bulb) to recover T(3) coliphage and Pasteurella pestis bacteriophage particles from aerosols maintained at 21 C and varied relative humidity. Collection of bacteriophage particles via the humidifier bulb altered both the initial recovery level and the apparent biological decay. Sampling airborne bacteriophage particles by the AGI-30 alone yielded data that apparently underestimated the maximal number of potentially viable particles within the aerosol, sometimes by as much as 3 logs.

  3. Characterization of bacteriophage communities and CRISPR profiles from dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Mayuri; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Abeles, Shira R; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2014-06-30

    Dental plaque is home to a diverse and complex community of bacteria, but has generally been believed to be inhabited by relatively few viruses. We sampled the saliva and dental plaque from 4 healthy human subjects to determine whether plaque was populated by viral communities, and whether there were differences in viral communities specific to subject or sample type. We found that the plaque was inhabited by a community of bacteriophage whose membership was mostly subject-specific. There was a significant proportion of viral homologues shared between plaque and salivary viromes within each subject, suggesting that some oral viruses were present in both sites. We also characterized Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) in oral streptococci, as their profiles provide clues to the viruses that oral bacteria may be able to counteract. While there were some CRISPR spacers specific to each sample type, many more were shared across sites and were highly subject specific. Many CRISPR spacers matched viruses present in plaque, suggesting that the evolution of CRISPR loci may have been specific to plaque-derived viruses. Our findings of subject specificity to both plaque-derived viruses and CRISPR profiles suggest that human viral ecology may be highly personalized.

  4. Stability of bacteriophages in burn wound care products.

    PubMed

    Merabishvili, Maia; Monserez, Riet; van Belleghem, Jonas; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages could be used along with burn wound care products to enhance antimicrobial pressure during treatment. However, some of the components of the topical antimicrobials that are traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection might affect the activity of phages. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the counteraction of therapeutic phage preparations by burn wound care products before application in patients. Five phages, representatives of two morphological families (Myoviridae and Podoviridae) and active against 3 common bacterial burn wound pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus) were tested against 13 different products commonly used in the treatment of burn wounds. The inactivation of the phages was quite variable for different phages and different products. Majority of the anti-infective products affected phage activity negatively either immediately or in the course of time, although impact was not always significant. Products with high acidity had the most adverse effect on phages. Our findings demonstrate that during combined treatment the choice of phages and wound care products must be carefully defined in advance.

  5. Structural characteristics of the Corynebacterium lilium bacteriophage CL31.

    PubMed Central

    Trautwetter, A; Blanco, C; Sicard, A M

    1987-01-01

    Bacteriophage CL31 was isolated on a Corynebacterium lilium strain. Out of 30 strains tested, only CL31 was able to form plaques on Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13287, Brevibacterium lactofermentum ATCC 21086, and Arthrobacter sp. strain SI55, but at a very low frequency. This phage belongs to group B of Bradley's classification (D. E. Bradley, Bacteriol. Rev. 31:230-314; 1967). Its head is 53 nm in diameter, and its tail is 396 nm in length. The phage capsid contains three major proteins, of 12.5, 29.0, and 37.0 kilodaltons, and five minor ones (23.9, 26.0, 27.0, 40.0, and 55.4 kilodaltons). CL31 DNA is a linear molecule of 48 kilobases with cohesive ends. Restriction mapping was performed for endonucleases BglII, EcoRI, SalI, and KpnI. The expression of CL31 genes in Escherichia coli was studied by the maxicell technique; 12 different proteins were detected. Images PMID:3033280

  6. Antimicrobial bacteriophage-derived proteins and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R; Donovan, David M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have the remarkable power to control bacterial infections. Unfortunately, widespread use, whether regarded as prudent or not, has favored the emergence and persistence of antibiotic resistant strains of human pathogenic bacteria, resulting in a global health threat. Bacteriophages (phages) are parasites that invade the cells of virtually all known bacteria. Phages reproduce by utilizing the host cell's machinery to replicate viral proteins and genomic material, generally damaging and killing the cell in the process. Thus, phage can be exploited therapeutically as bacteriolytic agents against bacteria. Furthermore, understanding of the molecular processes involved in the viral life cycle, particularly the entry and cell lysis steps, has led to the development of viral proteins as antibacterial agents. Here we review the current preclinical state of using phage-derived endolysins, virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases, polysaccharide depolymerases, and holins for the treatment of bacterial infection. The scope of this review is a focus on the viral proteins that have been assessed for protective effects against human pathogenic bacteria in animal models of infection and disease. PMID:26442196

  7. INTRACELLULAR GROWTH OF BACTERIOPHAGE STUDIED BY ROENTGEN IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Latarjet, Raymond

    1948-01-01

    Growing Escherichia coli infected with bacteriophage T2 was x-rayed during the 21 minute latent period which elapses between infection and lysis of the cells. Survival curves of the infected bacteria were determined almost from minute to minute; they disclosed the following facts which are related to the process of phage growth: During the first 7 minutes, the infective virus particle remains in the cell unique and genetically intact. The host cell synthesizes some ultraviolet-absorbing material probably devoted to building future particles. From the 7th to 9th minute the x-ray resistance of the virus particle increases, probably because of some internal change. Then, multiplication starts and is completed at about the 13th minute, when an average of 130 virulent units is present per cell, displaying an x-ray resistance twice as high as that of the extracellular virus particle. From 13 minutes to the end, the new units progressively recover the x-ray sensitivity of the extracellular virus. Nothing can be said about either the rate of multiplication between 9 and 13 minutes, or the nature of the multiplying units, except that they are more radiation-resistant (probably smaller) than the extracellular virus. The first steps of the growth process are favored by an unknown component of the lysate, different from the active particles. Several particles can grow in the same host cell. PMID:18870871

  8. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  9. DNA-DNA interaction inside bacteriophage modulated by multivalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan; Lee, Seil; Le, Tung

    2010-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, especially Mg^+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and non-monotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the least DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg^+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg^+2 concentration increases from zero, DNA net charge changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg^+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. Our theory fits experimental data well. The strength of DNA - DNA short range attraction, mediated by Mg^+2, is found to be - 0.003 kBT per nucleotide base. Results from expanded ensemble Monte-Carlo simulation of hexagonal DNA bundles are discussed and are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical results.

  10. Inhibition of DNA ejection from bacteriophage by Mg+2 counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sell; Tran, C. V.; Nguyen, T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, specifically Mg+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and nonmonotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the minimum amount of DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg+2 concentration increases from zero, the net charge of DNA changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. By fitting our theory to available experimental data, the strength of DNA-DNA short range attraction energies, mediated by Mg+2, is found to be -0.004 kBT per nucleotide base. This and other fitted parameters agree well with known values from other experiments and computer simulations. The parameters are also in agreement qualitatively with values for tri- and tetravalent counterions.

  11. Disposable amperometric biosensor based on nanostructured bacteriophages for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu Ri; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Nam, Chang Hoon; Kim, Soo Won

    2010-10-01

    The selection of electrode material profoundly influences biosensor science and engineering, as it heavily influences biosensor sensitivity. Here we propose a novel electrochemical detection method using a working electrode consisting of bio-nanowires from genetically modified filamentous phages and nanoparticles. fd-tet p8MMM filamentous phages displaying a three-methionine (MMM) peptide on the major coat protein pVIII (designated p8MMM phages) were immobilized on the active area of an electrochemical sensor through physical adsorption and chemical bonding. Bio-nanowires composed of p8MMM phages and silver nanoparticles facilitated sensitive, rapid and selective detection of particular molecules. We explored whether the composite electrode with bio-nanowires was an effective platform to detect the glucose oxidase. The current response of the bio-nanowire sensor was high at various glucose concentrations (0.1 µm-0.1 mM). This method provides a considerable advantage to demonstrate analyte detection over low concentration ranges. Especially, phage-enabled bio-nanowires can serve as receptors with high affinity and specificity for the detection of particular biomolecules and provide a convenient platform for designing site-directed multifunctional scaffolds based on bacteriophages and may serve as a simple method for label-free detection.

  12. Stability of bacteriophages in burn wound care products

    PubMed Central

    Monserez, Riet; van Belleghem, Jonas; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages could be used along with burn wound care products to enhance antimicrobial pressure during treatment. However, some of the components of the topical antimicrobials that are traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection might affect the activity of phages. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the counteraction of therapeutic phage preparations by burn wound care products before application in patients. Five phages, representatives of two morphological families (Myoviridae and Podoviridae) and active against 3 common bacterial burn wound pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus) were tested against 13 different products commonly used in the treatment of burn wounds. The inactivation of the phages was quite variable for different phages and different products. Majority of the anti-infective products affected phage activity negatively either immediately or in the course of time, although impact was not always significant. Products with high acidity had the most adverse effect on phages. Our findings demonstrate that during combined treatment the choice of phages and wound care products must be carefully defined in advance. PMID:28750102

  13. Exploring the contribution of bacteriophages to antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lekunberri, Itziar; Subirats, Jèssica; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are the most abundant and diverse biological entities in our planet. They infect susceptible bacterial hosts into which they either multiply or persist. In the latter case, phages can confer new functions to their hosts as a result of gene transfer, thus contributing to their adaptation (short-term) and evolution (long-term). In this regard, the role of phages on the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) among bacterial hosts in natural environments has not yet been clearly resolved. Here, we carry out a comprehensive analysis of thirty-three viromes from different habitats to investigate whether phages harbor ARGs. Our results demonstrate that while human-associated viromes do not or rarely carry ARGs, viromes from non-human sources (e.g. pig feces, raw sewage, and freshwater and marine environments) contain a large reservoir of ARGs, thus pointing out that phages could play a part on the spread of antibiotic resistance. Given this, the role of phages should not be underestimated and it should be considered when designing strategies to tackle the global crisis of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors influencing lysis time stochasticity in bacteriophage λ.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, John J; Wang, Ing-Nang

    2011-08-02

    Despite identical genotypes and seemingly uniform environments, stochastic gene expression and other dynamic intracellular processes can produce considerable phenotypic diversity within clonal microbes. One trait that provides a good model to explore the molecular basis of stochastic variation is the timing of host lysis by bacteriophage (phage). Individual lysis events of thermally-inducible λ lysogens were observed using a temperature-controlled perfusion chamber mounted on an inverted microscope. Both mean lysis time (MLT) and its associated standard deviation (SD) were estimated. Using the SD as a measure of lysis time stochasticity, we showed that lysogenic cells in controlled environments varied widely in lysis times, and that the level of lysis time stochasticity depended on allelic variation in the holin sequence, late promoter (pR') activity, and host growth rate. In general, the MLT was positively correlated with the SD. Both lower pR' activities and lower host growth rates resulted in larger SDs. Results from premature lysis, induced by adding KCN at different time points after lysogen induction, showed a negative correlation between the timing of KCN addition and lysis time stochasticity. Taken together with results published by others, we conclude that a large fraction of λ lysis time stochasticity is the result of random events following the expression and diffusion of the holin protein. Consequently, factors influencing the timing of reaching critical holin concentrations in the cell membrane, such as holin production rate, strongly influence the mean lysis time and the lysis time stochasticity.

  15. Factors influencing lysis time stochasticity in bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite identical genotypes and seemingly uniform environments, stochastic gene expression and other dynamic intracellular processes can produce considerable phenotypic diversity within clonal microbes. One trait that provides a good model to explore the molecular basis of stochastic variation is the timing of host lysis by bacteriophage (phage). Results Individual lysis events of thermally-inducible λ lysogens were observed using a temperature-controlled perfusion chamber mounted on an inverted microscope. Both mean lysis time (MLT) and its associated standard deviation (SD) were estimated. Using the SD as a measure of lysis time stochasticity, we showed that lysogenic cells in controlled environments varied widely in lysis times, and that the level of lysis time stochasticity depended on allelic variation in the holin sequence, late promoter (pR') activity, and host growth rate. In general, the MLT was positively correlated with the SD. Both lower pR' activities and lower host growth rates resulted in larger SDs. Results from premature lysis, induced by adding KCN at different time points after lysogen induction, showed a negative correlation between the timing of KCN addition and lysis time stochasticity. Conclusions Taken together with results published by others, we conclude that a large fraction of λ lysis time stochasticity is the result of random events following the expression and diffusion of the holin protein. Consequently, factors influencing the timing of reaching critical holin concentrations in the cell membrane, such as holin production rate, strongly influence the mean lysis time and the lysis time stochasticity. PMID:21810267

  16. Classification of Myoviridae bacteriophages using protein sequence similarity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We advocate unifying classical and genomic classification of bacteriophages by integration of proteomic data and physicochemical parameters. Our previous application of this approach to the entirely sequenced members of the Podoviridae fully supported the current phage classification of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). It appears that horizontal gene transfer generally does not totally obliterate evolutionary relationships between phages. Results CoreGenes/CoreExtractor proteome comparison techniques applied to 102 Myoviridae suggest the establishment of three subfamilies (Peduovirinae, Teequatrovirinae, the Spounavirinae) and eight new independent genera (Bcep781, BcepMu, FelixO1, HAP1, Bzx1, PB1, phiCD119, and phiKZ-like viruses). The Peduovirinae subfamily, derived from the P2-related phages, is composed of two distinct genera: the "P2-like viruses", and the "HP1-like viruses". At present, the more complex Teequatrovirinae subfamily has two genera, the "T4-like" and "KVP40-like viruses". In the genus "T4-like viruses" proper, four groups sharing >70% proteins are distinguished: T4-type, 44RR-type, RB43-type, and RB49-type viruses. The Spounavirinae contain the "SPO1-"and "Twort-like viruses." Conclusion The hierarchical clustering of these groupings provide biologically significant subdivisions, which are consistent with our previous analysis of the Podoviridae. PMID:19857251

  17. Molecular Basis for Lytic Bacteriophage Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Duerkop, Breck A.; Huo, Wenwen; Bhardwaj, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human intestine harbors diverse communities of bacteria and bacteriophages. Given the specificity of phages for their bacterial hosts, there is growing interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. A significant barrier to such therapies is the rapid development of phage-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need to understand how bacteria acquire phage resistance in vivo. Here we identify novel lytic phages in municipal raw sewage that kill Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that resides in the human intestine. We show that phage infection of E. faecalis requires a predicted integral membrane protein that we have named PIPEF (for phage infection protein from E. faecalis). We find that PIPEF is conserved in E. faecalis and harbors a 160-amino-acid hypervariable region that determines phage tropism for distinct enterococcal strains. Finally, we use a gnotobiotic mouse model of in vivo phage predation to show that the sewage phages temporarily reduce E. faecalis colonization of the intestine but that E. faecalis acquires phage resistance through mutations in PIPEF. Our findings define the molecular basis for an evolutionary arms race between E. faecalis and the lytic phages that prey on them. They also suggest approaches for engineering E. faecalis phages that have altered host specificity and that can subvert phage resistance in the host bacteria. PMID:27578757

  18. Targeted drug-carrying bacteriophages as antibacterial nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Bar, Hagit; Benhar, Itai

    2007-06-01

    While the resistance of bacteria to traditional antibiotics is a major public health concern, the use of extremely potent antibacterial agents is limited by their lack of selectivity. As in cancer therapy, antibacterial targeted therapy could provide an opportunity to reintroduce toxic substances to the antibacterial arsenal. A desirable targeted antibacterial agent should combine binding specificity, a large drug payload per binding event, and a programmed drug release mechanism. Recently, we presented a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages as targeted drug carriers that could partially inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. This partial success was due to limitations of drug-loading capacity that resulted from the hydrophobicity of the drug. Here we present a novel drug conjugation chemistry which is based on connecting hydrophobic drugs to the phage via aminoglycoside antibiotics that serve as solubility-enhancing branched linkers. This new formulation allowed a significantly larger drug-carrying capacity of the phages, resulting in a drastic improvement in their performance as targeted drug-carrying nanoparticles. As an example for a potential systemic use for potent agents that are limited for topical use, we present antibody-targeted phage nanoparticles that carry a large payload of the hemolytic antibiotic chloramphenicol connected through the aminoglycoside neomycin. We demonstrate complete growth inhibition toward the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli with an improvement in potency by a factor of approximately 20,000 compared to the free drug.

  19. Bacteriophages for prophylaxis and therapy in cattle, poultry and pigs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R P; Gyles, C L; Huff, W E; Ojha, S; Huff, G R; Rath, N C; Donoghue, A M

    2008-12-01

    The successful use of virulent (lytic) bacteriophages (phages) in preventing and treating neonatal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in calves, lambs and pigs has prompted investigation of other applications of phage therapy in food animals. While results have been very variable, some indicate that phage therapy is potentially useful in virulent Salmonella and E. coli infections in chickens, calves and pigs, and in control of the food-borne pathogens Salmonella and Campylobacter jejuni in chickens and E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. However, more rigorous and comprehensive research is required to determine the true potential of phage therapy. Particular challenges include the selection and characterization of phages, practical modes of administration, and development of formulations that maintain the viability of phages for administration. Also, meaningful evaluation of phage therapy will require animal studies that closely represent the intended use, and will include thorough investigation of the emergence and characteristics of phage resistant bacteria. As well, effective use will require understanding the ecology and dynamics of the endemic and therapeutic phages and their interactions with target bacteria in the farm environment. In the event that the potential of phage therapy is realized, adoption will depend on its efficacy and complementarity relative to other interventions. Another potential challenge will be regulatory approval.

  20. Salmonella bacteriophage diversity reflects host diversity on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Switt, Andrea I Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Hoelzer, Karin; Warnick, Lorin D; Cummings, Kevin J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella is an animal and human pathogen of worldwide concern. Surveillance programs indicate that the incidence of Salmonella serovars fluctuates over time. While bacteriophages are likely to play a role in driving microbial diversity, our understanding of the ecology and diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. Here we report the isolation of Salmonella phages from manure samples from 13 dairy farms with a history of Salmonella presence. Salmonella phages were isolated from 10 of the 13 farms; overall 108 phage isolates were obtained on serovar Newport, Typhimurium, Dublin, Kentucky, Anatum, Mbandaka, and Cerro hosts. Host range characterization found that 51% of phage isolates had a narrow host range, while 49% showed a broad host range. The phage isolates represented 65 lysis profiles; genome size profiling of 94 phage isolates allowed for classification of phage isolates into 11 groups with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showing considerable variation within a given group. Our data not only show an abundance of diverse Salmonella phage isolates in dairy farms, but also show that phage isolates that lyse the most common serovars causing salmonellosis in cattle are frequently obtained, suggesting that phages may play an important role in the ecology of Salmonella on dairy farms.

  1. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  2. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  3. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  4. Inhibition of DNA ejection from bacteriophage by Mg^+2 counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seil; Tran, Cathy V.; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2009-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, especially Mg^+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and non-monotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the least DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg^+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg^+2 concentration increases from zero, DNA net charge changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg^+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. Our theory fits experimental data well. The strength of DNA-DNA short range attraction, mediated by Mg^+2, is found to be -0.003 kBT per nucleotide base.

  5. Structural proteins of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans bacteriophage phi Aa.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R H; Hammond, B F; Fine, D H

    1990-08-01

    øAa is an A1 morphotype bacteriophage which infects certain strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of dissociated, purified phi Aa particles revealed 7 major structural proteins (P1-P7) ranging in size from 17.5 to 52.7 kilodaltons (Kd). Treatment of the intact phage particles with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the separation of the virion head and tail subunits. Purification of the head subunits was accomplished by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the DMSO-treated phage particles. The purified head subunits were composed of a single protein having an electrophoretic mobility which corresponded to a 39.5 Kd protein (P3) of the intact virus. Raising the pH of a purified phi Aa suspension to 12.7 disrupted the head subunits, as well as the tail tube and tail fibers, releasing intact contractile tail sheaths. The tail sheaths were collected by centrifugation. The purified tail sheaths were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and were found to be composed of two proteins (P1 and P2) having molecular weights of 52.7 and 41.2 Kd respectively. The location of each of the 4 remaining major structural proteins in the phi Aa virion remains to be determined.

  6. Transfection of Lactobacillus bulgaricus protoplasts by bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Boizet, B; Flickinger, J L; Chassy, B M

    1988-12-01

    A protoplast transfection system has been developed for Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The procedure involves a polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of bacteriophage DNA encapsulated in liposomes into mutanolysin-treated cells. With L. bulgaricus B004 and DNA isolated from the phage phi c5004, transfection reached a maximum when at least 95% of the cells were osmotically fragile. The incorporation of phage DNA into liposomes was essential; no transfectants were detected in the absence of liposomes. The largest number of transfectants was observed after longer periods (20 min) of fusion of mutanolysin-treated cells and liposomes with polyethylene glycol. The maximum efficiency of 5 x 10(7) PFU/microgram of DNA was reached after a 24-h incubation in growth media prior to plating transfected cells in an agar overlay to detect the appearance of plaques. A minimum of 4 h of incubation in growth medium after fusion was required to detect the production and release of virions. The possibility that the high frequencies observed were due to bursting of transfected cells and subsequent infection of additional cells was found not to be a factor. The number of transfectants observed was directly proportional to the quantity of DNA added. These results define conditions appropriate for the introduction of DNA into L. bulgaricus.

  7. Structural proteins of Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage ϕEf11

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Roy H.; Zhang, Hongming; Hsiao, Chaiwing; Kachlany, Scott; Tinoco, Eduardo M. B.; DePew, Jessica; Fouts, Derrick E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ϕEf11, a temperate Siphoviridae bacteriophage, was isolated by induction from a root canal isolate of Enterococcus faecalis. Sequence analysis suggested that the ϕEf11 genome included a contiguous 8 gene module whose function was related to head structure assembly and another module of 10 contiguous genes whose products were responsible for tail structure assembly. SDS-PAGE analysis of virions of a ϕEf11 derivative revealed 11 well-resolved protein bands. To unify the deduced functional gene assignments emanating from the DNA sequence data, with the structural protein analysis of the purified virus, 6 of the SDS-PAGE bands were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. 5 of the 6 protein bands analyzed by mass spectrometry displayed identical amino acid sequences to those predicted to be specified by 4 of the ORFs identified in the ϕEf11 genome. These included: ORF8 (predicted scaffold protein), ORF10 (predicted major head protein), ORF15 (predicted major tail protein), and ORF23 (presumptive antireceptor). PMID:28090386

  8. Quorum Regulated Resistance of Vibrio cholerae against Environmental Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, M. Mozammel; Naser, Iftekhar Bin; Bari, S. M. Nayeemul; Zhu, Jun; Mekalanos, John J.; Faruque, Shah M.

    2016-01-01

    Predation by bacteriophages can significantly influence the population structure of bacterial communities. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics interacts with numerous phages in the aquatic ecosystem, and in the intestine of cholera patients. Seasonal epidemics of cholera reportedly collapse due to predation of the pathogen by phages. However, it is not clear how sufficient number of the bacteria survive to seed the environment in the subsequent epidemic season. We found that bacterial cell density-dependent gene expression termed “quorum sensing” which is regulated by signal molecules called autoinducers (AIs) can protect V. cholerae against predatory phages. V. cholerae mutant strains carrying inactivated AI synthase genes were significantly more susceptible to multiple phages compared to the parent bacteria. Likewise when mixed cultures of phage and bacteria were supplemented with exogenous autoinducers CAI-1 or AI-2 produced by recombinant strains carrying cloned AI synthase genes, increased survival of V. cholerae and a decrease in phage titer was observed. Mutational analyses suggested that the observed effects of autoinducers are mediated in part through the quorum sensing-dependent production of haemaglutinin protease, and partly through downregulation of phage receptors. These results have implication in developing strategies for phage mediated control of cholera. PMID:27892495

  9. RNA polymerase activity associated with bacteriophage phi 6.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Vidaver, A K; Koski, R K; Semancik, J S

    1973-09-01

    The Pseudomonas phaseolicola bacteriophage phi6 incorporated labeled UTP into an acid-insoluble precipitate. Incorporation was dependent on the presence of manganese acetate, ATP, GTP, CTP, and a short heat treatment of the phage; the reaction was stimulated by NH(4)Cl. The substitution of (14)C-ATP, -CTP or -GTP for UTP, together with the appropriate unlabeled ribonucleoside triphosphates, disclosed that CMP was incorporated to the greatest extent followed by GMP, UMP, and AMP. Radioactive RNAs formed by the reaction were resistant to RNases A and T(1) in high salt but susceptible to these nucleases in low salt. The labeled RNA co-sedimented and co-electrophoresed with phi6 double-stranded (ds) RNA. However, the distribution of the radioactivity into the three ds-RNA components varied depending on the (14)C-ribonucleoside triphosphate used in the reaction. The incorporation of UMP was primarily into the two smaller ds-RNA segments, GMP primarily into the large ds-RNA segment, and CMP and AMP were about equally distributed into all three ds-RNA segments.

  10. Three-dimensional asymmetric reconstruction of tailed bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinghua; Sinkovits, Robert S; Baker, Timothy S

    2010-01-01

    A universal goal in studying the structures of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes by means of electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-TEM) and three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction is the derivation of a reliable atomic or pseudoatomic model. Such a model provides the foundation for exploring in detail the mechanisms by which biomolecules function. Though a variety of highly ordered, symmetric specimens such as 2D crystals, helices, and icosahedral virus capsids have been studied by these methods at near-atomic resolution, until recently, numerous challenges have made it difficult to achieve sub-nanometer resolution with large (≥~500Å), asymmetric molecules such as the tailed bacteriophages. After briefly reviewing some of the history behind the development of asymmetric virus reconstructions, we use recent structural studies of the prolate phage ϕ29 as an example to illustrate the step-by-step procedures used to compute an asymmetric reconstruction at sub-nanometer resolution. In contrast to methods that have been employed to study other asymmetric complexes, we demonstrate how symmetries in the head and tail components of the phage can be exploited to obtain the structure of the entire phage in an expedited, stepwise process. Prospects for future enhancements to the procedures currently employed are noted in the concluding section.

  11. Properties of Caulobacter Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophage φCb5

    PubMed Central

    Bendis, Inakaren; Shapiro, Lucille

    1970-01-01

    The ribonucleic acid (RNA) bacteriophage φCb5, which specifically infects only one form of the dimorphic stalked bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, has been obtained in high yield. Since the phage is extremely salt-sensitive, a purification procedure was devised which avoided contact with solutions of high ionic strength. Phage φCb5 was studied with respect to the physical and chemical properties of both the phage and its RNA. In an electron microscope, the phage particles appear as small polyhedra, 23 nm in diameter. The phage is similar to the Escherichia coli RNA phages in that it (i) sediments at an S20, w of 70.6S, (ii) is composed of a single molecule of single-stranded RNA and a protein coat, (iii) contains two structural proteins, and (iv) apparently contains the genetic capacity to code for a coat protein subunit, a maturation-like protein, and an RNA polymerase. Phage φCb5 differs from the E. coli RNA phages in (i) host specificity, (ii) salt sensitivity, and (iii) the presence of histidine, but not methionine, in the coat protein. Images PMID:5495512

  12. Nanoscale detection of bacteriophage triggered ion cascade (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobozi-King, Maria; Seo, Sungkyu; Kim, Jong U.; Cheng, Mosong; Kish, Laszlo B.; Young, Ryland

    2005-05-01

    In an era of potential bioterrorism and pandemics of antibiotic-resistant microbes, bacterial contaminations of food and water supplies is a major concern. There is an urgent need for the rapid, inexpensive and specific identification of bacteria under field conditions. Here we describe a method that combines the specificity and avidity of bacteriophages with fluctuation analysis of electrical noise. The method is based on the massive, transitory ion leakage that occurs at the moment of phage DNA injection into the host cell. The ion fluxes require only that the cells be physiologically viable (i.e., have energized membranes) and can occur within seconds after mixing the cells with sufficient concentrations of phage particles. To detect these fluxes, we have constructed a nano-well, a lateral, micron-size capacitor of titanium electrodes with gap size of 150 nm, and used it to measure the electrical field fluctuations in microliter (mm3) samples containing phage and bacteria. In mixtures where the analyte bacteria were sensitive to the phage, large stochastic waves with various time and amplitude scales were observed, with power spectra of approximately 1/f2 shape over at 1 - 10 Hz. Development of this SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascades) technology could provide rapid detection and identification of live, pathogenic bacteria on the scale of minutes, with unparalleled specificity. The method has a potential ultimate sensitivity of 1 bacterium/microliter (1 bacterium/mm3).

  13. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  14. Characterization of bacteriophage communities and CRISPR profiles from dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental plaque is home to a diverse and complex community of bacteria, but has generally been believed to be inhabited by relatively few viruses. We sampled the saliva and dental plaque from 4 healthy human subjects to determine whether plaque was populated by viral communities, and whether there were differences in viral communities specific to subject or sample type. Results We found that the plaque was inhabited by a community of bacteriophage whose membership was mostly subject-specific. There was a significant proportion of viral homologues shared between plaque and salivary viromes within each subject, suggesting that some oral viruses were present in both sites. We also characterized Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) in oral streptococci, as their profiles provide clues to the viruses that oral bacteria may be able to counteract. While there were some CRISPR spacers specific to each sample type, many more were shared across sites and were highly subject specific. Many CRISPR spacers matched viruses present in plaque, suggesting that the evolution of CRISPR loci may have been specific to plaque-derived viruses. Conclusions Our findings of subject specificity to both plaque-derived viruses and CRISPR profiles suggest that human viral ecology may be highly personalized. PMID:24981669

  15. UV-induced mutation in bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Yarosh, D B

    1978-01-01

    Two late gene am mutants of bacteriophage T4 that can be induced to revert by UV were crossed to a temperature-sensitive ligase mutant. In the double mutants, UV-induced reversion was eliminated at a semirestrictive temperature. When the single am mutants were irradiated and then allowed a single passage in a permissive host, the UV-induced reversion frequency was increased by 15- to 25-fold. This increased mutagenesis was also abolished by the presence of the ligase allele. When the UV-irradiated single am mutants multiply infected a permissive host, allowing multiplicity reactivation to occur, the induced reversion frequency was reduced similarly to the reduction in lethality. The mutagenesis that remained was again abolished by the presence of the ligase allele. It is concluded that UV induces mutations in phage T4 through the action of a pathway that includes polynucleotide ligase. The increase in mutation frequency after growth in a permissive host implies that mutagenesis can occur at more than one stage of the infection rather than only in an early stage before expression of the mutant genome. The process of multiplicity reactivation appears to be error-free since it overcomes lethal lesions without inducing new mutations. PMID:660716

  16. High Negative Interference and Recombination in Bacteriophage T5

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Barbara North

    1980-01-01

    The process of close recombinant formation in bacteriophage T5 crosses has been studied by examining the structure of internal heterozygotes (HETs), the immediate products of recombination events. The T5 system was chosen because it permits the study of internal heterozygotes exclusively, thus avoiding the ambiguities inherent in previous studies with T4. The heterozygotes were obtained by the nonselective screening of progeny phage in a prematurely lysed sample from an eight-factor cross. The molecular structure of each HET was inferred from the strand genotypes displayed among its progeny. This investigation presents unequivocal evidence that both overlap and insertion HETs are intermediates in recombinant formation and that insertion HETs are a significant source of close double recombinants. There is evidence suggesting that mismatch repair of overlap HETs could be the source of close triple exchanges. Thus, a significant part, and perhaps all, of the high negative interference for close-marker recombination observed in this system is a direct consequence of the fine structure of the recombinational intermediates. These findings are compatible with recombination models proposed by others, in which a single branched intermediate can give rise to HETs of both the overlap and insertion types. PMID:6937420

  17. Salmonella bacteriophage diversity reflects host diversity on dairy farms

    PubMed Central

    Switt, Andrea I Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C.; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Hoelzer, Karin; Warnick, Lorin D.; Cummings, Kevin J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is an animal and human pathogen of worldwide concern. Surveillance programs indicate that the incidence of Salmonella serovars fluctuates over time. While bacteriophages are likely to play a role in driving microbial diversity, our understanding of the ecology and diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. Here we report the isolation of Salmonella phages from manure samples from 13 dairy farms with a history of Salmonella presence. Salmonella phages were isolated from 10 of the 13 farms; overall 108 phage isolates were obtained on serovar Newport, Typhimurium, Dublin, Kentucky, Anatum, Mbandaka, and Cerro hosts. Host range characterization found that 51% of phage isolates had a narrow host range, while 49% showed a broad host range. The phage isolates represented 65 lysis profiles; genome size profiling of 94 phage isolates allowed for classification of phage isolates into 11 groups with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showing considerable variation within a given group. Our data not only show an abundance of diverse Salmonella phage isolates in dairy farms, but also show that phage isolates that lyse the most common serovars causing salmonellosis in cattle are frequently obtained, suggesting that phages may play an important role in the ecology of Salmonella on dairy farms. PMID:24010608

  18. DNA packaging orders the membrane of bacteriophage PRD1.

    PubMed

    Butcher, S J; Bamford, D H; Fuller, S D

    1995-12-15

    Bacteriophage PRD1 contains a linear dsDNA genome enclosed by a lipid membrane lying within a protein coat. Determination of the structure of the detergent-treated particle to 2 nm by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction has defined the position of the major coat protein P3. The coat contains 240 copies of trimeric P3 packed into positions of local 6-fold symmetry on a T = 25 lattice. The three-dimensional structures of the PRD1 virion and a DNA packaging mutant to a resolution of 2.8 nm have revealed specific interactions between the coat and the underlying membrane. The membrane is clearly visible as two leaflets separated by 2 nm and spanned by transmembrane density. The size of the coat does not change upon DNA packaging. Instead, the number of interactions seen between the protein shell and the membrane and the order of the membrane components increase. Thus the membrane of PRD1 plays a role in assembly which is akin to that played by the nucleocapsid in other membrane viruses.

  19. Factors Affecting Survival of Bacteriophage on Tomato Leaf Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Iriarte, F. B.; Balogh, B.; Momol, M. T.; Smith, L. M.; Wilson, M.; Jones, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated phage (phage mixed with skim milk) were evaluated. In field studies, copper caused significant phage reduction if applied on the day of phage application but not if applied 4 or 7 days in advance. Sunlight UV was evaluated for detrimental effects on phage survival on tomato foliage in the field. Phage was applied in the early morning, midmorning, early afternoon, and late evening, while UVA plus UVB irradiation and phage populations were monitored. The intensity of UV irradiation positively correlated with phage population decline. The protective formulation reduced the UV effect. In order to demonstrate direct effects of UV, phage suspensions were exposed to UV irradiation and assayed for effectiveness against bacterial spot of tomato. UV significantly reduced phage ability to control bacterial spot. Ambient temperature had a pronounced effect on nonformulated phage but not on formulated phages. The effects of desiccation and fluorescent light illumination on phage were investigated. Desiccation caused a significant but only slight reduction in phage populations after 60 days, whereas fluorescent light eliminated phages within 2 weeks. The protective formulation eliminated the reduction caused by both of these factors. Phage persistence was dramatically affected by UV, while the other factors had less pronounced effects. Formulated phage reduced deleterious effects of the studied environmental factors. PMID:17259361

  20. Novel N4 Bacteriophages Prevail in the Cold Biosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuanchao; Buchan, Alison; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Coliphage N4 is a lytic bacteriophage discovered nearly half a century ago, and it was considered to be a "genetic orphan" until very recently, when several additional N4-like phages were discovered to infect nonenteric bacterial hosts. Interest in this genus of phages is stimulated by their unique genetic features and propagation strategies. To better understand the ecology of N4-like phages, we investigated the diversity and geographic patterns of N4-like phages by examining 56 Chesapeake Bay viral communities, using a PCR-clone library approach targeting a diagnostic N4-like DNA polymerase gene. Many new lineages of N4-like phages were found in the bay, and their genotypes shift from the lower to the upper bay. Interestingly, signature sequences of N4-like phages were recovered only from winter month samples, when water temperatures were below 4°C. An analysis of existing metagenomic libraries from various aquatic environments supports the hypothesis that N4-like phages are most prolific in colder waters. In particular, a high number of N4-like phages were detected in Organic Lake, Antarctica, a cold and hypersaline system. The prevalence of N4-like phages in the cold biosphere suggests these viruses possess yet-to-be-determined mechanisms that facilitate lytic infections under cold conditions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.