Science.gov

Sample records for infrared laser excitation

  1. Mid-infrared ultrafast laser pulses induced third harmonic generation in nitrogen molecules on an excited state

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Li, Ziting; Zeng, Bin; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on generation of third harmonic from nitrogen molecules on the excited state with a weak driver laser pulse at a mid-infrared wavelength. The excited nitrogen molecules are generated using a circularly polarized intense femtosecond pulse which produces energetic electrons by photoionization to realize collisional excitation of nitrogen molecules. Furthermore, since the third harmonic is generated using a pump-probe scheme, it enables investigation of the excited-state dynamics of nitrogen molecules produced under different conditions. We also perform a comparative investigation in excited argon atoms, revealing different decay dynamics of the molecules and atoms from the excited states in femtosecond laser induced filaments. PMID:26522886

  2. Mid-infrared ultrafast laser pulses induced third harmonic generation in nitrogen molecules on an excited state.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Li, Ziting; Zeng, Bin; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2015-11-02

    We report on generation of third harmonic from nitrogen molecules on the excited state with a weak driver laser pulse at a mid-infrared wavelength. The excited nitrogen molecules are generated using a circularly polarized intense femtosecond pulse which produces energetic electrons by photoionization to realize collisional excitation of nitrogen molecules. Furthermore, since the third harmonic is generated using a pump-probe scheme, it enables investigation of the excited-state dynamics of nitrogen molecules produced under different conditions. We also perform a comparative investigation in excited argon atoms, revealing different decay dynamics of the molecules and atoms from the excited states in femtosecond laser induced filaments.

  3. Far-infrared laser magnetic resonance of vibrationally excited CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.; Mckellar, A. R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The detection of 13 rotational transitions in the first excited bending state (010) of CD2 using the technique of far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is reported. Molecular parameters for this state are determined from these new data together with existing infrared observations of the v(2) band. Additional information on the ground vibrational state (000) is also provided by the observation of a new rotational transition, and this is combined with existing data to provide a refined set of molecular parameters for the CD2 ground state. One spectrum has been observed that is assigned as a rotational transition within the first excited symmetric stretching state (100) of CD2. These data will be of use in refining the structure and the potential function of the methylene radical.

  4. Two-photon vibrational excitation of air by long-wave infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser pulses can resonantly excite vibrations in N2 and O2 through a two-photon transition. The absorptive vibrational component of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity grows in time, starting smaller than but quickly surpassing the electronic, rotational, and vibrational refractive components. The growth of the vibrational component results in a novel mechanism of third-harmonic generation, providing an additional two-photon excitation channel, fundamental + third harmonic. The original and emergent two-photon excitations drive the resonance exactly out of phase, causing spatial decay of the absorptive vibrational nonlinearity. This nearly eliminates two-photon vibrational absorption. Here we present simulations and analytical calculations demonstrating how these processes modify the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in air. The results reveal nonlinear optical phenomena unique to the LWIR regime of ultrashort pulse propagation in the atmosphere.

  5. Comparative study on atomic and molecular Rydberg-state excitation in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hang; Zuo, Wanlong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Rydberg-state excitation of atoms in strong infrared laser fields provides a new complementary aspect of the perspective of atom-strong field interactions. In this article, we perform an experimental and theoretical study on the corresponding process of diatomic molecules, N2 and O2. We show that neutral molecules can also survive strong 800-nm laser fields in high Rydberg states, while their behavior is remarkably different in comparison with their companion atoms, Ar and Xe. The Rydberg excitation of N2 generally behaves similarly to Ar, while that of O2 is more significantly suppressed than the ionization compared to Xe in a high intensity region, which can be understood in the frame of a semiclassical picture, together with their different structures of molecular orbitals. However, distinct quantum features in the Rydberg excitation processes that are apparently beyond the semiclassical picture have been identified, i.e., the less suppressed probability of O2 at low intensity and the oscillation behavior of the ratio between N2 and Ar, indicating that our understanding of the relevant physics is still far from complete.

  6. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  7. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  8. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  9. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  10. Terahertz-to-infrared emission through laser excitation of surface plasmons in metal films with porous nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-06-29

    We report on the investigation of terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) thermal emission that relies on the excitation of surface plasmons in metal films deposited on a substrate with randomly ordered nanoscale pore arrays. The THz-to-IR radiation was observed both in the direction of laser beam propagation and the reverse direction. The intensity ratio between backward and forward radiation is exponentially dependent on the nominal thickness of the porous metal films. The findings are discussed in view of the proposed generation mechanism based on propagating surface plasmon polaritons on both air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces.

  11. Terahertz-to-infrared emission through laser excitation of surface plasmons in metal films with porous nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-06-29

    We report on the investigation of terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) thermal emission that relies on the excitation of surface plasmons in metal films deposited on a substrate with randomly ordered nanoscale pore arrays. The THz-to-IR radiation was observed both in the direction of laser beam propagation and the reverse direction. The intensity ratio between backward and forward radiation is exponentially dependent on the nominal thickness of the porous metal films. The findings are discussed in view of the proposed generation mechanism based on propagating surface plasmon polaritons on both air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26191727

  12. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay. PMID:25741748

  13. Development of infrared sensors using energy transfer/energy upconversion processes: Study of laser excited fluorescence in rare Earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1994-01-01

    A summary is presented of the spectroscopic study of three systems: LaF3:Ho(3+), LaF3:Er(3+) and CaF2:Nd(3+). When the D levels of Ho(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 640 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from J (416 nm), F (485 nm), and E (546 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F and E levels of Ho(3+) when the material was excited with an 800 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Er(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 637 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the E (540 nm) and P (320, 400, and 468 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F, E, and D levels of Er(3+) when the material was resonantly excited with an 804 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Nd(3+) in CaF2 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 577 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the L (360 and 382 nm), K (418 nm), and I (432 nm) levels. Very weak upconverted emissions were detected when this system was irradiated with a near infrared laser. The numbers in parentheses are the wavelengths of the emissions.

  14. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Schlemmer, S; Balucani, N; Wagner, D R; Harrison, J A; Steiner, B; Saykally, R J

    1998-02-26

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  15. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  16. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed; Sonobe, Taro; Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  17. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  18. Near infrared lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-07-01

    Technology development in flow cytometry has closely tracked laser technology, the light source that flow cytometers almost exclusively use to excite fluorescent probes. The original flow cytometers from the 1970s and 1980s used large water-cooled lasers to produce only one or two laser lines at a time. Modern cytometers can take advantage of the revolution in solid state laser technology to use almost any laser wavelength ranging from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Commercial cytometers can now be equipped with many small solid state lasers, providing almost any wavelength needed for cellular analysis. Flow cytometers are now equipped to analyze 20 or more fluorescent probes simultaneously, requiring multiple laser wavelengths. Instrument developers are now trying to increase this number by designing fluorescent probes that can be excited by laser wavelength at the "edges" of the visible light range, in the near ultraviolet and near-infrared region. A variety of fluorescent probes have been developed that excite with violet and long wavelength ultraviolet light; however, the near-infrared range (660-800 nm) has yet seen only exploitation in flow cytometry. Fortunately, near-infrared laser diodes and other solid state laser technologies appropriate for flow cytometry have been in existence for some time, and can be readily incorporated into flow cytometers to accelerate fluorescent probe development. The near infrared region represents one of the last "frontiers" to maximize the number of fluorescent probes that can be analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, near infrared fluorescent probes used in biomedical tracking and imaging could also be employed for flow cytometry with the correct laser wavelengths. This review describes the available technology, including lasers, fluorescent probes and detector technology optimal for near infrared signal detection.

  19. Magnetically induced pulser laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Leopold, K.E.

    1985-02-15

    A novel excitation scheme has been developed for excimer discharge lasers. The technique uses pulse transformer technology to induce a fast, high voltage pulse directly onto a ground potential laser electrode resulting in the breakdown of the laser gas mix. Saturation of the pulse transformer core inductance then permits efficient energy transfer from the main energy storage circuit into the discharge. When this excitation technique was used in a XeCl laser an output energy density of 2.5 J/l and an overall electrical to optical efficiency of 2% were obtained. The technique appears promising for the development of high energy, high average power excimer lasers.

  20. Laser excited novel near-infrared photoluminescence bands in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Xu, Qiu; Evslin, Jarah; Cinausero, Marco

    2016-08-01

    New near-infrared photoluminescence bands were observed in neutron-irradiated spinel single crystal upon excitation by a 532 nm laser. The surface morphology of the unirradiated and fast neutron-irradiated samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Fast neutron-irradiated samples show a strong emission peak at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence intensity was also measured. At lower temperatures, the dominant peak at 1685 nm shifts toward lower energy whereas the other peaks remain fixed. Activation energies of luminescence quenching were estimated to be 5.7 and 54.6 meV for the lower and higher temperature regions respectively.

  1. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670 nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490 nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550 nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  2. Infrared Laser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R. M.

    1988-10-01

    Over the last 20 years there has been considerable research and development of infrared laser sources. This interest stems from the presence of two low attenuation windows in the atmosphere between 3-5μ,m and 8-14μ.m, on the basis of which, a wide range of military, industrial and medical applications have been proposed. In particular the CO2 laser with its lasing transitions between 9-11μm, has and continues to be, the focus of much attention. Although the CO2 laser was first demonstrated in 1964 by Patel', it is only in more recent years, with the application of improvements in the understanding of laser physics in conjunction with advances in relevant technologies, that high power devices which are also compact, efficient, reliable and long lived, have made practical applications feasible.

  3. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  4. Near-infrared spark source excitation for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. J. S.; Hungerford, G.; Imhof, R. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have extended the range of excitation wavelengths from spark sources used in single photon timing fluorometry into the near infrared by means of the all-metal coaxial flashlamp filled with an argon-hydrogen gas mixture. At 750 nm this mixture gives ˜15 times the intensity available from pure hydrogen for a comparable pulse duration. Measurements are demonstrated by using the laser dye IR-140 in acetone, for which a fluorescence lifetime of 1.20 ns is recorded.

  5. Infrared and ultraviolet laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled substituted salicylic acids; substitution effects on the excited state intramolecular proton transfer in salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hakam Abou El-Nasr, E.; Fujii, A.; Ebata, T.; Mikami, N.

    Substitution effects on the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in the salicylic acid (SA) frame were studied by electronic and infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled 5-methoxylsalicylic acid (5-MeOSA), 5-methylsalicylic acid (5-MeSA), 5-fluorosalicylic acid (5-FSA), 6-fluorosalicylic acid (6-FSA), and methyl salicylate (MS). Infrared spectra were measured in the 3 µm region for both the electronic ground (S0) and first excited (S1) states. The electronic excitation/emission spectra of 5-MeSA and 6-FSA showed the typical spectral features of ESIPT, which have been found in the spectra of SA. On the other hand, 5-MeOSA and 5-FSA exhibit a mirror-image relation between their excitation and emission spectra, which has been regarded as a result of the suppression of ESIPT. Despite such a remarkable difference among the electronic spectra, IR spectroscopy shows that a drastic change of the phenolic OH stretching vibration does occur upon electronic excitation of all substituted SAs, that is, the phenolic OH band of all the SAs disappears from the 3 µm region, indicating a large elongation of the phenolic O-H bond (over 0.1 Å) in S1. This result means that the intramolecular hydrogen bond strength is remarkably enhanced by electronic excitation in all the substituted SAs. Substitution effects on ESIPT in dimers are also discussed.

  6. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  7. University of Florida nuclear pumped laser program. [excitation of laser gaseous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of excitation of laser gases by fast ions (triton, proton, or fission fragments) and especially any role UF6 might play in radiative deexcitation of these gases were investigated. Population densities of excited important for laser action were obtained. Nuclear pumped CW-laser systems, especially He-Ne and CO2, were studied using steady state reactors. It was demonstrated that He-Ne lases in a CW-mode with nuclear pumping at both the red and the infrared transition. The infrared transition was observed to be superradiant.

  8. Imaging Cracks by Laser Excited Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, J.; Kervalishvili, G. N.; Maierhofer, Ch.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2010-02-01

    During the last years active thermography is increasingly used in a number of NDT problems in production and maintenance. In this work we focus on the detection of vertical cracks starting at the surface, which is an important indication of structural failure. By using local thermal excitation it is possible to image anisotropies in the lateral diffusivity by recording the temporal temperature data with an infrared camera. The regional transient behaviour of temperature distribution then can provide quantitative information of the crack parameter. In doing so, we present an advanced technique for the determination of the crack depth. The experimental set-up is based on an Nd:YAG laser. The beam is focused on the test sample by using an optical scanner to create the required lateral heat flow. The time resolved temperature distribution is recorded with an infrared camera (InSb FPA, 3 to 5 μm) providing a frame rate of up to 500 Hz. In addition we report on numerical simulation to investigate the concept of local heat excitation for a quantitative estimation of crack parameters. The modeling also includes the influence of surface to surface radiation inside the crack. We obtained a good consistency between experimental and theoretical data.

  9. Preparation of polarized molecules using coherent infrared multicolor ladder excitation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2010-04-21

    A density matrix treatment is presented for a general process of preparing polarized molecules through their coherent interaction with two or more infrared photons of different frequencies, each tuned to cause a transition between real levels. This process, which might be called infrared stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, allows complete population transfer to selected rotational-vibrational levels and controls the direction of the rotational angular momentum vector J of the molecule with the possibility of preparing higher moments of the J spatial distribution. HCl molecules in a supersonic molecular beam are considered as a candidate system. Theory predicts that under collision-free conditions two infrared laser pulses of microsecond duration and milliwatt power are able to achieve complete population transfer and alignment of HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=0) for mutually parallel excitation and HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=+/-1) for mutually perpendicular excitation. Orientation of the HCl (v=2, J=2, and M=+/-2) can also be achieved using two circularly polarized pulses of the same helicity. For simplicity, our treatment ignores nuclear spin depolarization, which would be the case for molecules such as (12)C(16)O and (12)C(16)OO(2). Polarized molecules in higher vibrational levels can be prepared using additional infrared pulses.

  10. Two-versus one photon excitation laser scanning microscopy: Critical importance of excitation wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Peter G.; Wokosin, David L.; Hall, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    It is often anticipated that two-photon excitation (TPE) laser scanning microscopy should improve cell survival and tissue penetration relative to conventional one-photon excitation (OPE) confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). However few studies have directly compared live cell imaging using one- vs two-photon laser scanning microscopy. We have used calcein-loaded in situ chondrocytes within cartilage as a model for quantitatively comparing these techniques. TPE reduced photo-bleaching and improved cell viability compared to OPE. Using improved detection sensitivity coupled with increased tissue penetration of the near infra-red TPE laser, it was possible to capture images deeper within the cartilage. However, the advantages of TPE vs OPE were strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. We conclude that optimising TPE conditions is essential if the full benefits of this approach are to be realised. PMID:17127269

  11. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  12. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  13. Cherenkov infrared laser

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Walsh, J.

    1985-01-01

    Successful production of microwave radiation by Cherenkov masers has prompted an investigation into their feasibility for submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength generation. A theoretical examination of output parameters such as frequency and small signal gain was conducted for an easily fabricated resonator geometry. The resonator consists of two parallel plates, each with a thin (0.5 to 3 ..mu..m) dielectric coating, separated by 2 mm. This waveguide will support TM modes which are coupled to a relativistic electron beam propagating between the plates. While the interaction of the electrons with the dielectric causes spontaneous Cherenkov emission, the difference between the beam velocity and the phase velocity of the mode causes a bunching of the electrons which is responsible for further stimulated emission. The frequency of the generated radiation is determined by the dispersion relation of the waveguide mode. Gain is calculated assuming the effects of space-charge modes are negligible i.e., operation is in the Compton regime. Results indicate that such a double-slab resonator will provide detectable levels of infrared radiation from a mildly relativistic (3-10 MeV) electron beam. The theoretical analysis is undertaken in preparation for a series of experiments to be conducted at the ENEA facility in Frascati, Italy where a 5 MeV microtron accelerator will be used to produce radiation in the 10- to 100 ..mu..m range. A suitable choice for the dielectric material would be polyethylene, both because of its low dielectric constant (2.2) and its relatively low loss in the infrared. A detailed discussion of the design choices will be presented.

  14. Near and Mid-Infrared Emission Characteristics of Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺-Doped LiYF₄ Single Crystals Excited by Laser Diode.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haoyang; Xia, Haiping; Wang, Peiyuan; Peng, Jiangtao; Zhang, Yuepin; Jiang, Haochuan; Chen, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    Yttrium lithium fluoride (LiYF₄) single crystals triply doped with Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺ are synthesized by a vertical Bridgman method. Absorption spectra, emission spectra, and decay curves are measured to investigate the luminescent properties of the crystals. Compared with Er³⁺ singly doped and Er³⁺/Tm³⁺ and Er³⁺/Ho³⁺ doubly doped LiYF₄ crystals, an intense emission around 2.7 µm can be obtained in the triply doped LiYF4 crystal under excitation of 980 nm laser diode. Meanwhile, the near infrared emission at 1.5 µm from Er³⁺ in the triply doped crystal is effectively reduced. The possible energy transfer processes and the luminescent mechanisms for enhancing emission at 2.7 µm and quenching emission at 1.5 µm in the Er³⁺/Ho³⁺/Tm³⁺ triply doped crystals are proposed. The large energy transfer efficiency of 82.0% and excellent optical transmission indicate that this Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺ triply doped crystal can be considered as a promising material for a mid- infrared laser at 2.7 µm. PMID:27398482

  15. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  16. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  17. Development of selective laser treatment techniques using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) laser with a specific wavelength can excite the corresponding biomolecular site to regulate chemical, thermal and mechanical interactions to biological molecules and tissues. In laser surgery and medicine, tunable MIR laser irradiation can realize the selective and less-invasive treatments and the special diagnosis by vibrational spectroscopic information. This paper showed a novel selective therapeutic technique for a laser angioplasty of atherosclerotic plaques and a laser dental surgery of a carious dentin using a MIR tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

  18. Parametric infrared tunable laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.; Sutter, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric tunable infrared laser system was built to serve as transmitter for the remote detection and density measurement of pollutant, poisonous, or trace gases in the atmosphere. The system operates with a YAG:Nd laser oscillator amplifier chain which pumps a parametric tunable frequency converter. The completed system produced pulse energies of up to 30 mJ. The output is tunable from 1.5 to 3.6 micrometers at linewidths of 0.2-0.5 /cm (FWHM), although the limits of the tuning range and the narrower line crystals presently in the parametric converter by samples of the higher quality already demonstrated is expected to improve the system performance further.

  19. Investigating the 3.3 micron infrared fluorescence from naphthalene following ultraviolet excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) type molecules are proposed as the carriers of the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Detailed studies of the 3.3 micrometer infrared emission features from naphthalene, the simplest PAH, following ultraviolet laser excitation are used in the interpretation of the 3.29 micrometer (3040 cm(sup -1)) UIR band. A time-resolved Fourier transform spectrometer is used to record the infrared emission spectrum of gas-phase naphthalene subsequent to ultraviolet excitation facilitated by an excimer laser operated at either 193 nm or 248 nm. The emission spectra differ significantly from the absorption spectrum in the same spectral region. Following 193 nm excitation the maximum in the emission profile is red-shifted 45 cm(sup -1) relative to the absorption maximum; a 25 cm(sup -1) red-shift is observed after 248 nm excitation. The red-shifting of the emission spectrum is reduced as collisional and radiative relaxation removes energy from the highly vibrationally excited molecules. Coupling between the various vibrational modes is thought to account for the differences between absorption and emission spectra. Strong visible emission is also observed following ultraviolet excitation. Visible emission may play an important role in the rate of radiative relaxation, which according to the interstellar PAH hypothesis occurs only by the slow emission of infrared photons. Studying the visible emission properties of PAH type molecules may be useful in the interpretation of the DIB's observed in absorption.

  20. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  1. Mechanism of resonant infrared laser vaporization of intact polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, R. F., Jr.; Belmont, R. J.; Bubb, D. M.; Dygert, N. L.; Johnson, S. L., Jr.; Schriver, K. E.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments on pulsed laser vaporization of many different kinds of polymers have demonstrated that it is possible to eject intact polymers into the ambient, whether air or vacuum, by resonant pulsed laser excitation, using both neat and matrix targets. Two recent studies of resonant infrared ablation - one on polystyrene, the other on poly(amic acid), the precursor for the thermoset polyimide - show moreover that the ablation process is both wavelength selective and surprisingly non-energetic, especially compared to ultraviolet laser ablation. We propose a wavelength-selective photothermal mechanism involving breaking of intermolecular hydrogen bonds that is consistent with these observations.

  2. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN IN THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NGC 4418

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Evans, Aaron S.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.

    2010-12-20

    Infrared pumping and its effect on the excitation of HCN molecules can be important when using rotational lines of HCN to probe dense molecular gas in galaxy nuclei. We report the first extragalactic detection of (sub)millimeter rotational lines of vibrationally excited HCN, in the dust-enshrouded nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. We estimate the excitation temperature of T{sub vib} {approx} 230 K between the vibrational ground and excited (v{sub 2} = 1) states. This excitation is most likely due to infrared radiation. At this high vibrational temperature the path through the v{sub 2} = 1 state must have a strong impact on the rotational excitation in the vibrational ground level, although it may not be dominant for all rotational levels. Our observations also revealed nearly confusion-limited lines of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, CS, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N at {lambda} {approx} 1 mm. Their relative intensities may also be affected by the infrared pumping.

  3. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  4. Treanor pumping of CO initiated by CO laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, W.; Lin, J.-X.; Subramaniam, V. V.; Havenith, M.; Rich, J. W.

    1989-02-01

    An experiment is discussed in which CO can be excited up to energies of several electronvolts by the absorption of infrared radiation from a relatively low-power CO laser. Furthermore, experimental results are examined through kinetic modelling. In the experiment, the beam of an intracavity-chopped CO laser operating on all lines at 500 mW and containing a few milliwatts of the fundamental ν= 1→0 band component, is focused into an absorption cell containing a mixture of CO and Ar. The absorption of this infrared radiation is monitored by the optoacoustic effect. A second CO laser operating cw and capable of providing 8 W on all lines but not lasing on the ν= 1→0 band component, is then focused into the same volume in the absorption cell. With both lasers simultaneously focused into the absorption cell, strong fluorescence from the irradiated region is detected by a photomultiplier tube. Modulation of the signal intensity with time is observed, and indicates chemical destruction of the CO in the cell. An analysis and kinetic modelling calculation of this experiment shows that it is possible to excite CO up to high vibrational quantum numbers (ν⩾40) at gas temperatures up to 800 K. by means of CO laser irradiation at the fundamental ν= 1→0 band component. One source responsible for the fluorescence signal observed in the experiment is identified as the 4th positive A 1Π→X 1Σ + spontaneous emission. Although the present kinetic model does not incorporate the chemical processes that may lead to the production of additional fluorescing species such as C 2, good agreement is obtained with the observed fluorescence signal characteristics.

  5. Quantum Cascade Lasers in Biomedical Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bird, Benjamin; Baker, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Technological advances, namely the integration of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) within an infrared (IR) microscope, are enabling the development of valuable label-free biomedical-imaging tools capable of targeting and detecting salient chemical species within practical clinical timeframes.

  6. [Infrared spectroscopy based on quantum cascade lasers].

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhong-Quan; Chen, Gang; Peng, Chen; Yuan, Wei-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are promising infrared coherent sources. Thanks to the quantum theory and band-gap engineering, QCL can access the wavelength in the range from 3 to 100 microm. Since the fingerprint spectrum of most gases are located in the mid-infrared range, mid-infrared quantum cascade laser based gas sensing technique has become the research focus world wide because of its high power, narrow linewidth and fast scanning. Recent progress in the QCL technology leads to a great improvement in laser output power and efficiency, which stimulates a fast development in the infrared laser spectroscopy. The present paper gives a broad review on the QCL based spectroscopy techniques according to their working principles. A discussion on their applications in gas sensing and explosive detecting is also given at the end of the paper.

  7. Site-Specific Dynamics of β-Sheet Peptides with (D) Pro-Gly Turns Probed by Laser-Excited Temperature-Jump Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Chi, Heng; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Turn residues and side-chain interactions play an important role for the folding of β-sheets. We investigated the conformational dynamics of a three-stranded β-sheet peptide ((D) P(D) P) and a two-stranded β-hairpin (WVYY-(D) P) by time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) infrared spectroscopy. Both peptide sequences contain (D) Pro-Gly residues that favor a tight β-turn. The three-stranded β-sheet (Ac-VFITS(D) PGKTYTEV(D) PGOKILQ-NH2 ) is stabilized by the turn sequences, whereas the β-hairpin (SWTVE(D) PGKYTYK-NH2 ) folding is assisted by both the turn sequence and hydrophobic cross-strand interactions. Relaxation times after the T-jump were monitored as a function of temperature and occur on a sub-microsecond time scale, (D) P(D) P being faster than WVYY-(D) P. The Xxx-(D) Pro tertiary amide provides a detectable IR band, allowing us to probe the dynamics site-specifically. The relative importance of the turn versus the intrastrand stability in β-sheet formation is discussed. PMID:26789931

  8. Site-Specific Dynamics of β-Sheet Peptides with (D) Pro-Gly Turns Probed by Laser-Excited Temperature-Jump Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Chi, Heng; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Turn residues and side-chain interactions play an important role for the folding of β-sheets. We investigated the conformational dynamics of a three-stranded β-sheet peptide ((D) P(D) P) and a two-stranded β-hairpin (WVYY-(D) P) by time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) infrared spectroscopy. Both peptide sequences contain (D) Pro-Gly residues that favor a tight β-turn. The three-stranded β-sheet (Ac-VFITS(D) PGKTYTEV(D) PGOKILQ-NH2 ) is stabilized by the turn sequences, whereas the β-hairpin (SWTVE(D) PGKYTYK-NH2 ) folding is assisted by both the turn sequence and hydrophobic cross-strand interactions. Relaxation times after the T-jump were monitored as a function of temperature and occur on a sub-microsecond time scale, (D) P(D) P being faster than WVYY-(D) P. The Xxx-(D) Pro tertiary amide provides a detectable IR band, allowing us to probe the dynamics site-specifically. The relative importance of the turn versus the intrastrand stability in β-sheet formation is discussed.

  9. Supersonic CO laser with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Buelow, H.; Zeyfang, E.

    1993-07-01

    A supersonic CO laser with a maximum output power of 990 W was developed. The gas is excited in a dielectrically stabilized radio-frequency discharge before it is cooled to a temperature of 90 K by the adiabatic expansion in a supersonic nozzle. After extraction of laser power the gas is recompressed by a supersonic diffuser and a Roots-pump system. No liquid nitrogen is needed for the operation of the laser. At a pressure of 500 mbar, the RF discharge could be operated homogeneously with a specific input power of 180 W/cu cm. It could be shown that the length of the discharge region and the distance between the discharge and the supersonic nozzle should be rather short. By this, the vibrational relaxation of the carbon monoxide is reduced and more laser power can be obtained. The laser power can be increased by using a folded resonator system. If the laser is operated at a low Fresnel number by inserting an aperture inside the cavity, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality can be obtained. Using a supersonic nozzle with a low Mach number enables the operation of the diffuser with a high pressure recovery. Thereby the overall system efficiency is increased.

  10. Optical modulation of quantum cascade laser with optimized excitation wavelength.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Chen, Gang; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer

    2013-04-15

    The excitation wavelength for all-optical modulation of a 10.6 μm mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade laser (QCL) was varied in order to obtain maximum modulation depth. Both amplitude and wavelength modulation experiments were conducted at 820 nm and 1550 nm excitation respectively, whereby the latter matches the interband transition in the QCL active region. Experimental results show that for continuous-wave mode-operated QCL, the efficiency of free carrier generation is doubled under 1550 nm excitation compared with 820 nm excitation, resulting in an increase of the amplitude modulation index from 19% to 36%. At the same time, the maximum wavelength shift is more than doubled from 1.05 nm to 2.80 nm. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrated the optical switching of a QCL operated in pulse mode by simple variation of the excitation wavelength.

  11. Imaging Electronic Excitation of NO by Ultrafast Laser Tunneling Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Akitaka; Fushitani, Mizuho; Yasuike, Tomokazu; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Tunneling-ionization imaging of photoexcitation of NO has been demonstrated by using few-cycle near-infrared intense laser pulses (8 fs, 800 nm, 1.1 ×1014 W /cm2 ). The ion image of N+ fragment ions produced by dissociative ionization of NO in the ground state, NO (X2Π ,2 π )→NO+ +e-→N+ +O +e- , exhibits a characteristic momentum distribution peaked at 45° with respect to the laser polarization direction. On the other hand, a broad distribution centered at ˜0 ° appears when the A2Σ+ (3 s σ ) excited state is prepared as the initial state by deep-UV photoexcitation. The observed angular distributions are in good agreement with the corresponding theoretical tunneling ionization yields, showing that the fragment anisotropy reflects changes of the highest-occupied molecular orbital by photoexcitation.

  12. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms.

  13. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  14. Spontaneous Raman and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy of Infrared Multiphoton-Excited Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    This thesis is a study of infrared multiphoton excitation using spontaneous and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The spontaneous Raman measurements provide information on the intramolecular vibrational energy distribution over the different modes. This information is complemented by the CARS measurements which make it possible to perform state-specific studies of the vibrational and rotational distribution. For SF_6, the time-resolved spontaneous Raman measurements show complete equilibrium of energy from the pump mode to other vibrational modes. In contrast, for smaller molecules such as CF_2 Cl_2, a nonthermal energy distribution is observed after excitation. These measurements therefore disprove the general belief that the intramolecular energy distribution in infrared multiphoton molecules is always in equilibrium. The CARS measurements on bulk OCS provide values for the anharmonicities and for the energy transfer rates between modes. In addition the spectra show a very fast relaxation of the vibrational energy within the nu_2 mode. For SO_2 , the CARS measurements show that it is the nu_1 symmetric stretching mode and not the overtone excitation of the nu_2 bending mode that is pumped by the CO_2 laser. Moreover, it is shown that the hot bands of SO_2 have been incorrectly assigned up to now. Corrected values for the anharmonicities are given. In the second half of the thesis, a pulsed supersonic molecular beam is added to the infrared multiphoton excitation study. Combined with the state-specific CARS technique, the collisionless and internally cooled molecules in the beam open the door to a more detailed study of the excitation process. Pure rotational CARS is used to study the change in rotational distribution of ethylene due to infrared excitation in the beam. The appearance of rotational holes reveal which rotational states are pumped by the CO _2 laser. For OCS the evolution of the overtone population into a thermal distribution is studied

  15. Infrared imaging results of an excited planar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Planar jets are used for many applications including heating, cooling, and ventilation. Generally such a jet is designed to provide good mixing within an enclosure. In building applications, the jet provides both thermal comfort and adequate indoor air quality. Increased mixing rates may lead to lower short-circuiting of conditioned air, elimination of dead zones within the occupied zone, reduced energy costs, increased occupant comfort, and higher indoor air quality. This paper discusses using an infrared imaging system to show the effect of excitation of a jet on the spread angle and on the jet mixing efficiency. Infrared imaging captures a large number of data points in real time (over 50,000 data points per image) providing significant advantages over single-point measurements. We used a screen mesh with a time constant of approximately 0.3 seconds as a target for the infrared camera to detect temperature variations in the jet. The infrared images show increased jet spread due to excitation of the jet. Digital data reduction and analysis show change in jet isotherms and quantify the increased mixing caused by excitation. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  16. Magnetically induced pulser laser excitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Leopold, K.

    1987-07-07

    An apparatus is described for exciting a laser having first and second electrodes and containing a gas mixture comprising: preionization means for preionizing the gas mixture, primary energy storage means for storing a sufficient electrical energy for the operation of the laser. Energy transfer means connects the primary energy storage means and the first electrode in an impedance matching manner for transferring the sufficient electrical energy the form of a main discharge voltage pulse, trigger pulse generating means forms a part of the primary energy storage means and for generating a trigger pulse in response to the main discharge voltage pulse. Secondary energy storage means stores an electrical energy, electromagnetic energy transfers means connected between the secondary energy storage means and the second electrode for transferring electromagnetically the electrical energy in the form of a high voltage pulse which breaks down the gas mixture. Switching means connects to the electromagnetic energy transfer means for initiating the electromagnetic energy transfer in response to the trigger pulse. The main discharge voltage pulse is longer in duration than the high voltage pulse. The two pulses are coincidental for a period of time to produce gas breakdown in the laser and to permit the energy transfer means for sufficient energy from the primary energy storage means to the laser.

  17. Titanium: Sapphire laser as an excitation source in two-photon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Armas, M.; Seaton, C.

    1997-02-01

    The passively mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser provides new opportunities for acquiring two-photon spectral data in the near-infrared, a region not commonly accessible to synchronously pumped dye lasers. This source generates pulses with peak powers near 100 kW at average powers over 1 W and is capable of yielding two-photon signals roughly two orders of magnitude larger than is possible with synchronously pumped dye lasers. However, the multimode output of this laser exhibits significant temporal and spectral pulse profile variations as the laser wavelength is tuned. As a consequence, peak powers of the titanium:sapphire laser can vary independently from average power across the tuning range. This wavelength dependence, coupled with the quadratic dependence of the two-photon signal upon the instantaneous power of the laser, precludes simple average power correction of nonlinear spectral band shapes. Here, we investigate the key properties of the titanium:sapphire laser as an excitation source for two-photon spectroscopy. We also identify a chemical reference suitable for obtaining source-corrected excitation spectra in the near-infrared using a double-beam, ratiometric approach; this is based on a source-independent two-photon excitation spectrum for the laser dye coumarin-480 that has been obtained with a single-frequency titanium:sapphire laser. From these data, correction factors are generated for correction of multimode source data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  18. New laser excitation method for modal analysis of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liangcai; Zhou, Quansheng; Wu, You; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A novel impulse laser excitation technique to determine the dynamic response of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) has been investigated. During the laser excitation experiments, MEMS structures are excited by the wide-band impact force created by the laser-target interaction, and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) is introduced to measure the vibration velocity of MEMS structures. A distinguishing characteristic of the methodology is that both the excitation and measurement are non-contact, which is especially suitable for the testing of MEMS microstructures that are not easily accessible. This novel excitation method and MEMS modal analysis system are verified by experiments on various cantilever beams. The results show that the laser excitation is capable of exciting the first three modes of cantilevers.

  19. Laser cooling via excitation of localized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    2007-07-01

    Under appropriate conditions, absorption of light by a solid can initiate a process by which it is cooled. In particular, energy is extracted from a material when its absorption of a photon is followed by emission of a photon of higher energy. This up-conversion requires some of the solid’s electrons to garner energy from atomic vibrations. Here, two schemes for laser cooling via localized electronic states are addressed. The first scheme utilizes the ground state and an excited state of a localized center. In this two-level scheme, the cooling process is initiated with photon absorption in the extreme low-energy tail of a localized state’s vibrationally broadened absorption spectrum. The subsequent atomic relaxation transfers energy of especially large vibratory atomic strains into electrical energy that is then extracted via photon emission. The second scheme involves the ground state and two excited states of a localized center. Cooling is facilitated when (i) the photoexcitation of an electron from its ground state to the lower excited level is followed by (ii) electron-phonon-induced promotion to the uppermost level and the subsequent (iii) return of the electron to its ground state with emission of a photon of higher energy than that of the absorbed photon. However, competing relaxation processes contribute to heating. The net cooling power per unit volume is maximized for both schemes, thereby determining characteristics of localized electronic systems that foster optical cooling. The cooling power per unit volume is greatest at high temperatures and falls rapidly as the thermal energy is reduced below each system’s luminescence Stokes shift. Moreover, cooling via the three-level scheme is most effective when (i) the energy separation between excited states is smaller than the thermal energy and (ii) the degeneracy of the highest-lying excited state is much larger than that of the center’s middle level. These restrictive conditions appear to be

  20. Detecting cracks in teeth using ultrasonic excitation and infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2001-06-01

    We describe a new technique, Thermosonics, that can be used to detect cracks in teeth. This technique was initially invented and developed for finding cracks in industrial and aerospace applications. The thermosonics technique employs a single short pulse (typically tens of milliseconds) of ultrasound excitation combined with infrared imaging. Ultrasonic waves vibrate the target material. This vibration causes rubbing and clapping between faying surfaces of any cracks which are present, resulting in a temperature rise around the cracks. An infrared camera is used to image the temperature distribution during and after the ultrasound excitation. Thus, cracks in teeth can be detected. Although this technique is still under development, it shows promise for clinical use by dentists.

  1. Integrated prepulse circuits for efficient excitation of gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, Dietmar E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Efficient impedance-matched gas laser excitation circuits integrally employ prepulse power generators. Magnetic switches are employed to both generate the prepulse and switch the prepulse onto the laser electrodes.

  2. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  3. Quantum-cascade lasers enable infrared sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, John F. )

    2003-05-01

    Quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor-injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well heterostructure. They are designed using band-structure engineering and grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The emission wavelength of a QCL is primarily a function of quantum-well thickness--thinner quantum wells lead to shorter wavelengths--and is essentially independent of the material bandgap. Quantum-cascade lasers can be designed to operate at any wavelength from 3.5 m (infrared) to 67 m (terahertz region) and are continuously tunable through ranges of a few inverse centimeters.1, 2, 3 This capability makes them well suited for spectroscopy in the infrared (see Laser Focus World, August 1999, p. 40).

  4. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  5. Quantum Cascade Lasers in Biomedical Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bird, Benjamin; Baker, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Technological advances, namely the integration of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) within an infrared (IR) microscope, are enabling the development of valuable label-free biomedical-imaging tools capable of targeting and detecting salient chemical species within practical clinical timeframes. PMID:26409774

  6. Beam uniformity analysis of infrared laser illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Dixon, Roberta E.; Proffitt, R. Patrick; Fung, Susan; Ramboyong, Len; Soyka, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    Uniform near-infrared (NIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) illuminators are desired in low ambient light detection, recognition, and identification of military applications. Factors that contribute to laser illumination image degradation are high frequency, coherent laser speckle and low frequency nonuniformities created by the laser or external laser cavity optics. Laser speckle analysis and beam uniformity improvements have been independently studied by numerous authors, but analysis to separate these two effects from a single measurement technique has not been published. In this study, profiles of compact, diode laser NIR and SWIR illuminators were measured and evaluated. Digital 12-bit images were recorded with a flat-field calibrated InGaAs camera with measurements at F/1.4 and F/16. Separating beam uniformity components from laser speckle was approximated by filtering the original image. The goal of this paper is to identify and quantify the beam quality variation of illumination prototypes, draw awareness to its impact on range performance modeling, and develop measurement techniques and methodologies for military, industry, and vendors of active sources.

  7. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  8. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  9. Strong excited state absorption (ESA) in Yb-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engholm, Magnus; Rydberg, Sara; Hammarling, Krister

    2013-03-01

    Excited state absorption (ESA) measurements performed on Yb-doped silica bers show the onset of a strong absorption band in the visible range. In this work, we perform experiments to investigate the possibility for ESA to be part of the induced optical losses (photodarkening) observed in Yb-doped ber lasers. Our results indicate that an ESA process, from the 2F5/2 excited state manifold in the Yb3+ ion to the charge-transfer state with absorption bands in the UV range, may constitute a transfer route for pump- and laser photons in the near-infrared range.

  10. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  11. The infrared photofragmentation of Ar + 2. Evidence of excited state population from dimer and cluster ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C. A.; Whitaker, B. J.; Knowles, P. J.; Stace, A. J.

    1992-03-01

    Argon dimer ions have been generated via three different techniques: (1) autoionization; (2) vertical ionization of neutral Ar2; (3) ionization and subsequent fragmentation of argon cluster ions. In experiments (2) and (3) the dimers and clusters are formed via the adiabatic expansion of argon in a supersonic beam. In each case Ar+2 ions have been mass selected and subjected to single-photon infrared excitation (912-1094 cm-1) using a line-tunable carbon dioxide laser in a crossed-beam arrangement. Only those Ar+2 ions with internal energies within 1000 cm-1 of a dissociation limit yield Ar+ photofragments, the kinetic energy spread of which has been measured using an electrostatic analyzer. The photofragment kinetic energy spectra of dimer ions formed by autoionization do not exhibit any dependence on the angle of laser polarization; it is proposed that such behavior is due to the presence of a high thermal rotational temperature (500 K). In contrast, the corresponding spectra of Ar+2 formed via vertical ionization, exhibit two quite distinct features, one of which shows a strong dependence on laser polarization angle. Calculations show that the latter behavior is most probably due to photodissociation out of an excited spin-orbit state of Ar+2. A very pronounced increase in Ar+2 infrared photodissociation signal is observed as a function of increasing nozzle stagnation pressure. To account for such behavior it is proposed that, following ionization, argon cluster ions fragment to give dimer ions in excited vibrational/rotational levels both in the electronic ground and an excited spin-orbit state.

  12. Explosive detection using infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildenbrand, J.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2009-01-01

    Stand-off and extractive explosive detection methods for short distances are investigated using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. A quantum cascade laser (QCL) system for TATP-detection by open path absorption spectroscopy in the gas phase was developed. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m was achieved. For explosives with lower vapor pressure an extractive hollow fiber based measurement system was investigated. By thermal desorption gaseous TATP or TNT is introduced into a heated fiber. The small sample volume and a fast gas exchange rate enable fast detection. TNT and TATP detection levels below 100 ng are feasible even in samples with a realistic contaminant background.

  13. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. Plasma wake excitation driven by lasers or particle beams is examined, and the implications of the different physical excitation mechanisms for accelerator design are discussed. Plasma-based accelerators have attracted considerable attention owing to the ultrahigh field gradients sustainable in a plasma wave, enabling compact accelerators. These relativistic plasma waves are excited by displacing electrons in a neutral plasma. Two basic mechanisms for excitation of plasma waves are actively being researched: (i) excitation by the nonlinear ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) of an intense laser or (ii) excitation by the space-charge force of a dense charged particle beam. There has been significant recent experimental success using lasers and particle beam drivers for plasma acceleration. In particular, for laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), the demonstration at LBNL in 2006 of high-quality, 1 GeV electron beams produced in approximately 3 cm plasma using a 40 TW laser. In 2007, for beam-driven plasma accelerators, or plasma-wakefield accelerators (PWFAs), the energy doubling over a meter to 42 GeV of a fraction of beam electrons on the tail of an electron beam by the plasma wave excited by the head was demonstrated at SLAC. These experimental successes have resulted in further interest in the development of plasma-based acceleration as a basis for a linear collider, and preliminary collider designs using laser drivers and beam drivers are being developed. The different physical mechanisms of plasma wave excitation, as well as the typical characteristics of the drivers, have implications for accelerator design. In the following, we identify the similarities and differences between wave excitation by lasers and particle beams. The field structure of the plasma wave driven by lasers or particle beams is discussed, as well as the

  14. Longitudinally Excited CO2 Laser with Short Laser Pulse like TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Nakamura, Kenshi; Goto, Tatsumi; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a short laser pulse similar to that of TEA and Q-switched CO2 lasers. A capacitor transfer circuit with a low shunt resistance provided rapid discharge and a sharp spike pulse with a short pulse tail. Specifically, a circuit with a resistance of 10 M Ω provided a spike pulse width of 103.3 ns and a pulse tail length of 61.9 μs, whereas a circuit with a shunt resistance of 100 Ω provided a laser pulse with a spike pulse width of 96.3 ns and a pulse tail length of 17.2 μs. The laser pulses from this longitudinally excited CO2 laser were used for processing a human tooth without carbonization and for glass marking without cracks.

  15. All-near-infrared multiphoton microscopy interrogates intact tissues at deeper imaging depths than conventional single- and two-photon near-infrared excitation microscopes.

    PubMed

    Sarder, Pinaki; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Akers, Walter J; Tang, Rui; Sudlow, Gail P; Egbulefu, Christopher; Achilefu, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    The era of molecular medicine has ushered in the development of microscopic methods that can report molecular processes in thick tissues with high spatial resolution. A commonality in deep-tissue microscopy is the use of near-infrared (NIR) lasers with single- or multiphoton excitations. However, the relationship between different NIR excitation microscopic techniques and the imaging depths in tissue has not been established. We compared such depth limits for three NIR excitation techniques: NIR single-photon confocal microscopy (NIR SPCM), NIR multiphoton excitation with visible detection (NIR/VIS MPM), and all-NIR multiphoton excitation with NIR detection (NIR/NIR MPM). Homologous cyanine dyes provided the fluorescence. Intact kidneys were harvested after administration of kidney-clearing cyanine dyes in mice. NIR SPCM and NIR/VIS MPM achieved similar maximum imaging depth of ∼100 μm. The NIR/NIR MPM enabled greater than fivefold imaging depth (>500 μm) using the harvested kidneys. Although the NIR/NIR MPM used 1550-nm excitation where water absorption is relatively high, cell viability and histology studies demonstrate that the laser did not induce photothermal damage at the low laser powers used for the kidney imaging. This study provides guidance on the imaging depth capabilities of NIR excitation-based microscopic techniques and reveals the potential to multiplex information using these platforms.

  16. Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Thomas E.; Wijk, Kasper van; Snieder, Roel; Willis, Mark E.

    2011-12-30

    We show that elastic waves can be excited at a fracture inside a transparent sample by focusing laser light directly onto this fracture. The associated displacement field, measured by a laser interferometer, has pronounced waves that are diffracted at the fracture tips. We confirm that these are tip diffractions from direct excitation of the fracture by comparing them with tip diffractions from scattered elastic waves excited on the exterior of the sample. Being able to investigate fractures - in this case in an optically transparent material - via direct excitation opens the door to more detailed studies of fracture properties in general.

  17. Oxide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin; Jiang, Xin

    2011-06-01

    We present an overview of rare-earth doped heavy metal oxide and oxy-fluoride glasses which show promise as host materials for lasers operating in the 2-5 μm spectral region for medical, military and sensing applications. By engineering glass composition and purity, tellurite and germanate glasses can support transmission up to and beyond 5 μm and can have favourable thermal, mechanical and environmental stability compared to fluoride glasses. We discuss techniques for glass purification and water removal for enhanced infrared transmission. By comparing the material properties of the glass, and spectroscopic performance of selected rare-earth dopant ions we can identify promising compositions for fibre and bulk lasers in the mid-infrared. Tellurite glass has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable host material for efficient and compact lasers in the {2 μm spectral region in fibre and bulk form and the next challenge is to extend the operating range further into the infrared region where silica fibre is not sufficiently transparent, and provide an alternative to fluoride glass and fibre.

  18. A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Stephan J.; Frings, Andreas; Ren, Ling; Gomolka, Amadeus; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Hansen, Nils-Owe; Jowett, Nathan; Richard, Gisbert; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas. PMID:25781907

  19. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  20. Mid-Infrared Laser Orbital Septal Tightening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Eugene A.; Li, Michael; Lazarow, Frances B.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed facial aesthetic surgeries. While myriad techniques exist to improve the appearance of the lower eyelids, there is no clear consensus on the optimal management of the orbital septum. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for orbital septal tightening, and to determine whether modest use of this laser would provide some degree of clinical efficacy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Direct laser irradiation of ex vivo bovine tissue was used to determine appropriate laser dosimetry using infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography before conducting a pilot clinical study in 5 patients. Laser irradiation of the lower eyelid orbital septum was performed through a transconjunctival approach. Standardized preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken for each patient and evaluated by 6 unbiased aesthetic surgeons. EXPOSURE Use of the Ho:YAG laser for orbital septal tightening. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE To determine appropriate laser dosimetry, infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography were used to monitor temperature and tissue shape changes of ex vivo bovine tissue that was subjected to direct laser irradiation. For the clinical study, preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated by 6 surgeons on a 10-point Likert scale. RESULTS Optical coherence tomography demonstrated that laser irradiation of bovine tissue to a temperature range of 60°C to 80°C resulted in an increase in thickness of up to 2-fold. There were no complications or adverse cosmetic outcomes in the patient study. Patient satisfaction with the results of surgery averaged 7 on a 10-point Likert scale. For 3 patients, 3 (50%) of the evaluators believed there was a mild improvement in appearance of the lower eyelids after surgery. The remaining patients were thought to have no significant changes. CONCLUSIONS AND

  1. Dynamics of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Dongqing; Li, Yunxuan; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-06-01

    Resonant ablation is beneficial to avoiding uncontrollable subsurface damages in the laser ablation of polymers. In this paper the dynamics of mid-infrared laser resonant ablation of polylactic acid and toluene was calculated by using fluid dynamic equations. The merits and drawbacks of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation of high molecular weight polymers have been discussed.

  2. A tunable mid-infrared laser source for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Many remote sensing needs can be effectively addressed with a tunable laser source in the mid infrared. One potential laser source is an optical parametric oscillator and amplifier system pumped by a near infrared solid state laser. Advantages of such a system and progress made at NASA Langley Research Center to date on such a system are described.

  3. Tunable infrared laser sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libatique, Nathaniel Joseph C.

    diode-pumped tunable mid-infrared (3 mum) fiber laser. (5) New electronically-controlled continuously wavelength-tunable near-infrared sources based on advanced electro-optic scanners fabricated from poled LiTaO3 crystals. (6) The development of continuously tunable electronically-controlled FBG-referenced near infrared sources suitable for trace gas spectroscopy.

  4. Long-Lived Excited-State Dynamics of i-Motif Structures Probed by Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keane, Páraic M; Baptista, Frederico R; Gurung, Sarah P; Devereux, Stephen J; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Brazier, John A; Cardin, Christine J; Kelly, John M; Quinn, Susan J

    2016-05-01

    UV-generated excited states of cytosine (C) nucleobases are precursors to mutagenic photoproduct formation. The i-motif formed from C-rich sequences is known to exhibit high yields of long-lived excited states following UV absorption. Here the excited states of several i-motif structures have been characterized following 267 nm laser excitation using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR). All structures possess a long-lived excited state of ∼300 ps and notably in some cases decays greater than 1 ns are observed. These unusually long-lived lifetimes are attributed to the interdigitated DNA structure which prevents direct base stacking overlap.

  5. Applications of the Infrared Free Electron Laser in Nonlinear and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain

    1990-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) have been envisioned as novel radiation sources tunable over a wide spectral range. In this dissertation I report two types of experiments that used the infrared FEL, Mark III, to study nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers and the possibility of long lived vibrational excitations in acetanilide, a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal.

  6. Infrared laser and Fourier transform spectroscopy of CCH: A highly excited bending vibration of the X ˜ 2Σ+ state and unique Renner-Teller levels of the A ˜ 2 Π state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokaryk, D. W.; Vervloet, M.; Phi, Tân-Trào

    2015-04-01

    New infrared bands of the linear carbon chain radical CCH are reported: X ˜ (0140 0)2Σ+ - X ˜ (000 0)2Σ+, recorded with a near-infrared diode laser spectrometer, and A ˜ (0 1 0) 22 Δ - X ˜ (011 0)2 Π, A ˜ (0 2 0) 32 Φ - X ˜ (022 0)2 Δ and A ˜ (0 3 0) 42 Γ - X ˜ (033 0)2 Φ, recorded in emission with a Fourier transform spectrometer. All of the upper levels in the transitions appear to be strongly affected by interactions with other levels. The data demonstrate the excellence of calculations by Tarroni and Carter (2003), which determine the upper state level positions, spin-orbit splitting A, and rotational parameter B to a remarkable level of accuracy, considering the very complex nature of the interactions between the X ˜ 2Σ+ and A ˜ 2 Π electronic states in the regions spanned by the observed levels.

  7. An infrared search for extraterrestrial laser signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of project SETI is on microwave frequencies, where receivers fundamentally have the best sensitivity for the detection of narrow band signals. Such receivers, when coupled to existing radio telescopes, form an optimum system for broad area searches over the sky. Detection of narrow band infrared signals is best done with a laser heterodyne reciever similar in function to a microwave spectral line receiver. A receiver was built for astrophysical observations at 30 THz (10 microns) and the spectrometer is being adapted for SETI work. The receiver uses a small CO2 laser as the local oscillator, a HgCdTe diode as the photomixer, and a multichannel intermediate frequency (IF) filterbank. An advanced multichannel IF processor is now being built to detect infrared line radiation in 1000 spectral channels each 1 MHz wide. When completed this processor will be used with a ground based telescope next year for a survey of several hundred selected stars for narrow band CO2 laser signals at 30 THz.

  8. Phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, A. A.; Efimkov, V. F.; Zubarev, I. G.; Mikhailov, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown experimentally that phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation calls for a stable difference in arm lengths, as in a classical Michelson interferometer. A scheme with automatic compensation for fluctuations of interferometer arm lengths has been proposed and experimentally implemented. This scheme makes it possible to perform stable phasing of two laser channels under standard laboratory conditions.

  9. Internal Cell Manipulation Using Infrared Laser Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkin, A.; Dziedzic, J. M.

    1989-10-01

    The ability of infrared laser traps to apply controlled forces inside of living cells is utilized in a study of the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of plant cells. It was discovered that infrared traps are capable of plucking out long filaments of cytoplasm inside cells. These filaments exhibit the viscoelastic properties of plastic flow, necking, stress relaxation, and set, thus providing a unique way to probe the local rheological properties of essentially unperturbed living cells. A form of internal cell surgery was devised that is capable of making gross changes in location of such relatively large organelles as chloroplasts and nuclei. The utility of this technique for the study of cytoplasmic streaming, internal cell membranes, and organelle attachment was demonstrated.

  10. Internal cell manipulation using infrared laser traps

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkin, A.; Dziedzic, J.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The ability of infrared laser traps to apply controlled forces inside of living cells is utilized in a study of the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of plant cells. It was discovered that infrared traps are capable of plucking out long filaments of cytoplasm inside cells. These filaments exhibit the viscoelastic properties of plastic flow, necking, stress relaxation, and set, thus providing a unique way to probe the local rheological properties of essentially unperturbed living cells. A form of internal cell surgery was devised that is capable of making gross changes in location of such relatively large organelles as chloroplasts and nuclei. The utility of this technique for the study of cytoplasmic streaming, internal cell membranes, and organelle attachment was demonstrated.

  11. Internal cell manipulation using infrared laser traps.

    PubMed Central

    Ashkin, A; Dziedzic, J M

    1989-01-01

    The ability of infrared laser traps to apply controlled forces inside of living cells is utilized in a study of the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of plant cells. It was discovered that infrared traps are capable of plucking out long filaments of cytoplasm inside cells. These filaments exhibit the viscoelastic properties of plastic flow, necking, stress relaxation, and set, thus providing a unique way to probe the local rheological properties of essentially unperturbed living cells. A form of internal cell surgery was devised that is capable of making gross changes in location of such relatively large organelles as chloroplasts and nuclei. The utility of this technique for the study of cytoplasmic streaming, internal cell membranes, and organelle attachment was demonstrated. Images PMID:2813368

  12. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  13. Lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud Hanafy; Bugayev, Aleksey; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is used to probe the lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony thin film. The temporal hierarchies of the intensity and position of diffraction orders are monitored. The femtosecond laser excitation of antimony film was found to lead to initial compression after the laser pulse, which gives way to tension vibrating at new equilibrium displacement. A damped harmonic oscillator model, in which the hot electron-blast force contributes to the driving force of oscillations in lattice spacing, is used to interpret the data. The electron-phonon energy-exchange rate and the electronic Grüneisen parameter were obtained.

  14. Investigation of germanium Raman lasers for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Raman lasers based on the germanium material system operating in the mid-infrared beyond the germanium two-photon absorption cut-off wavelength of 3.17 μm. The effective Raman gain has been estimated in waveguides based on germanium-on-silicon, germanium-on-SOI and germanium-on-Si3N4 technology platforms as a function of their crystallographic orientations. Furthermore, general design guidelines have been determined by means of a comparative analysis of Raman laser performance, i.e. the threshold power, polarization and directionality of the excited Stokes signals as a function of racetrack cavity length and directional-coupler dimensions. Finally, the emitted Raman laser power has been evaluated as a function of overall propagation losses and operative wavelengths up to 3.8 μm, while the time dynamics of Raman lasers has been simulated assuming continuous and pulse waves as input pump signals.

  15. Flashlamp-excited dye laser therapy for treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, David J.

    1990-06-01

    Flashlamp excited dye laser therapy represents an exciting new advance in the treatment of a variety of cutaneous vascular lesions. Portwine stains, angiomas and telangiectases can be treated in all age groups with this laser system. This paper will review the physics of flashlamp dye laser photothermolysis. The differences between argon laser photocoagulation and flashlamp excited dye laser therapy will be reviewed.

  16. Shock excited far-infrared molecular emission around T Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoglio, L.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Caux, E.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Lorenzetti, D.; Palla, F.; Pezzuto, S.; Saraceno, P.; Smith, H. A.; White, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    The first complete far-infrared spectrum of T Tau has been obtained with the LWS spectrometer on-board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which detected strong emission from high-J (J=14-25) CO, para- and ortho-H_2O and OH transitions over the wavelength range from 40 to 190 mu m. In addition the [OI]63mu m, [OI]145mu m and [CII]158mu m atomic lines were also detected. Most of the observed molecular emission can be explained by a single emission region at T ~ 300-900 K and n_H_2 ~ 105-6cm-3, with a diameter of about 2-3 arcsec. This corresponds to a very compact region of 300 - 400 AU at the distance of 140 pc. A higher temperature component seems to be needed to explain the highest excitation CO and H_2O lines. We derive a water abundance of 1-7 * 10-5 and an OH abundance of ~ 3* 10-5 with respect to molecular hydrogen, implying H_2O and OH enhancements by more than a factor of 10 with respect to the expected ambient gas abundance. The observed cooling in the various species amounts to 0.04 Lsun, comparable to the mechanical luminosity of the outflow, indicating that the stellar winds could be responsible of the line excitation through shocks. In order to explain the observed molecular cooling in T Tau in terms of C-type shock models, we hypothesise that the strong far-ultraviolet radiation field photodissociates water in favour of OH. This would explain the large overabundance of OH observed. The estimated relatively high density and compactness of the observed emission suggest that it originates from the shocks taking place at the base of the molecular outflow emission, in the region where the action of the stellar winds from the two stars of the binary system is important. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) with the participation of ISAS and NASA

  17. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  18. Excitation-Selectable Nanoprobe for Tumor Fluorescence Imaging and Near-Infrared Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanchun; Chen, Qun; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    The combination of diagnostics and therapeutics is growing rapidly in cancer treatment. Here, using upconversion nanoparticles coated with chitosan conjugated with a targeting molecule and loaded with indocyanine green (ICG), we develop an excitation-selectable nanoprobe with highly integrated functionalities, including the emission of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, strong optical absorption in the NIR region and high photostability. After intravenous injection in tumor bearing mice, the nanoprobes target to the tumor vascular system. NIR lasers (980 and 808 nm) are then selectively applied to the mice. The results show that the emitted upconversion fluorescence and NIR fluorescence can be used in a complementary manner for high signal/noise ratio and sensitive tumor imaging for more precise tumor localization. Highly effective photothermal therapy is realized using 808 nm laser irradiation, and the upconversion fluorescence at 654 nm can be used for monitoring treatment effect during the thermal therapy. In summary, using the nanoprobes, outstanding therapeutic efficacy could be realized through flexible excitation control, precise tumor localization, highly effective photothermal conversion and real-time treatment monitoring. The nanofabrication strategy highlights the promise of nanoparticles in cancer theranostics. PMID:27301175

  19. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under near-infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-05-01

    The negatively charged NV defect center (NV-) in diamond has become prominent for applications in quantum information, nanoscale magnetic and electric field sensing, and fluorescent biological markers. Switching between NV- and neutral charge states (NV0) have been extensively studied and modeled using exciting laser wavelengths that are shorter than the NV- zero-phonon line (ZPL), and typically result in decreased fluorescence from the NV- state. In this work, we report on the experimental observation that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with near-infrared (1064 nm) light, resulting in increased fluorescence from the NV- state. We have observed this effect in both ensembles of NVs in bulk diamond, and in diamond nanocrystals, and find that it is robust both at room and low temperature. We carried out microwave and two-color excitation combined with spectral and time-resolved experimental studies. We used rate-equation modeling and find evidence for competition between one-photon and two-photon processes for hole and electron ionization. This finding may help elucidate the study of the NV energy level structure, and impact recently emerging research in single-shot measurement of the NV- spin state via spin-to-charge conversion.

  20. Dual state antiphase excitability in optically injected quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, B.; Goulding, D.; Tykalewicz, B.; Fedorov, N.; Dubinkin, I.; Hegarty, S. P.; Huyet, G.; Erneux, T.; Viktorov, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    Depending on device and operating parameters, the emission of lasers based on InAs quantum dot (QD) material may come from the ground state (GS) only, from the first excited state (ES) only or simultaneously from both states. When the emission is from the ES only, optical injection at the GS frequency can completely suppress the ES output and instead, phase-locked emission from the GS can be obtained. We report on a variety of non-linear phenomena obtained when the frequency of the master laser is varied revealing two antiphase, dual-state excitable regimes.

  1. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development. PMID:23708442

  2. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development.

  3. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser.

  4. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E; Senesac, Larry R; Rajic, Slobodan; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Smith, Barton; Datskos, Panos G

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  5. The examination of berberine excited state by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lingli; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Hui; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Yao, Side; Wang, Shilong

    2009-07-01

    The property of the excited triplet state of berberine (BBR) was investigated by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm in acetonitrile. The transient absorption spectra of the excited triplet BBR were obtained in acetonitrile, which have an absorption maximum at 420 nm. And the ratio of excitation to ionization of BBR in acetonitrile solvent was calculated. The self-decay and self-quenching rate constants, and the absorption coefficient of 3BBR* were investigated and the excited state quantum yield was determined. Furthermore utilizing the benzophenone (BEN) as a triplet sensitizer, and the β-carotene (Car) as an excited energy transfer acceptor, the assignment of 3BBR* was further confirmed and the related energy transfer rate constants were also determined.

  6. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  7. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems. PMID:8175359

  8. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems.

  9. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under 1064-nm laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    The photophysics and charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has been extensively investigated, but is still not fully understood. In contrast to previous work, we find that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with low power near-infrared (1064-nm) light, resulting in increased photoluminescence from the NV- state. We used a combination of spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments and rate-equation modeling to conclude that NV0 converts to NV- via absorption of 1064-nm photons from the valence band of diamond. We report fast quenching and recovery of the photoluminescence from both charge states of the NV center under low power 1064-nm laser excitation, which has not been previously observed. We also find, using optically detected magnetic resonance experiments, that the charge transfer process mediated by the 1064-nm laser is spin dependent.

  10. Vibrational relaxation in infrared excited SF6.Arn+ cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrill, S.; Stace, A. J.

    1998-02-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the increase in internal temperature that should accompany the partitioning of a single quantum of vibrational energy within a small SF6ṡArn+ cluster ion. For each value of n, the kinetic energy release associated with unimolecular (metastable) decay is used to establish an initial temperature for the cluster ion; ˜950 cm-1 of vibrational energy is then deposited into the ν3 vibrational mode of the SF6 moiety (using a CO2 laser). This step promotes additional dissociation which is accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. From a model due to Klots [J. Chem. Phys. 58, 5364 (1973)] photofragment kinetic energies are predicted on the assumption that energy from the photon is partitioned statistically and leads to an overall increase in the temperature of each ion. Comparisons of experimental and calculated results clearly show that the infrared photoexcitation of SF6 in the ν3 mode leads to incomplete energy randomization. An improved description of the energy relaxation process is provided on the assumption that SF6 undergoes partial vibrational relaxation to either the ν2 or ν4 mode. The energy difference (˜300 cm-1) is then randomized throughout each cluster ion, and is reflected in the magnitude of the measured kinetic energy release accompanying the loss of a single argon atom. The estimated time scale for this process is an order of magnitude faster than the experimentally measured time for the total relaxation of SF6 (ν3=1) in an argon matrix.

  11. Radio frequency excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.L.; Tulip, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reports on the operation of radio frequency (rf) excited carbon dioxide waveguide lasers. An efficiency of greater than 10% has been achieved with a maximum power of 21 W. The effects of bore size, waveguide fabrication techniques, and gas mixture are discussed.

  12. Atomic excitation and acceleration in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Eichmann, U.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic excitation in the tunneling regime of a strong-field laser-matter interaction has been recently observed. It is conveniently explained by the concept of frustrated tunneling ionization (FTI), which naturally evolves from the well-established tunneling picture followed by classical dynamics of the electron in the combined laser field and Coulomb field of the ionic core. Important predictions of the FTI model such as the n distribution of Rydberg states after strong-field excitation and the dependence on the laser polarization have been confirmed in experiments. The model also establishes a sound basis to understand strong-field acceleration of neutral atoms in strong laser fields. The experimental observation has become possible recently and initiated a variety of experiments such as atomic acceleration in an intense standing wave and the survival of Rydberg states in strong laser fields. Furthermore, the experimental investigations on strong-field dissociation of molecules, where neutral excited fragments after the Coulomb explosion of simple molecules have been observed, can be explained. In this review, we introduce the subject and give an overview over relevant experiments supplemented by new results.

  13. Suppression of excited-state absorption in laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Kolesov, Roman; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2004-10-01

    Currently, a lot of experimental effort in solid-state optics is devoted to searching for laser materials suitable for tunable lasing, primarily in UV and VUV spectral regions. Researchers mainly focus on optical crystals doped with either transition metal or rare-earth ions. The latter ones doped into wide bandgap dielectric crystals have spectrally broad vibronic emission bands associated with 4fn-15d â" 4fn interconfigurational transitions, whose energies lie mostly in UV and VUV regions of the spectrum. The transitions are electric-dipole-allowed, therefore have large absorption and emission cross-sections, and are promising for efficient tunable laser action. However, in almost all promising crystals laser action in UV and VUV is hindered or completely prohibited due to excited-state absorption (ESA), i.e. absorption from metastable laser levels to higher-energy states, which occurs at emission or/and pump wavelengths. A method of suppression of losses due to excited-state absorption (ESA) in laser crystals is proposed, based on a well-known phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Absorption from a populated excited electronic state can be reduced under the action of an additional driving coherent field, resonantly coupling the terminal state of ESA to some intermediate discrete state.

  14. Excited states in DNA strands investigated by ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments on carefully selected DNA model compounds probe the effects of base stacking, base pairing, and structural disorder on excited electronic states formed by UV absorption in single and double DNA strands. Direct π-orbital overlap between two stacked bases in a dinucleotide or in a longer single strand creates new excited states that decay orders of magnitude more slowly than the generally subpicosecond excited states of monomeric bases. Half or more of all excited states in single strands decay in this manner. Ultrafast mid-IR transient absorption experiments reveal that the long-lived excited states in a number of model compounds are charge transfer states formed by interbase electron transfer, which subsequently decay by charge recombination. The lifetimes of the charge transfer states are surprisingly independent of how the stacked bases are oriented, but disruption of π-stacking, either by elevating temperature or by adding a denaturing co-solvent, completely eliminates this decay channel. Time-resolved emission measurements support the conclusion that these states are populated very rapidly from initial excitons. These experiments also reveal the existence of populations of emissive excited states that decay on the nanosecond time scale. The quantum yield of these states is very small for UVB/UVC excitation, but increases at UVA wavelengths. In double strands, hydrogen bonding between bases perturbs, but does not quench, the long-lived excited states. Kinetic isotope effects on the excited-state dynamics suggest that intrastrand electron transfer may couple to interstrand proton transfer. By revealing how structure and non-covalent interactions affect excited-state dynamics, on-going experimental and theoretical studies of excited states in DNA strands can advance understanding of fundamental photophysics in other nanoscale systems.

  15. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  16. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J.

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  17. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  18. Electronically Excited C2 from Laser Photodissociated C60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Scott, Carl D.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C2 and, at early times, also from a black body continuum. The C2 radiation is observed only when C60 is excited by green (532 nm) and not with IR (1064 nm) laser radiation at energy densities of about 1.5 J/square cm. Transient measurements indicate that there are two characteristic periods of decay of radiation. The first period, lasting about 2 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 0.3 micro seconds. The second period, lasting at least 50 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 5 micro seconds. These characteristic times are thought to be associated with cooling of C60 molecules or nanosized carbon particles during the early period; and with electronically excited C2 that is a decomposition product of laser excited C60, C58, ... molecules during the later period.

  19. Dynamics Of Electronic Excitation Of Solids With Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2010-10-08

    When ultrashort laser pulses irradiate a solid, photoabsorption by electrons in conduction band produces nonequilibrium highly energetic free electrons gas. We study the ionization and excitation of the electronic subsystem in a semiconductor and a metal (solid silicon and aluminum, respectively). The irradiating femtosecond laser pulse has a duration of 10 fs and a photon energy of h-bar {omega} = 38 eV. The classical Monte Carlo method is extended to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons excited to the conduction band. In the case of semiconductors this applies to the holes as well. Conduction band electrons and valence band holes induce secondary excitation and ionization processes which we simulate event by event. We discuss the transient electron dynamics with respect to the differences between semiconductors and metals. For metals the electronic distribution is split up into two branches: a low energy distribution as a slightly distorted Fermi-distribution and a long high energy tail. For the case of semiconductors it is split into two parts by the band gap. To thermalize, these excited electronic subsystems need longer times than the characteristic pulse duration. Therefore, the analysis of experimental data with femtosecond lasers must be based on non-equilibrium concepts.

  20. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  1. [Measurement and evaluation of middle infrared and long infrared dual-band laser emitting spectrum].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sheng-fu; Luo, Wei; Zou, Qian-jin; Yan, Bao-zhu

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 was selected as measuring equipment based on spectrum characteristics of a middle infrared and long infrared dual-band (DF & CO2) laser on account of problems, such as blending of CO2 spectrum and the third level of DF spectrum, existing in grating monochromator and spectrophotometer. Simulating measurement and real measurement of dual-band laser spectrum were explored after validating blackbody radiation response function of Tensor37. Effective data including spectrum composition, peak fluctuation, wavelength accuracy and relative intensity were evaluated for calculating gain media parameters, optimizing operating parameters and infrared application of dual-band laser.

  2. Time-resolved infrared-spectroscopic observation of relaxation and reaction processes during and after infrared-multiphoton excitation of 12CF3I and 13CF3I with shaped nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, Martin; Schwarz, René; Seyfang, Georg

    1992-06-01

    We have produced shaped infrared laser pulses of several kinds ranging from about 2-100 ns duration using a line tuned CO2 laser combined with intracavity absorbers and a CdTe electro-optical switch. The time-dependent infrared absorption of 12CF3I and 13CF3I during and after infrared-multiphoton excitation with these pulses was followed by means of a line tuned continuous wave-CO2 laser and a fast HgCdTe infrared detector (time resolution about 1 ns). The effective time-dependent absorption cross section shows fluence-dependent decay at large fluence with an effective exponential decay constant kI,σ≂1.12 cm2 J-1. This can be interpreted by first generation and then decay by further radiative pumping of highly excited levels of CF3I. The results have been analyzed by master equation modeling using a nonlinear case B/C master equation for multiphoton excitation and very simple models for the absorption properties of highly excited molecules. After nanosecond excitation to very high levels, one finds unimolecular decay CF3I→CF3+I with distinct rate constants (2±1)×108 and (5±4)×106 s-1, which corresponds to ensembles of molecules differing by one CO2 -laser quantum of energy, in agreement with unimolecular rate theory and master equation models. The most striking observation is a slow, collision-free intramolecular rovibrational redistribution process observed by real time spectroscopy on the nanosecond time scale for molecules excited by modest fluence corresponding to typical average energies of five CO2 laser quanta and somewhat more.

  3. Synthesis of materials with infrared and ultraviolet lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) infrared (CO/sub 2/) laser synthesis of silane (SiH/sub 4/) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/); (2) excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methyl- and chloro-substituted silanes; and, (3) excimer (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusions about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application. 19 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Calculating singlet excited states: Comparison with fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of coumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Uroos, Maliha; Calladine, James A.; Murphy, Thomas S.; Hamilton, Michelle; Clark, Ian P.; Towrie, Michael; Dowden, James; Besley, Nicholas A.; George, Michael W.

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the ground state, the calculation of the infrared (IR) spectroscopy of molecular singlet excited states represents a substantial challenge. Here, we use the structural IR fingerprint of the singlet excited states of a range of coumarin dyes to assess the accuracy of density functional theory based methods for the calculation of excited state IR spectroscopy. It is shown that excited state Kohn-Sham density functional theory provides a high level of accuracy and represents an alternative approach to time-dependent density functional theory for simulating the IR spectroscopy of singlet excited states.

  5. Calculating singlet excited states: Comparison with fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W D; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Uroos, Maliha; Calladine, James A; Murphy, Thomas S; Hamilton, Michelle; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; Dowden, James; Besley, Nicholas A; George, Michael W

    2015-04-21

    In contrast to the ground state, the calculation of the infrared (IR) spectroscopy of molecular singlet excited states represents a substantial challenge. Here, we use the structural IR fingerprint of the singlet excited states of a range of coumarin dyes to assess the accuracy of density functional theory based methods for the calculation of excited state IR spectroscopy. It is shown that excited state Kohn-Sham density functional theory provides a high level of accuracy and represents an alternative approach to time-dependent density functional theory for simulating the IR spectroscopy of singlet excited states.

  6. Laser Doppler velocimetry based on the optoacoustic effect in a RF-excited CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teaghee; Choi, Jong Woon; Kim, Yong Pyung

    2012-09-01

    We present a compact optoacoustic laser Doppler velocimetry method that utilizes the self-mixing effect in a RF-excited CO(2) laser. A portion of a Doppler-shifted laser beam, produced by irradiating a single wavelength laser beam on a moving object, is mixed with an originally existing laser beam inside a laser cavity. The fine change of pressure in the laser cavity modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency is detected by a condenser microphone in the laser tube. In our studies, the frequency of the Doppler signal due to the optoacoustic effect was detected as high as 50 kHz. Our measurements also confirmed that the signal varied linearly with the velocity of the external scatterer (the moving object) and the cosine of the angle between the laser beam and the velocity vector of the object.

  7. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  8. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  9. Asymmetric laser excitation in chiral molecules: quantum simulations for a proposed experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Dominik; Shibl, Mohamed F.; González, Leticia

    2003-04-01

    Quantum dynamical simulations based on ab initio potentials show that a single linearly polarized laser pulse (infrared or ultraviolet) can selectively excite one enantiomer from a racemic mixture. The degeneracy of the chiral pair is broken and a sequential reaction can distinguish between the two enantiomers based on energetic criteria. For instance, the undesired enantiomer can be photodestructed and the products can be probed using mass spectroscopy. The proposed scheme is applied to H 2POSD, which has a low interconversion barrier and to a chiral olefin possessing stable enantiomers.

  10. Infrared laser in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders, arthrogenous pain

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, T.L.

    1989-05-01

    The fast removal of intra-articular inflammation of the temporomandibular joint in five different patients after infrared laser application is described. Parameters of clinical evaluation was maximum mouth opening and subjective pain. The application of infrared laser of 700 Hz frequency for 3 minutes during five consecutive days at the skin over the painful area of the temporomandibular joint was used. However, the importance of concomitant mandibular stabilization is stressed to achieve optimal result.

  11. Evaluation of paint coating thickness variations based on pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Vrabie, V.; Bodnar, J. L.; Marthe, J.; Cauwe, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a pulsed Infrared thermography technique using a homogeneous heat provided by a laser source is used for the non-destructive evaluation of paint coating thickness variations. Firstly, numerical simulations of the thermal response of a paint coated sample are performed. By analyzing the thermal responses as a function of thermal properties and thickness of both coating and substrate layers, optimal excitation parameters of the heating source are determined. Two characteristic parameters were studied with respect to the paint coating layer thickness variations. Results obtained using an experimental test bench based on the pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique are compared with those given by a classical Eddy current technique for paint coating variations from 5 to 130 μm. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach and suggest that the pulsed Infrared thermography technique presents good perspectives to characterize the heterogeneity of paint coating on large scale samples with other heating sources.

  12. Nuclear Excitation by a Strong Short Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenmueller, Hans A.

    2011-05-06

    We derive the conditions on laser energy and photon number under which a short strong laser pulse excites a collective nuclear mode. We use the Giant Dipole Resonance as a representative example, and a random-matrix description of the fine-structure states and perturbation theory as tools. We identify the relevant observable as the nuclear time-decay function. That function is the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the associated scattering matrix and contains information not otherwise available. We evaluate that function in specific cases and show that it may deviate significantly from an exponential.

  13. Tabletop Transient Collisional Excitation X-Ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Li, Y; Osterheld, A L; Nilsen, J; Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Hunter, J R; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T A; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-09-03

    Recent transient collisional excitation x-ray laser experiments are reported using the COMET tabletop laser driver at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Ne-like and Ni-like ion x-ray laser schemes have been investigated with a combination of long 600 ps and short {approximately}1 ps high power laser pulses with 5-10 J total energy. We show small signal gain saturation for x-ray lasers when a reflection echelon traveling wave geometry is utilized. A gain length product of 18 has been achieved for the Ni-like Pd 4d{r_arrow}4p J=0-1 line at 147 {angstrom}, with an estimated output of {approximately}10{micro}J. Strong lasing on the 119 {angstrom} Ni-like Sn line has also been observed. To our knowledge this is the first time gain saturation has been achieved on a tabletop laser driven scheme and is the shortest wavelength tabletop x-ray laser demonstrated to date. In addition, we present preliminary results of the characterization of the line focus uniformity for a Ne-like ion scheme using L-shell spectroscopy.

  14. Two-photon excitation in laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, James H.; Webb, Watt W.

    1991-04-01

    Simultaneous absorption of two red photons from a strongly focused subpicosecond colliding pulse mode4ocked dye laser stimulates visible fluorescence emission from fluorophores having their normal absorption in the ultraviolet1. The quadratic increase of the two-photon excitation rate with excitation intensity restricts fluorescence emission to the focal volume thus providing the same depth resolution as does confocal microscopy. Image degradation due to out of focus backround is thus avoided. Photobleaching and most cellular photodamage are similarly confined to the focus thereby minimizing sample degredation during acquisition of the multiple sections required for 3-d image reconstruction. Fluorescence images of living cells and other thick photolabile fluorescence labled assemblies illustrate the depth discrimination of both two-photon fluorescence excitation and photobleaching. The quadratic intensity dependence of two-photon excitation allows 3-d spatially resolved photochemistry in particular the photolytic release of caged compounds such as neurotransmitters nucleotides fluorescent dyes and second messengers such as 1P3 and Ca. The two-photon release of cased ATP has been measured and release of a caged fluorescent dye has been shown. Point photobleaching and a 3-d " write once read many" optical memory have been demonstrated. Two-photon excitation of photo-initiated polymerization with a sharply focused single beam allows microfabrication of complex structures of arbitrary form. By scanning the focused beam through a liquid polymer with a UV excited initiator it is possible to harden the polymer only at the focus thereby creating

  15. Laser-excited fluorescence spectra of atomic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Songyue; Jin Changtai; Shen Mingtao; Wang Xiulan

    1987-05-01

    Using a dc-supply hollow-cathode lamp as a source of uranium vapor and a rhodamine 6G dye laser to excite the vapor optically, it was simple and convenient to detect fluorescence from uranium atoms at 753.393, 763.175, and 763.954 nm. We give a detailed discussion of how we eliminated the intense background emissions, which were principally due to the lamp.

  16. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  17. Ultra-broadband hybrid infrared laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilova, O. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Kinyaevskiy, I. O.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kotkov, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid IR laser system consisting of molecular gas lasers with frequency conversion of laser radiation in a solid-state converter (nonlinear crystal) was developed. One of these gas lasers is a carbon monoxide laser operating in multi-line or single-line mode. Another one is a carbon dioxide laser operating in multi-line mode. The two lasers operate under Q-switching with a joint rotating mirror. Due to sum- and difference-frequency generation in nonlinear crystals, the laser system emits within wavelength range from 2.5 to 16.6 μm. The laser system emitting radiation over such an extremely wide wavelength range (2.7 octaves) is of interest for remote sensing and other applications connected with laser beam propagation in the atmosphere.

  18. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  19. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-01

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  20. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  1. Photonics of laser-excited symmetric cationic polymethine dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlichnyi, Valerii A; Maier, G V; Lapin, I N; Kopylova, T N; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; Ishchenko, Aleksandr A

    2007-02-28

    Efficient lasing is obtained in the visible and near-IR spectral regions in solutions of symmetric polymethine dyes of the indolenine series (indocyanines) pumped by the second harmonic of a Nd{sup 3+}:YAG laser at 532 nm and an exciplex XeCl* laser at 308 nm into the first (long-wavelength) and higher-lying electronic absorption bands. The quantum lasing efficiency upon UV excitation achieves 37%. It is shown that these dyes can also limit the radiation power of these lasers. Polymethine dyes limit especially efficiently the second-harmonic power, their attenuation factor for the radiation power density of 100 MW cm{sup -2} achieving 14. The nanosecond flash-photolysis study of transient absorption spectra showed that the radiation power is limited by the mechanism of reverse saturated singlet-singlet absorption. It is established that the limiting ability of polymethines strongly depends on their structure. (active media)

  2. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Pugžlys, A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Andriukaitis, G.; Flöry, T.; Ališauskas, S.; Fedotov, A. B.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared. PMID:25687621

  3. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Pugžlys, A; Stepanov, E A; Andriukaitis, G; Flöry, T; Ališauskas, S; Fedotov, A B; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2015-02-17

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared.

  4. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  5. Advanced quantum cascade laser transmitter architectures and infrared photonics development

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2004-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security and civilian applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors. This paper reports on the current development in infrared photonics that provides a pathway for QCL transmitter miniaturization. This research has produced infrared waveguide-based optical components in chalcogenide glass using both direct-laser writing and holographic exposure techniques. We discuss here the design and fabrication concepts and capabilities required to produce integrated waveguides, waveguide couplers, and other photonic devices.

  6. Non-contact subsurface temperature measurements following mid-infrared laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, Sergey M.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2013-07-01

    A difficult challenge in laser processing at nanosecond time scales is monitoring substrate temperature in the laser focal volume, particularly for mid-infrared laser irradiation where the absorption depth is relatively large and the attained temperatures are often relatively low. Here, we describe time-dependent measurements of the subsurface temperature of a target material following absorption of pulsed mid-infrared (MIR) laser irradiation, by detecting the luminescence from micron-size ceramic phosphor particles (Gd-doped YAG:Ce) embedded in the target material at a concentration of up to 10 %. Temperature calibrations were obtained by measuring the luminescence decay of the probe particles in an oil-bath heater. A silica-nanoparticle film was irradiated by an Er:YAG laser operating in a free-running mode over a fluence range up to but below the ablation threshold, while the third harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser excited the luminescence of the probe particles. From the temperature calibrations, it was possible to infer the thermal history of the target as a function of time delay between the Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  7. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  8. Nanoparticle preparation of quinacridone and β-carotene using near-infrared laser ablation of their crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyama, K.; Sugiyama, T.; Asahi, T.; Ryo, S.; Oh, I.; Masuhara, H.

    2010-12-01

    Quinacridone nanoparticles with a mean size of about 200 nm are successfully prepared using nanosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser ablation of its microcrystalline powders in heavy water. The absorption spectra of the formed colloidal solutions depend on the excitation wavelengths, which is eventually ascribed to number and energy of absorbed photons. β-carotene has low photostability and is easily decomposed upon UV/VIS laser ablation of its solid, while its nanoparticles are prepared utilizing this NIR laser ablation technique. The advantage of nanoparticle preparation by NIR laser ablation is discussed.

  9. Laser induced infrared spectral shift of the MgB2:Cr superconductor films.

    PubMed

    AlZayed, N S; Kityk, I V; Soltan, S; El-Naggar, A M; Shahabuddin, M

    2015-02-01

    During illumination of the MgB2:Cr2O3 films it was established substantial spectral shift of the infrared spectra in the vicinity of 20-50cm(-1). The excitations were performed by nanosecond Er:glass laser operating at 1.54μm and by microsecond 10.6μm CO2 laser. The spectral shifts of the IR maxima were in opposite spectral directions for the two types of lasers. This one observed difference correlates well with spectral shift of their critical temperatures. The possible explanation is given by performance of DFT calculations of the charge density redistribution and the time kinetics of the photovoltaic response. To understand the kinetics of the photoinduced processes the time kinetics of photoresponse was done for the particular laser wavelengths.

  10. Separation of ionization and subsequent electronic excitation for formation of electronically excited ethanol cation in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, T.; Hosaka, K.; Akagi, H.; Yokoyama, A.; Yamanouchi, K.; Kannari, F.; Itakura, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ionization and subsequent electronic excitation occurring within the same laser pulse (400 nm, 96 fs, 1.3 ~ 18 TW cm-2) are separately investigated by measuring in coincidence an electron and a product ion produced from C2H5OH. It is revealed that the nascent population in the electronically excited C2H5OH+ prepared by the ionization decreases as the laser intensity increases, while the subsequent electronic excitation is enhanced through the resonant electronic transitions. Ionization and electronic excitation mechanisms are described based on the electronic-state distributions of C2H5OH+.

  11. Airborne laser systems for atmospheric sounding in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Jia, Huamin; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques for atmospheric sounding using Near Infrared (NIR) laser sources, direct detection electro-optics and passive infrared imaging systems. These techniques allow a direct determination of atmospheric extinction and, through the adoption of suitable inversion algorithms, the indirect measurement of some important natural and man-made atmospheric constituents, including Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The proposed techniques are suitable for remote sensing missions performed by using aircraft, satellites, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), parachute/gliding vehicles, Roving Surface Vehicles (RSV), or Permanent Surface Installations (PSI). The various techniques proposed offer relative advantages in different scenarios. All are based on measurements of the laser energy/power incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Experimental results are presented relative to ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 KHz PRF NIR laser systems in a variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft above ground level. Future activities are planned to validate the atmospheric retrieval algorithms developed for CO2 column density measurements, with emphasis on aircraft related emissions at airports and other high air-traffic density environments.

  12. Bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared emission from metal-coated nanostructures upon femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-09-21

    We report on the investigation of bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) radiation from a metal film coated on a substrate with randomly ordered pore arrays by irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses. THz-to-IR radiation was observed both for front-side excitation (laser incident on the metal surface) and for rear-side excitation (laser incident on the substrate). In both cases, the radiation was observed both in the propagation direction of the laser beam and in the reverse direction. Considering these findings, we propose a thermal emission mechanism based on the production of surface plasmons, either delocalized (through phase-matched excitation) or localized (through surface roughness) at the air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces.

  13. Bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared emission from metal-coated nanostructures upon femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-09-21

    We report on the investigation of bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) radiation from a metal film coated on a substrate with randomly ordered pore arrays by irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses. THz-to-IR radiation was observed both for front-side excitation (laser incident on the metal surface) and for rear-side excitation (laser incident on the substrate). In both cases, the radiation was observed both in the propagation direction of the laser beam and in the reverse direction. Considering these findings, we propose a thermal emission mechanism based on the production of surface plasmons, either delocalized (through phase-matched excitation) or localized (through surface roughness) at the air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26406717

  14. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  15. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, G. I.; McAuslan, D. L.; Sheridan, E.; Sachkou, Y.; Baker, C.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-08-01

    Superfluidity is a quantum state of matter that exists macroscopically in helium at low temperatures. The elementary excitations in superfluid helium have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However, measurements of phonon excitations have so far been limited to average thermodynamic properties or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of phonon excitations in real time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification. This represents a new tool to observe and control superfluid excitations that may provide insight into phonon-phonon interactions, quantized vortices and two-dimensional phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including the prospect of femtogram masses, high mechanical quality factors, strong phonon-phonon and phonon-vortex interactions, and self-assembly into complex geometries with sub-nanometre feature size.

  16. Coherent laser excitation of Ba-137 and Ba-138

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Kai-Shue

    1992-01-01

    Computations are carried out for the 1S(6s2)-1P(6s,6p) coherent laser excitation of Ba-137 and Ba-138 in a magnetic field. Results are presented for both the steady-state and time-dependent excited-state populations of the Zeeman-split magnetic sublevels. The quantum-statistical Liouville-equation approach (for the reduced density matrix) is compared to the rate-equations approach. Significant differences are found between these, due to the interference between strongly overlapping lines (especially for Ba-137). The time-evolution profiles indicate that the Ba-137 transient time is much longer than that of Ba-138.

  17. Diffusion of Excitation in GGG:Yb3+ Laser Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisialiou, I. G.; Ivakin, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    The excitation diffusion coefficient DE is measured directly in laser crystals by the optical method of high-frequency dynamic gratings. DE for Gd3Ga5O12:Yb3+ (21 at.%) crystal is found to be 3·10-9 cm3/s at room temperature and 1.2·10-8 cm3/s at 190°C. In KYW:Yb3+ (20 at.%) crystal no excitation diffusion is observed under the same experimental conditions. It is shown that DE is affected by the activator concentration, the temperature, and the probability of radiationless energy exchange between neighboring active impurity ions, which depends on the minimal distance between donor and acceptor.

  18. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse for hard tissue drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with a circular beam and a low divergence angle. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse width of 103 ns and a pulse tail length of 32.6 μs. The beam cross-section was circular and the full-angle beam divergence was 1.7 mrad. The laser was used to drill ivory samples without carbonization at fluences of 2.3-7.1 J/cm2. The drilling depth of the dry ivory increased with the fluence. The drilling mechanism of the dry ivory was attributed to absorption of the laser light by the ivory.

  19. Coded excitation for infrared non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Venkata Ghali, Subbarao

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a Barker coded excitation for defect detection using infrared non-destructive testing. Capability of the proposed excitation scheme is highlighted with recently introduced correlation based post processing approach and compared with the existing phase based analysis by taking the signal to noise ratio into consideration. Applicability of the proposed scheme has been experimentally validated on a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen containing flat bottom holes located at different depths.

  20. Nanosecond two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging with a multi color fiber MOPA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    A system is presented that uses a fiber based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with nanosecond-range pulses for two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging. The robust laser in the extended near infrared is based on an actively modulated electro-optical modulator (EOM), enabling free synchronization of the pulses to any other light source or detection unit. Pulses with a freely programmable duration between 0.4 and 10 ns are generated and then amplified to up to kilowatts of peak power with ytterbium doped fiber amplifiers (YDFA). Since we achieve peak power and duty cycles comparable to standard femto- and picosecond setups, the TPEF signal levels are similar, but realized with a robust and inexpensive fiber-based setup. The delivery fiber is further used as an optional, electronically controllable Raman shifter to effectively shift the 1064 nm light to 1122 nm and to 1186 nm. This allows imaging of a manifold of fluorophores, like e.g. TexasRed, mCherry, mRaspberry and many more. We show TPEF imaging of the autofluorescence of plant leaves of moss and algae, acquired in epi-direction. This modular laser unit can be integrated into existing systems as either a fiber-based, alignment free excitation laser or an extension for multi-modal imaging.

  1. Mid-infrared solid-state lasers and laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of NASA-Langley's objectives for the development of advanced lasers and laser materials systems applicable to remote sensing in the mid-IR range. Prominent among current concerns are fiber-optic spectroscopy, eye-safe solid-state lasers for both Doppler sensing and mid-IR wavelength-generation laser pumping, and nonlinear optics generating tunable mid-IR radiation. Ho:YAG lasers are noted to exhibit intrinsic advantages for the desired applications, and are pumpable by GaAlAs laser diodes with a quantum efficiency approaching 2.

  2. Fast Laser Excitation and Ultrahigh Strain-Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Averback

    2007-06-03

    Phase evolution induced by single or repeated excitation with energetic femtosecond laser pulses is examined. Of primary interest is the solidification behavior of pure metals at deep undercoolings and self-organization in simple eutectic alloys. Time resolved measurements using third harmonic generation (THG) of light and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) are employed to elucidate several issues related to fast laser excitation, including heat transport by ballistic and diffusional electrons through multilayer films, the dependence of crystallization velocities on materials properties, mechanisms controlling the transport of heat away from the crystal-liquid interface, and the possibility for quenching pure metals, such as Cu, Ni, and Fe, into the amorphous state. Special samples designed to maximize the quenching speed are developed. The properties of such pure metallic glasses, such as glass and crystallization temperatures, will be measured, if such samples are successfully produced. The measurements are complemented by molecular dynamics computer simulations of the solidification process. The second interest of this research is mesoscopic, self-organization of materials under repeated laser melting, with diffusional relaxation between pulses. We select binary alloys that are immiscible in the solid state but miscible in the liquid state, such as Ag-Cu. Femtosecond laser irradiation is employed to induce melting and to vary the melting time over a wide range, from a few ps to hundreds of ps. This enables us to perform critical experimental tests of key theoretical predictions self-organization in alloys under external forcing, in particular the existence of a threshold value of the forced mixing length for patterning to take place.

  3. Raman analysis of SF 6 molecular beams excited by a cw CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijks, G.; Timmerman, J.; Stolte, S.; Reuss, J.

    1983-06-01

    In a molecular beam the effects of vibrational pumping of SF 6 (ν 3 = 948 cm -1) are studied, using a line-tunable cw CO 2 laser. Intracavity spontaneous Raman scattering is used for analysis. For excitation in the collision regime ( xE/ D ≤ 1), a thermal redistribution of the ν 3 excitation over all vibrational modes is found, together with an average absorption up to six photons per molecule. The infrared absorption profile shows a red-shift of 6 cm -1. For excitation in the relatively rare collision regime ( xE/ D ⩾ 4), a structured non-thermal ν 1 Raman spectrum is observed, especially in the case of seeded molecular beams (10% in He). The observed hot-band peaks can be explained in terms of single-photon absorptions and collision-induced near-resonant V-V energy transfer, leading to single, double and triple excitations of the ν 3 mode. The value of Trot in the beam is found to influence sensitively the non-resonant energy-transfer rate [e.g. hν 3(948 cm -1)+Δ Erot → h(ν 4 + ν 6)(962 cm -1) relative to the near-resonant transfer rate ( hν 3 + hν 3 → 2 hν 3 + 3.5 cm -1)].

  4. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  5. Near-infrared laser-induced generation of three rare conformers of glycolic acid.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Anna; Lapinski, Leszek; Reva, Igor; Rostkowska, Hanna; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J

    2014-07-31

    Structural transformations were induced in conformers of glycolic acid by selective excitation with monochromatic tunable near-infrared laser light. For the compound isolated in Ar matrixes, near-IR excitation led to generation of two higher-energy conformers (GAC; AAT) differing from the most stable SSC form by 180° rotation around the C-C bond. A detailed investigation of this transformation revealed that one conformer (GAC) is produced directly from the near-IR-excited most stable conformer. The other higher-energy conformer (AAT) was effectively generated only upon excitation of the primary photoproduct (GAC) with another near-IR photon. Once these higher-energy conformers of glycolic acid were generated in an Ar matrix, they could be subsequently transformed into one another upon selective near-IR excitations. Interestingly, no repopulation of the initial most stable SSC conformer occurred upon near-IR excitation of the higher-energy forms of the compound isolated in solid Ar. A dramatically different picture of near-IR-induced conformational transformations was observed for glycolic acid isolated in N2 matrixes. In this case, upon near-IR excitation, the most stable SSC form converted solely into a new conformer (SST), where the acid OH group is rotated by 180°. This conformational transformation was found to be photoreversible. Moreover, SST conformer, photoproduced in the N2 matrix, spontaneously converted to the most stable SSC form of glycolic acid, when the matrix was kept at cryogenic temperature and in the dark.

  6. Two-photon excited fluorescence enhancement with broadband versus tunable femtosecond laser pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2012-02-01

    The inverse relationship between two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and laser pulse duration suggests that two-photon microscopy (TPM) performance may be improved by decreasing pulse duration. However, for ultrashort pulses of sub-10 femtosecond (fs) in duration, its spectrum contains the effective gain bandwidth of Ti:Sapphire and its central wavelength is no longer tunable. An experimental study was performed to explore this apparent tradeoff between untuned sub-10 fs transform-limited pulse (TLP) and tunable 140 fs pulse for TPEF. Enhancement factors of 1.6, 6.7, and 5.2 are measured for Indo-1, FITC, and TRITC excited by sub-10 fs TLP compared with 140 fs pulse tuned to the two-photon excitation (TPE) maxima at 730 nm, 800 nm, and 840 nm, respectively. Both degenerate (v1=v2) and nondegenerate (v1≠v2) mixing of sub-10 fs TLP spectral components result in its broad second-harmonic (SH) power spectrum and high spectral density, which can effectively compensate for the lack of central wavelength tuning and lead to large overlap with dye TPE spectra for TPEF enhancements. These pulse properties were also exploited for demonstrating its potential applications in multicolor imaging with TPM.

  7. Generation of picosecond pulses in a dye laser excited by radiation from an argon laser with passively locked modes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradova, A.A.; Krindach, D.P.; Nazarov, B.I.; Tsapenko, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Passive locking of argon laser modes was used in generation of tunable picosecond pulses in a synchronously excited dye laser. An experimental study was made of the characteristics of the dye laser radiation as a function of the argon laser characteristics.

  8. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  9. Low intensity infrared laser induces filamentation in Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Low intensity continuous wave and pulsed emission modes laser is used in treating many diseases and the resulting biostimulative effect on tissues has been described, yet the photobiological basis is not well understood. The aim of this wok was to evaluate, using bacterial filamentation assay, effects of laser on Escherichia coli cultures in exponential and stationary growth phase. E. coli cultures, proficient and deficient on DNA repair, in exponential and stationary growth phase, were exposed to low intensity infrared laser, aliquots were spread onto microscopic slides, stained by Gram method, visualized by optical microscopy, photographed and percentage of bacterial filamentation were determined. Low intensity infrared laser with therapeutic fluencies and different emission modes can induce bacterial filamentation in cultures of E. coli wild type, fpg/ mutM, endonuclease III and exonuclease III mutants in exponential and stationary growth phase. This study showed induction of bacterial, filamentation in E. coli cultures expose to low intensity infrared laser and attention to laser therapy protocols, which should take into account fluencies, wavelengths, tissue conditions, and genetic characteristics of cells before beginning treatment.

  10. Intense infrared lasers and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roso, Luis

    2012-02-01

    Electrons accelerate due to the huge electric field of the laser itself, and so they can generate very particular plasmas because the ionization process occurs in a few femtosecond, or even in a fraction of a femtosecond. Lasers can be focused now to intensities beyond 1022W/cm2 and there are projects to arrive up 1026W/cm2. Electric fields of the laser arrive now to 1014V/cm and magnetic fields reach the Megatesla. This is a monster density of electromagnetic energy, so that we are close to obtain light denser than matter. In this respect it is very convenient to observe that the well known Einstein's energy - mass equation, E = mc2, can be rewritten for laser light I = ρc3, I being the laser intensity and ρ the equivalent density. There are several PW lasers around the world, in operation or in construction, and one of them is going to be at Salamanca's CLPU.

  11. Spin-Dependent Dissociative Excitation in a Laser Pumped Afterglow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohler, Christopher Lee

    The energy and spin dependence of dissociating collisions between two types of noble gas metastable atoms and cadmium dihalide molecules have been studied in a flowing afterglow apparatus. The fluorescence spectra obtained in the range of 3000-7600 A which result from the Ar( ^{3}P_2) + CdX_2 interactions indicate a dominant dissociative excitation production mechanism. On the other hand, for the He(2^3S _1) + CdX_2 collisions, there appears to be competition between dissociative excitation and other "dark" channels. The emission spectra are further used to narrow the uncertainty in the currently accepted values for the dissociation energy of the CdX _2 molecules. The Wigner spin rule (conservation of total electronic spin) was verified for these processes as shown by the dominance of final state triplet production as compared to the virtual absence of singlet spin state production. In an attempt to further study the spin dependence of the dissociative excitation process, transfer of the longitudinal component of the electronic spin from oriented He(2 ^3S_1) atoms to Cd(6 ^3S_1) atoms was monitored. These data showed a null result for the transfor of the spin component, but were limited by a 3% systematic error of the apparatus. The spin dependent measurements rely on the ability to spin-polarize the He(2^3S _1) atoms by laser optical pumping methods. Four laser materials which exhibit promising characteristics for this procedure have been studied, and the results are presented for Nd^{3+}:YAP, La_{rm 1-x}Nd _{rm x}MgAl_ {11}O_{19}, Nd^{3+}:LiNbO _3, and Nd^{3+} :Silicate fibers.

  12. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of "mode disorder" appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  13. Design of a portable noninvasive photoacoustic glucose monitoring system integrated laser diode excitation with annular array detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lvming; Liu, Guodong; Yang, Diwu; Ren, Zhong; Huang, Zhen

    2008-12-01

    A near-infrared photoacoustic glucose monitoring system, which is integrated dual-wavelength pulsed laser diode excitation with eight-element planar annular array detection technique, is designed and fabricated during this study. It has the characteristics of nonivasive, inexpensive, portable, accurate location, and high signal-to-noise ratio. In the system, the exciting source is based on two laser diodes with wavelengths of 905 nm and 1550 nm, respectively, with optical pulse energy of 20 μJ and 6 μJ. The laser beam is optically focused and jointly projected to a confocal point with a diameter of 0.7 mm approximately. A 7.5 MHz 8-element annular array transducer with a hollow structure is machined to capture photoacoustic signal in backward mode. The captured signals excitated from blood glucose are processed with a synthetic focusing algorithm to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio and accurate location over a range of axial detection depth. The custom-made transducer with equal area elements is coaxially collimated with the laser source to improve the photoacoustic excite/receive efficiency. In the paper, we introduce the photoacoustic theory, receive/process technique, and design method of the portable noninvasive photoacoustic glucose monitoring system, which can potentially be developed as a powerful diagnosis and treatment tool for diabetes mellitus.

  14. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  15. Advanced nanoparticle generation and excitation by lasers in liquids.

    PubMed

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Compagnini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Today, nanoparticles are widely implemented as functional elements onto surfaces, into volumes and as nano-hybrids, resulting for example in bioactive composites and biomolecule conjugates. However, only limited varieties of materials compatible for integration into advanced functional materials are available: nanoparticles synthesized using conventional gas phase processes are often agglomerated into micro powders that are hard to re-disperse into functional matrices. Chemical synthesis methods often lead to impurities of the nanoparticle colloids caused by additives and precursor reaction products. In the last decade, laser ablation and nanoparticle generation in liquids has proven to be a unique and efficient technique to generate, excite, fragment, and conjugate a large variety of nanostructures in a scalable and clean manner. This editorial briefly highlights selected recent advancements and critical aspects in the field of pulsed laser-based nanoparticle generation and manipulation, including exemplary strategies to harvest the unique properties of the laser-generated nanomaterials in the field of biomedicine and catalysis. The presented critical aspects address future assignments such as size control and scale-up.

  16. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  17. Biophysical mechanisms responsible for pulsed low-level laser excitation of neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2006-02-01

    Background/Objective: The traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods and remains the gold standard to date despite inherent limitations. We have previously shown a new paradigm to in vivo neural activation based on pulsed infrared light, which provides a contact-free, spatially selective, artifact-free method without incurring tissue damage that may have significant advantages over electrical stimulation in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the physical mechanism of this phenomenon, which we propose is a photo-thermal effect from transient tissue temperature changes resulting in direct or indirect activation of transmembrane ion channels causing propagation of the action potential. Methods: Rat sciatic nerve preparation was stimulated in vivo with the Holmium:YAG laser (2.12μm), Free Electron Laser (2.1μm), Alexandrite laser (690nm), and the prototype for a solid state commercial laser nerve stimulator built by Aculight (1.87μm) to determine contributions of photobiological responses from laser tissue interactions, including temperature, pressure, electric field, and photochemistry, underlying the biophysical mechanism of stimulation. Single point temperature measurements were made with a microthermocouple adjacent to the excitation site, while an infrared camera was used for 2-D radiometry of the irradiated surface. Displacement from laser-induced pressure waves or thermoelastic expansion was measured using a PS-OCT system. Results: Results exclude a direct photochemical, electric field, or pressure wave effect as the mechanism of optical stimulation. Measurements show relative small contributions from thermoelastic expansion (300 nm) with the laser parameters used for nerve stimulation. The maximum change in tissue temperature is about 9°C (average increase of 3.66 °C) at stimulation threshold radiant exposures. Conclusion: Neural activation with pulsed

  18. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  19. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  20. Mid-infrared spatial filter fabrication using laser chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon R.

    2004-10-01

    Feedhorns like those commonly used in radio-telescope and radio communication equipment couple very efficiently (>98%) to the fundamental Gaussian mode (TEM00). High order modes are not propagated through a single-mode hollow metallic waveguides. It follows that a back to back feedhorn design joined with a small length of single-mode waveguide can be used as a very high throughput spatial filter. Laser micro machining provides a mean of scaling successful waveguide and quasi-optical components to far and mid infrared wavelengths. A laser micro machining system optimized for THz and far IR applications has been in operation at Steward Observatory for several years and produced devices designed to operate at λ=60μm. A new laser micromachining system capable of producing mid-infrared devices will soon be operational. These proceedings review metallic hollow waveguide spatial filtering theory, feedhorn designs as well as laser chemical etching and the design of a new high-NA UV laser etcher capable of sub-micron resolution to fabricate spatial filters for use in the mid-infrared.

  1. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-19

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω>300  eV) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ_{0}≈1800  nm) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution. PMID:26943536

  2. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-01

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω >300 eV ) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ0≈1800 nm ) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution.

  3. Integrated all-optical infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, John; Bonakdar, Alireza; Gelfand, Ryan; Dey, Dibyendu; Nia, Iman Hassani; Fathipour, Vala; Memis, Omer Gokalp; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-05-01

    We report a type of infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser, in which far field light in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 6.1 μm) is modulated by a near field interaction of light in the telecommunications wavelength (1.55 μm). To achieve this all-optical switch, we used cross-polarized bowtie antennas and a centrally located germanium nanoslab. The bowtie antenna squeezes the short wavelength light into the gap region, where the germanium is placed. The perturbation of refractive index of the germanium due to the free carrier absorption produced by short wavelength light changes the optical response of the antenna and the entire laser intensity at 6.1 μm significantly. This device shows a viable method to modulate the far field of a laser through a near field interaction.

  4. In vivo studies of ultrafast near-infrared laser tissue bonding and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulse lasers in the near-infrared (NIR) range exhibit very distinct properties upon their interaction with biomolecules compared to the corresponding continuous wave (CW) lasers. Ultrafast NIR laser tissue bonding (LTB) was used to fuse edges of two opposing animal tissue segments in vivo using fs laser photoexcitation of the native vibrations of chomophores. The fusion of the incised tissues was achieved in vivo at the molecular level as the result of the energy-matter interactions of NIR laser radiation with water and the structural proteins like collagen in the target tissues. Nonthermal vibrational excitation from the fs laser absorption by water and collagen induced the formation of cross-links between tissue proteins on either sides of the weld line resulting in tissue bonding. No extrinsic agents were used to facilitate tissue bonding in the fs LTB. These studies were pursued for the understanding and evaluation of the role of ultrafast NIR fs laser radiation in the LTB and consequent wound healing. The fs LTB can be used for difficult to suture structures such as blood vessels, nerves, gallbladder, liver, intestines, and other viscera. Ultrafast NIR LTB yields promising outcomes and benefits in terms of wound closure and wound healing under optimal conditions.

  5. Light-Harvesting Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria under Both Visible and Near-Infrared Excitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Cao, Xian; Ahmadov, Ms Tevhide Ozkaya; Ding, Rui; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng

    2016-04-01

    We report a hybrid singlet oxygen production system, where strong resonance coupling between plasmonic nanoparticles and photosensitizing molecules results in exceptionally high singlet oxygen production under both visible light and near-infrared light excitation, even for the photosensitizing molecules without near-infrared absorption. The light-harvesting property of the plasmon-photosensitizer hybrids leads to an enhanced, broad-spectrum photodynamic inactivation of bacteria under a wide range of excitations, including that with near-infrared light.

  6. Ultrafast Nonlinear Excitation Dynamics of Black Phosphorus Nanosheets from Visible to Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangpeng; Szydłowska, Beata M; Wang, Gaozhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jing Jing; Magan, John J; Zhang, Long; Coleman, Jonathan N; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J

    2016-07-26

    The recent progress on black phosphorus makes it a promising candidate material for broadband nanophotonic devices, especially operating in the mid-infrared spectral region. Here, the excited carrier dynamics and nonlinear optical response of unoxidized black phosphorus nanosheets and their wavelength dependence were systematically studied from 800 nm to 2.1 μm. The wavelength-dependent relaxation times of black phosphorus nanosheets are determined to be 360 fs to 1.36 ps with photon energies from 1.55 to 0.61 eV. In a comparative study with graphene, we found that black phosphorus has a faster carrier relaxation in near- and mid-infrared region. With regard to nonlinear optical absorption, the response of black phosphorus significantly increases from near- to mid-infrared, and black phosphorus is also confirmed to be better as saturable absorber to MoS2 in infrared region. PMID:27281449

  7. Ultrafast Nonlinear Excitation Dynamics of Black Phosphorus Nanosheets from Visible to Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangpeng; Szydłowska, Beata M; Wang, Gaozhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jing Jing; Magan, John J; Zhang, Long; Coleman, Jonathan N; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J

    2016-07-26

    The recent progress on black phosphorus makes it a promising candidate material for broadband nanophotonic devices, especially operating in the mid-infrared spectral region. Here, the excited carrier dynamics and nonlinear optical response of unoxidized black phosphorus nanosheets and their wavelength dependence were systematically studied from 800 nm to 2.1 μm. The wavelength-dependent relaxation times of black phosphorus nanosheets are determined to be 360 fs to 1.36 ps with photon energies from 1.55 to 0.61 eV. In a comparative study with graphene, we found that black phosphorus has a faster carrier relaxation in near- and mid-infrared region. With regard to nonlinear optical absorption, the response of black phosphorus significantly increases from near- to mid-infrared, and black phosphorus is also confirmed to be better as saturable absorber to MoS2 in infrared region.

  8. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine.

  10. Laser ablation and selective excitation directed to trace element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.

    1980-08-01

    A trace (element) analyser based on laser ablation and selectively excited radiation is proposed as an ultramicro-ultratrace technique for quantitative element analysis. Measurements of trace quantities of chromium in samples of NBS standard reference material (steel), doped skim milk powder and doped flour were undertaken. There is a linear 45 deg slope for Log/Log plot dependence of signal versus concentration that extends at least up to 1.3% (concentration by weight) in the case of chromium. The detection limit for the current unoptimized system is in the ppm range which corresponds to the absolute detection limit of 10 to the 13th power g. Although no chemical interference effects were observed, two physical interference effects were evident: differential mass vaporization and inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution of fast expanding analyte. The differential Doppler shift between the atoms along the line of observation reduces self-absorption even at high analyte concentrations.

  11. Superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D. S.; Karaganov, V.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Bray, I.; Bartschat, K.

    2007-06-15

    We present results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited Cs atoms in the (6p){sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Comparison of the measured pseudo-Stokes parameters P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} and the total degree of polarization P{sup +} for incident energies of 5.5 eV and 13.5 eV, respectively, with theoretical predictions based upon a nonrelativistic convergent close-coupling method and a 24-state semirelativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach indicates that driving channel coupling to convergence for these observables is more important than accounting for relativistic effects.

  12. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  13. Direct Visualization of Excited-State Symmetry Breaking Using Ultrafast Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dereka, Bogdan; Rosspeintner, Arnulf; Li, Zhiquan; Liska, Robert; Vauthey, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Most symmetric quadrupolar molecules designed for two-photon absorption behave as dipolar molecules in the S1 electronic excited state. This is usually explained by a breakup of the symmetry in the excited state. However, the origin of this process and its dynamics are still not fully understood. Here, excited-state symmetry breaking in a quadrupolar molecule with a D-π-A-π-D motif, where D and A are electron donating and accepting units, is observed in real time using ultrafast transient infrared absorption spectroscopy. The nature of the relaxed S1 state was found to strongly depend on the solvent polarity: (1) in nonpolar solvents, it is symmetric and quadrupolar; (2) in weakly polar media, the quadrupolar state observed directly after excitation transforms to a symmetry broken S1 state with one arm bearing more excitation than the other; and (3) in highly polar solvents, the excited state evolves further to a purely dipolar S1 state with the excitation localized entirely on one arm. The time scales associated with the transitions between these states coincide with those of solvation dynamics, indicating that symmetry breaking is governed by solvent fluctuations.

  14. In situ observation of photo-bleaching in human single living cell excited by a NIR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo; Whang, Kyoung-Hyun; Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Sohn, Seong-Hyang

    2008-03-01

    The photo-bleaching of single living cells excited by femtosecond laser irradiation was observed in situ to study the nonlinear interaction between ultrafast laser pulses and living human breast MDA-MB-231 cells. We conducted a systematic study of the energy dependence of plasma-mediated photo-disruption of fluorescently labeled subcellular structures in the nucleus of living cells using near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulses through a numerical aperture objective lens (0.75 NA). The behavior of photo-bleached living cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei was observed for 18 h after femtosecond laser irradiation under a fluorescence microscope. The photo-bleaching of single living cells without cell disruption occurred at between 470 and 630 nJ. To study the photo-disruption of subcellular organelles in single living cells using the nonlinear absorption excited by a NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the process of photo-bleaching without photo-disruption provides key information for clarifying the nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent fluorescently labeled living cells.

  15. Laser-excited confocal-fluorescence gel scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.; Scherer, J.R.; Quesada, M.A. ); Rye, H.S.; Glazer, A.N. )

    1994-04-01

    A high-sensitivity, laser-excited, confocal-fluorescence scanner has been developed for the detection of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids separated on slab gels. The gel is placed on a motor-driven, two-dimensional scan stage and raster scanned past the optical detection system. The 488-nm argon ion laser beam is introduced into the confocal optical system at a long-pass dichroic beam splitter and focused within the gel to an [similar to]2 [mu]m diameter spot by a high-numerical aperture microscope objective. The resulting fluorescence is gathered by the objective, passed back through the first long-pass beam splitter, and relayed to a second dichroic beam splitter that separates the red and green emissions. The fluorescence is then focused on confocal spatial filters to reduce stray and scattered light, passed through spectral filters, and detected with photomultipliers. The resulting signals are amplified, filtered, and digitized for display on a computer. This system can detect as little as 5[times]10[sup [minus]12] M fluorescein, the resolution as operated is 160 [mu]m, and it can scan a 6 cm[times]6 cm gel using a scan rate of 4 cm/s in 12 min. The detection of DNA on slab gels, two-color DNA fragment sizing, and microtiter plate scanning are presented to illustrate some of the possible applications of this apparatus.

  16. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  17. Scanning Laser Infrared Molecular Spectrometer (SLIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David C.; Rickey, Kelly; Ksendzov, Alexander; George, Warren P.; Aljabri, Abdullah S.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    This prototype innovation is a novel design that achieves very long, effective laser path lengths that are able to yield ppb (parts per billion) and sub-ppb measurements of trace gases. SLIMS can also accommodate multiple laser channels covering a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in detection of more chemicals of interest. The mechanical design of the mirror cell allows for the large effective path length within a small footprint. The same design provides a robust structure that lends itself to being immune to some of the alignment challenges that similar cells face. By taking a hollow cylinder and by cutting an elliptically or spherically curved surface into its inner wall, the basic geometry of a reflecting ring is created. If the curved, inner surface is diamond-turned and highly polished, a surface that is very highly reflective can be formed. The surface finish can be further improved by adding a thin chrome or gold film over the surface. This creates a high-quality, curved, mirrored surface. A laser beam, which can be injected from a small bore hole in the wall of the cylinder, will be able to make many low-loss bounces around the ring, creating a large optical path length. The reflecting ring operates on the same principle as the Herriott cell. The difference exists in the mirror that doesn't have to be optically aligned, and which has a relatively large, internal surface area that lends itself to either open air or evacuated spectroscopic measurements. This solid, spherical ring mirror removes the possibility of mirror misalignment caused by thermal expansion or vibrations, because there is only a single, solid reflecting surface. Benefits of the reflecting ring come into play when size constraints reduce the size of the system, especially for space missions in which mass is at a premium.

  18. Study of laser emission losses in rhodamine 6G solutions under quasilongitudinal laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A.V.; Eremenko, A.S.; Nikolaev, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    As a result of studies of the reciprocal of the quantum yield of stimulated laser emission as a function of the reciprocal of the useful loss factor, a quantitative dependence of induced losses in the pumping and lasing channels on the volume density of absorbed exciting radiation has been established. It is concluded from quantitative evidence that the margin of an appreciable increase in lasing efficiency for rhodamine 6G solutions consists in a decrease of the pumping-induced light scattering.

  19. Vibrationally compensated far infrared laser interferometer for plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Mendelsohn, A.

    1980-12-01

    A modulated far-infrared laser interferometer presently operating on the PDX experiment at Princeton is described. The interferometer geometry permits the characterization of inside 'D', outside 'D', and circular discharges. To achieve this versatility, a titanium corner cube reflector, mounted inside the PDX vacuum vessel is used in conjunction with a second visible wavelength interferometer for vibration corrections. In addition, the use of room temperature quasi-optical Schottky diodes in the far-infrared interferometer is reported. The minimum detectable line average density of the system is about 5 x 10 to the 11th per cu cm.

  20. Ultrafast pulses from a mid-infrared fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tomonori; Jackson, Stuart D; Hudson, Darren D

    2015-09-15

    Ultrafast laser pulses at mid-infrared wavelengths (2-20 μm) interact strongly with molecules due to the resonance with their vibration modes. This enables their application in frequency comb-based sensing and laser tissue surgery. Fiber lasers are ideal to achieve these pulses, as they are compact, stable, and efficient. We extend the performance of these lasers with the production of 6.4 kW at a wavelength of 2.8 μm with complete electric field retrieval using frequency-resolved optical gating techniques. Contrary to the problems associated with achieving a high average power, fluoride fibers have now shown the capability of operating in the ultrafast, high-peak-power regime. PMID:26371902

  1. Modeling of near infrared pulsed laser sintering of metallic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Pascal; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Karapatis, N. P.; André, C.; Glardon, R.

    2003-11-01

    Using pulsed near infrared laser radiation for selective laser sintering bears several advantages compared to cw sintering such as low requried average power, less residual heat and improved lateral precision. By adapting the pulse length (and thus the heat diffusion length during the pulse) to the grain size of the used metal powder, the laser pulse energy can mainly by deposited in the skin of the powder particles where heating and melting is obtained, whereas the centers of the grains remain at much lower temperature and act as heat sinks after consolidation. The model described here was numerically implemented and experimentally tested with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on titanium powder. The results of the model predictions and the performed experiments are in good agreement.

  2. Local excitation and interference of surface phonon polaritons studied by near-field infrared microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huber, A J; Ocelic, N; Hillenbrand, R

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that mid-infrared surface phonon polariton excitation, propagation and interference can be studied by scattering-type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). In our experiments we image surface phonon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on flat SiC crystals. They are excited by weakly focused illumination of single or closely spaced metal disks we fabricated on the SiC surface by conventional photolithography. SPP imaging is performed by pseudo-heterodyne interferometric detection of infrared light scattered by the metal tip of our s-SNOM. The pseudo-heterodyne technique simultaneously yields optical amplitude and phase images which allows us to measure the SPP wave vector--including its sign--and the propagation length and further to study SPP interference. High resolution imaging of SPPs could be applied to investigate for example SPP focusing or heat transfer by SPPs in low dimensional nanostructures.

  3. Characterization of a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser system for multielement flame laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry of cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, and thallium in buffalo river sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J X; Hou, X; Tsai, S J; Yang, K X; Michel, R G

    1997-02-01

    A pulsed (10 Hz) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system based on beta-barium borate (BBO) crystals and equipped with a frequency-doubling option (FDO) was characterized for use in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS). This all-solid-state laser has a narrow spectral line width, a wide spectral tuning range (220-2200 nm), and a rapid, computer-controlled slew scan of wavelength (0.250 nm s-1 in the visible and infrared, and 0.125 nm s-1 in the ultraviolet). The output power characteristics (15-90 mJ/pulse in the visible, 1-40 mJ in the infrared, and 1-11 mJ in the ultraviolet), laser pulse-to-pulse variability (3-13% relative standard deviation, RSD, of the laser pulses), conversion efficiency of the FDO (2-17%), and spectral bandwidth in the visible spectrum (0.1-0.3 cm-1) were measured. The laser was used as the excitation source for a flame LEAFS instrument for which rapid, sequential, multielement analysis was demonstrated by slew scan of the laser. The instrument allowed about 640 measurements to be made in about 6 h, with triplicate measurements of all solutions and aqueous calibration curves, which yielded accurate analyses of a river sediment (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Buffalo River Sediment, 2704) for five elements with precisions < 5% RSD. Comparable or improved flame LEAFS detection limits over literature values were obtained for cobalt (2 ng mL-1), copper (2 ng mL-1), lead (0.4 ng mL-1), manganese (0.2 ng mL-1), and thallium (0.9 ng mL-1) by flame LEAFS.

  4. Two-Color, Two-Photon Imaging at Long Excitation Wavelengths Using a Diamond Raman Laser.

    PubMed

    Trägårdh, Johanna; Murtagh, Michelle; Robb, Gillian; Parsons, Maddy; Lin, Jipeng; Spence, David J; McConnell, Gail

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the second-Stokes output from a diamond Raman laser, pumped by a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser, can be used to efficiently excite red-emitting dyes by two-photon excitation at 1,080 nm and beyond. We image HeLa cells expressing red fluorescent protein, as well as dyes such as Texas Red and Mitotracker Red. We demonstrate the potential for simultaneous two-color, two-photon imaging with this laser by using the residual pump beam for excitation of a green-emitting dye. We demonstrate this for the combination of Alexa Fluor 488 and Alexa Fluor 568. Because the Raman laser extends the wavelength range of the Ti:Sapphire laser, resulting in a laser system tunable to 680-1,200 nm, it can be used for two-photon excitation of a large variety and combination of dyes. PMID:27492283

  5. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  6. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Morales-Rodríguez, M E; Senesac, L R; Rajic, S; Lavrik, N V; Smith, D B; Datskos, P G

    2013-02-15

    We have investigated an IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. Although we use a chemical layer to absorb target molecules, IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings. The chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of 1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine and a monolayer of 2-Sulfanylethan-1-ol (2-mercaptoethanol) over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 μm. We found that both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  7. A dual far-infrared laser diagnostic of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Park, H.K.

    1988-02-01

    A dual far-infrared laser has been constructed and its properties have been exploited to probe tokamak-like discharges in the CDX toroidal device. Thermal variation of the difference frequency between the two far-infrared cavities is slow, though the cavities lack thermal stabilization, simply because their assembly on the same chassis exposes them to virtually identical temperature changes. The optical arrangement beyond the laser permits conversion within minutes between interferometry and density fluctuation observation, and within an hour between different operating wavelengths. Line-average densities of 2 /times/ 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and coherent fluctuations in the neighborhood of 20 kHz have been measured with this diagnostic. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Research on fission fragment excitation of gases and nuclear pumping of lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Davie, R. N.; Davis, J. F.; Fuller, J. L.; Paternoster, R. R.; Shipman, G. R.; Sterritt, D. E.; Helmick, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental investigations of fission fragment excited gases are reported along with a theoretical analysis of population inversions in fission fragment excited helium. Other studies reported include: nuclear augmentation of gas lasers, direct nuclear pumping of a helium-xenon laser, measurements of a repetitively pulsed high-power CO2 laser, thermodynamic properties of UF6 and UF6/He mixtures, and nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor.

  9. Lasing studies of new coumarin derivatives under laser and lamp excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A. V.; Veselova, T. V.; Kozlovskii, D. A.; Komlev, I. V.; Levin, M. B.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Tavrizova, M. A.; Cherkasov, A. S.

    1988-09-01

    The luminescence characteristics and results of a study of the comparative laser efficiency of ethanol solutions of a series of coumarin derivatives and rhodamine 6G are presented. It is shown that under laser excitation (neodymium laser third harmonic) and lamp excitation, the solutions of certain coumarins match rhodamine 6G in lasing efficiency values. A comparatively low photostability of the investigated coumarin solutions and its weak dependence on the spectral composition of the pumping radiation have been observed.

  10. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  11. The Far-Infrared Laser Magnetic Resonance Spectrum of CH2F.

    PubMed

    Nolte; Wagner; Sears; Temps

    1999-05-01

    Far-infrared laser magnetic resonance (FIR-LMR) spectra due to the CH2F radical have been recorded on seven laser lines at wavelengths between 301 and 568 µm. Observed resonances were assigned to fine and hyperfine components of pure rotational transitions of CH2F in the ground vibrational state and the first excited state of the nu4 out-of-plane bending mode. All assigned transitions obey a-dipole selection rules. The data were combined with previously reported microwave results (Y. Endo, C. Yamada, S. Saito, and E. Hirota, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 1605 (1983)) and subjected to a least-squares fit to determine the parameters of the effective Hamiltonian describing the v4 = 0 and 1 vibrational levels of the CH2F radical. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Selective inactivation of micro-organisms with near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Sankey, Otto F.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate an unconventional and revolutionary method for selective inactivation of micro-organisms by using near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. We show that if the wavelength and pulse width of the excitation femtosecond laser are appropriately selected, there exists a window in power density that enables us to achieve selective inactivation of target viruses and bacteria without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. This strategy targets the mechanical (vibrational) properties of micro-organisms, and thus its antimicrobial efficacy is likely unaffected by genetic mutation in the micro-organisms. Such a method may be effective against a wide variety of drug resistant micro-organisms and has broad implications in disinfection as well as in the development of novel treatments for viral and bacterial pathogens.

  13. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy. PMID:23346368

  14. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy.

  15. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy.

  16. Gas laser in which the gas is excited by capacitor discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lacour, B.; de Witte, O.; Maillet, M.; Vannier, C.

    1985-01-22

    A gas laser in which the gas is excited by laser discharge, said laser including two capacitors formed by two parallel metal plates between which two dielectric parts are spaced apart to form a passage which contains the laser gas. It further includes a transformer whose secondary winding is connected to the plates and whose primary winding is connected in series with a capacitor, means for charging and capacitor and a thyristor for discharging the capacitor in the primary winding. Application to exciting gas lasers in which the gas contains a dye stuff.

  17. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  19. Femtosecond-pulse-driven, electron-excited XUV lasers in eight-times-ionized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lemoff, B E; Barty, C P; Harris, S E

    1994-04-15

    We propose three XUV laser schemes in the 30-50-nm wavelength region that can be driven by 10-Hz ultrashort-pulse terawatt laser systems. Tunneling ionization by circularly polarized radiation produces both the ions and hot electrons necessary to excite the upper laser level.

  20. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  1. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  2. The influence of continuous vs. pulsed laser excitation on single quantum dot photophysics.

    PubMed

    Smyder, Julie A; Amori, Amanda R; Odoi, Michael Y; Stern, Harry A; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Krauss, Todd D

    2014-12-21

    The impact of pulsed versus continuous wave (cw) laser excitation on the photophysical properties of single quantum dots (QDs) has been investigated in an experiment in which all macroscopic variables are identical except the nature of laser excitation. Pulsed excitation exaggerates the effects of photobleaching, results in a lower probability of long ON fluorescence blinking events, and leads to shorter fluorescence lifetimes with respect to cw excitation at the same wavelength and average intensity. Spectral wandering, biexciton quantum yields, and power law exponents that describe fluorescence blinking are largely insensitive to the nature of laser excitation. These results explicitly illustrate important similarities and differences in fluorescence dynamics between pulsed and cw excitation, enabling more meaningful comparisons between literature reports and aiding in the design of new experiments to mitigate possible influences of high photon flux on QDs.

  3. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  4. The effect of excitation wavelength on dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Campos, D.; Sizyuk, V.; Hough, P.

    2011-03-15

    We investigated the effect of the excitation wavelength on the density evolution of laser-produced tin plasmas, both experimentally and numerically. For producing plasmas, Sn targets were excited with either 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser or 1.06 {mu}m Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for extreme ultraviolet lithography laser-produced plasma light sources. The electron density of the plasma during the isothermal expansion regime was estimated using an interferometric technique. The Stark broadening of isolated singly-ionized emission was employed for deducing the density during the plasma adiabatic expansion regime. Our results indicate that the excitation source wavelength determines the initial density of the plasma, as well the plume expansion dynamics. Numerical simulation using HEIGHTS simulation package agrees well with the experimentally measured density profile.

  5. Dentin mid-infrared laser ablation at various lasing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) Q-switched and free-running Er:YAG laser, as well as a novel design transversally excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) oscillator-double amplifier corona preionised high beam quality Hydrogen-Fluoride (HF) laser system, all developed in our lab, were used in dentin ablation experiments. In the case of the Er:YAG laser, pulses of 190 ns in Q-switched operation and of 80 μs pulse width in free-running operation at 2.94 μm were used, while HF laser pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.6-3.1 μm in a predominantly TEM00 beam were also used to interact in vitro with dentin tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of 0.4-1.5 mm thick. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue or after being waveguided through suitable mid-IR fiber/waveguide alternatively ended with quartz end-sealing caps. The correlation between the various laser beam parameters, as wavelength, pulse duration, repetition rate, energy and spatial distribution of the beam profile and the ablative characteristics (ablation rates, tissue surface morphology) of dentin surface were investigated.

  6. Highly efficient mid-infrared dysprosium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Jackson, Stuart D

    2016-05-15

    A new, highly efficient and power scalable pump scheme for 3 μm class fiber lasers is presented. Using the free-running 2.8 μm emission from an Er3+-doped fluoride fiber laser to directly excite the upper laser level of the H13/26→H15/26 transition of the Dy3+ ion, output at 3.04 μm was produced with a record slope efficiency of 51%. Using comparatively long lengths of Dy3+-doped fluoride fiber, a maximum emission wavelength of 3.26 μm was measured. PMID:27176955

  7. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  8. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  9. Laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microcope: two important tools for device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Eberhard

    1991-03-01

    The optical beam induced current (OBIC) produced in devices by a laser scan microscope (LSM) is used to localize hot spots, leakage currents, electrostatic discharge defects and weak points. The LSM also allows photoluminescence measurements with high spatial and energy resolution. Using the infrared laser scan microscope (IR LSM), defects in the metallization and latch-up sensitive region could be detected from the back of the device.

  10. A novel laser angioplasty guided hollow fiber using mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamada, Shinya; Sato, Izuru; Awazu, Kunio

    2006-02-01

    We have proposed selective removal of cholesterol ester by infrared laser of wavelength with 5.75 μm irradiation; the wavelength of 5.75 μm correspond with the ester bond C=O stretching vibration. The flexible laser guiding line and a compact light source are required for our proposal. We used a compact mid-infrared tunable laser by difference frequency generation; DFG laser was developed for substitute light source of free electron laser. In the present work, first, we have developed hollow optical fiber with a diamond lens-tip to deliver DFG laser in the blood vessel and evaluated the transmission of DFG laser from 5.5 μm to 7.5 μm. The transmission of 5.75 μm is about 65%, the DFG beam was focused on the tip of fiber by diamond lens-tip. Secondly, we performed the selective removal experiment of cholesterol ester using the hollow optical fiber with diamond lens-tip and DFG laser. The sample used a two layer model, cholesterol oleate and gelatin. The cholesterol oleate was decomposed by 5.75 μm DFG irradiation with 3.8 W/cm2.

  11. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  12. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  13. Ablation of crystalline oxides by infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Cahill, David G.; Gundrum, Bryan; Averback, R. S.

    2006-10-15

    We use focused laser pulses with duration of 180 fs and wavelength of 800 nm to study the interactions of high power near-infrared light with the surfaces of single-crystal transparent oxides (sapphire, LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, and MgO); the morphologies of the ablation craters are studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With the exception of LaAlO{sub 3}, the high temperature annealing of these oxide crystals produces atomically flat starting surfaces that enable studies of the morphology of ablation craters with subnanometer precision. The threshold fluence for ablation is determined directly from atomic-force microscopy images and increases approximately linearly with the band gap of the oxide. For all oxides except sapphire, the depth of the ablation crater increases approximately as the square root of the difference between the peak laser fluence and the threshold fluence for ablation. Sapphire shows unique behavior: (i) at laser fluences within 1 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold for ablation, the depth of the ablation crater increases gradually instead of abruptly with laser fluence, and (ii) the rms roughness of the ablation crater shows a pronounced minimum of <0.2 nm at a laser fluence of 1 J/cm{sup 2} above the threshold.

  14. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of laser-irradiated cementum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; White, Joel M.; Cecchini, Silvia C. M.; Hennig, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    Utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in specular reflectance mode chemical changes of root cement surfaces due to laser radiation were investigated. A total of 18 samples of root cement were analyzed, six served as controls. In this study laser energies were set to those known for removal of calculus or for disinfection of periodontal pockets. Major changes in organic as well as inorganic components of the cementum were observed following Nd:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, fiber diameter 320 μm, contact mode; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia). Er:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 6 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air water cooling 30 ml/min; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia) significantly reduced the Amid bands due to changes in the organic components. After irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 200 ns, q-switched, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 800 μm, contact mode, water cooling 30 ml/min; laboratory prototype) only minimal reductions in the peak intensity of the Amide-II band were detected.

  16. Microscopic spectral imaging using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin-.; Wang, Yi; Peng, Chuan; Luo, Guipeng; Le, Han Q.

    2003-07-01

    Infrared micro-spectroscopy is a useful tool for basic research and biomedical applications. Conventional microspectroscopic imaging apparatuses use thermal sources for sample illumination, which have low brightness, low optical spectral intensity, and high noise. This work evaluates the system engineering advantages of using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers that offer orders-of magnitude higher brightness, spectral intensity, and lower noise. A laser-based microscopic spectral imaging system with focal plane array detectors demonstrated a high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) at video frame rate for a large illuminated area. Microscopic spectral imaging with fixed-wavelength and tunable lasers of 4.6, 6, and 9.3-μm wavelength was applied to a number of representative samples that consist of biological tissues (plant and animal) and solid material (a stack of laminated polymers). Transmission spectral images with ~30-dB dynamic range were obtained with clear evidence of spectral features for different samples. The potential of more advanced systems with a wide coverage of spectral bands is discussed.

  17. Laser Doppler velocimetry based on the optoacoustic effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teaghee; Choi, Jong Woon; Kim, Yong Pyung

    2012-09-15

    We present a compact optoacoustic laser Doppler velocimetry method that utilizes the self-mixing effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser. A portion of a Doppler-shifted laser beam, produced by irradiating a single wavelength laser beam on a moving object, is mixed with an originally existing laser beam inside a laser cavity. The fine change of pressure in the laser cavity modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency is detected by a condenser microphone in the laser tube. In our studies, the frequency of the Doppler signal due to the optoacoustic effect was detected as high as 50 kHz. Our measurements also confirmed that the signal varied linearly with the velocity of the external scatterer (the moving object) and the cosine of the angle between the laser beam and the velocity vector of the object.

  18. Infrared laser sealing of porcine tissues: preliminary in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Perkins, William C.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    We are exploring infrared (IR) lasers as an alternative energy modality to radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasonic (US) devices intended to provide rapid surgical hemostasis with minimal collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. Previously, a 1470-nm IR laser sealed and cut ex vivo porcine renal arteries of 1-8 mm in 2 s, yielding burst pressures < 1200 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg) and thermal coagulation zones < 3 mm (including the seal). This preliminary study describes in vivo testing of a laser probe in a porcine model. A prototype, fiber optic based handheld probe with vessel/tissue clasping mechanism was tested on blood vessels < 6 mm diameter using incident 1470-nm laser power of 35 W for 1-5 s. The probe was evaluated for hemostasis after sealing isolated and bundled vasculature of abdomen and hind leg, as well as liver and lung parenchyma. Sealed vessel samples were collected for histological analysis of lateral thermal damage. Hemostasis was achieved in 57 of 73 seals (78%). The probe consistently sealed vasculature in small bowel mesentery, mesometrium, and gastro splenic and epiploic regions. Seal performance was less consistent on hind leg vasculature including saphenous arteries and bundles and femoral and iliac arteries. Collagen denaturation averaged 1.6 mm in 8 samples excised for histologic examination. A handheld laser probe sealed porcine vessels in vivo. With further improvements in probe design and laser parameter optimization, IR lasers may provide an alternative to RF and US vessel sealing devices.

  19. Surface plasmon excitation at near-infrared wavelengths in polymer optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuehao; Mégret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    We report the first excitation of surface plasmon waves at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths using polymer optical fibers (POFs) made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). For this, weakly tilted fiber-Bragg gratings (TFBGs) have been photo-inscribed in the core of step-index POFs and the fiber coated with a thin gold layer. Surface plasmon resonance is excited with radially polarized modes and is spectrally observed as a singular extinction of some cladding-mode resonances in the transmitted amplitude spectrum of gold-coated TFBGs. The refractometric sensitivity can reach ∼550  nm/RIU (refractive index unit) with a figure of merit of more than 2000 and intrinsic temperature self-compensation. This kind of sensor is particularly relevant to in situ operation. PMID:26368696

  20. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  1. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  2. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  3. Scattering assisted injection based injectorless mid infrared quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Siddharth Kamoua, Ridha

    2014-06-07

    An injectorless five-well mid infrared quantum cascade laser is analyzed which relies on phonon scattering injection in contrast to resonant tunneling injection, which has been previously used for injectorless designs. A Monte Carlo based self-consistent electron and photon transport simulator is used to analyze the performance of the analyzed design and compare it to existing injectorless designs. The simulation results show that the analyzed design could greatly enhance the optical gain and the characteristic temperatures of injectorless quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which have typically been hindered by low characteristic temperatures and significant temperature related performance degradation. Simulations of the analyzed device predict threshold current densities of 0.85 kA/cm{sup 2} and 1.95 kA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and 300 K, respectively, which are comparable to the threshold current densities of conventional injector based QCLs.

  4. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  5. Ionization of atomic hydrogen in strong infrared laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Abeln, Brant; Bartschat, Klaus; Weflen, Daniel; Urness, Timothy

    2010-04-15

    We have used the matrix iteration method of Nurhuda and Faisal [Phys. Rev. A 60, 3125 (1999)] to treat ionization of atomic hydrogen by a strong laser pulse. After testing our predictions against a variety of previous calculations, we present ejected-electron spectra as well as angular distributions for few-cycle infrared laser pulses with peak intensities of up to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. It is shown that the convergence of the results with the number of partial waves is a serious issue, which can be managed in a satisfactory way by using the velocity form of the electric dipole operator in connection with an efficient time-propagation scheme.

  6. T-3 electron-beam-excited laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R A

    1981-02-01

    A laser system specifically designed to study the kinetics of electron-beam driven systems is described. Details of the system are given along with measurements of the electron-beam uniformity and deposition in the laser medium. Some HF laser results obtained with this system are also given.

  7. Two-color two-photon excitation using femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Quentmeier, Stefan; Denicke, Stefan; Ehlers, Jan-Eric; Niesner, Raluca A; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2008-05-01

    The use of two-color two-photon (2c2p) excitation easily extends the wavelength range of Ti:sapphire lasers to the UV, widening the scope of its applications especially in biological sciences. We report observation of 2c2p excitation fluorescence of p-terphenyl (PTP), 2-methyl-5-t-butyl-p-quaterphenyl (DMQ) and tryptophan upon excitation with 400 and 800 nm wavelengths using the second harmonic and fundamental wavelength of a mode-locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. This excitation is energetically equivalent to a one-photon excitation wavelength at 266 nm. The fluorescence signal is observed only when both wavelengths are spatially and temporally overlapping. Adjustment of the relative delay of the two laser pulses renders a cross correlation curve which is in good agreement with the pulse width of our laser. The fluorescence signal is linearly dependent on the intensity of each of the two colors but quadratically on the total incident illumination power of both colors. In fluorescence microscopy, the use of a combination of intense IR and low-intensity blue light as a substitute for UV light for excitation can have numerous advantages. Additionally, the effect of differently polarized excitation photons relative to each other is demonstrated. This offers information about different transition symmetries and yields deeper insight into the two-photon excitation process. PMID:18407711

  8. Laser hyperdoping silicon for enhanced infrared optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification have attracted interest for decades as a method to achieve impurity concentrations in silicon orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit. The incorporation of sulfur into silicon using this technique led to the observation of strong broadband infrared absorption in the resulting material. This observation, combined with interest in impurity band optoelectronic device concepts, has resulted in renewed interest in laser techniques for achieving high impurity concentrations. In this paper, I review the literature that led to the present understanding of laser hyperdoping and provide a summary of the optical and optoelectronic measurements made on sulfur hyperdoped silicon to date. I mention recent work exploring transition metal impurities and discuss how considerations discovered in early solidification and later rapid solidification work inform our approaches to kinetically trapping such impurities. I also provide a simplified picture of how a laser hyperdoping process is typically carried out, as an entry point for an experimentalist seeking to fabricate such layers.

  9. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-01-01

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength. PMID:26709957

  10. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-12-18

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength.

  11. Infrared upconversion for astronomical applications. [laser applications to astronomical spectroscopy of infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of an upconversion system is examined for observation of astronomical sources in the low to middle infrared spectral range. Theoretical values for the performance parameters of an upconversion system for astronomical observations are evaluated in view of the conversion efficiencies, spectral resolution, field of view, minimum detectable source brightness and source flux. Experimental results of blackbody measurements and molecular absorption spectrum measurements using a lithium niobate upconverter with an argon-ion laser as the pump are presented. Estimates of the expected optimum sensitivity of an upconversion device which may be built with the presently available components are given.

  12. In situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells with infrared laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, G. J.; Liu, Y.; Iturriaga, R. H.

    1995-11-01

    We describe the application of infrared optical tweezers to the in situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells. A Nd:YAG laser (lambda=3D 1064 nm) trap is used to confine and manipulate single Nannochloris and Synechococcus cells in an enriched seawater medium while spectral fluorescence and Lorenz-Mie backscatter signals are simultaneously acquired under a variety of excitation and trapping conditions. Variations in the measured fluorescence intensities of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phycoerythrin pigments in phytoplankton cells are observed. These variations are related, in part, to basic intrasample variability, but they also indicate that increasing ultraviolet-exposure time and infrared trapping power may have short-term effects on cellular physiology that are related to Chl a photobleaching and laser-induced heating, respectively. The use of optical tweezers to study the factors that affect marine cell physiology and the processes of absorption, scattering, and attenuation by individual cells, organisms, and particulate matter that contribute to optical closure on a microscopic scale are also described. (c)1995 Optical Society of America

  13. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  14. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  15. Luminescence of crystals excited by a KrCl laser and a subnanosecond electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, E I; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Orlovskii, Viktor M; Alekseev, S B

    2005-08-31

    Luminescence of crystals of natural spodumene and natural diamond of the type IIa is studied upon excitation by a laser at a wavelength of 222 nm and by a subnanosecond avalanche electron beam (SAEB) formed in air at the atmospheric pressure. The photoluminescence spectra of spodumene and diamond are shown to exhibit additional bands, which are absent upon SAEB excitation. It is demonstrated that SAEB excitation allows one to analyse various crystals under normal conditions without using any vacuum equipment. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. Controlled surface photochemistry: Bond- and isotope-selective photodesorption of neutrals by adsorbate vibrational preparation with infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter; Paramonov, Guennaddi K.

    1997-12-01

    The possibility of controlling surface photochemistry by the selective vibrational preparation of adsorbates with infrared (ir) laser pulses is investigated theoretically. In particular, the selective ir plus ultraviolet (uv) light-induced desorption of different isotopomeric neutral adsorbates from metal surfaces is studied with the help of nuclear density matrix theory. As a concrete example the system NH3/ND3/Cu(111) is chosen. In a first step of the "vibrationally mediated chemistry" advocated here, based on computed two-mode dipole functions and model potentials, optimal infrared laser pulses are designed to selectively excite the umbrella mode ν2 of either adsorbed NH3 or ND3. In a second step, an uv/visible photon enforces an electronic transition, leading, after ultrafast quenching, to desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET). It is argued that despite strong dissipation, the proper vibrational preparation not only increases desorption yields substantially, but also allows for an almost complete separation of both isotopomers.

  17. Implementation of time-resolved step-scan fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using a kHz repetition rate pump laser.

    PubMed

    Magana, Donny; Parul, Dzmitry; Dyer, R Brian; Shreve, Andrew P

    2011-05-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)(3)Cl(2) in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers.

  18. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; and Alexander Pukhov

    2001-08-30

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined.

  19. Transverse-type laser assembly using induced electrical discharge excitation and method

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    A transverse-type laser assembly is disclosed herein. This assembly defines a laser cavity containing a vapor or gaseous substance which lases when subjected to specific electrical discharge excitation between a pair of spaced-apart electrodes located within the cavity in order to produce a source of light. An arrangement located entirely outside the laser cavity is provided for inducing a voltage across the electrodes within the cavity sufficient to provide the necessary electrical discharge excitation to cause a vapor substance between the electrodes to lase.

  20. Transverse-type laser assembly using induced electrical discharge excitation and method

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.

    1994-04-19

    A transverse-type laser assembly is disclosed herein. This assembly defines a laser cavity containing a vapor or gaseous substance which lases when subjected to specific electrical discharge excitation between a pair of spaced-apart electrodes located within the cavity in order to produce a source of light. An arrangement located entirely outside the laser cavity is provided for inducing a voltage across the electrodes within the cavity sufficient to provide the necessary electrical discharge excitation to cause a vapor substance between the electrodes to lase. 3 figures.

  1. Efficient 5D excitation of trapped Rb atoms with pulsed diode-laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Supetitz, W.; Duncan, B.C.; Lee, D.I.; Gould, P.L.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have demonstrated that appropriately time-ordered pulses of diode-laser light can provide efficient population transfer in a three-level cascade system. Laser-trapped Rb atoms are excited from the 5S ground state to the highly-excited 5D level (via the 5P intermediate level) with nearly 100% efficiency. Diode-lasers at 780 nm (5S{yields}5P) and 776 nm (5P{yields}5D) are pulsed with acousto-optic modulators to provide the excitation. The variation of transfer efficiency with relative delay between the two pulses is in good agreement with theoretical expectations. Optimum excitation occurs for the counterintuitive pulse ordering, i.e., when the upper transition is driven first.

  2. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  3. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.

    2011-11-15

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a starlike geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S{sub 1/2}{yields}5P{sub 3/2}{yields}6S{sub 1/2}{yields}nP in Rb atoms have shown that, compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation, this approach provides much narrower linewidth and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot vapors, if the intermediate one-photon resonances of the three-photon transition are detuned by more than respective single-photon Doppler widths. This method can be used to improve fidelity of Rydberg quantum gates and precision of spectroscopic measurements in Rydberg atoms.

  4. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  5. Near-infrared induced optical quenching effects on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dingkai Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Chen, Xing; Cai, Hong; Johnson, Anthony M.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2014-06-23

    In space communications, atmospheric absorption and Rayleigh scattering are the dominant channel impairments. Transmission using mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths offers the benefits of lower loss and less scintillation effects. In this work, we report the telecom wavelengths (1.55 μm and 1.3 μm) induced optical quenching effects on MIR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when QCLs are operated well above their thresholds. The QCL output power can be near 100% quenched using 20 mW of near-infrared (NIR) power, and the quenching effect depends on the input NIR intensity as well as wavelength. Time resolved measurement was conducted to explore the quenching mechanism. The measured recovery time is around 14 ns, which indicates that NIR generated electron-hole pairs may play a key role in the quenching process. The photocarrier created local field and band bending can effectively deteriorate the dipole transition matrix element and quench the QCL. As a result, MIR QCLs can be used as an optical modulator and switch controlled by NIR lasers. They can also be used as “converters” to convert telecom optical signals into MIR optical signals.

  6. Resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in laser-assisted diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. S.; Zhou, Y. S.; Wang, M. X.; Gao, Y.; Liu, L.; Silvain, J. F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in combustion chemical vapor deposition of diamond was investigated. Resonant vibrational excitation of the CH2-wagging mode (a type c fundamental band, υ7, at 949.3 cm-1) in ethylene molecules was achieved by using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with a matching wavelength at 10.532 µm. By comparing to laser irradiation at off-resonance wavelengths, an on-resonance vibrational excitation is more efficient in energy coupling, increasing flame temperatures, accelerating the combustion reactions, and promoting diamond deposition. An enhanced rate of 5.7 was achieved in terms of the diamond growth rate with an improved diamond quality index at a high flame temperature under a resonant excitation of the CH2-wagging mode. This study demonstrates that a resonant vibrational excitation is an effective route for coupling energy into the gas phase reactions and promoting the diamond synthesis process.

  7. Study of laser reflection of infrared cameras with germanium optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Patrio; Shih, Ishiang; Shi, S.; Laou, Philips

    2003-09-01

    Infrared cameras are widely used in today's battlefield for surveillance purpose. Because of retroreflection, an incident laser beam entering the camera optics results in a beam reflecting back to the direction of the laser source. An IR detector positioned close to the laser source can then detect the reflected beam. This effect can reveal the location of the cameras and thus increases the risk of covert operations. In the present work, the characteristics of the retroreflection is studied. It is found that the reflection intensity is high when the incident beam enters through the middle part of the lenses while it is low and the beam is diverged when entering through the outer part of the lenses. The reflection is symmetric when the incident beam is normal to the lenses while asymmetric when it is incident with an angle to the lenses. In order to study the potential effects on retroreflection of modified camera optics, IR low index slides (ZnSe and KCl with refractive indices of 2.49 and 1.54, respectively) with different thicknesses (2mm, 4mm and 6mm) are placed in the optical system. The result shows that the focal point of the lenses is changed by the addition of the slide but the optical paths of the reflection remain unchanged. The relationship between the different slides and beam intensity is also studied.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  9. Absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism of laser-cluster interactions in a nanoaerosol system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16  GW/cm^{2}, the scattering cross section of TiO_{2} clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_{E}, Peclet Pe_{E}, and Damköhler Da_{E} numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where Sl_{E}≫1, Pe_{E}≫1, and Da_{E}≪1, the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption.

  10. Absorption-Ablation-Excitation Mechanism of Laser-Cluster Interactions in a Nanoaerosol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16 GW /cm2 , the scattering cross section of TiO2 clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal SlE , Peclet PeE , and Damköhler DaE numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where SlE≫1 , PeE≫1 , and DaE≪1 , the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption.

  11. Absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism of laser-cluster interactions in a nanoaerosol system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16  GW/cm^{2}, the scattering cross section of TiO_{2} clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_{E}, Peclet Pe_{E}, and Damköhler Da_{E} numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where Sl_{E}≫1, Pe_{E}≫1, and Da_{E}≪1, the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption. PMID:25793812

  12. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  13. Experiments concerning the laser-enhanced reaction between vibrationally excited O3 and NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, K.-K.; Cool, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    The enhancement in reaction rate between O3 and NO is studied for the case of O3 vibrationally excited by a CO2 laser. Chemiluminescence observations of a vibrationally excited and an electronically excited nitrogen dioxide reaction product provide information on the separate contributions to the overall reaction rate of these two reactive channels. The contribution of the stretching and bending modes of O3 to the reaction rate enhancement is also discussed. In addition, consideration is given to the nonreactive vibrational deactivation of vibrationally excited O3.

  14. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Investigation of the populations of excited states of barium atoms in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burimov, V. N.; Zherikhin, A. N.; Popkov, V. L.

    1995-02-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence was used in an investigation of the populations of the ground and excited (6s5d 3D1 and 3D2) states of Ba atoms in a plasma formed by laser ablation of Y—Ba—Cu—O target. A nonequilibrium velocity distribution of the atoms was detected. At large distances from the target about 4% of the atoms were in an excited state.

  15. Excitation and deexcitation of the Si-H stretching mode in a Si:H with picosecond free electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Fauchet, M.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen in amorphous and crystalline silicon has been the topic of intense theoretical and experimental investigations for more than one decade. To better understand how the Si-H bonds interact with the Si matrix and how they can be broken, it would be useful to excite selectively these bonds and monitor the energy flow from the Si-H bonds into the bulk Si modes. One attractive way of exciting the Si-H modes selectively is with an infrared laser tuned to a Si-H vibrational mode. Unfortunately, up to now, this type of experiment had not been possible because of the lack of a laser producing intense, ultrashort pulses that are tunable in the mid infrared. In this presentation, we report the first measurement where a 1 picosecond long laser pulse was used to excite the Si-H stretching modes near 2000 cm{sup -1} and another identical laser pulse was used to measure the deexcitation from that specific vibrational mode. The laser was the Stanford free electron laser generating {approximately}1 ps-long pulses, tunable in the 5 {mu}m region and focussed to an intensity of {approximately}1 GW/cm{sup 2}. The pump-probe measurements were performed in transmission at room temperature on several 2 {mu}m thick a-Si:H films deposited on c-Si. Samples with predominant Si-H{sub 1} modes, predominant Si-H{sub n>1} modes and with a mixture of modes were prepared. The laser was tuned on resonance with either of these modes. Immediately after excitation, we observe a bleaching of the infrared absorption, which can be attributed to excitation of the Si-H mode. Beaching is expected since, as a result of anharmonicity, the detuning between the (E{sub 3} - E{sub 2}) resonance and the (E{sub 2} - E{sub 1}) resonance is larger than the laser bandwidth. Note that despite the anharmonicity, it should be possible to climb the vibrational ladder due to power broadening.

  16. Two-photon-induced photoluminescence imaging of tumors using near-infrared excited gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaesook; Estrada, Arnold; Sharp, Kelly; Sang, Krystina; Schwartz, Jon A; Smith, Danielle K; Coleman, Chris; Payne, J D; Korgel, Brian A; Dunn, Andrew K; Tunnell, James W

    2008-02-01

    Gold nanoshells (dielectric silica core/gold shell) are a novel class of hybrid metal nanoparticles whose unique optical properties have spawned new applications including more sensitive molecular assays and cancer therapy. We report a new photo-physical property of nanoshells (NS) whereby these particles glow brightly when excited by near-infrared light. We characterized the luminescence brightness of NS, comparing to that of gold nanorods (NR) and fluorescent beads (FB). We find that NS are as bright as NR and 140 times brighter than FB. To demonstrate the potential application of this bright two-photon-induced photoluminescence (TPIP) signal for biological imaging, we imaged the 3D distribution of gold nanoshells targeted to murine tumors. PMID:18542237

  17. Output power of a quantum dot laser: Effects of excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuchang; Jiang, Li Asryan, Levon V.

    2015-11-14

    A theory of operating characteristics of quantum dot (QD) lasers is discussed in the presence of excited states in QDs. We consider three possible situations for lasing: (i) ground-state lasing only; (ii) ground-state lasing at first and then the onset of also excited-state lasing with increasing injection current; (iii) excited-state lasing only. The following characteristics are studied: occupancies of the ground-state and excited-state in QDs, free carrier density in the optical confinement layer, threshold currents for ground- and excited-state lasing, densities of photons emitted via ground- and excited-state stimulated transitions, output power, internal and external differential quantum efficiencies. Under the conditions of ground-state lasing only, the output power saturates with injection current. Under the conditions of both ground- and excited-state lasing, the output power of ground-state lasing remains pinned above the excited-state lasing threshold while the power of excited-state lasing increases. There is a kink in the light-current curve at the excited-state lasing threshold. The case of excited-state lasing only is qualitatively similar to that for single-state QDs—the role of ground-state transitions is simply reduced to increasing the threshold current.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-04-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  19. Near-infrared transmittance pulse oximetry with laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Lopez Silva, Sonnia Maria; Dotor Castilla, Maria Luisa; Silveira Martin, Juan Pedro

    2003-07-01

    Pulse oximeters are widely used for noninvasive monitoring of oxygen saturation in arterial blood hemoglobin. We present a transmittance pulse oximetry system based on near-infrared (NIR) laser diodes (750 and 850 nm) for monitoring oxygen saturation of arterial blood hemoglobin. The pulse oximetry system is made up of the optical sensor, sensor electronics, and processing block. Also, we show experimental results obtained during the development of the whole NIR transmittance pulse oximetry system along with modifications in the sensor configuration, signal processing algorithm, and calibration procedure. Issues concerning wavelength selection and its implications for the improvement of the transmittance pulse oximetry technique are discussed. The results obtained demonstrate the proposed system's usefulness in monitoring a wide range of oxygen saturation levels.

  20. Conjugated Polymer-Based Hybrid Nanoparticles with Two-Photon Excitation and Near-Infrared Emission Features for Fluorescence Bioimaging within the Biological Window.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanlin; Liu, Peng; Ding, Hui; Wu, Yishi; Yan, Yongli; Liu, Heng; Wang, Xuefei; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Yongsheng; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2015-09-23

    Hybrid fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) capable of fluorescing near-infrared (NIR) light (centered ∼730 nm) upon excitation of 800 nm laser light were constructed. A new type of conjugated polymer with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) feature, P-F8-DPSB, was used as the NIR-light harvesting component and the energy donor while a NIR fluorescent dye, DPA-PR-PDI, was used as the energy acceptor and the NIR-light emitting component for the construction of the fluorescent NPs. The hybrid NPs possess δ value up to 2.3 × 10(6) GM per particle upon excitation of 800 nm pulse laser. The excellent two-photon absorption (TPA) property of the conjugated polymer component, together with its high fluorescence quantum yield (ϕ) up to 45% and the efficient energy transfer from the conjugated polymer to NIR-emitting fluorophore with efficiency up to 90%, imparted the hybrid NPs with TPEF-based NIR-input-NIR-output fluorescence imaging ability with penetration depth up to 1200 μm. The practicability of the hybrid NPs for fluorescence imaging in Hela cells was validated. PMID:26340609

  1. Near infrared excited micro-Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture and ruby fluorescence at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Shen, Z. X.; Tang, S. H.; Kuok, M. H.

    1999-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) lasers, as a new excitation source for Raman spectroscopy, has shown its unique advantages and is being increasingly used for some special samples, such as those emitting strong fluorescence in the visible region. This article focuses on some issues related to high-pressure micro-Raman spectroscopy using NIR excitation source. The Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture (4:1 M-E) show a linear variation in both Raman shifts and linewidths under pressure up to 18 GPa. This result is useful in distinguishing Raman scattering of samples from that of the alcohol mixture, an extensively used pressure-transmitting medium. The R1 fluorescence in the red region induced by two-photon absorption of the NIR laser is strong enough to be used as pressure scale. The frequency and line width of the R1 lines are very sensitive to pressure change and the glass transition of the pressure medium. Our results manifest that it is reliable and convenient to use NIR induced two-photon excited fluorescence of ruby for both pressure calibration and distribution of pressure in the 4:1 M-E pressure transmitting medium.

  2. Mid-wave/long-wave infrared lasers and their sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. K.; Shori, R.; Miller, J. K.; Sharma, S.

    2011-06-01

    Many advances have been made recently in both solid-state and semiconductor based mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser technologies, and there is an ever growing demand for these laser sources for Naval, DOD and homeland security applications. We will present various current and future programs and efforts at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) on the development of high-power, broadly tunable MWIR/LWIR lasers for sensing applications.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation on mid-infrared hydride stretch transitions: polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatrian, A.; Dagdigian, P. J.

    2009-09-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of a polymer (polystyrene) with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral region is presented. A particular goal of this study is to determine whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is tuned to that of a vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant enhancements were indeed observed upon irradiation on the C-H stretch fundamental vibrational transitions. In addition, mode-specific effects were observed; the signals were stronger, compared to the relative intensities in the one-photon absorption spectrum, for irradiation on the aromatic (phenyl) C-H stretch transitions, rather than those involving aliphatic (backbone) C-H modes. The applicability of mid-IR resonance enhanced LIBS for detection of residues on surfaces is discussed.

  4. Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy: applications in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Winfried

    1996-05-01

    High resolution fluorescence imaging in intact tissues faces special challenges posed by scattering of excitation and fluorescence light and the need to avoid photodynamic damage. Significant improvements over conventional widefield and confocal imaging are provided when two-photon excitation is used. Applications to the functional imaging of the calcium dynamics in synaptic spines, small invertebrate neurites, and auditory hair cells are shown. Two-photon absorption induced photolysis can also be used for scanning photochemical microscopy and for high resolution measurements of diffusional coupling between cellular compartments.

  5. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Misochko, Oleg V.; Chekalin, Sergey V.

    2013-07-01

    Femtosecond spectroscopy is applied to study transient electronic processes in bismuth. The components with relaxation times of 1 ps, 7 ps, and ˜1 ns are detected in the photoinduced reflectivity response of the crystal. To facilitate assignment of the observed relaxation to the decay of particular excited electronic states, we use pump pulses with central wavelengths ranging from 400 to 2300 nm. Additionally, we examine the variation of parameters of coherent A1g phonons upon the change of excitation and probing conditions. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone.

  6. Visible and near-infrared excitation spectra from the neptunyl ion doped into a uranyl tetrachloride lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau J.; Berg, John M.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Wozniak, Nicholas R.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2016-03-01

    Visible and near-infrared illumination induces 5f-5f and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions of the neptunyl tetrachloride anion in polycrystalline Cs2U(Np)O2Cl4, and results in near-infrared luminescence from the second electronically excited state to the ground state. This photoluminescence is used as a detection method to collect excitation spectra throughout the near-infrared and visible regions. The excitation spectra of LMCT transitions in excitation spectra were identified in previous work. Here the measurement and analysis is extended to include both LMCT and intra-5f transitions. The results manifest variation in structural properties of the neptunium-oxo bond among the low-lying electronic states. Vibronic intensity patterns and energy spacings are used to compare bond lengths and vibrational frequencies in the excited states, confirming significant characteristic differences between those excited by 5f-5f transitions from those due to LMCT transitions. Results are compared with recently published RASPT2/SO calculations of [NpO2Cl4]2-.

  7. Germanium-on-silicon mid-infrared grating couplers with low-reflectivity inverse taper excitation.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Benedikovic, Daniel; Penadés, Jordi Soler; Littlejohns, Callum G; Khokhar, Ali Z; Pérez-Galacho, Diego; Vivien, Laurent; Cheben, Pavel; Mashanovich, Goran Z

    2016-09-15

    A broad transparency range of its constituent materials and compatibility with standard fabrication processes make germanium-on-silicon (Ge-on-Si) an excellent platform for the realization of mid-infrared photonic circuits. However, the comparatively large Ge waveguide thickness and its moderate refractive index contrast with the Si substrate hinder the implementation of efficient fiber-chip grating couplers. We report for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a single-etch Ge-on-Si grating coupler with an inversely tapered access stage, operating at a 3.8 μm wavelength. Optimized grating excitation yields a coupling efficiency of -11  dB (7.9%), the highest value reported for a mid-infrared Ge-on-Si grating coupler, with reflectivity below -15  dB (3.2%). The large periodicity of our higher-order grating design substantially relaxes the fabrication constraints. We also demonstrate that a focusing geometry allows a 10-fold reduction in inverse taper length, from 500 to 50 μm. PMID:27628388

  8. Deposition of polyimide precursor by resonant infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Gies, A. P.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-11-01

    We report the successful deposition of a polyimide precursor using resonant infrared laser ablation (RIR-LA). A solution of poly(amic acid) (PAA) dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), the melt processable precursor to polyimide, was frozen in liquid nitrogen for use as an ablation target in a high-vacuum chamber. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine that the local chemical structure remained unaltered. Gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that the transferred PAA retained its molecular weight, showing that RIR-LA is able to transfer the polymer intact, with no detectable chain fragmentation. These results are in stark contrast to UV-processing which degrades the polymer. After deposition the PAA may be removed with a suitable solvent; however, once the material has undergone cyclodehydration it forms an impenetrable three-dimensional network associated with thermosetting polymers. The transfer of uncured PAA precursor supports the hypothesis that RIR-LA is intrinsically a low temperature process, because the PAA is transferred without reaching the curing temperature. The RIR-LA also effectively removes the solvent NMP from the PAA, during both the ablation and deposition phases; this is a necessary step in generating PI films.

  9. A fuzzy automated object classification by infrared laser camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Seigo; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Asari, Kazunari; Kuramoto, Kei; Kobashi, Syoji; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Home security in night is very important, and the system that watches a person's movements is useful in the security. This paper describes a classification system of adult, child and the other object from distance distribution measured by an infrared laser camera. This camera radiates near infrared waves and receives reflected ones. Then, it converts the time of flight into distance distribution. Our method consists of 4 steps. First, we do background subtraction and noise rejection in the distance distribution. Second, we do fuzzy clustering in the distance distribution, and form several clusters. Third, we extract features such as the height, thickness, aspect ratio, area ratio of the cluster. Then, we make fuzzy if-then rules from knowledge of adult, child and the other object so as to classify the cluster to one of adult, child and the other object. Here, we made the fuzzy membership function with respect to each features. Finally, we classify the clusters to one with the highest fuzzy degree among adult, child and the other object. In our experiment, we set up the camera in room and tested three cases. The method successfully classified them in real time processing.

  10. Photoacoustic-based detector for infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, L.; Palzer, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present an alternative detector technology for use in direct absorption spectroscopy setups. Instead of a semiconductor based detector, we use the photoacoustic effect to gauge the light intensity. To this end, the target gas species is hermetically sealed under excess pressure inside a miniature cell along with a MEMS microphone. Optical access to the cell is provided by a quartz window. The approach is particularly suitable for tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared range, where numerous molecules exhibit large absorption cross sections. Moreover, a frequency standard is integrated into the method since the number density and pressure inside the cell are constant. We demonstrate that the information extracted by our method is at least equivalent to that achieved using a semiconductor-based photon detector. As exemplary and highly relevant target gas, we have performed direct spectroscopy of methane at the R3-line of the 2v3 band at 6046.95 cm-1 using both detector technologies in parallel. The results may be transferred to other infrared-active transitions without loss of generality.

  11. Transcutaneous optical telemetry system with infrared laser diode.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Shiba, K; Shu, E; Koshiji, K; Tsukahara, K; Oh-umi, T; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Taenaka, Y; Takano, H

    1998-01-01

    A transcutaneous telemetry system is indispensable when monitoring and controlling the operation of an artificial heart totally implanted inside the body. A telemetry system using light is more useful than radio waves from the viewpoint of electromagnetic interference and power consumption. In this report, a transcutaneous optical coupler consisting of an infrared laser diode (LD) and a PIN photodiode (PINPD) was evaluated, and the transcutaneous optical coupling and information transmission characteristics were evaluated in in vitro experiments. The wavelength and directional angle of the LD used were 830 nm and 9.5 degrees, respectively. With regard to the directional angle of PINPD, the authors found that a PINPD with a larger directional angle allowed for more deviation between the axes optical axes of the LD and the PINPD. It was also found that the transcutaneous coupler had an optimum distance for the permissible deviation to be maximized. The information signals modulated by the phase shift keying (PSK) were transmitted at a rate of 9,600 bps through goat skin 4 mm thick, and demodulated by the phase locked loop (PLL) on the receiving side. As a result, the information signals were demodulated without any errors in deviation within 10.5 mm at a distance of 11 mm. In conclusion, the transcutaneous optical telemetry system using an infrared LD has sufficient characteristics to monitor and control the operation of an artificial heart totally implanted inside the body. PMID:9831095

  12. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Nanoscale Near-Infrared Emissive Polymersomes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Timothy V.; Ghoroghchian, P. Peter; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Therien, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Formed through cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic diblock copolymers and electronically conjugated porphyrinic near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores (NIRFs), NIR-emissive polymersomes (50 nm to 50 μm diameter polymer vesicles) define a family of organic-based, soft-matter structures that are ideally suited for deep-tissue optical imaging and sensitive diagnostic applications. Here, we describe magic angle and polarized pump–probe spectroscopic experiments that: (i) probe polymersome structure and NIRF organization and (ii) connect emitter structural properties and NIRF loading with vesicle emissive output at the nanoscale. Within polymersome membrane environments, long polymer chains constrain ethyne-bridged oligo(porphinato)zinc(II) based supermolecular fluorophore (PZnn) conformeric populations and disperse these PZnn species within the hydrophobic bilayer. Ultrafast excited-state transient absorption and anisotropy dynamical studies of NIR-emissive polymersomes, in which the PZnn fluorophore loading per nanoscale vesicle is varied between 0.1–10 mol %, enable the exploration of concentration-dependent mechanisms for nonradiative excited-state decay. These experiments correlate fluorophore structure with its gross spatial arrangement within specific nanodomains of these nanoparticles and reveal how compartmentalization of fluorophores within reduced effective dispersion volumes impacts bulk photophysical properties. As these factors play key roles in determining the energy transfer dynamics between dispersed fluorophores, this work underscores that strategies that modulate fluorophore and polymer structure to optimize dispersion volume in bilayered nanoscale vesicular environments will further enhance the emissive properties of these sensitive nanoscale probes. PMID:18611010

  13. Infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging and applications to imaging of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Brian James

    This dissertation introduces infrared planar laser- induced fluorescence (IR PLIF) techniques for visualization of species that lack convenient electronic transitions and are therefore unsuitable for more traditional electronic PLIF measurements. IR PLIF measurements can generate high signal levels that scale linearly with both laser energy and species concentration, thereby demonstrating advantages over Raman and multiphoton PLIF techniques. IR PLIF is shown to be a straightforward and effective tool for visualization of CO and CO2 in reactive flows. The slow characteristic times of vibrational relaxation and the large mole fractions of CO and CO2 in typical flows lead to high IR PLIF signal levels, despite the low emission rates typical of vibrational transitions. Analyses of rotational energy transfer (RET) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) show that excitation schemes in either linear (weak) or saturated (strong) limits may be developed, with the fluorescence collected directly from the laser-excited species or indirectly from bath gases in vibrational resonance with the laser-excited species. Use of short (~1 μs) exposures (for CO) or short exposures combined with long-pulse, high-pulse-energy excitation (for CO2) minimizes unwanted signal variation due to spatially-dependent VET rates. Results are presented for flows ranging from room- temperature mixing to a benchmark CH4 laminar diffusion flame. Linear excitation is appropriate for CO due to its slow vibrational relaxation. However, linear excitation is not well-suited for CO2 imaging due to fast H 2O-enhanced VET processes and the attendant difficulty in interpreting the resulting signal. Saturated excitation using a CO2 laser (or combined CO2 laser-OPO) technique is most appropriate for CO 2, as it generates high signal and minimizes spatial variations in fluorescence quantum yield. Since IR PLIF is applicable to most IR-active species, it has a high potential for expanding the diagnostic

  14. Doping of germanium and silicon crystals with non-hydrogenic acceptors for far infrared lasers

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Brundermann, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductors used for far infrared lasers with non-hydrogenic acceptors having binding energies larger than the energy of the laser photons. Doping of germanium or silicon crystals with beryllium, zinc or copper. A far infrared laser comprising germanium crystals doped with double or triple acceptor dopants permitting the doped laser to be tuned continuously from 1 to 4 terahertz and to operate in continuous mode. A method for operating semiconductor hole population inversion lasers with a closed cycle refrigerator.

  15. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  16. Quantum cascade semiconductor infrared and far-infrared lasers: from trace gas sensing to non-linear optics.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Langford, Nigel; McCulloch, Michael T; Wright, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    The Quantum cascade (QC) laser is an entirely new type of semiconductor device in which the laser wavelength depends on the band-gap engineering. It can be made to operate over a much larger range than lead salt lasers, covering significant parts of both the infrared and submillimetre regions, and with higher output power. In this tutorial review we survey some of the applications of these new lasers, which range from trace gas detection for atmospheric or medical purposes to sub-Doppler and time dependent non-linear spectroscopy.

  17. Investigation of the spectra of luminescence and Raman scattering in water and chlorophyll "a" excited by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukova, Yu. S.; Ilyin, A. A.; Golik, S. S.; Mayor, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The Raman spectra of femtosecond laser pulses in distilled and tap water, and luminescence spectra of aqueous solutions containing dissolved organic matter, chlorophyll "a" and biological objects excited by ultra-short laser pulses was investigated.

  18. Contribution of electronic excitation to the structural evolution of ultrafast laser-irradiated tungsten nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Samuel T.; Giret, Yvelin; Daraszewicz, Szymon L.; Lim, Anthony C.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Tanimura, Katsumi; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2016-03-01

    The redistribution of the electron density in a material during laser irradiation can have a significant impact on its structural dynamics. This electronic excitation can be incorporated into two temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) simulations through the use of electronic temperature dependent potentials. Here, we study the structural dynamics of laser irradiated tungsten nanofilms using 2T-MD simulations with an electronic temperature dependent potential and compare the results to equivalent simulations that employ a ground-state interatomic potential. Electronic excitation leads to an expansion of the crystal and a decrease in the melting point of tungsten. During laser irradiation these factors ensure that the threshold fluences to the different melting regimes are reduced. Furthermore, both heterogenous and homogeneous melting are predicted to occur more rapidly due to excitation and oscillations in the film thickness will be accentuated.

  19. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, I. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Firsov, K. N.

    2009-03-01

    Ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is studied experimentally. It is found that the spark initiates a feebly radiating incomplete-combustion wave, which is much faster than the combustion wave, but is substantially slower than the detonation wave. With a time delay of 500-700 μs, a bright optical flash occupying the entire chamber volume is observed, which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is drawn regarding the common nature of the process of ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume and the previously investigated initiation of combustion by laser sparks excited at solid targets, high-power microwave discharges, and high-current gliding discharges.

  20. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, I. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Firsov, K. N.

    2009-03-15

    Ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is studied experimentally. It is found that the spark initiates a feebly radiating incomplete-combustion wave, which is much faster than the combustion wave, but is substantially slower than the detonation wave. With a time delay of 500-700 {mu}s, a bright optical flash occupying the entire chamber volume is observed, which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is drawn regarding the common nature of the process of ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume and the previously investigated initiation of combustion by laser sparks excited at solid targets, high-power microwave discharges, and high-current gliding discharges.

  1. Ab initio non-Born-Oppenheimer simulations of rescattering dissociation of H2 in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Chao; He, Feng

    2014-11-01

    We simulate the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and observe the rescattering dissociation of H2 in strong infrared laser fields. Two dissociation pathways are identified, i.e., the dissociation of H2+ in the 2 p σu state and the dissociation of H2 in doubly excited states. The former accounts for larger proportions as the rescattering energy is larger. The kinetic energy release of dissociative fragments reflects the temporal internuclear distance at the moment the rescattering happens.

  2. High-order harmonic generation by an intense infrared laser pulse in the presence of a weak UV pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Popruzhenko, S. V.; Zaretsky, D. F.; Becker, W.

    2010-06-15

    High-order harmonic emission by an atom subject to the superposition of a strong infrared (IR) and a weak ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse is studied for the case when the UV photon energy remains below the ionization threshold. A simple analytical treatment is developed on the basis of the Lewenstein approach modified to account for the contribution of excited bound states of the atom. It is found that an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the high-harmonic emission rate can be expected, particularly in IR fields of moderate intensity. The results are discussed in view of recent experimental data and numerical simulations of the problem.

  3. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Boncher, William L.; Love, Steven P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90-100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8-12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  4. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus Peter; Boncher, William Lawrence; Love, Steven Paul

    2015-03-10

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90–100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8–12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  5. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    DOE PAGES

    Hehlen, Markus Peter; Boncher, William Lawrence; Love, Steven Paul

    2015-03-10

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. Theymore » show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90–100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8–12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.« less

  6. Impact of Infrared Lunar Laser Ranging on Lunar Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnès; Manche, Hervé; Gastineau, Mickael; Courde, Clément; Torre, Jean-Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques; LLR Observers : Astrogeo-OCA, Apache Point, McDonald Laser Ranging Station, Haleakala Observatory, Matera Laser Ranging Observatory

    2016-10-01

    Since 2015, in addition to the traditional green (532nm), infrared (1064nm) has been the preferred wavelength for lunar laser ranging at the Calern lunar laser ranging (LLR) site in France. Due to the better atmospheric transmission of IR with respect to Green, nearly 3 times the number of normal points have been obtained in IR than in Green [ C.Courde et al 2016 ]. In our study, in addition to the historical data obtained from various other LLR sites, we include the recent IR normal points obtained from Calern over the 1 year time span (2015-2016), constituting about 4.2% of data spread over 46 years of LLR. Near even distribution of data provided by IR on both the spatial and temporal domain, helps us to improve constraints on the internal structure of the Moon modeled within the planetary ephemeris : INPOP [ Fienga et al 2015 ]. IERS recommended models have been used in the data reduction software GINS (GRGS,CNES) [ V.Viswanathan et al 2015 ]. Constraints provided by GRAIL, on the Lunar gravitational potential and Love numbers have been taken into account in the least-square fit procedure. New estimates on the dynamical parameters of the lunar core will be presented.

  7. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  8. White light excitation of the near infrared Er3+ emission in exchanged zeolite sensitised by oxygen vacancies.

    PubMed

    Mech, Agnieszka; Monguzzi, Angelo; Cucinotta, Fabio; Meinardi, Francesco; Mezyk, Jakub; De Cola, Luisa; Tubino, Riccardo

    2011-04-01

    A new material based on Er(3+)-exchanged zeolite L crystals, in which oxygen vacancies have been generated, is proposed as an efficient emitter in the near infrared third telecommunication window. The rare earth ions photoluminescence is efficiently generated by energy transfer from the excited oxygen vacancies, which act as wide range light harvesters. The proposed material can be excited in the whole Near UV-VIS-NIR spectral range from 355 to 700 nm, thus representing the first step toward versatile, zeolite based NIR sources that can be excited with white light.

  9. Method and apparatus for secondary laser pumping by electron beam excitation

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Murray, John R.; Powell, Howard T.; Swingle, James C.; Turner, Jr., Charles E.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    1978-01-01

    An electron beam of energy typically 100 keV excites a fluorescer gas which emits ultraviolet radiation. This radiation excites and drives an adjacent laser gas by optical pumping or photolytic dissociation to produce high efficiency pulses. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, United States Energy Research and Development Administration Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with the University of California.

  10. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  11. Excitation of surface waves by a short laser pulse in a conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Uryupin, S A; Frolov, A A

    2013-12-31

    We have studied the possibility of exciting surface waves in a conductor, which is irradiated by a focused femtosecond laser pulse incident along the normal to the surface. The time-dependent ponderomotive force is shown to lead to the excitation of surface waves in the terahertz frequency range. It is also shown that the total energy and the pulse amplitude of the surface waves increases with increasing effective electron collision frequency. (terahertz radiation)

  12. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  13. Switching between ground and excited states by optical feedback in a quantum dot laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Virte, Martin; Breuer, Stefan; Sciamanna, Marc; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2014-09-22

    We demonstrate switching between ground state and excited state emission in a quantum-dot laser subject to optical feedback. Even though the solitary laser emits only from the excited state, we can trigger the emission of the ground state by optical feedback. We observe recurrent but incomplete switching between the two emission states by variation of the external cavity length in the sub-micrometer scale. We obtain a good qualitative agreement of experimental results with simulation results obtained by a rate equation that accounts for the variations of the feedback phase.

  14. Laser excitation of the n =3 level of positronium for antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Forslund, O. K.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jernelv, I. L.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Koettig, T.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Lehner, S.; Liberadzka, J.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Rienäcker, B.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Vamosi, S.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.; AEgIS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the laser excitation of the n =3 state of positronium (Ps) in vacuum. A combination of a specially designed pulsed slow positron beam and a high-efficiency converter target was used to produce Ps. Its annihilation was recorded by single-shot positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Pulsed laser excitation of the n =3 level at a wavelength λ ≈205 nm was monitored via Ps photoionization induced by a second intense laser pulse at λ =1064 nm. About 15% of the overall positronium emitted into vacuum was excited to n =3 and photoionized. Saturation of both the n =3 excitation and the following photoionization was observed and explained by a simple rate equation model. The positronium's transverse temperature was extracted by measuring the width of the Doppler-broadened absorption line. Moreover, excitation to Rydberg states n =15 and 16 using n =3 as the intermediate level was observed, giving an independent confirmation of excitation to the 3 3P state.

  15. Excitable laser processing network node in hybrid silicon: analysis and simulation.

    PubMed

    Nahmias, Mitchell A; Tait, Alexander N; Shastri, Bhavin J; de Lima, Thomas Ferreira; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-10-01

    The combination of ultrafast laser dynamics and dense on-chip multiwavelength networking could potentially address new domains of real-time signal processing that require both speed and complexity. We present a physically realistic optoelectronic simulation model of a circuit for dynamical laser neural networks and verify its behavior. We describe the physics, dynamics, and parasitics of one network node, which includes a bank of filters, a photodetector, and excitable laser. This unconventional circuit exhibits both cascadability and fan-in, critical properties for the large-scale networking of information processors based on laser excitability. In addition, it can be instantiated on a photonic integrated circuit platform and requires no off-chip optical I/O. Our proposed processing system could find use in emerging applications, including cognitive radio and low-latency control. PMID:26480191

  16. Excitable laser processing network node in hybrid silicon: analysis and simulation.

    PubMed

    Nahmias, Mitchell A; Tait, Alexander N; Shastri, Bhavin J; de Lima, Thomas Ferreira; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-10-01

    The combination of ultrafast laser dynamics and dense on-chip multiwavelength networking could potentially address new domains of real-time signal processing that require both speed and complexity. We present a physically realistic optoelectronic simulation model of a circuit for dynamical laser neural networks and verify its behavior. We describe the physics, dynamics, and parasitics of one network node, which includes a bank of filters, a photodetector, and excitable laser. This unconventional circuit exhibits both cascadability and fan-in, critical properties for the large-scale networking of information processors based on laser excitability. In addition, it can be instantiated on a photonic integrated circuit platform and requires no off-chip optical I/O. Our proposed processing system could find use in emerging applications, including cognitive radio and low-latency control.

  17. Progress in table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray lasers at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L B; Dunn, J; Li, Y; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-02-07

    We present progress in experiments for high efficiency Ne-like and Ni-like ion x-ray lasers using the transient collisional excitation scheme. Experimental results have been obtained on the COMET 15 TW table-top laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The plasma formation, ionization and collisional excitation of the x-ray laser have been optimized using two sequential laser pulses of 600 ps and 1 ps duration with an optional pre-pulse. We have observed high gains up to 55 cm{sup {minus}1} in Ne-like and Ni-like ion schemes for various atomic numbers. We report strong output for the 4d - 4p line in lower Z Ni-like ion sequence for Mo to Y, lasing from {approximately}190 {angstrom} to 240 {angstrom}, by pumping with less than 5 J energy on target.

  18. High gain x-ray lasers pumped by transient collisional excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J., LLNL

    1998-06-16

    We present recent results of x-ray laser amplification of spontaneous emission in Ne-like and Ni-like transient collisional excitation schemes. The plasma formation, ionization and collisional excitation can be optimized using two laser pulses of 1 ns and 1 ps duration at table-top energies of 5 J in each beam. High gain of 35 cm{sup -1} has been measured on the 147 {Angstrom} 4d{r_arrow}4p J=0{r_arrow}1 transition of Ni-like Pd and is a direct consequence of the nonstationary population inversion produced by the high intensity picosecond pulse. We report the dependence of the x-ray laser line intensity on the laser plasma conditions and compare the experimental measurements with hydrodynamic and atomic kinetics simulations for Ne-like and Ni-like lasing.

  19. Generation of an ultra-short electrical pulse with width shorter than the excitation laser

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Shaoqiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a rare phenomenon that the width of an electrical response is shorter than that of the excitation laser. In this work, generation of an ultrashort electrical pulse is by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and the generated electrical pulse width is shorter than that of the excitation laser from diode laser. When the pulse width and energy of the excitation laser are fixed at 25.7 ns and 1.6 μJ respectively, the width of the generated electrical pulse width by 3-mm-gap GaAs PCSS at the bias voltage of 9 kV is only 7.3 ns. The model of photon-activated charge domain (PACD) is used to explain the peculiar phenomenon in our experiment. The ultrashort electrical pulse width is mainly relevant to the time interval of PACD from occurrence to disappearance in the mode. The shorter the time interval is, the narrower the electrical pulse width will become. In more general terms, our result suggests that in nonlinear regime a response signal can have a much short width than the excitation pulses. The result clearly indicates that generating ultrashort electrical pulses can be achieved without the need of ultrashort lasers. PMID:27273512

  20. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  1. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  2. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  3. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  4. Laser excited fluorescence in the cesium-xenon excimer and the cesium dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Snow, W. L.; Hillard, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Argon ion laser lines are used to excite fluorescence in a mixture of cesium and xenon. Excimer band fluorescence is observed at higher pressures (about 1 atm) while at lower pressures (several torr) a diffuse fluorescence due to the cesium dimer is observed whose character changes with exciting wavelength. The excimer fluorescence is shown to be directly related to the location of the exciting wavelength within previously measured Cs/Xe line shapes. This fact suggests that the excimer systems may be efficiently pumped through these line shapes. Qualitative energy-level schemes are proposed to explain the observations in both the excimer and dimer systems.

  5. Control of Electron Excitation and Localization in the Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} and Its Isotopes Using Two Sequential Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    He Feng; Ruiz, Camilo; Becker, Andreas

    2007-08-24

    We study the control of dissociation of the hydrogen molecular ion and its isotopes exposed to two ultrashort laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. While the first ultraviolet pulse is used to excite the electron wave packet on the dissociative 2p{sigma}{sub u} state, a second time-delayed near-infrared pulse steers the electron between the nuclei. Our results show that by adjusting the time delay between the pulses and the carrier-envelope phase of the near-infrared pulse, a high degree of control over the electron localization on one of the dissociating nuclei can be achieved (in about 85% of all fragmentation events). The results demonstrate that current (sub-)femtosecond technology can provide a control over both electron excitation and localization in the fragmentation of molecules.

  6. Mid-infrared photothermal heterodyne spectroscopy in a liquid crystal using a quantum cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    Mërtiri, Alket; Jeys, Thomas; Liberman, Vladimir; Hong, M. K.; Mertz, Jerome; Altug, Hatice; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2012-01-01

    We report a technique to measure the mid-infrared photothermal response induced by a tunable quantum cascade laser in the neat liquid crystal 4-octyl-4′-cyanobiphenyl (8CB), without any intercalated dye. Heterodyne detection using a Ti:sapphire laser of the response in the solid, smectic, nematic and isotropic liquid crystal phases allows direct detection of a weak mid-infrared normal mode absorption using an inexpensive photodetector. At high pump power in the nematic phase, we observe an interesting peak splitting in the photothermal response. Tunable lasers that can access still stronger modes will facilitate photothermal heterodyne mid-infrared vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:22912508

  7. New infrared photon absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayfield, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    The fast ionization of atoms by very short laser pulses, and its possible suppression at extreme pulse intensities, is an active new field of investigation at present. Described is an investigation of whether past techniques for infrared laser multiphoton ionization of excited hydrogen atoms and of one-dimensional microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms can be combined and extended to address the new issues. Although technically difficult and requiring further improvement of apparatus, intense-field infrared laser experiments on excited hydrogen atoms are possible and can directly test theoretical and numerical results.

  8. A comparative study of experimental and finite element analysis on submillimeter flaws by laser and ultrasonic excited thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Yu, Lingyao; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, François; Joncas, Simon; Sheng, Yunlong; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it might cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. In this paper, new approaches including micro-VT, lock-in micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods are used to detect submillimeter flaws in stitched CFRP. A comparison of laser excitation thermography and micro-VT on micro-porosities is conducted. Micro-CT is used to validate the infrared results. Then, a finite element analysis (FEA) is performed. The geometrical model needed for finite element discretization was developed from micro-CT measurements. The model is validated for the experimental results. Finally a comprehensive experimental and simulation comparison of micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods is conducted.

  9. Detection of an infrared near-field optical signal by attaching an infrared-excitable phosphor to the end of a photocantilever.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Fukuzawa, K; Ohwaki, J

    1999-01-01

    To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of near-field scanning optical microscopy, we propose attaching an infrared-excitable phosphor (IEP) to a photocantilever. One source of noise is the light scattered from locations on the sample surface other than that of the probe tip. By detecting only the light scattered from the tip, we can obtain a near-field optical signal without noise. We attached an IEP particle to a photocantilever to convert infrared light to visible light and we used 1550-nm infrared illumination, so the light scattered from the sample was only infrared. The silicon photodiode of the photocantilever is 10(6) times less sensitive to infrared light than to visible light. As a result, only the converted visible light from the IEP particle, i.e. the signal containing the near-field optical information from the tip, was detected. We verified that the photocantilever detected the signal in the evanescent light produced by infrared illumination and that the detected signal was the light converted by the IEP. The experimental results show the feasibility of detecting infrared light and not the background light through the use of the IEP. PMID:11388267

  10. Collision of counterpropagating laser-excited wake bubbles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z G; Yang, L; Zhou, C T; Yu, M Y; Ying, H P; Wang, X G

    2014-06-01

    The collision of wake bubbles behind two counterpropagating laser pulses in rarefied plasma is investigated using particle-in-cell simulation. Special attention is paid to the highly nonlinear dynamics of the electrons in the interaction region. It is found that, as the two bubbles approach each other and collide, the electrons in the interaction region first oscillate in a periodic fashion, forming a quasistationary dense electron density ripple with fairly regular spatial structure. At longer times, the electron motion becomes chaotic, and the density grating is gradually smeared. The electrons escape in the transverse direction, and eventually the two bubbles merge to form a single one. The transition of the electron motion from regular to chaotic is confirmed by analytical modeling using test electrons moving in counterpropagating planar electromagnetic waves. The findings shed light on the dynamics of wake-bubble collisions and the complex behavior induced by multiple laser pulses in plasmas.

  11. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement by femtosecond longitudinal interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Le Blanc, S.P.; Fisher, D.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Babine, A.; Stepanov, A.; Sergeev, A.

    1996-04-01

    Plasma density oscillations (Langmuir waves) in the wake of an intense (I{sub peak} {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulse (100 fs) are measured with ultrafast time resolution using a longitudinal interferometric technique. Phase shifts consistent with large amplitude ({delta}n{sub e}/n{sub e} {approximately} 1) density waves at the electron plasma frequency were observed in a fully tunnel-ionized He plasma, corresponding to longitudinal electric fields of {approximately} 10 GV/m. Strong radial ponderomotive forces enhance the density oscillations. As this technique utilizes a necessary component of any laser-based plasma accelerator, it promises to be a powerful tool for on-line monitoring and control of future plasma-based particle accelerators.

  12. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  13. Chemical and explosive detection with long-wave infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, Ei E.; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) mostly uses silicon-based detectors and measures the atomic emission in the UV-Vis-NIR (UVN) region of the spectrum. It can be used to detect the elements in the sample under test, such as the presence of lead in the solder for electronics during RoHS compliance verification. This wavelength region, however, does not provide sufficient information on the bonding between the elements, because the molecular vibration modes emit at longer wavelength region. Measuring long-wave infrared spectrum (LWIR) in a LIBS setup can instead reveal molecular composition of the sample, which is the information sought in applications including chemical and explosive detection and identification. This paper will present the work and results from the collaboration of several institutions to develop the methods of LWIR LIBS for chemical/explosive/pharmaceutical material detection/identification, such as DMMP and RDX, as fast as using a single excitation laser pulse. In our latest LIBS setup, both UVN and LWIR spectra can be collected at the same time, allowing more accurate detection and identification of materials.

  14. Coulomb expansion of laser-excited ion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Feldbaum, D; Morrow, N V; Dutta, S K; Raithel, G

    2002-10-21

    We determine the electric field in mm-sized clouds of cold Rb+ ions, produced by photoionization of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, using the Stark effect of embedded Rydberg atoms. The dependence of the electric field on the time delay between the ion plasma production and the probe of the electric field reflects the Coulomb expansion of the plasma. Our experiments and models show expansion times <1micros.

  15. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe; Chirot, Fabien

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  16. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Chirot, Fabien; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  17. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues.

  18. Fast Infrared Chemical Imaging with a Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm–1) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  19. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  20. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  1. Selective mode excitation in finite size plasma crystals by diffusely reflected laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar

    2015-02-15

    The possibility to use diffuse reflections of a laser beam to exert a force on levitating dust particles is studied experimentally. Measurements and theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement. Further, the method is applied to test the selective excitation of breathing-like modes in finite dust clusters.

  2. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by excited ions in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. M.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.; Rychev, M. V.; Fedotov, Andrei B.

    1989-07-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) method was used in observation of excited Al II, Al III, In II and N II in an optical breakdown plasma. The feasibility of CARS spectroscopy of multiply charged ions in a laser plasma was established.

  3. Single photon excimer laser photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.; Rice, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The ir + uv photodissociation of SF/sub 6/ has been performed using CO/sub 2/ and ArF lasers. The two-color photolysis significantly enhances the photodissociation process over ArF irradiation alone and is found to preserve the initial isotopic specificity of the ir excitation process.

  4. Raman Laser Spectrometer internal Optical Head current status: opto-mechanical redesign to minimize the excitation laser trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Miguel; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Pérez, Carlos; Belenguer, Tomás; del Rosario Canchal, María; Zuluaga, Pablo; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Santiago, Amaia; Rull, Fernando; Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Universidad de Valladolid (UVa), Ingeniería de Sistemas para la Defesa de España S.A. (ISDEFE)

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is the Pasteur Payload instruments of the ExoMars mission, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, that will perform for the first time in an out planetary mission Raman spectroscopy. RLS is composed by SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit). iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples (excitation path), and collects the Raman emission from the sample (collection path, composed on collimation system and filtering system). The original design presented a high laser trace reaching to the detector, and although a certain level of laser trace was required for calibration purposes, the high level degrades the Signal to Noise Ratio confounding some Raman peaks.The investigation revealing that the laser trace was not properly filtered as well as the iOH opto-mechanical redesign are reported on. After the study of the Long Pass Filters Optical Density (OD) as a function of the filtering stage to the detector distance, a new set of filters (Notch filters) was decided to be evaluated. Finally, and in order to minimize the laser trace, a new collection path design (mainly consisting on that the collimation and filtering stages are now separated in two barrels, and on the kind of filters to be used) was required. Distance between filters and collimation stage first lens was increased, increasing the OD. With this new design and using two Notch filters, the laser trace was reduced to assumable values, as can be observed in the functional test comparison also reported on this paper.

  5. Feasibility study: Monodisperse polymer particles containing laser-excitable dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswarlu, Putcha; He, K. X.; Sharma, A.

    1993-01-01

    The optical properties associated with small particles, which include aerosols, hydrosols and solid microspheres have an impact on several areas of science and engineering. Since the advent of high-speed computers and lasers, the interaction of light with matter in the form of small particles with a discontinuous optical boundary relative to the surroundings has been much better understood. Various nonlinear optical effects have been observed involving interaction of a laser beam with both solid microspheres and liquid microdroplets. These include observation of second and third harmonic generation, four wave mixing, optical visibility, two photon absorption, observation of stimulated emission and lasing, and Stimulated Raman Scattering. Many of these effects are observed with laser intensities which are orders of magnitude less than that required by threshold condition for interactions in macroscopic bulk medium. The primary reason for this is twofold. The front surface of the microsphere acts as a thick lens to enhance the internal intensity of the input laser radiation, and the spherical shape of the droplet acts as an optical cavity to provide feedback at specific wavelengths corresponding to the whispering gallery modes or the morphology dependent resonances (MDR's). The most interesting and significant recent finding in this field is undoubtedly the existence of resonance peaks in linear and nonlinear optical spectra. Such resonance peaks are only dependent on the particle morphology, which means the size, shape and refractive index of the particle. Because of the simultaneous presence of these resonances, they have been referred to by many names, including structural resonances, whispering modes or whispering gallery modes, creeping waves, circumferential waves, surfaces modes, and virtual modes. All of these names refer to the same phenomena, i.e. morphology dependent resonances (MDR's) which has already been described and predicted precisely by

  6. Study of laser excited vibration of silicon cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Song Yaqin; Cretin, Bernard; Vairac, Pascal; Todorovic, D. M.

    2008-11-15

    In this paper an interferometric setup called 'thermoelastic microscopy' has been used to measure the vibration response of the semiconductor cantilevers under modulated laser thermal source. The small vibration amplitude has been detected well below 10 pm magnitude in accurate adjustment conditions. The results showed that experimental responses have a good agreement with the theoretical ones. Also from the analysis we could conclude that the signal amplitude has a power functional dependence on the modulation frequency and that the phase angle linearly depended on the square root of modulation frequency.

  7. Dual-frequency injection-locked continuous-wave near-infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Trivikramarao; Ohashi, Takeru; Sasaki, Yusuke; Kawashima, Takuya; Hamano, Hiroaki; Yoshizaki, Ryo; Fujimura, Yuki; Yoshii, Kazumichi; Ohae, Chiaki; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    We report a dual-frequency injection-locked continuous-wave near-infrared laser. The entire system consists of a Ti:sapphire ring laser as a power oscillator, two independent diode lasers employed as seed lasers, and a master cavity providing a frequency reference. Stable dual-frequency injection-locked oscillation is achieved with a maximum output power of 2.8 W. We show its single longitudinal/transverse mode characteristics and practical power stability, as fundamental performance features of this laser system. We also demonstrate arbitrary selectivity of the two frequencies and flexible control of their relative powers by simply manipulating the seed lasers, as advanced features.

  8. Photo-ionization and photo-excitation of curcumin investigated by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tingting; Kun, Li; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, ShiLong

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin (Cur) has putative antitumor properties. In the current study, we examined photophysical and photochemical properties of Cur using laser flash photolysis. The results demonstrated that Cur could be photo-ionized at 355 nm laser pulse to produce radical cation (Currad +) and solvated electron esol- in 7:3 ethanol-water mixtures. The quantum yield of Cur photo-ionization and the ratio of photo-ionization to photo-excitation were also determined. Currad + could be transferred into neutral radical of Cur (Currad ) via deprotonation with the pKa 4.13. The excited singlet of Cur (1Cur*) could be transferred into excited triplet (3Cur*), which could be quenched by oxygen to produce singlet oxygen 1O2∗. Reaction of 3Cur* with tryptophan was confirmed. The results encourage developing curcumin as a photosensitive antitumor agent.

  9. Single pulse laser excitation of structural vibration using power densities below the surface ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philp, W. R.; Booth, D. J.; Perry, N. D.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes sub-ablation optical excitation of flexural vibration in cantilevers and a suspended truck-wheel rim by using a single 600μs, Nd:glass laser pulse with energies between 1J and 40J. The excitation is consistent with the photothermal production of a localized thermoelastic bending moment at the site of the laser irradiation. This method of excitation has been combined with fibre optic sensing and modal analysis of the resulting vibrations to provide a practical method of remotely measuring the structural properties upon which the frequencies of vibration depend. The modal frequencies of slot-damaged cantilevers are presented to demonstrate the possible application of this non-contact measurement technique for non-destructive testing.

  10. CO/sub 2/ dissociation in sealed rf-excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, B.A.; Tulip, J.

    1988-05-01

    A mass spectrometer has been used to study the gas composition in a sealed rf-excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide laser during operation. CO/sub 2/ dissociation levels, at 53% to 71%, are similar to those reported for dc-excited waveguide lasers and substantiate prior measurements on rf-excited discharges. The degree of dissociation decreases with increasing pressure and xenon content, but increases as the proportion of helium in the gas mixture is increased. Dissociation has been found to be insensitive to the rf input power per unit discharge length over the range of 2.7 to 4.7 W/cm. This is believed to be the result of increased rates of water vapor outgassing at higher input power levels.

  11. Design of an infrared camera based aircraft detection system for laser guide star installations

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Macintosh, B.

    1996-03-05

    There have been incidents in which the irradiance resulting from laser guide stars have temporarily blinded pilots or passengers of aircraft. An aircraft detection system based on passive near infrared cameras (instead of active radar) is described in this report.

  12. Controlling the formation of excited neutral D* fragments of D2 using intense ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizollah, Peyman; Berry, Ben; Severt, T.; Jochim, Bethany; Zohrabi, M.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Rajput, Jyoti; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2016-05-01

    Excited neutral D* fragments (n >> 1) are produced by the interaction of strong-field laser pulses with D2 molecules. In this work, we focus on the formation of low kinetic energy release (KER) D* fragments, which are relatively unstudied, using NIR (800-nm) and UV (400-nm) laser pulses. The KER spectrum is found to be very sensitive to the laser parameters, including laser chirp. By changing the chirp of the UV laser pulses, two separate low-KER peaks are generated instead of a single peak. Moreover, the ratio between these peaks can be controlled with the chirp. Similarly, by chirping the NIR pulses, the low-KER peak is attenuated and shifted to lower energy. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. Department of Energy. BJ was also supported in part by DOE-SCGF (DE-AC05-06OR23100).

  13. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai; Lasse H., Lillevang; Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian; Balling, Peter; Senftleben, Arne; Baumert, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  14. Copper bromide vapour laser excited by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevskii, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    Lasing on self-terminating copper atom transitions is obtained for the first time by pumping the Ne – CuBr mixture by regular pulses and by a pulse train of low-energy electron beams formed in an 'open' discharge. In these regimes in a range of experimental conditions, a growth of power and radiation energy is demonstrated with an increase in the electron beam current and pulse repetition rate. In a double pulse excitation regime, the lasing energy is completely recovered in ~2.5 μs. In a central zone of the active element where CuBr molecules are totally dissociated, the specific lasing energy of ~44 μJ cm-3 is obtained at a physical efficiency of 8.5%.

  15. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses can induce nanoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Short infrared (IR) laser pulses on the order of hundreds of microseconds to single milliseconds with typical wavelengths of 1800-2100 nm, have shown the capability to reversibly stimulate action potentials (AP) in neuronal cells. While the IR stimulation technique has proven successful for several applications, the exact mechanism(s) underlying the AP generation has remained elusive. To better understand how IR pulses cause AP stimulation, we determined the threshold for the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Using a surrogate calcium ion, thallium, which is roughly the same shape and charge, but lacks the biological functionality of calcium, we recorded the flow of thallium ions into an exposed cell in the presence of a battery of channel antagonists. The entry of thallium into the cell indicated that the ions entered via nanopores. The data presented here demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental effects of IR stimulation and speculates that nanopores, formed in response to the IR exposure, play an upstream role in the generation of AP.

  16. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry Application to Artworks: New Acoustic and Mechanical Exciters for Structural Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnani, A.; Esposito, E.

    After first attempts some years ago, the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer has become an effective way of diagnosing different types of artworks; successful applications regard frescoes, icons, mosaics, ceramic artefacts and wood inlays. Also application to historical bridges has been successfully developed and a recently approved European Commission project will see the employment of scanning laser Doppler Vibrometry (SLDV) for the dynamical characterization of ancient buildings. However, a critical issue consists in the adequate excitation of the structure under test. Moreover different types of defects and different kinds of artworks require different types of excitation, so this topic needs a deep consideration. In this work we will present two new types of exciters developed at our Department, namely an acoustic exciter and a mechanical one. Acoustic exciters allow remote non-invasive loading but are limited in the lower frequency range and in the amount of vibrational energy input into the structure. The proposed automatic tapping device based on a commercial impact hammer overcomes these problems. Also another acoustic exciter, a HyperSonic Sound (HSS) source has been evaluated, showing interesting features as regards sound radiation.

  17. Generation of tunable far-infrared radiation by optical pumping molecular gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained by optical pumping molecular gas lasers by use of a 20 atm high-pressure CO 2-laser. The far-infrared laser gases investigated were several isotopes of the methylhalides (CH 3X; X  F, Cl, Br, I), heavy water (D 2O) and ammonia (NH 3), that delivered around 1000 laser lines with wavelengths ranging from the millimeter region down to 40 μm. By exploiting the continuous tunability of the CO 2-laser to pump either a waveguide laser or a multipass Raman-cell broadly tunable FIR emission can be generated via stimulated Raman scattering. Moreover the observed far-infrared laser pulses were found to have pulse durations of less than 100 ps.

  18. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  19. Dynamic near-field nanofocusing by V-shaped metal groove via a femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangqing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Ou, Yan; Yong, Jiale; Hou, Xun

    2016-03-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of plasmonic near-field nanofocusing by a V-shaped groove milled on Au film via a femtosecond laser excitation is theoretically studied based on finite element method. The spatiotemporal evolution of the focused e-fields around the V-groove geometry is obtained. It is revealed that the strong nanofocusing at the V-shaped groove occurs at the moderate electron temperature of 3000 K in the electron-phonon uncoupled state via a femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The phenomenon is explained as the electron thermal dynamics manipulation of plasmon resonances due to femtosecond laser fluence modifications. This study provides basic understanding of ultrafast dynamics of near-field nanofocusing in V-shaped geometry for wide applications in the fields such as super-resolution imaging, SERS, and photothermal therapy.

  20. Laboratory analysis of techniques for remote sensing of estuarine parameters using laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Houghton, W. M.; Esaias, W.; Harriss, R. C.; Farmer, F. H.; White, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical concepts underlying remote sensing of estuarine parameters using laser excitation are examined. The concepts are extended to include Mie scattering as a measure of the total suspended solids and to develop the water Raman signal as an internal standard. Experimental validation of the theory was performed using backscattered laser light from a laboratory tank to simulate a remote-sensing geometry. Artificially prepared sediments and biological cultures were employed to check specific aspects of the theory under controlled conditions. Natural samples gathered from a variety of water types were also analyzed in the tank to further enhance the simulation. The results indicate that it should be possible to remotely quantify total suspended solids, dissolved organics, attenuation coefficient, chlorophyll a, and phycoerythrin in estuarine water using laser excitation.

  1. Note: Longitudinally excited N{sub 2} laser with low beam divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, K. Akitsu, T.; Jitsuno, T.

    2014-09-15

    We developed a longitudinally excited N{sub 2} laser (337 nm) with low beam divergence without collimator lenses. The N{sub 2} laser consisted of a 30 cm long Pyrex glass tube with an inner diameter of 2.5 mm, a normal stable resonator formed by flat mirrors, and a simple, novel driver circuit. At a N{sub 2} gas pressure of 0.4 kPa and a repetition rate of 40 Hz, the N{sub 2} laser produced a circular beam with an output energy of 2.6 μJ and a low full-angle beam divergence of 0.29 mrad due to the uniform discharge formed by the longitudinal excitation scheme, the long cavity with the small aperture, and the low-input energy oscillation.

  2. Stability of quantum-dot excited-state laser emission under simultaneous ground-state perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptan, Y. Herzog, B.; Schöps, O.; Kolarczik, M.; Woggon, U.; Owschimikow, N.; Röhm, A.; Lingnau, B.; Lüdge, K.; Schmeckebier, H.; Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D.; Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G.

    2014-11-10

    The impact of ground state amplification on the laser emission of In(Ga)As quantum dot excited state lasers is studied in time-resolved experiments. We find that a depopulation of the quantum dot ground state is followed by a drop in excited state lasing intensity. The magnitude of the drop is strongly dependent on the wavelength of the depletion pulse and the applied injection current. Numerical simulations based on laser rate equations reproduce the experimental results and explain the wavelength dependence by the different dynamics in lasing and non-lasing sub-ensembles within the inhomogeneously broadened quantum dots. At high injection levels, the observed response even upon perturbation of the lasing sub-ensemble is small and followed by a fast recovery, thus supporting the capacity of fast modulation in dual-state devices.

  3. Ultrafast gating of a mid-infrared laser pulse by a sub-pC relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, D. B.; Musumeci, P.; Alesini, D.

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we discuss a relative time-of-arrival measurement scheme between an electron beam and a mid-infrared laser pulse based on the electron-beam controlled transmission in semiconductor materials. This technique can be used as a time-stamping diagnostic in ultrafast electron diffraction or microscopy. In particular, our characterization of Germanium demonstrates that sub-ps time-of-arrival sensitivity could be achieved in a single shot and with very low charge beams (<1 pC). Detailed measurements as a function of the beam charge and the laser wavelength offer insights on the free carrier dynamics in the semiconductor upon excitation by the electron beam.

  4. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1988-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers work performed during the period from April 13, 1988 to October 13, 1988 under NASA grant number NAG-1-877 entitled, Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. We have designed a flashlamp-pumped Cr3(+);GSAG laser of pulsed laser energy greater than 200 mJ and of pulse width of 1 ms FWHM to simulate a high-power laser diode in pumping mid-infrared laser crystals such as Tm3(+), Er3(+), and/or Ho3(+)-ion doped YAG, YLF or other host materials. This Cr3(+);GSAG laser will be used to determine optimum conditions for laser diode pumped mid-infrared lasers, maximum energy extraction limit with longitudinal pumping, thermal damage limit, and other problems related to high power laser diode pumping. We have completed a modification of an existing flashlamp-pumped and liquid nitrogen cooled rare earth laser system for 60 J electrical input energy and a 500 micron pulse width, and have carried out preliminary experiments with a Ho(+):Er3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal to test the system performance. This flashlamp-pumped rare earth laser system will be used to determine optimum Tm3(+)-ion concentration in Ho3(+):Cr3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal in the remaining research period.

  5. Controlling the excitation process of free electrons by a femtosecond elliptically polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lili; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on the excitation rates of free electrons of an aluminum (Al) bulk irradiated by an elliptically polarized laser in simulation, using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The polarized 400 nm, 10 fs laser pulse consisted of two elementary sinusoidal beams, and is adjusted by changing the phase difference φ and the intersection angle θ of the polarization directions between the two beams. The simulation includes cases of φ = π/2 with θ = 30°, θ = 45°, θ = 60°, θ = 90°, θ = 120°, θ = 135°, θ = 150°, and cases of θ = 90° with φ = π/4, φ = π/3, φ = π/2, φ = 2π/3, φ = 3π/4. The absorbed energy, the excitation rates and the density distributions of free electrons after laser termination are investigated. At the given power intensity (1×1014Wcm-2), pulse width (10 fs) and wavelength (400 nm) of each elementary laser beam, computational results indicate that the excitation rate of free electrons is impacted by three major factors: the long axis direction of the laser projected profile, the amplitude difference of the first main oscillation (1st AD), and the total amplitude difference of main oscillations (TAD) of the external electric field. Among the aforementioned three factors for the excitation rate of free electrons, the direction of long axis plays the most significant role. The screen effect is crucial to compare the importance of the remaining two factors. The analysis approach to investigate the electron dynamics under an elliptically polarized laser is both pioneering and effective.

  6. Low intensity infrared laser effects on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Teixeira, A. F.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Valença, S. S.; Paoli, F.

    2012-10-01

    Biostimulative effect of low intensity laser in tissues has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases. The aim of this work was to evaluate effects of laser exposure on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid topological forms. Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were exposed to infrared laser to study bacterial survival and electrophoretic profile, respectively. Data indicate low intensity infrared laser: (i) had no effect on E. coli wild type, endonuclease IV, exonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cultures, but decreased the survival of E. coli UvrA protein deficient cultures; (ii) there was no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids. Exposure to low intensity infrared laser decreases survival of Escherichia coli cultures deficient in nucleotide excision repair of DNA and this effect could depend on fluences, wavelength and tissues conditions.

  7. Long-wavelength infrared surface plasmons on Ga-doped ZnO films excited via 2D hole arrays for extraordinary optical transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Justin W.; Esfahani, Nima Nader; Vangala, Shivashankar; Guo, Junpeng; Hendrickson, Joshua R.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Thomson, Darren; Look, David C.

    2013-09-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through highly conductive ZnO films with sub-wavelength hole arrays is investigated in the long-wavelength infrared regime. EOT is facilitated by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and can be tuned utilizing the physical structure size such as period. Pulse laser deposited Ga-doped ZnO has been shown to have fluctuations in optical and electrical parameters based on fabrication techniques, providing a complimentary tuning means. The sub-wavelength 2D hole arrays are fabricated in the Ga-doped ZnO films via standard lithography and etching processes. Optical reflection measurements completed with a microscope coupled FTIR system contain absorption resonances that are in agreement with analytical theories for excitation of SPPs on 2D structures. EOT through Ga-doped ZnO is numerically demonstrated at wavelengths where SPPs are excited. This highly conductive ZnO EOT structure may prove useful in novel integrated components such as tunable biosensors or surface plasmon coupling mechanisms.

  8. Diode laser probing of CO2 and CO vibrational excitation produced by collisions with high energy electrons from 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Scott A.; Zhu, Lei; Flynn, George W.

    1992-11-01

    The vibrational, rotational, and translational excitation of CO2 and CO following excimer laser photolysis of iodine is evaluated by means of time-domain absorption spectroscopy. In spite of the lack of change in the rotational and translational molecular energy, pronounced vibrational excitation is noted. The excimer laser photolysis of the iodine is thought to generate hot electrons that collide with the CO2 leading to vibrationally excited molecules.

  9. Plasma membrane nanoporation as a possible mechanism behind infrared excitation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Hope T.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Musick, Joshua D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses have been used to stimulate action potentials in neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon has remained elusive. In vitro studies have found that pulsed IR exposure generates a nearly instant change in capacitance in the plasma membrane, characterized by inward rectification, a common feature in pore-forming exposures, such as electrical pulses and acoustic shock waves. Based on this similarity, we hypothesize that the mechanism of IR stimulation is the formation of short-lived nanopores in the plasma membrane. These transient, small-diameter pores allow the influx of extracellular ions that lead to action potential generation, possibly through activation of secondary messenger pathways or depolarization of the cell membrane resulting in activation of voltage-gated ion channels. Approach. A variety of fluorescent markers are used to observe the cell response to IR stimulation to monitor for effects indicative of nanoporation in other modalities. Main results. We observe rapid, transient rises in intracellular Ca2+, influx of YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide into the cell signifying membrane permeabilization, cellular blebbing and swelling, and activation of the intracellular phosphoinositides lipid signaling pathway. Significance. This conclusion better explains the experimental observations and limitations of IR-induced neurological stimulation and represents a distinct theoretical shift in the understanding of the mechanism of IR-induced stimulation.

  10. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  11. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions.

  12. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  13. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols.

  14. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions. PMID:27220530

  15. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with tail-free short pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a tail-free short laser pulse. In a discharge tube, two structures were researched. One is a shingle scheme that is constituted of a 45 cm-long discharge tube. Another is a tandem that is constituted of two 30 cm-long discharge tubes connected with an intermediate electrode were used. In gas media, CO2- rich mixture (CO2: N2= 20: 1) was used to reduce a laser pulse tail. The laser system did not require expensive and scarce helium. A fast discharge (<1 μs) in a low gas pressure (<1.8 kPa) produced a tail-free laser pulse with the pulse width of about 100 ns. The single scheme produced an output energy of 4.7 mJ by a charging voltage of -36.3 kV, and the tandem scheme produced an output energy of 9.3 mJ by a charging voltage of -25.2 kV. The tandem scheme produced higher spike pulse by lower voltage than the single scheme. Therefore, the tandem scheme will be effective in longitudinally excited CO2 lasers with simple and compact designs.

  16. Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Lalanne, Elaine; Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Xiaojun; Johnson, Anthony M.

    2014-05-26

    We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60 GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

  17. Laser-excited fluorescence of rare earth elements in fluorite: Initial observations with a laser Raman microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, R.C.; Ging, T.G.; Eppinger, R.G.; Samson, a.M.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence emission spectra of three samples of fluorite containing 226-867 ppm total rare earth elements (REE) were excited by visible and ultraviolet wavelength lines of an argon ion laser and recorded with a Raman microprobe spectrometer system. Narrow emission lines ( 0.9 for Eu2+ and 0.99 for Er3+. Detection limits for three micrometer spots are about 0.01 ppm Eu2+ and 0.07 ppm Er3+. These limits are less than chondrite abundance for Eu and Er, demonstrating the potential microprobe analytical applications of laser-excited fluorescence of REE in fluorite. However, application of this technique to common rock-forming minerals may be hampered by competition between fluorescence emission and radiationless energy transfer processes involving lattice phonons. ?? 1992.

  18. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  19. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of 93Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in 57Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  20. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  1. Color printing on plastics using a slab, RF-excited CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarazaki, Masaru; Sakurada, Noriyo; Ishii, Yoshio; Kubota, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2003-02-01

    A coloring method using a laser system has been proposed in our laboratory. This method has the features as follows. i) The processing objects are plastic materials such as acrylic, nylon, epoxy, polyester etc. ii) Heating the dye solution by the irradiation of a laser, a material can be dyed at a local area of laser irradiation. iii) The images which printed by this method have persistence for erasing such as washing or rubbing. iv) Since the absorptivity of CO2 laser to the dye solution is high, a slap, RF excited CO2 laser was used as a heating source. This method, however, could be expressed only one-color image. In order to perform expression based on the digital image, not one-color but the colors printing of the image has been required. In this study, the innovative laser coloring method has been introduced for the colors printing. This method combines the laser processing dots which are possessed different colors. For example, by combining the dots of two colors, another color printing can be created. Otherwise, by changing the combining rate of the dots of two colors, more other color printing has been possible. A color printing on plastics using the innovative laser coloring method has been successfully attempted.

  2. High quality electron beam acceleration by ionization injection in laser wakefields with mid-infrared dual-color lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Luo, Ji; Chen, Min; Mori, Warren B.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    For the laser wakefield acceleration, suppression of beam energy spread while keeping sufficient charge is one of the key challenges. In order to achieve this, we propose bichromatic laser ionization injection with combined laser wavelengths of 2.4 μ m and 0.8 μ m for wakefield excitation and triggering electron injection via field ionization, respectively. A laser pulse at 2.4 μ m wavelength enables one to drive an intense acceleration structure with a relatively low laser power. To further reduce the requirement of laser power, we also propose to use carbon dioxide as the working gas medium, where carbon acts as the injection element. Our three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that electron beams at the GeV energy level with both low energy spreads (around 1%) and high charges (several tens of picocoulomb) can be obtained by the use of this scheme with laser peak power totaling sub-100 TW.

  3. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  4. Photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by invisible infrared radiation emitted from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Yahya A H; Khedr, Abdulla H

    2014-01-01

    There are a wide variety of laser pointers sold to the general public. Among those are the high-powered diode-pumped solid-state lasers (>5 mW), which do not follow the laser safety regulations for packing, and are sold as regular lasers without the infrared (IR) filters. In this case report, we encountered a patient with photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by the invisible IR radiations emitted from a green laser pointer. Owing to the thermal effect of the invisible IR rays led to the disease. PMID:24618868

  5. Table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray laser research at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J., Osterheld, A.L., Shepherd, R., White, W.E., Shlyaptsev, V.N., Bullock, A.B., Stewart, R.E.

    1997-10-06

    We describe recent experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to produce a table-top x-ray laser. Using a combination of long 800 ps and short {approximately}1 ps high power laser pulses with {approximately} 6 J in each beam, a transient collisionally excited Ne-like ion x-ray laser scheme has been investigated. We present results of high x-ray laser gain for the Ne- like Ti 3p-3s J=O-l transition at 326 {Angstrom} and have achieved gL product of 15 for target lengths up to 1 cm. We have extended the transient collisional scheme to shorter wavelengths using the Ni-like analog, specifically the 4d-4p J=O-l of Ni-like Pd at 147 {Angstrom}.

  6. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses.

  7. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca2+ imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25–1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm2 resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca2+] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca2+ involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca2+]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca2+ release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. PMID:24920028

  8. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  9. Infrared/laser multi-sensor fusion and tracking based on the multi-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingjian; Hao, Jingya; Yi, Xiang; Wu, Feihong; Li, Min; Qin, Hanlin; Huang, Hanqiao

    2016-03-01

    The state estimation problem of targets detected by infrared/laser composite detection system with different sampling rates was studied in this paper. An effective state estimation algorithm based on data fusion is presented. Because sampling rate of infrared detection system is much higher than that of the laser detection system, the theory of multi-scale analysis is used to establish multi-scale model in this algorithm. At the fine scale, angle information provided by infrared detection system is used to estimate the target state through the unscented Kalman filter. It makes full use of the high frequency characteristic of infrared detection system to improve target state estimation accuracy. At the coarse scale, due to the sampling ratio of infrared and laser detection systems is an integer multiple, the angle information can be fused directly with the distance information of laser detection system to determine the target location. The fused information is served as observation, while the converted measurement Kalman filter (CMKF) is used to estimate the target state, which greatly reduces the complexity of filtering process and gets the optimal fusion estimation. The simulation results of tracking a target in 3-D space by infrared and laser detection systems demonstrate that the proposed algorithm in this paper is efficient and can obtain better performance than traditional algorithm.

  10. Wide field intravital imaging by two-photon-excitation digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (2p-DSLM) with a high-pulse energy laser

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Oshima, Yusuke; Kajiura-Kobayashi, Hiroko; Nonaka, Shigenori; Imamura, Takeshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (DSLM) illuminates a sample in a plane and captures single-photon–excitation fluorescence images with a camera from a direction perpendicular to the light sheet. This method is potentially useful for observing biological specimens, because image acquisition is relatively fast, resulting in reduction of phototoxicity. However, DSLM cannot be effectively applied to high-scattering materials due to the image blur resulting from thickening of the light sheet by scattered photons. However, two-photon–excitation DSLM (2p-DSLM) enables collection of high-contrast image with near infrared (NIR) excitation. In conventional 2p-DSLM, the minimal excitation volume for two-photon excitation restricts the field of view. In this study, we achieved wide-field 2p-DSLM by using a high–pulse energy fiber laser, and then used this technique to perform intravital imaging of a small model fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Wide fields of view (>700 μm) were achieved by using a low–numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and high–peak energy NIR excitation at 1040 nm. We also performed high-speed imaging at near-video rate and successfully captured the heartbeat movements of a living medaka fish at 20 frames/sec. PMID:25360352

  11. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  12. Preablation electron and lattice dynamics on the silicon surface excited by a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-11-15

    The study of the time-resolved optical reflection from the silicon surface excited by single femtosecond laser pulses below and near the melting threshold reveals fast (less than 10 ps) Auger recombination of a photogenerated electron–hole plasma with simultaneous energy transfer to the lattice. The acoustic relaxation of the excited surface layer indicates (according to reported data) a characteristic depth of 150 nm of the introduction of the laser radiation energy, which is related to direct linear laser radiation absorption in the photoexcited material due to a decrease in the energy bandgap. The surface temperature, which is probed at a time delay of about 100 ps from the reflection thermomodulation of probe radiation and the integrated continuous thermal emission from the surface, increases with the laser fluence and, thus, favors a nonlinear increase in the fluorescence of sublimated silicon atoms. The surface temperature estimated near the picosecond melting threshold demonstrates a substantial (20%) overheating of the material with respect to the equilibrium melting temperature. Above the melting threshold, the delay of formation of the material melt decreases rapidly (from several tens of picoseconds to several fractions of a picosecond) when the laser fluence and, correspondingly, the surface temperature increase. In the times of acoustic relaxation of the absorbing layer and even later, the time modulation of the optical reflectivity of the material demonstrates acoustic reverberations with an increasing period, which are related to the formation of melt nuclei in the material.

  13. Laser capture microdissection: Arcturus(XT) infrared capture and UV cutting methods.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rosa I; Blakely, Steven R; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a technique that allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue under direct microscopic visualization. LCM can be used to harvest the cells of interest directly or can be used to isolate specific cells by ablating the unwanted cells, resulting in histologically enriched cell populations. The fundamental components of laser microdissection technology are (a) visualization of the cells of interest via microscopy, (b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and (c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. Laser energy supplied by LCM instruments can be infrared (810 nm) or ultraviolet (355 nm). Infrared lasers melt thermolabile polymers for cell capture, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes the unique features of the Arcturus(XT) laser capture microdissection instrument, which incorporates both infrared capture and ultraviolet cutting technology in one instrument, using a proteomic downstream assay as a model.

  14. Middle infrared, quantum cascade laser optoelectronic absorption system for monitoring glucose in serum.

    PubMed

    Martin, W Blake; Mirov, Sergey; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2005-07-01

    Advances in middle infrared technology are leading researchers beyond the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and to the quantum cascade laser. While most research focuses on gas-phase detection, recent research explores its use for condensed-phase matter studies. This work investigates its use for monitoring biologically relevant samples of glucose in serum. Samples with physiological glucose concentrations were monitored with a laser at 1036 cm-1. A 0.992 R2 linearity value was observed. In addition, using another laser at 1194 cm-1 as a measure of the background spectroscopic characteristics, a linearity of 0.998 R2 was observed. The average predictive standard errors of the mean (SEM) were 32.5 and 24.7 mg/dL, respectively, for each method. Quantum cascade lasers could be used to develop middle infrared devices for uses beyond the confines of the laboratory.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a traveling wave excited TEA nitrogen laser

    SciTech Connect

    Santa, I.; Kozma, L.; Nemet, B.; Hebling, J.; Gorbal, M.R.

    1986-11-01

    The authors studied the capacitor transfer type of flat-plate-transmission-line traveling wave excited atmospheric pressure nitrogen laser. Experiments were carried over a wide variety of parameters such as charging voltage, separation and angle of electrodes, capacitance of bank, inductance of switching circuit, and geometrical parameters of resonators. The theory is based upon the macroscopic properties of nitrogen discharges. Laser pulses were calculated by solving numerically the space-dependent rate equations for population and photon number densities. The theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  16. Selective emission and luminescence of Er2O3 under intense laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Iskhakova, L. D.; Studenikin, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    The microstructure of Er2O3 polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er2SiO5) layers was observed upon interaction of Er2O3 and SiO2 melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er2O3 polycrystals in the range 200 - 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength λ = 10.6 μm) and resonant laser (λ ≈ 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er2O3 polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er3+ ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er2O3 polycrystals in the range 400 - 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er3+ ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er2O3 spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er3+ ions formed under intense laser excitation of the 4I11/2 level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er2O3 upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er3+ ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples.

  17. Efficiency of GaInAs/GaAs quantum-well lasers upon inhomogeneous excitation of quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, D V; Afonenko, A A; Aleshkin, V Ya

    2013-11-30

    A model for calculating the power characteristics of laser structures taking into account inhomogeneous excitation of quantum wells (QWs), recombination in the barrier regions, and nonlinear gain effects is developed. It is shown that, with increasing number of QWs, the output power of the Ga{sub 0.8}In{sub 0.2}As/GaAs/InGaP structures at first considerably increases and then slightly decreases. In a wide range of injection currents, the optimal number of QWs is 5 ± 1. The inhomogeneity of QW excitation increases with increasing injection current and decreases the laser power compared to homogeneous excitation. (lasers)

  18. Real-time quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy in-vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger-Lui, N.; Haase, K.; Pucci, A.; Schönhals, A.; Petrich, W.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared microscopy can be performed to observe dynamic processes on a microscopic scale. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-based microscopes are bound to limitations regarding time resolution, which hampers their potential for imaging fast moving systems. In this manuscript we present a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope which overcomes these limitations and readily achieves standard video frame rates. The capabilities of our setup are demonstrated by observing dynamical processes at their specific time scales: fermentation, slow moving Amoeba Proteus and fast moving Caenorhabditis elegans. Mid-infrared sampling rates between 30 min and 20 ms are demonstrated.

  19. [Infrared tunable difference frequency laser source]. Final technical report, September 15, 1990--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of grant was to purchase equipment necessary to construct an infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation in AgGaS[sub 2]. This continuous wave, single frequency, tunable infrared source has been assembled and is being used for infrared kinetic spectroscopy of small free radicals important in combustion. Infrared spectra are given for the Q-branch of a combination band (11[sup 1]1) of N[sub 2]O, and for the transient in CO produced by flash photolysis of acetone in various vibrational states.

  20. [Infrared tunable difference frequency laser source]. Final technical report, September 15, 1990--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.

    1992-12-31

    Purpose of grant was to purchase equipment necessary to construct an infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation in AgGaS{sub 2}. This continuous wave, single frequency, tunable infrared source has been assembled and is being used for infrared kinetic spectroscopy of small free radicals important in combustion. Infrared spectra are given for the Q-branch of a combination band (11{sup 1}1) of N{sub 2}O, and for the transient in CO produced by flash photolysis of acetone in various vibrational states.

  1. The luminescence response of Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate complexes upon preresonant excitation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B.; Stefanov, Ivan L.; Stanimirov, Stanislav S.; Petkov, Ivan K.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (TTA) coordination complexes of trivalent europium ion (Eu(III)) in aqueous solutions and in solid-state polymeric films is probed upon single- and two-photon preresonant excitation with Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. Particularly, diamine-liganded Eu(III)(TTA) 3 and poly(oxyethylene phosphate)tris(β-diketonate)Eu(III) complexes are examined aiming their possible applications as luminescent labels for sensing and imaging of biological molecules. Even at a pre-resonance, the excitation of these compounds with high-intensity, broadband light of frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser centered around 400 nm results in a luminescence response suitable for fluorometric applications.

  2. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngcobo, Sandile; Bell, Teboho

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate novel method of generating discrete excitation of on-demand Lagaurre-Gaussian (LG) mode pulses, in a diode pumped solid-state digital laser. The digital laser comprises of an intra-cavity spatial light modulator (SLM) that acts as an end-mirror of the resonator for uploading digital holograms, for the selection of discrete LG modes and controlling the quality facto, Q of the resonator. Discrete excitation of LG mode pulses of azimuthal-order l of 0, 1, 2, with zero radial-order (p = 0) were generated. Pulses of duration 200 ms and intensities as high as 1 mW with repetition speed of 60 Hz were produced at 1 um wavelength. The maximum peak power-conversion efficiency measured was 1.3%.

  3. Frequency-encoded laser-induced fluorescence for multiplexed detection in infrared-mediated quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Schrell, Adrian M; Roper, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    A frequency-modulated fluorescence encoding method was used as a means to increase the number of fluorophores monitored during infrared-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Laser lines at 488 nm and 561 nm were modulated at 73 and 137 Hz, respectively, exciting fluorescence from the dsDNA intercalating dye, EvaGreen, and the temperature insensitive dye, ROX. Emission was collected in a color-blind manner using a single photomultiplier tube for detection and demodulated by frequency analysis. The resulting frequency domain signal resolved the contribution from the two fluorophores as well as the background from the IR lamp. The detection method was successfully used to measure amplification of DNA samples containing 10(4)-10(7) starting copies of template producing an amplification efficiency of 96%. The utility of this methodology was further demonstrated by simultaneous amplification of two genes from human genomic DNA using different color TaqMan probes. This method of multiplexing fluorescence detection with IR-qPCR is ideally suited as it allows isolation of the signals of interest from the background in the frequency domain and is expected to further reduce the complexity of multiplexed microfluidic IR-qPCR instrumentation.

  4. Far-Infrared Laser Interferometry Measurements on the STP-3(M) Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1994-04-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 µm was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of ˜10% for both chords during the current rising phase and ˜5% and ˜15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a ˜30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m=0 magnetic fluctuations, and a ˜90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  5. Far-infrared laser interferometry measurements on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1993-09-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 micro m was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of approx. 10% for both chords during the current rising phase and approx. 5% and approx. 15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a approx. 30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m = 0 magnetic fluctuations, and a approx. 90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  6. Emission from ionic cesium fluoride excimers excited by a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubodera, S.; Frey, L.; Wisoff, P. J.; Sauerbrey, R.

    1988-06-01

    Fluorescence was observed from the Cs(2+)F(-) state at 185 nm using a laser-produced plasma as the excitation source in a CsF heat pipe. The dependence of the ionic excimer emission on CsF vapor pressure and temporally resolved emission from the Cs(2+)F(-) is analyzed. It is found that the pressure dependence of the fluorescence is influenced by self-absorption in the CsF vapor.

  7. Generation of terahertz radiation by a surface ballistic photocurrent in semiconductors under subpicosecond laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziaziulia, P. A.; Malevich, V. L.; Manak, I. S.; Krotkus, A.

    2012-02-15

    An analytical model describing the onset of a surface ballistic photocurrent in cubic semiconductors under femtosecond laser excitation is proposed. It is shown that the contribution of the photocurrent component parallel to the surface to the generation of terahertz pulses may be comparable to the contribution of the perpendicular component. Consideration of the cubic symmetry of a semiconductor leads to the azimuthal anisotropy of terahertz generation.

  8. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady; Fisch, Nathaniel J; Pukhov, Alexander

    2002-04-05

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Dw between beams and duration tL of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. The first approach assumes tL ª 2/wp. Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with tL >> 2/wp1 detuned by Dw ~ 2wp from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2wp of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M.N. Rosenbluth, C.S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29 (1972) 701], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented.

  9. Excitability and optical pulse generation in semiconductor lasers driven by resonant tunneling diode photo-detectors.

    PubMed

    Romeira, Bruno; Javaloyes, Julien; Ironside, Charles N; Figueiredo, José M L; Balle, Salvador; Piro, Oreste

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate, experimentally and theoretically, excitable nanosecond optical pulses in optoelectronic integrated circuits operating at telecommunication wavelengths (1550 nm) comprising a nanoscale double barrier quantum well resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photo-detector driving a laser diode (LD). When perturbed either electrically or optically by an input signal above a certain threshold, the optoelectronic circuit generates short electrical and optical excitable pulses mimicking the spiking behavior of biological neurons. Interestingly, the asymmetric nonlinear characteristic of the RTD-LD allows for two different regimes where one obtain either single pulses or a burst of multiple pulses. The high-speed excitable response capabilities are promising for neurally inspired information applications in photonics. PMID:24103966

  10. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation. Final progress report, March 15, 1984--July 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy.

  11. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria De A.; Macedo, Zélia S.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  12. Estimating optical feedback from a chalcogenide fiber in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumpertz, L.; Caillaud, C.; Gilles, C.; Ferré, S.; Schires, K.; Brilland, L.; Troles, J.; Carras, M.; Grillot, F.

    2016-10-01

    The amount of optical feedback originating from a chalcogenide fiber used to couple light from a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser is evaluated experimentally. Threshold reduction measurements on the fibered laser, combined with an analytical study of a rate equations model of the laser under optical feedback, allow estimating the feedback strength between 11% and 15% depending on the fiber cleavage quality. While this remains below the frontier of the chaotic regime, it is sufficient to deeply modify the optical spectrum of a quantum cascade laser. Hence for applications such as gas spectroscopy, where the shape of the optical spectrum is of prime importance, the use of mid-infrared optical isolators may be necessary for fibered quantum cascade lasers to be fully exploited.

  13. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  14. Viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with red laser, infrared laser, and red light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Bagnato, Vanderley Salvador; Machado, Maria A. A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is noninvasive, painless and has no known side effect. However, for its incorporation into clinical practice, more well-designed studies are necessary to define optimal parameters for its application. The viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with either a red laser, an infrared laser, or a red light-emitting diode (LED) was analyzed. Irradiation parameters were: red laser (660 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), infrared laser (780 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), and red LED (637 +/- 15 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2). All applications were punctual and performed with a spot with 0.4 mm2 of diameter for 4 or 8 s. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance of the general linear model (p <= 0.05) were used for statistical analysis. After 72 h, phototherapy with low-intensity laser and LED showed no toxicity at the cellular level. It even stimulated methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT) conversion and neutral red uptake of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress, especially in the group irradiated with infrared laser (p = 0.004 for MTT conversion and p < 0.001 for neutral red uptake). Considering the parameters and protocol of phototherapy used, it can be concluded that phototherapy stimulated the viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional deficit resembling those found in traumatized tissue in which cell viability is reduced.

  15. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-12-28

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 μm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36° and beam quality factor of M2=1.02.

  16. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-12-28

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 μm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36° and beam quality factor of M2=1.02. PMID:26831996

  17. The edge detection method of the infrared imagery of the laser spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jinxi; Zhang, Jinchun; Li, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    In the jamming effectiveness experiments, in which the thermal infrared imager was interfered by the CO2 Laser, in order to evaluate the jamming effect of the thermal infrared imager by the CO2 Laser, it was needed to analyses the obtained infrared imagery of laser spot. Because the laser spot pictures obtained from the thermal infrared imager are irregular, the edge detection is an important process. The image edge is one of the most basic characteristics of the image, and it contains most of the information of the image. Generally, because of the thermal balance effect, the partly temperature of objective is no quite difference; therefore the infrared imagery's ability of reflecting the local detail of object is obvious week. At the same time, when the information of heat distribution of the thermal imagery was combined with the basic information of target, such as the object size, the relative position of field of view, shape and outline, and so on, the information just has more value. Hence, it is an important step for making image processing to extract the objective edge of the infrared imagery. Meanwhile it is an important part of image processing procedure and it is the premise of many subsequent processing. So as to extract outline information of the target from the original thermal imagery, and overcome the disadvantage, such as the low image contrast of the image and serious noise interference, and so on, the edge of thermal imagery needs detecting and processing. The principles of the Roberts, Sobel, Prewitt and Canny operator were analyzed, and then they were used to making edge detection on the thermal imageries of laser spot, which were obtained from the jamming effect experiments of CO2 laser jamming the thermal infrared imager. On the basis of the detection result, their performances were compared. At the end, the characteristics of the operators were summarized, which provide reference for the choice of edge detection operators in thermal imagery

  18. Design and Validation of an Infrared Badal Optometer for Laser Speckle (IBOLS)

    PubMed Central

    Teel, Danielle F. W.; Copland, R. James; Jacobs, Robert J.; Wells, Thad; Neal, Daniel R.; Thibos, Larry N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To validate the design of an infrared wavefront aberrometer with a Badal optometer employing the principle of laser speckle generated by a spinning disk and infrared light. The instrument was designed for subjective meridional refraction in infrared light by human patients. Methods Validation employed a model eye with known refractive error determined with an objective infrared wavefront aberrometer. The model eye was used to produce a speckle pattern on an artificial retina with controlled amounts of ametropia introduced with auxiliary ophthalmic lenses. A human observer performed the psychophysical task of observing the speckle pattern (with the aid of a video camera sensitive to infrared radiation) formed on the artificial retina. Refraction was performed by adjusting the vergence of incident light with the Badal optometer to nullify the motion of laser speckle. Validation of the method was performed for different levels of spherical ametropia and for various configurations of an astigmatic model eye. Results Subjective measurements of meridional refractive error over the range −4D to + 4D agreed with astigmatic refractive errors predicted by the power of the model eye in the meridian of motion of the spinning disk. Conclusions Use of a Badal optometer to control laser speckle is a valid method for determining subjective refractive error at infrared wavelengths. Such an instrument will be useful for comparing objective measures of refractive error obtained for the human eye with autorefractors and wavefront aberrometers that employ infrared radiation. PMID:18772719

  19. Mid-Infrared Pumped Laser-Induced Thermal Grating Spectroscopy for Detection of Acetylene in the Visible Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Sahlberg, Anna-Lena; Kiefer, Johannes; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2016-06-01

    We present mid-infrared laser-induced thermal grating spectroscopy (IR-LITGS) using excitation radiation around 3 µm generated by a simple broadband optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Acetylene as a typical small hydrocarbon molecule is used as an example target species. A mid-infrared broadband OPO pumped by the fundamental output of a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to generate the pump beams, with pulse energies of 6-10 mJ depending on the wavelength. The line width of the OPO idler beam was ∼5 cm(-1), which is large enough to cover up to six adjacent acetylene lines. The probe beam was the radiation of a 532 nm cw solid state laser with 190 mW output power. Signals were generated in atmospheric pressure gas flows of N2, air, CO2 and Ar with small admixtures of C2H2 A detection limit of less than 300 ppm was found for a point measurement of C2H2 diluted in N2 As expected, the oscillation frequency of the IR-LITGS signal was found to have a large dependency on the buffer gas, which allows determination of the speed of sound. Moreover, the results reveal a very strong collisional energy exchange between C2H2 and CO2 compared to the other gases. This manifests as significant local heating. In summary, the MIR-LITGS technique enables spectroscopy of fundamental vibrational transitions in the infrared via detection in the visible spectral range. PMID:27091904

  20. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence. PMID:26246319

  1. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  2. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kennis, John T M

    2015-08-06

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600~700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  3. Ultrafast spin-transfer torque driven by femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    A hot topic in the field of ultrafast laser-induced manipulation of the magnetic state is that of the role and exploitation of laser-induced spin currents. Intense debate has been triggered by claims that such a spin-transfer, e.g. in the form of super-diffusive spin currents over tens of nanometers, might be a main contributor to the demagnetization process in ferromagnetic thin films after femtosecond laser excitation. In this presentation the underlying concepts will be introduced and recent developments reviewed. Particularly we demonstrate the possibility to apply a laser-induced spin transfer torque on a free magnetic layer, using a non-collinear multilayer configuration consisting of a free in-plane layer on top of a perpendicularly magnetized injection layer, as separated by a nonmagnetic spacer. Interestingly, this approach allows for a quantitative measurement of the amount of spin transfer. Moreover, it might provide access to novel device architectures in which the magnetic state is controlled by fs laser pulses. Careful analysis of the resulting precession of the free layer allows us to quantify the applied torque, and distinguish between driving mechanisms based on laser-induced transfer of hot electrons versus a spin Seebeck effect due to the large thermal gradients. Further engineering of the layered structures in order to gain fundamental understanding and optimize efficiencies will be reported. A simple model that treats local non-equilibrium magnetization dynamics to spin transport effects via a spin-dependent chemical potential will be introduced.

  4. Spectral characteristics of nonchain HF and DF electric-discharge lasers in efficient excitation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Panchenko, Aleksei N; Orlovsky, V M; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2004-04-30

    The spectral characteristics of efficient nonchain HF and DF chemical lasers are studied. It is found that the emission spectra of nonchain lasers operating with high efficiency are strongly broadened. Almost 30 emission lines of an HF laser and cascade lasing on the v(3-2) {yields} v(2-1) {yields} v(1-0) vibrational transitions of HF molecules for a number of rotational lines are obtained. It is shown that the development of discharge inhomogeneities significantly reduces the number of lasing lines in the spectra of nonchain chemical lasers. For an SF{sub 6} - D{sub 2} mixture excited by a generator with an inductive storage, about 40 lasing lines are observed on four vibrational transitions of DF molecules and the v(4-3) {yields} v(3-2) {yields} v(2-1) {yields} v(1-0) cascade lasing is obtained at several rotational lines. Nonchain HF and DF electric-discharge lasers with a total and intrinsic efficiency of up to 6% and 10%, respectively, pumped from capacitive and inductive generators are developed. (lasers)

  5. Evaluation of quantum-cascade lasers as local oscillators for infrared heterodyne spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sonnabend, Guido; Wirtz, Daniel; Schieder, Rudolf

    2005-11-20

    We report experiments evaluating the feasibility of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) at mid-infrared wavelengths for use as local oscillators (LOs) in a heterodyne receiver. Performance tests with continuous-wave (cw) lasers around 9.6 and 9.2 microm were carried out investigating optical output power, laser linewidth, and tunability. A direct comparison with a CO2 gas laser LO is presented as well. The achieved system sensitivity in a heterodyne spectrometer of only a factor of 2 above the quantum limit together with the measured linewidth of less than 1.5 MHz shows that QCLs are suitable laser sources for heterodyne spectroscopy with sufficient output power to replace gas lasers as LOs even in high-sensitivity astronomical heterodyne receivers. In addition, our experiments show that the tunability of the lasers can be greatly enhanced by use of an external cavity.

  6. Development of long wavelength semiconductor diode lasers near 28 microns for use in infrared heterodyne spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of tunable diode lasers operating in the 28 micrometers spectral region for use in infrared heterodyne spectrometers is reported. A process capable of yielding lasers emitting 500 micron W of multimode power, 112 micron W in a true single mode and true single mode operation at laser currents of up to 35% above threshold was developed. Results were obtained from narrow mesastripe (20 micrometer wide) short cavity (120 micrometer length) laser configurations. Six stripe geometry lasers, with a variety of cavity widths and lengths were delivered. The techniques to fabricate such devices was obtained and the long term reliability of such lasers by reproducible electrical and optical output characteristics fabrication from lasers are demonstrated.

  7. Transient enhancement of magnetization damping in CoFeB film via pulsed laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Ruan, Xuezhong; Wu, Zhenyao; Tu, Hongqing; Du, Jun; Wu, Jing; Lu, Xianyang; He, Liang; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced spin dynamics of in-plane magnetized CoFeB films has been studied by using time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. While the effective demagnetization field shows little dependence on the pump laser fluence, the intrinsic damping constant has been found to be increased from 0.008 to 0.076 with the increase in the pump fluence from 2 mJ/cm2 to 20 mJ/cm2. This sharp enhancement has been shown to be transient and ascribed to the heating effect induced by the pump laser excitation, as the damping constant is almost unchanged when the pump-probe measurements are performed at a fixed pump fluence of 5 mJ/cm2 after irradiation by high power pump pulses.

  8. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOEpatents

    Bischel, W.K.; Jacobs, R.R.; Prosnitz, D.P.; Rhodes, C.K.; Kelly, P.J.

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH[sub 3]) or methyl fluoride (CH[sub 3]F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO[sub 2] lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level. 3 figs.

  9. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOEpatents

    Bischel, William K. [Menlo Park, CA; Jacobs, Ralph R. [Livermore, CA; Prosnitz, Donald [Hamden, CT; Rhodes, Charles K. [Palo Alto, CA; Kelly, Patrick J. [Fort Lewis, WA

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH.sub.3) or methyl fluoride (CH.sub.3 F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO.sub.2 lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level.

  10. Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R; Stauffer, Hans U; Danehy, Paul M; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2016-05-15

    Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging (STARFLEET), a nonseeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and nonreactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25 nm 100 fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 μJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and nonreactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities, and further demonstrate the significantly less intrusive nature of STARFLEET. PMID:27176968

  11. Investigation of superelastic electron scattering by laser-excited Ba - Experimental procedures and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Fineman, M. A.; Poe, R. T.; Csanak, G.; Jensen, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Differential (in angle) electron scattering experiments on laser-excited Ba-138 1P were carried out at 30- and 100-eV impact energies. The laser light was linearly polarized and located in the scattering plane. The superelastic scattering signal was measured as a function of polarization direction of the laser light with respect to the scattering plane. It was found at low electron scattering angles that the superelastic scattering signal was asymmetric to reflection of the polarization vector with respect to the scattering plane. This is in contradiction with theoretical predictions. An attempt was made to pinpoint the reason for this observation, and a detailed investigation of the influence of experimental conditions on the superelastic scattering was undertaken. No explanation for the asymmetry has as yet been found.

  12. Luminescence from pigments and resins for oil paintings induced by laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, Ilaria; Fantoni, Roberta; Flamini, Chiara; Di Palma, Tonia M.; Giardini Guidoni, Anna; Mele, Aldo

    1998-05-01

    The present work reports results of an extensive study of laser induced luminescence by tripled Nd:YAG laser ( λ=355 nm) of a few most common painting materials, namely, natural and synthetic pigments and resins. The luminescence spectra have been analyzed by an Optical Multichannel Analyzer (OMA III). Luminescence time decay has been measured by a Streak camera or by the OMA III. Pigments and resins show characteristic emission spectra with bands peaking in the visible. The decay ranges from less than 1 ns up to 700 μs for pigments and for resins. The mechanism of excitation and relaxation leading to luminescence is discussed for the various materials. Oil colour specimens have been irradiated by a UV KrF laser ( λ=248 nm). Luminescence photographs have been detected by an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera at different time delays.

  13. Excitation mechanism in a hollow cathode He-Kr ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hazama, J.; Arai, T.; Goto, M.; Iijima, T.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed laser operation in the afterglow of a positive column He-Kr discharge on the 469.4 nm (6s{sup 4}P{sub 5/2} {yields} 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}) transition of Kr(II) was observed for the first time by Dana and Laure`s. It appears that the upper level of Kr(II) laser line is populated by the second kind collisions between He 2{sup 3}S metastable atoms and ground state Kr ions. CW oscillations on Kr(II) transitions have been obtained in a hollow cathode discharge. In this work, we have estimated the excitation mechanism for the upper state of 469.4 nm laser line from the measurements of the decay of endlight intensity in the hollow cathode He-Kr discharge.

  14. Zero-dimensional hybrid model for analysis of discharge excited XeCl lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamrous, O.; Gaouar, A.; Yousfi, M.

    1996-05-01

    A powerful zero-dimensional hybrid model to study the positive column of a glow discharge used as an excitation medium for XeCl lasers is presented. This model was employed using a numerical code including three strongly coupled parts: electric circuit equations (electric model), electron Boltzmann equation (particle model), and kinetics equations (chemical kinetics model). From this hybrid model, kinetics and electrical parameters of Ne-Xe-HCl laser discharge mixtures have been discussed and analyzed. Calculated discharge current and voltage are also compared with available theoretical and experimental results. The good qualitative agreement observed shows the validity of the present model which can used as an efficient tool for the investigation of the homogeneous excimer laser discharge.

  15. Portable optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with a pulsed laser diode excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lvming; Liu, Guodong; Yang, Diwu; Ji, Xuanrong

    2013-02-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been significantly improved in terms of spatial resolution, detection sensitivity, imaging speed, and penetration depth. However, the popular producibility of OR-PAM system is still limited by the size and cost of solid-state laser excitation. Here, we developed a portable laser-diode-based OR-PAM (LD-OR-PAM) system using a pulsed semiconductor laser source, which was operated at 905 ± 15 nm with a pulse energy as low as 4.9 μJ. The measured lateral resolution has been improved to ˜1.5 μm from hundreds of microns. The compact and inexpensive natures of LD-OR-PAM would promote the potential clinical applications such as in dermatology.

  16. Uniform acceptor distribution in neutron-transmutation-doped far-infrared p-Ge lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, E. W.; Dolguikh, M. V.; Flitsiyan, E. S.; Muravjov, A. V.; Peale, R. E.; Kleckley, S. H.; Vernetson, W. G.; Tsipin, V. Z.

    2003-09-01

    A neutron transmutation doped (NTD) far-infrared p-Ge laser crystal and a melt-grown p-Ge laser are analyzed and compared. Though the doping level in the NTD active crystal is twice lower than optimal, the laser performance is comparable to that produced from high-quality melt-grown crystals because of superior dopant uniformity. Compensation was examined by comparing results of neutron activation analysis with majority carrier concentration. Study of impurity breakdown electric field reveals better crystal quality in NTD. The current saturation behavior confirms the expected higher doping uniformity over melt grown laser rods.

  17. Pulsed mid-infrared radiation from spectral broadening in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2013-07-15

    Spectral red-shifting of high power laser pulses propagating through underdense plasma can be a source of ultrashort mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. During propagation, a high power laser pulse drives large amplitude plasma waves, depleting the pulse energy. At the same time, the large amplitude plasma wave provides a dynamic dielectric response that leads to spectral shifting. The loss of laser pulse energy and the approximate conservation of laser pulse action imply that spectral red-shifts accompany the depletion. In this paper, we investigate, through simulation, the parametric dependence of MIR generation on pulse energy, initial pulse duration, and plasma density.

  18. Strong visible light emission from well-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube films under infrared laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Gong Tao; Liu Wenjin; Zhang Xianfeng; Chang Jianguo; Wang Kunlin; Wu Dehai

    2005-10-24

    We report strong and brilliant visible light emission from well-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (AMWNT) films under infrared (IR) laser irradiation with wavelength at 1.06 and 10.6 {mu}m, respectively. The AMWNT film shows a high durability against laser irradiation and achieved a conversion from IR laser to visible light. It is a good candidate for optical converter. Light emission spectra versus different wavelengths and various powers were found to have similar line shapes. It could be explained as combination of laser-induced photoluminescence and resistive heating.

  19. Continuous wave operation of a mid-infrared semiconductor laser at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Beck, Mattias; Hofstetter, Daniel; Aellen, Thierry; Faist, Jérôme; Oesterle, Ursula; Ilegems, Marc; Gini, Emilio; Melchior, Hans

    2002-01-11

    Continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers is reported up to a temperature of 312 kelvin. The devices were fabricated as buried heterostructure lasers with high-reflection coatings on both laser facets, resulting in continuous wave operation with optical output power ranging from 17 milliwatts at 292 kelvin to 3 milliwatts at 312 kelvin, at an emission wavelength of 9.1 micrometers. The results demonstrate the potential of quantum cascade lasers as continuous wave mid-infrared light sources for high-resolution spectroscopy, chemical sensing applications, and free-space optical communication systems.

  20. Use of powerful infrared pulsed Nd-YAG laser for treating osteogenic sarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biser, Vladimir A.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Kursova, Larisa V.; Neborak, Yuri T.

    1996-01-01

    Powerful infra-red laser radiation may induce necrosis of a malignant tumor located in a human bone without destructing skin cover. A superficial irradiation of the osteogenic sarcoma with an Nd-YAG laser (pulse power no less than 10 MW, average power 100 - 300 mW, time of exposure 10 - 90 min) has resulted in a severe damage of the tumor (more than 90% of the tumor mass) in 57% of cases. A combined laser/gamma irradiation showed a severe damage in 83% of cases. The results obtained suggest that laser radiation with the above parameters combined with gamma radiation may be used in treatment of osteogenic sarcoma.

  1. A stable, high power optically pumped far infrared laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1988-01-01

    The generation of 1.25 watts of CW laser power at the 119-micron (2522.8 GHz) methanol line is reported. The maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. This laser has also been tested on numerous other lines ranging from 403.7 GHz (HCOOH) to 5260 GHz (CH3OD) with improved power and stability.

  2. Fluorescence properties and energy transfer study of Er3+/Nd3+ doped fluorophosphate glass pumped at 800 and 980 nm for mid-infrared laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying; Xu, Rongrong; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Junjie

    2012-04-01

    The fluorescence properties of 2.7 μm emission as well as near infrared emissions in Er3+/Nd3+ doped fluorophosphate glasses are investigated under 800 and 980 nm excitation. The fluorescence dynamics and energy transfer processes between Er and Nd ions in different pumping schemes are reported. Three Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, energy transfer microparameters, and efficiency have been determined using the Judd-Ofelt and Förster-Dexter theories. The calculated energy transfer efficiency of the Er3+:4I13/2 level to the Nd3+:4I15/2 level is as high as 83.91%. The results indicate that Nd3+ may be an efficient sensitizer for Er3+ to obtain mid-infrared emission and the more suitable pumping scheme of 2.7 μm laser applications for Er3+/Nd3+ doped fluorophosphate glass is 980 nm excitation.

  3. Electronic Relaxation after Resonant Laser Excitation of Cr in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) atoms embedded into helium nanodroplets (HeN) are ejected from the droplets upon photoexcitation. During ejection they undergo electronic relaxation resulting in bare Cr atoms in various excited states. In a study of the relaxation process we present absorption spectra observed via laser induced fluorescence and beam depletion as well as dispersed fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Broad and shifted absorption structures were found for the strong z7P° ← a7S3 and y7P° ← a7S3 excitations from the ground state. Emission lines are, in contrast, very narrow, which indicates that fluorescence is obtained from bare excited Cr atoms after ejection. Upon excitation into the y7P2,3,4° states we observed fluorescence from y7P2°, z5P1,2,3°, and z7P2,3,4°, indicating that these states are populated by electronic relaxation during the ejection processes. Relative population ratios are obtained from the intensities of individual spectral lines. Excitation into the z7P2,3,4° states resulted in fluorescence only from z7P2°. Estimates of the time duration of the ejection process are obtained from time-resolved measurements. PMID:23410146

  4. Surface-enhanced mid-infrared spectroscopy using a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Hasenkampf, Anton; Kröger, Niels; Schönhals, Arthur; Petrich, Wolfgang; Pucci, Annemarie

    2015-03-01

    We report on the successful measurement of surface-enhanced infrared vibrational spectra from a few nanometer thick organic semiconductor layers on samples with resonant plasmonic nanoantennas arranged in arrays. For the first time, a setup with a tunable quantum cascade laser as the light source in mid-infrared range is used. The combination of the quantum cascade laser with a microbolometer array for infrared light allows to map an area 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2) with a spatial resolution of about 9 μm, a bandwidth from 1170 to 1300 cm(-1), and a spectral resolution of 2.5 cm(-1) within only five minutes versus 16 hours using a conventional FTIR micro-spectrometer. We present a quantitative comparison of the experimental results from the setup with the quantum cascade laser with those from the FTIR micro-spectrometer.

  5. Resonant secondary light emission from plasmonic Au nanostructures at high electron temperatures created by pulsed-laser excitation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingyu; Wang, Wei; Murphy, Catherine J.; Cahill, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures are of great current interest as chemical sensors, in vivo imaging agents, and for photothermal therapeutics. We study continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed-laser excitation of aqueous suspensions of Au nanorods as a model system for secondary light emission from plasmonic nanostructures. Resonant secondary emission contributes significantly to the background commonly observed in surface-enhanced Raman scattering and to the light emission generated by pulsed-laser excitation of metallic nanostructures that is often attributed to two-photon luminescence. Spectra collected using cw laser excitation at 488 nm show an enhancement of the broad spectrum of emission at the electromagnetic plasmon resonance of the nanorods. The intensity of anti-Stokes emission collected using cw laser excitation at 785 nm is described by a 300 K thermal distribution of excitations. Excitation by subpicosecond laser pulses at 785 nm broadens and increases the intensity of the anti-Stokes emission in a manner that is consistent with electronic Raman scattering by a high-temperature distribution of electronic excitations predicted by a two-temperature model. Broadening of the pulse duration using an etalon reduces the intensity of anti-Stokes emission in quantitative agreement with the model. Experiments using a pair of subpicosecond optical pulses separated by a variable delay show that the timescale of resonant secondary emission is comparable to the timescale for equilibration of electrons and phonons. PMID:24395798

  6. 3rd Tech DeltaSphere-3000 Laser 3D Scene Digitizer infrared laser scanner hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-02-01

    A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for the 3rd Tech model DeltaSphere-3000{reg_sign} Laser 3D Scene Digitizer, infrared laser scanner model based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers. The portable scanner system is used in the Robotic Manufacturing Science and Engineering Laboratory (RMSEL). This scanning system had been proposed to be a demonstrator for a new application. The manufacture lists the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) as less than 2 meters. It was necessary that SNL validate this NOHD prior to its use as a demonstrator involving the general public. A formal laser hazard analysis is presented for the typical mode of operation for the current configuration as well as a possible modified mode and alternative configuration.

  7. CO2 laser-forward looking infrared /FLIR/ integration concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osche, G. R.; Luck, C. F.; Seavey, R. E.; Phelan, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of techniques for combining active laser functions with passive thermal imaging systems is presented along with some recent accomplishments. Emphasis is placed on the advantages of integrating CO2 lasers with the 8 - 12 micron thermal sensors arising from the commonality of operating wavelengths. Compatibility of performance, eye safety, and sharing of optical components are pointed out as the primary driving factors which favor CO2 lasers. Recent accomplishments include the development of the first U.S. CO2 laser rangefinder which has been integrated with the thermal sensor for a high survivability test vehicle. A fully modularized, sealed-off CO2 TEA laser rangefinder developed for the U.S. Army is also described.

  8. Hyper-Rayleigh scattering and hyper-Raman scattering of dye-adsorbed silver nanoparticles induced by a focused continuous-wave near-infrared laser

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ihama, Takashi; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-02-20

    We report that hyper-Rayleigh scattering, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, and two-photon excited luminescence occur intermittently by focusing a continuous-wave near-infrared (cw-NIR) laser into a colloidal silver solution including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and sodium chloride (NaCl). On the other hand, continuous hyper-Rayleigh scattering is observed from colloidal silver free from R6G and NaCl, demonstrating that hyper-Raman scattering and two-photon excited luminescence are attributed to R6G and their intermittent features are dependent on the colloidal dispersion. These results suggest that the cw-NIR laser has three roles; the source of the nonlinear response, optical trapping of nanoparticles, and making nanoparticle aggregates possessing the high activity for the nonlinear response.

  9. Laser safety in design of near-infrared scanning LIDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Elgin, D.

    2015-05-01

    3D LIDARs (Light Detection and Ranging) with 1.5μm nanosecond pulse lasers have been increasingly used in different applications. The main reason for their popularity is that these LIDARs have high performance while at the same time can be made eye-safe. Because the laser hazard effect on eyes or skin at this wavelength region (<1.4μm) is mainly from the thermal effect accumulated from many individual pulses over a period of seconds, scanning can effectively reduce the laser beam hazard effect from the LIDARs. Neptec LIDARs have been used in docking to the International Space Station, military helicopter landing and industrial mining applications. We have incorporated the laser safety requirements in the LIDAR design and conducted laser safety analysis for different operational scenarios. While 1.5μm is normally said to be the eye-safe wavelength, in reality a high performance 3D LIDAR needs high pulse energy, small beam size and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to achieve long range, high resolution and high density images. The resulting radiant exposure of its stationary beam could be many times higher than the limit for a Class 1 laser device. Without carefully choosing laser and scanning parameters, including field-of-view, scan speed and pattern, a scanning LIDAR can't be eye- or skin-safe based only on its wavelength. This paper discusses the laser safety considerations in the design of eye-safe scanning LIDARs, including laser pulse energy, PRF, beam size and scanning parameters in two basic designs of scanning mechanisms, i.e. galvanometer based scanner and Risley prism based scanner. The laser safety is discussed in terms of device classification, nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) and safety glasses optical density (OD).

  10. Complementary analysis of tissue homogenates composition obtained by Vis and NIR laser excitations and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Malek, Kamilla; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy and four excitation lines in the visible (Vis: 488, 532, 633 nm) and near infrared (NIR: 785 nm) were used for biochemical analysis of rat tissue homogenates, i.e. myocardium, brain, liver, lung, intestine, and kidney. The Vis Raman spectra are very similar for some organs (brain/intestines and kidney/liver) and dominated by heme signals when tissues of lung and myocardium were investigated (especially with 532 nm excitation). On the other hand, the NIR Raman spectra are specific for each tissue and more informative than the corresponding ones collected with the Vis excitations. The spectra analyzed without any special pre-processing clearly illustrate different chemical composition of each tissue and give information about main components e.g. lipids or proteins, but also about the content of some specific compounds such as amino acid residues, nucleotides and nucleobases. However, in order to obtain the whole spectral information about tissues complex composition the spectra of Vis and NIR excitations should be collected and analyzed together. A good agreement of data gathered from Raman spectra of the homogenates and those obtained previously from Raman imaging of the tissue cross-sections indicates that the presented here approach can be a method of choice for an investigation of biochemical variation in animal tissues. Moreover, the Raman spectral profile of tissue homogenates is specific enough to be used for an investigation of potential pathological changes the organism undergoes, in particular when supported by the complementary FTIR spectroscopy.

  11. Control of crystallographic orientation in diamond synthesis through laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi Qiang; Bai, Jaeil; Zhou, Yun Shen; Gao, Yi; Park, Jongbok; Guillemet, Thomas; Jiang, Lan; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Lu, Yong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations determine the optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of crystals. Control of crystallographic orientations has been studied by changing the growth parameters, including temperature, pressure, proportion of precursors, and surface conditions. However, molecular dynamic mechanisms underlying these controls remain largely unknown. Here we achieved control of crystallographic orientations in diamond growth through a joint experimental and theoretical study of laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules (ethylene). Resonant vibrational excitation of the ethylene molecules using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser steers the chemical reactions and promotes proportion of intermediate oxide species, which results in preferential growth of {100}-oriented diamond films and diamond single crystals in open air. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of chemisorption energies of radicals detected from our mass-spectroscopy experiment provide an in-depth understanding of molecular reaction mechanisms in the steering of chemical reactions and control of crystallographic orientations. This finding opens up a new avenue for controlled chemical vapor deposition of crystals through resonant vibrational excitations to steer surface chemistry. PMID:24694918

  12. Pulsed laser imaging of rapid Ca2+ gradients in excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Monck, J R; Robinson, I M; Escobar, A L; Vergara, J L; Fernandez, J M

    1994-01-01

    Excitable cells are thought to respond to action potentials by forming short lived and highly localized Ca2+ gradients near sites of Ca2+ entry or near the site of Ca2+ release by intracellular stores. However, conventional imaging techniques lack the spatial and temporal resolution to capture these gradients. Here we demonstrate the use of pulsed-laser microscopy to measure Ca2+ gradients with submicron spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution in two preparations where the Ca2+ signal is thought to be fast and highly localized: adrenal chromaffin cells, where the entry of Ca2+ through voltage dependent Ca2+ channels triggers exocytotic fusion; and skeletal muscle fibers, where intracellular Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum initiates contraction. In chromaffin cells, Ca2+ gradients developed over 10-100 ms and were initially restricted to discrete submembrane domains, or hot spots, before developing into complete rings of elevated Ca2+ concentration. In frog skeletal muscle large, short-lived (approximately 6 ms) Ca2+ gradients were observed within individual sarcomeres following induction of action potentials. The pulsed laser imaging approach permits, for the first time, the capture and critical examination of rapid Ca2+ signaling events such as those underlying excitation-secretion and excitation-contraction coupling. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7948669

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Luminescence of crystals excited by a KrCl laser and a subnanosecond electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, E. I.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Orlovskii, Viktor M.; Alekseev, S. B.

    2005-08-01

    Luminescence of crystals of natural spodumene and natural diamond of the type IIa is studied upon excitation by a laser at a wavelength of 222 nm and by a subnanosecond avalanche electron beam (SAEB) formed in air at the atmospheric pressure. The photoluminescence spectra of spodumene and diamond are shown to exhibit additional bands, which are absent upon SAEB excitation. It is demonstrated that SAEB excitation allows one to analyse various crystals under normal conditions without using any vacuum equipment.

  14. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  15. Damage detection in membrane structures using non-contact laser excitation and wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Feblil; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by laser is proposed to detect damage in membrane structures. A high power Nd: YAG pulse laser is used to supply an ideal impulse to a membrane structure by generating shock waves via laser-induced breakdown in air. A health monitoring apparatus is developed with this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm which only requires the vibration mode shape of the damaged membrane. Artificial damage is induced in membrane structure by cutting and tearing the membrane. The vibration mode shapes of the membrane structure extracted from vibration testing by using the laser-induced breakdown and laser Doppler vibrometer are then analyzed by 2-D continuous wavelet transformation. The location of damage is determined by the dominant peak of the wavelet coefficient which can be seen clearly by applying a boundary treatment and the concept of an iso-surface to the 2-D wavelet coefficient. The applicability of the present approach is verified by finite element analysis and experimental results, demonstrating the ability of the method to detect and identify the positions of damage induced on the membrane structure.

  16. Multiphoton imaging of quantum dot bioconjugates in cultured cells following Nd:YLF laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Elba E.; Knight, V. B.

    2005-04-01

    Quantum dot bioconjugates offer unprecedented opportunities for monitoring biological processes and molecular interactions in cells, tissues, and organs. We are interested in developing applications that permit investigation of physiological processes and cytoskeletal organization in live cells, and allow imaging of complex organs, such as the auditory and vestibular sensory structures of the inner ear. Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for acquiring images from deep within a sample while reducing phototoxic effects of laser light exposure on cells. Previous studies have established that a solid-state Nd:YLF laser can be used to acquire two-photon and three-photon images from live cells while minimizing phototoxic side effects (Wokosin et al., 1996, Bioimaging, 4:208-214; Squirrell et al., 1999, Nature Biotechnology, 8:763-767). We present here the results of experiments using an all-solid-state Nd:YLF 1047 nm femtosecond laser (Microlase DPM1000) source to excite quantum dot bioconjugates. Cells were labeled with Qdot (Quantum Dot Corporation) bioconjugates or with Alexa Fluor (Molecular Probes) bioconjugates and then imaged with a BioRad 1024 confocal microscope configured for multiphoton imaging using internal or external (non-descanned) detectors. Results demonstrate that the Nd:YLF laser can be used to stimulate fluorescence emission of quantum dots and Alexa Fluor bioconjugates in cultured amphibian (Xenopus) and mammalian (rat, chinese hamster) cells. We conclude that the Nd:YLF laser is a viable excitation source that extends the applicability of quantum dots for investigation of biological processes using multiphoton microscopy.

  17. Multispectral diode laser based shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for biological sample identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a well established analytical method with applications in many areas, e.g. analysis of biological samples. To overcome the problem of an undesired fluorescence background masking the Raman signals we present a multi-spectral approach using shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). For our investigations we applied microsystem diode lasers which realize two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths required to perform SERDS at 488 nm, 671 nm, and 785 nm. The emission at 488 nm with an optical power of up to 30 mW and a spectral shift of 0.3 nm (12 cm-1) is realized by frequency doubling of a 976 nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. The 671 nm laser diode contains two separate laser cavities (spectral shift: 0.7 nm (13 cm-1)) each incorporating a volume Bragg grating as frequency selective element. In that case, optical powers up to 50 mW can be obtained. For investigations at 785 nm we used a DFB laser with a maximum optical power of 110 mW and a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1). Meat, fat tissue, connective tissue and bones from pork and beef were used as test samples to demonstrate the effective background removal using SERDS. For all three wavelengths integration times of only 5 - 10 seconds were necessary showing the possibility of SERDS for rapid sample identification. A comparison with conventional Raman spectra is given pointing out the improvement of spectral quality. The applicability of SERDS for other analytical applications, e.g. medical diagnosis will be discussed.

  18. Optical and Near Infrared Study of the Cepheus E Outflow, a Very Low Excitation Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreiga-Crespo, A.; Ayala, S.; Garnavich, P.; Curiel, S.; Raga, A.; Bohm, K.; Raymond, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we explore the link between the physical properties of the outflow as determined from optical imaging and spectroscopy, and compare these results with those obtained from observations in the near infrared.

  19. Near-infrared emitting ytterbium metal-organic frameworks with tunable excitation properties.

    PubMed

    White, Kiley A; Chengelis, Demetra A; Zeller, Matthias; Geib, Steven J; Szakos, Jessica; Petoud, Stéphane; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2009-08-14

    The design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) incorporating near-infrared emitting ytterbium cations and organic sensitizers allows for the preparation of new materials with tunable and enhanced photophysical properties.

  20. Laser-induced excited-state crossover and spectral variation of Cr3+ in the high-crystal-field environment of CaGa2O4.

    PubMed

    Rai, M; Singh, S K; Morthekai, P

    2016-08-01

    We have studied a wide-bandgap oxide semiconductor, CaGa1.99Cr0.01O4, which possesses high crystal field strength and develops deep traps. These traps efficiently store electric charges after excitation with ultraviolet light. Stimulation of trap charges using infrared radiation (both coherent and incoherent) gives wideband emission of Cr3+ in the red-infrared region, which is similar to the photon upconversion process in lanthanides. Under laser excitation, high photon density and local heating pronounce the coupling of E2 and T24 states and causes an excited state crossover of the population from the E2 to T24 state. This expands the emission band-width of Cr3+ up to 900 nm. PMID:27472637

  1. Low cytotoxicity porous Nd2(SiO4)3 nanoparticles with near infrared excitation and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Hua; Zeng, Dequan; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Haomiao; Jin, Guang-Hui; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Chen, Xueyuan; Kang, Junyong; Zheng, Lansun

    2011-05-01

    Porous Nd2(SiO4)3 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by a controlled route. This kind of silicate nanoparticle could be excited by near-infrared (NIR) radiation (808 nm) and triggered a NIR emission (1066 nm) at room temperature. By monitoring the 1066 nm emission, the long-lived luminescent lifetime was determined to be 19.5 µs. These NIR nanoparticles with appropriate diameters (<100 nm) were suitable for cell assays. MTT assays showed that the cytotoxicity of the porous Nd2(SiO4)3 nanoparticles was very low. Therefore, these porous silicate nanoparticles are potential biosafe high-performance NIR biolabeling materials.

  2. Studies of fullerene absorption and production using an infrared free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Affatigato, M.; Haglund, R.F.; Ying, Z.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    Tunable photon sources such as free-electron lasers are potentially valuable tools in spectroscopic studies of fullerenes, a new class of carbon materials with unique cage structures. We have used the infrared free-electron-laser facility at Vanderbilt University to study the infrared absorption of gas-phase fullerene molecules and also to investigate the effects of an infrared laser in the synthesis and crystallization of fullerene materials. In one experiment, fullerene vapor was created in a heat pipe through which the FEL beam was passed; the transmission of the FEL beam relative to a reference detector was measured as a function of wavelength. A large (>10%) absorption of the IR laser was observed when it passed through C{sub 60} vapor at {approximately}800{degrees}C. Due to the broad spectral width of the FEL as well as spectral congestion, no spectral peaks were seen when the laser wavelength was tuned across a T{sub 1u}C{sub 60} IR mode near 7.0 {mu}. However, it is expected that the vibrational features can be resolved experimentally by passing the transmitted beam through a monochromator. In a separate experiment, the FEL beam was focused onto a surface of graphite or graphite/metal mixture target. Various fullerene molecules, including endohedral types, were produced when the soot was recovered from the ablation chamber. The yield of the products was measured to be {approximately}0.4 g/J of the incident laser energy. However, both the yield and the product distribution are virtually, the same as those in experiments using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. This suggests that the laser wavelength is not a crucial parameter in making fullerenes by laser ablation. Even when the laser is at resonance with one of the vibrational modes of C{sub 60}, the fullerene production is neither substantially enhanced nor suppressed.

  3. The possibilities of applying infrared lasers in otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Wojtowicz, Piotr; Oledzka, Iwona; Obarska, Agnieszka

    2003-10-01

    The authors present their many years of experience in the area of laryngological surgery with various types of solid lasers. In our clinical practice we use Nd-YAG, Ho-YAG and Er-YAG surgical lasers. There are many reasons for applying lasers, depending on medical conditions. One of the most frequent cases are the nasal polyps, where surgical treatment is aimed at curing the results. For this type the procedures there was applied Nd-YAG laser, which has shortened the period of treatment and extended the remission. We also use this laser for mucal tissue corrections of the nasal conchs through deep coagulation effect. The above mentioned laser is also useful for the preventative treatment of granulation stenosis by removal of granulation tissue from different sections of the upper way; from the nose to the trachea.Other laser procedures in the nasal area include coagulation of Kisselbach locus, bleeding in Rendu-Osler disease, separating adhesions of the nasal concha from the nasal septum, coagulation of septal bleeding polyps, angiomas of different location, small papillomae of throat and nose, and reduction of hypertrophy nasopharyngeal mucoosa in OSAS patients, and uvolo-palato-pharyngoplasty (UPPP). Neodymium laser is also used for the management of neoplastic diseases in palliative and radical (CA. basocellulare) treatment for the resection of the premalignant changes (papilloma, leukoplakia) and early neoplastic changes of throat and larynx. Keloplasty in the area of larynx and trachea is performed with the use of Ho-YAG laser, with shallow effect, regardless of the density of tissue, enabling coagulation of vascular vessels. It enables non-traumatic resections of bone structures, such as the wall of maxillary sinus, nasal spine, or conchoplasty; the mucal tissue and the frame. Recent clinical tests are examining the possibilities of Er-YAG laser application for crushing calculus in the salivary ducts. Using lasers in laryngology enables their extensive

  4. Corneal morphology after ex-vivo UV and mid-infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Voloudakis, G. E.; Moutsouris, K.; Asproudis, I.; Baltatzis, S.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea tissue were conducted with two solid state lasers (an Er:YAG laser and the 4th harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser, both in the ns pulse width range) emitting in mid infrared and ultraviolet part of the spectrum respectively, at moderate laser fluences. The cornea epithelium of each porcine eye was manually removed before the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was performed, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal or mechanical damage caused by the midinfrared and the UV laser irradiation. For a detailed and complete examination of the morphology of the laser ablated corneal tissue, the surface roughness was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray laser research at LLNL: Status June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    This is a status report of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser experiments at LLNL during June 1997 that have the advantage of being conducted on a table-top. Two laser drivers with modest energy {approximately}6 J are used in the scheme: a long {approximately}1 ns pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a short {approximately}1 ps pulse to produce the excitation and population inversion. The beams are co-propagated and focused using a combination of a cylindrical lens and paraboloid to a line of {approximately}70 {micro}m x 12.5 mm dimensions. High repetition rates approaching 1 shot/3 min. allow typically in excess of 50 target shots in a day. Various slab targets have been irradiated and we report preliminary results for x-ray laser gain in 3p-3s J=0-1 Ne-like Ti and Fe transitions where gains as high as 24 cm{sup -1} and gL products of {approximately}15 have been observed.

  6. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  7. The effect of near-infrared MLS laser radiation on cell membrane structure and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Jolanta; Pasternak, Kamila; Zavodnik, Ilya; Irzmański, Robert; Wróbel, Dominika; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation of different wavelengths and light doses are well known, but the biochemical mechanism of the interaction of laser light with living cells is not fully understood. We have investigated the effect of MLS (Multiwave Locked System) laser near-infrared irradiation on cell membrane structure, functional properties, and free radical generation using human red blood cells and breast cancer MCF-4 cells. The cells were irradiated with low-intensity MLS near-infrared (simultaneously 808 nm, continuous emission and 905 nm, pulse emission, pulse-wave frequency, 1,000 or 2,000 Hz) laser light at light doses from 0 to 15 J (average power density 212.5 mW/cm(2), spot size was 3.18 cm(2)) at 22 °C, the activity membrane bound acetylcholinesterase, cell stability, anti-oxidative activity, and free radical generation were the parameters used in characterizing the structural and functional changes of the cell. Near-infrared low-intensity laser radiation changed the acetylcholinesterase activity of the red blood cell membrane in a dose-dependent manner: There was a considerable increase of maximal enzymatic rate and Michaelis constant due to changes in the membrane structure. Integral parameters such as erythrocyte stability, membrane lipid peroxidation, or methemoglobin levels remained unchanged. Anti-oxidative capacity of the red blood cells increased after MLS laser irradiation. This irradiation induced a time-dependent increase in free radical generation in MCF-4 cells. Low-intensity near-infrared MLS laser radiation induces free radical generation and changes enzymatic and anti-oxidative activities of cellular components. Free radical generation may be the mechanism of the biomodulative effect of laser radiation.

  8. The improved pyroelectric detectors for far-infrared laser interferometer measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gao

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, the application of the pyroelectric detectors for Far-Infrared laser diagnostics on TOKAMAK plasma is described. We discovered experimentally that the Fabry-Perot interference could affect the performance of the pyroelectric detectors (PED). The improved pyroelectric detector (IPD) was developed for FIR laser coheront measuring. Some designing considerations about the pyroelectric detectors used in high temperature plasma conditions are mentioned.

  9. Applications of infrared free electron lasers in picosecond and nonlinear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, W. S.; Benson, S. V.; Madey, J. M. J.; Etemad, S.; Baker, G. L.; Rothberg, L.; Roberson, M.; Austin, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we describe two different types of spectroscopic experiments that exploit the characteristics of the infrared FEL, Mark III, for studies of condensed matter: - the spectrum of χ(3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) in polyacetylene: an application of the free electron laser in nonlinear optical spectroscopy, and - a dynamical test of Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free electron laser. These two studies highlight the unique contributions FELs can make to condensed-matter spectroscopy.

  10. Low-intensity infrared laser effects on zymosan-induced articular inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januária dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara; da Fonseca, Adenilson d. S.; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2015-03-01

    Low-level therapy laser is a phototherapy treatment that involves the application of low power light in the red or infrared wavelengths in various diseases such as arthritis. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosaninduced articular inflammatory process. Inflammatory process was induced in C57BL/6 mouse by intra-articular injection of zymosan into rear tibio-tarsal joints. Thirty animals were divided in five groups: (I) control, (II) laser, (III) zymosan-induced, (IV) zymosan-induced + laser and (V). Laser exposure was performed after zymosan administration with low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), power 10 mW, fluence 3.0 J/cm2 at continuous mode emission, in five doses. Twenty-four hours after last irradiation, the animals were sacrificed and the right joints fixed and demineralized. Morphological analysis was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain, pro-apoptotic (caspase-6) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL assay in articular cartilage cells. Inflammatory process was observed in connective tissue near to articular cartilage, in IV and V groups, indicating zymosan effect. This process was decreased in both groups after laser treatment and dexamethasone. Although groups III and IV presented higher caspase-6 and DNA fragmentation percentages, statistical differences were not observed when compared to groups I and II. Our results suggest that therapies based on low-intensity infrared lasers could reduce inflammatory process and could not cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosan-induced articular inflammatory process.

  11. Infrared absorption nano-spectroscopy using sample photoexpansion induced by tunable quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng; Belkin, Mikhail A

    2011-10-10

    We report a simple technique that allows obtaining mid-infrared absorption spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution under low-power illumination from tunable quantum cascade lasers. Light absorption is detected by measuring associated sample thermal expansion with an atomic force microscope. To detect minute thermal expansion we tune the repetition frequency of laser pulses in resonance with the mechanical frequency of the atomic force microscope cantilever. Spatial resolution of better than 50 nm is experimentally demonstrated.

  12. Response measurement by laser Doppler vibrometry in vibration qualification tests with non-Gaussian random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the field of vibration qualification testing, random excitations are typically imposed on the tested system in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) profile. This is the one of the most popular ways to control the shaker or slip table for durability tests. However, these excitations (and the corresponding system responses) exhibit a Gaussian probability distribution, whereas not all real-life excitations are Gaussian, causing the response to be also non-Gaussian. In order to introduce non-Gaussian peaks, a further parameter, i.e., kurtosis, has to be controlled in addition to the PSD. However, depending on the specimen behaviour and input signal characteristics, the use of non-Gaussian excitations with high kurtosis and a given PSD does not automatically imply a non-Gaussian stress response. For an experimental investigation of these coupled features, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations and consequently evaluate the input signals most representative for real-life, non-Gaussian excitations. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and burst non-Gaussian excitation signals. The laser Doppler vibrometry technique was used in this type of test for the first time, in order to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response as proportional to the differential displacement measured at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of measurements using accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal dropouts occurring during the experiment is described. The results demonstrate the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal features and therefore to select the most appropriate input signal for the fatigue test.

  13. Growth and characterization of materials for tunable lasers in the near infrared spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Martin, Joel J.

    1989-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy, crystal growth, and radiation damage research was performed. The laser spectroscopy effort focused on understanding the effects of excited state absorption processes involving pump photons. This was performed on a variety of rare earth ions in different hosts. The crystal growth and radiation damage effort focused on LiFY4 (YLF) doped with rare earth ions. The results of this work is described.

  14. Spectroscopic and laser properties of Tm3+ optical centers in CaF2 crystal under 795 nm diode laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, M. E.; Alimov, O. K.; Papashvili, A. G.; Martynova, K. A.; Konyushkin, V. A.; Nakladov, A. N.; Osiko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of Tm3+ optical center formation with increasing thulium concentration and the influence of different optical centers on the fluorescence and laser properties of the 2 μm 3F4-3H6 transition under ~795 nm laser diode excitation is studied.

  15. High duty cycle far-infrared germanium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Danielle Russell

    The effects of crystal geometry, heat transport, and optics on high duty cycle germanium hole population inversion lasers are investigated. Currently the laser's low duty cycle limits its utility for many applications. This low duty cycle is a result of the combination of the large electrical input power necessary and insufficient heat extraction. In order to achieve a continuous-wave device, the input power must be decreased and the cooling power increased. In order to improve laser efficiency and lower the input power, the effect of laser crystal geometry on the electric field uniformity is considered. Geometries with d/L>>1 or <<1 are shown to have improved electric field uniformity, where d is the distance between electrical contacts and L is the length in the direction of the Hall electric field. A geometry with d/L>>1 is shown to decrease the threshold voltage for lasing. Laser crystals with the traditional contact geometry have been compared to a new, planar contact design with both electrical contacts on the same side of the laser crystal. This new geometry provides a large d/L ratio while also allowing effective heat sinking. A pure, single-crystal silicon heat sink is developed for planar contact design lasers, which improves the duty cycle tenfold. For the traditional contact design, copper heat sinks are developed that demonstrate cooling powers up to 10 Watts. The effects of thermal conductivity, surface area, and interfacial thermal resistance on the heat transport are compared. To improve the cavity quality, thereby allowing for smaller crystal volumes, new optical designs are investigated. A vertical cavity structure is demonstrated for the planar contact structure using strontium titanate single crystals as mirrors. A mode-selecting cavity is implemented for the traditional contact design. The spectra of small-volume, near-threshold lasers are measured. In contrast to the emission of larger lasers, these lasers emit within narrow frequency peaks

  16. Theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical effects in laser trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    PubMed

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K

    2016-09-19

    The use of low-power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation in stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the recent past; the high peak power of each pulse leads to instantaneous trapping of a nanoparticle with fast inertial response and the high repetition-rate ensures repetitive trapping by successive pulses However, with such high peak power pulsed excitation under a tight focusing condition, nonlinear optical effects on trapping efficiency also become significant and cannot be ignored. Thus, in addition to the above mentioned repetitive instantaneous trapping, trapping efficiency under pulsed excitation is also influenced by the optical Kerr effect, which we theoretically investigate here. Using dipole approximation we show that with an increase in laser power the radial component of the trapping potential becomes progressively more stable but the axial component is dramatically modulated due to increased Kerr nonlinearity. We justify that the relevant parameter to quantify the trapping efficiency is not the absolute depth of the highly asymmetric axial trapping potential but the height of the potential barrier along the beam propagation direction. We also discuss the optimal excitation parameters leading to the most stable dipole trap. Our results show excellent agreement with previous experiments.

  17. Theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical effects in laser trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    PubMed

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K

    2016-09-19

    The use of low-power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation in stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the recent past; the high peak power of each pulse leads to instantaneous trapping of a nanoparticle with fast inertial response and the high repetition-rate ensures repetitive trapping by successive pulses However, with such high peak power pulsed excitation under a tight focusing condition, nonlinear optical effects on trapping efficiency also become significant and cannot be ignored. Thus, in addition to the above mentioned repetitive instantaneous trapping, trapping efficiency under pulsed excitation is also influenced by the optical Kerr effect, which we theoretically investigate here. Using dipole approximation we show that with an increase in laser power the radial component of the trapping potential becomes progressively more stable but the axial component is dramatically modulated due to increased Kerr nonlinearity. We justify that the relevant parameter to quantify the trapping efficiency is not the absolute depth of the highly asymmetric axial trapping potential but the height of the potential barrier along the beam propagation direction. We also discuss the optimal excitation parameters leading to the most stable dipole trap. Our results show excellent agreement with previous experiments. PMID:27661888

  18. Excitation of sound waves upon propagation of laser pulses in optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Biryukov, A S; Sukharev, M E; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2002-09-30

    A revised, more comprehensive model of excitation and propagation of acoustic vibrations, electrostrictively induced in optical fibres by laser pulses, is presented. An analytic expression for the acoustic response function of the refractive index in a standard single-mode fibre is derived. Response functions are found for a standard fibre as well as for a single-mode double-clad fibre, which offers much promise for fibreoptic communication lines and where the effective area of mode-field cross section is increased with respect to a standard fibre. It is shown that the intensity of excited sound waves in double-clad fibres is usually several times higher than that in standard fibres. This intensity is determined mainly by the shape of the radial distribution of the electromagnetic field in the pulse, which is different for the fibres considered in this paper. (invited paper)

  19. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G. Jackson; Campana, Maria I.; Walko, Donald A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz. PMID:26751616

  20. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G Jackson; Campana, Maria I; Walko, Donald A; Landahl, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz. PMID:26751616

  1. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G. Jackson; Campana, Maria I.; Walko, Donald A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-11

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Finally, using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acousticmore » oscillations at frequencies of several GHz.« less

  2. Photoluminescence of Traces of Aromatic Compounds in Aqueous Solutions Upon Excitation by a Repetitively Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agal'Tsov, A. M.; Gorelik, V. S.; Moro, R. A.

    2000-06-01

    A method is suggested for quantitative and qualitative analysis of aromatic compounds in water at extremely low concentrations (<1 ng/l). The method is based on excitation of luminescence by short (20 ns) UV laser pulses with a peak power of 104 W at 255.3 nm and a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. The shape of luminescence spectra of benzene, benzoic acid, saccharin, aspirin, and L-tryptophan at low concentrations in water is analyzed. The luminescence kinetics of these compounds is studied at short delay times (10 20 ns). The lifetimes of the electronic excited states of the aromatic compounds are measured. The applications of the method for studies of low-concentration aqueous solutions of biological and medicine compounds are analyzed.

  3. Food powder analysis by using transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Sukra Lie, Zener; Setiabudi, Wahyu; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-06-01

    A direct and sensitive analysis of food powder sample has successfully been carried out by utilizing the special characteristics of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser. In this study, a food powder was placed in a container made of copper plate and covered by a metal mesh. The container was perpendicularly attached on a metal surface. A high-temperature luminous plasma was induced on a metal surface 5 mm above the mesh. Once the plasma was produced, a strong shock wave was induced, blowing-off of the powder from the container to enter into the plasma to be dissociated and excited. By using this method, a semi-quantitative analysis of food powder was made. The detection limits of Cr in the powdered agar and Cd in the powdered rice were 9 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively.

  4. One-photon excitation in the e -H collision in the presence of a laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Cionga, A. ); Florescu, V. )

    1992-04-01

    We consider the one-photon excitation of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the presence of a homogeneous monochromatic linearly polarized electric field as a model for the radiation field of the laser. In the framework of the approximative approach of Faisal and Rahman (in {ital Fifth} {ital International} {ital Conference} {ital on} {ital Atomic} {ital Physics}, edited by R. Marrus, M. H. Prior, and H. A. Stutgart (University of California, Berkeley, 1976), p. 49), suited for high-energy electrons, we present an analytic expression for the transition amplitude to an arbitrary {ital nlm} state, in terms of hypergeometric Gauss and Appell {ital F}{sub 1} functions, together with the numerical results for excitation to the {ital n}=4 states.

  5. Picosecond x-ray strain rosette reveals direct laser excitation of coherent transverse acoustic phonons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooheyong; Williams, G Jackson; Campana, Maria I; Walko, Donald A; Landahl, Eric C

    2016-01-11

    Using a strain-rosette, we demonstrate the existence of transverse strain using time-resolved x-ray diffraction from multiple Bragg reflections in laser-excited bulk gallium arsenide. We find that anisotropic strain is responsible for a considerable fraction of the total lattice motion at early times before thermal equilibrium is achieved. Our measurements are described by a new model where the Poisson ratio drives transverse motion, resulting in the creation of shear waves without the need for an indirect process such as mode conversion at an interface. Using the same excitation geometry with the narrow-gap semiconductor indium antimonide, we detected coherent transverse acoustic oscillations at frequencies of several GHz.

  6. Spectroscopy of the three-photon laser excitation of cold Rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2013-05-15

    The spectra of the three-photon laser excitation 5S{sub 1/2} {yields} 5P{sub 3/2} {yields} 6S{sub 1/2}nP of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in an operating magneto-optical trap based on continuous single-frequency lasers at each stage are studied. These spectra contain two partly overlapping peaks of different amplitudes, which correspond to coherent three-photon excitation and incoherent three-step excitation due to the presence of two different ways of excitation through the dressed states of intermediate levels. A four-level theoretical model based on optical Bloch equations is developed to analyze these spectra. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated data is achieved by introducing additional decay of optical coherence induced by a finite laser line width and other broadening sources (stray electromagnetic fields, residual Doppler broadening, interatomic interactions) into the model.

  7. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  8. Multi-spectral imaging with mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yang; Le, Han Q.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-spectral laser imaging can be a useful technology for target discrimination, classification, and identification based on object spectral signatures. The mid-IR region (~3-14 μm) is particularly rich of molecular spectroscopic fingerprints, but the technology has been under utilized. Compact, potentially inexpensive semiconductor lasers may allow more cost-effective applications. This paper describes a development of semiconductor-laser-based multi-spectral imaging for both near-IR and mid-IR, and demonstrates the potential of this technology. The near-IR study employed 7 wavelengths from 0.635-1.55 μm, and used for system engineering evaluation as well as for studying the fundamental aspects of multi-spectral laser imaging. These include issues of wavelength-dependence scattering as a function of incident and receiving angle and the polarization effects. Stokes vector imaging and degree-of-linear-polarization were shown to reveal significant information to characterize the targets. The mid-IR study employed 4 wavelengths from 3.3-9.6 μm, and was applied to diverse targets that consist of natural and man-made materials and household objects. It was shown capable to resolve and distinguish small spectral differences among various targets, thanks to the laser radiometric and spectral accuracy. Colorless objects in the visible were shown with "colorful" signatures in the mid-IR. An essential feature of the study is an advanced system architecture that employs wavelength-division-multiplexed laser beams for high spectral fidelity and resolution. In addition, unlike conventional one-transmitter and one receiver design, the system is based on a scalable CDMA network concept with multiple transmitters and receivers to allow efficient information acquisition. The results suggest that multi-spectral laser imaging in general can be a unique and powerful technology for wide ranging applications.

  9. Laser anemometry two dimensional measurement of velocity fluctuations in an excited jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P.; Sava, P. G.

    1983-05-01

    The coherent structure of the velocity fluctuation field in a free jet excited at appropriate frequencies was studied using a 2 component laser anemometer at a 0.5 Strouhal number and at 600,000 Reynolds number. The coherent field is described as a series of turbulent structures conveyed with a phase velocity of 0.56 the initial jet velocity. It is shown that the characteristics of the turbulent field are strongly dependent on space-time location in the coherent field.

  10. Formation of sp{sup 3}-Bonded Carbon Nanostructures by Femtosecond Laser Excitation of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, J.; Inami, E.; Tanimura, K.; Ohnishi, H.; Nasu, K.

    2009-02-27

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study and ab initio total energy calculations have identified the atomic-level structure of novel sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon nanoscale domains formed dynamically from graphite by femtosecond-laser excitation. The structure is characterized by a pseudo sp{sup 3}-bonding configuration that results in inward displacement of surface carbon atoms by 0.5 A in every third row along the [1100] orientation. This structural periodicity is unique and differs from conventional phases of diamond.

  11. Excitation density distribution in electron-beam-pumped ZnSe semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Donskoi, E N; Zalyalov, A N; Petrushin, O N; Savel'ev, Yu A; Tarasov, M D; Shigaev, Yu S; Zhdanova, E V; Zverev, M M; Peregudov, D V; Ivanov, S V; Sedova, I V; Sorokin, S V

    2008-12-31

    The spatial density distribution of the absorbed energy in ZnSe semiconductor lasers excited by electrons with energies from 2 keV to 1 MeV is calculated by the Monte-Carlo method. Approximate analytic expressions determining the absorbed energy of electrons in ZnSe are presented. The pump power threshold in a semiconductor quantum-well ZnSe structure is experimentally determined. The lasing threshold in such structures is estimated as a function of the electron energy. (active media)

  12. Information coding of exciting laser pulses in an optical echo-processor

    SciTech Connect

    Rusanova, I A

    2013-07-31

    We report the possibility of controlling the distribution of quantum bits within an inhomogeneously broadened line of a resonant transition in recording and transforming information in optical echo-processors. We consider the efficiency of realisation of the elementary logic XOR gate based on a two-pulse excitation of a resonant medium with phase memory. The encoded information is incorporated into the temporal shape of laser pulses in the form of amplitude modulation of an 'echelon' of present ('1') and absent ('0') pulse-codes for obtaining more efficient logic elements that reduce the noise in a quantum communication channel. (optical information processing)

  13. Structural health monitoring by high-frequency vibration measurement with non-contact laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, I.; Miyamoto, D.; Hosoya, N.; Nishidome, C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by a laser ablation. High power YAG pulse laser is used for producing an ideal impulse force on structural surface. It is possible to measure high frequency vibration responses in this system. A health monitoring system is constructed by this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm. A microscopic damage of structures can be extracted by detecting fluctuations of high frequency vibration response with the present health monitoring system. In this study, loosening of bolt tightening torques is defined as the damage of the system. The damage is detected and identified by statistical evaluations with Recognition-Taguchi method.

  14. Spectroscopic analysis of the excitation transfer from background air to diffusing aluminum laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribiere, M.; Cheron, B. G.; Karabourniotis, D.

    2009-04-15

    During the relaxation of the plasma plume generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target, a pronounced intensity enhancement is observed at the central wavelength of the 396.15 nm self-reversed resonant line. This spectral special feature is analyzed and related to the interaction of the plasma edge with the background air excited by the shockwave, prompt electrons, and extreme ultraviolet radiation produced at the earliest times of the ablation. In this article, the electron density, the aluminum ground state, and resonant level populations are determined from the fitting of the 396.15 nm calculated line profile to the experimental one at two background pressures (100 and 1000 Pa). The evolution of these densities is derived from experiments performed at delays, after the laser pulse arrival, ranging from 120 to 180 ns.

  15. Ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation via laser double pulses excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangqing; Wu, Yanmin; Uddin, Noor; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Bian, Hao; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    The ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation on gold film via ultrafast laser double pulses excitation is theoretically investigated by numerical simulations. The non-equilibrium thermal modulations with respect to the electron and phonon energy transfers within gold film is proposed for predicting the nano-ripples formation. It is revealed that the nano-ripples contrast on gold film surface can be well controlled via tuning the pulse energy ratio, pulse separation and pulse exchange of ultrafast laser double-pulse. It is attributed to the tunable energy transfer routes between the electron thermal diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling via tuning double pulses parameters. The study provides theoretical basis for producing high-contrast ripples for a wide range application in the fields such as high-absorptive solar cells, surface friction devices and super-hydrophobic surface.

  16. The role of asymmetric excitation in self-organized nanostructure formation upon femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Varlamov, Sergej; Bestehorn, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Surface pattering upon multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation is modeled by a non-linear-dynamic erosion/smoothing model, similar to structure formation during ion sputtering. The model is adopted to account for the influence of laser polarization on nanostructure features. Based on a nonlinear equation of the Kuramoto-Siavshinsky type, it is shown that the directional anisotropy in the pattern formation may result from a spatial anisotropy of the initial excitation/energy-coupling process, such as resonant coupling to surface plasmons/polaritons, or electron diffusion properties. Also, anisotropy of elasto-dynamic surface and diffusion properties may be involved. A comparison of numeric simulations based on the model with corresponding experi-mental results gives a very good agreement.

  17. Cholesteric liquid crystal laser in a dielectric mirror cavity upon band-edge excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhisa, Yuko; Huang, Yuhua; Zhou, Ying; Wu, Shin-Tson; Takao, Yuuki; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    Low threshold laser action of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) is demonstrated using an input circularly polarized light whose handedness is the same as the cholesteric helix of the sample at the high-energy band edge of the reflection band. The mechanism originates from the dramatic increase of the photon density of state at the band edges. We also demonstrate an enhanced laser action of a CLC in a dielectric multilayer cavity. In such a device configuration, the band-edge excitation at high-energy band edge improves the lasing performance not only for the same handedness circularly polarized pump beam as the cholesteric helix but also for the opposite one. It stems from the polarization independence of the dielectric multilayers.

  18. Nonlinear optical measurements of conducting copolymers of aniline under CW laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis and measurements of third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting of conducting copolymers of aniline are presented. Single beam z-scan technique was employed for the nonlinear optical studies. Continuous wave He-Ne laser operating at 633 nm was used as the source of excitation. Copolymer samples exhibited reverse saturable absorption (RSA) process. The nonlinear refraction studies depict that the copolymers exhibit self-defocusing property. The estimated values of βeff, n2 and χ(3) were found to be of the order of 10-2 cm/W, 10-5 esu and 10-7 esu respectively. Self-diffraction rings were observed due to refractive index change when exposed to the laser beam. A good optical limiting and clamping of power of ∼0.9 mW and ∼0.05 mW was observed. Therefore, copolymers of aniline emerge as a potential candidate for photonic device applications.

  19. Bound state - excitation in ion-ion collisions related to X-ray lasers modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Stancalie, V.; Sureau, A.; Klisnick, A.

    1995-12-31

    As in the earlier work of Walling and Weisheit we used the Seaton`s semi-classical, impact parameter formulation of Coulomb excitation for a variety of inelastic ion-ion collisions, involved in laser-produced soft X-ray lasers with Li-like aluminum ions, 1s{sup 2} nl configuration. Energy levels has been calculated by direct SCF method including the spin-orbit interaction. Our definition of the electric 2{sup {lambda}} - pole line strength, S{sup {lambda}}, is consistent with that of Sobelman. The ion-ion collision processes have been considered for a wide range of temperature between 500 eV to 30 eV, with a particular interest in the last part of plasma evolution time, when complications such as non-Maxwellian particle distributions, radiation fields and transient plasma conditions can be neglected, and when the plasma electrons and ions have comparable temperatures.

  20. Fluence-dependent dynamics of the 5d6s exchange splitting in Gd metal after femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietsch, Björn; Carley, Robert; Gleich, Markus; Teichmann, Martin; Bowlan, John; Weinelt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the fluence-dependent dynamics of the exchange-split 5d6s valence bands of Gd metal after femtosecond, near-infrared (IR) laser excitation. Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulses is used to simultaneously map the transient binding energies of the minority and majority spin valence bands. The decay constant of the exchange splitting increases with fluence. This reflects the slower response of the occupied majority-spin component, which we attribute to Elliot–Yafet spin-flip scattering in accordance with the microscopic three-temperature model (M3TM). In contrast, the time constant of the partly unoccupied minority-spin band stays unaffected by a change in pump fluence. Here, we introduce as an alternative to superdiffusive spin transport exchange scattering, which is an ultrafast electronic mechanism explaining the observed dynamics. Exchange scattering can reduce the spin polarization in the partially unoccupied minority-spin band and thus its energetic position without effective demagnetization.