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Sample records for infrared laser radiation

  1. [Two-step exposure of biological objects to infrared laser and microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Kol'tsov, Iu V; Korolev, V N; Kusakin, S A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of two-step exposure of bacterial objects to infrared laser and microwave pulse radiations was studied. The effect is determined by the time interval between two excitation steps and pulse duration. It was shown that the biologically active dose of microwave radiation is much lower than that of infrared laser radiation; however, laser radiation induces a stronger cellular response. It was found that microwaves enhance the efficiency of infrared laser radiation.

  2. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute radiation ulcers in rats with low-power infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursova, Larisa V.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Nikitina, Rosa G.; Maligina, Antonina I.

    1999-12-01

    Exposure of radiation ulcers in rats to low-power infrared laser radiation (LPLR) (wavelength--890 nm, pulse power--6 W, frequency--150 and 300 Hz, irradiation time--10 min) noticeably accelerates their healing, reduces exudative processes, increases number of specialized cells in wound. Application of LPLR prior to radiation damage decreases ulcer dimensions.

  3. [Infrared laser radiation in the treatment of low back pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mika, T; Orłow, H; Kuszelewski, Z

    1990-06-01

    The effectiveness was estimated of infrared laser radiation in the treatment of low back pain syndrome. The patients received irradiation from a semiconductor laser. The results were evaluated in 82 patients using a questionnaire of pain, taking into account its intensity, frequency, taking of analgesics, and the motor activity of the patient. The results suggest a favourable effect of infrared laser radiation on pain.

  4. Turbid Media Extinction Coefficient for Near-Infrared Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreischuh, T.; Gurdev, L.; Vankov, O.; Stoyanov, D.; Avramov, L.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, extended investigations are performed of the extinction coefficient of Intralipid-20% dilutions in distilled water depending on the Intralipid concentration, for laser radiation wavelengths in the red and near-infrared regions covering the so-called tissue optical window. The extinction is measured by using an approach we have developed recently based on the features of the spatial intensity distribution of laser-radiation beams propagating through semi-infinite turbid media. The measurements are conducted using separately two dilution- containing plexiglass boxes of different sizes and volumes, in order to prove the appropriateness of the assumption of semi-infinite turbid medium. The experimental results for the extinction are in agreement with our previous results and with empiric formulae found by other authors concerning the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient of Intralipid - 10% and Intralipid - 20%. They are also in agreement with known data of the water absorptance. It is estimated as well that the wavelengths around 1320 nm would be advantageous for deep harmless sensing and diagnostics of tissues.

  5. Low-intensity infrared laser radiation influence on the tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheida, A. A.; Efimova, E. G.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared laser radiation of low intensity in exposition dose of 25-35 mJicm2 does not cause progress the tumor process. Moreover, disturbing the blood flow in the tumor due to changing synthesis of norepinephrine and histamine this radiation contributes to the damage of the tumor tissue accompanied by the beginning of adaptation reaction in the organism.

  6. Photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by invisible infrared radiation emitted from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Yahya A H; Khedr, Abdulla H

    2014-03-11

    There are a wide variety of laser pointers sold to the general public. Among those are the high-powered diode-pumped solid-state lasers (>5 mW), which do not follow the laser safety regulations for packing, and are sold as regular lasers without the infrared (IR) filters. In this case report, we encountered a patient with photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by the invisible IR radiations emitted from a green laser pointer. Owing to the thermal effect of the invisible IR rays led to the disease.

  7. The effect of near-infrared MLS laser radiation on cell membrane structure and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Jolanta; Pasternak, Kamila; Zavodnik, Ilya; Irzmański, Robert; Wróbel, Dominika; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation of different wavelengths and light doses are well known, but the biochemical mechanism of the interaction of laser light with living cells is not fully understood. We have investigated the effect of MLS (Multiwave Locked System) laser near-infrared irradiation on cell membrane structure, functional properties, and free radical generation using human red blood cells and breast cancer MCF-4 cells. The cells were irradiated with low-intensity MLS near-infrared (simultaneously 808 nm, continuous emission and 905 nm, pulse emission, pulse-wave frequency, 1,000 or 2,000 Hz) laser light at light doses from 0 to 15 J (average power density 212.5 mW/cm(2), spot size was 3.18 cm(2)) at 22 °C, the activity membrane bound acetylcholinesterase, cell stability, anti-oxidative activity, and free radical generation were the parameters used in characterizing the structural and functional changes of the cell. Near-infrared low-intensity laser radiation changed the acetylcholinesterase activity of the red blood cell membrane in a dose-dependent manner: There was a considerable increase of maximal enzymatic rate and Michaelis constant due to changes in the membrane structure. Integral parameters such as erythrocyte stability, membrane lipid peroxidation, or methemoglobin levels remained unchanged. Anti-oxidative capacity of the red blood cells increased after MLS laser irradiation. This irradiation induced a time-dependent increase in free radical generation in MCF-4 cells. Low-intensity near-infrared MLS laser radiation induces free radical generation and changes enzymatic and anti-oxidative activities of cellular components. Free radical generation may be the mechanism of the biomodulative effect of laser radiation.

  8. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2<2 (Er-laser microprocessing). Proposed method was used for preparation of hard tooth tissues surface before filling for improvement of bond strength between tissues surface and restorative materials, microleakage reduction between tissues surface and restorative materials, and for caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  9. Grid spectral purity filters for suppression of infrared radiation in laser-produced plasma EUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soer, Wouter A.; Jak, Martin J. J.; Yakunin, Andrei M.; van Herpen, Maarten M. J. W.; Banine, Vadim Y.

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a grid-type spectral purity filter (SPF) for suppression of infrared radiation in laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources for high-volume EUV lithography. The SPF is a silicon grid with sub-wavelength periodicity that is metalized to make it reflective for infrared radiation. EUV radiation is transmitted geometrically through the open area of the grid. The first prototype samples show an in-band EUV transmittance of 74% at normal incidence. Infrared spectrometry exhibits a clear cut-off behavior as expected, with a transmittance of <0.1% at a wavelength of 10.6 µm. In a first power-load test, a grid was exposed to a CO2 laser at 100 W/cm2 in vacuum for 8 hours. Another grid was kept at 800 °C in a vacuum oven for 24 hours. Both grids remained structurally intact and maintained an infrared transmittance of <0.1%.

  10. Maculopathy following exposure to visible and infrared radiation from a laser pointer: a clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James V M; Sromicki, Julian; Mangold, Mario; Golling, Matthias; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Laser pointer devices have become increasingly available in recent years, and their misuse has caused a number of ocular injuries. Online distribution channels permit trade in devices which may not conform to international standards in terms of their output power and spectral content. We present a case study of ocular injury caused by one such device. The patient was examined approximately 9 months following laser exposure using full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ERG and MF-ERG), electrooculography (EOG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), in addition to a full ophthalmological examination. MF-ERG, OCT, and the ophthalmological examination were repeated 7 months after the first examination. The output of the laser pointer was measured. Despite severe focal damage to the central retina visible fundoscopically and with OCT, all electrophysiological examinations were quantitatively normal; however, qualitatively the central responses of the MF-ERG appeared slightly reduced. When the MF-ERG was repeated 7 months later, all findings were normal. The laser pointer was found to emit both visible and infrared radiation in dangerous amounts. Loss of retinal function following laser pointer injury may not always be detectable using standard electrophysiological tests. Exposure to non-visible radiation should be considered as a possible aggravating factor when assessing cases of alleged laser pointer injury.

  11. Melanin and the cellular effects of ultrashort-pulse, near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Kumar, Neeru; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Stolarski, David J.

    2003-07-01

    Our research into laser bioeffects has increasingly focused on cytotoxic mechanisms affecting genomic expression and programmed cellular stress responses. In the context of DNA damage, we previously reported that more DNA strand breaks were produced in cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to ultrashort pulse, than to CW, near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation. To test the hypothesis that RPE melanin was the cellular chromophore responsible for mediating this damage, the experiments were repeated with a line of human-derived RPE cells that could be grown in culture expressing varying levels of pigmentation. Lightly-pigmented cells were either unexposed, or exposed to the output of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 810 nm light in mode-locked pulses (48-fsec at 80 MHz), or as CW radiation. Cells were irradiated at 160 W/cm2 or 80 W/cm2 (the estimated ED50 or half-ED50 for a retinal lesion). Immediately following the laser exposure, cells were processed for the comet assay. Longer "comet" tails and larger "comet" areas indicated more DNA strand breaks. In lightly-pigmented RPE cells, the overall comet assay differences among the laser-exposed groups were smaller than those observed in our earlier experiments which utilized highly pigmented primary cells. The comet tail lengths of cells exposed to the mode-locked pulses at the ED50, however, were significantly longer than those of the controls or the CW-exposed cells. The other comet assay parameters examined (tail moment, comet area) did not show consistent differences among the groups. While these results support the involvement of melanin in the ultrashort pulse laser-induced damage to DNA, they do not exclude the involvement of other cellular chromophores. Some preliminary experiments describing other measures of cellular stress responses to laser-induced oxidative stress are described.

  12. Thermal lensing from near-infrared laser radiation in an artificial eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Oliver, Jeff; Rockwell, Benjamin; Thomas, Robert; Welch, Ashley J.

    2009-02-01

    A confocal imaging system mounted to a micrometer stage was used to image the thermal lens induced into a water filled Cain-cell artificial eye. A dual-beam pump-probe geometry was used to quantify the 633-nm visible wavelength probe beam's transient response when exposed to the near-infrared pump-beam source. The infrared laser radiation wavelengths tested were 1110, 1130, 1150 and 1318 nm for 1-s exposures to 450-mW of power. Analysis of video data revealed the amount of refractive shift, induced by the thermal lens, as a function of time. Data demonstrate how the formation and dissipation of the thermal lens follow a logarithmic excitation and exponential decay in time respectively. Confocal imaging showed that thermal lensing was strongest for the 1150-nm wavelength followed by 1130, 1318 and 1110-nm.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of postsurgical inflammation by infrared radiation thermometer and laser flare-cell meter.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, H; Toda, I; Yagi, Y; Tsubota, K

    1994-07-01

    Using an infrared radiation thermometer and a laser flare-cell meter, we evaluated intraocular inflammation in 40 patients who had cataract surgery by measuring central corneal temperature, number of cells, and amount of flare in the anterior chamber. Patients were divided into two groups based on duration of surgery: Group A, more than 40 minutes; Group B, less than 40 minutes. In Group A (n = 32), corneal temperature (degrees Celsius) increased by 1.10 +/- 0.57, 0.75 +/- 0.69, 0.41 +/- 0.56, and 0.24 +/- 0.45 on days 1, 2, 14, and 30, respectively. Group B (n = 8) had no significant rise in corneal temperature, but cell count (mean +/- 1 SD) increased to 39.3 +/- 13.6, 36.4 +/- 18.1, 15.5 +/- 16.5, and 4.4 +/- 3.1 on days 1, 2, 7, and 14, respectively. Flare increased to 88.9 +/- 88.9, 45.8 +/- 30.1, 38.3 +/- 25.4, and 18.5 +/- 9.4 on days 2, 7, 14, and 30, respectively. These observations show that the longer the cataract surgery, the greater the inflammation. Although inflammation was evaluated quantitatively by both infrared radiation thermometer and laser flare-cell meter, the latter appears to be more sensitive. Thermometry will only detect the results of very traumatic surgery, with a corresponding breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier.

  14. Stable 1.25 watts CW far infrared laser radiation at the 119 micron methanol line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1987-01-01

    Far-infrared CW radiation of 1.25 watts has been obtained at the 119 micron methanol line with a CO2 pump power of 125 watts, and the maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is measured to be less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. Reflecting optics have been used, when possible, to minimize CO2 degradation, and the frequency stability is ensured by cooling the input and output couplers. The input and output assemblies within the lasing medium are enclosed to minimize the external effects on the cavity length and to eliminate the mechanical instabilities associated with the use of bellows. The vibrational bottle-neck is broken by cooling the resonator wall to 5 deg and adding He as the buffer gas.

  15. Stable 1.25 watts CW far infrared laser radiation at the 119 micron methanol line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1987-01-01

    Far-infrared CW radiation of 1.25 watts has been obtained at the 119 micron methanol line with a CO2 pump power of 125 watts, and the maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is measured to be less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. Reflecting optics have been used, when possible, to minimize CO2 degradation, and the frequency stability is ensured by cooling the input and output couplers. The input and output assemblies within the lasing medium are enclosed to minimize the external effects on the cavity length and to eliminate the mechanical instabilities associated with the use of bellows. The vibrational bottle-neck is broken by cooling the resonator wall to 5 deg and adding He as the buffer gas.

  16. Effects of Infrared Laser Radiation on the In Vitro Isomerization of All-Trans Retinal to 11-Cis Retinal

    PubMed Central

    Liegner, J.; Taboada, J.; Tsin, A. T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro effect of infrared laser light on the isomerization of all-trans retinal dissolved in an ether/hexane and also an ethanol solvent was studied. Pulsed laser energy at 1064 nm was used to drive the molecular reconfiguration of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the conversion. Overall isomerization was minimal (0.2 percent to 1.0 percent), yet, a significant difference in isomerization due to pulsed infrared laser energy over non-modulated monochromatic laser light was detected (up to 168 percent difference). Potentially, pulsed laser radiation tuned to the ethylenic stretch frequency of the C11=C12 bond of retinal may induce rotational changes to the chromophore. PMID:26321787

  17. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  18. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  19. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  20. [Effect of infrared low-intensity laser radiation on a mutation process and proliferative corneal activity in experimental cerebral hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Shurygina, I P; Galenkina, N M; Shkurat, T P

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the impact of infrared low-intensity laser radiation (IRLILR) on a mutation process and the proliferative activity of the animal cornea during stimulation of circulatory brain hypoxia. During an experiment on laboratory albino rats, IRLILR was studied for its impact on the level of chromosomal rearrangements and the mitotic index in the corneal cells was calculated in circulatory brain hypoxia. Laser exposure during stimulation of circulatory brain hypoxia favors normalization of the level of chromosomal aberrations and a mitotic cycle in the rat corneal epithelial cells. The experimental findings suggest that IRLILR may be used in ophthalmological care for antihypoxic purposes.

  1. Infrared radiation and inversion population of CO2 laser levels in Venusian and Martian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordiyets, B. F.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Formation mechanisms of nonequilibrium 10 micron CO2 molecule radiation and the possible existence of a natural laser effect in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars are theoretically studied. An analysis is made of the excitation process of CO2 molecule vibrational-band levels (with natural isotropic content) induced by direct solar radiation in bands 10.6, 9.4, 4.3, 2.7 and 2.0 microns. The model of partial vibrational-band temperatures was used in the case. The problem of IR radiation transfer in vibrational-rotational bands was solved in the radiation escape approximation.

  2. Coherent infrared radiation from the ALS generated via femtosecond laser modulation of the electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2004-07-01

    Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS produces large modulation of the electron energies within a short {approx}100 fs slice of the electron bunch. Propagating around the storage ring, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories. The length of the perturbation evolves with a distance from the wiggler but is much shorter than the electron bunch length. This perturbation causes the electron bunch to emit short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent infrared light which are automatically synchronized to the modulating laser. The intensity and spectra of the infrared light were measured in two storage ring locations for a nominal ALS lattice and for an experimental lattice with the higher momentum compaction factor. The onset of instability stimulated by laser e-beam interaction had been discovered. The infrared signal is now routinely used as a sensitive monitor for a fine tuning of the laser beam alignment during data accumulation in the experiments with femtosecond x-ray pulses.

  3. Analgesic effect of simultaneous exposure to infrared laser radiation and μT magnetic field in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Mrowiec, Janina; Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the experiment was to estimate the effect of repeated simultaneous exposures to infrared laser radiation and μT variable magnetic field used in magnetostimulation on pain perception in rats, as well as the involvement of endogenous opioid system in the mechanism of this effect. In experimental group clean-shaven scull of male Wistar rats placed individually in a specially designed plastic chamber were simultaneously exposed to infrared laser radiation (wavelength - 855 nm, mean power - 4,1 mW, energy density - 30 J/cm2) and variable magnetic field of saw-like shape of impulse, at a frequency of basic impulse 180-195 Hz and mean induction value of 120 μT generated by magneto-laser applicator of device for magnetostimulation Viofor JPS (Med & Life, Poland) 12 minutes daily for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days, with 2 days-lasting break between them, while control animals were sham-exposed. The pain perception was determined by means of "hot plate" test on the basis of calculated analgesic index. As a result of repeated exposures a significant increase in analgesic index persisting also till 14 th day after the end of a cycle of exposures was observed. This analgesic effect was inhibited by prior i.p. injection of opioid antagonist - Naloxone.

  4. SiC absorption of near-infrared laser radiation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelmann, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical and experimental investigation of the temperature-dependent optical absorption of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC for a temperature range between room temperature and the decomposition point. The theoretical model is based on free carrier absorption including the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. With respect to laser material processing of silicon carbide, the analysis focusses on a near-infrared wavelength range. At room temperature, the calculated absorption is in excellent agreement to transmission and reflection measurements. For the experimental study of the absorption at higher temperatures induced by intense 1070-nm laser irradiation, a two-color pyrometer is employed with the thermal emission of the laser interaction zone being collected coaxial to the impinging laser. Exemplarily, the simulated temperature-dependent absorption is used to determine the heating of a 0.4-mm-thick 4H-SiC specimen during laser irradiation and compared to the experimentally determined temperature. In an initial time domain of the irradiation with an attained temperature below 1350 K, the simulated and measured temperatures are in good agreement. Above 1350 K, however, the measured temperature reveals a sharp and fast increase up to 2100 K which is not predicted by the model. This discrepancy is attributed to a strong additional absorption mechanism caused by carbonization at the surface which is confirmed by EDX analysis.

  5. Supra-threshold epidermis injury from near-infrared laser radiation prior to ablation onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Peterson, Amanda M.; Lile, Lily A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Stolarski, David J.; Zohner, Justin J.; Kumru, Semih S.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    With continued advancement of solid-state laser technology, high-energy lasers operating in the near-infrared (NIR) band are being applied in an increasing number of manufacturing techniques and medical treatments. Safety-related investigations of potentially harmful laser interaction with skin are commonplace, consisting of establishing the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) thresholds under various conditions, often utilizing the minimally-visible lesion (MVL) metric as an indication of damage. Likewise, characterization of ablation onset and velocity is of interest for therapeutic and surgical use, and concerns exceptionally high irradiance levels. However, skin injury response between these two exposure ranges is not well understood. This study utilized a 1070-nm Yb-doped, diode-pumped fiber laser to explore the response of excised porcine skin tissue to high-energy exposures within the supra-threshold injury region without inducing ablation. Concurrent high-speed videography was employed to assess the effect on the epidermis, with a dichotomous response determination given for three progressive damage event categories: observable permanent distortion on the surface, formation of an epidermal bubble due to bounded intra-cutaneous water vaporization, and rupture of said bubble during laser exposure. ED50 values were calculated for these categories under various pulse configurations and beam diameters, and logistic regression models predicted injury events with approximately 90% accuracy. The distinction of skin response into categories of increasing degrees of damage expands the current understanding of high-energy laser safety while also underlining the unique biophysical effects during induced water phase change in tissue. These observations could prove useful in augmenting biothermomechanical models of laser exposure in the supra-threshold region.

  6. Air core Bragg fibers for delivery of near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Frank, Milan; Kubeček, Václav; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-12-01

    Optical fibers designed for high power laser radiation delivery represent important tools in medicine, solar systems, or industry. For such purposes several different types of glass optical fibers such as silica, sapphire, or chalcogenide ones as well as hollow-glass fibers, photonic crystal fibers and Bragg fibers have been investigated. Air-core Bragg fibers or photonic crystal fibers offer us the possibility of light transmission in a low dispersive material - air having a high damage threshold and small non-linear coefficient. However, preforms for drawing Bragg fibers can be fabricated by MCVD method similarly as preforms of standard silica fibers. In this paper we present fundamental characteristics of laboratory-designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air cores intended for delivery of laser radiation at a wavelength range from 0.9 to 1.5 μm. Bragg fibers with different air core diameters of 5, 45 and 73 mm were prepared. The fiber core was surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Each pair was composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index with a contrast up to 0.03. Several laser sources emitting at 0.975, 1.06, and 1.55 μm were used as radiation sources. Attenuation coefficients, overall transmissions, bending losses, and spatial profiles of output beams from fibers were determined at these wavelengths. The lowest attenuation coefficient of 70 dB/km was determined for the 45 μm and 73 mm air-core fiber when radiation from a laser was launched into the fibers by using optical lenses. However, multimodal transmission has been observed in such condition. It has also been found that bending losses of such fibers are negligible for bending diameters higher than 15 mm.

  7. Infrared Radiation of Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-10-01

    March 1960. 4. S. Silverman, G. A. Hornbeck, and R. C. Herman , J. Chem. Phys. 16 155 (1947). The Infrared Emission and Absorption or-the Carbon Monoxide...by Infrared Radiation. 9. S. Silverman and R. C. Herman , J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 216 (1949). The Infrared Emission Spectra of the Oxy- Hydrogen and Oxy...Press, 1961). 35. W. J, Pearce, Conference on Extremely High Temperatures, Fischer and Mansur , eds. (John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1958), p. 123. 36. M. P

  8. Use of near infrared femtosecond lasers as sub-micron radiation microbeam for cell DNA damage and repair studies.

    PubMed

    Botchway, S W; Reynolds, P; Parker, A W; O'Neill, P

    2010-01-01

    Laser induced radiation microbeam technology for radiobiology research is undergoing rapid growth because of the increased availability and ease of use of femtosecond laser sources. The main processes involved are multiphoton absorption and/or plasma formation. The high peak powers these lasers generate make them ideal tools for depositing sub-micrometer size radiant energy within a region of a living cell nucleus to activate ionising and/or photochemically driven processes. The technique allows questions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation, the propagation and treatment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and repair in individual live cells as well as non-targeted cell to cell effects to be addressed. This mini-review focuses on the use of near infrared (NIR) ca. 800nm radiation to induce damage that is radically different from the early and subsequent ultraviolet microbeam techniques. Ultrafast pulsed NIR instrumentation has many benefits including the ability to eliminate issues of unspecific UV absorption by the many materials prevalent within cells. The multiphoton interaction volume also permits energy deposition beyond the diffraction limit. Work has established that the fundamental process of the damage induced by the ultrashort laser pulses is different to those induced from continuous wave light sources. Pioneering work has demonstrated that NIR laser microbeam radiation can mimic ionising radiation via multiphoton absorption within the 3D femtolitre volume of the highly focused Gaussian beam. This light-matter interaction phenomenon provides a novel optical microbeam probe for mimicking both complex ionising and UV radiation-type cell damage including double strand breaks (DSBs) and base damage. A further advantage of the pulsed laser technique is that it provides further scope for time-resolved experiments. Recently the NIR laser microbeam technique has been used to investigate the recruitment of repair proteins to the sub

  9. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p < 0.001). The model simulations of superficial temperature correlated with the measured skin surface temperature (r > 0.90, p < 0.001). Of the 16 subjects tested; eight subjects reported pricking pain in the hairy skin following a stimulus of 0.6 J/cm2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm) only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin) was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation. PMID:21059226

  10. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  11. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  12. Temperature alterations of infrared light absorption by cartilage and cornea under free-electron laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Kitai, Moishe S.; Edwards, Glenn S.

    2003-05-01

    Like pure water, the water incorporated into cartilage and cornea tissue shows a pronounced dependence of the absorption coefficient on temperature. Alteration of the temperature by radiation with an IR free-electron laser was studied by use of a pulsed photothermal radiometric technique. A computation algorithm was modified to take into account the real IR absorption spectra of the tissue and the spectral sensitivity of the IR detector used. The absorption coefficients for several wavelengths within the 2.9- and 6.1- μm water absorption bands have been determined for various laser pulse energies. It is shown that the absorption coefficient for cartilage decreases at temperatures higher than 50 °C owing to thermal alterations of water-water and water-biopolymer interactions.

  13. Decrease of neutrophils chemiluminescence during exposure to low-power laser infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Zenon P.; Adamek, Mariusz; Krol, Wojciech; Sieron, Aleksander; Cieslar, Grzegorz

    1995-01-01

    The neutrophil is the cell in which phagocyting and transforming of some exogeneous agents results in marked stimulation of nonmitochondrial respiratory chain activity (respiratory burst). In our experiment we focused on determining the level of chemiluminescence (CL) of stimulated neurotrophils during and after irradiation, measuring the photon emission intensity in 6 second's intervals. We used Ga-Al-As pulsed laser (wavelength 904 nm, mean power 8,9 mW, Alpha-Electronics GmbH, Germany) which was placed over the tube containing the suspension of guinea pig peritoneal neurotrophils (2X106 cells/ml). The sensitivity range of used photomultiplier (9514s, THORN EMI, Middlesex, England) was 300-600 nm, which allowed us to measure the CL of neutrophils while being irradiated. The neutrophils were stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and CL intensified by luminol. The decay of luminol-dependent CL of neutrophils may be described by hyperbolic function curve. We switched the laser radiation on for 20 s, 60 s and 300 s and each time we observed the same reaction: the about 20% decrease of intensity of CL immediately after beginning the irradiation. The CL remained on decreased level during the whole period of irradiation reaching immediately the level of CL intensity characteristic for decay curve (20% increase), just after switching off the laser. Only after the longest irradiation time (300 s) we observed CL being higher and inconsistent with decay curve for several minutes. The type of reaction was always the same, regardless to the point of CL decay curve at which laser radiation was applied. The same changes of Cl we obtained irradiating the enzymatic system: horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-luminol - H2O2.

  14. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Cihelka, J.; Matulková, I.

    2010-12-01

    Three types of lasers (double-heterostructure 66 K InAsSb/InAsSbP laser diode, room temperature, multi quantum wells with distributed feedback (MQW with DFB) (GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb based) diode laser and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) (GaSb based) have been characterized using Fourier transform emission spectroscopy and compared. The photoacoustic technique was employed to determine the detection limit of formaldehyde (less than 1 ppmV) for the strongest absorption line of the v3 + v5 band in the emission region of the GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser. The detection limit (less than 10 ppbV) of formaldehyde was achieved in the 2820 cm-1 spectral range in case of InAsSb/InAsSbP laser (fundamental bands of v1, v5). Laser sensitive detection (laser absorption together with high resolution Fourier transform infrared technique including direct laser linewidth measurement, infrared photoacoustic detection of neutral molecules (methane, form-aldehyde) is discussed. Additionally, very sensitive laser absorption techniques of such velocity modulation are discussed for case of laser application in laboratory research of molecular ions. Such sensitive techniques (originally developed for lasers) contributed very much in identifying laboratory microwave spectra of a series of anions (C6H-, C4H-, C2H-, CN-) and their discovery in the interstellar space (C6H-, C4H-).

  15. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (<10-μm) thermal damage was observed for pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation time (Tr ) of the deposited laser energy, with and without applied water at 9.6 um and only with applied water at 2.79 μm. For pulse durations greater than Tr, significantly greater peripheral thermal damage was observed for both IR laser wavelengths with and without the water spray. There was minimal thermal damage for 355-nm laser pulses, however extensive mechanical damage (cracks) was observed. High resolution SR-FTIR is well suited for characterization of the chemical changes that occur due to thermal damage peripheral to laser incisions in proteinaceous hard tissues. Sub

  16. Delivery of midinfrared (6 to 7-microm) laser radiation in a liquid environment using infrared-transmitting optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mackanos, Mark A; Jansen, E Duco; Shaw, Brandon L; Sanghera, Jas S; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Katzir, Abraham

    2003-10-01

    Ablation at wavelengths near lambda = 6.45 microm results in tissue ablation with minimal collateral damage (< 40 microm) yet yields a high ablation rate that is useful for human surgery. However, delivery of this wavelength has been limited to that in air and thus to applications in which the target tissue can be readily exposed. The goal of this study is to investigate the potential of a pulsed infrared laser at lambda = 6.45 microm for noncontact ablation in a liquid environment. To this end we investigated fiber delivery in combination with the use of infrared transparent liquids. Transmission characteristics and damage thresholds for two types of fiber materials (silver halide and arsenic sulfide), for high-power pulsed laser radiation were determined using the Mark III free electron laser. Both fibers had comparable bulk losses (0.54 dB/m and 0.62 dB/m, respectively) while the arsenic sulfide fibers showed more coupling losses (37 versus 27%). Damage thresholds were higher in arsenic sulfide fibers than in silver halide fibers (1.12 GW/cm2 versus 0.54 GW/cm2), but both fibers were sufficient to deliver radiant exposures well above the ablation threshold in tissue. Seven different perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCLs), known for their transparency at lambda = 2.94 microm, were investigated and their optical transmission was determined using Fourier transform infrared and direct Beer's law measurements. All of the PFCLs tested had similar values for an absorption coefficient mu(a) at a given wavelength (mu(a) = 0.05 mm(-1) at lambda = 2.94 microm and mu(a) is approximately 3 mm(-1) at lambda = 6.45 microm). Pump-probe imaging showed the ablation sequence (lambda = 6.45 microm) at the fiber tip in a water environment, which revealed a fast expanding and collapsing bubble. In contrast, the volatile PF-5060 showed no fast bubble expansion and collapse, but rather formation of nontransient gas bubbles. Perfluorodecalin did not show any bubble formation at the radiant

  17. Corneal thermal damage threshold dependence on the exposure duration for near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Chen, Hongxia; Yang, Zaifu; Hu, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    The corneal damage effects induced by 1319-nm transitional near-infrared laser have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. The in vivo corneal damage thresholds (ED50s) were determined in New Zealand rabbits for 1319-nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 75 ms to 10 s. An additional corneal ED50 was determined at 1338 nm for a 5-ms exposure. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 2 mm for all exposure conditions to avoid the influence of spot size on threshold. The ED50s given in terms of the corneal radiant exposure for exposure durations of 5 ms, 75 ms, 0.35 s, 2 s, and 10 s were 39.4, 51.5, 87.2, 156.3, and 311.1 J/cm2, respectively. The 39.4 J/cm2 was derived from the ED50 for 1338 nm (27.0 J/cm2). The ED50s for exposure durations of 75 ms to 10 s were correlated by a power law equation, ED50=128.9t0.36 in J/cm2, where t was the input in the unit of second, with correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997. Enough safe margins existed between the ED50s and the maximum permitted exposures from current laser safety standard.

  18. Retinal thermal damage threshold dependence on exposure duration for the transitional near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Jing, Xiaomin; Chen, Hongxia; Hu, Xiangjun; Yang, Zaifu

    2016-01-01

    The retinal damage effects induced by transitional near-infrared (NIR) lasers have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. In this paper, the in-vivo retinal damage ED50 thresholds were determined in chinchilla grey rabbits for 1319 nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 0.1 s to 10 s. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 5 mm. The ED50 thresholds given in terms of the total intraocular energy (TIE) for exposure durations of 0.1, 1 and 10 s were 1.36, 6.33 and 28.6 J respectively. The ED50 thresholds were correlated by a power law equation, ED50 = 6.31t0.66 [J] where t is time [s], with correlation coefficient R = 0.9999. There exists a sufficient safety margin (factor of 28~60) between the human ED50 thresholds derived from the rabbit and the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values in the current laser safety standards. PMID:27231639

  19. The Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, G. A.; Laughlin, K. B.; Cohen, R. C.; Busarow, K. L.; Gwo, D.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed description is presented for a tunable far infrared laser spectrometer based on frequency mixing of an optically pumped molecular gas laser with tunable microwave radiation in a Schottky point contact diode. The system has been operated on over 30 laser lines in the range 10-100/cm and exhibits a maximum absorption sensitivity near one part in a million. Each laser line can be tuned by + or - 110 GHz with first-order sidebands.

  20. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  1. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  2. Coherent tunable far infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Tunable, CW, FIR radiation has been generated by nonlinear mixing of radiation from two CO2 lasers in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode. The FIR difference-frequency power was radiated from the MIM diode antenna to a calibrated InSb bolometer. FIR power of 200 nW was generated by 250 mW from each of the CO2 lasers. Using the combination of lines from a waveguide CO2 laser, with its larger tuning range, with lines from CO2, N2O, and CO2-isotope lasers promises complete coverage of the entire FIR band with stepwise-tunable CW radiation.

  3. Pollution Encrustation Removal by Means of Combined Ultraviolet and Infrared Laser Radiation: The Application of this Innovative Methodology on the Surface of the Parthenon West Frieze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouli, P.; Frantzikinaki, K.; Papakonstantinou, E.; Zafiropulos, V.; Fotakis, C.

    This study refers to the innovative laser cleaning methodology developed at FORTH IESL on the combination of ultraviolet and infrared laser radiation emitted from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the successful removal of pollution encrustation from marble substrates. The above-mentioned methodology is presented as regards its successful application on the fragile and demanding surface of the Parthenon West Frieze in collaboration with the Committee for the Preservation of the Acropolis Monuments. The aim of this intervention was to remove encrustation, accumulated on the stone due to the atmospheric pollution, without any discoloration or structural alteration to the original surface. The preliminary experiments on all the possible substrates and encrustations present on the surface of the Acropolis monuments and the laser cleaning parameters are presented in detail.

  4. Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

    2010-10-28

    Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations

  5. Quadratic autocorrelation of free-electron laser radiation and photocurrent saturation in two-photon quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.; Drachenko, O.; Winnerl, S.; Helm, M.; Walther, M.

    2006-09-25

    Using the free-electron laser facility FELBE, the authors have studied the influence of the intensity on the quadratic autocorrelation measured with two-photon quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs). At high illumination powers, the shape of the autocorrelation trace is affected by photocurrent saturation of the two-photon QWIP. They describe the saturation mechanism by different analytical models taking account of the photocurrent nonlinearity in analogy to linear QWIPs and give conditions where true quadratic behavior can be observed. While these studies were carried out at 77 K, properties of two-photon QWIPs at room temperature will also be addressed.

  6. Infrared laser writing of MOFs.

    PubMed

    Hirai, K; Sada, K

    2017-05-09

    An infrared (IR) laser machine is used for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Solutions containing metal ions and organic ligands are casted on glass substrates. MOF crystals are formed at the positions the IR laser irradiated, resulting in the patterning of MOFs.

  7. [The influence of pulsed low-intensity laser radiation of the red (635 nm) and infrared (904 nm) spectra on the human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Moskvin, S V; Kliuchnikov, D Iu; Antipov, E V; Volchkov, S E; Kiseleva, O N

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have for a long time been an object of investigation with a view to elucidating the prospects for their application in clinical medicine and cosmetology. One of the approaches to the non-specific regulation of the activity of these cells at the stage of preliminary in vitro combination is the treatment with low-intensity laser radiation (LILR). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using pulsed LILR of the infrared and red spectra for this purpose. We used the 4th passage adhesive MSC cultures based at the umbilical tissue of a donor who gave the informed consent to participate in the study. The source of illumination was a Lazmik-VLOK laser therapeutic apparatus (RU No RZN 2014/1410 dated 06.02.2014) with the matrix laser infrared radiation heads (wavelength 904 nm, light pulse length 108 ns, frequency 1500 Hz). The apparatus was operated either in the multi-frequency Lazmik regime [Moskvin S.V., 2014] with mean power density 0.05 and 0.14 mW/cm2 and the red spectrum (wavelength 635 nm, light pulse length 144 ns, frequency 1500 Hz) or in the multi-frequency Lazmik regime [Moskvin S.V., 2014] with mean power density 0.03 and 0.12. The exposition was 5 min in both regimes. The study has demonstrated that neither the morphological structure nor the viability of mesenchymal stem cells changed under the influence of energy and time parameters used in experiments. The number of cells was shown to slightly increase in comparison with control. The most pronounced effect was documented after illumination with pulse infrared (904 nm) LILR in the multi-frequency Lazmik regime. The maximum effect was observed during a period between days 1 and 3 of cultivation.

  8. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  9. Efficient blue upconversion emission due to confined radiative energy transfer in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 waveguides under infrared-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Shepherd, D. P.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Hassan, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Intense blue upconversion emission at 480 nm has been obtained at room temperature in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 channel waveguides fabricated on a Si substrate, when the sample is excited with an infrared laser at 793 nm. The upconversion mechanism is based on the radiative relaxation of the Nd 3+ ions ( 4F 3/2 → 4I 11/2) at about 1064 nm followed by the absorption of the emitted photons by Tm 3+ ions in the 3H 4 excited state. A coefficient of energy transfer rate as high as 3 × 10 -16 cm 3/s has been deduced using a rate equation analysis, which is the highest reported for Tm-Nd co-doped systems. The confinement of the 1064 nm emitted radiation in the waveguide structure is the main reason of the high energy transfer probability between Nd 3+ and Tm 3+ ions.

  10. Tunable Infrared Semiconductor Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-20

    is a thulium fiber laser that has output of 20Watts at 1.908 µm with a collimated output beam diameter of about 5 mm. With a cylindrical lens, a...the device onto a copper heat sink and then to the cold finger of liquid nitrogen Dewar. In characterization, a thulium fiber laser at 1.908 nm

  11. Recombination-pumped triatomic hydrogen infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saykally, R. J.; Michael, E. A.; Wang, J.; Greene, Chris H.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-infrared laser lines observed in hydrogen/rare gas discharges are assigned to three-body recombination processes involving an electron, a rare gas (He or Ne) atom, and the triatomic hydrogen ion (H3+). Calculations of radiative transitions between neutral H3 Rydberg states support this interpretation, and link it to recent results for hydrogenic/rare gas afterglow plasmas. A mechanism for the population inversion is proposed, and the potential generality and astrophysical implications of such molecular recombination laser systems are briefly discussed.

  12. Banana Dehydration Utilizing Infrared Radiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The enzyme of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize biochemical degradation hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to investigate quality characteristics of bananas dried ...

  13. Effects of clinical infrared laser on superficial radial nerve conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Greathouse, D.G.; Currier, D.P.; Gilmore, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the effects of infrared laser radiation on the sensory nerve conduction of a specified peripheral nerve in man and determine temperature changes in the tissue surrounding the treated nerve. Twenty healthy adults were divided into three groups: control (n = 5); experimental (n = 10), infrared laser radiation at 20 sec/cm2; and experimental (n = 5), infrared laser radiation treatment at 120 sec/cm2. Antidromic sensory nerve conduction studies were performed on the superficial radial nerve of each subject's right forearm. The infrared laser radiation was applied at a fixed intensity for five 1-cm2 segments. Latency, amplitude, and temperature measurements were recorded pretest; posttest; and posttest intervals of 1, 3, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to examine the data. No significant change was noted in the distal sensory latency or amplitude of the evoked sensory potential in either experimental or control groups as a result of the applications of the infrared laser radiation treatment. This study demonstrates that infrared laser used at clinically applied intensities does not alter conduction of sensory nerves nor does it elevate the subcutaneous temperature.

  14. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  15. Infrared laser sclerostomies.

    PubMed

    Ozler, S A; Hill, R A; Andrews, J J; Baerveldt, G; Berns, M W

    1991-08-01

    Four solid-state lasers with three fiberoptic delivery systems were used to perform laser sclerostomies in an acute-injury rabbit model and in fresh human globes. The lasers used were continuous-wave neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, 1.06 microns) and pulsed holmium:yttrium scandium galliam garnet (YSGG) (2.10 microns), erbium:YSGG (2.79 microns), and erbium:YAG (2.94 microns). Thermal damage to tissue and total laser energy required to produce sclerostomies decreased with increasing wavelength. In human tissue using a 600-microns fused silica fiberoptic, maximum thermal damage (greater than or equal to 100 microns) was noted at 1.06 microns with a total energy of 21 J at a power density of 2.5 kW/cm2. In addition, focal damage to the iris and ciliary body was noted at this wavelength. The least amount of thermal damage (15-20 microns) and lowest total energies needed were found at 2.94 microns. A 250-microseconds pulse length and pulse radiant exposures of 3.6 J/cm2 and 14.3 J/cm2 were used for the low hydroxyl-fused silica (500 microns) and zirconium fluoride (250 microns) fiberoptics, respectively. Although zirconium fluoride fibers have high through-put efficiencies that facilitate study of laser tissue interactions at 2.94 microns, problems encountered with fragility and solubility of the bare tip in aqueous media limit its usefulness. A high attenuation rate with the low hydroxyl-fused silica fiber limited its usable length to 35 cm at 2.94 microns. Tissue damage during sclerostomy formation was minimized at 2.94 microns, reaching a maximum at 1.06 microns. Minimizing tissue damage theoretically could decrease subconjunctival scarring and filtration failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  17. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  18. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, N. A. Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I.

    2013-08-15

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

  19. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  20. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  1. Synthesis Of Materials With Infrared And Ultraviolet Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John L.

    1989-05-01

    This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) Infrared (CO2) laser synthesis of silane (SiH4) from disilane (Si2H6); (2) Excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methyl-and chlorosubstituted silanes; and, (3) Excimer (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusions about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application.

  2. Synthesis of materials with infrared and ultraviolet lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John L.

    This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) infrared (CO2) laser synthesis of silane (SiH4) from disilane (Si2H6); (2) excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methly- and chloro-substituted silanes; and (3) exciver (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusins about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application.

  3. Infrared Radiative Properties of Food Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Precisely, infrared radiation is electromagnetic radiation whose wavelength is longer than that of visible light, but shorter than that of terahertz radiation and microwaves. The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum spans roughly three orders of magnitude (750 nm to 100 µm) and has been...

  4. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Pugžlys, A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Andriukaitis, G.; Flöry, T.; Ališauskas, S.; Fedotov, A. B.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared. PMID:25687621

  5. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Pugžlys, A; Stepanov, E A; Andriukaitis, G; Flöry, T; Ališauskas, S; Fedotov, A B; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2015-02-17

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared.

  6. Parametric infrared tunable laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.; Sutter, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric tunable infrared laser system was built to serve as transmitter for the remote detection and density measurement of pollutant, poisonous, or trace gases in the atmosphere. The system operates with a YAG:Nd laser oscillator amplifier chain which pumps a parametric tunable frequency converter. The completed system produced pulse energies of up to 30 mJ. The output is tunable from 1.5 to 3.6 micrometers at linewidths of 0.2-0.5 /cm (FWHM), although the limits of the tuning range and the narrower line crystals presently in the parametric converter by samples of the higher quality already demonstrated is expected to improve the system performance further.

  7. An infrared search for extraterrestrial laser signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of project SETI is on microwave frequencies, where receivers fundamentally have the best sensitivity for the detection of narrow band signals. Such receivers, when coupled to existing radio telescopes, form an optimum system for broad area searches over the sky. Detection of narrow band infrared signals is best done with a laser heterodyne reciever similar in function to a microwave spectral line receiver. A receiver was built for astrophysical observations at 30 THz (10 microns) and the spectrometer is being adapted for SETI work. The receiver uses a small CO2 laser as the local oscillator, a HgCdTe diode as the photomixer, and a multichannel intermediate frequency (IF) filterbank. An advanced multichannel IF processor is now being built to detect infrared line radiation in 1000 spectral channels each 1 MHz wide. When completed this processor will be used with a ground based telescope next year for a survey of several hundred selected stars for narrow band CO2 laser signals at 30 THz.

  8. Combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transforms infrared microspectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to understand spatial heterogeneity in aquatic multispecies biofilms.

    PubMed

    Reuben, Sheela; Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka; Swarup, Sanjay

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the spatial heterogeneity within environmental biofilms can provide an insight into compartmentalization of different functions in biofilm communities. We used a non-destructive and label-free method by combining Synchrotron Radiation-based Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy (SR-FTIR) with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) to distinguish the spatial chemical changes within multispecies biofilms grown from natural storm waters in flow cells. Among the different surfaces tested for biofilm growth and optimal imaging, mylar membranes were most suited and it enabled successful spatial infrared imaging of natural biofilms for obtaining reliable and interpretable FTIR spectra. Time series analysis of biofilm growth showed that influx of water during biofilm growth, results in significant changes in biofilm formation. Early biofilms showed active nutrient acquisition and desiccation tolerance mechanisms corresponding with accumulation of secreted proteins. Statistical approach used for the evaluation of chemical spectra allowed for clustering and classification of various regions of the biofilm. Microheterogeneity was observed in the polymeric components of the biofilm matrix, including cellulose, glycocalyx and dextran-like molecules. Fructan and glycan-rich regions were distinguishable and glycocalyx was abundant in the strongly adhering peripheral regions of biofilms. Inner core showed coexistence of oxygen dimers and ferrihydrite that will likely support growth of Fe (II)-oxidising bacteria. The combined SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and CSLM approach for complex natural biofilms described here will be useful both in understanding heterogeneity of matrix components and in correlating functions of juxtaposed microbial species in complex natural biofilms with physicochemical microenvironment to which they are exposed.

  9. Subsurface optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using continuous-wave near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Successful identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), which are responsible for sexual function, during prostate cancer surgery, will require subsurface detection of the CN beneath a thin fascia layer. This study explores optical nerve stimulation (ONS) in the rat with a fascia layer placed over the CN. Two near-IR diode lasers (1455 nm and 1550 nm lasers) were used to stimulate the CN in CW mode with a 1-mm-diameter spot in 8 rats. The 1455 nm wavelength provides an optical penetration depth (OPD) of ~350 μm, while 1550 nm provides an OPD of ~1000 μm (~3 times deeper than 1455 nm and 1870 nm wavelengths previously tested). Fascia layers with thicknesses of 85 - 600 μm were placed over the CN. Successful ONS was confirmed by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the rat penis at 1455 nm through fascia 110 μm thick and at 1550 nm through fascia 450 μm thick. Higher incident laser power was necessary and weaker and slower ICP responses were observed as fascia thickness was increased. Subsurface ONS of the rat CN at a depth of 450 μm using a 1550 nm laser is feasible.

  10. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  11. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  12. Generating Far-Infrared Radiation By Two-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstain, Shmuel

    1992-01-01

    Far-infrared radiation 1 to 6 GHz generated by two-wave mixing in asymmetrically grown GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple-quantum-well devices. Two near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers phase-locked. Outputs amplified, then combined in semiconductor nonlinear multiple-quantum-well planar waveguide. Necessary to optimize design of device with respect to three factors: high degree of confinement of electromagnetic field in nonlinear medium to maximize power density, phase matching to extend length of zone of interaction between laser beams in non-linear medium, and nonlinear susceptibility. Devices used as tunable local oscillators in heterodyne-detection radiometers.

  13. Strong-field physics with mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    2002-04-01

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 μm wavelength CO2 laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 μm wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO2 lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO2 lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO2 lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science. .

  14. Laser-induced filaments in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared gives rise to unique regimes of nonlinear wave dynamics and reveals in many ways unusual nonlinear-optical properties of materials in this frequency range. The λ 2 scaling of the self-focusing threshold P cr, with radiation wavelength λ, allows the laser powers transmitted by single mid-IR filaments to be drastically increased without the loss of beam continuity and spatial coherence. When extended to the mid-infrared, laser filamentation enables new methods of pulse compression. Often working around the universal physical limitations, it helps generate few-cycle and subcycle field waveforms within an extraordinarily broad range of peak powers, from just a few up to hundreds of P cr. As a part of a bigger picture, laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared offers important physical insights into the general properties of the nonlinear-optical response of matter as a function of the wavelength. Unlike their near-infrared counterparts, which can be accurately described within the framework of perturbative nonlinear optics, mid-infrared filaments often entangle perturbative and nonperturbative nonlinear-optical effects, showing clear signatures of strong-field optical physics. With the role of nonperturbative nonlinear-optical phenomena growing, as a general tendency, with the field intensity and the driver wavelength, extension of laser filamentation to even longer driver wavelengths, toward the long-wavelength infrared, promises a hic sunt dracones land.

  15. Near infrared lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-07-01

    Technology development in flow cytometry has closely tracked laser technology, the light source that flow cytometers almost exclusively use to excite fluorescent probes. The original flow cytometers from the 1970s and 1980s used large water-cooled lasers to produce only one or two laser lines at a time. Modern cytometers can take advantage of the revolution in solid state laser technology to use almost any laser wavelength ranging from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Commercial cytometers can now be equipped with many small solid state lasers, providing almost any wavelength needed for cellular analysis. Flow cytometers are now equipped to analyze 20 or more fluorescent probes simultaneously, requiring multiple laser wavelengths. Instrument developers are now trying to increase this number by designing fluorescent probes that can be excited by laser wavelength at the "edges" of the visible light range, in the near ultraviolet and near-infrared region. A variety of fluorescent probes have been developed that excite with violet and long wavelength ultraviolet light; however, the near-infrared range (660-800 nm) has yet seen only exploitation in flow cytometry. Fortunately, near-infrared laser diodes and other solid state laser technologies appropriate for flow cytometry have been in existence for some time, and can be readily incorporated into flow cytometers to accelerate fluorescent probe development. The near infrared region represents one of the last "frontiers" to maximize the number of fluorescent probes that can be analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, near infrared fluorescent probes used in biomedical tracking and imaging could also be employed for flow cytometry with the correct laser wavelengths. This review describes the available technology, including lasers, fluorescent probes and detector technology optimal for near infrared signal detection.

  16. Biological applications of synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Augusto; Cricenti, Antonio; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; Petibois, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Extremely brilliant infrared (IR) beams provided by synchrotron radiation sources are now routinely used in many facilities with available commercial spectrometers coupled to IR microscopes. Using these intense non-thermal sources, a brilliance two or three order of magnitude higher than a conventional source is achievable through small pinholes (<10 μm) with a high signal to-noise ratio. IR spectroscopy is a powerful technique to investigate biological systems and offers many new imaging opportunities. The field of infrared biological imaging covers a wide range of fundamental issues and applied researches such as cell imaging or tissue imaging. Molecular maps with a spatial resolution down to the diffraction limit may be now obtained with a synchrotron radiation IR source also on thick samples. Moreover, changes of the protein structure are detectable in an IR spectrum and cellular molecular markers can be identified and used to recognize a pathological status of a tissue. Molecular structure and functions are strongly correlated and this aspect is particularly relevant for imaging. We will show that the brilliance of synchrotron radiation IR sources may enhance the sensitivity of a molecular signal obtained from small biosamples, e.g., a single cell, containing extremely small amounts of organic matter. We will also show that SR IR sources allow to study chemical composition and to identify the distribution of organic molecules in cells at submicron resolution is possible with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the recent availability of two-dimensional IR detectors promises to push forward imaging capabilities in the time domain. Indeed, with a high current synchrotron radiation facility and a Focal Plane Array the chemical imaging of individual cells can be obtained in a few minutes. Within this framework important results are expected in the next years using synchrotron radiation and Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources for spectro-microscopy and spectral

  17. Hard tooth tissue removal by short and long Er:YAG or Er,Cr:YSGG mid-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Dostálová, T.; Remeš, M.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Fibrich, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hard dental tissue removal by laser radiation is an alternative treatment to conventional dental-drilling procedures. The advantages of this therapy are fast and localized treatment of hard dental tissue and painlessness. The most effective systems for those purposes are Er-lasers generating radiation at wavelengths of around 3 μm. The aim of this study was qualitative and quantitative examination of human dentin and ivory tissue removal by pulsed free-running (FR) and Q-switched (QSW) Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser radiations. From the obtained results it follows that generally Er:YAG laser has lower threshold for the tissue removal in both FR and QSW regimes. Furthermore, the FR Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG radiation can be effective for both dentin and ivory ablation and can prepare smooth cavities without side effects. The QSW regime is useful preferably for precise ablation of a starting tooth defect and for the part of the tooth very close to the gum. This regime is excellent for micro-preparation or for tooth treatment of children.

  18. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  19. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  20. [Infrared spectroscopy based on quantum cascade lasers].

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhong-Quan; Chen, Gang; Peng, Chen; Yuan, Wei-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are promising infrared coherent sources. Thanks to the quantum theory and band-gap engineering, QCL can access the wavelength in the range from 3 to 100 microm. Since the fingerprint spectrum of most gases are located in the mid-infrared range, mid-infrared quantum cascade laser based gas sensing technique has become the research focus world wide because of its high power, narrow linewidth and fast scanning. Recent progress in the QCL technology leads to a great improvement in laser output power and efficiency, which stimulates a fast development in the infrared laser spectroscopy. The present paper gives a broad review on the QCL based spectroscopy techniques according to their working principles. A discussion on their applications in gas sensing and explosive detecting is also given at the end of the paper.

  1. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  2. Reflected laser radiation - relevance for laser safety?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeh, M. F.; Braunreuther, S.; Daub, R.; Stadler, T.

    Safety is compulsory in today's production lines. Those lines often use laser material processing applications. The highest risk for the operator or a bystander of a laser application is the exposure to the direct beam. With the present laser beam intensities, an accident at least causes sudden blindness or severe burns. Even if the process works correctly, which means the beam is always oriented towards the workpiece, the scattered and reflected parts of the laser beam still can be powerful enough to cause serious harm. The state-of-the-art safety measures are passive laser safety cabins around the application. Because of the high intensities and the low beam divergence of the highly brilliant laser beam sources, they cannot guarantee a safe use of these laser applications. An option is to use active laser safety barriers that react to an impinging laser beam on its surface. A new approach to guarantee laser safety is to monitor the system and watch for incidents, to ensure that the laser spot never reaches the safety barrier. Assuming that accidents with the direct laser beam cannot occur, the passive safety measures still have to withstand the reflected laser radiation. In this paper a theoretical model is presented with which the energy distribution in a hemisphere above a deep-welding-process can be calculated. The model was calibrated and validated with intensity measurements during a welding process. The results of the measurement can be used to develop a process-tailored safety cabin. Because of the increased mobility such a system increases the flexibility of the production cell. Furthermore, the costs for laser-safety may be decreased significantly.

  3. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  4. Satellite and lunar laser ranging in infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courde, Clement; Torre, Jean-Marie; Samain, Etienne; Martinot-Lagarde, Gregoire; Aimar, Mourad; Albanese, Dominique; Maurice, Nicolas; Mariey, Hervé; Viot, Hervé; Exertier, Pierre; Fienga, Agnes; Viswanathan, Vishnu

    2017-05-01

    We report on the implementation of a new infrared detection at the Grasse lunar laser ranging station and describe how infrared telemetry improves the situation. We present our first results on the lunar reflectors and show that infrared detection permits us to densify the observations and allows measurements during the new and the full moon periods. We also present the benefit obtained on the ranging of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites and on RadioAstron which have a very elliptic orbit.

  5. Improved source of infrared radiation for spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Rao, K. N.

    1971-01-01

    Radiation from a crimped V-groove in the electrically heated metallic element of a high-resolution infrared spectrometer is more intense than that from plane areas adjacent to the element. Radiation from the vee and the flat was compared by alternately focusing on the entrance slit of a spectrograph.

  6. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-12-18

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  8. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  9. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  10. Lunar laser ranging in infrared at the Grasse laser station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courde, C.; Torre, J. M.; Samain, E.; Martinot-Lagarde, G.; Aimar, M.; Albanese, D.; Exertier, P.; Fienga, A.; Mariey, H.; Metris, G.; Viot, H.; Viswanathan, V.

    2017-06-01

    For many years, lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations using a green wavelength have suffered an inhomogeneity problem both temporally and spatially. This paper reports on the implementation of a new infrared detection at the Grasse LLR station and describes how infrared telemetry improves this situation. Our first results show that infrared detection permits us to densify the observations and allows measurements during the new and the full Moon periods. The link budget improvement leads to homogeneous telemetric measurements on each lunar retro-reflector. Finally, a surprising result is obtained on the Lunokhod 2 array which attains the same efficiency as Lunokhod 1 with an infrared laser link, although those two targets exhibit a differential efficiency of six with a green laser link.

  11. Mid-infrared solid-state lasers and laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of NASA-Langley's objectives for the development of advanced lasers and laser materials systems applicable to remote sensing in the mid-IR range. Prominent among current concerns are fiber-optic spectroscopy, eye-safe solid-state lasers for both Doppler sensing and mid-IR wavelength-generation laser pumping, and nonlinear optics generating tunable mid-IR radiation. Ho:YAG lasers are noted to exhibit intrinsic advantages for the desired applications, and are pumpable by GaAlAs laser diodes with a quantum efficiency approaching 2.

  12. Remote Minefield Detection Using Infrared Laser Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    Technology of Coherent Infrared Radar, pp. 60, 1981. 22. R.M. Hardesty , T.R. Lawrence, R.A. Richter, et al., "Ground- Based Coherent Lidar Measurement...vegetation damage related to their deployment. High- resolution imaging RMD lidar systems can use this information as a further aid to minefield...example a CO2 laser- based system can be called a ladar, a lidar , an optical radar, or an infrared radar. The most commonly used expressions are lidar and

  13. Quantum-cascade lasers enable infrared sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, John F. )

    2003-05-01

    Quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor-injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well heterostructure. They are designed using band-structure engineering and grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The emission wavelength of a QCL is primarily a function of quantum-well thickness--thinner quantum wells lead to shorter wavelengths--and is essentially independent of the material bandgap. Quantum-cascade lasers can be designed to operate at any wavelength from 3.5 m (infrared) to 67 m (terahertz region) and are continuously tunable through ranges of a few inverse centimeters.1, 2, 3 This capability makes them well suited for spectroscopy in the infrared (see Laser Focus World, August 1999, p. 40).

  14. Optically Pumped Far Infrared Molecular Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    third and fifth order nonlinear processes can exceed first order laser processes. An experimental study of the generation of a 22.653 GHz signal (the...prime, practical sources. There are no counterparts in the far infrared of devices like IMPATTs, magnetrons, laser diodes, gyrotrons , etc. While in...1,000 GHz , the only proven, high spectral quality, modest technology, coherent source available to all researchers in the area, is the opti- cally

  15. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G.

    1965-01-01

    Wedge immersed-thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The thermistor flakes are immersed by optical contact on a wedge-shaped germanium lens whose narrow dimension is clamped between two complementary wedge-shaped germanium blocks bonded with a suitable adhesive.

  16. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the Earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10 power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the Earth's shadow.

  17. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  18. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  19. Plasmonically enhanced thermomechanical detection of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Zhu, Hai; Reed, Jason C; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2013-04-10

    Nanoplasmonics has been an attractive area of research due to its ability to localize and manipulate freely propagating radiation on the nanometer scale for strong light-matter interactions. Meanwhile, nanomechanics has set records in the sensing of mass, force, and displacement. In this work, we report efficient coupling between infrared radiation and nanomechanical resonators through nanoantenna enhanced thermoplasmonic effects. Using efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy to mechanical energy in this plasmo-thermomechanical platform with a nanoslot plasmonic absorber integrated directly on a nanobeam mechanical resonator, we demonstrate room-temperature detection of nanowatt level power fluctuations in infrared radiation. We expect our approach, which combines nanoplasmonics with nanomechanical resonators, to lead to optically controlled nanomechanical systems enabling unprecedented functionality in biomolecular and toxic gas sensing and on-chip mass spectroscopy.

  20. Lasers and infrared thermography: advantageous cooperation.

    PubMed

    Vainer, Boris G

    2016-12-01

    In a brief review, the beneficial outcomes that have arisen from simultaneous use of laser- and infrared thermography (IRT)-based techniques are demonstrated. The most recent literary and original experimental results collected from different research and practical areas are presented. It is shown that modern IRT acts as an indispensable laser partner in various biomedical and many other applications and technologies. And vice versa, the laser-based methods and techniques often serve as an appropriate research instrument enriching IRT measurement data with independently obtained information.

  1. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  2. Spatial filtering of radiation from wire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, E. E.; Solyankin, P. M.; Angeluts, A. A.; Lee, A.; Kosareva, O. G.; Ozheredov, I. A.; Balakin, A. V.; Andreeva, V. A.; Panov, N. A.; Aksenov, V. N.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2017-04-01

    In this letter we propose an approach to obtain directive radiation from wire lasers with subwavelength transverse dimensions and length much larger than the radiation wavelength (wire lasers) based on spatial filtering of their radiation using a combination of a spherical lens and a diaphragm. Theoretical modeling based on the antenna model for wire lasers shows that a directive beam with the uniform phase front can be formed when the diaphragm separates the maximum of the image field of the laser created by the lens. We demonstrate spatial filtering of wire laser radiation experimentally using a terahertz quantum cascade laser.

  3. Subsurface thermal coagulation of tissues using near infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Hung Jack

    Noninvasive laser therapy is currently limited primarily to cosmetic dermatological applications such as skin resurfacing, hair removal, tattoo removal and treatment of vascular birthmarks. In order to expand applications of noninvasive laser therapy, deeper optical penetration of laser radiation in tissue as well as more aggressive cooling of the tissue surface is necessary. The near-infrared laser wavelength of 1075 nm was found to be the optimal laser wavelength for creation of deep subsurface thermal lesions in liver tissue, ex vivo, with contact cooling, preserving a surface tissue layer of 2 mm. Monte Carlo light transport, heat transfer, and Arrhenius integral thermal damage simulations were conducted at this wavelength, showing good agreement between experiment and simulations. Building on the initial results, our goal is to develop new noninvasive laser therapies for application in urology, specifically for treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Various laser balloon probes including side-firing and diffusing fibers were designed and tested for both transvaginal and transurethral approaches to treatment. The transvaginal approach showed the highest feasibility. To further increase optical penetration depth, various types and concentrations of optical clearing agents were also explored. Three cadavers studies were performed to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of laser treatment for SUI.

  4. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  5. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  6. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  7. Visible and Near-Infrared Dissociation Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    NUMBERS(s J. G. Eden N00014-82-K-0209 S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10 PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK 9., Dent. of Electrical and Computer...of the viability of this system as a tunable green amplifier. B. Cdl Discharge-Pumped Laser Tunable, efficient sources of coherent radiation in the...in the gain spectrum. As a demonstration of the tunability of new laser media in the visible, an injection locking experiment has been performed on a

  8. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  9. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  10. Laser radiation propagation in the hard and soft dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Sulc, Jan; Cerny, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Cech, Miroslav; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the penetration effect of the near and mid-infrared laser radiation. For this reason the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and alexandrite laser systems were used in the experiments. The spread of the laser radiation energy in the hard dental tissue surrounding the root canal was evaluated and the possible bactericidal effect of these various laser wavelengths was analyzed. During the measurements, three experimental arrangements were used. The energy transport through the tooth tissue was observed for the frontal and side experimental layout. It was demonstrated that due to the absorption in the hydroxyapatite and water content in the dentin, the Er:YAG laser radiation is fully, and the Nd:YAG is partly absorbed in the root canal's wall. On the other hand, it was proved that the alexandrite laser radiation spreads through the canal system space and leaks into the surrounding tooth tissues. All laser radiation can be efficiently used for killing dental bacteria but the spreading of their radiation in the tooth tissues is different.

  11. Wheat germ stabilization by infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Gili, Renato D; Palavecino, Pablo M; Cecilia Penci, M; Martinez, Marcela L; Ribotta, Pablo D

    2017-01-01

    Wheat germ has an important enzymatic activity, being lipases the enzymes which cause the highest impact in the reduction of shelf life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of infrared radiation on wheat germ stabilization in an attempt to extend the shelf life. The effects of treatment time, gap (sample distance to IR emitters) and infrared radiation intensity on wheat germ were analyzed through response surface methodology. Final moisture content, final temperature, color of germ and germ oil quality parameters: free fatty acid content changes and total tocopherol content were the responses evaluated using a Box-Behnken design. A combination of an infrared radiation intensity of 4800 W/m(2), a 3 min treatment and 0.2 m emitter-sample distance were the best processing condition to stabilize the wheat germ without significantly reduction of the tocopherol content. A confirmatory experiment was conducted with these optimal conditions, and the heat-treated and raw germ samples were stored for 90 days at room temperature in three layer packages to protect them against light and oxygen. The oil quality parameters indicated that the raw germ had a shelf-life of about 15 days, with the heat-treated wheat germ maintaining its quality for at least 90 days under these stored conditions.

  12. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  13. Alternative infrared lasers for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Lawrence S.; Font, David E.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Treat, Michael R.

    1990-06-01

    There are substantial technical problems attendant to the removal of sessile polyps from the lumen of thin walled gastrointestinal organs such as the colon. A laser system which is capable of precise and circumscribed mucosal tissue vaporization would be useful for this task. Because of technical shortcomings of existing medical laser systems, we investigated the possibilities of mid-infrared lasers which could take advantage of large water absorption peaks in the 2 micron region to produce precise vaporization while retaining fiberoptic transmissibility. In addition to a high absorption wavelength, pulsed energy delivery contributes to precise vaporizing capabilities. The laser system that best fits our criteria is the 2.15 micron thulium-holmium- chromium:YAG which produces 200 microsecond pulses of energies up to 1 joule at firing rates up to 6 Hz. The laser output is transmitted efficiently via low hydroxyl quartz fibers. Ablative efficiency, defined here as the slope of the vaporization depth versus energy, reveals that the THC:YAG produces approximately 3 times greater depth of vaporization per joule than the cw Nd:YAG. On average, the Nd:YAG produced 1.5 times the amount of thermal damage as the THC:YAG for a given depth of vaporization. The THC:YAG laser should have an important clinical role since its use could reduce the risk of perforation in endoscopic laser procedures such as the removal of sessile polyps.

  14. Laser undulated synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baine, Michael A. J.

    2000-07-01

    This work will address the practicality of using lasers to undulate electron beams for the production of tunable, short pulsed, monochromatic, synchrotron radiation. An x-ray source based on this mechanism, referred to as a Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS), has several attractive features: (1)x-rays can be generated with an electron beam whose energy is a factor of 100 smaller than competing synchrotron sources that use magnetic undulators, (2)the pulse length can be made extremely short (<100fs) by using short pulsed lasers, (3)the polarization can be controlled by changing the polarization of the incident laser, (4)the bandwidth can be quite narrow (<1%), and (5)the resultant x-rays are well collimated (θ < .1 rad for γ > 10) in the direction of the electron beam. These factors combine to produce one of the brightest (>1018 J/s mrad mm2 1%BW) sources of x-rays available. The most attractive feature, however, is its compact size and low cost, which suit it well for applications in Medicine, Biology, and Physics. The problem will be treated in two parts: analysis of nonlinear Thomson scattering for arbitrary interaction geometry of intense lasers and relativistic electron beams, and description of a proof-of-principle experiment carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  15. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  16. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  17. Oxide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin; Jiang, Xin

    2011-06-01

    We present an overview of rare-earth doped heavy metal oxide and oxy-fluoride glasses which show promise as host materials for lasers operating in the 2-5 μm spectral region for medical, military and sensing applications. By engineering glass composition and purity, tellurite and germanate glasses can support transmission up to and beyond 5 μm and can have favourable thermal, mechanical and environmental stability compared to fluoride glasses. We discuss techniques for glass purification and water removal for enhanced infrared transmission. By comparing the material properties of the glass, and spectroscopic performance of selected rare-earth dopant ions we can identify promising compositions for fibre and bulk lasers in the mid-infrared. Tellurite glass has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable host material for efficient and compact lasers in the {2 μm spectral region in fibre and bulk form and the next challenge is to extend the operating range further into the infrared region where silica fibre is not sufficiently transparent, and provide an alternative to fluoride glass and fibre.

  18. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  19. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  20. Infrared radiation from an extrasolar planet.

    PubMed

    Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara; Richardson, L Jeremy; Harrington, Joseph

    2005-04-07

    A class of extrasolar giant planets--the so-called 'hot Jupiters' (ref. 1)--orbit within 0.05 au of their primary stars (1 au is the Sun-Earth distance). These planets should be hot and so emit detectable infrared radiation. The planet HD 209458b (refs 3, 4) is an ideal candidate for the detection and characterization of this infrared light because it is eclipsed by the star. This planet has an anomalously large radius (1.35 times that of Jupiter), which may be the result of ongoing tidal dissipation, but this explanation requires a non-zero orbital eccentricity (approximately 0.03; refs 6, 7), maintained by interaction with a hypothetical second planet. Here we report detection of infrared (24 microm) radiation from HD 209458b, by observing the decrement in flux during secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the star. The planet's 24-microm flux is 55 +/- 10 microJy (1sigma), with a brightness temperature of 1,130 +/- 150 K, confirming the predicted heating by stellar irradiation. The secondary eclipse occurs at the midpoint between transits of the planet in front of the star (to within +/- 7 min, 1sigma), which means that a dynamically significant orbital eccentricity is unlikely.

  1. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  2. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  3. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  4. Mid-Infrared Laser Orbital Septal Tightening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Eugene A.; Li, Michael; Lazarow, Frances B.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed facial aesthetic surgeries. While myriad techniques exist to improve the appearance of the lower eyelids, there is no clear consensus on the optimal management of the orbital septum. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for orbital septal tightening, and to determine whether modest use of this laser would provide some degree of clinical efficacy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Direct laser irradiation of ex vivo bovine tissue was used to determine appropriate laser dosimetry using infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography before conducting a pilot clinical study in 5 patients. Laser irradiation of the lower eyelid orbital septum was performed through a transconjunctival approach. Standardized preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken for each patient and evaluated by 6 unbiased aesthetic surgeons. EXPOSURE Use of the Ho:YAG laser for orbital septal tightening. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE To determine appropriate laser dosimetry, infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography were used to monitor temperature and tissue shape changes of ex vivo bovine tissue that was subjected to direct laser irradiation. For the clinical study, preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated by 6 surgeons on a 10-point Likert scale. RESULTS Optical coherence tomography demonstrated that laser irradiation of bovine tissue to a temperature range of 60°C to 80°C resulted in an increase in thickness of up to 2-fold. There were no complications or adverse cosmetic outcomes in the patient study. Patient satisfaction with the results of surgery averaged 7 on a 10-point Likert scale. For 3 patients, 3 (50%) of the evaluators believed there was a mild improvement in appearance of the lower eyelids after surgery. The remaining patients were thought to have no significant changes. CONCLUSIONS AND

  5. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  6. A tunable mid-infrared laser source for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Many remote sensing needs can be effectively addressed with a tunable laser source in the mid infrared. One potential laser source is an optical parametric oscillator and amplifier system pumped by a near infrared solid state laser. Advantages of such a system and progress made at NASA Langley Research Center to date on such a system are described.

  7. [The study of transpiration influence on plant infrared radiation character].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Zhang, Shuan-Qin; Pan, Jia-Liang; Lian, Chang-Chun; Yang, Hui

    2012-07-01

    Studying vegetation infrared radiation character is the base of developing infrared camouflage and concealment technology of ground military target. Accurate fusion of target and background can be achieved by simulating formation mechanism of vegetation infrared radiation character. Leaf transpiration is characteristic physiological mechanism of vegetation and one of the main factors that influence its infrared radiation character. In the present paper, physical model of leaf energy balance is set up. Based on this model the influence of plant transpiration on leaf temperature is analyzed and calculated. The daily periodic variation of transpiration, leaf temperature and infrared radiation character of typical plants such as camphor tree and holly is actually measured with porometer and infrared thermal imaging system. By contrasting plant leaf with dryness leaf, experimental data indicates that plant transpiration can regulate leaf energy balance effectively and control leaf temperature in a reasonable range and suppress deep range variation of leaf infrared radiation character.

  8. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  9. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  10. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  11. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  12. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  13. Infrared synchrotron radiation instrumentation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) in the wavelength range from 1 μm to ˜1 cm has now been used quite extensively both in Japan at UVSOR, Okasaki and in the United States at the NSLS, Brookhaven, following an earlier program at the first infrared beamline at Daresbury in England. Elsewhere around the world, several new beamlines are under construction or planned-including a new facility at Daresbury (UK), and those at Lund (Sweden), SuperACO (France), ADONE (Italy), and the ALS (USA). The use of IRSR poses many new challenges, none the least of which is the fact that the radiation covers four decades of energy and is also very divergent and subject to diffraction. However the advantages are particularly significant due to the 1000-fold increase in brightness available over conventional sources in a region where detectors become a limiting factor. In addition, IRSR is also highly spatially coherent allowing the possibility of a new class of interferometers based on wave front division. We will discuss this and other instrumentation issues as they critically relate to experiments. The applications discussed will be in the areas of surface vibrational spectroscopy, both in ultrahigh vacuum and in electrochemical cells, and in areas which use the pulsed nature of the source both for fast response studies and for pump-probe studies.

  14. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  15. Infrared Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.

    1991-12-31

    Infrared Synchrotron Radiation (IRSR) is a blossoming field which has three working beamlines, U4IR at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, and two at the Institute of Molecular Sciences in Okasaki, Japan with extensive research projects. There are also several new beamlines in the planning and development stages, both in the United States and abroad. IRSR offers a unique way to access the far infrared (30 {mu} to approx 1 mm) which is a notoriously difficult region to work in. In particular, experiments that demand high brightness are well suited to IRSR just as they are in the x-ray region. The central issue in all of the experiments to data has been good signal to noise, which has been the focus of the instrumentation improvements at the U4IR beamline. A commercial Fourier transform instrument was the chosen spectrometer. Then modifications were made in order to expand the usable region of the existing experiments, in both the far and near infrared. As an example of the performance of this beamline, I will focus on the reflection absorption spectroscopy results for adsorbates on clean surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. 15 refs.

  16. Infrared Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1991-01-01

    Infrared Synchrotron Radiation (IRSR) is a blossoming field which has three working beamlines, U4IR at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, and two at the Institute of Molecular Sciences in Okasaki, Japan with extensive research projects. There are also several new beamlines in the planning and development stages, both in the United States and abroad. IRSR offers a unique way to access the far infrared (30 {mu} to approx 1 mm) which is a notoriously difficult region to work in. In particular, experiments that demand high brightness are well suited to IRSR just as they are in the x-ray region. The central issue in all of the experiments to data has been good signal to noise, which has been the focus of the instrumentation improvements at the U4IR beamline. A commercial Fourier transform instrument was the chosen spectrometer. Then modifications were made in order to expand the usable region of the existing experiments, in both the far and near infrared. As an example of the performance of this beamline, I will focus on the reflection absorption spectroscopy results for adsorbates on clean surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. 15 refs.

  17. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  18. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion.

  19. Probe And Enhancement Of SBS Based Phonons In Infrared Fibers Using Waveguide Coupled External Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung; Chong, Yat C.; Fong, Chee K.

    1989-06-01

    Interaction of GHz and MHz radiation with CO2 laser propagation in a silver halide fiber using sBs based phonon coupling is furthet investigated. The external signal serves to both probe and enhance laser generated sBs phonons in the fiber. Efficient coupling of microwave radiation into the fiber is accomplished by placing the fiber in a hollow metallic waveguide, designed and constructed to transmit the dominant mode in the 0.9-2.0 GHz band. MHz radiation is conveniently coupled into the fiber using the guided microwave radiation as carrier. Phonon emissions from the fiber under CO2 laser pumping are first established on a spectrum analyzer; low frequency generators ale then tuned to match these frequencies and their maximum interaction recorded. Such interactions are systematically studied by monitoring the amplitude and waveform of the reflected and transmitted laser pulse at various power levels and frequencies of the externally coupled radiation. A plot of reflected laser power versus incident laser power reveals a distinct sBs generated phonon threshold. Variouslaunch directions of the GHz and MHz radiation with respect to the direction of laser propagation are realized to verify theory governing sBs interactions. The MHz radiation and its associated phonons in the fiber are convenient tools for probing sBs related phenomenon in infrared fibers.

  20. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  1. Treatment with near-infrared radiation promotes apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    OBAYASHI, TOMOHIKO; FUNASAKA, KOHEI; OHNO, EIZABURO; MIYAHARA, RYOJI; HIROOKA, YOSHIKI; HAMAGUCHI, MICHINARI; GOTO, HIDEMI; SENGA, TAKESHI

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of human mortality worldwide. Radiation and chemotherapy are commonly used for cancer treatment; however, the combination of these therapies and surgery do not completely eradicate cancer cells. Near-infrared radiation (NIR) is a low-energy form of radiation that exerts multiple effects on mammalian cells. Previous studies have reported that NIR induces DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis of cancer cells. In the present study, a 915-nm laser was used to examine the effects of NIR on pancreatic cancer cells. Irradiation of pancreatic cancer cells using a 915-nm laser significantly induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition, the combination of gemcitabine treatment and a 915-nm laser synergistically increased the number of apoptotic cells. The results of the present study indicate the use of infrared irradiation and chemotherapy may be a possible therapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26622761

  2. Effect of microstructure on the coupled electromagnetic-thermo-mechanical response of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-estane energetic aggregates to infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Judith A.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-09-28

    The coupled electromagnetic (EM)-thermo-mechanical response of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-estane energetic aggregates under laser irradiation and high strain rate loads has been investigated for various aggregate sizes and binder volume fractions. The cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals are modeled with a dislocation density-based crystalline plasticity formulation and the estane binder is modeled with finite viscoelasticity through a nonlinear finite element approach that couples EM wave propagation with laser heat absorption, thermal conduction, and inelastic deformation. Material property and local behavior mismatch at the crystal-binder interfaces resulted in geometric scattering of the EM wave, electric field and laser heating localization, high stress gradients, dislocation density, and crystalline shear slip accumulation. Viscous sliding in the binder was another energy dissipation mechanism that reduced stresses in aggregates with thicker binder ligaments and larger binder volume fractions. This investigation indicates the complex interactions between EM waves and mechanical behavior, for accurate predictions of laser irradiation of heterogeneous materials.

  3. Infrared radiation of thin plastic films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, C. L.; Chan, C. K.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental study is presented for infrared radiation characteristics of thin plastic films with and without a metal substrate. On the basis of the thin-film analysis, a simple analytical technique is developed for determining band-averaged optical constants of thin plastic films from spectral normal transmittance data for two different film thicknesses. Specifically, the band-averaged optical constants of polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide were obtained from transmittance measurements of films with thicknesses in the range of 0.25 to 3 mil. The spectral normal reflectance and total normal emittance of the film side of singly aluminized films are calculated by use of optical constants; the results compare favorably with measured values.

  4. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud using a vertical two steam approximation was modeled. The emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemisphere flux escaping from the cloud top has a gradient from the center to the edges which brighten when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8 to 13.6 micrometer region show that there is cooling from the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds were computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two stream approximation. It is suggested that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud top temperature.

  5. Nanoantennas for visible and infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Paolo; Huang, Jer-Shing; Hecht, Bert

    2012-02-01

    Nanoantennas for visible and infrared radiation can strongly enhance the interaction of light with nanoscale matter by their ability to efficiently link propagating and spatially localized optical fields. This ability unlocks an enormous potential for applications ranging from nanoscale optical microscopy and spectroscopy over solar energy conversion, integrated optical nanocircuitry, opto-electronics and density-of-states engineering to ultra-sensing as well as enhancement of optical nonlinearities. Here we review the current understanding of metallic optical antennas based on the background of both well-developed radiowave antenna engineering and plasmonics. In particular, we discuss the role of plasmonic resonances on the performance of nanoantennas and address the influence of geometrical parameters imposed by nanofabrication. Finally, we give a brief account of the current status of the field and the major established and emerging lines of investigation in this vivid area of research.

  6. Infrared radiation of thin plastic films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, C. L.; Chan, C. K.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental study is presented for infrared radiation characteristics of thin plastic films with and without a metal substrate. On the basis of the thin-film analysis, a simple analytical technique is developed for determining band-averaged optical constants of thin plastic films from spectral normal transmittance data for two different film thicknesses. Specifically, the band-averaged optical constants of polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide were obtained from transmittance measurements of films with thicknesses in the range of 0.25 to 3 mil. The spectral normal reflectance and total normal emittance of the film side of singly aluminized films are calculated by use of optical constants; the results compare favorably with measured values.

  7. Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infrared Radiation.

    PubMed

    Dyson, F J

    1960-06-03

    If extraterrestrial intelligent beings exist and have reached a high level of technical development, one by-product of their energy metabolism is likely to be the large-scale conversion of starlight into far-infrared radiation. It is proposed that a search for sources of infrared radiation should accompany the recently initiated search for interstellar radio communications.

  8. New infrared solid state laser materials for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Tunable infrared laser light may serve as a useful means by which to detect the presence of the targeted effluents. Since optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have proven to be a versatile method of generating coherent light from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, this technology is a promising choice by which to service the CALIOPE applications. In addition, since some uncertainty remains regarding the precise wavelengths and molecules that will be targeted, the deployment of OPOs retains the greatest amount of wavelength flexibility. Another approach that the authors are considering is that of generating tunable infrared radiation directly with a diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL). One important advantage of a DPSSL is that it offers flexible pulse format modes that can be tailored to meet the needs of a particular application and target molecule. On the other hand, direct generation by a tunable DPSSL will generally be able to cover a more limited wavelength range than is possible with OPO technology. In support of the CALIOPE objectives the authors are exploring the potential for laser action among a class of materials comprised of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals (i.e., ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe). The Cr{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} dopants were selected as the most favorable candidates, on the basis of their documented spectral properties in the scientific literature. Thus far, the authors have characterized the absorption and emission properties of these ions in the ZnS and ZnSe crystals. The absorption spectra are used to determine the preferred wavelength at which the crystal should be pumped, while the emission spectra reveal the extent of the tuning range potentially offered by the material. In addition, measurements of the emission lifetime as a function of temperature turn out to be quite useful, since this data is suggestive of the room temperature emission yield.

  9. Method for generation of tunable far infrared radiation from two-dimensional plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Tunable far infrared radiation is produced from two-dimensional plasmons in a heterostructure, which provides large inversion-layer electron densities at the heterointerface, without the need for a metallic grating to couple out the radiation. Instead, a light interference pattern is produced on the planar surface of the heterostructure using two coherent laser beams of a wavelength selected to be strongly absorbed by the heterostructure in order to penetrate through the inversion layer. The wavelength of the far infrared radiation coupled out can then be readily tuned by varying the angle between the coherent beams, or varying the wavelength of the two interfering coherent beams, thus varying the periodicity of the photoconductivity grating to vary the wavelength of the far infrared radiation being coupled out.

  10. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development.

  11. Unidirectionality of an optically pumped far infrared ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Kyoji; Higashida, Noriyoshi; Sokabe, Noburu; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1995-02-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made on the unidirectional operation of an optically pumped far infrared ring laser. A ring laser operating on the 119 μm line of CH 3OH experiences reversal of output direction in either case of (a) the pump frequency being tuned across the line center of the infrared pump transition or (b) the fir cavity being tuned across the far infrared line center. A model based on two-mode laser theory predicts the output directionality of the optically pumped fir ring laser.

  12. Infrared radiation budget of the Harmattan haze. [West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Weickmann, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared in situ observations of the West African Harmaltan Haze during the 1974 GATE field phase were conducted to determine the radiative properties of the tropospheric phenomenon and to develop a calculation model for radiative transfer through the haze. Radiometric observations of the dust haze were analyzed for haze infrared transmission. Infrared and tropospheric cooling rates are given together with the haze volume absorption rate.

  13. Infrared radiation budget of the Harmattan haze. [West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Weickmann, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared in situ observations of the West African Harmaltan Haze during the 1974 GATE field phase were conducted to determine the radiative properties of the tropospheric phenomenon and to develop a calculation model for radiative transfer through the haze. Radiometric observations of the dust haze were analyzed for haze infrared transmission. Infrared and tropospheric cooling rates are given together with the haze volume absorption rate.

  14. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  15. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-07-28

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols.

  16. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols.

  17. Applications of the Infrared Free Electron Laser in Nonlinear and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain

    1990-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) have been envisioned as novel radiation sources tunable over a wide spectral range. In this dissertation I report two types of experiments that used the infrared FEL, Mark III, to study nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers and the possibility of long lived vibrational excitations in acetanilide, a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal.

  18. Transcranial low-level infrared laser irradiation ameliorates depression induced by reserpine in rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham S

    2016-11-01

    Transcranial low-level infrared laser is a modality of therapy based on the principle of photons delivered in a non-invasive manner through the skull for the treatment of some neurological conditions such as psychological disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and neurodegenerative diseases among others. In the present study, effects of low-level infrared laser irradiation with different radiation powers (80, 200, and 400 mW, continuous wave) were investigated on normal animals subjected to forced swimming test (FST). Results indicated that there are changes in FST parameters in animals irradiated with laser; the lowest dose provoked a significant increase in animal activity (swimming and climbing) and a significant decrease in animal's immobility, while the highest laser dose resulted in a complete inverse action by significantly increasing animal immobility and significantly decreasing animal activity with respect to control animals. The lowest dose (80 mW) of transcranial laser irradiation has then utilized on animals injected with a chronic dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days) served as an animal model of depression. Laser irradiation has successfully ameliorated depression induced by reserpine as indicated by FST parameters and electrocorticography (ECoG) spectral analysis in irradiated animals. The findings of the present study emphasized the beneficial effects of low-level infrared laser irradiation on normal and healthy animals. Additionally, it indicated the potential antidepressant activity of the low dose of infrared laser irradiation.

  19. Design and Validation of an Infrared Badal Optometer for Laser Speckle (IBOLS)

    PubMed Central

    Teel, Danielle F. W.; Copland, R. James; Jacobs, Robert J.; Wells, Thad; Neal, Daniel R.; Thibos, Larry N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To validate the design of an infrared wavefront aberrometer with a Badal optometer employing the principle of laser speckle generated by a spinning disk and infrared light. The instrument was designed for subjective meridional refraction in infrared light by human patients. Methods Validation employed a model eye with known refractive error determined with an objective infrared wavefront aberrometer. The model eye was used to produce a speckle pattern on an artificial retina with controlled amounts of ametropia introduced with auxiliary ophthalmic lenses. A human observer performed the psychophysical task of observing the speckle pattern (with the aid of a video camera sensitive to infrared radiation) formed on the artificial retina. Refraction was performed by adjusting the vergence of incident light with the Badal optometer to nullify the motion of laser speckle. Validation of the method was performed for different levels of spherical ametropia and for various configurations of an astigmatic model eye. Results Subjective measurements of meridional refractive error over the range −4D to + 4D agreed with astigmatic refractive errors predicted by the power of the model eye in the meridian of motion of the spinning disk. Conclusions Use of a Badal optometer to control laser speckle is a valid method for determining subjective refractive error at infrared wavelengths. Such an instrument will be useful for comparing objective measures of refractive error obtained for the human eye with autorefractors and wavefront aberrometers that employ infrared radiation. PMID:18772719

  20. Structural alterations in the cornea from exposure to infrared radiation. Final technical memo. , 1 July 1977-30 June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, R.A.; McCally, R.L.; Bargeron, C.B.; Green, W.R.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes the research on the interaction of infrared radiation, especially from CO/sub 2/ lasers, with the cornea. The report discusses laser systems, endothelial temperature histories, endothelial damage thresholds, stromal damage, wound repair, epithelial damage from single- and multiple-pulse exposures, and a new thermal damage model based on a phased transition.

  1. Tunable diode lasers for 3-30 micron infrared operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tunable diode laser is now widely used in high resolution infrared spectroscopy studies, taking into account laboratory and industrial applications. The present investigation is concerned with advances related to laser performance and reliability. The advances are the result of improvements in materials and device technologies. Reliability data for broad-area Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se lasers are considered along with performance improvements in stripe-geometry lasers, laser performance at wavelengths above 25 microns, and laser performance at wavelengths below 4 microns. Attention is given to tunable Pb-salt infrared diode lasers, mesa-stripe geometry lasers of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se and PbS(1-x)Se(x), and long wavelength diode laser emission observed in both Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te and Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se.

  2. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems.

  3. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Spectrum of the barium atom in a laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', I. I.; Suran, V. V.

    1990-08-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of a laser radiation field on the spectrum of barium atoms. The investigation was carried out by the method of three-photon ionization spectroscopy using dye laser radiation (ω = 14 800-18 700 cm - 1). The electric field intensity of the laser radiation was 103-106 V/cm. This laser radiation field had a strong influence on a number of bound and autoionizing states. The nature of this influence depended on the ratio of the excitation frequencies of bound and autoionizing states.

  5. Electron injector for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Jazini, J.; Fathi, M.; Khosravi, N.; Shokri, B.

    2016-12-01

    The quality of the electron beam for applications like free electron lasers (FELs) has a direct impact on the quality of the laser radiation. The electron injector considered for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRIFEL) includes a thermionic RF electron gun plus a bunch compressor as the electron preinjector and a 50 MeV constant gradient traveling wave linac as the main accelerator of the electron injector. In the present work, a thermionic RF gun is designed and matched with an optimized linac to produce a high quality mono-energetic electron beam. The results show that the preinjector is capable of delivering an electron bunch with 1 ps bunch length and 3 mm-mrad emittance to the linac entrance which is desirable for IRIFEL operation. The results also show that by geometrical manipulation and optimization of the linac structure, the pattern of the RF fields in the linac will be more symmetric, which is important in order to produce high stable mono-energetic bunches.

  6. Vital parameters related low level laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Capone, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    The first work hypotesis is that biosensors on the patient detecting heart, breath rate and skin parameters, modulate laser radiation to enhance the therapeutic outcome; in the second work hypotesis: biofeedback could be effective, when integrated in the low level laser energy release.

  7. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud is modeled using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. Computations are made at 10 microns for a Deirmendjian (1969) C-1 water cloud where the single scattering albedo is equal to 0.638 and the asymmetry parameter is 0.865. The results indicate that the emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemispheric flux escaping from the cloud top possesses a gradient from the center to the edges which are warmer when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8-13.6 micron region demonstrate that there is cooling out of the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds are computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two-stream approximation. Results indicate that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud-top temperature.

  8. Nonlinear effects in fiber optic interferometers for propagation in optical fiber low-power single-frequency infrared radiation of a semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. L.; Bulgakova, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Fiber-optic interferometers are one of the most sensitive components of optical meters of physical fields, mechanical strains and movements. The greatest efficiency is shown when such devices are used together with semiconductor sources - lasers, LED and SRD. Until very recently nonlinear effects in optical instruments and devices were thought to play an obvious role only with emissions having comparatively great power (from some units up to some tens mW ) in quartz fibers. The results of the most recent researches show that non-linear effects in fiber-interferometers with the length of baselines up to some kilometers with small emission power in the fiber (deciles mW ) play an important role.

  9. Progress in rare-earth-doped mid-infrared fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Angela B; Tang, Zhuoqi; Furniss, David; Sujecki, Slawomir; Benson, Trevor M

    2010-12-06

    The progress, and current challenges, in fabricating rare-earth-doped chalcogenide-glass fibers for developing mid-infrared (IR) fiber lasers are reviewed. For the first time a coherent explanation is forwarded for the failure to date to develop a gallium-lanthanum-sulfide glass mid-IR fiber laser. For the more covalent chalcogenide glasses, the importance of optimizing the glass host and glass processing routes in order to minimize non-radiative decay and to avoid rare earth ion clustering and glass devitrification is discussed. For the first time a new idea is explored to explain an additional method of non-radiative depopulation of the excited state in the mid-IR that has not been properly recognized before: that of impurity multiphonon relaxation. Practical characterization of candidate selenide glasses is presented. Potential applications of mid-infrared fiber lasers are suggested.

  10. Testing Unruh Radiation with Ultraintense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshi

    1999-07-01

    We point out that using the state-of-the-art (or soon-to-be) intense electromagnetic pulses, violent accelerations that may be suitable for testing quantum field theory in curved spacetime can be realized through the interaction of a high-intensity laser with an electron. In particular, we demonstrate that the Unruh radiation is detectable, in principle, beyond the conventional radiation (most notably the Larmor radiation) background noise, by taking advantage of its specific dependence on the laser power and distinct character in spectral-angular distributions.

  11. Parameterization of Outgoing Infrared Radiation Derived from Detailed Radiative Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Starley L.; Warren, Stephen G.

    1982-12-01

    State-of-the-art radiative transfer models can calculate outgoing infrared (IR) irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (F) to an accuracy suitable for climate modeling given the proper atmospheric profiles of temperature and absorbing gases and aerosols. However, such sophisticated methods are computationally time consuming and ill-suited for simple vertically-averaged models or diagnostic studies. The alternative of empirical expressions for F is plagued by observational uncertainty which forces the functional forms to be very simple. We develop, a parameterization of climatological F by curve-fitting the results of a detailed radiative transfer model. The parameterization comprises clear-sky and cloudy-sky terms. Only two parameters are used to predict clear-sky outgoing IR irradiance: surface air temperature (Ts) and 0-12 km height-mean relative humidity (RH). With this choice of parameters (in particular, the use of RH instead of precipitable water) the outgoing IR irradiance can be estimated without knowledge of the detailed temperature profile or average lapse rate. Comparisons between the clear-sky parameterization and detailed model show maximum errors of 10 W m2 with average errors of only a few watts per square meter. Single-layer `black' clouds are found to reduce the outgoing IR irradiance (relative to clear-sky values) as a function of Ts Tc, Tc and RH, where Tc is the cloud-top temperature. Errors in the parameterization of the cloudy-sky term are comparable to those of the clear-sky term.

  12. Nd:YAG laser systems with radiation delivery by thin hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the work was the investigation of hollow waveguide utilization for near infrared laser radiation delivery. As basic delivery unit, a new thin cyclic olefin polymer coated silver hollow glass waveguide with diameters 100/190 μm or 250/360 μm and length up to 20 cm was used. Four near infrared laser sources were based on the Nd:YAG crystals. The first one - Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by LiF:F 2- saturable absorber - was coherently pumped by Alexandrite radiation. The system generated 1.06 μm wavelength radiation with 6 ns length of pulse and 0.7 mJ maximum output energy. The second and third laser systems were compact longitudinally diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers generating radiation at wavelength 1.06 μm and 1.44 μm. These lasers were operating in a free-running regime under pulsed pumping (pulse repetition rate 50 Hz). Mean output power 160 mW (90 mW) with pulse length 0.5 ms (1 ms) was generated at wavelength 1.06 μm (1.44 μm). The last radiation source was the Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip laser pumped by laser diode and generating the radiation at 1.34 μm wavelength. The output power, pulse length, and repetition rate were 25 mW, 6 ns, and 250 Hz, respectively. All lasers were generating beam with gaussian TEM 00 profile. These radiations were focused into thin a waveguide and delivery radiation characteristics were investigated. It was recognized that the output spatial structure is significantly modified in all cases. However a compact delivery system can be useful for near infrared powerful radiation delivery in some special technological and medical applications.

  13. Infrared presensitization photography at deuterium fluoride laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Geary, J.M.; Ross, K.; Suter, K. )

    1989-09-01

    Near-field irradiance distributions of a deuterium flouride laser system are obtained using infrared presensitization photography. This represents the shortest wavelength region to employ this technique thus far.

  14. Blackbody Infrared Radiative Dissociation of Protonated Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentabil, Messele A.; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2011-12-01

    The dissociation pathways, kinetics, and energetics of protonated oligosaccharides in the gas phase were investigated using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD). Time-resolved BIRD measurements were performed on singly protonated ions of cellohexaose (Cel6), which is composed of β-(1 → 4)-linked glucopyranose rings, and five malto-oligosaccharides (Malx, where x = 4-8), which are composed of α-(1 → 4)-linked glucopyranose units. At the temperatures investigated (85-160 °C), the oligosaccharides dissociate at the glycosidic linkages or by the loss of a water molecule to produce B- or Y-type ions. The Y ions dissociate to smaller Y or B ions, while the B ions yield exclusively smaller B ions. The sequential loss of water molecules from the smallest B ions (B1 and B2) also occurs. Rate constants for dissociation of the protonated oligosaccharides and the corresponding Arrhenius activation parameters (Ea and A) were determined. The Ea and A-factors measured for protonated Malx (x > 4) are indistinguishable within error (~19 kcal mol-1, 1010 s-1), which is consistent with the ions being in the rapid energy exchange limit. In contrast, the Arrhenius parameters for protonated Cel6 (24 kcal mol-1, 1012 s-1) are significantly larger. These results indicate that both the energy and entropy changes associated with the glycosidic bond cleavage are sensitive to the anomeric configuration. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that formation of B and Y ions occurs through a common dissociation mechanism, with the position of the proton establishing whether a B or Y ion is formed upon glycosidic bond cleavage.

  15. Average power meter for laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevnina, Elena I.; Maraev, Anton A.; Ishanin, Gennady G.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced metrology equipment, in particular an average power meter for laser radiation, is necessary for effective using of laser technology. In the paper we propose a measurement scheme with periodic scanning of a laser beam. The scheme is implemented in a pass-through average power meter that can perform continuous monitoring during the laser operation in pulse mode or in continuous wave mode and at the same time not to interrupt the operation. The detector used in the device is based on the thermoelastic effect in crystalline quartz as it has fast response, long-time stability of sensitivity, and almost uniform sensitivity dependence on the wavelength.

  16. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M.; Horie, Yu; ...

    2015-01-01

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. We report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventionalmore » UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 μm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36° and beam quality factor of M² =1.02.« less

  17. Efficient dielectric metasurface collimating lenses for mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Arbabi, Amir; Briggs, Ryan M.; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. We report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 μm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0.36° and beam quality factor of M² =1.02.

  18. Structural Alterations in the Cornea from Exposure to Infrared Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    mylar disks that were preformed - 4- to match the corneal curvature. The disks were attached 0 at their edges to excised corneas using cyanoacrylate ...ICFIECOP JHU/APL TG 1364 JULY 1985 (0 FINAL Technical Memorandum STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS IN THE CORNEA FROM EXPOSURE TO INFRARED RADIATION R. A...Structural Alterations in the Cornea from Exposure to Infrared Radiation 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R. A. Farrell, R. L. McCally, C. B. Bargeron, and W. R. Green

  19. Absorption of CO laser radiation by NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes absorption calculations and measurements at selected infrared CO laser wavelengths which are nearly coincident with absorption lines in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO near 5.3 microns. Initial work was directed towards establishing the optimal CO laser-NO absorption line coincidence for high temperature applications. Measurements of the absorption coefficient at this optimal laser wavelength were carried out, first using a room-temperature absorption cell for high-temperature calculations and then using a shock tube, for the temperature range 630-4000 K, to validate the high temperature calculations.

  20. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  1. Infrared laser in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders, arthrogenous pain

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, T.L.

    1989-05-01

    The fast removal of intra-articular inflammation of the temporomandibular joint in five different patients after infrared laser application is described. Parameters of clinical evaluation was maximum mouth opening and subjective pain. The application of infrared laser of 700 Hz frequency for 3 minutes during five consecutive days at the skin over the painful area of the temporomandibular joint was used. However, the importance of concomitant mandibular stabilization is stressed to achieve optimal result.

  2. A fuzzy automated object classification by infrared laser camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Seigo; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Asari, Kazunari; Kuramoto, Kei; Kobashi, Syoji; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Home security in night is very important, and the system that watches a person's movements is useful in the security. This paper describes a classification system of adult, child and the other object from distance distribution measured by an infrared laser camera. This camera radiates near infrared waves and receives reflected ones. Then, it converts the time of flight into distance distribution. Our method consists of 4 steps. First, we do background subtraction and noise rejection in the distance distribution. Second, we do fuzzy clustering in the distance distribution, and form several clusters. Third, we extract features such as the height, thickness, aspect ratio, area ratio of the cluster. Then, we make fuzzy if-then rules from knowledge of adult, child and the other object so as to classify the cluster to one of adult, child and the other object. Here, we made the fuzzy membership function with respect to each features. Finally, we classify the clusters to one with the highest fuzzy degree among adult, child and the other object. In our experiment, we set up the camera in room and tested three cases. The method successfully classified them in real time processing.

  3. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  4. Investigation of laser radar systems based on mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybaltowski, Adam

    This dissertation deals with the possibility of utilizing mid-infrared semiconductor lasers in systems of optical remote sensing with range resolution, called laser radar or lidar. The main subject investigated in this dissertation is two-fold: firstly, an analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and related maximum sensing range calculations in this type of lidar based on available system components, and---secondly---improvements in the Random-Modulation Continuous-Wave (RM-CW) lidar technique to better utilize available mid-infrared semiconductor lasers. As far as the SNR analysis is concerned, an appropriate framework has been constructed to analyze post-demodulation noise in mid-infrared direct-detection RM-CW lidar. It is based on a generalization of the Wiener-Khintchine theorem; noise is assumed to be additive, stationary, and have an arbitrary power spectrum. This is in contrast to the SNR analysis in the literature on this subject, which is inadequate for mid-infrared RM-CW lidar as it only considers Poissonian fluctuations of the number of detected photons. In addition to regular SNR analysis, the framework derived in this dissertation allows treatment of singularities such as demodulation with an unbalanced sequence in 1/f noise. To calculate maximum lidar sensing range, the following detection limits have been considered: signal shot noise, background blackbody radiation shot noise based on the Background-Limited Photodetection (BLIP) detectivity limit, and minimum-size detector noise given by diffraction-limited focusing. The latter is found to be of greatest practical interest. Furthermore, a lidar figure of merit has been introduced, and all quantities related to lidar performance and its detection limits have been presented graphically. Since pseudo-random sequences discussed in the literature have been found highly non-optimal for most applications of RM-CW lidar, a framework for the construction of new pseudo-random sequences of desired

  5. Red and infrared gas laser beam for therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Ristici, Marin; Ristici, E.; Tivarus, Madalina-Elena

    2000-06-01

    For the low power laser therapy, the experiments show that better results are obtained when the laser beam is an overlapping of two radiations: one in the visible region of the spectrum and the other in IR region. Also, some experiments show that for good results in biostimulation it is important to have a high coherence length of laser beam; this is not the case of the laser diodes The He-Ne laser has the best coherence, being able to generate laser radiations in visible and IR. It has tow strong laser lines: 633 nm and 1.15 micrometers . Although their gains are about the same, the available power of the red radiation is 3-4 times higher because of its larger width, when they oscillate separately. Using special dichroic mirrors for simultaneous reflection of the both liens, the laser beam will consist of the two radiations, each of them having good coherence . A 420 mm active length, 1.8 mm inner diameter He-Ne laser tube and a special designed resonator has been developed. The mirrors reflect both radiations as follows: one reflects 99.9 percent and the other, the output mirror, reflects 98 percent. There is a competition between them because these lines have a common lower level. The output power of the laser beam as 6 mW for 633 nm and 4 mW for 1.15 micrometers , respectively.

  6. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  7. Reduced Auger Recombination in Mid-Infrared Semiconductor Lasers (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    overcome for successful system adoption. Within the last 15 years, quantum cascade lasers ( QCLs ) have proven to be a very capable semiconductor laser...restricted at the longer wavelengths, compared to QCLs due to band filling.9 In the short-wave and mid-wave infrared wavelengths, their low T0

  8. [Characteristics of infrared radiation of meridians and acupoints].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan-Juan; Shen, Xue-Yong; Zhao, Yi

    2010-10-01

    Infrared radiation temperature and characteristics of infrared spectrum of meridians and acupoints are summarized in this article. The infrared radiant track along the running course of meridians might be a ubiquitous phenomenon of the vital activity. The high temperature bands below the meridian lines at the cuticular layer are often taken as the manifestation of the tract. It could be induced by various stimulations on acupoints with warm-needling as the best causative method. High temperature and low resistance are considered as 2 features of the acupoint zone. The adenosine-triphosphate energy metabolism of the acupoint zone is higher than the non-point zone, which indicates that essential physiological and pathological information are carried by infrared radiation temperature of acupoint and infrared spectrum of acupoint. However, it is realized that study on characteristics of infrared radiation only is far from enough to reveal the essence of meridians and acupoints. And much still remains to be done in strengthening basic studies of characteristics of infrared radiation, structure pattern of meridians and acupoints as well as volt-ampere characteristics.

  9. Using Guide Wavelengths to Assess Far-Infrared Laser Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeShano, B.; Olivier, K.; Cain, B.; Zink, L. R.; Jackson, M.

    2014-09-01

    An optically pumped molecular laser system with a transverse excitation scheme has been used to observe 77 guide wavelengths associated with the modes of an oversized waveguide laser resonator. These guide wavelengths, spanning from 102.6 to 990.6 μm, were generated by a variety of lasing media, including methanol along with several symmetric- and asymmetric-top molecules. The guide wavelengths displayed several consistent characteristics when compared with their respective fundamental laser emissions: their wavelengths were about 0.47 % larger and their relative powers were at least a factor of ten weaker. The properties of these guide wavelengths were used to assess frequency and wavelength measurements associated with known far-infrared laser emissions. For several of these laser emissions, this prompted a reinvestigation and subsequent revision of their measured values. Five far-infrared laser frequencies were also measured for the first time.

  10. Using Guide Wavelengths to Assess Far-Infrared Laser Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeShano, B.; Olivier, K.; Cain, B.; Zink, L. R.; Jackson, M.

    2015-01-01

    An optically pumped molecular laser system with a transverse excitation scheme has been used to observe 77 guide wavelengths associated with the modes of an oversized waveguide laser resonator. These guide wavelengths, spanning from 102.6 to 990.6 μm, were generated by a variety of lasing media, including methanol along with several symmetric- and asymmetric-top molecules. The guide wavelengths displayed several consistent characteristics when compared with their respective fundamental laser emissions: their wavelengths were about 0.47 % larger and their relative powers were at least a factor of ten weaker. The properties of these guide wavelengths were used to assess frequency and wavelength measurements associated with known far-infrared laser emissions. For several of these laser emissions, this prompted a reinvestigation and subsequent revision of their measured values. Five far-infrared laser frequencies were also measured for the first time.

  11. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  12. Tunable Infrared Lasers: Preparing for Expanded use in Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Killinger, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The literature on the use of tunable infrared lasers, for atmospheric trace gas detection and monitoring is about 25 years of age. However, this field, whith its myriad of potential application areas, has always been driven by the available laser technology. As new or improved laser devices become available, with characteristics which lend themselves to operation in compact, nearly autonomous instruments, their application to atmospheric science and environmental measurements expands.

  13. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  14. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  15. The interaction of infrared radiation with the eye: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of data concerning the effects of infrared radiation on the eye is presented. Information in the following areas is included: (1) transmission and absorption of infrared radiation by the ocular tissues, (2) range of infrared radiation which is harmful to the ocular tissues, (3) infrared radiation thresholds of the various oscular tissues, and (4) infrared radiation transmission and absorption of current optic materials.

  16. Advanced quantum cascade laser transmitter architectures and infrared photonics development

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2004-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security and civilian applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors. This paper reports on the current development in infrared photonics that provides a pathway for QCL transmitter miniaturization. This research has produced infrared waveguide-based optical components in chalcogenide glass using both direct-laser writing and holographic exposure techniques. We discuss here the design and fabrication concepts and capabilities required to produce integrated waveguides, waveguide couplers, and other photonic devices.

  17. Stark effect applicable to optically pumped far-infrared laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Koo, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption measurements at CO2 laser frequencies were carried out as a function of Stark fields and CH3OH gas pressures to assess the effect of low electric field Stark tuning on methanol absorption at the P(12) 9.4 micron CO2 laser line, in a continuing search for coherent emitters at submillimeter wavelengths (far infrared). The line center absorption coefficient is found to increase five-fold with a 2.3 kV/cm Stark field at the 220 mtorr methanol pressure optimal for methanol far infrared lasing. The low electric field Stark tuning encourages efforts to enhance the pumping efficiency of a methanol far infrared laser at its normal optimum operating pressure, and suggests that significant Stark field induced frequency modulation of the far IR laser output is feasible.

  18. Short infrared laser pulses block action potentials in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Martens, Stacey L.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2017-02-01

    Short infrared laser pulses have many physiological effects on cells including the ability to stimulate action potentials in neurons. Here we show that short infrared laser pulses can also reversibly block action potentials. Primary rat hippocampal neurons were transfected with the Optopatch2 plasmid, which contains both a blue-light activated channel rhodopsin (CheRiff) and a red-light fluorescent membrane voltage reporter (QuasAr2). This optogenetic platform allows robust stimulation and recording of action potential activity in neurons in a non-contact, low noise manner. For all experiments, QuasAr2 was imaged continuously on a wide-field fluorescent microscope using a Krypton laser (647 nm) as the excitation source and an EMCCD camera operating at 1000 Hz to collect emitted fluorescence. A co-aligned Argon laser (488 nm, 5 ms at 10Hz) provided activation light for CheRiff. A 200 mm fiber delivered infrared light locally to the target neuron. Reversible action potential block in neurons was observed following a short infrared laser pulse (0.26-0.96 J/cm2; 1.37-5.01 ms; 1869 nm), with the block persisting for more than 1 s with exposures greater than 0.69 J/cm2. Action potential block was sustained for 30 s with the short infrared laser pulsed at 1-7 Hz. Full recovery of neuronal activity was observed 5-30s post-infrared exposure. These results indicate that optogenetics provides a robust platform for the study of action potential block and that short infrared laser pulses can be used for non-contact, reversible action potential block.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Control of the radiation parameters of a copper vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, Yu P.; Yudin, Nikolai A.

    2003-09-01

    The possibility of controlling the pulse shape and duration and the beam divergence of a copper vapour laser operating in the mode of double pump pulses, when the first pulse excites lasing in the active medium and the second amplifies it. It is shown that a change in the delay of the second pump pulse relative to the laser pulse initiated by the first pump pulse allows an efficient control of the laser-radiation characteristics. In this case, the coefficient of laser-radiation conversion into a beam with a diffraction-limited divergence may reach ~80 %.

  20. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Microwave generation in an optical breakdown plasma created by modulated laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A. A.; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z.; Losev, Leonid L.; Soskov, V. I.

    1990-06-01

    It was established that when laser radiation, intensity modulated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz, interacted with an optical breakdown plasma which it had created, a microwave component appeared in the thermal emf of the plasma. The amplitude of the microwave thermal emf reached 0.7 V for a laser radiation intensity of 6 GW/cm2. Laser radiation with λL = 1.06 μm was converted to the microwave range with λmω = 13 cm in the optical breakdown plasma. A microwave signal power of ~ 0.5 W was obtained from a laser power of ~ 5 MW.

  1. Pulsed 808-nm infrared laser stimulation of the auditory nerve in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Wu, Xiao Y; Wang, Xing; Mou, Zong X; Wang, Man Q; Gu, Xin; Zheng, Xiao L; Hou, Wen S

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed near-infrared radiation has been proposed as an alternative stimulus for auditory nerve stimulation and could be potentially used in the design of cochlear implant. Although the infrared with high absorption coefficient of water (i.e., wavelength ranged from 1.8 to 2.2 μm) has been widely investigated, the lymph in the cochlea absorbs most of the infrared energies, and only a small part can arrive at the target auditory nerves. The present study is aimed to test whether the short-wavelength near-infrared irradiation with lower absorption coefficients can penetrate the lymph fluid to stimulate the auditory nerves. An 808-nm near-infrared laser was chosen to stimulate the auditory nerve in the guinea pig cochlea. The infrared pulse was delivered by an optical fiber that was surgically inserted near the round window membrane and oriented toward the spiral ganglion cells in the basal turn of the cochlea. The 2-Hz infrared pulses were used to stimulate the cochlea before and after the deafness with different pulse durations (100-1,000 μs). Optically evoked compound action potentials (oCAPs) were recorded during the infrared radiation. We successfully recorded oCAPs from both normal hearing animals and deafened animals. The oCAP amplitude increased with the infrared radiation energy. The preliminary experiment suggests that the near-infrared with lower absorption coefficients can effectively pass through the lymph filled in the cochlea and stimulate the auditory nerve. Further studies will optimize the deafness animal model and determine the optimal stimulation parameters.

  2. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators.

    PubMed

    Brar, Victor W; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A; Atwater, Harry A

    2015-05-07

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emission from graphene plasmonic resonators on a silicon nitride substrate. It is shown that the graphene resonators produce antenna-coupled blackbody radiation, which manifests as narrow spectral emission peaks in the mid-infrared. By continuously varying the nanoresonator carrier density, the frequency and intensity of these spectral features can be modulated via an electrostatic gate. This work opens the door for future devices that may control blackbody radiation at timescales beyond the limits of conventional thermo-optic modulation.

  3. Airborne laser systems for atmospheric sounding in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Jia, Huamin; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques for atmospheric sounding using Near Infrared (NIR) laser sources, direct detection electro-optics and passive infrared imaging systems. These techniques allow a direct determination of atmospheric extinction and, through the adoption of suitable inversion algorithms, the indirect measurement of some important natural and man-made atmospheric constituents, including Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The proposed techniques are suitable for remote sensing missions performed by using aircraft, satellites, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), parachute/gliding vehicles, Roving Surface Vehicles (RSV), or Permanent Surface Installations (PSI). The various techniques proposed offer relative advantages in different scenarios. All are based on measurements of the laser energy/power incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Experimental results are presented relative to ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 KHz PRF NIR laser systems in a variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft above ground level. Future activities are planned to validate the atmospheric retrieval algorithms developed for CO2 column density measurements, with emphasis on aircraft related emissions at airports and other high air-traffic density environments.

  4. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  5. Plans for a far-infrared free-electron laser in India

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Centre for Advanced Technology is building the INDUS complex of synchrotron radiation sources. As part of this programme it is also proposed to build a far-infrared free-electron laser oscillator. This will use a microtron injector and a 40 period undulator made of NdFeB permanent magnets, and is designed to law around 200 microns. We discuss details of the FEL design and the present status of experimental activities on this front.

  6. Lasers pumped by solar radiation (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golger, A. L.; Klimovskii, I. I.

    1984-02-01

    Theoretical models and existing experimental data on solar-pumped lasers are surveyed. Necessary conditions for lasing to occur are defined, including the necessity that the chemical used must be stable to solar radiation. Attention is given to photodissociation gas lasers such as RI, IBr and CO2-Br2 lasers, molecular gas lasers such as CO2 devices and four-level solid-state lasers, e.g., YAG:Nd and waveguide lasers. Consideration is devoted to efficiencies optimized by the selection of specific values for the density, absorption cross-section of the active media, the rate of de-excitation, the transverse dimensions of the active medium and necessary levels of solar concentration. The discussion reveals that only the closed cycle gas dynamic laser and a solid-state waveguide laser can currently produce 3-6 percent efficiency operation, the latter requiring only 100 suns concentration for a 100 W output. Configurations of arrays of transversely concentrating parabolic heliostats to produce sufficient power for energy applications are discussed.

  7. Effect of ablation parameters on infrared pulsed laser deposition of poly(ethylene glycol) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Papantonakis, M. R.; Toftmann, B.; Horwitz, J. S.; McGill, R. A.; Chrisey, D. B.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Polymer thin films were deposited by laser ablation using infrared radiation both resonant (2.90, 3.40, 3.45, and 8.96 mum) and nonresonant (3.30, 3.92, and 4.17 mum) with vibrational modes in the starting material, polyethylene glycol. The chemical structure of the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the molecular weight distribution was investigated using gel permeation chromatography. The films deposited by resonant irradiation are superior to those deposited with nonresonant radiation with respect to both the chemical structure and the molecular weight distribution of the films. However, the molecular-weight distributions of films deposited at nonresonant infrared wavelengths show marked polymer fragmentation. Fluence and wavelength dependence studies show that the effects may be related to the degree of thermal confinement, and hence to the relative absorption strengths of the targeted vibrational modes.

  8. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  9. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Markham, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  10. Polarimeter measures sea state characteristics using emitted infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared polarimeter, capable of operating between 1 and 12 micrometers wavelength has been used to measure the polarization of emitted radiation from the sea. The observed polarization at 10.6 micrometers from a smooth sea was found to be positive, indicating the dominance of reflected infrared sky radiation over the emitted. With the appearance of waves, the percent polarization increased, as expected, for a zenith angle well above the Brewster angle for water. This is qualitatively in accordance with a model presented to explain the behavior. Initial analyses indicate that the polarized components of the sea's emitted and reflected radiation are affected by type and direction of waves, angle of viewing, and foam. The effects of variations in these parameters require further delineation. The infrared polarimetric technique appears to be a novel new passive method for remote monitoring of waves.

  11. [Comparative study of effect of infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter electromagnetic radiation on wing somatic mutations in Drosophila melanogaster induced by gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V I; Pogodin, A S; Dubatolova, T D; Varlamov, A V; Leont'ev, K V; Khamoian, A G

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the number of spontaneous and gamma-radiation-induced somatic mutations in wing cells of fruit flies (third instar larvae) exposed to laser irradiation of submillimeter range (lambda = 81.5 microns) was significantly lower than in control. Laser irradiation did not affect the number of recombinations. Exposure to laser radiation in the infrared range and electromagnetic waves of the millimeter range (lambda = 3.8 mm) enhanced the effect of gamma-irradiation.

  12. Atmospheric Laser and Infrared Transmission Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    mature high energy solid state laser technol- ogy is flashlamp- pumped 1.06 μ neodymium/glass (Nd:glass), however, diode pumping , and alternative lasing...field will have relatively simple characteristics, such as those of the TEM00 mode. But some features of high-power lasers militate against this. In...a transverse -flow gas laser , upstream depletion of the inversion may destroy axial symmetry of the output. Support structures for optics may block

  13. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  14. Investigation of Infra-red and Nonequilibrium Air Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, Christophe O.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program was intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Prior to this work, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared had been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems were already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements were required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance were accounted for in the model. The program was further motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Detailed comparisons between measured and simulated spectra are presented.

  15. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInville, R. M.; Hassan, H. A.

    1982-06-01

    By employing detailed kinetic models, three concepts which utilize a blackbody cavity for the conversion of solar energy into laser energy using a CO2 lasant are analyzed and compared. In the first, the blackbody radiation is used to excite flowing CO2 directly. The second and third employ a mixing laser concept with CO and N2 being the donor gases. The CO is optically pumped while thermal heating excites the N2. Blackbody temperatures ranging from 1500 deg K - 2500 deg K are considered. Based on calculated laser power output per unit flow rate of CO2, it appears that the N2-CO2 mixing laser is the most attractive system.

  16. Infrared Radiation Image Sensor with Function of Vacuum Pressure Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Koichi; Funaki, Hideyuki; Yagi, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Ikuo; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Honda, Hiroto

    We propose a new detecting method of vacuum pressure utilizing reference cells with the similar structure as pixels in the IR(infrared radiation) image sensor of which the sensitivity is greatly depended on the vacuum pressure in the sensor package. This method showed the excellent correlation between the vacuum pressure and output voltage without any additional pirani gauge requiring readout circuit which is generally utilized to detect the vacuum pressure. The proposed method is understood to realize the detection of the package vacuum pressure with detecting infrared radiation as an IR image sensor.

  17. Advanced Excitation Techniques for Tunable Infrared Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    EXCITAT I ON TECHNI QUES FOR TUNA BLE I NFRARED LASERS 1. F. Ewanizky ~ Nig ht Vision & Elect ro-Optics Laboratory ERAD COM US ARMY ELECTRONICS...of this project. In order to enhance compatibility of this investigation with practical application, the pump laser was chosen to be of the target

  18. Decomposition of NO studied by infrared emission and CO laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Flower, W. L.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    A diagnostic technique for monitoring the concentration of NO using absorption of CO laser radiation was developed and applied in a study of the decomposition kinetics of NO. Simultaneous measurements of infrared emission by NO at 5.3 microns were also made to validate the laser absorption technique. The data were obtained behind incident shocks in NO-N2O-Ar (or Kr) mixtures, with temperatures in the range 2400-4100 K. Rate constants for dominant reactions were inferred from comparisons with computer simulations of the reactive flow.

  19. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers on XPA and XPC gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-09-01

    Laser devices emit monochromatic, coherent, and highly collimated intense beams of light that are useful for a number of biomedical applications. However, for low-intensity lasers, possible adverse effects of laser light on DNA are still controversial. In this work, the expression of XPA and XPC genes in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at different fluences in continuous mode emission. Skin and muscle tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of XPA and XPC mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats, depending on physical (fluence and wavelength) and biological (tissue) parameters. Laser light could modify expression of genes related to the nucleotide excision repair pathway at fluences and wavelengths used in clinical protocols.

  20. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  1. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3-100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3- 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects.

  2. Instrumental laser beam systems in navigation using scattered radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshlakov, Viktor G.

    1998-06-01

    Molecular and aerosol scattering of laser radiation, propagating in the atmosphere, makes it possible to visualize it in space. This phenomenon can be used for navigation in the navy, air force and astronautics. The laser radiation scattering is known to be used in the visual laser beam systems. The scattered laser radiations is small as compared with direct laser radiation and safe for sight. The method being developed uses the scattering effect and enables one to create the instrumental laser beam systems for pilotage alone fairways and approach canals in coastal waters and seaports.

  3. Mid-infrared high-power diode lasers and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Márc T.; Gilly, Juergen; Rattunde, Marcel; Wagner, Joachim; Ahlert, Sandra; Biesenbach, Jens

    2010-02-01

    High-power diode lasers in the mid-infrared wavelength range between 1.8μm and 2.3μm have emerged new possibilities for applications like processing and accelerated drying of materials, medical surgery, infrared countermeasures or for pumping of solid-state and semiconductor disc lasers. We will present results on MBE grown (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters with emitter widths between 90μm and 200μm. In addition laser bars with 20% or 30% fill factor have been processed. More than 30% maximum wall-plug efficiency in cw operation for single emitters and laser bars has been reached. Even at 2200nm more than 15W have been demonstrated with a 30% fill factor bar. Due to an increasing interest in pulsed operation modes for these mid-infrared lasers, we have investigated single emitters and laser bars at 1940nm for different pulse times and duty cycles. More than 9W have been measured at 30A with 500ns pulse time and 1% duty cycle without COMD for a single emitter. Most applications mentioned before need fiber coupled output power, therefore fiber coupled modules based on single emitters or laser bars have been developed. Single-emitter based modules show 600mW out of a 200μm core fiber with NA=0.22 at different wavelengths between 1870nm and 1940nm. At 2200nm an output power of 450mW ex fiber impressively demonstrates the potential of GaSb based diode lasers well beyond wavelengths of 2μm. Combining several laser bars, 20W out of a 600μm core fiber have been established at 1870nm. Finally for a 7 bar stack at 1870nm we have demonstrated more than 85W at 50A in qcw mode.

  4. Simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for designing laser shields.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Piotr; Wolska, Agnieszka; Swiderski, Jacek; Zajac, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a computer simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for calculating the angle of laser shields performed with the Laser Shield Solver computer program. The authors describe a method of calculating the shield angle for laser shields which protect workers against reflected and scattered laser radiation and which are made from different materials. The main assumptions of the program, which calculates and simulates reflected laser radiation from any material and which can be used for designing shield angles, are presented. Calculations are compared with measurements of reflected laser radiation. The results for one type of laser and different materials which interacted with a laser beam showed that the Laser Shield Solver was an appropriate tool for designing laser shields and its simulations of reflected laser radiation distribution have practical use.

  5. A radiatively pumped CW CO2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Insuik, R. J.; Christiansen, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate the physics of a radiatively pumped laser has been carried out. For the first time, a blackbody cavity has optically pumped a CW CO2 laser. Results are presented from a series of experiments using mixtures of CO2, He, and Ar in which maximum output power was obtained with a 20 percent CO2-15 percent He-65 percent Ar mixture. The dependence of the output power on the blackbody temperature and the cooling gas flow rate is also discussed. By appropriately varying these parameters, continuous output powers of 8-10 mW have been achieved.

  6. Infrared Laser Therapy using IR absorption of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, K.; Ishii, K.; Hazama, H.

    2011-02-01

    Since numerous characteristic absorption lines caused by molecular vibration exist in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength region, selective excitation or selective dissociation of molecules is possible by tuning the laser wavelength to the characteristic absorption lines of target molecules. By applying this feature to the medical fields, less-invasive treatment and non-destructive diagnosis with absorption spectroscopy are possible using tunable MIR lasers. A high-energy nanosecond pulsed MIR tunable laser was obtained with difference-frequency generation (DFG) between a Nd:YAG and a tunable Cr:forsterite lasers. The MIR-DFG laser was tunable in a wavelength range of 5.5-10 μm and generated a laser pulses with an energy of up to 1.4 mJ, a pulse width of 5 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. Selective removal of atherosclerotic lesion was successfully demonstrated with the MIR-DFG laser tuned at a wavelength of 5.75 μm, which corresponds to the characteristic absorption of the ester bond in cholesterol esters in the atherosclerotic lesions. We have developed a non-destructive diagnostic probe with an attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism and two hollow optical fibres. An absorption spectrum of cholesterol was measured with the ATR probe by scanning the wavelength of the MIR-DFG laser, and the spectrum was in good agreement with that measured with a commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  7. Low intensity infrared laser induces filamentation in Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Low intensity continuous wave and pulsed emission modes laser is used in treating many diseases and the resulting biostimulative effect on tissues has been described, yet the photobiological basis is not well understood. The aim of this wok was to evaluate, using bacterial filamentation assay, effects of laser on Escherichia coli cultures in exponential and stationary growth phase. E. coli cultures, proficient and deficient on DNA repair, in exponential and stationary growth phase, were exposed to low intensity infrared laser, aliquots were spread onto microscopic slides, stained by Gram method, visualized by optical microscopy, photographed and percentage of bacterial filamentation were determined. Low intensity infrared laser with therapeutic fluencies and different emission modes can induce bacterial filamentation in cultures of E. coli wild type, fpg/ mutM, endonuclease III and exonuclease III mutants in exponential and stationary growth phase. This study showed induction of bacterial, filamentation in E. coli cultures expose to low intensity infrared laser and attention to laser therapy protocols, which should take into account fluencies, wavelengths, tissue conditions, and genetic characteristics of cells before beginning treatment.

  8. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETER: Dependence of polarisation of radiation of a linear Nd:YAG laser on the pump radiation polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Nikolai V.; Lariontsev, E. G.; Naumkin, Nikolai I.

    2004-09-01

    The dependence of polarisation characteristics of radiation of a linear Nd:YAG laser on polarisation of radiation of a pump diode laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that, in the case of polarisation isotropy of the optical resonator, the polarisation of radiation of the Nd:YAG laser is completely determined by the polarisation of pump radiation. Based on the vector model of this laser pumped by polarised radiation, an analytic solution describing stationary lasing is obtained.

  9. In vivo studies of ultrafast near-infrared laser tissue bonding and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulse lasers in the near-infrared (NIR) range exhibit very distinct properties upon their interaction with biomolecules compared to the corresponding continuous wave (CW) lasers. Ultrafast NIR laser tissue bonding (LTB) was used to fuse edges of two opposing animal tissue segments in vivo using fs laser photoexcitation of the native vibrations of chomophores. The fusion of the incised tissues was achieved in vivo at the molecular level as the result of the energy-matter interactions of NIR laser radiation with water and the structural proteins like collagen in the target tissues. Nonthermal vibrational excitation from the fs laser absorption by water and collagen induced the formation of cross-links between tissue proteins on either sides of the weld line resulting in tissue bonding. No extrinsic agents were used to facilitate tissue bonding in the fs LTB. These studies were pursued for the understanding and evaluation of the role of ultrafast NIR fs laser radiation in the LTB and consequent wound healing. The fs LTB can be used for difficult to suture structures such as blood vessels, nerves, gallbladder, liver, intestines, and other viscera. Ultrafast NIR LTB yields promising outcomes and benefits in terms of wound closure and wound healing under optimal conditions.

  10. Picosecond detection and broadband mixing of near-infrared radiation by YBaCuO film

    SciTech Connect

    Karasik, B.; Zorin, M.; Trifonov, V.; Gol`tsman, G.; Gershenzon, E.; Lindgren, M.; Danerud, M.; Winkler, D.

    1994-12-31

    Nonequilibrium picosecond and bolometric responses of YBCO films 500 {angstrom} thick patterned into 20 {times} 20 {micro}m{sup 2} size structure to 17 ps laser pulses and modulated radiation of GaAs and CO{sub 2} lasers have been studied. The modulation frequencies up to 10 GHz for GaAs laser and up to 1 GHz for CO{sub 2} were attained. The use of small radiation power (1--10 mW/cm{sup 2} for cw radiation and 10--100 nJ/cm{sup 2} for pulse radiation) in combination with high sensitive read-out system made possible to avoid any nonlinear transient processes caused by an overheating of sample above a critical temperature or S-N switching enhanced by an intense radiation. Responses due to the change of kinetic inductance were believed to be negligible. The only signals observed were caused by a small change of the film resistance either in the resistive state created by a bias current or in the normal state. The data obtained by means of pulse and modulation techniques are in agreement. The responsivity about 1 V/W was measured at 1 GHz modulation frequency both for 0.85 {micro}m and 10.6 {micro}m wavelengths. The sensitivity of high-{Tc} fast wideband infrared detector is discussed.

  11. Quality Characteristics of Dried Bananas Produced with Infrared Radiation Technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Browning of fruits during drying is a major quality concern. The enzyme polyphenol oxidase has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize enzymatic browning hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to inves...

  12. Rectenna that converts infrared radiation to electrical energy

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W.

    2016-09-06

    Technologies pertaining to converting infrared (IR) radiation to DC energy are described herein. In a general embodiment, a rectenna comprises a conductive layer. A thin insulator layer is formed on the conductive layer, and a nanoantenna is formed on the thin insulator layer. The thin insulator layer acts as a tunnel junction of a tunnel diode.

  13. Feasibility of Jujube peeling using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating has a promising potential to be used as a sustainable and effective method to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the jujube-peeling process and enhance the quality of peeled products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of use IR he...

  14. The mid-infrared swept laser: life beyond OCT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, D. T. D.; Hogg, R. A.; Revin, D. G.; Rehman, I. U.; Cockburn, J. W.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared external cavity lasers with high tuning rates ("swept lasers") have come to dominate the field of nearinfrared low-coherence imaging of biological tissues. Compared with time-domain OCT, swept-source OCT a) replaces slow mechanical scanning of a bulky reference mirror with much faster tuning of a laser cavity filter element and b) provides a ×N (N being the number of axial pixels per A-scan) speed advantage with no loss of SNR. We will argue that this striking speed advantage has not yet been fully exploited within biophotonics but will next make its effects felt in the mid-infrared. This transformation is likely to be driven by recent advances in external cavity quantum cascade lasers, which are the mid-IR counterpart to the OCT swept-source. These mid-IR sources are rapidly emerging in the area of infrared spectroscopy. By noting a direct analogy between time-domain OCT and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy we show analytically and via simulations that the mid-IR swept laser can acquire an infrared spectrum ×N (N being the number of spectral data points) faster than an FTIR instrument, using identical detected flux levels and identical receiver noise. A prototype external cavity mid-IR swept laser is demonstrated, offering a comparatively low sweep rate of 400 Hz over 60 cm-1 with 2 cm-1 linewidth, but which provides evidence that sweep rates of over a 100 kHz should be readily achievable simply by speeding up the cavity tuning element. Translating the knowledge and experience gained in near-IR OCT into mid-IR source development may result in sources offering significant benefits in certain spectroscopic applications.

  15. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  16. Efficient material treatment by axi-symmetrically polarized laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makin, V. S.; Pestov, Yu I.; Makin, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Recent years the increased interest is to the problem of interaction of nontraditionally polarized laser radiation with condensed media. The experiments with axisymmetrical polarization attract more attention. The peculiarities of interaction of axisymmetrical laser radiation with condensed matter are considered in framework of universal polariton model. It is shown that more effective is interaction of radially polarized laser radiation with surface active media. The optical schemes for efficient material treatment by radially polarized radiation are sketched.

  17. Laser-induced temperature-rise measurement by infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianhui; Tam, Siu Chung; Lam, Yee Loy; Zheng, Qiguang; Wei, Xueqin

    2000-06-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced temperature-rise are important information in laser material processing. In our experiment, several kinds of metals such as mild carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum alloy and copper, and non-metals namely epoxy and polymethyl methacrylate were irradiated by using a high-power CW CO2 laser beam, while the temperature distribution and variation on their surfaces were measured by using a fast scanning infrared camera to image the laser irradiated area. The CO2 laser beam power was varied from several tens of Watts to several hundreds of Watts for the irradiating of different materials. 2-D and 3-D temperature distributions and the temperature variations against the time of laser irradiation on certain points within the laser-irradiated area were recorded and measured. It is found that the temperature distribution on the surfaces of the irradiated materials was tightly related to the laser beam mode, and the temperature fluctuations corresponded to the laser beam power fluctuations. The results of this research could be applied to laser material processing.

  18. Dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free molecules and clusters of iron pentacarbonyl

    SciTech Connect

    Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Poydashev, D. G. Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2016-04-15

    The dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free Fe(CO){sub 5} molecules and their clusters owing to the resonant excitation of vibrations of CO bonds in the 5-μm range has been studied. The technique of infrared excitation and photoionization probing (λ = 400 nm) by femtosecond pulses has been used in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been found that an infrared pulse selectively excites vibrations of CO bonds in free molecules, which results in a decrease in the yield of the Fe(CO){sub 5}{sup +} molecular ion. Subsequent relaxation processes have been analyzed and the results have been interpreted. The time of the energy transfer from excited vibrations to other vibrations of the molecule owing to intramolecular relaxation has been measured. The dynamics of dissociation of [Fe(CO){sub 5}]{sub n} clusters irradiated by femtosecond infrared radiation has been studied. The time dependence of the yield of free molecules has been measured under different infrared laser excitation conditions. We have proposed a model that well describes the results of the experiment and makes it possible, in particular, to calculate the profile of variation of the temperature of clusters within the “evaporation ensemble” concept. The intramolecular and intracluster vibrational relaxation rates in [Fe(CO){sub 5}]{sub n} clusters have been estimated.

  19. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  20. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  1. [Comparative evaluation of influence of low-intensity laser radiation of different spectrum components and regimen of laser work upon microcirculation in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Shidova, A V; Maslova, V V

    2008-01-01

    Comparative study of the influence details of low-intensity pulse and continuous oscillation of laser radiation of red and infrared parts of spectrum upon microcirculation indices in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis of light and middle severity was performed. For the first time the predominantly activating influence upon microcirculation in gingival tissues of the pulsed laser radiation in the red part of spectrum was established.

  2. Dichromatic and monochromatic laser radiation effects on survival and morphology of Pantoea agglomerans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomé, A. M. C.; Souza, B. P.; Mendes, J. P. M.; Soares, L. C.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Despite the beneficial effects of low-level lasers on wound healing, their application for treatment of infected injuries is controversial because low-level lasers could stimulate bacterial growth exacerbating the infectious process. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate in vitro effects of low-level lasers on survival, morphology and cell aggregation of Pantoea agglomerans. P. agglomerans samples were isolated from human pressure injuries and cultures were exposed to low-level monochromatic and simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation to study the survival, cell aggregation, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells in exponential and stationary growth phases. Fluence, wavelength and emission mode were those used in therapeutic protocols for wound healing. Data show no changes in morphology and cell aggregation, but dichromatic laser radiation decreased bacterial survival in exponential growth phase and monochromatic red and infrared lasers increased bacterial survival at the same fluence. Simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation and simultaneous dichromatic laser could be the option for treatment of infected pressure injuries by Pantoea agglomerans.

  3. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer.

  4. Modeling and analyzing characteristics of self-infrared radiation on airplane-skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaozhao; Wu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chengguo; Yang, Yuntao; Huang, Yanhua; Sunxiaobo, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic of the self-infrared radiation of airplane-skin is very important for the stealth performance of airplane. Based on the theory of the airplane-skin temperature field, the distribution of the atmospheric temperature field and the principle of the black-body radiation function the self-infrared radiation model was established. In specified flight conditions, the influence of the atmospheric temperature, the speed of flight, the emissivity and the sight angle detection on the self-infrared radiation of the airplane skin were analyzed. Through the simulation of infrared radiation, some results under different flight states are obtained. The simulation results show that skin infrared radiation energy mainly concentrate on the far infrared wavebands, and various factors have different effects on the infrared radiation of skin. This conclusion can help reduce the infrared radiation and improve the stealth performance of airplane in the engineering design and the selection of flight conditions.

  5. High Power Mid Wave Infrared Semiconductor Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-15

    injected MWIR laser arrays using III-V antimonide based materials. In this approach, InGaSb quantum wells are grown on metamorphic layers on a GaSb or GaAs...also demonstrated room temperature photoluminescence up to 3 gm from InGaSb quantum wells grown on GaAs substrate. Using this approach we have...InAsSb/InAlAs quantum well lasers was reported with a To of 26K. Thus typically, the devices require thermoelectric or even cryogenic cooling to operate

  6. Short infrared laser pulses increase cell membrane fluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cantu, Jody C.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2017-02-01

    Short infrared laser pulses induce a variety of effects in cells and tissues, including neural stimulation and inhibition. However, the mechanism behind these physiological effects is poorly understood. It is known that the fast thermal gradient induced by the infrared light is necessary for these biological effects. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that the fast thermal gradient induced in a cell by infrared light exposure causes a change in the membrane fluidity. To test this hypothesis, we used the membrane fluidity dye, di-4-ANEPPDHQ, to investigate membrane fluidity changes following infrared light exposure. Di-4-ANEPPDHQ fluorescence was imaged on a wide-field fluorescence imaging system with dual channel emission detection. The dual channel imaging allowed imaging of emitted fluorescence at wavelengths longer and shorter than 647 nm for ratiometric assessment and computation of a membrane generalized polarization (GP) value. Results in CHO cells show increased membrane fluidity with infrared light pulse exposure and this increased fluidity scales with infrared irradiance. Full recovery of pre-infrared exposure membrane fluidity was observed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that infrared light induces a thermal gradient in cells that changes membrane fluidity.

  7. Multifocal terahertz radiation by intense lasers in rippled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Reenu; Singh, Divya; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the generation of terahertz radiation by cosh-Gaussian laser beams of high intensity, which are capable of creating relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. We find the components of the terahertz radiation for the relativistic laser plasma interaction, i.e. beating of the two lasers of same amplitude and different frequency in under dense plasma. We plot the electric field profile of the emitted radiation under the effect of lasers index. By creating a dip in peak of the incident lasers' fields, we can achieve multifocal terahertz radiation.

  8. Cascaded frequency doublers for broadband laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N F; Vlasova, K V; Davydov, V S; Kulikov, S M; Makarov, A I; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Freidman, Gennadii I; Shubin, S V

    2012-10-31

    A new scheme of a cascaded converter of the first harmonic of broadband cw laser radiation into the second harmonic (SH) with compensation for the group walk-off in cascades is proposed and investigated. The conditions under which high conversion coefficients of broadband ({approx}33 cm{sup -1}) single-mode fibre laser radiation with low peak power ({approx}300 W) into the SH are determined for frequency doublers based on the most promising LBO crystal. Conversion of cw radiation with an average power of 300 W and efficiency {eta} = 4.5 % into the SH is obtained in a single LBO crystal. Effect of coherent addition of SH radiation excited in different cascades is demonstrated for two- and three-stage schemes. The expected conversion efficiencies, calculated disregarding loss but taking into account real aberrations of elements, are 18 % and 38 %, respectively. The effect of pumping depletion begins to manifest itself in the third cascade of a three-stage converter; it may reduce the latter value to {approx}30 %. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  9. Radiative efficiency of MOCVD grown QD lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawst, Luke; Tsvid, Gene; Dudley, Peter; Kirch, Jeremy; Park, J. H.; Kim, N.

    2010-02-01

    The optical spectral gain characteristics and overall radiative efficiency of MOCVD grown InGaAs quantum dot lasers have been evaluated. Single-pass, multi-segmented amplified spontaneous emission measurements are used to obtain the gain, absorption, and spontaneous emission spectra in real units. Integration of the calibrated spontaneous emission spectra then allows for determining the overall radiative efficiency, which gives important insights into the role which nonradiative recombination plays in the active region under study. We use single pass, multi-segmented edge-emitting in which electrically isolated segments allow to vary the length of a pumped region. In this study we used 8 section devices (the size of a segment is 50x300 μm) with only the first 5 segments used for varying the pump length. The remaining unpumped segments and scribed back facet minimize round trip feedback. Measured gain spectra for different pump currents allow for extraction of the peak gain vs. current density, which is fitted to a logarithmic dependence and directly compared to conventional cavity length analysis, (CLA). The extracted spontaneous emission spectrum is calibrated and integrated over all frequencies and modes to obtain total spontaneous radiation current density and radiative efficiency, ηr. We find ηr values of approximately 17% at RT for 5 stack QD active regions. By contrast, high performance InGaAs QW lasers exhibit ηr ~50% at RT.

  10. Integrated all-optical infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, John; Bonakdar, Alireza; Gelfand, Ryan; Dey, Dibyendu; Nia, Iman Hassani; Fathipour, Vala; Memis, Omer Gokalp; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-05-09

    We report a type of infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser, in which far field light in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 6.1 μm) is modulated by a near field interaction of light in the telecommunications wavelength (1.55 μm). To achieve this all-optical switch, we used cross-polarized bowtie antennas and a centrally located germanium nanoslab. The bowtie antenna squeezes the short wavelength light into the gap region, where the germanium is placed. The perturbation of refractive index of the germanium due to the free carrier absorption produced by short wavelength light changes the optical response of the antenna and the entire laser intensity at 6.1 μm significantly. This device shows a viable method to modulate the far field of a laser through a near field interaction.

  11. Mid-Infrared Quantum Dot Cascade Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-18

    temperature, high efficiency infared laser sources can open up new applications such as medical imaging, sensing, inspection, and security surveillance...devices could be useful for new surgery and medical spectroscopy techniques, as well as monitoring of chemical species and free space communication

  12. Near Infrared Laser Spectroscopy of Scandium Monobromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ye; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Liao, Zhenwu; Yang, Mei; Chan, Man-Chor

    2012-06-01

    High resolution laser spectrum of scandium monobromide (ScBr) between 787 and 845 nm has been investigated using the technique of laser vaporization/reaction with free jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. ScBr was produced by reacting laser vaporized Sc atoms with ethyl bromide (C2H5Br). Spectra of six vibrational bands of both Sc79Br and Sc81Br isotopomers of the C1 Σ+ - X1 Σ+ transition and seven vibrational bands of the e3 Δ - a3 Δ transition were obtained and analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions for the singlet transitions yielded accurate molecular constants for the v = 0 - 3 levels of the C1 Σ+ state and the v = 0 - 2 levels of the X1 Σ+ state. Similar least-squares fit for the triplet transitions yielded molecular constants for the v = 0 - 2 levels of both e3 Δ and a3 Δ states. The equilibrium bond length, r_0, of the a3 Δ state has been determined to be 2.4789 Å. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged

  13. Mid-infrared coronary laser angioplasty with multifiber catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; Collins, Tyrone J.

    1993-06-01

    Mid-infrared laser wavelengths offer advantages as a source for coronary angioplasty based upon the excellent fiberoptic transmission and the enhanced tissue absorption of these photons. We report the results of a pilot clinical trial of a Holmium:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) coronary laser angioplasty using a prototype (1.6 mm and 2.0 mm) multifiber catheters. Coronary laser angioplasty with or without adjunctive balloon angioplasty or directional atherectomy was performed in 14 patients with 17 coronary stenoses. Laser success was obtained in 13/14 (93%) patients and 16/17 (94%) lesions. Uncomplicated procedural success was achieved in 9/14 (64%) patients and 12/17 (71%) lesions. Our initial laser success rate was very encouraging using this prototype multifiber catheter with a holmium:YAG laser. However, our overall procedural success rate was disappointing, and not superior to that expected with conventional angioplasty alone. The holmium laser remains an attractive energy source for laser angioplasty, but its utility is limited by catheters which create inadequate channels for stand-alone laser angioplasty.

  14. Biological activities caused by far-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoué, Shojiro; Kabaya, Morihiro

    1989-09-01

    Contrary to previous presumption, accumulated evidence indicates that far-infrared rays are biologically active. A small ceramic disk that emist far-infrared rays (4 16 μm) has commonly been applied to a local spot or a whole part of the body for exposure. Pioneering attempts to experimentally analyze an effect of acute and chronic radiation of far-infrared rays on living organisms have detected a growth-promoting effect in growing rats, a sleep-modulatory effect in freely behaving rats and an insomiac patient, and a blood circulation-enhancing effect in human skin. Question-paires to 542 users of far-infrared radiator disks embedded in bedelothes revealed that the majority of the users subjectively evaluated an improvement of their health. These effects on living organisms appear to be non-specifically triggered by an exposure to far-infrared rays, which eventually induce an increase in temperature of the body tissues or, more basically, an elevated motility of body fluids due to decrease in size of water clusters.

  15. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  16. Features of gallstone and kidney stone fragmentation by IR-pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishche, Sergei A.

    1995-05-01

    It is shown that infra-red ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) long pulse (approximately 100 microsecond(s) ) radiation of YAG:Nd laser, operating in free generation regime, effectively fragments gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. The features of the mechanism of this process are investigated. Laser lithotripsy is nowadays a method widely used for fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. Flashlamp pumped dye lasers of microsecond duration are most often used for such purposes. Nevertheless, there are some reports on lithotripsies with nanosecond duration laser pulses (for example, Q-switched YAG:Nd laser). The mechanism of the laser fragmentation of such stones was supposed to be the next. The laser powerful radiation, delivered through the optical fiber, is absorbed by the material of the stone. As a result of such highly localized energy absorption, dense plasma is formed, which expands. Such plasma and vapor, liquid confined, forms a cavitation bubble. This bubble grows, reaches its most dimension and then collapses on itself in some hundreds of micro seconds. Shock waves generated during the growth and the collapse of these bubbles are the origin of fragmentation of the stone. It is necessary to say that there are rather confined data on the hundreds microsecond laser pulse fragmentation especially what concerns the usage of infra-red (IR) YAG:Nd lasers with long laser pulses. Clearing this problem would result in better understanding of the fragmentation mechanism and it could favor development of simple and more reliable laser systems for lithotripsy. In this work we report about investigation of features of an effective fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones under exposure of IR ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) radiation of repetitive YAG:Nd laser working in free generation regime.

  17. A cesium plasma TELEC device for conversion of laser radiation to electric power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Rasor, N. S.; Lee, G.; Billman, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of the thermoelectronic laser energy converter (TELEC) concept are reported. This device has been devised as a means to convert high-average-power laser radiation into electrical energy, a crucial element in any space laser power transmission scheme using the available high-power/efficiency infrared lasers. Theoretical calculations, based upon inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in a cesium plasma, indicate internal conversion efficiency up to 50% with an overall system efficiency of 42%. The experiments reported were made with a test cell designed to confirm the theoretical model rather than demonstrate efficiency; 10.6-micron laser-beam absorption was limited to about 0.001 of the incident beam by the short absorption region. Nevertheless, confirmatory results were obtained, and the conversion of absorbed radiation to electric power is estimated to be near 10%.

  18. Analysis of stray radiation for infrared optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Tingcheng; Liao, Zhibo; Mu, Shengbo; Du, Jianxiang; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Based on the theory of radiation energy transfer in the infrared optical system, two methods for stray radiation analysis caused by interior thermal radiation in infrared optical system are proposed, one of which is important sampling method technique using forward ray trace, another of which is integral computation method using reverse ray trace. The two methods are discussed in detail. A concrete infrared optical system is provided. Light-tools is used to simulate the passage of radiation from the mirrors and mounts. Absolute values of internal irradiance on the detector are received. The results shows that the main part of the energy on the detector is due to the critical objects which were consistent with critical objects obtained by reverse ray trace, where mirror self-emission contribution is about 87.5% of the total energy. Corresponding to the results, the irradiance on the detector calculated by the two methods are in good agreement. So the validity and rationality of the two methods are proved.

  19. An intense radiation in mid-infrared of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Liu, Dong; Guo, Jingwei; Sang, Fengting

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the optically pumped rare gas lasers have been attracted extensive attention. Rare gas laser systems with Ne (2p53p), Ar (3p54p), and Kr (4p55p) atoms have been investigated. However, there are sparse studies based on Xe. In this work, new phenomena, intensive mid-infrared amplified spontaneous emissions (ASEs), are found after two-photon excitation of Xe from the ground state to the 6p[1/2]0 state. Simultaneously, substantial 6p[1/2]1 atoms are populated. The thresholds of ASE peak 1 and the generation of 6p[1/2]1 atoms are both about 1.5 mJ. It indicates that there should exist the relationship between these two phenomena. The ASE signals show broadband spectra. Therefore, it must be yielded by the superposition of Xe2* excimer transitions. The mid-infrared ASEs lead to excimers correlating to the 6s'[1/2]1 enormously generated. Then these excimers dissociate to produce substantial 6p[1/2]1 atoms. Under some circumstance, the ratio of the 6p[1/2]1 to 6p[1/2]0 atoms reaches about 80%. It indicates that the 6p[1/2]0 atoms strongly tend to decay through the emissions between the excimer states. Using these emissions, continuous-tunable mid-infrared laser with metastable Xe can be promisingly produced.

  20. Pulsed Infrared Laser Induced Visible Luminescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Tne- Technic~1 ~~~~~~~~ scence ”r~ ——— 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER _____________ ______UN BE R(a)I~~~~I1 ~~~~I1a~~~~ B...here can produce pressure waves reaching kilobar 1evels)~~ 13 A possibility , then , is one of laser shock induced tribolumine — scence . This could be

  1. Innovative Solid State Infrared Laser Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Signature// KENNETH L. SCHEPLER JOHN F. CARR, Chief EO CM Tech Branch EO CM Tech Branch Multispectral Sensing & Detection Division...a flat sapphire70% transmissive output coupler (OC) and a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror ( SESAM ) fabricated by NRL for this experiment...Cr2+:ZnSe laser,” Optics Letters 25: 168-170. (2000). [5] I. T Sorokina, E. Sorokin, and T. J Carrig, “Femtosecond pulse generation from a SESAM

  2. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  3. Laser radiation action on the biomedium as nonadiabatic excitation of macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, Igor N.; Krasnov, Andrey E.; Malov, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    The extended sphere of the laser successful use at large vagueness of the gear of radiation interaction with biological and biosimilar objects is a main modern paradox in the application of low-intensity coherent radiation in biology and medicine. There are rather regularly, for example, the reasons of immateriality of such parameters as laser radiation coherency degree for biostimulation, but the replacement of semi-conductor lasers by the light diodes isn't observed in medical practice until now. there are also no convincing results on comparative analysis of biostimulated effect under coherent and noncoherent radiation. Action of coherent electromagnetic radiation of the visible and infrared spectral range causes, as appear, the same type structure-optical changes in various objects biological liquids, cells suspensions, model biomolecular solutions, cells of plan, insects and animals. The medicobiologic consequences of laser effect are extremely variable because of the complexity of biological object and sophistication of research techniques and analyses. The energy doze of radiation acting onto a bio-object, as a rule, is extremely small, and hence like the case of extremely high frequency radiation one can to name this action by the 'informative' one, i.e., initiating only biosystem reactions is produced due to its own energy. In connection with the relatively slow biosystem response to the laser radiation action, the nonlocality of this reaction at the local action and large variety of biochemical reactions caused with laser radiation one can assume the existence of uniform physical mechanism realizing the biostimulation effect of laser radiation for various biosystems.

  4. Monitoring corneal hydration with a mid-infrared (IR) laser.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Abhijeet; Bennett, David B; Stafsudd, Oscar M

    2015-01-01

    A mid-infrared (IR) source at ∼ 3 μm radiation is used as a probe to measure hydration in porcine cornea. Since the Er(3+):YAG emission targets vibrational modes (around 3300 cm(-1)) in the H2O molecule, it is highly sensitive to changes in water content in the first ∼ 10 μm of the corneal tissue.

  5. Two-laser mid-infrared and ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Mark W.; Murray, Kermit K.

    2007-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was performed using two-pulsed lasers with wavelengths in the infrared and ultraviolet regions. A 2.94 [mu]m pulsed optical parametric oscillator laser system and a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser irradiated the same spot on the sample target. Sinapinic acid (SA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA), and 4-nitroaniline (NA) were used as matrices, and bovine insulin and cytochrome C were used as analytes. The laser energy was adjusted so that one-laser MALDI and LDI was at a minimum and the matrix and analyte ion signal was enhanced when the two lasers were fired together. Two-laser LDI was observed with SA, DHB, and NA matrices and two-laser MALDI was observed with SA and DHB. Plots of ion signal as a function of delay between the IR and UV lasers show two-laser signal from 0 ns up to a delay of 500 ns when the IR laser is fired before the UV laser. The results are interpreted in terms of IR laser heating of the target that leads to an enhancement in UV LDI and MALDI.

  6. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans; Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Altermatt, Hans J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 mu m, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400- mu m ZrF4 fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200- mu s, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 mu s) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 mu m as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50- mu m collateral tissue damage. wave, cavitation, channel formation, infrared-fiber-delivery system, tissue damage, cartilage.

  7. Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Ulrich; Weitz, Martin

    2009-09-03

    The general idea that optical radiation may cool matter was put forward 80 years ago. Doppler cooling of dilute atomic gases is an extremely successful application of this concept. More recently, anti-Stokes cooling in multilevel systems has been explored, culminating in the optical refrigeration of solids. Collisional redistribution of radiation has been proposed as a different cooling mechanism for atomic two-level systems, although experimental investigations using moderate-density gases have not reached the cooling regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of an atomic gas based on collisional redistribution of radiation, using rubidium atoms in argon buffer gas at a pressure of 230 bar. The frequent collisions in the ultradense gas transiently shift a highly red-detuned laser beam (that is, one detuned to a much lower frequency) into resonance, whereas spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed atomic resonance frequency. During each excitation cycle, kinetic energy of order k(B)T-that is, the thermal energy (k(B), Boltzmann's constant; T, temperature)-is extracted from the dense atomic sample. In a proof-of-principle experiment with a thermally non-isolated sample, we demonstrate relative cooling by 66 K. The cooled gas has a density more than ten orders of magnitude greater than the typical values used in Doppler-cooling experiments, and the cooling power reaches 87 mW. Future applications of the technique may include supercooling beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature and optical chillers.

  8. Near-Infrared Laser Adjuvant for Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Yuan, Jianping; Forbes, Benjamin; Hibert, Mathew L.; Lee, Eugene L. Q.; Whicher, Laura; Goudie, Calum; Yang, Yuan; Chen, Tao; Edelblute, Beth; Collette, Brian; Edington, Laurel; Trussler, James; Nezivar, Jean; Leblanc, Pierre; Bronson, Roderick; Tsukada, Kosuke; Suematsu, Makoto; Dover, Jeffrey; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Safe and effective immunologic adjuvants are often essential for vaccines. However, the choice of adjuvant for licensed vaccines is limited, especially for those that are administered intradermally. We show that non-tissue damaging, near-infrared (NIR) laser light given in short exposures to small areas of skin, without the use of additional chemical or biological agents, significantly increases immune responses to intradermal influenza vaccination without augmenting IgE. The NIR laser-adjuvanted vaccine confers increased protection in a murine influenza lethal challenge model as compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. We show that NIR laser treatment induces the expression of specific chemokines in the skin resulting in recruitment and activation of dendritic cells and is safe to use in both mice and humans. The NIR laser adjuvant technology provides a novel, safe, low-cost, simple-to-use, potentially broadly applicable and clinically feasible approach to enhancing vaccine efficacy as an alternative to chemical and biological adjuvants. PMID:24349390

  9. Study of imaging radar using ultra-wideband microwave-modulated infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Inutake, Masaaki; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present an ultra-wideband microwave-modulated laser radar which is designed and fabricated for improvement of the spatial resolution both in the range direction and the azimuth direction. The amplitude modulation in a range of 0.01-18 GHz is applied to an infrared laser source of 1550 nm wavelength. The frequency and the bandwidth are assigned by the Administration of Radio under the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications in Japan. However, there is no bandwidth limitation in the infrared region. Considering the influence of radiation pattern for microwave antennas case, there is no side lobe in laser beam transmission. Ambiguous signal and interferences which are returned from the ground can be suppressed. A prototype of laser-radar system with a fiber collimator for both transmitting and receiving optics has been fabricated. A vector network analyzer is used to obtain S21 signal between the microwave modulation input and that of received signal. The system is, at first, applied to the measurement of the distance (position) of an object. It is proved that the spatial resolution is less than 1 cm during 5-10 m. As an initial experiment, we have succeeded to obtain 3D image of object by scanning a laser beam in two dimensions.

  10. Spectroscopic Study of Terahertz Generation in Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Kim, Jae Hyun; Demmerle, Frederic; Boehm, Gerhard; Amann, Markus C.; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra-cavity difference-frequency generation are currently the only room-temperature mass-producible diode-laser-like emitters of coherent 1–6 THz radiation. Device performance has improved dramatically over the past few years to reach milliwatt-level power output and broad tuning from 1.2 to 5.9 THz, all at room-temperature. Terahertz output in these sources originates from intersubband optical nonlinearity in the laser active region. Here we report the first comprehensive spectroscopic study of the optical nonlinearity and investigate its dependence on the mid-infrared pump frequencies. Our work shows that the terahertz generation efficiency can vary by a factor of 2 or greater depending on the spectral position of the mid-infrared pumps for a fixed THz difference-frequency. We have also measured for the first time the linewidth for transitions between the lower quantum cascade laser states, which is critical for determining terahertz nonlinearity and predicting optical loss in quantum cascade laser waveguides. PMID:26879901

  11. Infrared laser damage to ciliary motion in Phragmatopoma.

    PubMed

    Rikmenspoel, R; Orris, S E; O'Day, P

    1977-04-01

    A glass neodymium laser was modified to make it possible to produce small lesions of 1-2 micron size with a quantitatively known amount of energy. The 1-06-micron radiation of this laser is sufficiently absorbed by water to work without the additions of dyes. Ciliary arrest in Phragmatopoma gills was produced by an amount of energy, sufficient to cause a rise in temperature of 150 degrees C in an area of 2 micron3. At these low doses the effect was fully reversible. With higher doses of laser energy the cilia stopped permanently, probably because of structural damage of the irradiated cells.

  12. Scanning Laser Infrared Molecular Spectrometer (SLIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David C.; Rickey, Kelly; Ksendzov, Alexander; George, Warren P.; Aljabri, Abdullah S.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    This prototype innovation is a novel design that achieves very long, effective laser path lengths that are able to yield ppb (parts per billion) and sub-ppb measurements of trace gases. SLIMS can also accommodate multiple laser channels covering a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in detection of more chemicals of interest. The mechanical design of the mirror cell allows for the large effective path length within a small footprint. The same design provides a robust structure that lends itself to being immune to some of the alignment challenges that similar cells face. By taking a hollow cylinder and by cutting an elliptically or spherically curved surface into its inner wall, the basic geometry of a reflecting ring is created. If the curved, inner surface is diamond-turned and highly polished, a surface that is very highly reflective can be formed. The surface finish can be further improved by adding a thin chrome or gold film over the surface. This creates a high-quality, curved, mirrored surface. A laser beam, which can be injected from a small bore hole in the wall of the cylinder, will be able to make many low-loss bounces around the ring, creating a large optical path length. The reflecting ring operates on the same principle as the Herriott cell. The difference exists in the mirror that doesn't have to be optically aligned, and which has a relatively large, internal surface area that lends itself to either open air or evacuated spectroscopic measurements. This solid, spherical ring mirror removes the possibility of mirror misalignment caused by thermal expansion or vibrations, because there is only a single, solid reflecting surface. Benefits of the reflecting ring come into play when size constraints reduce the size of the system, especially for space missions in which mass is at a premium.

  13. Effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on erythema and pigmentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Lindsay R; Almutawa, Fahad; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on cutaneous erythema, immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning are affected by a variety of factors. Some of these factors include the depth of cutaneous penetration of the specific wavelength, the individual skin type, and the absorption spectra of the different chromophores in the skin. UVB is an effective spectrum to induce erythema, which is followed by delayed tanning. UVA induces immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning. At high doses, UVA (primarily UVA2) can also induce erythema in individuals with skin types I-II. Visible light has been shown to induce erythema and a tanning response in dark skin, but not in fair skinned individuals. Infrared radiation produces erythema, which is probably a thermal effect. In this article we reviewed the available literature on the effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on the skin in regards to erythema and pigmentation. Much remains to be learned on the cutaneous effects of visible light and infrared radiation.

  14. Infrared Laser and Reaction Rate Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    other isotopes in which plants can be grown. (3) Separation of rare earths Ot and Hf, which may be competitive with other techniques. (4...34«.. Thls ls ha- « .i-PL p^ ■*•"«•> lasers TH ""»bllshed fact fo ^actions nanism of the HF 2 «r + F 2 ^^ + H and produces HP...22, p. 983 (1974). 65. H. R. Fetterman and H. R. Schlossberg, Microwave J., Vol. 17, p. 35 (1974). 66. T. Plant , L. Newman, E. J. Danielewicz, T

  15. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  16. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation

    DOE PAGES

    O’Callahan, Brian T.; Lewis, William E.; Möbius, Silke; ...

    2015-12-03

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy.With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainablemore » near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. As a result, the use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy.« less

  17. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation

    SciTech Connect

    O’Callahan, Brian T.; Lewis, William E.; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C.; Muller, Eric A.; Raschke, Markus B.

    2015-12-03

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy.With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. As a result, the use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy.

  18. A variable reflectivity output coupler for optically pumped far infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, U. U.; Harris, A. I.; Stutzki, J.; Genzel, R.

    1992-06-01

    The design and performance of a variable reflectivity output coupler for optically pumped far infrared lasers are investigated. The output coupler is a compact, tunable Michelson interferometer. The output coupling ratio is adjustable between 0 and equal to or greater than 60% for laser line wavelengths between 110 and 500 micrometers. This output coupler provides increased output power and flexibility. Beam profile measurements show that the Michelson output coupler produces a well collimated Gaussian laser beam. Design features are: the use of a 10 micrometers reflection coated quartz vacuum window which acts as a dichroic mirror for the pump radiation; the high mechanical stability obtained by leaf sping flexure mount of the movable Michelson mirror and by restricted alignment devices.

  19. Investigation of infra-red and nonequilibrium air radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress on the first year of a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this date, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared has been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems are already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements are required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance are accounted for. The present program is motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Developing accurate collisional-radiative models for these excited NO states is of importance as the UV-VUV transitions of NO (beta, gamma, epsilon, beta prime, gamma prime) produce a major, if not dominant, fraction of the radiation emitted by air plasmas. During the first year of the program, research has focused on the spectral range 1.0 to 1.5 microns, as detailed in Section 2 of this report. The measurements, conducted in a 50 kW radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operating on air at atmospheric pressure, extend previous shock tube investigations by Wray to a wider spectral range (1.0 to 1.5 microns vs 0.9 to 1.2 microns) and higher temperatures (7600 K in the plasma torch versus 6700 K in the shock-tube). These higher temperatures in the present experiment have made it possible to

  20. Analytical Characterization of CFRP Laser Treated by Excimer Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreling, S.; Fischer, F.; Delmdahl, R.; Gäbler, F.; Dilger, K.

    Due to the increasing interest in lightweight structures, carbon-fiber reinforced plastics are increasingly applied, especially in the transportation industry. An interesting technology for joining these materials is adhesive bonding due to numerous advantages compared to conventional techniques like riveting. However, to achieve a strong and durable bond, surface pre-treatment is necessary to remove residues of release agents that are transferred to the surface during manufacturing. This paper describes analytical experiments, namely SEM and XPS, performed on CFRP surfaces pre-treated with 308 nm excimer laser radiation.

  1. Non-infrared femtosecond lasers: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmann, Max; Gebs, Raphael; Fleischhaker, Robert; Zawischa, Ivo; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Russ, Simone; Bauer, Lara; Keller, Uwe; Faisst, Birgit; Budnicki, Aleksander; Sutter, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    The unique properties of ultrafast laser pulses pave the way to numerous novel applications. Particularly lasers in the sub-pico second regime, i.e. femtosecond lasers, in the last decade arrived at a level of reliability suitable for the industrial environment and now gain an increasing recognition since these pulse durations combine the advantages of precise ablation with higher efficiency especially in the case of processing metallic materials. However, for some micro processing applications the infrared wavelength of these lasers is still a limiting factor. Thus, to further broaden the range of possible applications, industrial femtosecond lasers should combine the advantages of femtosecond pulses and shorter wavelengths. To that extend, we present results obtained with a frequency doubled TruMicro 5000 FemtoEdition. We show that depending on the processed material, the higher photon energy as well as tighter focusing options of the shorter wavelength can open up a new regime of processing parameters. This regime is not accessible by infrared light, leading to a wider range of possible applications.

  2. Infrared laser ablation sample transfer for MALDI imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2012-04-03

    An infrared laser was used to ablate material from tissue sections under ambient conditions for direct collection on a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) target. A 10 μm thick tissue sample was placed on a microscope slide and was mounted tissue-side down between 70 and 450 μm from a second microscope slide. The two slides were mounted on a translation stage, and the tissue was scanned in two dimensions under a focused mid-infrared (IR) laser beam to transfer material to the target slide via ablation. After the material was transferred to the target slide, it was analyzed using MALDI imaging using a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Images were obtained from peptide standards for initial optimization of the system and from mouse brain tissue sections using deposition either onto a matrix precoated target or with matrix addition after sample transfer and compared with those from standard MALDI mass spectrometry imaging. The spatial resolution of the transferred material is approximately 400 μm. Laser ablation sample transfer provides several new capabilities not possible with conventional MALDI imaging including (1) ambient sampling for MALDI imaging, (2) area to spot concentration of ablated material, (3) collection of material for multiple imaging analyses, and (4) direct collection onto nanostructure assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI) targets without blotting or ultrathin sections.

  3. Note: Infrared laser diagnostics for deuterium gas puff Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; McKee, E. S.; Hammel, B. D.; Darling, T. W.; Swanson, K. J.; Covington, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    Deuterium gas puff Z pinches have been used for generation of strong neutron fluxes on the MA class pulse power machines. Due to the low electron density of deuterium Z-pinch plasma, regular laser diagnostics in the visible range cannot be used for observation and study of the pinch. Laser probing at the wavelength of 1064 nm was used for visualization of deuterium plasma. Infrared schlieren and interferometry diagnostics showed the deuterium gas puff plasma dynamics, instabilities, and allowed for the reconstruction of the profile of the plasma density.

  4. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  5. Design of FELiChEM, the first infrared free-electron laser user facility in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ting; Jia, Qi-Ka; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wang, Lin; Yang, Yong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    FELiChEM is a new experimental facility under construction at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC). Its core device is two free electron laser oscillators generating middle-infrared and far-infrared laser and covering the spectral range of 2.5-200 μm. It will be a dedicated infrared light source aiming at energy chemistry research. We present the brief design of the FEL oscillators, with the emphasis put on the middle-infrared oscillator. Most of the basic parameters are determined and the anticipated performance of the output radiation is given. The first light of FELiChEM is targeted for the end of 2017. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21327901)

  6. Thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed infrared-laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that achieve tissue removal through the delivery of short pulses of high-intensity infrared laser radiation, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed infrared laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and analyzing the stress transients generated by Q-sw Er:YSGG (lambda = 2.79 microns) and TEA CO2 (lambda = 10.6 microns) laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not produce material removal, the stress transients are consistent with thermal expansion of the tissue samples. The temporal structure of the stress transients generated at the threshold radiant exposure for ablation indicates that the onset of material removal is delayed with respect to irradiation. Once material removal is achieved, the magnitude of the peak compressive stress and its variation with radiant exposure are consistent with a model that considers this process as an explosive event occurring after the laser pulse. This mechanism is different from ArF- and KrF-excimer laser ablation where absorption of ultraviolet radiation by the collagenous tissue matrix leads to tissue decomposition during irradiation and results in material removal via rapid surface vaporization. It appears that under the conditions examined in this study, explosive boiling of tissue water is the process that mediates the ablation event. This study provides evidence that the dynamics and mechanism of tissue ablation processes can be altered by targeting tissue water rather than the tissue structural matrix. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8744336

  7. Speckle-free near-infrared imaging using a Nd3+ random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barredo-Zuriarrain, M.; Iparraguirre, I.; Fernández, J.; Azkargorta, J.; Balda, R.

    2017-10-01

    Single shot infrared images of different patterns obtained, both by reflection and transmission, with a near infrared random laser source and a narrowband laser are analyzed under similar experimental conditions. The Nd-based crystal powder random laser provides speckle-free transmission and reflection infrared images with higher values of contrast to noise ratio than those obtained with the narrowband laser. These results open up new possibilities to enhance the field of high resolution imaging for optoelectronic and biomedical applications.

  8. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  9. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  10. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Morales-Rodríguez, M E; Senesac, L R; Rajic, S; Lavrik, N V; Smith, D B; Datskos, P G

    2013-02-15

    We have investigated an IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. Although we use a chemical layer to absorb target molecules, IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings. The chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of 1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine and a monolayer of 2-Sulfanylethan-1-ol (2-mercaptoethanol) over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 μm. We found that both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  11. Nonsequential double ionization with mid-infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Bin; Wang, Xu; Yu, Ben-Hai; Tang, Qing-Bin; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Using a full-dimensional Monte Carlo classical ensemble method, we present a theoretical study of atomic nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) with mid-infrared laser fields, and compare with results from near-infrared laser fields. Unlike single-electron strong-field processes, double ionization shows complex and unexpected interplays between the returning electron and its parent ion core. As a result of these interplays, NSDI for mid-IR fields is dominated by second-returning electron trajectories, instead of first-returning trajectories for near-IR fields. Some complex NSDI channels commonly happen with near-IR fields, such as the recollision-excitation-with-subsequent-ionization (RESI) channel, are virtually shut down by mid-IR fields. Besides, the final energies of the two electrons can be extremely unequal, leading to novel e-e momentum correlation spectra that can be measured experimentally.

  12. Nonsequential double ionization with mid-infrared laser fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Bin; Wang, Xu; Yu, Ben-Hai; Tang, Qing-Bin; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Using a full-dimensional Monte Carlo classical ensemble method, we present a theoretical study of atomic nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) with mid-infrared laser fields, and compare with results from near-infrared laser fields. Unlike single-electron strong-field processes, double ionization shows complex and unexpected interplays between the returning electron and its parent ion core. As a result of these interplays, NSDI for mid-IR fields is dominated by second-returning electron trajectories, instead of first-returning trajectories for near-IR fields. Some complex NSDI channels commonly happen with near-IR fields, such as the recollision-excitation-with-subsequent-ionization (RESI) channel, are virtually shut down by mid-IR fields. Besides, the final energies of the two electrons can be extremely unequal, leading to novel e-e momentum correlation spectra that can be measured experimentally. PMID:27857182

  13. Nonsequential double ionization with mid-infrared laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying -Bin; Wang, Xu; Yu, Ben -Hai; Tang, Qing -Bin; Wang, Guang -Hou; Wan, Jian -Guo

    2016-11-18

    Using a full-dimensional Monte Carlo classical ensemble method, we present a theoretical study of atomic nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) with mid-infrared laser fields, and compare with results from near-infrared laser fields. Unlike single-electron strong-field processes, double ionization shows complex and unexpected interplays between the returning electron and its parent ion core. As a result of these interplays, NSDI for mid-IR fields is dominated by second-returning electron trajectories, instead of first-returning trajectories for near-IR fields. Here, some complex NSDI channels commonly happen with near-IR fields, such as the recollision-excitation-with-subsequent-ionization (RESI) channel, are virtually shut down by mid-IR fields. Besides, the final energies of the two electrons can be extremely unequal, leading to novel e-e momentum correlation spectra that can be measured experimentally.

  14. Nonsequential double ionization with mid-infrared laser fields

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Ying -Bin; Wang, Xu; Yu, Ben -Hai; ...

    2016-11-18

    Using a full-dimensional Monte Carlo classical ensemble method, we present a theoretical study of atomic nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) with mid-infrared laser fields, and compare with results from near-infrared laser fields. Unlike single-electron strong-field processes, double ionization shows complex and unexpected interplays between the returning electron and its parent ion core. As a result of these interplays, NSDI for mid-IR fields is dominated by second-returning electron trajectories, instead of first-returning trajectories for near-IR fields. Here, some complex NSDI channels commonly happen with near-IR fields, such as the recollision-excitation-with-subsequent-ionization (RESI) channel, are virtually shut down by mid-IR fields. Besides, the finalmore » energies of the two electrons can be extremely unequal, leading to novel e-e momentum correlation spectra that can be measured experimentally.« less

  15. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  16. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Subsonic radiation waves in neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loseva, T. V.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical methods are used to investigate the propagation of plane subsonic radiation waves in neon from an obstacle in the direction opposite to the incident radiation of Nd and CO2 lasers. An analysis is made of the influence of the power density of the incident radiation (in the range 10-100 MW/cm2) and of the initial density of neon (beginning from the normal valuep ρ0 up to 10ρ0) on the various characteristics of subsonic radiation waves. It is shown that waves traveling in neon can provide an effective source of radiation with a continuous spectrum and an efficiency of ~ 12-27% in the ultraviolet range (with a characteristic photon energy ~ 5-10 eV).

  17. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  18. Infrared heterodyne spectrometer measurements of vertical profile of tropospheric ammonia and ozone. [using dual carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peyton, B. J.; Lange, R. A.; Savage, M. G.; Seals, R. K.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing of the concentration and vertical distribution of atmospheric gases has been carried out using a dual CO2 laser multichannel infrared heterodyne spectrometer (IHS). The high specificity and nearly quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of the IHS provide the capability of scanning individual signature lines of selected atmospheric constituents in the 9 to 11 micron region. A comprehensive investigation of the spectral overlap between CO2 laser local oscillator transitions and selected atmospheric constituents was performed; measurements of the atmospheric absorption of solar radiation from the ground were carried out at selected laser transitions for ammonia and ozone.

  19. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spatial distribution of laser radiation scattered in a plasma formed by optical breakdown of a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufetov, Igor'A.; Bufetova, G. A.; Fyodorov, V. B.

    1994-12-01

    Spatial distributions of laser radiation scattered by a laser spark were determined at different laser radiation wavelengths (λ = 1060, 530, 353, and 265 nm) and gas pressures (air at 10-760 Torr). An interference structure of the cone of the scattered radiation behind the spark was detected for the first time. The structure was attributed to interference of the radiation scattered in two or more self-focusing centres in the laser-spark plasma in air. The dependences of the maximum scattering angle on the gas pressure and on the laser radiation wavelength were determined experimentally.

  20. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  1. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  2. Bifluorophores - radiation transformers of excimeric lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonova, L.C.; Afanasiadi, L.S.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Kopylova, T.N.; Tarasenko, V.F.; Turr, I.N.

    1985-12-01

    This article describes the method of transformation of radiation as the result of intramolecular energy transfer in molecules called bifluorophores. The aim of this work was to study the spectral luminescent properties of oxazole, its equimolar mixtures and bifluorophore systems based on them, and also the possibilities of transformation using them of the radiation of the XeCl laser into the blue-green region of the spectrum. The power of the laser reached 1 MW, the pulse duration at the half-height was 20-30 nsec, and the pulse repetition frequency was 1 Hz. The generation properties of the molecules in the solutions were studied on an apparatus described in detail. A lateral variant of the excitation was used, and the resonator was formed by a dull mirror and the surface of the cuvette. The spectral-luminescent properties were studied on a Specord UV-VIS spectrophotometer and a fluorimeter mounted on the base of a SF4A monochromator.

  3. Radiation-reaction trapping of electrons in extreme laser fields.

    PubMed

    Ji, L L; Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-04-11

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  4. Widely tunable (PbSn)Te lasers using etched cavities for mass production. [for infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    Lead salt diode lasers are being used increasingly as tunable sources of monochromatic infrared radiation in a variety of spectroscopic systems. These devices are particularly useful, both in the laboratory and in the field, because of their high spectral brightness (compared to thermal sources) and wide spectral coverage (compared to line-tunable gas lasers). While the primary commercial application of these lasers has been for ultrahigh resolution laboratory spectroscopy, there are numerous systems applications, including laser absorbtion pollution monitors and laser heterodyne radiometers, for which diode lasers have great potential utility. Problem areas related to the wider use of these components are identified. Among these are total tuning range, mode control, and high fabrication cost. A fabrication technique which specifically addresses the problems of tuning range and cost, and which also has potential application for mode control, is reported.

  5. Laser plasma influence on the space-time structure of powerful laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyin, O. B.; Bogdanov, G. S.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Gerasimov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Melekhov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of laser plasma on the structure of the radiation field of a powerful Nd-glass laser with pulse energy up to 30 J and with the diameter of the output beam 45 mm. Laser plasma is generated by focusing the laser radiation on a low-density target such as nylon mesh and teflon or mylar films. Temporal profile of the laser pulse with a total duration of 25 ns consists of a several short pulse train. Duration of each pulse is about 2 ns. Notable smoothing of spatially non-uniform radiation structure was observed in the middle of the laser pulse.

  6. Focusers of obliquely incident laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharskiy, A. V.; Danilov, V. A.; Popov, V. V.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Sisakyan, I. N.; Sayfer, V. A.; Stepanov, V. V.

    1984-08-01

    Focusing obliquely incident laser radiation along a given line in space with a given intensity distribution is treated as a problem of synthesizing a mirror surface. The intricate shape of such a surface, characterized by a function z= z (u,v) in the approximation of geometrical optics, is determined from the equation phi (u,v,z) - phi O(u,v,z)=O, which expresses that the incident field and the reflected field have identical eikonals. Further calculations are facilitated by replacing continuous mirror with a more easily manufactured piecewise continuous one. The problem is solved for the simple case of a plane incident wave with a typical iconal phi O(u,v,z)= -z cos0 at a large angle to a focus mirror in the z-plane region. Mirrors constructed on the basis of the theoretical solution were tested in an experiment with a CO2 laser. A light beam with Gaussian intensity distribution was, upon incidence at a 45 deg angle, focused into a circle or into an ellipse with uniform intensity distribution. Improvements in amplitudinal masking and selective tanning technology should reduce energy losses at the surface which results in efficient laser focusing mirrors.

  7. High frequency electron nuclear double resonance at 239 GHz using a far-infrared laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Paschedag, L.; van Tol, J.; Wyder, P.

    1995-10-01

    We report on the application of {sup 14}N electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) at 8.5 T and 239 GHz ({lambda}=1.2 mm) in a {gamma}-irradiated betaine arsenate single crystal. A laser was used as a far-infrared radiation source in a transmission-type electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup without a cavity. The four expected nitrogen ENDOR lines were observed, but due to insufficient saturation of the EPR transitions the signal/noise ratio was not larger than 10 and the signals vanished at temperatures above 20 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Radiating electron source generation in ultraintense laser-foil interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Capdessus, R. King, M.; McKenna, P.

    2016-08-15

    A radiating electron source is shown to be created by a laser pulse (with intensity of 10{sup 23 }W/cm{sup 2} and duration equal to 30 fs) interacting with a near-critical density plasma. It is shown that the back radiation reaction resulting from high energy synchrotron radiation tends to counteract the action of the ponderomotive force. This enhances the collective dynamics of the radiating electrons in the highest field areas, resulting in the production of a compact radiation source (containing 80% of the synchrotron radiation emission), with an energy on the order of tens of MeV over the laser pulse duration. These phenomena are investigated using a QED-particle-in-cell code, and compared with a kinetic model accounting for the radiation reaction force in the electron distribution function. The results shed new light on electron-photon sources at ultra-high laser intensities and could be tested on future laser facilities.

  9. Infrared laser-assisted desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezenom, Yohannes H; Dong, Jianan; Murray, Kermit K

    2008-02-01

    We have used an infrared laser for desorption of material and ionization by interaction with electrosprayed solvent. Infrared laser-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (IR LADESI) mass spectrometry was used for the direct analysis of water-containing samples under ambient conditions. An ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to include a pulsed Er:YAG laser at 2.94 microm wavelength coupled into a germanium oxide optical fiber for desorption at atmospheric pressure and a nanoelectrospray source for ionization. Analytes in aqueous solution were placed on a stainless steel target and irradiated with the pulsed IR laser. Material desorbed and ablated from the target was ionized by a continuous stream of charged droplets from the electrosprayed solvent. Peptide and protein samples analyzed using this method yield mass spectra similar to those obtained by conventional electrospray. Blood and urine were analyzed without sample pretreatment to demonstrate the capability of IR LADESI for direct analysis of biological fluids. Pharmaceutical products were also directly analyzed. Finally, the role of water as a matrix in the IR LADESI process is discussed.

  10. Monolithically Integrated Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser and Detector

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Benedikt; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the monolithic integration of a mid-infrared laser and detector utilizing a bi-functional quantum cascade active region. When biased, this active region provides optical gain, while it can be used as a detector at zero bias. With our novel approach we can measure the light intensity of the laser on the same chip without the need of external lenses or detectors. Based on a bound-to-continuum design, the bi-functional active region has an inherent broad electro-luminescence spectrum of 200 cm−1, which indicate sits use for single mode laser arrays. We have measured a peak signal of 191.5 mV at theon-chip detector, without any amplification. The room-temperature pulsed emission with an averaged power consumption of 4 mW and the high-speed detection makes these devices ideal for low-power sensors. The combination of the on-chip detection functionality, the broad emission spectrum and the low average power consumption indicates the potential of our bi-functional quantum cascade structures to build a mid-infrared lab-on-a-chip based on quantum cascade laser technology. PMID:23389348

  11. Monolithically integrated mid-infrared quantum cascade laser and detector.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Benedikt; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-02-06

    We demonstrate the monolithic integration of a mid-infrared laser and detector utilizing a bi-functional quantum cascade active region. When biased, this active region provides optical gain, while it can be used as a detector at zero bias. With our novel approach we can measure the light intensity of the laser on the same chip without the need of external lenses or detectors. Based on a bound-to-continuum design, the bi-functional active region has an inherent broad electro-luminescence spectrum of 200 cm⁻¹, which indicates its use for single mode laser arrays. We have measured a peak signal of 191.5 mV at the on-chip detector, without any amplification. The room-temperature pulsed emission with an averaged power consumption of 4 mW and the high-speed detection makes these devices ideal for low-power sensors. The combination of the on-chip detection functionality, the broad emission spectrum and the low average power consumption indicates the potential of our bi-functional quantum cascade structures to build a mid-infrared lab-on-a-chip based on quantum cascade laser technology.

  12. Laser Welding of Copper Using Multi Mode Fiber Lasers at Near Infrared Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebl, S.; Wiedenmann, R.; Ganser, A.; Schmitz, P.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Due to the increasing electrification of automotive drives and the expansion of decentralized renewable energygeneration, the consumption of copper for the fabrication of electrical components such as electric motors or conducting paths increases. To jointhese components, laser welding is more frequently used since it represents a flexible and fully automatable joining process. Because of the high thermal conductivity, the low absorption coefficient forinfrared wavelength of common laser beam sources and the resulting limited process efficiency, welding of copper alloys represents a major challenge for laser assisted processes. In this paper, experimental investigationsare presented to identify arising process limits during laser welding of pure copper materials with multi-mode fiber lasers at near infrared wavelength depending on the applied laser power and welding velocity. In addition, a potential stabilization of the welding process by shielding gas support was examined. Further investigations were focused on the influence of shielding gas on the molten pool geometry.

  13. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Design and fabrication of visible and infrared laser HR coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meixuan; Dong, Lianhe; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Boqi; Ma, Jun

    2014-08-01

    In view of the special requirements of the high power laser spectral bands and the incident angle, plate dual wavelength laser high reflecting membrane on the K9 optical glass by using electron beam evaporation deposition. Under the condition of vertical incidence, the reflectivity of 532 nm wavelength is higher than 90%; Under the condition of plus or minus 45 ° incident angle, the reflectivity of 1064 nm wavelength at near infrared band is higher than 99.9%. Through material selection, optimization of process parameters and the method of the ion source assisted deposition to improve the membrane layer density and membrane base binding strength, laser-damaged threshold and meet the requirements of the use of optical instruments under certain environmental conditions.

  15. Development of Mid-Infrared Lasers for the Measurement of Trace Atmospheric Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannun, R. A.; Witinski, M. F.; Forouhar, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    In order to thoroughly characterize atmospheric composition at all altitudes, an unprecedented scientific and technical effort is needed. Essential to the advancement of both satellite and in situ science are improvements in continuous wave (CW) and high-power pulsed laser systems in the infrared spectral region integrated with miniaturized electronic and optical components, allowing for the deployment of single mode light sources aboard satellite and UAV platforms. Sources in the the spectral region from 2.8 μm to 3.5 μm are crucial to the sensitive and precise quantification of several atmospherically relevant species, including: OH, H2O, H218O, HDO, CH4, 13CH4, CO2, CH2O, and C2H6, all of which present strong fundamental vibrational absorptions in this mid-infrared range. Currently, however, a massive technology gap exists in both CW and pulsed laser systems within this spectral window. Recent developments include the advancement of CW tunable diode technology using new solid state materials to improve electron hole localization, and the initial integration of these lasers into miniaturized optoelectronic systems ideal for in situ deployment. In addition, high-power pulsed light sources have been produced using optical parametric generation (OPG). A single-frequency Nd:YAG pumps a nonlinear crystal, injection seeded with a diode laser to enhance efficiency and reduce the bandwidth of the output radiation, creating a light source ideal for LIDAR and other remote sensing applications.

  16. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  17. 3D finite element model for writing long-period fiber gratings by CO2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-08-12

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented.

  18. Broadly tunable Cr 4+-doped solid-state lasers in the near infrared and visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennaroglu, Alphan

    2002-11-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the characteristics of Cr 4+-doped solid-state lasers which produce broadly tunable coherent radiation in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 1.13 and 1.63 μm. Cr 4+-doped gain media have several favorable characteristics including broad absorption bands that overlap with the operating wavelengths of several commercial pump lasers, a 4-level energy structure that allows continuous-wave as well as pulsed operation with low threshold pump powers, and the presence of broad amplification bands for the generation of ultrashort optical pulses. In addition, non-linear frequency conversion schemes can be readily employed to construct broadly tunable coherent visible sources based on Cr 4+-doped gain media. These favorable features make Cr 4+-doped lasers potentially important in many applications in optical communications, eye-safe imaging, medicine, and spectroscopy. After a description of the basic physical mechanisms that lead to broad emission in tunable solid-state lasers in general and Cr 4+-doped gain media in particular, the manuscript provides a detailed description of the operational characteristics of Cr 4+-doped lasers, including rate-equation analysis of power performance, role of thermal effects, and different mode-locking techniques for the generation of ultrashort optical pulses. Later sections focus on the work performed in the development and characterization of specific examples of Cr 4+-doped lasers. Particular attention is given to Cr 4+:forsterite and Cr 4+:YAG laser systems due to their superior power performance. Gain-switched, continuous-wave, and mode-locked operations of these lasers are described with a particular emphasis on recent developments. Studies carried out with other Cr 4+-doped lasers such as Cr 4+:Y 2SiO 5, Cr 4+-doped oxyapatite, Cr 4+-doped garnets, and Cr 4+:Ca 2GeO 4 are also described. Finally, use of non-linear conversion schemes in the generation

  19. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  20. Local changes in arterial oxygen saturation induced by visible and near-infrared light radiation.

    PubMed

    Yesman, S S; Mamilov, S O; Veligotsky, D V; Gisbrecht, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficiency of laser radiation on oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) rate in blood vessels and its wavelength dependence. The results of in vivo experimental measurements of the laser-induced photodissociation of HbO2 in cutaneous blood vessels in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range are presented. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was measured by a method of fingertip pulse oximetry, which is based on the measurement of the modulated pulse wave of the blood. The light irradiating the finger was provided by corresponding light-emitting diodes (LED) at 15 wavelengths in the 400-940 nm spectrum range. Statistical results with a value of p < 0.05 were viewed as being significant for all volunteers. The results show that there is a decrease in SpO2 in the blood under the influence of the transcutaneous laser irradiation. Three maxima in the spectral range (530, 600, and 850 nm) are revealed, wherein decrease in the relative concentration of SpO2 reaches 5 % ± 0.5 %. Near-IR radiation plays a dominant role in absorption of laser radiation by oxyhemoglobin in deeper layers of tissue blood vessels. The obtained data correlate with the processes of light propagation in biological tissue. The observed reduction in SpO2 indicates the process of photodissociation of HbO2 in vivo and may result in local increase in O2 in the tissue. Such laser-induced enrichment of tissue oxygenation can be used in phototherapy of pathologies, where the elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical.

  1. A novel laser angioplasty guided hollow fiber using mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamada, Shinya; Sato, Izuru; Awazu, Kunio

    2006-02-01

    We have proposed selective removal of cholesterol ester by infrared laser of wavelength with 5.75 μm irradiation; the wavelength of 5.75 μm correspond with the ester bond C=O stretching vibration. The flexible laser guiding line and a compact light source are required for our proposal. We used a compact mid-infrared tunable laser by difference frequency generation; DFG laser was developed for substitute light source of free electron laser. In the present work, first, we have developed hollow optical fiber with a diamond lens-tip to deliver DFG laser in the blood vessel and evaluated the transmission of DFG laser from 5.5 μm to 7.5 μm. The transmission of 5.75 μm is about 65%, the DFG beam was focused on the tip of fiber by diamond lens-tip. Secondly, we performed the selective removal experiment of cholesterol ester using the hollow optical fiber with diamond lens-tip and DFG laser. The sample used a two layer model, cholesterol oleate and gelatin. The cholesterol oleate was decomposed by 5.75 μm DFG irradiation with 3.8 W/cm2.

  2. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  3. Ultrastructural study of thyroid capillaries after IR laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Lourdes; Perez de Vargas, I.; Carrillo, F.; Parrado, C.; Pelaez, A.

    1994-02-01

    Laser radiation causes microscopical changes in the follicular cells relative to dose intensity. So, we have observed focal degenerative phenomena, at maximal doses, and activation of cellular function similar to the ones observed after stimulation with TSH, at minimal doses. In order to evaluate the evolution of these changes we have planned an ultrastructural study of rats thyroid capillaries treated with IR laser radiation.

  4. Laser method for simulating the transient radiation effects of semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Sun, Peng; Tang, Ge; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the laser simulation adequacy both by theoretical analysis and experiments. We first explain the basic theory and physical mechanisms of laser simulation of transient radiation effect of semiconductor. Based on a simplified semiconductor structure, we describe the reflection, optical absorption and transmission of laser beam. Considering two cases of single-photon absorption when laser intensity is relatively low and two-photon absorption with higher laser intensity, we derive the laser simulation equivalent dose rate model. Then with 2 types of BJT transistors, laser simulation experiments and gamma ray radiation experiments are conducted. We found good linear relationship between laser simulation and gammy ray which depict the reliability of laser simulation.

  5. Design and fabrication of multilayer thin film coated hollow waveguides for enhanced infrared radiation delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bledt, Carlos M.; Melzer, Jeffrey E.; Harrington, James A.

    2013-03-01

    Metal coated Hollow Glass Waveguides (HGWs) incorporating single dielectric thin films have been widely used for the low-loss transmission of infrared radiation in applications ranging from surgery to spectroscopy. While the incorporation of single dielectric film designs have traditionally been used in metal/dielectric coated HGWs, recent research has focused on the development of alternating low/high refractive index multilayer dielectric thin film stacks for further transmission loss reduction. Continuing advances in the deposition of optically functional cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide thin films in HGWs have allowed for the simultaneous increase in film quality and greater film thickness control necessary for the implication of such multilayer stack designs for enhanced reflectivity at infrared wavelengths. This study focuses on the theoretical and practical considerations in the development of such multilayer stack coated waveguides and presents novel results including film growth kinetics of multilayer stack thin film materials, IR spectroscopic analysis, and IR laser attenuation measurements. The effects of incorporating progressive alternating cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide dielectric thin films on the optical properties of next generation dielectric thin film stack coated HGWs in the near and mid infrared regions are thoroughly presented. The implications of incorporating such dielectric multilayer stack coatings based on metal sulfide thin films on the future of IR transmitting hollow waveguides for use in applications ranging from spectroscopy, to high laser power delivery are briefly discussed.

  6. Mesoscopic modelling of the interaction of infrared lasers with composite materials: an application to human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila Verde, A.; Ramos, Marta M. D.; Stoneham, Marshall; Mendes Ribeiro, R.

    2004-11-01

    The mesostructure and composition of composite materials determine their mechanical, optical and thermal properties and, consequently, their response to incident radiation. We have developed general finite element models of porous composite materials under infrared radiation to examine the influence of pore size on one of the determining parameters of the stress distribution in the material: the temperature distribution. We apply them to the specific case of human dental enamel, a material which has nanometer scale pores containing water/organic, and predict the maximum temperature reached after a single 0.35 μs laser pulse of sub-ablative fluence by two lasers: Er:YAG (2.9 μm) and CO2 (10.6 μm). For the Er:YAG laser, the results imply a strong dependence of the maximum temperature reached at the pore on the area-to-volume ratio of the pore, whereas there is little such dependence for CO2 lasers. Thus, CO2 lasers may produce more reproducible results than Er:YAG lasers when it comes to enamel ablation, which may be of significant interest during clinical practice. More generally, when ablating composite materials by infrared lasers researchers should account for the material's microstructure and composition when designing experiments or interpreting results, since a more simplistic continuum approach may not be sufficient to explain differences observed during ablation of materials with similar optical properties or of the same material but using different wavelengths.

  7. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  8. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-02-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  9. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  10. The influence of infrared radiation on short-term ultraviolet-radiation-induced injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidbey, K.H.; Witkowski, T.A.; Kligman, A.M.

    1982-05-01

    Because heat has been reported to influence adversely short- and long-term ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced skin damage in animals, we investigated the short-term effects of infrared radiation on sunburn and on phototoxic reactions to topical methoxsalen and anthracene in human volunteers. Prior heating of the skin caused suppression of the phototoxic response to methoxsalen as evidenced by an increase in the threshold erythema dose. Heat administered either before or after exposure to UV radiation had no detectable influence on sunburn erythema or on phototoxic reactions provoked by anthracene.

  11. Biological effects and medical applications of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 760nm and 100,000nm. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy generally employs light at red and near-infrared wavelengths (600-100nm) to modulate biological activity. Many factors, conditions, and parameters influence the therapeutic effects of IR, including fluence, irradiance, treatment timing and repetition, pulsing, and wavelength. Increasing evidence suggests that IR can carry out photostimulation and photobiomodulation effects particularly benefiting neural stimulation, wound healing, and cancer treatment. Nerve cells respond particularly well to IR, which has been proposed for a range of neurostimulation and neuromodulation applications, and recent progress in neural stimulation and regeneration are discussed in this review. The applications of IR therapy have moved on rapidly in recent years. For example, IR therapy has been developed that does not actually require an external power source, such as IR-emitting materials, and garments that can be powered by body heat alone. Another area of interest is the possible involvement of solar IR radiation in photoaging or photorejuvenation as opposites sides of the coin, and whether sunscreens should protect against solar IR? A better understanding of new developments and biological implications of IR could help us to improve therapeutic effectiveness or develop new methods of PBM using IR wavelengths. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. How well do we know the incoming solar infrared radiation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsey, Jonathan; Coleman, Marc; Gardiner, Tom; Shine, Keith

    2017-04-01

    The solar spectral irradiance (SSI) has been identified as a key climate variable by the Global Climate Observing System (Bojinski et al. 2014, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.). It is of importance in the modelling of atmospheric radiative transfer, and the quantification of the global energy budget. However, in the near-infrared spectral region (between 2000-10000 cm-1) there exists a discrepancy of 7% between spectra measured from the space-based SOLSPEC instrument (Thuillier et al. 2015, Solar Physics) and those from a ground-based Langley technique (Bolseé et al. 2014, Solar Physics). This same difference is also present between different analyses of the SOLSPEC data. This work aims to reconcile some of these differences by presenting an estimate of the near-infrared SSI obtained from ground-based measurements taken using an absolutely calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer. Spectra are obtained both using the Langley technique and by direct comparison with a radiative transfer model, with appropriate handling of both aerosol scattering and molecular continuum absorption. Particular focus is dedicated to the quantification of uncertainty in these spectra, from both the inherent uncertainty in the measurement setup and that from the use of the radiative transfer code and its inputs.

  13. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  14. Picosecond passively mode-locked mid-infrared fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Zhu, X.; Norwood, R. A.; Kieu, K.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-02-01

    Mode-locked mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber lasers are of increasing interest due to their many potential applications in spectroscopic sensors, infrared countermeasures, laser surgery, and high-efficiency pump sources for nonlinear wavelength convertors. Er3+-doped ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) fiber lasers, which can emit mid-IR light at 2.65-2.9 μm through the transition from the upper energy level 4I11/2 to the lower laser level 4I13/2, have attracted much attention because of their broad emission range, high optical efficiency, and the ready availability of diode pump lasers at the two absorption peaks of Er3+ ions (975 nm and 976 nm). In recent years, significant progress on high power Er3+- doped ZBLAN fiber lasers has been achieved and over 20 watt cw output at 2.8 μm has been demonstrated; however, there has been little progress on ultrafast mid-IR ZBLAN fiber lasers to date. We report a passively mode-locked Er3+- doped ZBLAN fiber laser in which a Fe2+:ZnSe crystal was used as the intracavity saturable absorber. Fe2+:ZnSe is an ideal material for mid-IR laser pulse generation because of its large saturable absorption cross-section and small saturation energy along with the excellent opto-mechanical (damage threshold ~2 J/cm2) and physical characteristics of the crystalline ZnSe host. A 1.6 m double-clad 8 mol% Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber was used in our experiment. The fiber core has a diameter of 15 μm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.1. The inner circular cladding has a diameter of 125 μm and an NA of 0.5. Both continuous-wave and Q-switched mode-locking pulses at 2.8 μm were obtained. Continuous-wave mode locking operation with a pulse duration of 19 ps and an average power of 51 mW were achieved when a collimated beam traversed the Fe2+:ZnSe crystal. When the cavity was modified to provide a focused beam at the Fe2+:ZnSe crystal, Q-switched mode-locked operation with a pulse duration of 60 ps and an average power of 4.6 mW was achieved. More powerful

  15. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stolken, James; Vignes, Ryan

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  16. Retinal safety of near infrared radiation in photovoltaic restoration of sight

    PubMed Central

    Lorach, H.; Wang, J.; Lee, D. Y.; Dalal, R.; Huie, P.; Palanker, D.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic restoration of sight requires intense near-infrared light to effectively stimulate retinal neurons. We assess the retinal safety of such radiation with and without the retinal implant. Retinal damage threshold was determined in pigmented rabbits exposed to 880nm laser radiation. The 50% probability (ED50) of retinal damage during 100s exposures with 1.2mm diameter beam occurred at 175mW, corresponding to a modeled temperature rise of 12.5°C. With the implant, the same temperature was reached at 78mW, close to the experimental ED50 of 71mW. In typical use conditions, the retinal temperature rise is not expected to exceed 0.43°C, well within the safety limits for chronic use. PMID:26819813

  17. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Soft apertures for lasers emitting visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolerov, A. N.; Arzumanyan, Sh O.; Chirkina, K. P.; Gritsaĭ, I. I.

    1988-12-01

    It was found that an Al2O3:Ti3+ crystal grown by the Verneuil method can be used in the fabrication of "soft" apertures for lasers emitting in the blue-green range. The experimental results indicated equalization of the intensity of the radiation across the laser beam and also "polychromatic" lasing when apertures made of Al2O3:Ti3+ were placed inside the resonator cavity.

  18. Structural alterations in the cornea from exposure to infrared radiation. Final report, 1 April 1986-14 April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Farrall, R.A.; McCally, R.L.; Bargeron, C.B.; Green, W.R.

    1989-08-01

    This report summarizes our research on the interaction of infrared radiation, especially from high-intensity CO{sub 2} TEA lasers, with the cornea. The research reported here was performed between April 1, 1986 and April 14 1988. The report discusses threshold epithelial damage from single- and multiple-pulse exposures, material ejection from the anterior corneal surface, lesion histology, and possible damage mechanisms.

  19. Effect of helium-neon and infrared laser irradiation on wound healing in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, B.; McCarthy, R.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Forde, D.E.; Overfield, M.; Bapna, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the biostimulating effects of helium-neon laser radiation (HeNe; 632.8 nm), pulsed infrared laser radiation (IR; 904 nm), and the two combined on skin wound healing in New Zealand white rabbits. Seventy-two rabbits received either (1) no exposure, (2) 1.65 J/cm2 HeNe, (3) 8.25 J/cm2 pulsed IR, or (4) both HeNe and IR together to one of two dorsal full-thickness skin wounds, daily, for 21 days. Wound areas were measured photographically at periodic intervals. Tissue samples were analyzed for tensile strength, and histology was done to measure epidermal thickness and cross-sectional collagen area. Significant differences were found in the tensile strength of all laser-treated groups (both the irradiated and nonirradiated lesion) compared to group 1. No differences were found in the rate of wound healing or collagen area. Epidermal growth was greater in the HeNe-lased area compared to unexposed tissue, but the difference was not significant. Thus, laser irradiation at 632.8 nm and 904 nm alone or in combination increased tensile strength during wound healing and may have released tissue factors into the systemic circulation that increased tensile strength on the opposite side as well.

  20. Infrared (2 12 μm) solid-state laser sources: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, Antoine

    2007-12-01

    The infrared domain is very attractive for many applications owing to two unique features: (i) it contains several atmospheric transparency windows, (ii) it corresponds to the 'molecular fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum where various molecules have strong rovibrational absorption lines. In many cases, these applications (e.g. laser surgery, trace gas monitoring, remote sensing, nonlinear spectroscopy, countermeasures, …) require coherent light radiation as the one emitted by a laser source. In this context, the choice of the proper technology is a key issue. Depending on the selected application, it could be required the source to deliver tunable emission, narrow linewidth, nearly diffraction limited beam, pulsed or continuous-wave (CW) radiation, etc. This article briefly reviews the main technologies, restricted to CW and nanosecond pulsed sources emitting in the 2-12 μm range. The technologies considered include rare-earth and transition-metal doped bulk and fiber lasers, semiconductor lasers, and optical parametric sources. Pros and cons of these technologies are then briefly discussed in the context of several selected applications. To cite this article: A. Godard, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  1. Influence of low-power laser radiation on the activity of some membraneous and mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Adamek, Mariusz; Sieron, Aleksander; Kaminski, Marcin

    1995-01-01

    It was observed in some experiments that visible laser radiation activates the enzymatic function of mitochondria, while infrared laser radiation affects the enzymatic activity of cellular membranes. The aim of the study was to estimate the activity of some membranous as well as mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats irradiated with infrared laser. Experimental material consisted of 38 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups -- a studied group exposed to infrared laser radiation and a control group, in which no irradiation was made. A semiconductive infrared laser (wavelength -- 904 nm, mean power -- 8.9 mW) was used. The clean-shaven skin of the right infracostal region of animals was irradiated 5 minutes daily for 15 consecutive days. After finishing the experiment in the preparations from obtained segments of the left liver lobe, the enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.3.99.1), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), Mg2+ dependent ATP-ase (ATP-ase Mg2+, EC 3.1.3.2.) and acid phosphatase (AcP, EC 3.6.1.8.) was estimated with the use of histochemical methods. In the case of SDH and LDH the increase of enzymatic activity was observed in all 3 zones of liver cluster, especially in male rats. In the case of ATP-ase Mg2+ and AcP the increase of enzymatic activity in biliary canaliculi of hepatocytes in all zones of the liver cluster was observed. On the basis of the obtained results it was proved that infrared laser radiation activates significantly the enzymatic activity of most of the analyzed enzymes, which means that it affects not only properties of biological membranes but also activates the oxidoreductive processes of organism, as it has been observed for visible laser radiation. On the basis of the spectrum of energetic levels in macromolecules (Jablonski's diagram) the mechanisms of availed results are discussed both for enzymes possessing and not possessing chromatophores.

  2. Intense Nanosecond-Pulsed Cavity-Dumped Laser Radiation at 1.04 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We report first results of intense far-infrared (FIR) nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation at 1.04 THz from a previously described[2] cavity-dumped, optically-pumped molecular gas laser. The gain medium, methyl fluoride, is pumped by the 9R20 line of a TEA CO2 laser[3] with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. The THz laser pulses contain of 30 kW peak power in 5 nanosecond pulse widths at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The line width, measured by a scanning metal-mesh FIR Fabry-Perot interferometer, is 100 MHz. The novel THz laser is being used in experiments to resonantly excite coherent ns-pulsed 1.04 THz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping-superlattices. The research is supported by NASA EPSCoR NNX11AM04A and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0100 awards.

  3. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  4. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  5. QEPAS nitric oxide sensor based on a mid-infrared fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Shi, Chao; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Chenyu

    2017-04-01

    We report a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor (QEPAS) for nitric oxide (NO) detection using a mid-infrared fibercoupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) near 5.2 μm. The QCL radiation was coupled into an InF3 fiber (100 μm core diameter) for light delivery to the quartz tuning fork, a tiny piezoelectric element converting the acoustic wave induced mechanical vibration to the gas-absorption associated electrical signal. This mid-infrared fiber can achieve nearly single-mode light delivery for the target wavelength. The off-beam configuration was adopted for the fiber-coupled detection considering its simpler installation, optical alignment and comparative sensitivity to the traditional on-beam setup.

  6. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  7. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  8. Photoresponse of double-stacked graphene to Infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Prarthana; Mohapatra, Dipti R; Misra, Abha

    2015-10-14

    We report the photoresponse of stacked graphene layers towards infrared radiation. Graphene is stacked in two configurations, namely, crossed and parallel layers. Raman analysis demonstrated a strong interaction among the stacked graphene layers. Graphene in the crossed configuration exhibited the presence of both negative and positive conductivities; however, other configurations of graphene exhibited positive conductivity only. The presence of negative photoconductivity is proposed to be due to oxygen or oxygen-related functional group absorbents that are trapped in between two monolayers of graphene and act as scattering centers for free carriers. An interesting trend is reported in differential conductivity when stacked layers are compared with multilayers and parallel-stacked graphene layers.

  9. Photoresponse of double-stacked graphene to Infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Mohapatra, Dipti R.; Misra, Abha

    2015-09-01

    We report the photoresponse of stacked graphene layers towards infrared radiation. Graphene is stacked in two configurations, namely, crossed and parallel layers. Raman analysis demonstrated a strong interaction among the stacked graphene layers. Graphene in the crossed configuration exhibited the presence of both negative and positive conductivities; however, other configurations of graphene exhibited positive conductivity only. The presence of negative photoconductivity is proposed to be due to oxygen or oxygen-related functional group absorbents that are trapped in between two monolayers of graphene and act as scattering centers for free carriers. An interesting trend is reported in differential conductivity when stacked layers are compared with multilayers and parallel-stacked graphene layers.

  10. Absorption of infrared radiation by human dental hard substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Klaus K.; Duczynski, Edwin W.; von der Heide, Hans-Joachim; Struve, Bert

    1993-12-01

    Absorption spectra of enamel, dentin, synthetic hydroxyapatite and deionized water were taken in the wavelength band 500 to 3000 nm. It could be shown that infrared radiation is mainly absorbed in the aqueous components of dental hard tissues. Because of their decreased water content extinctions measured are slightly lower than those of deionized water. Furthermore, mineral absorptions could be detected in the range of 2760 to 2840 nm with a maximum at 2800 nm in enamel and a smaller one at 2500 nm in dentin.

  11. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  12. Intracellular protein mass spectroscopy using mid-infrared laser ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2007-07-01

    Large-scale analysis of proteins, which can be regarded as functional biomolecule, assumes an important role in the life science. A MALDI using an ultraviolet laser (UV-MALDI) is one of ionization methods without fragmentation and has achieved conformation analysis of proteins. Recently, protein analysis has shifted from conformation analysis to functional and direct one that reserves posttranslational modifications such as the sugar chain addition and phosphorylation. We have proposed a MALDI using a mid-infrared tunable laser (IR-MALDI) as a new ionization method. IR-MALDI is promising because most biomolecules have a specific absorption in mid-infrared range, and IR-MALDI is expected to offer; (1) use of various matrices, (2) use of biomolecules such as water and lipid as the matrix, and (3) super-soft ionization. First, we evaluated the wavelength dependence of ionization of different matrices using a difference frequency generation (DFG) laser, which can tune the wavelength within a range from 5.5 to 10.0 μm. As results, ionization was specifically occurred at 5.8 μm which the C=O vibration stretching bond in matrix material and mass spectrum was observed. Next, protein mass spectrum was observed in the culture cells, MIN6, which secrete insulin, without the conventional cell-preparation processes. We demonstrate that the IR-MALDI has an advantage over the conventional method (UV-MALDI) in direct analysis of intracellular proteins.

  13. Infrared radiation from explosions in a spark-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Charles F , Jr; Caldwell, Frank R; Steele, Sydney

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the variations in intensity and spectral distribution of the radiant energy emitted by the flames during normal and knocking explosions in an engine. Radiation extending into the infrared was transmitted by a window of fluorite, placed either near the spark plug or over the detonation zone at opposite ends of the combustion chamber. Concave, surface-silvered mirrors focused the beam, first at the slit of a stroboscope which opened for about 2 degrees of crank angle at any desired point in the engine cycle, and then upon the target of a sensitive thermocouple for measuring radiation intensity. Spectral distribution of the radiant energy was determined by placing over the window, one at a time, a series of five filters selected with a view to identifying, as far as possible without the use of a spectrograph, the characteristic emissions of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and incandescent carbon.

  14. Infrared laser sealing of porcine tissues: preliminary in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Perkins, William C.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    We are exploring infrared (IR) lasers as an alternative energy modality to radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasonic (US) devices intended to provide rapid surgical hemostasis with minimal collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. Previously, a 1470-nm IR laser sealed and cut ex vivo porcine renal arteries of 1-8 mm in 2 s, yielding burst pressures < 1200 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg) and thermal coagulation zones < 3 mm (including the seal). This preliminary study describes in vivo testing of a laser probe in a porcine model. A prototype, fiber optic based handheld probe with vessel/tissue clasping mechanism was tested on blood vessels < 6 mm diameter using incident 1470-nm laser power of 35 W for 1-5 s. The probe was evaluated for hemostasis after sealing isolated and bundled vasculature of abdomen and hind leg, as well as liver and lung parenchyma. Sealed vessel samples were collected for histological analysis of lateral thermal damage. Hemostasis was achieved in 57 of 73 seals (78%). The probe consistently sealed vasculature in small bowel mesentery, mesometrium, and gastro splenic and epiploic regions. Seal performance was less consistent on hind leg vasculature including saphenous arteries and bundles and femoral and iliac arteries. Collagen denaturation averaged 1.6 mm in 8 samples excised for histologic examination. A handheld laser probe sealed porcine vessels in vivo. With further improvements in probe design and laser parameter optimization, IR lasers may provide an alternative to RF and US vessel sealing devices.

  15. Origin of the low frequency radiation emitted by radiative polaritons excited by infrared radiation in planar La2O3 films.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Anita J; Schwab, Yosyp; Mann, Harkirat S; Francoeur, Mathieu; Hammonds, James S; Scarel, Giovanna

    2013-01-23

    Upon excitation in thin oxide films by infrared radiation, radiative polaritons are formed with complex angular frequency ω, according to the theory of Kliewer and Fuchs (1966 Phys. Rev. 150 573). We show that radiative polaritons leak radiation with frequency ω(i) to the space surrounding the oxide film. The frequency ω(i) is the imaginary part of ω. The effects of the presence of the radiation leaked out at frequency ω(i) are observed experimentally and numerically in the infrared spectra of La(2)O(3) films on silicon upon excitation by infrared radiation of the 0TH type radiative polariton. The frequency ω(i) is found in the microwave to far infrared region, and depends on the oxide film chemistry and thickness. The presented results might aid in the interpretation of fine structures in infrared and, possibly, optical spectra, and suggest the study of other similar potential sources of electromagnetic radiation in different physical scenarios.

  16. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipchak, A. I.; Solomonov, V. I.; Tel'nov, V. A.; Osipov, V. V.

    1995-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma formed by the interaction of a CO2 laser pulse with a target in atmospheric air. The results obtained indicate that the main role in the process of filling the excited states in a laser plasma is played by a recombination cascade and that both atoms and molecules of the atmospheric gases are excited. The result also show that a laser plasma can be used in spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent samples. The solution of the thermophysical problem of heating of a target by laser radiation supports the existing ideas on the process of formation of a plasma near the target surface in air.

  17. Resonance transition radiation X-ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Piestrup, Melvin A.

    1991-01-01

    A free electron laser is proposed using a periodic dielectric and helical magnetic field. Periodic synchronism between the electrons and the optical wave is obtained at the period of the dielectric and not at the period of the helical magnetic field. The synchronism condition and the gain of the new device are derived. The effects on the gain from dephasing and beam expansion due to elastic scattering of the electrons in the periodic medium are included in the gain calculation. Examples of the resonance transition radiation laser and klystron are given. Operation at photon energies between 2.5 and 3.5 keV with net gain up to 12 percent is feasible using high electron-beam energies of 3 and 5 GeV. Moderate (300-MeV) beam energy allows operation between 80 to 110 eV with up to 57 percent net gain using a klystron design. In both cases, rapid foil heating may limit operation to a single electron-beam pulse.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Collisionless absorption of intense laser radiation in nanoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretsky, D. F.; Korneev, Philipp A.; Popruzhenko, Sergei V.

    2007-06-01

    The rate of linear collisionless absorption of an electromagnetic radiation in a nanoplasma — classical electron gas localised in a heated ionised nanosystem (thin film or cluster) irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse — is calculated. The absorption is caused by the inelastic electron scattering from the self-consistent potential of the system in the presence of a laser field. The effect proves to be appreciable because of a small size of the systems. General expressions are obtained for the absorption rate as a function of the parameters of the single-particle self-consistent potential and electron distribution function in the regime linear in field. For the simplest cases, where the self-consistent field is created by an infinitely deep well or an infinite charged plane, closed analytic expressions are obtained for the absorption rate. Estimates presented in the paper demonstrate that, over a wide range of the parameters of laser pulses and nanostructures, the collisionless mechanism of heating electron subsystem can be dominant. The possibility of experimental observation of the collisionless absorption of intense laser radiation in nanoplasma is also discussed.

  19. Intense terahertz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. M.; Yuan, X. H.; Nilsen, J.; Ozaki, T.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of tabletop intense terahertz (THz) radiation sources is extremely important for THz science and applications. This paper presents our measurements of intense THz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions under different experimental conditions. Several THz generation mechanisms have been proposed and investigated, including coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by fast electrons from the target rear surface, transient current radiation at the front of the target, and mode conversion from electron plasma waves (EPWs) to THz waves. The results indicate that relativistic laser plasma is a promising driver of intense THz radiation sources.

  20. Comb-assisted subkilohertz linewidth quantum cascade laser for high-precision mid-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, I.; Cappelli, F.; Bartalini, S.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; Cancio, P.; De Natale, P.; Siciliani de Cumis, M.; Borri, S.; Montori, A.; Akikusa, N.; Yamanishi, M.

    2013-03-25

    We report on the linewidth narrowing of a room-temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade laser by phase-locking to a difference-frequency-generated radiation referenced to an optical frequency comb synthesizer. A locking bandwidth of 250 kHz, with a residual rms phase-noise of 0.56 rad, has been achieved. The laser linewidth is narrowed by more than 2 orders of magnitude below 1 kHz, and its frequency is stabilized with an absolute traceability of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}. This source has allowed the measurement of the absolute frequency of a CO{sub 2} molecular transition with an uncertainty of about 1 kHz.

  1. Evaluation of human papillomavirus elimination from cervix uteri by infrared laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Dymkovets, V P; Ezhov, V V; Manykin, A A; Belov, S V; Danileiko, Yu K; Osiko, V V; Salyuk, V A

    2011-12-01

    Elimination of types 16 and 18 human papilloma virus from the surface of cervix uteri for secondary prevention of cervical cancer was evaluated. The method is protected by patent of invention of the Russian Federation. Infrared laser therapy of cervix uteri was carried out in patients with precancer diseases of cervix uteri at Department of Gynecology of Municipal Clinical Hospital No. 52 (Moscow). Papillomavirus infection was eliminated using a Russian diode laser (lambda=1.06 μ, radiation power 10 W) with a collimating headpiece using carbon die at a distance of 10-12 cm from the exposed surface. The treatment resulted in a high percentage of elimination of types 16 and 18 oncogenic virus 4-6 weeks and during delayed periods after exposure.

  2. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  3. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  4. Infrared laser spectroscopy of the linear C13 carbon cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesen, T. F.; Van Orden, A.; Hwang, H. J.; Fellers, R. S.; Provencal, R. A.; Saykally, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum of a linear, 13-atom carbon cluster (C13) has been observed by using a supersonic cluster beam-diode laser spectrometer. Seventy-six rovibrational transitions were measured near 1809 wave numbers and assigned to an antisymmetric stretching fundamental in the 1 sigma g+ ground state of C13. This definitive structural characterization of a carbon cluster in the intermediate size range between C10 and C20 is in apparent conflict with theoretical calculations, which predict that clusters of this size should exist as planar monocyclic rings.

  5. Infrared laser spectroscopy of the linear C13 carbon cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesen, T. F.; Van Orden, A.; Hwang, H. J.; Fellers, R. S.; Provencal, R. A.; Saykally, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum of a linear, 13-atom carbon cluster (C13) has been observed by using a supersonic cluster beam-diode laser spectrometer. Seventy-six rovibrational transitions were measured near 1809 wave numbers and assigned to an antisymmetric stretching fundamental in the 1 sigma g+ ground state of C13. This definitive structural characterization of a carbon cluster in the intermediate size range between C10 and C20 is in apparent conflict with theoretical calculations, which predict that clusters of this size should exist as planar monocyclic rings.

  6. Tunable ultrasonic phononic crystal controlled by infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ezekiel; Reyes, Delfino; Rojas, Miguel Mayorga; Krokhin, Arkadii; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2014-10-01

    A tunable phononic crystal based ultrasonic filter was designed by stimulating the phase of the polymeric material embedded in a periodic structure using infrared radiation. The acoustic filter can be tuned remotely using thermal stimulation induced by the infrared radiation. The filter is composed of steel cylinder scatterers arranged periodically in a background of bulk poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) polymer hydrogel. The lattice structure creates forbidden bands for certain sets of mechanical waves that cause it to behave as an ultrasonic filter. Since the bandstructure is determined by not only the arrangement of the scatterers but also the physical properties of the materials composing the scatterers and background, modulating either the arrangement or physical properties will alter the effect of the crystal on propagating mechanical waves. Here, the physical properties of the filter are varied by inducing changes in the polymer hydrogel using an electromagnetic thermal stimulus. With particular focus on the k00-wave, the transmission of ultrasonic wave changes by as much as 20 dBm, and band widths by 22% for select bands.

  7. Tunable ultrasonic phononic crystal controlled by infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ezekiel; Neogi, Arup E-mail: arup@unt.edu; Reyes, Delfino; Rojas, Miguel Mayorga; Krokhin, Arkadii; Wang, Zhiming E-mail: arup@unt.edu

    2014-10-06

    A tunable phononic crystal based ultrasonic filter was designed by stimulating the phase of the polymeric material embedded in a periodic structure using infrared radiation. The acoustic filter can be tuned remotely using thermal stimulation induced by the infrared radiation. The filter is composed of steel cylinder scatterers arranged periodically in a background of bulk poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) polymer hydrogel. The lattice structure creates forbidden bands for certain sets of mechanical waves that cause it to behave as an ultrasonic filter. Since the bandstructure is determined by not only the arrangement of the scatterers but also the physical properties of the materials composing the scatterers and background, modulating either the arrangement or physical properties will alter the effect of the crystal on propagating mechanical waves. Here, the physical properties of the filter are varied by inducing changes in the polymer hydrogel using an electromagnetic thermal stimulus. With particular focus on the k{sub 00}-wave, the transmission of ultrasonic wave changes by as much as 20 dBm, and band widths by 22% for select bands.

  8. Infrared radiation transmission through GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Bagge, S.; Gustavsson, M.; Haglund, Å.; Willander, M.; Li, Na; Li, Ning; Lu, W.; Liu, X. Q.; Yuan, X. Z.; Li, Z. F.; Dou, H. F.; Shen, S. C.

    2001-04-01

    This paper discusses experimental and theoretical studies of the efficiency of optical coupling in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple-quantum-well-infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) via optical diffraction grating. Optical responsivity has been studied to compare the effectiveness of different grating structures fabricated by chemical wet and reactive ion etching (RIE) methods. By the unique measurement of infrared radiation transmission spectrum of the QWIP system, we have clearly demonstrated the optical interference effect in the GaAs/ AlGaAs active MQW layer and the potential utilization of the interference effect in designing and optimizing QWIP systems has been discussed. An optical grating processed by the RIE technique is advantageous due to its accurate control over the feature size of optical apertures.

  9. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  10. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  11. Target tracking using infrared measurements and laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maybeck, Peter S.; Herrera, Theodore D.; Evans, Roger J.

    1994-07-01

    A missile target tracker is designed using a filter/correlator (with adaptive target shape identification) based on forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor measurements to track the center-of-intensity of the hardbody/plume combination, and another filter using Doppler and/or speckle information in the return from a low-power laser illuminator to estimate the offset between the intensity centroid and the hardbody center-of-mass. The Doppler information is shown to yield smaller bias and error variance from the tracker than the speckle information. Performance of trackers based on just Doppler or both Doppler and speckle information from the laser return is portrayed as a function of important parameters in the tracking environment.

  12. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  13. Infrared Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for MALDI and Electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit King

    2011-08-01

    We have used an infrared laser to ablate materials under ambient conditions that were captured in solvent droplets. The droplets were either deposited on a MALDI target for off-line analysis by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry or flow-injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. An infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system at 2.94 μm wavelength and approximately 1 mJ pulse energy was focused onto samples for ablation at atmospheric pressure. The ablated material was captured in a solvent droplet 1-2 mm in diameter that was suspended from a silica capillary a few millimeters above the sample target. Once the sample was transferred to the droplet by ablation, the droplet was deposited on a MALDI target. A saturated matrix solution was added to the deposited sample, or in some cases, the suspended capture droplet contained the matrix. Peptide and protein standards were used to assess the effects of the number of IR laser ablation shots, sample to droplet distance, capture droplet size, droplet solvent, and laser pulse energy. Droplet collected samples were also injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer with a 500 nL injection loop. It is estimated that pmol quantities of material were transferred to the droplet with an efficiency of approximately 1%. The direct analysis of biological fluids for off-line MALDI and electrospray was demonstrated with blood, milk, and egg. The implications of this IR ablation sample transfer approach for ambient imaging are discussed.

  14. Infrared laser deposition of Teflon coatings on microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papantonakis, M. R.; HaglundJr., R. F.

    2006-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, trade name Teflon) has a wide range of unique and desirable physical, electrical and chemical properties. Its tribological properties are well-suited to anti-stiction applications, and its chemical inertness commends it as a barrier and passivation layer. However, conventional thin-film techniques are not suited for depositing Teflon films on microstructures. Spin coating is impossible because of the well-known insolubility of PTFE. Plasma polymerization of fluorocarbon monomers, ion beam and rf sputtering produce PTFE films that are deficient in fluorine. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using excimer and Ti:sapphire lasers is unsatisfactory because UV or near-IR laser ablation "unzips" the PTFE, and requires high-temperature annealing to re-polymerize the deposited monomeric film. We have demonstrated that a completely dry, vapor-phase coating technique - resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) at a wavelength of 8.26 μm -produces crystalline, smooth Teflon films at low process temperatures. Indeed, the films as deposited by RIR-PLD exhibit a surprising degree of crystallinity even at room temperature. The stoichiometry and local electronic structure are preserved during the laser vaporization process, as demonstrated by IR absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films deposited on microscale structures show good adhesion, excellent smoothness, and a high degree of conformability to the structures. We also discuss experiments planned for the near future to compare the tribological properties of the PTFE films deposited by RIR-PLD with those of other tribological coatings. We will also discuss the implementation of RIR-PLD in practical processing schemes for MEMS applications, including the challenge in adapting existing solid-state mid-IR laser technology for this purpose.

  15. Infrared free electron laser enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Kunio; Uchizono, Takeyuki; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Kazushi

    2005-08-01

    It is necessary to control enhancement of transdermal drug delivery with non-invasive. The present study was investigated to assess the effectivity of enhancing the drug delivery by irradiating 6-μm region mid infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL). The enhancement of transdermal drug (lidocaine) delivery of the samples (hairless mouse skin) irradiated with lasers was examined for flux (μg/cm2/h) and total penetration amount (μg/cm2) of lidocaine by High performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The flux and total amount penatration date was enhanced 200-300 fold faster than the control date by the laser irradiation. FEL irradiating had the stratum corneum, and had the less thermal damage in epidermis. The effect of 6-μm region MIR-FEL has the enhancement of transdermal drug delivery without removing the stratum corneum because it has the less thermal damage. It leads to enhancement drug delivery system with non-invasive laser treatment.

  16. Laser hyperdoping silicon for enhanced infrared optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification have attracted interest for decades as a method to achieve impurity concentrations in silicon orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit. The incorporation of sulfur into silicon using this technique led to the observation of strong broadband infrared absorption in the resulting material. This observation, combined with interest in impurity band optoelectronic device concepts, has resulted in renewed interest in laser techniques for achieving high impurity concentrations. In this paper, I review the literature that led to the present understanding of laser hyperdoping and provide a summary of the optical and optoelectronic measurements made on sulfur hyperdoped silicon to date. I mention recent work exploring transition metal impurities and discuss how considerations discovered in early solidification and later rapid solidification work inform our approaches to kinetically trapping such impurities. I also provide a simplified picture of how a laser hyperdoping process is typically carried out, as an entry point for an experimentalist seeking to fabricate such layers.

  17. Vacuum electrospray of volatile liquids assisted by infrared laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yuji; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2012-04-15

    Current large cluster sources such as C(60) or argon utilize gas-phase sources which are of low-brightness and cannot be focused efficiently to better than 1 micron diameter spot size. The development of a high-brightness large cluster ion source is of critical importance to achieve high resolution in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of organics. We propose a new high-brightness large cluster ion source, and a technique for producing a stable electrospray of volatile liquids under vacuum. It is known that vacuum electrospray of volatile liquids such as water is extremely difficult because of freezing of the liquids introduced in vacuum by evaporative cooling. To avoid freezing, the tip of the electrospray emitter was irradiated by a continuous wave infrared laser. Without continuous laser irradiation the vacuum electrospray of a water/methanol solution was unstable with respect to the shapes of the Taylor cone and current, whereas continuous laser irradiation produced a stable electrospray of water. The typical modes of electrospray were clearly observed with an optical microscope even under vacuum conditions. A stable vacuum electrospray could be achieved by improving the vacuum pressure to suppress electric discharge and by using the laser to maintain the liquid state. This is the first description of the production of a stable vacuum electrospray of volatile liquids such as water. This vacuum electrospray technique can be expected to produce a novel high-brightness large cluster ion beam source. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Satellite laser ranging in the near-infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckl, Johann J.; Schreiber, K. Ulrich; Schüler, Torben

    2017-05-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging Systems typically operate on the second harmonic wavelength of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm. The absence of sufficiently sensitive photo-detectors with a reasonably large active area made it beneficial to trade the conversion loss of frequency doubling against the higher quantum efficiency of the detectors. Solid state silicon detectors in the near infra-red regime at λ = 1.064 µm also suffered from high thermal noise and slow signal rise times, which increased the scatter of the measurements by more than a factor of 3 over the operation at λ = 532 nm. With the availability of InGaAs/InP compound - Single Photon Avalanche Diodes the situation has changed considerably. Their quantum efficiency has reached 70% and the compound material of these diodes provides a response bandwidth, which is commensurate with high high speed detectors in the regime of 532 nm. We have investigated the properties of such a diode type Princeton Lightwave PGA-200-1064 for its suitability for SLR at the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength with respect to the quantum efficiency and their timing properties. The results are presented in this paper. Furthermore, we provide remarks to on the performance of the diode compared to state of the art detectors, that operate at the Nd:YAG second harmonic wavelength. Finally, we give an estimate of the photoelectron statistics in satellite laser ranging for different operational parameters of the Wettzell Laser Ranging System.

  19. Studying the mechanism of neurostimulation by infrared laser light using GCaMP6s and Rhodamine B imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Bardet, Sylvia M.; O'Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared laser light radiation can be used to depolarize neurons and to stimulate neural activity. The absorption of infrared radiation and heating of biological tissue is thought to be the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon whereby local temperature increases in the plasma membrane of cells either directly influence membrane properties or act via temperature sensitive ion channels. Action potentials are typically measured electrically in neurons with microelectrodes, but they can also be observed using fluorescence microscopy techniques that use synthetic or genetically encoded calcium indicators. In this work, we studied the impact of infrared laser light on neuronal calcium signals to address the mechanism of these thermal effects. Cultured primary mouse hippocampal neurons expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP6s were used in combination with the temperature sensitive fluorophore Rhodamine B to measure calcium signals and temperature changes at the cellular level. Here we present our all-optical strategy for studying the influence of infrared laser light on neuronal activity.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser plume spectroscopy. 1. Graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Platonov, V. V.; Snigireva, O. A.; Ivanov, M. G.; Lisenkov, V. V.

    2005-05-01

    Spectral and kinetic characteristics of a plume formed in the vicinity of a graphite target exposed to radiation from a pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6 μm with a peak power of 9 kW (pulse energy 1.69 J, pulse duration 330 μs at the 0.1 level) in air are studied at room temperature. It is shown that the plume propagating at a right angle to the target surface and at an angle of 45° to the laser radiation is a nonequilibrium gas plasma flow at a temperature of the order of 10 kK; its shape and size are determined by the shape and power of the laser pulse. Emission of C+ ions and C2 molecules is excited in the plume. The temperature and emission are sustained by the energy of the exothermic reaction of association of carbon atoms and the vibrationally excited molecules formed in it.

  1. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-03-12

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  2. Generation and application of ultrashort coherent mid-infrared electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, Scott

    Particle accelerators are useful instruments that help address critical issues for the future development of nuclear energy. Current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency (rf) cavities are too large and expensive for widespread commercial use, and alternative designs must be considered for supplying relativistic beams to small-scale applications, including medical imaging, secu- rity screening, and scientific research in a university-scale laboratory. Laser-driven acceleration using micro-fabricated dielectric photonic structures is an attractive approach because such photonic microstructures can support accelerating fields that are 10 to 100 times higher than that of rf cavity-based accelerators. Dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) use commercial lasers as a driving source, which are smaller and less expensive than the klystrons used to drive current rf-based accelerators. Despite the apparent need for compact and economical laser sources for laser-driven acceleration, the availability of suitable high-peak-power lasers that cover a broad spectral range is currently limited. To address the needs of several innovative acceleration mechanisms like DLA, it is proposed to develop a coherent source of mid-infrared (IR) electromagnetic radiation that can be implemented as a driving source of laser accelerators. The use of ultrashort mid-IR high peak power laser systems in various laser-driven acceleration schemes has shown the potential to greatly reduce the optical pump intensities needed to realize high acceleration gradients. The optical intensity needed to achieve a given ponderomotive potential is 25 times less when using a 5-mum mid-IR laser as compared to using a 1-mum near-IR solid-state laser. In addition, dielectric structure breakdown caused by multiphoton ionization can be avoided by using longer-wavelength driving lasers. Current mid-IR laser sources do not produce sufficiently short pulse durations, broad spectral bandwidths

  3. Influence of MLS laser radiation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity and secondary structure of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Nowacka, Olga; Wróbel, Dominika; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2014-03-01

    The biostimulating activity of low level laser radiation of various wavelengths and energy doses is widely documented in the literature, but the mechanisms of the intracellular reactions involved are not precisely known. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of low level laser radiation from an multiwave locked system (MLS) of two wavelengths (wavelength = 808 nm in continuous emission and 905 nm in pulsed emission) on the human erythrocyte membrane and on the secondary structure of human serum albumin (HSA). Human erythrocytes membranes and HSA were irradiated with laser light of low intensity with surface energy density ranging from 0.46 to 4.9 J cm(-2) and surface energy power density 195 mW cm(-2) (1,000 Hz) and 230 mW cm(-2) (2,000 Hz). Structural and functional changes in the erythrocyte membrane were characterized by its fluidity, while changes in the protein were monitored by its secondary structure. Dose-dependent changes in erythrocyte membrane fluidity were induced by near-infrared laser radiation. Slight changes in the secondary structure of HSA were also noted. MLS laser radiation influences the structure and function of the human erythrocyte membrane resulting in a change in fluidity.

  4. Stable isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by infrared spectroscopy by use of diode laser difference-frequency generation.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Michael E; Chen, Pin; Garcia, Guilherme de Andrade; Hollberg, Leo W; Tans, Pieter P

    2006-06-10

    An infrared absorption spectrometer has been constructed to measure the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric methane samples. The spectrometer employs periodically poled lithium niobate to generate 15 microW of tunable difference-frequency radiation from two near-infrared diode lasers that probe the nu3 rotational-vibrational band of methane at 3.4 microm. To enhance the signal, methane is extracted from 25 l of air by use of a cryogenic chromatographic column and is expanded into the multipass cell for analysis. A measurement precision of 12 per thousand is demonstrated for both delta13C and deltaD.

  5. Optical diagnostic and therapy applications of femtosecond laser radiation using lens-axicon focusing.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Johnson, Jacqueline A; Splinter, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic modalities by means of optical and/or near infrared femtosecond radiation through biological media can in principle be adapted to therapeutic applications. Of specific interest are soft tissue diagnostics and subsequent therapy through hard tissue such as bone. Femto-second laser pulses are delivered to hydroxyapatite representing bone, and photo-acoustic spectroscopy is presented in order to identify the location of optical anomalies in an otherwise homogeneous medium. Imaging through bone is being considered for diagnostic, and potentially therapeutic, applications related to brain tumors. The use of mesomeric optics such as lens-axicon combinations is of interest to achieve the favorable distribution of focused radiation. Direct therapy by increasing local temperature to induce hyperthermia is one mode of brain tumor therapy. This can be enhanced by seeding the tumor with nanoparticles. Opto-acoustic imaging using femtosecond laser radiation is a further opportunity for diagnosis.

  6. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin; Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  7. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  8. Mid-infrared microspectroscopic imaging with a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Kevin; Schulmerich, Matthew; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Conventional mid-infrared (mid-IR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging systems employ an incoherent globar source and achieve spectral contrast through interferometry. While this approach is suitable for many general applications, recent advancements in broadly tunable external cavity Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) offer new approaches to and new possibilities for mid-IR micro-spectroscopic imaging. While QCL-based devices have yet to achieve the wide spectral range generally employed by spectroscopists for molecular analyses, they are starting to be used for microscopy at discrete frequencies. Here, we present a discrete frequency IR (DFIR) microscope based on a QCL source and explore its utility for mid-IR imaging. In our prototype instrument, spectral contrast is achieved by tuning the QCL to bands in a narrow spectral region of interest. We demonstrate wide-field imaging employing a 128x128 pixel liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane array (FPA) detector. The resulting images demonstrate successful imaging as well as several unique features due to coherence effects from the laser source. Here we discuss the effects of this coherence and compare our instrument to conventional mid-IR imaging instrumentation.

  9. Patient identification using a near-infrared laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manit, Jirapong; Bremer, Christina; Schweikard, Achim; Ernst, Floris

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new biometric approach where the tissue thickness of a person's forehead is used as a biometric feature. Given that the spatial registration of two 3D laser scans of the same human face usually produces a low error value, the principle of point cloud registration and its error metric can be applied to human classification techniques. However, by only considering the spatial error, it is not possible to reliably verify a person's identity. We propose to use a novel near-infrared laser-based head tracking system to determine an additional feature, the tissue thickness, and include this in the error metric. Using MRI as a ground truth, data from the foreheads of 30 subjects was collected from which a 4D reference point cloud was created for each subject. The measurements from the near-infrared system were registered with all reference point clouds using the ICP algorithm. Afterwards, the spatial and tissue thickness errors were extracted, forming a 2D feature space. For all subjects, the lowest feature distance resulted from the registration of a measurement and the reference point cloud of the same person. The combined registration error features yielded two clusters in the feature space, one from the same subject and another from the other subjects. When only the tissue thickness error was considered, these clusters were less distinct but still present. These findings could help to raise safety standards for head and neck cancer patients and lays the foundation for a future human identification technique.

  10. Surface modification of UHMWPE with infrared femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Naranjo-León, S.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymer with mechanical and corrosion properties, which make it appropriate for using in biomedical devices such as hip and knee prostheses. The surface morphology and chemistry of UHMWPE influence its biocompatibility. A laser with wavelength at 1027 nm delivering 450 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 1 kHz is used to modify the surface of UHMWPE samples with 0.45 μm root mean square surface roughness. Micrometric resolution is achieved with the use of a focusing lens of 0.25 NA and pulse energies of few microjoules. The study focuses in the influence of different pulse energies and pulse overlaps on the laser-induced surface roughness and ablation yield. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize changes in the morphology of the irradiated surfaces, and their chemical structure is analyzed by attenuated total reflectance infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The roughness increases as the pulse energy increases until it reaches a maximum. The ablation yield increases with the pulse energy and pulse overlap. However, the ablation yield per pulse is lower for higher pulse overlap. Pulses of 6 μJ have the highest ablation efficiency. Infrared and Raman spectra of samples irradiated with low energy pulses are similar to those of the pristine sample. However, some Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds can be detected after irradiation with the highest pulse energies.

  11. Infrared upconversion for astronomical applications. [laser applications to astronomical spectroscopy of infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of an upconversion system is examined for observation of astronomical sources in the low to middle infrared spectral range. Theoretical values for the performance parameters of an upconversion system for astronomical observations are evaluated in view of the conversion efficiencies, spectral resolution, field of view, minimum detectable source brightness and source flux. Experimental results of blackbody measurements and molecular absorption spectrum measurements using a lithium niobate upconverter with an argon-ion laser as the pump are presented. Estimates of the expected optimum sensitivity of an upconversion device which may be built with the presently available components are given.

  12. Terahertz plasmonic laser radiating in an ultra-narrow beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chongzhao; Khanal, Sudeep; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-07-07

    Plasmonic lasers (spasers) generate coherent surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and could be realized at subwavelength dimensions in metallic cavities for applications in nanoscale optics. Plasmonic cavities are also utilized for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which are the brightest available solid-state sources of terahertz radiation. A long standing challenge for spasers that are utilized as nanoscale sources of radiation, is their poor coupling to the far-field radiation. Unlike conventional lasers that could produce directional beams, spasers have highly divergent radiation patterns due to their subwavelength apertures. Here, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a new technique for implementing distributed feedback (DFB) that is distinct from any other previously utilized DFB schemes for semiconductor lasers. The so-termed antenna-feedback scheme leads to single-mode operation in plasmonic lasers, couples the resonant SPP mode to a highly directional far-field radiation pattern, and integrates hybrid SPPs in surrounding medium into the operation of the DFB lasers. Experimentally, the antenna-feedback method, which does not require the phase matching to a well-defined effective index, is implemented for terahertz QCLs, and single-mode terahertz QCLs with a beam divergence as small as 4°×4° are demonstrated, which is the narrowest beam reported for any terahertz QCL to date. Moreover, in contrast to a negligible radiative field in conventional photonic band-edge lasers, in which the periodicity follows the integer multiple of half-wavelengths inside the active medium, antenna-feedback breaks this integer limit for the first time and enhances the radiative field of the lasing mode. Terahertz lasers with narrow-beam emission will find applications for integrated as well as standoff terahertz spectroscopy and sensing. Furthermore, the antenna-feedback scheme is generally applicable to any plasmonic laser with a Fabry–Perot cavity

  13. Terahertz plasmonic laser radiating in an ultra-narrow beam

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chongzhao; Khanal, Sudeep; Reno, John L.; ...

    2016-07-07

    Plasmonic lasers (spasers) generate coherent surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and could be realized at subwavelength dimensions in metallic cavities for applications in nanoscale optics. Plasmonic cavities are also utilized for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which are the brightest available solid-state sources of terahertz radiation. A long standing challenge for spasers that are utilized as nanoscale sources of radiation, is their poor coupling to the far-field radiation. Unlike conventional lasers that could produce directional beams, spasers have highly divergent radiation patterns due to their subwavelength apertures. Here, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a new technique for implementing distributed feedback (DFB) thatmore » is distinct from any other previously utilized DFB schemes for semiconductor lasers. The so-termed antenna-feedback scheme leads to single-mode operation in plasmonic lasers, couples the resonant SPP mode to a highly directional far-field radiation pattern, and integrates hybrid SPPs in surrounding medium into the operation of the DFB lasers. Experimentally, the antenna-feedback method, which does not require the phase matching to a well-defined effective index, is implemented for terahertz QCLs, and single-mode terahertz QCLs with a beam divergence as small as 4°×4° are demonstrated, which is the narrowest beam reported for any terahertz QCL to date. Moreover, in contrast to a negligible radiative field in conventional photonic band-edge lasers, in which the periodicity follows the integer multiple of half-wavelengths inside the active medium, antenna-feedback breaks this integer limit for the first time and enhances the radiative field of the lasing mode. Terahertz lasers with narrow-beam emission will find applications for integrated as well as standoff terahertz spectroscopy and sensing. Furthermore, the antenna-feedback scheme is generally applicable to any plasmonic laser with a Fabry–Perot cavity

  14. Effect of pulsed laser radiation on deformation band dynamics and discontinuous deformation in aluminum-magnesium Al-6%Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Gasanov, M. F.; Zheltov, M. A.; Proskuryakov, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics and morphology of deformation bands and the discontinuous deformation under local action of pulsed infrared fiber laser radiation on the surface of aluminum-magnesium Al-6%Mg alloy have been studied by high-speed video recording techniques. Conditions under which laser action leads to the formation of macrolocalized deformation bands and deformation jumps of several percent on the stress-strain diagram are experimentally established. A possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed.

  15. EDISON project and radiatively cooled infrared space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Hawarden, Timothy G.; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Orlowska, Anna H.; Penny, Alan J.; Turner, R. F.; Rapp, Donald

    1993-11-01

    We describe the current design for Edison, the first large radiatively-cooled infrared space observatory, now under consideration by the European Space Agency. Without the large cryogen tanks, more of the spacecraft can be filled with light-collecting optics and, of course, the observatory has no built-in lifetime. Our proposal is for a telescope with a 1.7 m primary to be launched by an Atlas, Ariane 5, or Proton. The baseline orbit for the observatory is a 'halo' around L2, a location which allows additional radiating area to be placed anti-sunward. Models of the temperature behavior of the observatory indicate an equilibrium temperature via radiation alone of about 20 K. Use of near-future cryo-coolers may allow optical system temperatures as low as approximately 15 K. Consequently, Edison will be limited in sensitivity by the celestial thermal background at wavelengths shortward of about 60 micrometers and by celestial source confusion at longer wavelengths.

  16. Dy{sup 3+}-doped Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Anping; Peng, Yuefeng; Zhang, Bin; Ren, He; Guo, Wei; Yang, Yan; Zhai, Chengcheng; Wang, Yuwei; Yang, Zhiyong; Tang, Dingyuan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Novel Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses doped with Dy{sup 3+} ions were synthesized. • The glasses show good thermal stability and excellent infrared transparency. • The glasses show low phonon energy and intense mid-infrared emissions. • The mid-infrared emissions have high quantum efficiency. • The mid-infrared emissions have large stimulated emission cross sections. - Abstract: Novel Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses doped with different amount of Dy{sup 3+} ions were prepared. Their thermal stability, optical properties, and mid-infrared (MIR) emission properties were investigated. The glasses show good thermal stability, excellent infrared transparency, very low phonon energy (∼306 cm{sup −1}), and intense emissions centered at 2.95, 3.59, 4.17 and 4.40 μm. Three Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω{sub 2} = 8.51 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}, Ω{sub 4} = 2.09 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}, and Ω{sub 6} = 1.60 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}) are obtained, and the related radiative transition properties are evaluated. The high quantum efficiencies and large stimulated emission cross sections of the MIR emissions (88.10% and 1.11 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} for 2.95 μm emission, 75.90% and 0.38 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} for 4.40 μm emission, respectively) in the Dy{sup 3+}-doped Ga–Sb–S glasses make them promising gain materials for the MIR lasers.

  17. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  18. New trends in high-order harmonics generation using the mid-infrared pulses propagating through the laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2017-06-01

    Various recently emerged applications of mid-infrared pulses for high-order harmonic generation in laser plasmas produced on the surfaces of various materials are reviewed. Among them are (a) the highorder harmonic generation in Ag, Sn, fullerene, and graphene nanoparticle-containing plasmas using tunable two-color mid-infrared pulses, (b) efficiency dependence on the generating particle properties in the case of two-color high-harmonic generation of the longer-wavelength radiation in the plasmas, and (c) high-order sum and difference frequency generation using tunable two- and three-color commensurate and incommensurate mid-infrared pumps of graphite plasma. These studies demonstrate the perspectives of the frequency conversion of mid-infrared radiation in the extended laser-produced plasmas.

  19. Method and means for generation of tunable laser sidebands in the far-infrared region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Herbert M. (Inventor); Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method for generating tunable far-infrared radiation is described. The apparatus includes a Schottky-barrier diode which has one side coupled through a conductor to a waveguide that carries a tunable microwave frequency; the diode has an opposite side which is coupled through a radiating whisker to a bias source. Infrared light is directed at the diode, and infrared light with tunable sidebands is radiated by the whisker through an open space to a reflector. The original infrared is separated from a tunable infrared sideband by a polarizing Michelson interferometer.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Properties of the interaction of laser radiation with a gaseous dust medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glova, A. F.; Lysikov, A. Yu; Zverev, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    It is found that upon irradiation of a mixture of the atmospheric air and carbon particles of size 30-300 μm at a concentration of ~102 cm-3 by a cw CO2 laser, the active combustion of particles in the mixture appears when the radiation intensity in the focal region achieves ~103 W cm-2. The dependences of the threshold radiation intensity for the evaporation of particles on their radius are obtained for a gaseous dust medium in the form of a free vertical jet of spherical aluminium and carbon microparticles in nitrogen. It is shown that particles of size ~10 μm can be completely evaporated in a focused cw laser beam of power ~102 W.

  1. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  2. Plume attenuation of laser radiation during high power fiber laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. Yu; Uspenskiy, S. A.; Gumenyuk, A. V.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Rethmeier, M.; Yermachenko, V. M.

    2011-06-01

    The results of an in-situ plume-laser interaction measurement during welding of mild steel with a 5 kW ytterbium fiber laser are reported. A measurement of the attenuation of probe laser beam passing through the plume has allowed to estimate the plume characteristics like the size of the extinction area and the spatial distribution of the extinction coefficient. The power loss of the fiber laser radiation propagating through the whole plume length was calculated. Together with a measured temporal characteristics of extinction the result indicates a significant decreasing of the laser radiation stability, which can lead to the formation of the macroscopic welding defects.

  3. Principal component analysis and radiative transfer modelling of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, P. D.; Oliver, S.; Farrah, D.; Wang, L.; Efstathiou, A.

    2012-08-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. We further investigate the principal components (PCs) of ULIRGs derived in Wang et al. We quantitatively show that five PCs are optimal for describing the Infrared Spectrograph spectra. These five components (PC1-PC5) and the mean spectrum provide a template basis set that reproduces spectra of all z < 0.35 ULIRGs within the noise. For comparison, the spectra are also modelled with a combination of radiative transfer models of both starbursts and the dusty torus surrounding active galactic nuclei (AGN). The five PCs typically provide better fits than the models. We argue that the radiative transfer models require a colder dust component and have difficulty in modelling strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Aided by the models we also interpret the physical processes that the PCs represent. The third PC is shown to indicate the nature of the dominant power source, while PC1 is related to the inclination of the AGN torus. Finally, we use the five PCs to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixture modelling and trained on widely used optical classifications. The five PCs, average spectra for the four classifications and the code to classify objects are made available at: .

  4. Broadband near-field infrared spectromicroscopy using photothermal probes and synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Paul M; Kelley, Chris S; Frogley, Mark D; Filik, Jacob; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2016-02-08

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the use of infrared synchrotron radiation (IR-SR) as a broadband source for photothermal near-field infrared spectroscopy. We assess two methods of signal transduction; cantilever resonant thermal expansion and scanning thermal microscopy. By means of rapid mechanical chopping (50-150 kHz), we modulate the IR-SR at rates matching the contact resonance frequencies of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, allowing us to record interferograms yielding Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) photothermal absorption spectra of polystyrene and cyanoacrylate films. Complementary offline measurements using a mechanically chopped CW IR laser confirmed that the resonant thermal expansion IR-SR measurements were below the diffraction limit, with a spatial resolution better than 500 nm achieved at a wavelength of 6 μm, i.e. λ/12 for the samples studied. Despite achieving the highest signal to noise so far for a scanning thermal microscopy measurement under conditions approaching near-field (dictated by thermal diffusion), the IR-SR resonant photothermal expansion FT-IR spectra measured were significantly higher in signal to noise in comparison with the scanning thermal data.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  6. Electro-optic modulator for infrared laser using gallium arsenide crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. E.

    1968-01-01

    Gallium arsenide electro-optic modulator used for infrared lasers has a mica quarter-wave plate and two calcite polarizers to amplitude or phase modulate an infrared laser light source in the wavelength range from 1 to 3 microns. The large single crystal has uniformly high resistivities, is strain free, and comparable in quality to good optical glass.

  7. Design of stabilization system for medium wave infrared laser power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhong-kui; Wang, Lin; Shi, Xue-shun; Xu, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The 3~5um Medium Wave Infrared(MWIR) laser has gained a lot of attention for its important application values in remote sensing, medical, military and many other fields. However, there are many technical difficulties to fabricate those kind lasers, and the performance of their output power stabilities remain to be improved. In a practical application, the MWIR's output power will be instability when the temperature changes and the current varies. So a system of reducing MWIR power fluctuation should be established. In this paper, a photoelectric system of stabilizing the output power of He-Ne laser is developed, which is designed based on the theory of feedback control. Some primary devices and technologies are presented and the functions of each module are described in detail. Among of those, an auxiliary visible light path is designed to aid to adjust WMIR optical system. A converging lens as spatial filter is employed to eliminate stray light well. Dewar temperature control equipment is also used to reduce circuit noise in IR detector. The power supply of AD conversion circuit is independently designed to avoid the crosstalk caused by the analog section and digital section. Then the system has the advantages of good controllability, stability and high precision after above designation. Finally, the measurement precision of the system is also analyzed and verified.

  8. Application of supercontinuum radiation for mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgus, Jakob; Müller, Petra; Moselund, Peter M.; Brandstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of new laser-based mid-infrared (MIR) sources, such as quantum cascade lasers (QCL), led to substantial developments in the field of MIR spectroscopy in the last decade. Recently, also MIR supercontinuum (SC) sources became available. They combine broadband spectral emission known from thermal sources emission with coherent properties known from laser sources like QCLs. Nevertheless, while the latter already find practical application in the field of optical sensing, SC sources have yet to prove their applicability. In this contribution we present the development, characterization and application of a measurement concept consisting of a fiber-coupled broadband MIR SC source (1.75 μm-4.2 μm, 75 mW optical power) and a fully-integrated MOEMS-based Fabry-Pérot microspectrometer (FPMS) for MIR spectroscopy. The main hindrance for the use of SC sources in spectroscopy so far, are the significant pulse-to-pulse fluctuations arising from the non-linear nature of the SC generation process. We show to what extent spectral averaging makes sense and evaluate the noise performance. By combining a SC source and a FPMS it was possible to significantly reduce noise in spectral, time and polarization domain, resulting in a set-up suitable for MIR spectroscopy. The performance of the set-up was characterized both in transmission and reflection geometry. Low-noise absorption spectra of oils, polymers and aqueous solutions of acetic acid were acquired . Furthermore, time-resolved measurements of the curing process of ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate and results of the chemical mapping of a painted metal surface are reported. The obtained results prove the concept of SC-FPMS promising for MIR spectroscopy, characterized by its simplicity and versatility.

  9. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  10. Cell viability after exposure to optical tweezers using high-power red laser diodes or near-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hendinger, Anita; Sailer, Reinhard; Gschwend, Michael H.; Bauer, Manfred; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schuetze, Karin

    1997-12-01

    In comparison with optical tweezers using near infrared lasers, red emitting high power laser diodes ((lambda) equals 670 - 680 nm) may offer several advantages, such as easier adjustment, smaller beam diameter in the focal plane and low absorption of optical radiation. One-photon absorption by water or two-photon absorption by various cellular components may induce cell killing by heat or by photochemical reactions. To test cell viability, cultivated CHO cells were exposed to various light doses of this wavelength as well as to a moderate light dose of a conventional Nd:YAG laser. Loss of clonogenicity of about 50% as well as a reduction of cell growth were measured at 680 nm when using a maximum light dose of 2.4 GJ/cm2. In contrast, no cell damage was found at 670 nm as well as at 1064 nm when using a light dose of 340 MJ/cm2, which revealed to be sufficient for several applications.

  11. Practical challenges for radiation-balanced lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Steven R.

    2017-02-01

    Radiation Balanced Lasers (RBL) use cooling from spontaneous emission to offset waste heat generation. This technique offers the potential for very high power operation without thermo-optic distortions or damage. Nevertheless establishing and maintaining radiation balance poses interesting problems for the laser designer. An analysis of RBL's sensitivity to material losses, intensity variation, and temperature will be presented. This comparison of simulations and experiments is intended to assist in the design of future high power systems.

  12. Generation of tunable and broadband far-infrared laser pulses during two-color filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Theberge, Francis; Chateauneuf, Marc; Roy, Gilles; Mathieu, Pierre; Dubois, Jacques

    2010-03-15

    Tunable far-infrared laser pulses were generated efficiently during two-color filamentation in air. Understanding the creation of few-cycle far-infrared laser pulses is important since it is at the frontier between two possible generation mechanisms. The first one is the four-wave mixing generation, associated to the generation of wavelengths from ultraviolet up to mid-infrared laser pulses. The second process is the formation of transient photocurrent, which was recently used to describe the generation of submillimetric (terahertz) waves. Comparison between experiments and simulations revealed that the four-wave mixing mechanism is dominant for the far-infrared generation during two-color filamentation.

  13. In vivo comparison of near infrared lasers for skin welding.

    PubMed

    Tabakoğlu, Haşim Ozgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-05-01

    The skin closure abilities of near infrared lasers and suturing were compared by histological examination and mechanical tensile tests during a 21-day healing period. One-centimeter incisions on the dorsal skin of Wistar rats were treated by one of the closing techniques: (a) soldering, using an 809 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s) with 25% bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 2.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG); (b) direct welding with a 980 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (c) direct welding with a 1,070 nm fiber laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (d) suturing. Six spots (79.61 J/cm(2) for each spot) were applied through the incisions. Healing was inspected on the 1st, 4th, 7th, 14th, and 21st post-operative days. The closure index (CI), thermally altered area (TAA), granulation area (GA) and epidermal thickness (ET) were determined by histological examination. Tensile tests were performed at a 5 mm/min crosshead speed up to the first opening along the incision. Immediate superficial closure with high CI values was found for the laser-irradiated incisions at the early phase of recovery. Clear welds without thermal damage were observed for the group irradiated at 1,070 nm. For the sutured group, the incisions remained unclosed for the first day, and openings through the incision were observed. At the end of the 21-day recovery period, no differences between experimental groups were observed in terms of the CI, GA and ET values. However, the tensile strength of the groups irradiated at 980 nm and 1,070 nm was found to be higher than that of the sutured incisions. The laser welding techniques were found to be reliable in terms of immediate and mechanically strong closure compared with suturing. Of them, 1,070 nm laser welding yielded noticeably stronger bonds, with minimal scarring at the end of the 21-days of recovery.

  14. Near-infrared induced optical quenching effects on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dingkai Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Chen, Xing; Cai, Hong; Johnson, Anthony M.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2014-06-23

    In space communications, atmospheric absorption and Rayleigh scattering are the dominant channel impairments. Transmission using mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths offers the benefits of lower loss and less scintillation effects. In this work, we report the telecom wavelengths (1.55 μm and 1.3 μm) induced optical quenching effects on MIR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when QCLs are operated well above their thresholds. The QCL output power can be near 100% quenched using 20 mW of near-infrared (NIR) power, and the quenching effect depends on the input NIR intensity as well as wavelength. Time resolved measurement was conducted to explore the quenching mechanism. The measured recovery time is around 14 ns, which indicates that NIR generated electron-hole pairs may play a key role in the quenching process. The photocarrier created local field and band bending can effectively deteriorate the dipole transition matrix element and quench the QCL. As a result, MIR QCLs can be used as an optical modulator and switch controlled by NIR lasers. They can also be used as “converters” to convert telecom optical signals into MIR optical signals.

  15. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  16. Calibration and investigation of infrared camera systems applying blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Juergen; Fischer, Joachim

    2001-03-01

    An experimental facility is presented, which allows calibration and detailed investigation of infrared camera systems. Various blackbodies operating in the temperature range from -60 degree(s)C up to 3000 degree(s)C serve as standard radiation sources, enabling calibration of camera systems in a wide temperature and spectral range with highest accuracy. Quantitative results and precise long-term investigations, especially in detecting climatic trends, require accurate traceability to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). For the used blackbodies the traceability to ITS- 90 is either realized by standard platinum resistance thermometers (in the temperature range below 962 degree(s)C) or by absolute and relative radiometry (in the temperature range above 962 degree(s)C). This traceability is fundamental for implementation of quality assurance systems and realization of different standardizations, for example according ISO 9000. For investigation of the angular and the temperature resolution our set-up enables minimum resolvable (MRTD) and minimum detectable temperature difference (MDTD) measurements in the various temperature ranges. A collimator system may be used to image the MRTD and MDTD targets to infinity. As internal calibration of infrared camera systems critically depends on the temperature of the surrounding, the calibration and investigation of the cameras is performed in a climate box, which allows a detailed controlling of the environmental parameters like humidity and temperature. Experimental results obtained for different camera systems are presented and discussed.

  17. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25–50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel ‘THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10−6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  18. Doppler-free spectroscopy of xenon in the mid-infrared using difference-frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Rusciano, G; De Luca, A; Pignatiello, F; Sasso, A

    2005-10-17

    We report on the first Doppler-free spectroscopy investigation of an atomic species, xenon, performed in the mid-infrared using difference-frequency radiation. The absorption saturated spectrum of the xenon 6p[3/2]2?5d[5/2]3 transition (2p6?3d'1 in Paschen notation) at 3.1076 microm was investigated using about 60 microwatts of cw narrowband radiation (Deltanu=50 kHz) generated by difference-frequency mixing in a periodically-poled Lithium Niobate crystal. A single frequency Ti:Sapphire laser (power 800 mW) and a monolithic diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser (300 mW) were used as pump and signal waves respectively. We used natural enriched xenon, which contains nine stable isotopes, two of which, 129Xe and 131Xe, exhibit a hyperfine structure owing to their nuclear spin. The small isotope displacements expected for this atom and the complex hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes make it difficult to fully resolve the recorded saturated-absorption spectra. In spite of this, we have been able to analyze the isolated 129Xe F''=5/2?F'=7/2 hyperfine component by means of first-derivative FM spectroscopy.

  19. Fiber-delivered mid-infrared (6-7) laser ablation of retinal tissue under perfluorodecalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Joos, Karen M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2003-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser (l=2.94mm) is an effective tool in vitreo-retinal surgery. Pulsed mid-infrared (l=6.45 mm) radiation from the Free Electron Laser has been touted as a potentially superior cutting tool. To date, use of this laser has been limited to applications in an air environment. The goal of this study was: 1) determine feasibility of fiberoptic delivery of 6.45mm using silverhalide fibers (d=700mm); 2) use infrared transparent vitreous substitute (perfluorodecalin) to allow non-contact ablation of the retina at 6.45mm. Fiber damage threshold=7.8J/cm2 (0.54GW/cm2) while transmission loss=0.54dB/m, allowing supra-ablative radiant exposures to the target. FTIR measurements of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm yielded ma=3mm-1. Pump-probe imaging of ablation of a tissue-phantom through perfluorodecalin showed feasibility of non-contact ablation at l=6.45mm. Ablation of the retinal membranes of enucleated pig eyes was carried out under perfluorodecalin (5 Hz, 1.3 J/cm2). Each eye was cut along its equator to expose the retina. Vitreous was replaced by perfluorodecalin and laser radiation was delivered to the retina via the silverhalide fiber. The eye was rotated (at 2 rpm) using a stepper motor (0.9o/step) to create an ablation circle around the central axis of the retina (50% spot-to-spot overlap). Histological analysis of ablation yield and collateral damage will be presented. We have shown that using l=6.45mm delivered via silver halide fibers through perfluorodecalin allowed non-contact laser ablation. Remote structures are shielded, as the radiant exposure falls below the ablation threshold owing non-negligible absorption of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm. This may optimize efficacy and safety of laser-based vitreoretinal surgery.

  20. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  1. A blackbody radiation-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.; Deyoung, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

  2. Effects of flameless catalytic infrared radiation on Sitophilus oryzae (L.) life stages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A laboratory bench top flameless catalytic infrared emitter was evaluated against all life stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), an insect species associated with stored wheat. The infrared radiation emitted was in the 3 to 7 µm range. A non-contact infrared thermometer measured grain t...

  3. CONTROL OF RADIATION PARAMETERS Radiation phase locking in an array of globally coupled fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotskii, D. V.; Elkin, N. N.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    A model of an array of globally coupled fibre lasers, with the same fraction of the total output beam returned to each laser, is considered. The basic element of the model is a single laser controlled by an external signal. The output power of each laser in the array is found as a function of small-signal gain and frequency detuning. The maximum efficiency of phase locking and minimum fraction of output radiation that is necessary to form a feedback are calculated as functions of the number of lasers in the array. It is shown that gain saturation increases the efficiency of coherent beam summation in arrays containing up to 20 lasers.

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Feasibility of investigation of optical breakdown statistics using multifrequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanov, S. F.

    1990-06-01

    A method proposed for investigating the statistics of bulk optical breakdown relies on multifrequency lasers, which eliminates the influence of the laser radiation intensity statistics. The method is based on preliminary recording of the peak intensity statistics of multifrequency laser radiation pulses at the caustic using the optical breakdown threshold of K8 glass. The probability density distribution function was obtained at the focus for the peak intensities of the radiation pulses of a multifrequency laser. This method may be used to study the self-interaction under conditions of bulk optical breakdown of transparent dielectrics.

  5. Studies of new media radiation induced laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.; Shiu, Y. J.; Raju, S. R.; Hwang, I. H.; Tabibi, B.

    1984-01-01

    Various lasants were investigated especially, 2-iodohepafluoropropane (i-C3F7I) for the direct solar pumped lasers. Optical pumping of iodine laser was achieved using a small flashlamp. Using i-C3F7I as a laser gain medium, threshold inversion density, small signal gain, and laser performance at the elevated temperature were measured. The experimental results and analysis are presented. The iodine laser kinetics of the C3F7I and IBr system were numerically simulated. The concept of a direct solar-pumped laser amplifier using (i-C3F7I) as the laser material was evaluated and several kinetic coefficients for i-C3F7I laser system were reexamined. The results are discussed.

  6. Mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for iodine laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Space-based laser power systems will require converters to change laser radiation into electricity. Vertical junction photovoltaic converters are promising devices for this use. A promising laser for the laser power station is the t-C4F9I laser which emits radiation at a wavelength of 1.315 microns. This paper describes the results of mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for use with this laser. The material for this photovoltaic converter is Ga(53)In(47)As which has a bandgap energy of 0.94 eV, slightly below the energy of the laser photons (0.943 eV). Results of a study optimizing the converter parameters are presented. Calculated efficiency for a 1000 vertical junction converter is 42.5 percent at a power density of 1 x 10 to the 3d power w/sq cm.

  7. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  8. Propagation of infrared radiation in a naturally obscured atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, L. W., Jr.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Lee, S. M.; Wilburn, D. K.

    1981-07-01

    An integrated model of target vehicle signatures must include a description of the effect of transmission of electromagnetic radiation through the atmosphere between the target and the threat sensor devices. A number of models published by various investigators are in use to describe this transmission phenomenon. These models predict fairly accurately the attenuation of light as it propagates through clear air, indicating that they account for the molecular absorption reasonably well. They are not as accurate when the atmosphere contains small particles such as those in rain, fog, snow, etc. In adverse atmospheric conditions, the scattering process becomes comparatively more important and must also be considered. In this report, a detailed investigation is presented for the scattering of infrared radiation by atmospheric aerosols. The theoretical analysis is compared to the measured data obtained at the Keweenaw Research Center (KRC). The analysis and the results are compared to the prediction of other available models. In addition, the implication of the present work on the ongoing TACOM/KRC modeling effort of target signature is discussed.

  9. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  10. Research on radiation induced laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Rowe, M. J.; Carter, B. D.; Walters, R. A.; Cox, J. D.; Liang, R.; Roxey, T.; Zapata, L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of high power nuclear pumped lasers is discussed. The excitation mechanism of continuous wave (CW) HeNe nuclear pumped lasers is studied and a CO2 nuclear pumped laser is used to demonstrate the CW output in the order of watts. The assumption that high power densities are only achievable by volume fission fragment sources is used to identify laser gases which are compatible with UF6 by excited states lifetime measurements. The examination of Xe2, XeF, and KrF under nuclear irradiation to determine if they are good candidates for nuclear-pumped lasers is described.

  11. Laser interferometry of radiation driven gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Kyle James; Ivanov, Vladimir; Mancini, Roberto; Mayes, Daniel C.

    2017-06-01

    In a series of experiments performed at the 1MA Zebra pulsed power accelerator of the Nevada Terawatt Facility nitrogen gas jets were driven with the broadband x-ray flux produced during the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch implosion. The wire arrays were comprised of 4 and 8, 10μm-thick gold wires and 17μm-thick nickel wires, 2cm and 3cm tall, and 0.3cm in diameter. They radiated 12kJ to 16kJ of x-ray energy, most of it in soft x-ray photons of less than 1keV of energy, in a time interval of 30ns. This x-ray flux was used to drive a nitrogen gas jet located at 0.8cm from the axis of the z-pinch radiation source and produced with a supersonic nozzle. The x-ray flux ionizes the nitrogen gas thus turning it into a photoionized plasma. We used laser interferometry to probe the ionization of the plasma. To this end, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at the wavelength of 266 nm was set up to extract the atom number density profile of the gas jet just before the Zebra shot, and air-wedge interferometers at 266 and 532 nm were used to determine the electron number density of the plasma right during the Zebra shot. The ratio of electron to atom number densities gives the distribution of average ionization state of the plasma. A python code was developed to perform the image data processing, extract phase shift spatial maps, and obtain the atom and electron number densities via Abel inversion. Preliminary results from the experiment are promising and do show that a plasma has been created in the gas jet driven by the x-ray flux, thus demonstrating the feasibility of a new experimental platform to study photoionized plasmas in the laboratory. These plasmas are found in astrophysical scenarios including x-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, and the accretion disks surrounding black holes1. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451.1R. C. Mancini et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041001 (2009)

  12. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Roger; Cornacchia, Max; Emma, Paul; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Ruland, Robert; Johnson, Erik; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John; Lidia, Steve; Duffy, Pat; Libkind, Marcus; Frigola, Pedro; Murokh, Alex; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James; Tremaine, Aaron

    2001-12-01

    The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA) free electron laser (FEL) is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800-600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70-85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than +/-50 μm per field gain length.

  13. Caries inhibition potential of Er:YAG and Er:YSGG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D. B.; Visuri, Steven R.; Seka, Wolf D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dental hard tissues can be ablated efficiency by (lambda) equals 3 micrometers laser irradiation with minimal subsurface thermal damage. However, the potential of lasers operating in the region of the infrared for caries preventive treatments has not been investigated. In this study, the caries inhibition potential of Er:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.94 micrometers ) and Er:YSGG ((lambda) equals 2.79 micrometers ) laser radiation on dental enamel was evaluated at various irradiation intensities. Pulsed IR radiometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to measure the time-resolved surface temperatures during laser irradiation and to detect changes in the surface morphology. The magnitude and temporal evolution of the surface temperature during multiple pulse irradiation of the tissue was dependent on the wavelength, irradiation intensity, and the number of laser pulses. Radiometry and SEM micrographs indicated that ablation was initiated at temperatures of approximately 300 degree(s)C for Er:YAG and 800 degree(s)C for Er:YSGG laser irradiation, well below the melting and vaporization temperatures of the carbonated hydroxyapatite mineral component (m.p. equals 1200 degree(s)C). Nevertheless, there was marked caries inhibition for irradiation intensities below those temperature thresholds, notably 60% and 40% inhibition was achieved after Er:YSGG and Er:YAG laser irradiation, respectively. These results indicate that the Er:YSGG laser can be used effectively for both preventive dental treatments and for hard tissue removal.

  14. Chalcogenide molded freeform optics for mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenard, Francois; Alvarez, Oseas; Yi, Allen

    2017-05-01

    High-precision chalcogenide molded micro-lenses were produced to collimate mid-infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs). Molded cylindrical micro-lens prototypes with aspheric contour (acylindrical), high numerical aperture (NA 0.8) and small focal length (f<2 mm) were fabricated to collimate the QCL fast-axis beam. Another innovative freeform micro-lens has an input acylindrical surface to collimate the fast axis and an orthogonal output acylindrical surface to collimate the slow axis. The thickness of the freeform lens is such that the output fast- and slow-axis beams are circular. This paper presents results on the chalcogenide molded freeform micro-lens designed to collimate and circularize QCL at 4.6 microns.

  15. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-04-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  16. Caloric stimulation with near infrared radiation does not induce paradoxical nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Asenov, D R; Di Martino, E

    2011-04-01

    Near infrared radiation can be used for warm stimulation in caloric irrigation of the equilibrium organ. Aim of this study was to determine whether near infrared radiation offers effective stimulation of the vestibular organ, whether it is well tolerated by the patients and especially whether it is a viable alternative to warm air stimulation in patients with defects of the tympanic membrane and radical mastoid cavities. Patients with perforations of the tympanic membrane (n = 15) and with radical mastoid cavities (n = 13) were tested both with near infrared radiation and warm dry air. A caloric-induced nystagmus could be seen equally effectively and rapidly in all patients. Contrary to stimulation with warm dry air, no paradoxical nystagmus was observed following caloric irrigation with a warm stimulus (near infrared radiation). Results of a questionnaire showed excellent patient acceptance of near infrared stimulation with no arousal effects or unpleasant feeling. In conclusion, near infrared radiation proved to be an alternative method of caloric irrigation to warm dry air in patients with tympanic membrane defects and radical mastoid cavities. Near infrared radiation is pleasant, quick, contact free, sterile and quiet. With this method an effective caloric warm stimulus is available. If near infrared radiation is used for caloric stimulus no evaporative heat loss occurs.

  17. Doping of germanium and silicon crystals with non-hydrogenic acceptors for far infrared lasers

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Brundermann, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductors used for far infrared lasers with non-hydrogenic acceptors having binding energies larger than the energy of the laser photons. Doping of germanium or silicon crystals with beryllium, zinc or copper. A far infrared laser comprising germanium crystals doped with double or triple acceptor dopants permitting the doped laser to be tuned continuously from 1 to 4 terahertz and to operate in continuous mode. A method for operating semiconductor hole population inversion lasers with a closed cycle refrigerator.

  18. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  19. Quantum Quenching of Radiation Losses in Short Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C N; Gonoskov, A; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M

    2017-03-10

    Accelerated charges radiate, and therefore must lose energy. The impact of this energy loss on particle motion, called radiation reaction, becomes significant in intense-laser matter interactions, where it can reduce collision energies, hinder particle acceleration schemes, and is seemingly unavoidable. Here we show that this common belief breaks down in short laser pulses, and that energy losses and radiation reaction can be controlled and effectively switched off by appropriate tuning of the pulse length. This "quenching" of emission is impossible in classical physics, but becomes possible in QED due to the discrete nature of quantum emissions.

  20. Testing Unruh Radiation with Ultra-Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshiki

    1997-04-01

    We point of that using the state-of-the-art (or soon to be) intense ultrafast laser technology, violent acceleration of electrons that may be suitable for testing general relativistic effects can be realized in the laboratory settings. In particular we demonstrate that the Unruh radiation is detectable, in principle, beyond the conventional radiation (most notably the Larmor radiation) background noise, by taking the advantages of their specific dependences on the laser power, their different characters in spectral-angular distributions, and the time structure of the signals.

  1. Quantum Quenching of Radiation Losses in Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, C. N.; Gonoskov, A.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.

    2017-03-01

    Accelerated charges radiate, and therefore must lose energy. The impact of this energy loss on particle motion, called radiation reaction, becomes significant in intense-laser matter interactions, where it can reduce collision energies, hinder particle acceleration schemes, and is seemingly unavoidable. Here we show that this common belief breaks down in short laser pulses, and that energy losses and radiation reaction can be controlled and effectively switched off by appropriate tuning of the pulse length. This "quenching" of emission is impossible in classical physics, but becomes possible in QED due to the discrete nature of quantum emissions.

  2. Photoacoustic-based detector for infrared laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, L.; Palzer, S.

    2016-07-25

    In this contribution, we present an alternative detector technology for use in direct absorption spectroscopy setups. Instead of a semiconductor based detector, we use the photoacoustic effect to gauge the light intensity. To this end, the target gas species is hermetically sealed under excess pressure inside a miniature cell along with a MEMS microphone. Optical access to the cell is provided by a quartz window. The approach is particularly suitable for tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared range, where numerous molecules exhibit large absorption cross sections. Moreover, a frequency standard is integrated into the method since the number density and pressure inside the cell are constant. We demonstrate that the information extracted by our method is at least equivalent to that achieved using a semiconductor-based photon detector. As exemplary and highly relevant target gas, we have performed direct spectroscopy of methane at the R3-line of the 2v{sub 3} band at 6046.95 cm{sup −1} using both detector technologies in parallel. The results may be transferred to other infrared-active transitions without loss of generality.

  3. Development of a scanning near-field infrared microscope based on a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, M.K.; Erramilli, S.; Jeung, A.

    1995-12-31

    Infrared spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive technique available for identifying and characterizing organic materials. Most molecules exhibit a large number of well-resolved strongly absorbing spectral lines in the mid-IR region of the spectrum. In addition to our own efforts described last year, Creuzet et al have also been working on combining infrared spectroscopy with sub-micron spatial resolution imaging. Scanning Near Field Infrared Microscopy (SNIM) when combined with high brightness tunable FEL radiation, provides a powerful new research tool. We have developed two new probes for use in SNIM. The first are chalcogenide fibers capable of transmitting images in the 2-12 {mu} range. At the Stanford picosecond Free Electron Laser, we have successfully obtained images of metal surfaces and of collagen fibers on diamond at a wavelength of 5.01 {mu}, with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.5 {mu} demonstrating that near field imaging can be obtained on biological samples. At a wavelength of 6.3{mu}, we found that the chalcogenide fibers are limited in their ability to withstand high powers, most likely because of the presence of absorption bands in the polyimide coating used to sheath the brittle fibers. In collaboration with Prof J. Harrington (Rutgers University), we have also developed hollow glass capillaries with metal coated on the inside. These probes are able to withstand significantly higher powers, and can function to longer wavelengths, out into the Far IR region.

  4. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protective filters. PMID:26327153

  5. Quantum cascade semiconductor infrared and far-infrared lasers: from trace gas sensing to non-linear optics.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Langford, Nigel; McCulloch, Michael T; Wright, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    The Quantum cascade (QC) laser is an entirely new type of semiconductor device in which the laser wavelength depends on the band-gap engineering. It can be made to operate over a much larger range than lead salt lasers, covering significant parts of both the infrared and submillimetre regions, and with higher output power. In this tutorial review we survey some of the applications of these new lasers, which range from trace gas detection for atmospheric or medical purposes to sub-Doppler and time dependent non-linear spectroscopy.

  6. Coherent sources for mid-infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honzátko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Mondal, Shyamal; Peterka, Pavel; Todorov, Filip

    2016-12-01

    Mid-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is useful for molecular trace gas concentration measurements in gas mixtures. While the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is still the gold standard in gas analysis, LAS offers several advantages. It takes tens of minutes for a gas mixture to be separated in the capillary column precluding gas chromatography from real-time control of industrial processes, while LAS can measure the concentration of gas species in seconds. LAS can be used in a wide range of applications such as gas quality screening for regulation, metering and custody transfer,1 purging gas pipes to avoid explosions,1 monitoring combustion processes,2 detection and quantification of gas leaks,3 by-products monitoring to provide feedback for the real-time control of processes in petrochemical industry,4 real-time control of inductively coupled plasma etch reactors,5, 6 and medical diagnostics by means of time-resolved volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis in exhaled breath.7 Apart from the concentration, it also permits us to determine the temperature, pressure, velocity and mass flux of the gas under observation. The selectivity and sensitivity of LAS is linked to a very high spectral resolution given by the linewidth of single-frequency lasers. Measurements are performed at reduced pressure where the collisional and Doppler broadenings are balanced. The sensitivity can be increased to ppb and sometimes to ppt ranges by increasing the interaction length in multi-pass gas cells or resonators and also by adopting modulation techniques.8

  7. Near-infrared hybrid plasmonic multiple quantum well nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiamin; Wei, Wei; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Jinnan; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-04-17

    The lasing characteristics of hybrid plasmonic AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) nanowire (NW) lasers beyond diffraction limit have been investigated by 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results show that the hybrid plasmonic MQW NW has lower threshold gain over a broad diameter range in comparison with its photonic counterpart. Beyond the diffraction limit, the hybrid plasmonic MQW NW has a lowest threshold gain of 788 cm-1 at a diameter of 130 nm, and a cutoff diameter of 80 nm, half that of the photonic lasers. In comparison with the hybrid plasmonic core-shell NWs, the hybrid plasmonic MQW NWs exhibit significantly lower threshold gain, higher Purcell factor, and smaller cutoff diameter, which are attributed to the superior overlap between the hybrid plasmonic modes and gain medium, as well as a stronger optical confinement due to the grating-like effect of MQW structures. Moreover, the hybrid plasmonic MQW NW has a lower threshold gain than that of the core-shell NW over a broad wavelength range. The hybrid plasmonic MQW NW structure is promising for ultrasmall and low-consumption near-infrared nanolasers.

  8. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus Peter; Boncher, William Lawrence; Love, Steven Paul

    2015-03-10

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90–100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8–12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  9. Impact of Infrared Lunar Laser Ranging on Lunar Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnès; Manche, Hervé; Gastineau, Mickael; Courde, Clément; Torre, Jean-Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques; LLR Observers : Astrogeo-OCA, Apache Point, McDonald Laser Ranging Station, Haleakala Observatory, Matera Laser Ranging Observatory

    2016-10-01

    Since 2015, in addition to the traditional green (532nm), infrared (1064nm) has been the preferred wavelength for lunar laser ranging at the Calern lunar laser ranging (LLR) site in France. Due to the better atmospheric transmission of IR with respect to Green, nearly 3 times the number of normal points have been obtained in IR than in Green [ C.Courde et al 2016 ]. In our study, in addition to the historical data obtained from various other LLR sites, we include the recent IR normal points obtained from Calern over the 1 year time span (2015-2016), constituting about 4.2% of data spread over 46 years of LLR. Near even distribution of data provided by IR on both the spatial and temporal domain, helps us to improve constraints on the internal structure of the Moon modeled within the planetary ephemeris : INPOP [ Fienga et al 2015 ]. IERS recommended models have been used in the data reduction software GINS (GRGS,CNES) [ V.Viswanathan et al 2015 ]. Constraints provided by GRAIL, on the Lunar gravitational potential and Love numbers have been taken into account in the least-square fit procedure. New estimates on the dynamical parameters of the lunar core will be presented.

  10. Laser tissue soldering with near-infrared absorbing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Andre M.; O'Neal, D. P.; Halas, Naomi J.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; West, Jennifer L.

    2005-04-01

    Gold nanoshells are a new class of nanoparticles with tunable optical absorption that can be placed in the near infrared. Gold nanoshells consist of a spherical silica core surrounded by a thin gold shell. The ratio of the sizes of the core diameter to the shell thickness as well as the total size of the nanoshell determines the optical absorption properties. Previous experiments have shown that these nanoparticles are stable at >325°C for durations typical of laser tissue welding. We have investigated the use of gold nanoshells as exogenous NIR absorbers to facilitate ex vivo laser tissue soldering. For ex vivo testing, gold nanoshells with peak absorption at approximately 820 nm were suspended in an albumin solder formulation and applied to muscle strips, followed by irradiation of the tissue at 821 nm. Mechanical testing of nanoshell-solder welds in muscle revealed successful fusion of tissues with tensile strengths of the weld site equal to the native tissue. The use of thermally stable nanoshells as an exogenous absorber allows the usage of light sources that are minimally absorbed by tissue components, thereby minimizing damage to surrounding tissue and producing welds sufficient for wound closure.

  11. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Boncher, William L.; Love, Steven P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90-100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8-12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  12. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    DOE PAGES

    Hehlen, Markus Peter; Boncher, William Lawrence; Love, Steven Paul

    2015-03-10

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. Theymore » show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90–100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8–12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.« less

  13. Effects of low-power laser radiation on mice immunity.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Glushkova, O V; Cherenkov, D A; Chudnovsky, V M; Fesenko, E E

    2006-02-01

    Because of large interest in biological effects of laser radiation used in laser therapy, the effect of extremely low-level red laser light intensity on the immune cell activity has been studied in the animal model with well-characterized macrophage and T cell populations as responder cells producing cytokines, protective proteins, active oxygen, and nitric compounds. To study of the possible side effects of laser immunotherapy we monitored the productions of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in mice subjected to a periodic laser exposure for 1 month. Helium-neon laser radiation with the power of 0.2 mW/cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm was applied on two different mouse skin surfaces, i.e. a thymus projection area or a hind limb. Healthy NMRI male mice were irradiated repeatedly with laser light for 1 min with 48-h intervals for 30 days. The animals were divided into three groups of 25 mice. The first and the second groups were exposed to laser light, on the thymus and hind limb area, respectively. The third, sham-irradiated group served as a control. Early and prolonged effects of laser radiation on the levels of NO (by Griess assay), Hsp70 (by Western blot assay), tumor necrosis factors (TNF-alpha and TNF-beta) (by cytotoxic assay using L929 cells as targets), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) (by ELISA assay) were determined. The dynamics of immune responses to low-power laser light intensity was shown to be dependent on two factors, i.e. the cumulative dose and the localization of the irradiated surface. Besides, various populations of cells demonstrated different sensitivity to laser radiation, with T cells being more responsive among examined populations of the cells. Low intensity laser light induced an immune cell activity when the exposure duration did not exceed 10 days, while a more prolonged period of treatment generated more severe changes in the immune system, up to immunosuppression. The treatment of the thymus zone resulted in

  14. Extinction of CO2 Laser Radiation Under Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    81-1280 B0 91,a 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EXTINCTION OF CO2 LASER RADIATION UNDER FINAL Oct 78 Oct 81 ADVERSE WEATHER...CONDITIONS 6 PERFORMING O0G r_ r NUMBER 7. AUTHOR( s ) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) Dr. Vincent Chimelis ŝ PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...number) Laser Propagation Rain Laser Extinction CO2 Lasers Adverse Weather Aerosol s - 20 RACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by

  15. THz Radiation Generation via Laser Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2008-12-01

    Recently radiation generation from the interaction between laser and plasma is studied. Terahertz radiation from photo-conductive antenna which is based on semiconductor technology is widely used, The power is in the order of nano-watt level so that it is hard to use for application. On the other hand, terahertz radiation from laser plasma interaction is much higher than that of semiconductor technology. In our experiments, we have studied by use DARC (dc to ac radiation converter) mechanism by using YAG laser with nano-second pulse duration. DARC is novel radiation source using the interaction between laser-created ionization front and static electric field. The frequency of radiation is determined by both plasma density of ionization front and the geometry of DARC structure. We observed radiation pulse of frequency of 1.2 THz and pulse duration of 2 ps with ZnSe crystal as media detected by EO (electro-optics) sampling technique. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  16. Low-intensity laser radiation in diagnosis and treatment of nephrotuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.; Krasnov, Vladimir A.

    2001-05-01

    In Siberia there is a hard epidemic situation on tuberculosis. Urogenital tuberculosis (42.4%) has the first place in the incidence rate among extrapulmonary forms. Complicated and widespread lesions are prevailing. One of the main reasons that is lack of pathognomonic symptoms. So different provocation tests are used. Our investigations have proved provoking influence of a low- intensity laser radiation on a tubercular inflammation. Local transcutaneous effect by an infrared laser radiation allows to provoke an exacerbation of a latent tubercular inflammation in kidneys and to discover it by means of the urinalyses also analysis of blood. In case of an expressed initial pathology of the urinalyses previously therapy ex juvantibus carried out by assignment of brief rates of unspecific preparations, optimum among which is ofromax. This method was used for 60 patients with various urological diseases and has allowed to increase the efficiency of diagnosis on 36%.

  17. Biological Effects of Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation and Vitamin D for Health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Humans evolved in sunlight and had depended on sunlight for its life giving properties that was appreciated by our early ancestors. However, for more than 40 years the lay press and various medical and dermatology associations have denounced sun exposure because of its association with increased risk for skin cancer. The goal of this review is to put into perspective the many health benefits that have been associated with exposure to sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB), visible and infrared radiation. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Lasing of middle-infrared free-election lasers using the storage ring NIJI-IV.

    PubMed

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2011-09-15

    We report for the first time to our knowledge the experimental realization of a storage ring free-electron laser (FEL) in the middle-infrared (MIR) region. A technique to adjust the optical cavity using higher harmonic FELs was developed for a fundamental FEL in the MIR region. The MIR FELs were oscillated in the wavelength region of 2475 to 2673 nm, and the relative linewidth was 5×10⁻⁴. A quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an energy of 700 keV was generated using FEL Compton backscattering. We were able to realize a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam, whose energy is difficult to generate even in advanced synchrotron radiation facilities.

  19. [Calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xun; Tong, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Chao-Zhe; Tong, Qi; Li, He; Zhang, Zhi-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Spectral distribution of infrared radiation from plume by the method to calculate infrared radiance of the gaze direction in small sight field was calculated. Based on numerical value and form of radiative transfer equation, infrared radiant intensity of the gaze direction was calculated using the Malkmus statistical narrow-band model and CG approach. Flow field and mole fraction distribution were simulated using a FLUENT computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software. Infrared imaging simulation model of hot jet was established. The hot jet's infrared images of liquid rocket engine were generated. The results demonstrate that the method can detect well-resolved fine structure of flow field. And the model is also applicable to calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, N. I.; Shaparev, N. Ya

    2006-04-01

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo.

  1. Counterpropagating Radiative Shock Experiments on the Orion Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Clayson, T.; Stehlé, C.; Swadling, G. F.; Foster, J. M.; Skidmore, J.; Graham, P.; Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chaulagain, U.; Singh, R. L.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Patankar, S.; Spindloe, C.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Velarde, P.; Danson, C.

    2017-08-01

    We present new experiments to study the formation of radiative shocks and the interaction between two counterpropagating radiative shocks. The experiments are performed at the Orion laser facility, which is used to drive shocks in xenon inside large aspect ratio gas cells. The collision between the two shocks and their respective radiative precursors, combined with the formation of inherently three-dimensional shocks, provides a novel platform particularly suited for the benchmarking of numerical codes. The dynamics of the shocks before and after the collision are investigated using point-projection x-ray backlighting while, simultaneously, the electron density in the radiative precursor was measured via optical laser interferometry. Modeling of the experiments using the 2D radiation hydrodynamic codes nym and petra shows very good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Mid-infrared photothermal heterodyne spectroscopy in a liquid crystal using a quantum cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    Mërtiri, Alket; Jeys, Thomas; Liberman, Vladimir; Hong, M. K.; Mertz, Jerome; Altug, Hatice; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2012-01-01

    We report a technique to measure the mid-infrared photothermal response induced by a tunable quantum cascade laser in the neat liquid crystal 4-octyl-4′-cyanobiphenyl (8CB), without any intercalated dye. Heterodyne detection using a Ti:sapphire laser of the response in the solid, smectic, nematic and isotropic liquid crystal phases allows direct detection of a weak mid-infrared normal mode absorption using an inexpensive photodetector. At high pump power in the nematic phase, we observe an interesting peak splitting in the photothermal response. Tunable lasers that can access still stronger modes will facilitate photothermal heterodyne mid-infrared vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:22912508

  3. Effects of Infrared Radiation on Skin Photo-Aging and Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2006-01-01

    Infrared radiation is increasingly and uncritically used for cosmetic and wellness purposes, despite the poorly understood biologic effects of such treatments on humans. In the present study, we investigated the effects of infrared radiation on collagen and elastin production in dermal fibroblasts, as well as the clinical and histopathologic effects of infrared radiation on photo-aged facial skin lesions. In order to determine the effects of infrared radiation on collagen and elastin production, dermal fibroblasts were exposed to infrared radiation for varying lengths of time and collagen and elastin contents were subsequently determined. Additionally, 20 patients with mild to moderate facial wrinkles and hyperpigmented lesions received daily treatments of far infrared radiation (900 to 1000 µm) for six-months. During the treatment, patients and a medical observer conducted independent photographic and clinical evaluations every 4 weeks, and skin biopsies were obtained for histological analysis at baseline and one month post-treatment. We found that the content of collagen and elastin produced by the fibroblasts increased after infrared radiation, and that this increase was proportional to the duration of irradiation exposure. Following 6 months of treatment, all patients reported good (51-75%) improvements in skin texture and roughness. Additionally, patients noted fair (25-50%) improvement in color tone of the skin; however, improvements in hyperpigmented lesions were not observed. Objective medical evaluation of the patients indicated that roughness and laxity were fairly improved, but there was no significant improvement in hyperpigmented lesions. Histological examination failed to reveal any differences as well. These results suggest that infrared radiation may have beneficial effects on skin texture and wrinkles by increasing collagen and elastin contents from the stimulated fibroblasts. Therefore, skin treatment with infrared radiation may be an effective

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Conversion of the energy of fast electrons to thermal plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergunova, G. A.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the conversion of the energy of highly energetic fast electrons, generated by the action of CO2 laser radiation on a target, into characteristic radiation emitted by a plasma formed from shell targets which, for instance, may be present inside targets irradiated by the CO2 laser. Analytical formulas are obtained for the temperature of the converted radiation. The results show that it is possible to control this radiation by choosing the parameters of the target and of the fast electron flux. The efficiency of conversion into characteristic thermal radiation is found numerically to be 95%. This method of conversion is more favorable than direct interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a target since the emitting region is localized in the target mass. When a laser interacts with a target the mass of this region increases with time and so the temperature of the emitted radiation is lower than in the case when fast electrons act on the target.

  5. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOEpatents

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  6. Laser radiography forming bremsstrahlung radiation to image an object

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Sefcik, Joseph A.

    2004-01-13

    A method of imaging an object by generating laser pulses with a short-pulse, high-power laser. When the laser pulse strikes a conductive target, bremsstrahlung radiation is generated such that hard ballistic high-energy electrons are formed to penetrate an object. A detector on the opposite side of the object detects these electrons. Since laser pulses are used to form the hard x-rays, multiple pulses can be used to image an object in motion, such as an exploding or compressing object, by using time gated detectors. Furthermore, the laser pulses can be directed down different tubes using mirrors and filters so that each laser pulse will image a different portion of the object.

  7. Surface treatment of CFRP composites using femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V.; Sharma, S. P.; de Moura, M. F. S. F.; Moreira, R. D. F.; Vilar, R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the surface treatment of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites by laser ablation with femtosecond laser radiation. For this purpose, unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites were treated with femtosecond laser pulses of 1024 nm wavelength and 550 fs duration. Laser tracks were inscribed on the material surface using pulse energies and scanning speeds in the range 0.1-0.5 mJ and 0.1-5 mm/s, respectively. The morphology of the laser treated surfaces was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We show that, by using the appropriate processing parameters, a selective removal of the epoxy resin can be achieved, leaving the carbon fibers exposed. In addition, sub-micron laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are created on the carbon fibers surface, which may be potentially beneficial for the improvement of the fiber to matrix adhesion in adhesive bonds between CFRP parts.

  8. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Multichannel optical modulator for a laser diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhavin, S. I.; Kuz'minov, V. V.; Mashkovskii, D. A.; Timoshkin, V. N.

    2007-07-01

    The possibility of the development of a multichannel electrooptical modulator of laser radiation with a large diffraction divergence and a small coherence length is studied experimentally and its design is described.

  9. The Evolution of Dust and Infrared Radiation in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchieva, A.; Wiebe, D.; Kirsanova, M.; Krushinsky, V.

    2017-06-01

    Regions of ionized hydrogen are often observed in infrared (IR) emission as ring-like nebulae. IR emission presumably comes from hot dust embedded in ionized gas and surrounding the ionized gas. The dust within these regions is believed to be partially blown away by the action of both the stellar wind and radiation pressure from young massive stars. We investigate trends in morphology of IR ring nebulae representing HII regions. Archival data from VLA New GPS 20 cm survey as well as from Spitzer GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys at 8 and 24 micron are utilized to select visually objects with more or less regular shapes. We have identified 92 HII regions surrounded by closed or nearly closed IR rings. Shapes of these rings are characterized by fitting ellipses in order to estimate their orientation and oblateness. From our catalogue of 92 objects we have selected 27 objects with eccentricities of fitted ellipses less than 0.3. These objects are suggested as prototype targets for 1D hydrodynamic modeling.

  10. Photochemical effects in the lens from near infrared radiation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Al-Saqry, Riyadh; Schulmeister, Karl; Gallichanin, Konstantin; Kronschläger, Martin; Yu, Zhaohua

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: The current data are consistent with a potential photochemical effect of in vivo exposure of the crystalline lens to near infrared radiation since the onset of cataract after in just above threshold dose was at least 18 hrs delayed after the exposure. Materials and methods: The eyes of 6 weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed unilaterally in vivo to 1090 nm, 6.2 W quasi-top hat spatial distribution with a 3 mm spot on the anterior lens surface within the dilated pupil. First, four exposure time groups of rats were exposed to increasing exposure times. At 24 hrs after exposure, the difference of light scattering between the lenses from the same animal was measured. Then, based on the first experiment, four post-exposure time groups were exposed unilaterally in vivo to 8 s of 1090 nm, 6.2 W quasi-top hat spatial distribution with a 3 mm spot on the anterior lens surface within the dilated pupil. After, the intended post-exposure time, the difference of light scattering between the lenses from the same animal was measured. Results: A 3 mm spot of 6.2 W induces light scattering in the lens with exposures of at least 8 s. Further, after 8 s of 6.2 W within a 3 mm spot on the lens surface, the light scattering increase in the lens was delayed at least 18 hrs after the exposure.

  11. Investigation of ultrafast laser-driven radiative blast waves.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M J; MacKinnon, A J; Zweiback, J; Shigemori, K; Ryutov, D; Rubenchik, A M; Keilty, K A; Liang, E; Remington, B A; Ditmire, T

    2001-08-20

    We have examined the evolution of cylindrically symmetric blast waves produced by the deposition of femtosecond laser pulses in gas jets. In high- Z gases radiative effects become important. We observe the production of an ionization precursor ahead of the shock front and deceleration parameters below the adiabatic value of 1/2 (for a cylinder), an effect expected when the blast wave loses energy by radiative cooling. Despite significant radiative cooling, the blast waves do not appear to develop thin shell instabilities expected for strongly radiative waves. This is believed to be due to the stabilizing effect of a relatively thick blast wave shell resulting in part from electron thermal conduction effects.

  12. Research on infrared radiation characteristics of Pyromark1200 high-temperature coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuyao; Huan, Kewei; Dong, Wei; Wang, Jinghui; Zang, Yanzhe; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2014-11-01

    Pyromark 1200 (Tempil Co, USA), which is a type of high-temperature high-emissivity coating, is silicon-based with good thermal radiation performance. Its stably working condition is at the temperature range 589~922 K thus a wide range of applications in industrial, scientific research, aviation, aerospace and other fields. Infrared emissivity is one of the most important factors in infrared radiation characteristics. Data on infrared spectral emissivity of Pyromark 1200 is in shortage, as well as the reports on its infrared radiation characteristics affected by its spray painting process, microstructure and thermal process. The results of this research show that: (1) The coating film critical thickness on the metal base is 10μm according to comparison among different types of spray painting process, coating film thickness, microstructure, which would influence the infrared radiation characteristics of Pyromark 1200 coating. The infrared spectral emissivity will attenuate when the coating film thickness is lower or much higher than that. (2) Through measurements, the normal infrared radiation characteristics is analyzed within the range at the temperature range 573~873 K under normal atmospheric conditions, and the total infrared spectral emissivity of Pyromark 1200 coating is higher than 0.93 in the 3~14 μm wavelength range. (3) The result of 72-hour aging test at the temperature 673 K which studied the effect of thermal processes on the infrared radiation characteristics of the coating shows that the infrared spectral emissivity variation range is approximately 0.01 indicating that Pyromark 1200 coating is with good stability. Compared with Nextel Velvet Coating (N-V-C) which is widely used in optics field, Pyromark 1200 high-temperature coating has a higher applicable temperature and is more suitable for spraying on the material surface which is in long-term operation under high temperature work conditions and requires high infrared spectral emissivity.

  13. A method to measure internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; Li, Zhou; He, Fengyun; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    The suppression level of internal stray radiation is a key criterion for infrared imaging systems, especially for high-precision cryogenic infrared imaging systems. To achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures, a measurement method, which is based on radiometric calibration, is presented in this paper. First of all, the calibration formula is deduced considering the integration time, and the effect of ambient temperature on internal stray radiation is further analyzed in detail. Then, an approach is proposed to measure the internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures. By calibrating the system under two ambient temperatures, the quantitative relation between the internal stray radiation and the ambient temperature can be acquired, and then the internal stray radiation of the cryogenic infrared imaging system under various ambient temperatures can be calculated. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can be used to measure internal stray radiation with high accuracy at various ambient temperatures and integration times. The proposed method has some advantages, such as simple implementation and the capability of high-precision measurement. The measurement results can be used to guide the stray radiation suppression and to test whether the internal stray radiation suppression performance meets the requirement or not.

  14. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-06

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues.

  15. Fast Infrared Chemical Imaging with a Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm–1) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  16. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  17. Partially coherent radiation from lasers, undulators, and laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskander, Nasif; Wang, Nadine

    The coherence properties of several existing and proposed sources of soft X-rays are compared with emphasis on the LLNL Se laser. Average and peak values of spectral brightness and coherent power are calculated and plotted. Coherent power is plotted in units of watts for coherence lengths of 1 micron and 10 microns (two useful lengths of experiments) as well as 200 microns (to illustrate the natural long coherence length of the LLNL Se laser).

  18. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Structure of matrices for the transformation of laser radiation by biofractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel'skii, O. V.; Ushenko, A. G.; Arkhelyuk, A. D.; Ermolenko, S. B.; Burkovets, D. N.

    1999-12-01

    The changes in the state of polarisation of laser radiation transformed by biofractal objects are examined. The orientational angular structure of the matrix elements of the operator representing the optical properties of biofractals with different morphological structures (mineralised collagen fibres and myosin bundles) is investigated. An optical model for the description of fractal laser fields under the conditions of single light scattering is proposed.

  19. Nonlinear femtosecond near infrared laser structuring in oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Arnaud

    Three-dimensional femtosecond laser structuring has a growing interest because of its ease of implementation and the numerous possible applications in the domain of photonic components. Structures such as waveguides, diffraction gratings, optical memories or photonic crystals can be fabricated thanks to this technique. Its use with oxide glasses is promising because of several advantages; they are resistant to flux and ageing, their chemical composition can easily be changed to fit the well-defined requirements of an application. They can already be found in Raman amplifiers, optical fibers, fiber lasers, and other devices. This thesis is based on two axes. The first axis consists in characterizing the linear and nonlinear optical properties of bulk vitreous materials in order to optimize their composition with a particular application in view. Within this context, the nonlinear optical properties, their physical origins (electronic and nuclear) as well as their characteristic response times (from a few femtoseconds to a few hundreds of picoseconds) are described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Fused silica and several sodium-borophosphate glasses containing different concentrations in niobium oxide have been studied. Results show that the nonlinear optical properties of fused silica are mainly from electronic origin, whereas in the sodium-borophosphate glasses, the contribution from nuclear origin becomes predominant when the concentration of niobium oxide exceeds 30%. The second axis is based on the structuring of materials. Three commercially available fused silica samples presenting different fabrication conditions (therefore distinct impurity levels) and irradiated with a near infrared femtosecond laser have been studied. The laser induced defects have been identified by means of several spectroscopic techniques. They show the formation of color centers as well as a densification inside the irradiated area. Their linear refractive index and

  20. Fiber laser pumped high power mid-infrared laser with picosecond pulse bunch output.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kaihua; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-10-21

    We report a novel quasi-synchronously pumped PPMgLN-based high power mid-infrared (MIR) laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The pump laser is a linearly polarized MOPA structured all fiberized Yb fiber laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The output from a mode-locked seed fiber laser was directed to pass through a FBG reflector via a circulator to narrow the pulse duration from 800 ps to less than 50 ps and the spectral FWHM from 9 nm to 0.15 nm. The narrowed pulses were further directed to pass through a novel pulse multiplier through which each pulse was made to become a pulse bunch composing of 13 sub-pulses with pulse to pulse time interval of 1.26 ns. The pulses were then amplified via two stage Yb fiber amplifiers to obtain a linearly polarized high average power output up to 85 W, which were then directed to pass through an isolator and to pump a PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator via quasi-synchronization pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. High MIR output with average power up to 4 W was obtained at 3.45 micron showing the feasibility of such pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output.

  1. Compact, High Power, Multi-Spectral Mid-Infrared Semiconductor Laser Package

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Pumped (OP) type-II lasers The optically pumped laser devices were tested by pumping with 980 nm diode laser . Figure 29 shows the typical...Choi, and D. A. Coppeta "High-power diode - laser - pumped InAsSb/GaSb and GaInAsSb/GaSb lasers emitting from 3 to 4 µm" Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 152 (1994...Arias, M. Zandian, R. R. Zucca, and Y.-Z. Liu "High-power diode - pumped mid-infrared semiconductor lasers ," Proc. SPIE 2382, 262

  2. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Hafizi, B.; Chen, Y.-H.; Johnson, L. A.; Peñano, J. R.; Helle, M. H.; Mamonau, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ˜2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  3. Resonant four-wave mixing of laser radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, A.; Joshi, C. )

    1991-10-01

    Experimental evidence of resonant four-wave mixing of CO{sub 2} laser radiation in a plasma is presented for the first time to our knowledge. Comparison of the experiment with theory indicates that, while collisions lead to a narrow spectral width of the ion acoustic resonance, convection and detuning owing to laser heating limit the enhancement of the signal reflectivity to below the expected value.

  4. Trends in Retinal Damage Thresholds from 100-Millisecond Near-Infrared Laser Radiation Exposures: A Study at 1,110, 1,130, 1,150, and 1,319 nm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    majority (> 90%) of lesions were present at 1 hour [10]. Histology of the 1,318-nm radiation lesions also revealed full-retinal thickness damage at...Beer’s law and linear absorption data from Maher [15]. Physical thicknesses for the cornea, aqueous humor, crystalline lens, and vitreous humor were...the average thickness of the layer of pigmented granules which are found in the cells of the RPE is approximately 5mm. Birngruber et al. reported

  5. ARTICLES: High-power laser radiation damage to transparent insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Kulikov, V. I.; Pedanov, V. V.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the kinetics of the post-breakdown phenomena accompanying the focusing of high-power laser radiation inside transparent insulators (using the example of single-crystal potassium alum). Measurements were made of the rate of growth of the damage region and of the propagation velocity of the elastic wave, its amplitude and wavelength. The dimensions of the breakdown region were compared with those of the damage zone in the insulator. An analysis was made of the laser radiation energy distribution in the observed phenomenon.

  6. Peculiarities of radiation formation in laser systems for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yury N.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The study results of a high-quality radiation formation in the UV and IR spectral ranges for using in lidar systems to detect the vapors of nitric oxide and complex molecules, including data radicals, are discussed. The influence of the existing cavity losses on the radiation formation in the dispersion cavity is studied.The development of KrF laser with a broad spectral band adjustment of 247.5-249.5 nm and high energy are presented about. The possibility of pulse formation with duration of 30 ns in CO2 laser is shown.

  7. Results of using low-intensity laser radiation for plumbum intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1999-11-01

    We have studied the noninvasive effect of low-intensive laser impulse radiation in the infrared spectrum region on the liver projection site in experimental lead intoxication achieved by means of intragastric administration of Pb acetate to albino rats over a period of 30 days in a dose of 30 mg/kg. We determined a number of indices in laboratory animals which characterized the state of the nervous system, immune system, muscular performance efficiency. We have also investigated the hematologic indices and the blood and urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid content as well as the plumbum levels in the blood, urine and the animals' inner organs.

  8. Design of an infrared camera based aircraft detection system for laser guide star installations

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Macintosh, B.

    1996-03-05

    There have been incidents in which the irradiance resulting from laser guide stars have temporarily blinded pilots or passengers of aircraft. An aircraft detection system based on passive near infrared cameras (instead of active radar) is described in this report.

  9. Germ cell DNA quantification shortly after IR laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, D; Carrasco, F; Diaz, F; Perez-de-Vargas, I

    1991-01-01

    The immediate effect of IR laser radiation on rat germ cells was studied by cytophotometric quantification of the nuclear DNA content in testicular sections. Two different levels of radiation were studied: one according to clinical application (28.05 J/cm2) and another known to increase the germ cell number (46.80 J/cm2). The laser beam induced changes in the germ cell DNA content depending on the cell type, the cell cycle phase and the doses of radiation energy applied. Following irradiation at both doses the percentage of spermatogonia showing a 4c DNA content was increased, while the percentage of these with a 2c DNA content was decreased. Likewise, the percentages of primary spermatocytes with a DNA content equal to 4c (at 28.05 J/cm2), between 2c and 4c (at 46.80 J/cm2) and higher than 4c (at both doses) were increased. No change in the mean spermatid DNA content was observed. Nevertheless, at 46.80 J/cm2 the percentages of elongated spermatids with a c or 2c DNA content differed from the controls. Data show that, even at laser radiation doses used in therapy, the germ cell DNA content is increased shortly after IR laser radiation.

  10. Radiation temperature measurements in laser-heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Goldman, S.R.; Bessarab, A.V.; Kunin, A.V.; Tokarev, V.A.

    1997-11-01

    Two x-ray spectrographs have been used on the Trident laser at LANL to monitor the radiation temperature of small Au hohlraums. The cylindrical targets are smaller than 1 mm. The x radiation produced by {approximately} 400 J of 0.53-{micro}m laser light is detected with a 7-channel VNIIEF soft-x-ray spectrometer. Each channel employs a multi-layer mirror and a filter to limit the channel bandwidth to 1--3% of the channel energy. X rays are detected with calibrated Al x-ray diodes. A second spectrometer is based on a free-standing Au transmission grating for spectral dispersion and a multi-channel diamond photo-conductive device detector. The small hohlraum results are consistent with radiation temperatures exceeding 100 eV. Simple computer modeling shows that late in the plasma discharge, radiation of this temperature is emitted from the target.

  11. Infrared Lunar Laser Ranging at Calern : Impact on Lunar Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnes; Manche, Herve; Gastineau, Mickael; Courde, Clement; Torre, Jean Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: Since 2015, in addition to the traditional green (532nm), infrared (1064nm) has been the preferred wavelength for lunar laser ranging at the Calern lunar laser ranging (LLR) site in France. Due to the better atmospheric transmission of IR with respect to Green, nearly 3 times the number of normal points have been obtained in IR than in Green [1]. Dataset: In our study, in addition to the historical data obtained from various other LLR sites, we include the recent IR normal points obtained from Calern over the 1 year time span (2015-2016), constituting about 4.2% of data spread over 46 years of LLR. Near even distribution of data provided by IR on both the spatial and temporal domain, helps us to improve constraints on the internal structure of the Moon modeled within the planetary ephemeris : INPOP [2]. Data reduction: IERS recommended models have been used in the data reduction software GINS (GRGS,CNES) [3]. Constraints provided by GRAIL [4], on the Lunar gravitational potential and Love numbers have been taken into account in the least-square fit procedure. Earth orientation parameters from KEOF series have been used as per a recent study [5]. Results: New estimates on the dynamical parameters of the lunar core will be presented. Acknowledgements: We thank the lunar laser ranging observers at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France, McDonald Observatory, Texas, Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, and Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico for providing LLR observations that made this study possible. The research described in this abstract was carried out at Geoazur-CNRS, France, as a part of a PhD thesis funded by Observatoire de Paris and French Ministry of Education and Research. References: [1] Clement C. et al. (2016) submitted to A&A [2] Fienga A. et al. (2015) Celest Mech Dyn Astr, 123: 325. doi:10.1007/s10569-015-9639-y [3] Viswanathan V. et al. (2015) EGU, Abstract 18, 13995 [4] Konopliv A. S. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 1415

  12. Wideband optical coatings for artwork protection from ultraviolet and infrared radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Angela M.; Polato, Pietro

    2003-11-01

    The damaging effects of illumination on artworks are well known. Art conservation requires protection against vandalism and protection against radiation damage. Glass is an appropriate material for both requirements, but it partially transmits ultraviolet and infrared radiation. An optical coating on glass that eliminates the ultraviolet and the infrared radiation coming from natural or artificial source of illumination, is proposed. This coated glass, positioned in front of the artwork, is also able to reduce the visible radiation without altering the vision or the color rendering.

  13. A low radiation optical system with lens positioned inside of the infrared detector Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhen, Zheng; Wang, Yingrui; Li, Juan; Ou, Wen; Li, Ang; Xiong, Jian

    2016-10-01

    For the far distance and weak signal detecting, low background noise is essential. Because the spatial noise of infrared system is mostly determined by spontaneous thermal radiation, it is the most directly method to achieve low spatial noise by refrigerating optics. This paper introduced a low radiation optical system with lens positioned inside of the infrared detector Dewar. The system includes two parts: the two mirror Cassegrain system working at room temperature which images the intermediate focus (IF) and the lens positioned inside of infrared detector Dewar which image the IF to focal plane. The working temperature inside of the infrared detector Dewar is 80K, the cryogenic lens contain three pieces lens whose total weight is below 5g. In view of engineering application, the low radiation optical system, the stray light analysis, cryogenic optics mounting and system testing were discussed. Calculations indicate that the equivalent blackbody radiation temperature (EBRT) is less than 180K.

  14. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1988-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers work performed during the period from April 13, 1988 to October 13, 1988 under NASA grant number NAG-1-877 entitled, Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. We have designed a flashlamp-pumped Cr3(+);GSAG laser of pulsed laser energy greater than 200 mJ and of pulse width of 1 ms FWHM to simulate a high-power laser diode in pumping mid-infrared laser crystals such as Tm3(+), Er3(+), and/or Ho3(+)-ion doped YAG, YLF or other host materials. This Cr3(+);GSAG laser will be used to determine optimum conditions for laser diode pumped mid-infrared lasers, maximum energy extraction limit with longitudinal pumping, thermal damage limit, and other problems related to high power laser diode pumping. We have completed a modification of an existing flashlamp-pumped and liquid nitrogen cooled rare earth laser system for 60 J electrical input energy and a 500 micron pulse width, and have carried out preliminary experiments with a Ho(+):Er3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal to test the system performance. This flashlamp-pumped rare earth laser system will be used to determine optimum Tm3(+)-ion concentration in Ho3(+):Cr3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal in the remaining research period.

  15. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1988-07-01

    This semiannual progress report covers work performed during the period from April 13, 1988 to October 13, 1988 under NASA grant number NAG-1-877 entitled, Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. We have designed a flashlamp-pumped Cr3(+);GSAG laser of pulsed laser energy greater than 200 mJ and of pulse width of 1 ms FWHM to simulate a high-power laser diode in pumping mid-infrared laser crystals such as Tm3(+), Er3(+), and/or Ho3(+)-ion doped YAG, YLF or other host materials. This Cr3(+);GSAG laser will be used to determine optimum conditions for laser diode pumped mid-infrared lasers, maximum energy extraction limit with longitudinal pumping, thermal damage limit, and other problems related to high power laser diode pumping. We have completed a modification of an existing flashlamp-pumped and liquid nitrogen cooled rare earth laser system for 60 J electrical input energy and a 500 micron pulse width, and have carried out preliminary experiments with a Ho(+):Er3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal to test the system performance. This flashlamp-pumped rare earth laser system will be used to determine optimum Tm3(+)-ion concentration in Ho3(+):Cr3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal in the remaining research period.

  16. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses can induce nanoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Short infrared (IR) laser pulses on the order of hundreds of microseconds to single milliseconds with typical wavelengths of 1800-2100 nm, have shown the capability to reversibly stimulate action potentials (AP) in neuronal cells. While the IR stimulation technique has proven successful for several applications, the exact mechanism(s) underlying the AP generation has remained elusive. To better understand how IR pulses cause AP stimulation, we determined the threshold for the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Using a surrogate calcium ion, thallium, which is roughly the same shape and charge, but lacks the biological functionality of calcium, we recorded the flow of thallium ions into an exposed cell in the presence of a battery of channel antagonists. The entry of thallium into the cell indicated that the ions entered via nanopores. The data presented here demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental effects of IR stimulation and speculates that nanopores, formed in response to the IR exposure, play an upstream role in the generation of AP.

  17. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-09

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg(-1) and 8 μg kg(-1), respectively.

  18. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg−1 and 8 μg kg−1, respectively. PMID:28276454

  19. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg‑1 and 8 μg kg‑1, respectively.

  20. Photothermal effect for arteriosclerotic region using infrared free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Kunio; Fukami, Yuko

    1999-09-01

    Cholesteryl oleate can be selectively removed with an infrared free-electron laser (IFEL). To determine the mechanisms that are involved in the effects induced by IFEL, we compared the effect of FEL exposure and the effect of heating on a sample film and bulk sample of cholesteryl oleate. Heating is regarded as one of the mechanisms by which FEL ablates cholesteryl oleate that has accumulated on the arteriosclerotic region of arterial walls. FEL was applied at a wavelength of 5.75 micrometers and at several average powers (2 - 15 mW). FEL exposure induced melting and a decrease in the number of ester bonds. Using the value of absorbed IFEL- macropulse energy for each power density, the temperature was assumed to be 50 - 300 degree(s)C. In the heating experiment, the sample was heated from room temperature to 500 degree(s)C. Melting and carbonization were observed at 50 degree(s)C and 300 degree(s)C, respectively. We found that FEL exposure and heating each induced melting. FEL exposure induced chemical changes and ablation of cholesteryl oleate, although heating did not. Heating the cholesteryl oleate above 305 degree(s)C induced carbonization, although FEL exposure to the same temperature did not.