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Sample records for infrared multiphoton excitation

  1. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  2. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  3. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  4. The Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Three Nitrolkanes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-24

    eam experiment, using infrared multiphoton dissociation where the concept of temperature has no place, can be quantitatively related to pyrolysis ...respectively. This large release of translational energy is suggested to be due to the nature of the transition state mechanical barrier which is largely...to pyrolysis experiments which are conducted under collisional, thermal conditions and measure phenomenological quantities such as activation energies

  5. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  6. Infrared multiphoton dissociation for quantitative shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Lee, M Violet; McAlister, Graeme C; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2012-05-15

    We modified a dual-cell linear ion trap mass spectrometer to perform infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in the low-pressure trap of a dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap (dual-cell QLT) and perform large-scale IRMPD analyses of complex peptide mixtures. Upon optimization of activation parameters (precursor q-value, irradiation time, and photon flux), IRMPD subtly, but significantly, outperforms resonant-excitation collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) for peptides identified at a 1% false-discovery rate (FDR) from a yeast tryptic digest (95% confidence, p = 0.019). We further demonstrate that IRMPD is compatible with the analysis of isobaric-tagged peptides. Using fixed QLT rf amplitude allows for the consistent retention of reporter ions, but necessitates the use of variable IRMPD irradiation times, dependent upon precursor mass to charge (m/z). We show that IRMPD activation parameters can be tuned to allow for effective peptide identification and quantitation simultaneously. We thus conclude that IRMPD performed in a dual-cell ion trap is an effective option for the large-scale analysis of both unmodified and isobaric-tagged peptides.

  7. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation for Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Lee, M. Violet; McAlister, Graeme C.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We modified a dual-cell linear ion trap mass spectrometer to perform infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in the low pressure trap of a dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap (dual cell QLT) and perform large-scale IRMPD analyses of complex peptide mixtures. Upon optimization of activation parameters (precursor q-value, irradiation time, and photon flux), IRMPD subtly, but significantly outperforms resonant excitation CAD for peptides identified at a 1% false-discovery rate (FDR) from a yeast tryptic digest (95% confidence, p = 0.019). We further demonstrate that IRMPD is compatible with the analysis of isobaric-tagged peptides. Using fixed QLT RF amplitude allows for the consistent retention of reporter ions, but necessitates the use of variable IRMPD irradiation times, dependent upon precursor mass-to-charge (m/z). We show that IRMPD activation parameters can be tuned to allow for effective peptide identification and quantitation simultaneously. We thus conclude that IRMPD performed in a dual-cell ion trap is an effective option for the large-scale analysis of both unmodified and isobaric-tagged peptides. PMID:22480380

  8. Some simple mechanisms of multiphoton excitation in many - level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, E. A.; Marquardt, R.; Quack, M.; Stohner, J.; Thanopulos, I.; Wallenborn, E.-U.

    Results are reported on coherent monochromatic multiphoton excitation in many-level systems, which are representative for some of the basic mechanisms for atomic and molecular multiphoton processes. Numerical solutions are discussed that use the Floquet and quasiresonant approximations in the framework of the URIMIR program package. The excitation schemes include direct three-photon excitation, two-photon excitation with diagonal coupling, Göppert-Mayer-type two-photon processes, multiphoton excitation with off-resonant intermediates, and practically irreversible coherent excitation into dense spectral structures. Several interesting phenomena are observed, such as nonlinear line shifts and broadenings of multiphoton resonances of relevance for multiphoton spectroscopy and almost constant intermediate population inversions, potentially useful for laser design. The accurate numerical results are compared with approximate solutions from perturbation theory, and with simple analytical solutions from Rabi-type formulae.

  9. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  10. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    PubMed

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  11. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  12. IR and visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Vatsa, R. K.; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Mittal, J. P.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.

    1995-07-01

    The infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane gives rise to IR and visible luminescence. Vibrationally excited parent molecules dissociate via two primary channels yielding bromine and vibrationally excited HBr. The strong visible emission observed between 350 to 750 nm has been assigned to electronically excited carbene CF 2Br CH.

  13. Control of multiphoton molecular excitation with shaped femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingwei

    The work presented in this dissertation describes the use of shaped femtosecond laser pulses to control the outcome of nonlinear optical process and thus to achieve the selectivity for multiphoton molecular transitions. This research could lead to applications in various fields including nonlinear optical spectroscopy, chemical identification, biological imaging, communications, photodynamic therapy, etc. In order to realize accurate pulse shaping of the femtosecond laser pulses, it is essential to measure and correct the spectral phase distortion of such pulses. A method called multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan is used to do so throughout this dissertation. This method is highly accurate and reproducible, and has been proved in this work to be compatible with any femtosecond pulses regardless of bandwidth, intensity and repetition rate of the laser. The phase control of several quasi-octave laser sources is demonstrated in this dissertation, with the generation of 4.3 fs and 5.9 fs pulses that reach the theoretically predicted transform-limited pulse duration. The excellent phase control achieved also guarantees the reproducibility for selective multiphoton excitations by accurate phase and/or amplitude shaping. Selective two-photon excitation, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with a single broadband laser source are demonstrated in this dissertation. Pulse shaping is used to achieve a fast and robust approach to measure the two-photon excitation spectrum from fluorescent molecules, which provide important information for two-photon biological imaging. The selective excitation concept is also applied in the field of remote chemical identification. Detection of characteristic Raman lines for several chemicals using a single beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy from a 12 meter standoff distance is shown, providing a promising approach to standoff detection of chemicals, hazardous contaminations

  14. Circular Dichroism in Multiphoton Ionization of Resonantly Excited He+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Douguet, N.; Mazza, T.; Rafipoor, A. J.; Callegari, C.; Finetti, P.; Plekan, O.; Prince, K. C.; Demidovich, A.; Grazioli, C.; Avaldi, L.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Devetta, M.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Düsterer, S.; Ueda, K.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Bozhevolnov, A. V.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Meyer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Intense, circularly polarized extreme-ultraviolet and near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses are combined to double ionize atomic helium via the oriented intermediate He+(3 p ) resonance state. Applying angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, we find a large photon helicity dependence of the spectrum and the angular distribution of the electrons ejected from the resonance by NIR multiphoton absorption. The measured circular dichroism is unexpectedly found to vary strongly as a function of the NIR intensity. The experimental data are well described by theoretical modeling and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Volumetric display with holographic multi-photon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Kumagai, Kota

    2016-10-01

    We developed a volumetric display with holographic two- and multi-photon excitations using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The holographic technique has advantages of increasing the number of voxels of the volumetric graphics per unit time, increasing the total input energy to the volumetric display because the maximum energy incident at a point in the display material is limited by the damage threshold, and controlling the size, shape and spatial position of voxels. We demonstrated a volumetric display with stacked multi-color fluorescence plates.

  16. Visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadesh; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mittal, J. P.

    1997-11-01

    A strong visible luminescence was observed in the CO 2 laser induced infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane. The emission observed between 350-750 nm is attributed to electronically excited carbene CF 2ClCH. The temporal profile of this luminescence was studied as a function of laser pulse duration, pulse energy, excitation frequency and substrate pressure. A suitable dissociation mechanism is presented considering various channels of IRMPD of this molecule.

  17. Two-color temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging with tunable-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Abrigo, Gerald; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chien, Fan-Ching

    2017-02-01

    Wavelength tunable temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) is conducted to visualize optical sectioning images of multiple fluorophore-labeled specimens through the optimal two-photon excitation (TPE) of each type of fluorophore. The tunable range of excitation wavelength was determined by the groove density of the grating, the diffraction angle, the focal length of lenses, and the shifting distance of the first lens in the beam expander. Based on a consideration of the trade-off between the tunable-wavelength range and axial resolution of temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging, the presented system demonstrated a tunable-wavelength range from 770 to 920 nm using a diffraction grating with groove density of 830 lines/mm. TPE fluorescence imaging examination of a fluorescent thin film indicated that the width of the axial confined excitation was 3.0±0.7 μm and the shifting distance of the temporal focal plane was less than 0.95 μm within the presented wavelength tunable range. Fast different wavelength excitation and three-dimensionally rendered imaging of Hela cell mitochondria and cytoskeletons and mouse muscle fibers were demonstrated. Significantly, the proposed system can improve the quality of two-color TFMPEM images through different excitation wavelengths to obtain higher-quality fluorescent signals in multiple-fluorophore measurements.

  18. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers. [REAMPA code

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 ..mu..m laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 ..mu..m excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 ..mu..m excitation than for 10 ..mu..m excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 ..mu..m excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF/sub 6/ caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm/sup -1/ of energy is removed from SF/sub 6/ excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF/sub 6/ molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF/sub 4/ as absorbing gas for the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

  19. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-09

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  20. Switching the vibrational excitation of a polyatomic ion in multi-photon strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Gerber, Thomas; Radi, Peter; Sych, Yaroslav; Knopp, Gregor

    2014-08-01

    The multiphoton ionization (MPI) of CH3I has been investigated by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of femtosecond laser excitation intensity. A sudden change in the electron kinetic energy is observed above a specific field strength. The multiphoton excitation at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm becomes vibronically resonant due to Stark shifting of intermediate Rydberg state levels. The present letter gives an experimental evidence for ultrafast optical control of the vibrational excitation in a polyatomic ion by adjusting the intensity of a femtosecond laser pulse.

  1. Photodynamic therapy and knocking out of single tumor cells by multiphoton excitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Koenig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses of 780 nm have been used to induce intracellular photodynamic reactions by nonlinear excitation of porphyrin photosensitizers. Intracellular accumulation and photobleaching of the fluorescent photosensitizers protoporphyrin IX and Photofrin (PF) have been studied by non-resonant two-photon fluorescence excitation of PF and aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-labeled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To testify the efficacy of both substrates to induce irreversible destructive effects, the cloning efficiency (CE) of cells exposed to femtosecond pulses of a multiphoton laser scanning microscope (40x/1.3) was determined. In the case of Photofrin accumulation, CEs of 50% and 0% were obtained after 17 laserscans (2 mW?, 16 s/ frame) and 50 scans, respectively. All cells exposed to 50 scans died within 48h after laser exposure. 100 scans were required to induce lethal effects in ALA labeled cells. Sensitizer-free control cells could be scanned 250 times (1.1 h) and more without impact on the reproduction behavior, morphology, and vitality. In addition to the slow phototoxic effect by photooxidation processes, another destructive but immediate effect based on optical breakdown was induced when employing high intense NIR femtosecond laser beams. This was used to optically knock out single tumor cells in living mice (solid Ehrlich-Carcinoma) in a depth of 10 to 100 μm.

  2. [Infrared multiphoton quantum cutting phenomena of rare earth materials].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Deng, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Li-Li; Li, Song; Yu, Chun-Lei; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Cui, Jian-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Duan; Zhou, Hong-Yu; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2012-10-01

    Infrared quantum cutting of rare earth ion is an international hot research field. It is significant for the enhancement of solar cell efficiency and for the reduction of solar cell price. The present paper summarizes the research significance of infrared quantum cutting of rare earth ion. Based on the summarization of general principle and loss mechanism of solar cell, the possible method to enhance the solar cell efficiency by infrared quantum cutting is analyzed. Meanwhile, the present paper summarizes the infrared quantum cutting phenomena of Er3+ ion single-doped material. There is intense 4I13/2 --> 4I15/2 infrared quantum cutting luminescence of Er3+ ion when the 2H11/2 energy level is excited. The intense {2H11/2 --> 4I9/2, 4I15/2 --> 4I13/2} cross energy transfer is the main reason for the result in the high quantum cutting efficiency when the 2H11/2 energy level is excited.

  3. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations between highly excited Stark states of potassium

    SciTech Connect

    He Yonglin

    2011-11-15

    We have applied a nonperturbative resonant theory to study the Rabi frequency of microwave multiphoton transitions between two Rydberg states of potassium in a static electric field. The Stark electric dipole moments used to calculate the Rabi frequency are determined by the Stark states' wave functions, which are obtained by the diagonalization method. The frequencies of the Rabi oscillations are in good agreement with either experimental ones or ones calculated by the time-dependent close-coupling method and the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we are able to show that the size of avoided crossings between the (n+2)s and (n,3) states can be predicted from the Stark electric dipole moment and the difference of the two Stark states' energy at a given resonance.

  4. Photoelectron imaging following 2 + 1 multiphoton excitation of HBr.

    PubMed

    Romanescu, Constantin; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2006-07-07

    The photodissociation and photoionization dynamics of HBr via low-n Rydberg and ion-pair states was studied by using 2 + 1 REMPI spectroscopy and velocity map imaging of photoelectrons. Two-photon excitation at about 9.4-10 eV was used to prepare rotationally selected excited states. Following absorption of the third photon the unperturbed F (1)Delta(2) and i (3)Delta(2) states ionize directly into the ground vibrational state of the molecular ion according to the Franck-Condon principle and upon preservation of the ion core. In case of the V (1)Sigma(+)(0(+)) ion-pair state and the perturbed E (1)Sigma(+)(0(+)), g (3)Sigma(-)(0(+)), and H (1)Sigma(+)(0(+)) Rydberg states the absorption of the third photon additionally results in a long vibrational progression of HBr(+) in the X (2)Pi state as well as formation of electronically excited atomic photofragments. The vibrational excitation of the molecular ion is explained by autoionization of repulsive superexcited states into the ground state of the molecular ion. In contrast to HCl, the perturbed Rydberg states of HBr show strong participation of the direct ionization process, with ionic core preservation.

  5. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm2. PMID:27231620

  6. Microfluorometric Detection of Catecholamines with Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, J.; Reddy, Chandra S.; Kaushalya, S. K.; Maiti, Sudipta

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate sensitive spatially resolved detection of physiological chromophores that emit in the ultraviolet (less than 330 nm). An atypical laser source (a visible wavelength femtosecond optical parametric oscillator), and an unconventional collection geometry (a lensless detector that detects the forward-emitted fluorescence) enable this detection. We report the excitation spectra of the catecholamines dopamine and norepinephrine, together with near-UV emitters serotonin and tryptophan, in the range of 550-595 nm. We estimate the molecular two-photon action cross section of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin to be 1.2 mGM (1 GM, or Goppert Mayor, is equal to 10^-58 m^4 s^-1 photon^-1), 2 mGM, and 43 mGM, respectively, at 560 nm. The sensitivity achieved by this method holds promise for the microscopic imaging of vesicular catecholamines in live cells.

  7. 5-HT spatial distribution imaging with multiphoton excitation of 5-HT correlative visible fluorescence in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Yafeng; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Tongsheng; Luo, Qingming

    2002-04-01

    The autofluorescence of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) loaded rat mucosal mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells) is imaged with multiphoton excitation laser scanning microscope (MPELSM). 5-HT correlative visible fluorescence (Fco-vis) excited with 740-nm multiphoton excitation is observed in live cells for the first time, and the generating mechanism of 5-HT Fco-vis is studied. The spatial distribution of 5-HT in live cells is imaged at high spatial resolution in our experiment, which provides a new way to study the correlation between 5-HT spatial distribution and content, and the cellular functional state in live tissue or cells.

  8. Nonperturbative quantum and classical calculations of multiphoton vibrational excitation and dissociation of Morse molecules^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K. I.; Mercouris, Th.; Constantoudis, V.; Komninos, Y.; Nicolaides, C. A.

    2006-05-01

    The multiphoton vibrational excitation and dissociation of Morse molecules have been computed nonperturbatively using Hamilton's and Schrφdinger's time-dependent equations, for a range of laser pulse parameters. The time-dependent Schrφdinger equation is solved by the state-specific expansion approach [e.g.,1]. For its solution, emphasis has been given on the inclusion of the continuous spectrum, whose contribution to the multiphoton probabilities for resonance excitation to a number of excited discrete states as well as to dissociation has been examined as a function of laser intensity, frequency and pulse duration. An analysis of possible quantal-classical correspondences for this system is being carried out. We note that distinct features exist from previous classical calculations [2]. For example, the dependence on the laser frequency gives rise to an asymmetry around the red-shifted frequency corresponding to the maximum probability. [1] Th. Mercouris, I. D. Petsalakis and C. A. Nicolaides, J. Phys. B 27, L519 (1994). [2] V. Constantoudis and C. A. Nicolaides, Phys. Rev. E 64, 562112 (2001). ^1This work was supported by the program 'Pythagoras' which is co - funded by the European Social Fund (75%) and Natl. Resources (25%). ^2Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens, Greece.^3Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.

  9. Simultaneous multiple-excitation multiphoton microscopy yields increased imaging sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers many advantages over conventional wide-field and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for imaging biological samples such as 3D resolution of excitation, reduced phototoxicity, and deeper tissue imaging. However, adapting MPM for critical multi-color measurements presents a challenge because of the largely overlapping two-photon absorption (TPA) peaks of common biological fluorophores. Currently, most multi-color MPM relies on the absorbance at one intermediate wavelength of multiple dyes, which introduces problems such as decreased and unequal excitation efficiency across the set of dyes. Results Here we describe an MPM system incorporating two, independently controlled sources of two-photon excitation whose wavelengths are adjusted to maximally excite one dye while minimally exciting the other. We report increased signal-to-noise ratios and decreased false positive emission bleed-through using this novel multiple-excitation MPM (ME-MPM) compared to conventional single-excitation MPM (SE-MPM) in a variety of multi-color imaging applications. Conclusions Similar to the tremendous gain in popularity of CLSM after the introduction of multi-color imaging, we anticipate that the ME-MPM system will further increase the popularity of MPM. In addition, ME-MPM provides an excellent tool to more rapidly design and optimize pairs of fluorescence probes for multi-color two-photon imaging, such as CFP/YFP or GFP/DsRed for CLSM. PMID:21366923

  10. Analysis of microparticle penetration into human and porcine skin: non-invasive imaging with multiphoton excitation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, William J.; Kendall, Mark A.; Bellhouse, Brian J.; White, Nick

    2002-06-01

    At the University of Oxford and PowderJect Pharmaceuticals plc, a unique form of needle-free injection technology has been developed. Powdered vaccines and drugs in micro-particle form are accelerated in a high-speed gas flow to sufficient velocity to enter the skin, subsequently achieving a pharmaceutical effect. To optimize the delivery of vaccines and drugs with this method a detailed understanding of the interactive processes that occur between the microparticles and the skin is necessary. Investigations to date of micro-particle delivery into excised human and animal tissue have involved image analyses of histology sections. In the present study, a series of investigations were conducted on excised human and porcine skin using the technique of Multi-Photon fluorescence excitation Microscopy (MPM) to image particles and skin structures post-penetration. Micro-particles of various size and composition were imaged with infrared laser excitation. Three-dimensional images of stratum corneum and epidermal cell deformation due to micro-particle penetration were obtained. Measurements of micro-particle penetration depth taken from z-scan image stacks were used to successfully quantify micro-particle distribution within the skin, without invasively disrupting the skin target. This study has shown that MPM has great potential for the non-invasive imaging of particle skin interactive processes that occur with the transdermal delivery of powdered micro-particle vaccines and drugs.

  11. Multiphoton excitation and photodynamic activity of macromolecular derivatized mTHPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Marc; Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Balanos, Evangelos; Rakowsky, Stefan; Sinn, Hanns-joerg; Schlag, Peter M.

    2000-03-01

    Multiphoton excitation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy constitutes a promising approach, because of the increasing tissue penetration for longer wavelength of illumination. In this contribution the photodynamic activity of polyethylene glycol macromolecular derivatized mTHPC upon two-photon excitation is established. To test the photo- activity of the photosensitizer, human colon carcinoma cells, HCT-116, were incubated with 2 (mu) g/ml of mTHPC- CMPEG4 in the nutrition medium. Subsequent pulsed laser irradiation at 784 nm focused down on growing cell monolayers restricts cell vitality clearly within 24 hours after irradiation. To investigate whether an anoxic or euoxic energy transfer mechanism is involved, a uric acid assay was performed to test for the generation of singlet oxygen. Upon single-photon excitation mTHPC-CMPEG4 in TriPEG decomposed uric acid via the generation of singlet oxygen. Using femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation no decomposition of the uric acid was found, implying an anoxic energy transfer mechanism after tow-photon excitation. However, at present, we cannot exclude local hyperthermic effects in the cells containing the photosensitizer to contribute to the photodynamic activity upon two-photon excitation.

  12. Determination of biological toxins using capillary electrokinetic chromatography with multiphoton-excited fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Okerberg, E; Dunlap, J; Ly, C; Shear, J B

    2000-03-15

    We report a highly sensitive and rapid strategy for characterizing biological toxins based on capillary electrokinetic chromatography with multiphoton-excited fluorescence. In this approach, aflatoxins B1, B2, and G1 and the cholera toxin A-subunit are fractionated in approximately 80 s in a narrow-bore electrophoretic channel using the negatively charged pseudostationary phase, carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The aflatoxins--highly mutagenic multiple-ringed heterocycles produced by Aspergillus fungi--are excited at the capillary outlet through the simultaneous absorption of two to three 750-nm photons to yield characteristic blue fluorescence; cholera toxin A-subunit, the catalytic domain of the bacterial protein toxin from Vibrio cholera, is excited through an unidentified multiphoton pathway that apparently includes photochemical transformation of an aromatic residue in the polypeptide. The anionic carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin, used to chromatographically resolve the uncharged aflatoxins, enhances emission from these compounds without contributing substantially to the background. Detection limits for these toxins separated in 2.1-micron-i.d. capillaries range from 4.4 zmol (approximately 2700 molecules) for aflatoxin B2 to 3.4 amol for the cholera toxin A-subunit. Larger (16-micron-i.d.) separation capillaries provide concentration detection limits for aflatoxins in the 0.2-0.4 nM range, severalfold lower than achieved in 2.1-micron capillaries. These results represent an improvement of > 10(4) in mass detectability compared to previously published capillary separations of aflatoxins and demonstrate new possibilities for the analysis of proteins and peptides.

  13. Influence of multi-photon excitation on the atomic above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan-Ye; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Li, Su-Yu; Guo, Fu-Ming; Ding, Da-Jun; Wim-G, Roeterdink; Chen, Ji-Gen; Zeng, Si-Liang; Liu, Xue-Shen; Yang, Yu-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Using the time-dependent pseudo-spectral scheme, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a hydrogen-like atom in a strong laser field in momentum space. The intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum in above-threshold ionization is obtained and further analyzed. We find that with the increase of the laser intensity, the above-threshold ionization emission spectrum exhibits periodic resonance structure. By analyzing the population of atomic bound states, we find that it is the multi-photon excitation of bound state that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon, which is in fairly good agreement with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274141, 11034003, 11304116, 11274001, and 11247024), and the Jilin Provincial Research Foundation for Basic Research, China (Grant No. 20140101168JC).

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell interactions with 3D ECM modules fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Tran, Quyen A; Fong, Jimmy J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M; Campagnola, Paul J

    2012-09-10

    To understand complex micro/nanoscale ECM stem cell interactions, reproducible in vitro models are needed that can strictly recapitulate the relative content and spatial arrangement of native tissue. Additionally, whole ECM proteins are required to most accurately reflect native binding dynamics. To address this need, we use multiphoton excited photochemistry to create 3D whole protein constructs or "modules" to study how the ECM governs stem cell migration. The constructs were created from mixtures of BSA/laminin (LN) and BSA alone, whose comparison afforded studying how the migration dynamics are governed from the combination of morphological and ECM cues. We found that mesenchymal stem cells interacted for significantly longer durations with the BSA/LN constructs than pure BSA, pointing to the importance of binding cues of the LN. Critical to this work was the development of an automated system with feedback based on fluorescence imaging to provide quality control when synthesizing multiple identical constructs.

  15. Second- and third-harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy for simultaneous imaging of cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzda, Virginijus; Greenhalgh, Catherine; Aus der Au, Juerg; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Elmore, Steven; van Beek, Johannes H.

    2004-06-01

    Simultaneous detection of second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and multiphoton excitation fluorescence with ultrafast laser pulses from a Nd:Glass laser was used to image isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes. The simultaneous detection enabled visualization of different organelles of cardiomyocytes, based on the different contrast mechanisms. It was found that SHG signal depicted characteristic patterns of sarcomeres in a myofilament lattice. The regular pattern of the THG signal, which was anticorrelated with the SHG signal, suggested that the third harmonic is generated within mitochondria. By labeling the cardiomyocytes with the mitochondrial dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), comparisons could be made between the TMRM fluorescence, THG, and SHG images. The TMRM fluorescence had significant correlation with THG signal confirming that part of the THG signal originates from mitochondria.

  16. Nonperturbative analysis of the two-level atom: Applications to multiphoton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duvall, R.E.; Valeo, E.J.; Oberman, C.R.

    1987-08-01

    Selective excitation in an atomic system subjected to a slowly varying external electromagnetic field is studied using a two-level model. Time evolution of the system is found using an approach which is nonperturbative in the field strength. There is no constraint to small values of the applied field, that is, the field (in appropriate energy units) need not be small compared to the difference in energies of the two levels. Rather, we prey upon the fact that the situation of interest to us is where the frequency of the exciting field is small compared to the frequency associated with the level difference. Transition probabilities and resonance conditions are found which circumscribe both the large and small field limits. In the weak field limit the previous results of high-order perturbation theory are readily recovered. For a monochromatic field the characteristic features of resonance excitation at high harmonic number of the applied field are (a) extremely narrow resonance widths and (b) shifts in resonance positions which are strong functions of field intensity. Because of this sensitivity, we are able to demonstrate that when slow temporal evolution of the field amplitude is taken into account (e.g., due to finite pulse duration) the appropriate mean excitation rate is that due to the uncorrelated contribution of many resonances. The results of this analysis are used to estimate excitation rates in a specific atomic system, Cd/sup 12 +/, which are then compared to multiphoton ionization rates. Our calculations suggest that the ionization rate exceeds the excitation rate by several orders of magnitude. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Generation of highly vibrationally excited H2 and detection by 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Daniel C.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1990-02-01

    We report the first detection by optical means of highly vibrationally excited H2 X1Σ+g(vx=6-11). Vibrationally excited H2 was generated using a recently discovered hot-wire effect in H2 gas, and was detected in 40 bands with 2+1 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization via the EF state (vEF=0-14). Rotational temperatures are in the range 200-650 K, well below that required for thermal excitation of the observed vibrational levels.

  18. Minimally invasive imaging method based on second harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence in translational respiratory research.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Wadsworth, Samuel; Carthy, Jon M; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; McManus, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    For translational respiratory research including in the development of clinical diagnostic tools, a minimally invasive imaging method, which can provide both cellular and extracellular structural details with sufficient specificity, sensitivity and spatial resolution, is particularly useful. Multiphoton microscopy causes excitation of endogenously fluorescent macromolecular systems and induces highly specific second harmonic generation signals from non-centrosymmetric macromolecules such as fibrillar collagens. Both these signals can be captured simultaneously to provide spatially resolved 3D structural organization of extracellular matrix as well as the cellular morphologies in their native states. Besides briefly discussing the fundamentals of multiphoton excitation fluorescence and harmonic generation signals and the instrumentation details, this review focuses on the specific applications of these imaging modalities in lung structural imaging, particularly morphological features of alveolar structures, visualizing and quantifying extracellular matrix remodelling accompanying emphysematous destructions as well as the IPF, detecting lung cancers and the potential use in the tissue engineering applications.

  19. Enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase inside protein and polymer structures fabricated via multiphoton excitation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Swarna; Campagnola, Paul J

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate micron scale control of bioactivity through the use of multiphoton excited photochemistry, where this technique has been used to cross-link three-dimensional matrixes of alkaline phosphatase, bovine serum albumin, and polyacrylamide and combinations therein. Using a fluorescence-based assay (ELF-97), the enzymatic activity has been studied using a Michaelis-Menten analysis, and we have measured the specificity constants kcat/KM for alkaline phosphatase in both the protein and polymer matrixes to be on the order of 10(5)-10(6) M(-1) s(-1)and are comparable to known literature values in other environments. It is found that the enzyme is simply entrapped in the polymer matrix, whereas it is completely covalently bound in the protein structures. The relative reaction rate of alkaline phosphatase bound to BSA with the ELF substrate was measured as a function of cross-link density and was found to decrease in the more tightly formed matrixes, indicating a decrease in the diffusion in the matrix.

  20. First in vivo animal studies on intraocular nanosurgery and multiphoton tomography with low-energy 80-MHz near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Krauss, Oliver; Riemann, Iris; Schubert, Harald; Kirste, Sigrun; Fischer, Peter

    2004-07-01

    We report on a method for refractive laser surgery based on low-energy femtosecond laser pulses provided by ultracompact turn-key non-amplified laser systems. An additional excimer laser is not required for ablation of the stroma. The novel method has the potential to be used for (i) optical flap creation as well as stroma ablation and (ii) for non-invasive flap-free intrastromal ablation. In addition, 3D multiphoton imaging of the cornea can be performed. In particular, we used sub-nanojoule near infrared 80 MHz femtosecond laser pulses for multiphoton imaging of corneal structures with ultrahigh resolution (< 1μm) as well as for highly precise intraocular refractive surgery. Imaging based on two-photon excited cellular autofluorescence and SHG formation in collagen structures was performed at GW/cm2 intensities, whereas destructive optical breakdown for nanoprocessing occurred at TW/cm2 light intensities. These high intensities were realized with sub-nJ pulses within a subfemtoliter intrastromal volume by diffraction-limited focussing with high NA objectives and beam scanning 50 to 140 μm below the epithelial surface. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the target of interest and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. Histological examination with light- and electron microscopes of laser-exposed porcine and rabbit eyes reveal a minimum intratissue cut size below 1 μm without destructive effects to surrounding collagen structures. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities could be realized with high precision using 200 fs, 80 MHz, sub-nanojoule pulses at 800 nm. First studies on 80 MHz femtosecond laser surgery on living rabbits have been performed.

  1. Multiphoton near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse-induced DNA damage with and without the photosensitizer proflavine.

    PubMed

    Shafirovich, V; Dourandin, A; Luneva, N P; Singh, C; Kirigin, F; Geacintov, N E

    1999-03-01

    The excitation of pBr322 supercoiled plasmid DNA with intense near-IR 810 nm fs laser pulses by a simultaneous multiphoton absorption mechanism results in single-strand breaks after treatment of the irradiated samples with Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease. This enzyme cleaves DNA strands at sites of cyclobutane dimers that are formed by the simultaneous absorption of three (or more) 810 nm IR photons (pulse width approximately 140 fs, 76 MHz pulse repetition, average power output focused through 10x microscope objective is approximately 1.2 MW/cm2). Direct single-strand breaks (without treatment with M. luteus) were not observed under these conditions. However, in the presence of 6 microM of the intercalator proflavine (PF), both direct single- and double-strand breaks are observed under conditions where substantial fractions of undamaged supercoiled DNA molecules are still present. The fraction of direct double-strand breaks is 30 +/- 5% of all measurable strand cleavage events, is independent of dosage (up to 6.4 GJ/cm2) and is proportional to In, where I is the average power/area of the 810 nm fs laser pulses, and n = 3 +/- 1. The nicking of two DNA strands in the immediate vicinity of the excited PF molecules gives rise to this double-strand cleavage. In contrast, excitation of the same samples under low-power, single-photon absorption conditions (approximately 400-500 nm) gives rise predominantly to single-strand breaks, but some double-strand breaks are observed at the higher dosages. Thus, single-photon excitation with 400-500 nm light and multiphoton activation of PF by near-IR fs laser pulses produces different distributions of single- and double-strand breaks. These results suggest that DNA strand cleavage originates from unrelaxed, higher excited states when PF is excited by simultaneous IR multiphoton absorption processes.

  2. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  3. Comparison of infrared multiphoton dissociation and collision-induced dissociation of supercharged peptides in ion traps.

    PubMed

    Madsen, James A; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-03-01

    The number and types of diagnostic ions obtained by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were evaluated for supercharged peptide ions created by electrospray ionization of solutions spiked with m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. IRMPD of supercharged peptide ions increased the sequence coverage compared with that obtained by CID for all charge states investigated. The number of diagnostic ions increased with the charge state for IRMPD; however, this trend was not consistent for CID because the supercharged ions did not always yield the greatest number of diagnostic ions. Significantly different fragmentation pathways were observed for the different charge states upon CID or IRMPD with the latter yielding far more immonium ions and often fewer uninformative ammonia, water, and phosphoric acid neutral losses. Pulsed-Q dissociation resulted in an increase in the number of internal product ions, a decrease in sequence-informative ions, and reduced overall ion abundances. The enhanced sequence coverage afforded by IRMPD of supercharged ions was demonstrated for a variety of model peptides, as well as for a tryptic digest of cytochrome c.

  4. Top-down protein fragmentation by infrared multiphoton dissociation in a dual pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Madsen, James A; Gardner, Myles W; Smith, Suncerae I; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Schwartz, Jae C; Stafford, George C; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-11-01

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) was implemented in a novel dual pressure linear ion trap for rapid top-down proteomics. The high pressure cell provided improved trapping and isolation efficiencies while the isotopic profiles of 10+ charged ions could be resolved by mass analysis in the low pressure cell that enabled effective top down protein identification. Striking differences between IRMPD in the low pressure cell and CID in the high pressure cell were observed for proteins ranging from 8.6 to 29 kDa. Because of secondary dissociation, IRMPD yielded product ions in significantly lower charge states as compared to CID, thus facilitating more accurate mass identification and streamlining product ion assignment. This outcome was especially useful for database searching of larger proteins (approximately 29 kDa) as IRMPD substantially improved protein identification and scoring confidence. Also, IRMPD showed an increased selectivity toward backbone cleavages N-terminal to proline and C-terminal to acidic residues (especially for the lowest charge states), which could be useful for a priori spectral predictions and enhanced database searching for protein identification.

  5. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of peptide cations in a dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Myles W; Smith, Suncerae I; Ledvina, Aaron R; Madsen, James A; Coon, Joshua J; Schwartz, Jae C; Stafford, George C; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-10-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells-the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 x 10(-3) Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 x 10(-4) Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y(1) fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of approximately 100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra.

  6. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  7. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  8. Multiphoton microscopy in life sciences.

    PubMed

    König, K

    2000-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) multiphoton microscopy is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for fluorescence imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution, diagnostics, photochemistry and nanoprocessing within living cells and tissues. Three-dimensional fluorescence imaging based on non-resonant two-photon or three-photon fluorophor excitation requires light intensities in the range of MW cm(-2) to GW cm(-2), which can be derived by diffraction limited focusing of continuous wave and pulsed NIR laser radiation. NIR lasers can be employed as the excitation source for multifluorophor multiphoton excitation and hence multicolour imaging. In combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), this novel approach can be used for multi-gene detection (multiphoton multicolour FISH). Owing to the high NIR penetration depth, non-invasive optical biopsies can be obtained from patients and ex vivo tissue by morphological and functional fluorescence imaging of endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavin, lipofuscin, porphyrins, collagen and elastin. Recent botanical applications of multiphoton microscopy include depth-resolved imaging of pigments (chlorophyll) and green fluorescent proteins as well as non-invasive fluorophore loading into single living plant cells. Non-destructive fluorescence imaging with multiphoton microscopes is limited to an optical window. Above certain intensities, multiphoton laser microscopy leads to impaired cellular reproduction, formation of giant cells, oxidative stress and apoptosis-like cell death. Major intracellular targets of photodamage in animal cells are mitochondria as well as the Golgi apparatus. The damage is most likely based on a two-photon excitation process rather than a one-photon or three-photon event. Picosecond and femtosecond laser microscopes therefore provide approximately the same safe relative optical window for two-photon vital cell studies. In labelled cells, additional phototoxic effects may occur via

  9. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Martínez-García, M. Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures. PMID:22076258

  10. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Emilio J; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez-García, M Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2011-11-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures.

  11. Excitation beyond the monochromatic laser limit: simultaneous 3-D confocal and multiphoton microscopy with a tapered fiber as white-light laser source.

    PubMed

    Betz, Timo; Teipel, Jörn; Koch, Daniel; Härtig, Wolfgang; Guck, Jochen; Käs, Josef; Giessen, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Confocal and multiphoton microscopy are essential tools in modern life sciences. They allow fast and highly resolved imaging of a steadily growing number of fluorescent markers, ranging from fluorescent proteins to quantum dots and other fluorophores, used for the localization of molecules and the quantitative detection of molecular properties within living cells and organisms. Up to now, only one physical limitation seemed to be unavoidable. Both confocal and multiphoton microscopy rely on lasers as excitation sources, and their monochromatic radiation allows only a limited number of simultaneously usable dyes, which depends on the specific number of laser lines available in the used microscope. We have overcome this limitation by successfully replacing all excitation lasers in a standard confocal microscope with pulsed white light ranging from 430 to 1300 nm generated in a tapered silica fiber. With this easily reproducible method, simultaneous confocal and multiphoton microscopy was demonstrated. By developing a coherent and intense laser source with spectral width comparable to a mercury lamp, we provide the flexibility to excite any desired fluorophore combination.

  12. Photoleucine Survives Backbone Cleavage by Electron Transfer Dissociation. A Near-UV Photodissociation and Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Action Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Martens, Jonathan; Marek, Aleš; Oomens, Jos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational study aimed at elucidating the structure of N-terminal fragment ions of the c type produced by electron transfer dissociation of photo-leucine (L*) peptide ions GL*GGKX. The c 4 ion from GL*GGK is found to retain an intact diazirine ring that undergoes selective photodissociation at 355 nm, followed by backbone cleavage. Infrared multiphoton dissociation action spectra point to the absence in the c 4 ion of a diazoalkane group that could be produced by thermal isomerization of vibrationally hot ions. The c 4 ion from ETD of GL*GGK is assigned an amide structure by a close match of the IRMPD action spectrum and calculated IR absorption. The energetics and kinetics of c 4 ion dissociations are discussed.

  13. LeRoy Apker Award Lecture: Strong-field dissociation dynamics of NO^2+: A multiphoton electronic or vibrational excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochim, Bethany

    2012-06-01

    A 3-D momentum imaging technique is employed to study intense ultrafast laser-induced dissociation of a metastable NO^2+ beam. We focus on N^+ + O^+ coincidences and explore possible dissociation pathways using estimates of the initial vibrational population and transition rates between the X ^2σ^+ and A ^2π states together with our measured kinetic energy release and angular distribution spectra. Our analysis suggests that lower intensity pulses (<10^15 W/cm^2) drive perpendicular transitions between these states. Higher intensity pulses (˜10^16 W/cm^2), on the other hand, yield a prominent contribution from molecules breaking parallel to the polarization. An intriguing possibility is that this feature is due to a two photon permanent dipole transition to the vibrational continuum of the X ^2σ^+ state, i.e., a multiphoton vibrational excitation involving only the electronic ground state. The results of our time-dependent Schr"odinger equation calculations comparing the probabilities of this type of pathway and competing electronic transitions will be presented.

  14. Multiphoton excited hemoglobin fluorescence and third harmonic generation for non-invasive microscopy of stored blood

    PubMed Central

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Glenn, Rachel; Murashova, Gabrielle A.; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy usually appear as dark disks because of their low fluorescent signal. Here we use 15fs 800nm pulses for TPEF, 45fs 1060nm pulses for three-photon excited fluorescence, and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging. We find sufficient fluorescent signal that we attribute to hemoglobin fluorescence after comparing time and wavelength resolved spectra of other expected RBC endogenous fluorophores: NADH, FAD, biliverdin, and bilirubin. We find that both TPEF and THG microscopy can be used to examine erythrocyte morphology non-invasively without breaching a blood storage bag. PMID:27699111

  15. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 2. Infrared multiphoton dissociation and mechanistic studies of z-ions from pentapeptides.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Dissociations of z(4) ions from pentapeptides AAXAR where X=H, Y, F, W, and V produce dominant z(2) ions that account for >50 % of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z(4) ions proceed by amide trans→cis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable C(β) radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the C(α)-CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x(2) intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x(2) intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z(2) fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CID and IRMPD MS(4) experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x(2) ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate.

  16. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part2. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Mechanistic Studies of z-Ions from Pentapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Dissociations of z4 ions from pentapeptides AAXAR, where X = H, Y, F, W, and V, produce dominant z2 ions that account for >50% of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z4 ions proceed by amide transcis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable Cβ radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the Cα—CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x2 intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x2 intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z2 fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CAD and IRMPD MS4 experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x2 ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate. PMID:22669762

  17. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders.

    PubMed

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria de A; Macedo, Zélia S; de Araújo, Cid B; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2015-01-07

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  18. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria De A.; Macedo, Zélia S.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  19. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  20. Application of Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy for the Study of Chiral Recognition in the Protonated Serine Clusters: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.; Xu, Yunjie; Yang, Guochun

    2011-06-01

    Serine is an amino acid which has long been known to form the magic-number serine octamer [Ser_8 + H]^+. It has been shown that the serine octamer exhibits strong preference for homochirality. Although a few possible structures for the homochiral serine octamer have been proposed, no definite conclusion has so far been drawn. Last year at this conference, we reported on the study of the protonated serine octamer and dimer as well as the chiral recognition in these clusters using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopic technique coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Here we present our latest results on the search for the infrared signatures of chiral recognition in the serine octamer and the dimer using a mixture of the deuterated 2,3,3-d_3-L-serine and normal D-serine solution. Using the isotopic labeled species, we could isolate the heterochiral species and obtain their IRMPD spectra which can be directly compared with those of the homochiral species. As an aid to interpret the observed spectra, molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both homochiral and heterochiral octamer and dimer have been predicted by ab initio calculations. New insights into the hitherto undetermined structure of the serine octamer will be discussed. S. C. Nanita and R. G. Cooks Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45, (554), 2006.

  1. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN IN THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NGC 4418

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Evans, Aaron S.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.

    2010-12-20

    Infrared pumping and its effect on the excitation of HCN molecules can be important when using rotational lines of HCN to probe dense molecular gas in galaxy nuclei. We report the first extragalactic detection of (sub)millimeter rotational lines of vibrationally excited HCN, in the dust-enshrouded nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. We estimate the excitation temperature of T{sub vib} {approx} 230 K between the vibrational ground and excited (v{sub 2} = 1) states. This excitation is most likely due to infrared radiation. At this high vibrational temperature the path through the v{sub 2} = 1 state must have a strong impact on the rotational excitation in the vibrational ground level, although it may not be dominant for all rotational levels. Our observations also revealed nearly confusion-limited lines of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, CS, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N at {lambda} {approx} 1 mm. Their relative intensities may also be affected by the infrared pumping.

  2. Differentiation and Distributions of DNA/Cisplatin Crosslinks by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhe; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) mass spectrometry was developed to investigate the distributions of intrastrand crosslinks formed between cisplatin and two oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), d(A1T2G3G4G5T6A7C8C9C10A11T12) (G3-D) and its analog d(A1T2G3G4G5T6T7C8C9C10A11T12) (G3-H), which have been reported to adopt different secondary structures in solution. Based on the formation of site-specific fragment ions upon IRMPD, two isobaric crosslink products were differentiated for each ODN. The preferential formation of G3G4 and G4G5 crosslinks was determined as a function of reaction conditions, including incubation temperature and presence of metal ions. G3-D consistently exhibited a greater preference for formation of the G4G5 crosslink compared with the G3-H ODN. The ratio of G3G4:G4G5 crosslinks increased for both G3-D and G3-H at higher incubation temperatures or when metal salts were added. Comparison of the IRMPD fragmentation patterns of the unmodified ODNs and the intramolecular platinated crosslinks indicated that backbone cleavage was significantly suppressed near the crosslink.

  3. Infrared imaging results of an excited planar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Planar jets are used for many applications including heating, cooling, and ventilation. Generally such a jet is designed to provide good mixing within an enclosure. In building applications, the jet provides both thermal comfort and adequate indoor air quality. Increased mixing rates may lead to lower short-circuiting of conditioned air, elimination of dead zones within the occupied zone, reduced energy costs, increased occupant comfort, and higher indoor air quality. This paper discusses using an infrared imaging system to show the effect of excitation of a jet on the spread angle and on the jet mixing efficiency. Infrared imaging captures a large number of data points in real time (over 50,000 data points per image) providing significant advantages over single-point measurements. We used a screen mesh with a time constant of approximately 0.3 seconds as a target for the infrared camera to detect temperature variations in the jet. The infrared images show increased jet spread due to excitation of the jet. Digital data reduction and analysis show change in jet isotherms and quantify the increased mixing caused by excitation. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  4. Large excited state two photon absorptions in the near infrared region of surprisingly stable radical cations of (ferrocenyl)indenes.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Scuppa, Stefano; Santi, Saverio; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2013-08-21

    Multiphoton absorptions are important non-linear optical processes which allow us to explore excited states with low energy photons giving rise to new possibilities for photoinduced processes. Among these processes, multiphoton absorptions from excited states are particularly interesting because of the large susceptibilities characteristic of excited states. Here we explore the nonlinear transmission measurements recorded with 9 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm of the radical cations of (2-ferrocenyl)indene and of (2-ferrocenyl)-hexamethylindene, two interesting very stable molecules. The non-linear transmission data can be interpreted with a multiphoton sequence of three photon absorptions, the first being a one photon absorption related to the intramolecular charge transfer and the second a two photon absorption from the excited state created with the first process. The two photon absorption cross section is found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those usually found for two photon absorbing systems excited from the ground state.

  5. CANOES II; Dynamics of Atmospheric Infrared Thermochemical Excitation. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    4 8 which carried at least 6.5 eV internal energy, in their studies on the excitation of mercuric halides by N2 (A). The energy of the companion...as auroral precursors of infrared radiation ., 20. DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION MUNCLASSIFIED/tINLIMITED...investigate chemiluminescent reactions of atmospherically important radiators which could significantly contribute to emissions in several important

  6. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A J; Tielens, A G G M; Ruth, A A

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles' spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp(3)/sp(2) hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  7. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  8. Optical visualization of Alzheimer’s pathology via multiphoton-excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Alex C.; Duff, Karen; Gouras, Gunnar K.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic optical emissions, such as autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG), are potentially useful for functional fluorescence imaging and biomedical disease diagnosis for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, using multiphoton and SHG microscopy, we identified sources of intrinsic emissions in ex vivo, acute brain slices from AD transgenic mouse models. We observed autofluorescence and SHG at senile plaques as well as characterized their emission spectra. The utility of intrinsic emissions was demonstrated by imaging senile plaque autofluorescence in conjunction with SHG from microtubule arrays to assess the polarity of microtubules near pathological lesions. Our results suggest that tissues from AD transgenic models contain distinct intrinsic emissions, which can provide valuable information about the disease mechanisms. PMID:19259208

  9. Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence-Encoded Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mastron, Joseph N; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-11-23

    We report on a method for performing ultrafast infrared (IR) vibrational spectroscopy using fluorescence detection. Vibrational dynamics on the ground electronic state driven by femtosecond mid-infrared pulses are detected by changes in fluorescence amplitude resulting from modulation of a two-photon visible transition by nuclear motion. We examine a series of coumarin dyes and study the signals as a function of solvent and excitation pulse parameters. The measured signal characterizes the relaxation of vibrational populations and coherences but yields different information than conventional IR transient absorption measurements. These differences result from the manner in which the ground-state dynamics are projected by the two-photon detection step. Extensions of this method can be adapted for a variety of increased-sensitivity IR measurements.

  10. Formation of infrared solitons in graphene ensemble under Raman excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chunling; Yu, Rong; Yang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Duo; Huang, Mingju

    2015-11-01

    The formation of infrared solitons in graphene under Raman excitation is investigated using density-matrix approach. We find that the unique band structure and selection rules for the optical transitions near the Dirac point can result in extremely strong optical nonlinearity. Theoretical investigations with the aid of slowly varying envelope approximation and perturbation theory clearly indicate the existence of bright and dark solitons in Landau-quantized graphene. Actually, the formation of spatial soliton in such a material is the consequence of the balance between nonlinear effects and the dispersion properties. Also, the corresponding carrier frequency is tunable in the infrared range. These results can make us know better the crossover between optical solitons and graphene metamaterials. The predicted nonlinear optical effect in graphene may provide a new possibility for designing high-fidelity graphene-based information processing device.

  11. Electrically excited, localized infrared emission from single carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Marcus; Tsang, James C; Kirtley, John; Carlsen, Autumn; Chen, Jia; Troeman, Aico; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Avouris, Phaedon

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) produce band gap derived infrared emission under both ambipolar and unipolar transport conditions. We demonstrate here that heterogeneities/defects in the local environment of a CNTFET perturb the local potentials and, as a result, the characteristic bias dependent motion of the ambipolar light emission. Such defects can also introduce localized infrared emission due to impact excitation by carriers accelerated by a voltage drop at the defect. The correlation of the change in the motion of the ambipolarlight emission and of the stationary electroluminescence with the electrical characteristics of the CNTFETs shows that stationaryelectroluminescence can identify "environmental defects" in carbon nanotubes and help evaluate their influence on electrical transport and device operation. A number of different defects are studied involving local dielectric environment changes (partially polymer-covered nanotubes), nanotube-nanotube contacts in looped nanotubes, and nanotube segments close to the electronic contacts. Random defects due to local charging are also observed.

  12. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  13. Large two-photon absorption cross sections of hemiporphyrazines in the excited state: the multiphoton absorption process of hemiporphyrazines with different central metals.

    PubMed

    Dini, Danilo; Calvete, Mario J F; Hanack, Michael; Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2008-09-17

    A series of five hemiporphyrazines (Hps) with different coordinating central atoms (H2, GeCl2, InCl, Pt, Pb), and the acyclic derivative 1,3-bis-(6'-amino-4'-butoxy-2'-pyridylimino)-1,3-dihydroisoindoline have been synthesized and their multiphoton absorption properties examined at the second harmonic frequency of the Nd:YAG laser in the nanosecond time regime. Metal-free and platinum Hps display saturation of optical transmittance within incident fluence values of 6 J cm(-2). Comparison with other similar molecular structures like phthalocyanines and related molecules shows that Hps are strong nonlinear absorbers. The experimental curves of nonlinear transmission at 532 nm have been fitted by means of a three-level model with the occurrence of simultaneous two-photon absorption from an excited state. In the sole case of the InCl complex we found that a five-level model is needed because of the participation of triplet states. Contrary to phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, and porphyrins, a heavy central atom does not improve the nonlinear absorption properties since a different excited states dynamic is involved. The large nonlinear absorption of Hps combined with the very small absorption in the visible spectral range makes these molecules a very interesting class of molecules for nonlinear optical applications.

  14. Multivariate analysis of electron detachment dissociation and infrared multiphoton dissociation mass spectra of heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides differing only in hexuronic acid stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Han Bin; Leach, Franklin E; Arungundram, Sailaja; Al-Mafraji, Kanar; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Amster, I Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    The structural characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates by mass spectrometry has been a long-standing analytical challenge due to the inherent heterogeneity of these biomolecules, specifically polydispersity, variability in sulfation, and hexuronic acid stereochemistry. Recent advances in tandem mass spectrometry methods employing threshold and electron-based ion activation have resulted in the ability to determine the location of the labile sulfate modification as well as assign the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues. To facilitate the analysis of complex electron detachment dissociation (EDD) spectra, principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to differentiate the hexuronic acid stereochemistry of four synthetic GAG epimers whose EDD spectra are nearly identical upon visual inspection. For comparison, PCA is also applied to infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra (IRMPD) of the examined epimers. To assess the applicability of multivariate methods in GAG mixture analysis, PCA is utilized to identify the relative content of two epimers in a binary mixture.

  15. Infrared multiphoton induced isomerization and dissociation of FCN, ClCN, and BrCN in liquid Ar: A classical simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming; Gong Jiangbin; Ma Ao; Rice, Stuart A.

    2007-10-14

    We report the results of classical mechanics simulations of infrared multiphoton induced control of isomerization of FCN, ClCN, and BrCN in liquid Ar, using ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for the XCN molecules. The field induced isomerization and fragmentation dynamics of these molecules are found to be different from that of HCN in liquid Ar. In particular, the scheme that provides complete controlled conversion of HCN to CNH in liquid Ar fails to generate complete conversion of XCN to CNX in liquid Ar for X=F,Cl,Br. It is suggested that the sources of the differences in behavior arise from differences in the spectra of vibrational nonlinear resonances in HCN and XCN and to the occurrence of monodromy in the dynamics of the XCN molecules.

  16. High-order multiphoton laser-assisted elastic electron scattering by Xe in a femtosecond near-infrared intense laser field: Plateau in energy spectra of scattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Kakuta; Morimoto, Yuya; Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton free-free transitions were observed in laser-assisted elastic electron scattering (LAES) by Xe atoms in a femtosecond near-infrared intense laser field. The distinct peak structures at the energy shifts of n -photons (n =+1 ,+2 ,+3 ,+4 ,+5 , and +6 ) were identified in the observed energy spectrum, and the energy and angular distributions of the LAES signals were in good agreement with those obtained by numerical simulations based on the Kroll-Watson theory. The LAES signal intensities at the scattering angles at 9.1° and 11.8° exhibited a clear plateau structure as a function of the harmonic order n , and the mechanism of these nonperturbative LAES processes was interpreted by a classical mechanical description.

  17. Multiphoton imaging of freezing and heating effects in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Tümer, Fatma; König, Karsten

    2013-08-01

    Thermally-induced changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves were investigated with a novel cryo microscope by multiphoton, fluorescence lifetime and spectral imaging as well as micro spectroscopy. Samples were excited with fs pulses in the near-infrared range and cooled/heated in a cryogenic chamber. The results show morphological changes in the chloroplast distribution as well as a shift from chlorophyll to cell-wall fluorescence with decreasing temperature. At temperatures below -40 °C, also second harmonic generation was observed. The measurements illustrate the suitability of multiphoton imaging to investigate thermally-induced changes at temperatures used for cryopreservation as well as for basic investigations of thermal effects on plant tissue in general.

  18. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  19. Excited state two photon absorption of a charge transfer radical dimer in the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Schiccheri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2005-06-02

    Nonlinear transmission measurements of a solution of radical dimers of tetramethyl-tetrathiafulvalene, (TMTTF+)2, recorded with 9 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm are reported and interpreted on the basis of a multiphoton absorption process. One finds that the process can be interpreted with a sequence of three photon absorption, the first being a one photon absorption related to the intermolecular charge transfer process characteristic of the dimers and the second a two photon absorption from the excited state created with the first process. A model calculation allows one to obtain the value of the two photon absorption cross section which is found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those usually found for two photon absorbing systems excited from the ground state. These results show the importance of an excited-state population for obtaining large nonlinear optical responses.

  20. Multiphoton molecular spectroscopy and excited-state dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP): acid base specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Hess, Samuel T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2001-12-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP), isolated from Aequorea victoria jellyfish, has been used extensively as a noninvasive intracellular pH indicator and site-specific fluorescent marker in biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular genetics. Numerous mutations, aimed at optimizing spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of GFP, have been created for different applications. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) reveals that the enhanced green fluorescent protein mutant (EGFP; S65T/F64L) undergoes external proton exchange with the buffer on ˜45-300 μs time scale with p Ka=5.8±0.1 [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95 (1998) 13573]. This contribution represents a comprehensive characterization of pH and excitation mode (wavelength, one and two photon (2P)) effects on the spectroscopy, excited-state dynamics, and rotational mobility of EGFP aiming at elucidating the significant electronic states of this molecular system. EGFP exhibits a large 2P action cross-section and, therefore, is well suited for intracellular imaging using 2P fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Sub-cycle dynamics of multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    Sub-cycle oscillatory structures are revealed in calculated time-dependent multiphoton ionization rates. Both atomic and molecular targets manifest multiple ionization bursts per one optical cycle of the laser field. Using the accurate and efficient time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have performed calculations on H, He+, H2+,and HHe2+, for the laser fields with several intensities and wavelengths in the near-infrared range (750 nm to 1064 nm). The sub-cycle structures appear a universal feature of multiphoton ionization and become well pronounced for sufficiently strong laser fields depending on the target atom or molecule. Analysis of the electron density distributions on the sub-femtosecond time scale shows several time moments per optical cycle (not necessarily corresponding to the peak values of the laser field) when significant portions of the electron density move away from the nucleus giving rise to the bursts in the ionization rate. The nature of the phenomenon can be related to ionization through different pathways, including direct ionization as well as population of the excited states by the laser field with subsequent ionization at later times. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  2. Three-dimensional imaging and uptake of the anticancer drug combretastatin in cell spheroids and photoisomerization in gels with multiphoton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Kathrin M.; Bisby, Roger H.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Hadfield, John A.; Haycock, John W.; Parker, Anthony W.

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of E-combretastatins, potential prodrugs of the anticancer Z-isomers, into multicellular spheroids has been imaged by intrinsic fluorescence in three dimensions using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging with 625-nm ultrafast femtosecond laser pulses. Uptake is initially observed at the spheroid periphery but extends to the spheroid core within 30 min. Using agarose gels as a three-dimensional model, the conversion of Z(trans)→E(cis) via two-photon photoisomerization is demonstrated and the location of this photochemical process may be precisely selected within the micron scale in all three dimensions at depths up to almost 2 mm. We discuss these results for enhanced tissue penetration at longer near-infrared wavelengths for cancer therapy and up to three-photon excitation and imaging using 930-nm laser pulses with suitable combretastatin analogs.

  3. Assigning structures to gas-phase peptide cations and cation-radicals. An infrared multiphoton dissociation, ion mobility, electron transfer, and computational study of a histidine peptide ion.

    PubMed

    Moss, Christopher L; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Nicol, Edith; Brown, Jeffery; Campuzano, Iain; Richardson, Keith; Williams, Jonathan P; Bush, Matthew F; Bythell, Benjamin; Paizs, Bela; Turecek, Frantisek

    2012-03-15

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, using a free-electron laser, and ion mobility measurements, using both drift-cell and traveling-wave instruments, were used to investigate the structure of gas-phase peptide (AAHAL + 2H)(2+) ions produced by electrospray ionization. The experimental data from the IRMPD spectra and collisional cross section (Ω) measurements were consistent with the respective infrared spectra and Ω calculated for the lowest-energy peptide ion conformer obtained by extensive molecular dynamics searches and combined density functional theory and ab initio geometry optimizations and energy calculations. Traveling-wave ion mobility measurements were employed to obtain the Ω of charge-reduced peptide cation-radicals, (AAHAL + 2H)(+●), and the c(3), c(4), z(3), and z(4) fragments from electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) of (AAHAL + 2H)(2+). The experimental Ω for the ETD charge-reduced and fragment ions were consistent with the values calculated for fully optimized ion structures and indicated that the ions retained specific hydrogen bonding motifs from the precursor ion. In particular, the Ω for the doubly protonated ions and charge-reduced cation-radicals were nearly identical, indicating negligible unfolding and small secondary structure changes upon electron transfer. The experimental Ω for the (AAHAL + 2H)(+●) cation-radicals were compatible with both zwitterionic and histidine radical structures formed by electron attachment to different sites in the precursor ion, but did not allow their distinction. The best agreement with the experimental Ω was found for ion structures fully optimized with M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and using both projection approximation and trajectory methods to calculate the theoretical Ω values.

  4. Bleed-through and photobleaching correction in multiphoton FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides a tool to visualize the protein with high spatial and temporal resolution. In multi-photon FRET microscopy one experiences considerably less photobleaching compared to one-photon excitation since the illumination is the diffraction limited spot and the excitation is infrared-pulsed laser light. Because of the spectral overlap involved in the selection of the fluorophore pair for FRET imaging, the spectral bleed-through signal in the FRET channel is unavoidable. We describe in this paper the development of dedicated software to correct the bleed-through signal due to donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules. We used living cells expressed with BFP-RFP (DsRed)-C/EBP(alpha) proteins in the nucleus. We acquired images of different combinations like donor alone, acceptor alone, and both acceptor and donor under similar conditions. We statistically evaluated the percentage of bleed-through signal from one channel to the other based on the overlap areas of the spectra. We then reconstructed the images after applying the correction. Characterization of multi-photon FRET imaging system taking into account the intensity, dwell time, concentration of fluorophore pairs, objective lens and the excitation wavelength are described in this paper.

  5. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for imaging keratoconus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the possible application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the structural features of keratoconus cornea and to evaluate its potential as being a clinical in vivo monitoring technique. Using the near-infrared excitation source from a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by a diode-pumped, solid state (DPSS) laser system, we can induce and simultaneously acquire multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG signals from the cornea specimens with keratoconus. A home-modified commercial microscope system with specified optical components is used for optimal signal detection. Keratoconus cornea button from patient with typical clinical presentation of keratoconus was obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty. The specimen was also sent for the histological examination as comparison. In all samples of keratoconus, destruction of lamellar structure with altered collagen fiber orientation was observed within whole layer of the diseased stromal area. In addition, the orientation of the altered collagen fibers within the cone area shows a trend directing toward the apex of the cone, which might implicate the biomechanical response of the keratoconus stroma to the intraocular pressure. Moreover, increased autofluorescent cells were also found in the cone area, with increased density as one approaches the apical area. In conclusion, multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG microscopy non-invasively demonstrated the morphological features of keratoconus cornea, especially the structural alternations of the stromal lamellae. We believe that in the future the multiphoton microscopy can be applied in vivo as an effective, non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring technique for keratoconus.

  6. H2 Ejection from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Study of Protonated Acenaphthene and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Vala, Martin T.

    2011-01-01

    The infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of protonated acenaphthene ([ACN+H]+) and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene ([DHP+H]+) have been recorded using an infrared free electron laser after the compounds were protonated by electrospray ionization and trapped in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. In both compounds, the loss of two mass units is predominant. Density functional calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) of the infrared spectra of all possible protonated isomers of each species showed that the observed IRMPD spectra are best fit to the isomer with the largest proton affinity and lowest relative electronic energy. Potential energy surfaces of the most stable isomers of [ACN+H]+ and [DHP+H]+ have been calculated for H and H2 loss. The lowest energy barriers are for loss of H2, with predicted energies 4.28 and 4.15 eV, respectively. After H2 ejection, the adjacent aliphatic hydrogens migrate to the bare ejection site and stabilize the remaining fragment. Single H loss may occur from [ACN+H]+ but the energy required is higher. No single H loss is predicted from [DHP+H]+, only H migration around the carbon skeleton. The vibrational bands in the parent closed-shell protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are compared to bands observed from the interstellar medium.

  7. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980 nm excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi

    2013-12-02

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  8. Coded excitation for infrared non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Venkata Ghali, Subbarao

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a Barker coded excitation for defect detection using infrared non-destructive testing. Capability of the proposed excitation scheme is highlighted with recently introduced correlation based post processing approach and compared with the existing phase based analysis by taking the signal to noise ratio into consideration. Applicability of the proposed scheme has been experimentally validated on a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen containing flat bottom holes located at different depths.

  9. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  10. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  11. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Szoeke, A.

    1986-03-01

    A non-perturbative approach to the theory of multiphoton ionization is reviewed. Adiabatic Floquet theory is its first approximation. It explains qualitatively the energy and angular distribution of photoelectrons. In many-electron atoms it predicts collective and inner shell excitation. 14 refs.

  12. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  13. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  14. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  15. Localized multiphoton photoactivation of paGFP in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Periklis; González-Gaitán, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    In biological imaging of fluorescent molecules, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) has become the favorite method of fluorescence microscopy in tissue explants and living animals. The great power of MPLSM with pulsed lasers in the infrared wavelength lies in its relatively deep optical penetration and reduced ability to cause potential nonspecific phototoxicity. These properties are of crucial importance for long time-lapse imaging. Since the excited area is intrinsically confined to the high-intensity focal volume of the illuminating beam, MPLSM can also be applied as a tool for selectively manipulating fluorophores in a known, three-dimensionally defined volume within the tissue. Here we introduce localized multiphoton photoactivation (MP-PA) as a technique suitable for analyzing the dynamics of photoactivated molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution of a few micrometers. Short, intense laser light pulses uncage photoactivatable molecules via multiphoton excitation in a defined volume. MP-PA is demonstrated on photoactivatable paGFP in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. This technique is especially useful for extracting quantitative information about the properties of photoactivatable fusion proteins in different cellular locations in living tissue as well as to label single or small patches of cells in tissue to track their subsequent lineage.

  16. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  17. Design and development of compact multiphoton microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehravar, SeyedSoroush

    A compact multi-photon microscope (MPM) was designed and developed with the use of low-cost mode-locked fiber lasers operating at 1040nm and 1560nm. The MPM was assembled in-house and the system aberration was investigated using the optical design software: Zemax. A novel characterization methodology based on 'nonlinear knife-edge' technique was also introduced to measure the axial, lateral resolution, and the field curvature of the multi-photon microscope's image plane. The field curvature was then post-corrected using data processing in MATLAB. A customized laser scanning software based on LabVIEW was developed for data acquisition, image display and controlling peripheral electronics. Finally, different modalities of multi-photon excitation such as second- and third harmonic generation, two- and three-photon fluorescence were utilized to study a wide variety of samples from cancerous cells to 2D-layered materials.

  18. Ultrafast Nonlinear Excitation Dynamics of Black Phosphorus Nanosheets from Visible to Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangpeng; Szydłowska, Beata M; Wang, Gaozhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jing Jing; Magan, John J; Zhang, Long; Coleman, Jonathan N; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J

    2016-07-26

    The recent progress on black phosphorus makes it a promising candidate material for broadband nanophotonic devices, especially operating in the mid-infrared spectral region. Here, the excited carrier dynamics and nonlinear optical response of unoxidized black phosphorus nanosheets and their wavelength dependence were systematically studied from 800 nm to 2.1 μm. The wavelength-dependent relaxation times of black phosphorus nanosheets are determined to be 360 fs to 1.36 ps with photon energies from 1.55 to 0.61 eV. In a comparative study with graphene, we found that black phosphorus has a faster carrier relaxation in near- and mid-infrared region. With regard to nonlinear optical absorption, the response of black phosphorus significantly increases from near- to mid-infrared, and black phosphorus is also confirmed to be better as saturable absorber to MoS2 in infrared region.

  19. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  20. Mode-selective phonon excitation in gallium nitride using mid-infrared free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heishun; Hachiya, Kan; Sagawa, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    The single-phonon mode was selectively excited in a solid-state sample. A mid-infrared free-electron laser, which was tuned to the target phonon mode, was irradiated onto a crystal cooled to a cryogenic temperature, where modes other than the intended excitation were suppressed. An A 1(LO) vibrational mode excitation on GaN(0001) face was demonstrated. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering was used to observe the excited vibrational mode, and the appearance and disappearance of the scattering band at the target wavenumber were confirmed to correspond to on and off switching of the pump free-electron laser and were fixed to the sample vibrational mode. The sum-frequency generation signals of the pump and probe lasers overlapped the Raman signals and followed the wavenumber shift of the pump laser.

  1. Multiphoton Effects in Rutile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royce, Gerald A.

    Multiphoton effects are investigated in crystalline rutile TiO(,2) using Nd:YAG laser photons. The 1.06 micron laser is operated in Q-switched mode with intensities up to 1.4 x 10('6) watts/cm('2) on the rutile crystal. Photoconductivity measurements provide data indicating a mixture of modes for electrons to be photoionized. Assuming aluminum impurity as the contributing sites, the first order photionization cross section is found to be 1.5 x 10('-26) cm('2) and second order cross section is found to be 7.7 x 10('-51) cm('4)-s. No appreciable change in cross section is observed for circular versus linear polarization of the laser. Observations of the photo-emission of the laser illuminated crystal provide radiative relaxation times on the order of 100 nanoseconds with emission peaks at 4500 and 5000 angstroms plus a near infrared continuum out to 1 micron. The thermoluminescence of rutile shows a number of trapping levels between 0.4 and 0.8 eV below the conduction band. These are attributed to an aluminum impurity.

  2. FDTD/TDSE study of surface-enhanced infrared absorption by metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-H.; Schatz, G. C.; Gray, S. K.; Chemistry; Northwestern Univ.; National Cheng-Kung Univ.

    2006-01-01

    We study surface-enhanced infrared absorption, including multiphoton processes, due to the excitation of surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation and finite-difference time-domain method are self-consistently coupled to treat the problem.

  3. On the nature of excited states of photosynthetic reaction centers: An ultrafast infrared study

    SciTech Connect

    Haran, G.; Wynne, K.; Reid, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) contain eight chromophores forming a well-defined supramolecular structure within a protein framework. Theoretical studies suggest that the excited states of these chromophores are delocalized and contain important contributions from charge-transfer and resonance states. There is no clear-cut experimental evidence pertaining to the degree of localization of excited states. We have used ultrafast near and mid-infrared spectroscopic methods to investigate the character of some of the excited states. Exciting the 800 nm, absorption band, we followed the fate of the excitation energy using either the stimulated emission of the special pair at 920 nm or a transient absorption at 1.2 {mu}m. For a completely localized system, Forster theory-based calculations are expected to accurately predict the kinetics of energy transfer. It was found, however, that calculated rates arc much faster than measured rates. This corroborates a delocalized picture, with internal conversion rather than energy transfer between states. We have also measured the transient absorption spectrum of the RC in the infrared spectral region, detecting several new low-lying electronic states. Assignments for these states, and implications for the localization problem will be discussed.

  4. Fluorescence response of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids: observation of photobleaching under mild excitation condition and multiphoton confocal microscopic study of the fluorescence recovery dynamics.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Kotni; Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Rangaraj, Nandini; Samanta, Anunay

    2010-02-11

    The fluorescence behavior of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino) benzonitrile has been studied in room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) as a function of temperature, excitation wavelength, and exposure time. Dual emission from the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of the molecule has been observed and the relative intensities of the two emission bands and the peak position of the ICT emission are found consistent with the viscosity and polarity of the ILs. Temperature dependence study reveals a blue shift of the ICT emission peak with lowering of temperature indicating that under this condition the emission occurs from incompletely solvated state of the molecule. The observed excitation wavelength dependence of the emission behavior has been attributed to the microheterogeneity of the media. Exposure of the solution to the exciting radiation under very mild condition is found to influence the relative intensities of the two emission bands; an enhancement of the LE emission accompanied by a slight decrease of the ICT emission is observed. The emission intensities, however, return almost to their original values when the exposed solution is kept in the dark. The observation has been attributed to photoreaction of the exposed molecules and the recovery to replenishment of phototransformed molecules by the surrounding unexposed molecules. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching has been studied by multiphoton confocal fluorescence microscopic technique to obtain insight into the recovery dynamics. The diffusion coefficient estimated from this study is found to be lower than that predicted by the Stokes-Einstein equation by a factor of nearly 7 indicating the microheterogeneous nature of the ILs.

  5. Far-infrared laser magnetic resonance of vibrationally excited CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.; Mckellar, A. R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The detection of 13 rotational transitions in the first excited bending state (010) of CD2 using the technique of far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is reported. Molecular parameters for this state are determined from these new data together with existing infrared observations of the v(2) band. Additional information on the ground vibrational state (000) is also provided by the observation of a new rotational transition, and this is combined with existing data to provide a refined set of molecular parameters for the CD2 ground state. One spectrum has been observed that is assigned as a rotational transition within the first excited symmetric stretching state (100) of CD2. These data will be of use in refining the structure and the potential function of the methylene radical.

  6. Nanowires-assisted excitation and propagation of mid-infrared surface plasmon polaritons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hua; Zhao, Jianlin; Gu, Min

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the excitation and propagation of surface plasmon polaritons in a novel graphene hybrid photonic nanostructure, which consists of a graphene sheet and a dielectric layer with partly etched nanowires coated on the silicon substrate. The simulation and analytical results show that the mid-infrared plasmonic wave can be generated in the graphene sheet by normally incident light due to the satisfaction of the wavevector matching condition. Especially, we find that the plasmonic wavelength and spectral width are determined by the width, pitch, and refractive index of the dielectric nanowires, as well as the layer number and the Fermi level of graphene sheet. The analytical calculations agree well with the finite-difference time-domain simulations. These results would provide an new avenue toward the excitation of graphene plasmonics for the manipulation of mid-infrared light at nanoscale.

  7. Clinical multiphoton and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on clinical CARS imaging of human skin in vivo with the certified hybrid multiphoton tomograph CARSDermaInspect. The CARS-DermaInspect provides simultaneous imaging of non-fluorescent intradermal lipid and water as well as imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence from intrinsic molecules. Two different excitation schemes for CARS imaging have been realized: In the first setup, a combination of fs oscillator and optical parametric oscillator provided fs-CARS pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. In the second setup a fs oscillator was combined with a photonic crystal fiber which provided a broadband spectrum. A spectral range out of the broadband-spectrum was selected and used for CARS excitation in combination with the residual fs-oscillator output. In both setups, in addition to CARS, single-beam excitation was used for imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. Both CARS-excitation systems were successfully used for imaging of lipids inside the skin in vivo.

  8. Near-infrared excited surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of rhodamine 6G on colloidal silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, K.; Roth, E.; Engert, C.; Kiefer, W.

    1993-05-01

    1064 nm excited surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) on NaCl-activated silver sol is reported performed with a scanning Raman spectrometer. The present study gives the opportunity to compare directly the enhancement factors for excitation in the near-infrared (NIR) and in the visible region and shows that for the case of Rh 6G these factors are of the same order of magnitude. This result can be explained by a growing electromagnetic contribution to the enhancement at 1064 nm which compensates the loss of resonance Raman enhancement by the change of excitation wavelength from about 500 to 1064 nm. An additional enhancement factor ascribed to the local mechanism of a Rh 6G-adatom—anion surface complex gives an essential contribution to SERS. This specific enhancement due to Cl-activated sites results in similar contributions in the visible and in the NIR.

  9. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. PMID:24974026

  10. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs.

  11. Multi-excitation near infrared (NIR) spectral fluorescence imaging using organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Choyke, Peter L.

    2008-02-01

    The ability to obtain multi-color fluorescent imaging in vivo simultaneously using multi-targeted imaging probes could be of potential benefit from both a research and a clinical perspective. However, the simultaneous acquisition of more than 2 separate organic fluorophores usually requires more than one excitation source, since a single excitation source may not optimally excite all the fluorophores. In this study, we employed a multi-excitation approach in order to acquire optimized images with multiple near infrared (NIR) organic fluorophores at the same time. Using 3 sets of excitation filters (595+/-20nm, 640+/-25nm, 688+/-17nm) to acquire 3 distinct spectra and spectral unmixing software (CRi, Woburn, MA), it was possible to resolve the emission spectra of each of the NIR fluorophores using commercial software (Nuance, CRi, Woburn, MA) To demonstrate the utility of this approach 2 mouse models were investigated; In one model, mice bearing four implanted malignancies were injected with a cocktail of 3 fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies, each with its own distinct NIR fluorophore. In the second model five different lymph node drainage basins were imaged with 5-color dendrimer-based lymphatic imaging agents tagged with 5 different NIR fluorophores. We successfully detected each of the targeted tumors in the first model and all of the lymph nodes by their distinct color in the second model; neither of which would have been possible using the single excitation method. In conclusion, multi-excitation NIR spectral fluorescence imaging is feasible in a reasonable time frame and opens the possibility for in vivo immunohistochemical imaging (IHCi).

  12. Multiphoton excitation and ionization by elliptically polarized, intense short laser pulses: Recognizing multielectron dynamics and doorway states in C{sub 60} vs Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Shchatsinin, I.; Ritze, H.-H.; Schulz, C. P.; Hertel, I. V.

    2009-05-15

    Ionization and fragmentation of C{sub 60} fullerenes are studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in elliptically polarized femtosecond laser fields at 797 nm of intensities I{sub 0}=(0.5-4.3)x10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. Xe atoms serve as a test case. We derive a qualitative theory describing such polarization studies. It turns out that polarization dependence can very sensitively distinguish single active electron (SAE) and multiple active electrons dynamics. In the case of Xe a clear signature of SAE dynamics is observed, with very pronounced changes in the ion yield as a function of ellipticity, indicative of N=5-8 and 18-22 photon processes for Xe{sup +} and Xe{sup 2+}, respectively. In contrast, only a moderate polarization dependence is observed in the C{sub 60} case, although at least 5 h{nu} photons at 797 nm are needed to generate C{sub 60}{sup +} and additional 11 for C{sub 60}{sup 2+}. At lower intensities, a moderate reduction in the ion yield for circular polarization establishes a two-photon SAE absorption process, connected with the key role of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO)+1(t{sub 1g}) as 'doorway state'. The absence of any polarization effect at 399 nm corroborates this finding. At high intensities enhanced fragmentation is observed, which is tentatively attributed to returning loops of electron trajectories by the combined action of the C{sub 60}{sup +} field and the circularly polarized laser field - in contrast to conventional wisdom that linear polarization should lead to an enhanced recolliding electron yield. No sign of a pronounced multiphoton polarization signature with five and more photons is seen for C{sub 60} which would be predicted by the SAE picture - although the slopes of the ion yield as a function of intensity are given by the corresponding power laws {proportional_to}I{sub 0}{sup N}. This is taken as clear evidence of multielectron dynamics after reaching the doorway state.

  13. Proton formation in 2+1 resonance enhanced multiphoton excitation of HCl and HBr via (Omega=0) Rydberg and ion-pair states.

    PubMed

    Romanescu, Constantin; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2007-09-28

    Molecular beam cooled HCl was state selected by two-photon excitation of the V (1) summation operator(0(+)) [v=9,11-13,15], E (1) summation operator(0(+)) [v=0], and g (3) summation operator(-)(0(+)) [v=0] states through either the Q(0) or Q(1) lines of the respective (1,3) summation operator(0(+))<--<--X (1) summation operator(0(+)) transition. Similarly, HBr was excited to the V (1) summation operator(0(+)) [v=m+3, m+5-m+8], E (1) summation operator(0(+)) [v=0], and H (1) summation operator(0(+)) [v=0] states through the Q(0) or Q(1) lines. Following absorption of a third photon, protons were formed by three different mechanisms and detected using velocity map imaging. (1) H(*)(n=2) was formed in coincidence with (2)P(i) halogen atoms and subsequently ionized. For HCl, photodissociation into H(*)(n=2)+Cl((2)P(12)) was dominant over the formation of Cl((2)P(32)) and was attributed to parallel excitation of the repulsive [(2) (2)Pi4llambda] superexcited (Omega=0) states. For HBr, the Br((2)P(32))Br((2)P(12)) ratio decreases with increasing excitation energy. This indicates that both the [(3) (2)Pi(12)5llambda] and the [B (2) summation operator5llambda] superexcited (Omega=0) states contribute to the formation of H(*)(n=2). (2) For selected intermediate states HCl was found to dissociate into the H(+)+Cl(-) ion pair with over 20% relative yield. A mechanism is proposed by which a bound [A (2) summation operatornlsigma] (1) summation operator(0(+)) superexcited state acts as a gateway state to dissociation into the ion pair. (3) For all intermediate states, protons were formed by dissociation of HX(+)[v(+)] following a parallel, DeltaOmega=0, excitation. The quantum yield for the dissociation process was obtained using previously reported photoionization efficiency data and was found to peak at v(+)=6-7 for HCl and v(+)=12 for HBr. This is consistent with excitation of the repulsive A(2) summation operator(12) and (2) (2)Pi states of HCl(+), and the (3) (2)Pi state

  14. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  15. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (mfMPLSM) in the biological and medical sciences has the potential to become a ubiquitous tool for obtaining high-resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of mfMPLSM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for mfMPLSM in which whole-field detection with a single detector, rather than detection with a matrix of detectors, such as a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, is implemented. This advance makes mfMPLSM fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method makes it possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single scan of the specimen.

  16. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  17. Multiple intermolecular bend vibrational excitation of a hydrogen bond: An extended infrared study of OCOHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, David J.; Lovejoy, Christopher M.

    1990-12-01

    We report the use of near infrared tunable difference frequency laser absorption methods to investigate low-frequency bending of the intermolecular hydrogen bond in OCOHF complexes. By deliberate thermal warming of the slit jet expansion to 16 K, we observe bending ``hot band'' transitions built on the fundamental vHF=1←0 HF stretch from the lowest five internally excited bending states (i.e., vlbend=00←00, 11←11, 20←20, 22←22, and 31←31) which correspond to low-frequency, skeletal bending of the intermolecular hydrogen bond. In addition, much weaker parallel (Δl=0) combination band transitions (vlbend=20←00 and 31←11 ) are observed at ≲5% of the 00←00 intensity. Furthermore, measurements of the extremely weak 11←00 perpendicular (Δl=1) band are obtained at ≲1% of the 00←00 intensity. The fundamental, hot band, and combination band data permit quantitative measurement of the absolute vibrational energies of all vibrational levels for the l=0 and 1 manifolds in both HF excited (vHF=1) and ground-state (vHF=0) complexes. The bending frequencies are surprisingly low (˜10 cm-1 ) and exhibit positive anharmonicity (i.e., the energy level spacings increase with vlbend ). The results suggest nearly unrestricted bending of the hydrogen bond in a very flat, highly anharmonic angular potential. In contrast with many other weakly bound complexes, the lowest bending frequency decreases dramatically upon HF excitation, which signals a vHF vibrationally induced shift from a linear to a nonlinear equilibrium geometry for the vHF=1 excited OCOHF potential surface. Excess Lorentzian line widths are observed in all OCOHF transitions, attributable to vibrational predissociation lifetimes that vary smoothly from 1.2 ns (vlbend=00) to 650 ps (vlbend=31) as a function of intermolecular bending excitation.

  18. Multiphoton upconversion emission switching in Tm,Yb co-doped nanocrystalline yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Dong, G. Z.; Zhang, X. L.; Nie, M.; Cui, J. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Li, R. M.

    2010-10-01

    Multiphoton upconversion luminescence (UL) properties from the Yb3+-sensitized Tm3+ ions in nanocrystalline yttria host were studied experimentally under 973 nm laser excitation. Bright pure blue luminescence in the visible spectral region was performed even at low pump excitation level. An interesting chromatic switching behavior was observed for the near-infrared and blue spectral bands at room temperature, showing a pump intensity-controlled emission wavelength switcher. The chromatic switching is intrinsically associated with the competition of two-photon UL and three-photon UL processes. Moreover, the wavelength switching of Stark emission of Tm3+ 1G4 state took place as the pump intensity rises enough. This phenomenon is attributed to pump induced photothermal effect changing the distribution of Stark level populations in Tm3+ 1G4 energy state.

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of keratin endogenous signal for skin multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Strupler, M.; Boulesteix, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2005-08-01

    We recorded one-photon excited fluorescence (1PEF) and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) spectra of purified keratin from human epidermis, and determined the action cross section of this endogenous chromophore. We used this spectroscopic analysis to analyse multiphoton images of skin biopsies and assign the intrinsic fluorescence signals in the epidermis. We observed a good agreement between in situ and in vitro 2PEF spectra of keratin. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the 2PEF signal of the keratins from the epidermis, and will be of practical interest for multiphoton imaging of the skin.

  20. Multiphoton imaging of renal tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2005-06-01

    The highly inhomogeneous and light-scattering structure of living renal tissue makes the application of conventional imaging techniques more difficult compared with other parenchymal organs. On the other hand, key physiological processes of the kidney, such as regulation of glomerular filtration, hemodynamics, concentration, and dilution, involve complex interactions between multiple cell types and otherwise inaccessible structures that necessitate visual approaches. An ideal solution is multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy, a state-of-the-art imaging technique superior for deep optical sectioning of living tissue samples. Here, we review the basics and advantages of multiphoton microscopy and provide examples for its application in renal physiology using dissected cortical and medullary tissues in vitro. In combination with microperfusion techniques, the major functions of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, tubuloglomerular feedback and renin release, can be studied with high spatial and temporal resolution. Salt-dependent changes in macula densa cell volume, vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole, and activity of an intraglomerular precapillary sphincter composed of renin granular cells are visualized in real time. Release and tissue activity of renin can be studied on the individual granule level. Imaging of the living inner medulla shows how interstitial cells interconnect cells of the vasa recta, loop of Henle, and collecting duct. In summary, multiphoton microscopy is an exciting new optical sectioning technique that has great potential for numerous future developments and is ideal for applications that require deep optical sectioning of living tissue samples.

  1. Comparative study on atomic and molecular Rydberg-state excitation in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hang; Zuo, Wanlong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Rydberg-state excitation of atoms in strong infrared laser fields provides a new complementary aspect of the perspective of atom-strong field interactions. In this article, we perform an experimental and theoretical study on the corresponding process of diatomic molecules, N2 and O2. We show that neutral molecules can also survive strong 800-nm laser fields in high Rydberg states, while their behavior is remarkably different in comparison with their companion atoms, Ar and Xe. The Rydberg excitation of N2 generally behaves similarly to Ar, while that of O2 is more significantly suppressed than the ionization compared to Xe in a high intensity region, which can be understood in the frame of a semiclassical picture, together with their different structures of molecular orbitals. However, distinct quantum features in the Rydberg excitation processes that are apparently beyond the semiclassical picture have been identified, i.e., the less suppressed probability of O2 at low intensity and the oscillation behavior of the ratio between N2 and Ar, indicating that our understanding of the relevant physics is still far from complete.

  2. In vivo multiphoton tomography of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Buckle, Rainer; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Fluhr, Joachim; Elsner, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect was used to perform first clinical studies on the early non-invasive detection of skin cancer based on non-invasive optical sectioning of skin by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation. In particular, deep-tissue pigmented lesions -nevi- have been imaged with intracellular resolution using near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser radiation. So far, more than 250 patients have been investigated. Cancerous tissues showed significant morphological differences compared to normal skin layers. In the case of malignant melanoma, the occurrence of luminescent melanocytes has been detected. Multiphoton tomography will become a novel non-invasive method to obtain high-resolution 3D optical biopsies for early cancer detection, treatment control, and in situ drug screening.

  3. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  4. Clinical multiphoton endoscopy with FLIM capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton endoscopy can be applied for intra-corporeal imaging as well as to examine otherwise hard-to-access tissue areas like chronic wounds. Using high-NA (NA = 0.8) gradient-index (GRIN) lens-based endoscopes with a diameter of 1.4 mm and effective lengths of 7 mm and 20 mm, respectively, two-photon excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) is used for multimodal in vivo imaging of human skin. A further imaging modality is fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) which allows functional imaging to investigate the healing mechanism of chronic wounds and the corresponding cell metabolism. We performed first in vivo measurements using FLIM endoscopy with the medically-certified multiphoton tomograph MPTflex® in combination with a computer-controlled motorized scan head and a GRIN-lens endoscope.

  5. Multiphoton tomography of intratissue tattoo nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Most of today's intratissue tattoo pigments are unknown nanoparticles. So far, there was no real control of their use due to the absence of regulations. Some of the tattoo pigments contain carcinogenic amines e.g. azo pigment Red 22. Nowadays, the European Union starts to control the administration of tattoo pigments. There is an interest to obtain information on the intratissue distribution, their interaction with living cells and the extracellular matrix, and the mechanisms behind laser tattoo removal. Multiphoton tomographs are novel biosafety and imaging tools that can provide such information non-invasively and without further labeling. When using the spectral FLIM module, spatially-resolved emission spectra, excitation spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes can pr provided. Multiphoton tomographs are used by all major cosmetic comapanies to test the biosafety of sunscreen nanoparticles.

  6. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  7. Characterization of multiphoton emission from aggregated gold nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Akira; Lu, Phat; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2016-09-01

    Although gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are promising probes for biological imaging because of their attracting optical properties and bio-friendly nature, properties of the multi-photon (MP) emission from GNP aggregates produced by a short-wave infrared (SWIR) laser have not been examined. In this paper, characterization of MP emission from aggregated 50 nm GNPs excited by a femtosecond (fs) laser at 1560 nm is discussed with respect to aggregate structures. The key technique in this work is single particle spectroscopy. A pattern matching technique is applied to correlate MP emission and SEM images, which includes an optimization processes to maximize cross correlation coefficients between a binary microscope image and a binary SEM image with respect to xy displacement, image rotation angle, and image magnification. Once optimization is completed, emission spots are matched to the SEM image, which clarifies GNP ordering and emission properties of each aggregate. Correlation results showed that GNP aggregates have stronger MP emission than single GNPs. By combining the pattern matching technique with spectroscopy, MP emission spectrum is characterized for each GNP aggregate. A broad spectrum in the visible region and near infrared (NIR) region is obtained from GNP dimers, unlike previously reported surface plasmon enhanced emission spectrum.

  8. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators for multi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.; Zadoyan, R.; Baldacchini, T.; Franke, T.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years two-photon microscopy with fixed-wavelength has raised increasing interest in life-sciences: Two-photon (2P) absorption spectra of common dyes are broader than single-photon ones. Therefore, excitation of several dyes simultaneously with a single IR laser wavelength is feasible and could be seen as an advantage in 2P microscopy. We used pulsed fixed-wavelength infrared lasers with center wavelength at 1040 nm, for two-photon microscopy in a variety of biologically relevant samples, among these a mouse brain sample, a mouse artery (within the animal, acute preparation), and a preparation of mouse bladder. The 1040 nm laser proved to be efficient not only in exciting fluorescence from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and red fluorescent dyes, but also for second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from muscle tissue and collagen. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint fixedwavelength lasers can present an interesting alternative to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy.

  9. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  10. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  11. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  12. Effective novel dissociation methods for intact protein: heat-assisted nozzle-skimmer collisionally induced dissociation and infrared multiphoton dissociation using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with a micrometal electrospray ionization emitter.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Ei-Ichiro; Hirayama, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Heating of a nano-electrospray ionization (nanoESI) source can improve the dissociation efficiency of collisionally induced dissociation (CID) methods, such as nozzle-skimmer CID (NS-CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), for large biomolecule fragmentation. A metal nanoESI emitter was used due to its resistance to heating above 250 degrees C. This novel method for the dissociation of large biomolecular ions is termed "heat-assisted NS-CID" (HANS-CID) or "heat-assisted IRMPD" (HA-IRMPD). Multiple charged nonreduced protein ions (8.6 Da ubiquitin, 14 kDa lysozyme, and 67 kDa bovine serum albumin) were directly dissociated by HANS-CID and HA-IRMPD to effectively yield fragment ions that could be assigned. The fragment ions of ubiquitin by HANS-CID can be analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using sustained off-resonance irradiation CID (SORI-CID) and IRMPD. In addition, a native large protein, immunoglobulin G (IgG, 150 kDa), was efficiently dissociated by HA-IRMPD. The product ions that were obtained reflected the domain structure of IgG. However, these product ions of IgG and lysozyme were not dissociated by MS/MS using the same heating energetic methods such as IRMPD and SORI-CID.

  13. Development of UV-excitable red and near-infrared fluorescent labels and their application for simultaneous multicolor bioimaging by single-wavelength excitation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Keitaro; Shindo, Yutaka; Citterio, Daniel; Oka, Kotaro; Suzuki, Koji

    2013-09-01

    We report a new type of UV-excitable red/NIR-emissive fluorescent dyads (PKF series). Conjugation of a pyrene and a novel bright red/near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore resulted in large quasi-Stokes shift while retaining intense fluorescence emission and sharp spectral bands. Labeling of PKF dyads to biomolecules was performed by means of introduction of a succinimidyl ester. Simultaneous Ca(2+)/albumin dual-color intracellular imaging by PKF in combination with fura-2 (UV-excitable/VIS-emissive Ca(2+) indicator) reveals its usefulness as a new bioimaging tool.

  14. Visible and near-infrared excitation spectra from the neptunyl ion doped into a uranyl tetrachloride lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau J.; Berg, John M.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Wozniak, Nicholas R.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2016-03-01

    Visible and near-infrared illumination induces 5f-5f and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions of the neptunyl tetrachloride anion in polycrystalline Cs2U(Np)O2Cl4, and results in near-infrared luminescence from the second electronically excited state to the ground state. This photoluminescence is used as a detection method to collect excitation spectra throughout the near-infrared and visible regions. The excitation spectra of LMCT transitions in excitation spectra were identified in previous work. Here the measurement and analysis is extended to include both LMCT and intra-5f transitions. The results manifest variation in structural properties of the neptunium-oxo bond among the low-lying electronic states. Vibronic intensity patterns and energy spacings are used to compare bond lengths and vibrational frequencies in the excited states, confirming significant characteristic differences between those excited by 5f-5f transitions from those due to LMCT transitions. Results are compared with recently published RASPT2/SO calculations of [NpO2Cl4]2-.

  15. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shijing; Argondizzo, Adam; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Petek, Hrvoje

    2017-01-01

    Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  16. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Webb, Watt W.

    2002-11-01

    The inherent advantages of nonlinear excitation make multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) awell-suited imaging technique for extracting valuable information from turbid and thick biological samples. These advantages include high three-dimensional spatial resolution, large penetration depth, minimum out-of-focus cellular photodamage, and high signal-to-noise contrast. We have investigated the nonlinear spectroscopy of biologically important molecules such as NADH, flavins, and intrinsically fluorescent proteins. Fundamental understanding of the molecular spectroscopy and dynamics of these biomolecules is essential for advancing their applications in biological research. MPFM has been utilized for monitoring a large spectrum of biological processes including metabolic activity and exocytosis. We will discuss two-photon (2P) redox fluorescence microscopy of NADH, which gives a quantitative measure of the respiratory chain activity, thus allowing functional imaging of energy metabolism in neurons and native brain tissue. Finally, a rational design strategy, based on donor-acceptor-donor configuration, will be elucidated for fluorescent probes with large 2P-excitation cross-section. These dyes are water-soluble, yet possess a high affinity to organic phases with site-specific labeling and Ca+2 sensitivity (Kd ~ 350 nM). A brief account on the biological application of nanocrystals and second harmonic imaging will be reviewed.

  17. High-Quality-Factor Mid-Infrared Toroidal Excitation in Folded 3D Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Du, Shuo; Cui, Ajuan; Li, Zhancheng; Fan, Yuancheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2017-02-22

    With unusual electromagnetic radiation properties and great application potentials, optical toroidal moments have received increasing interest in recent years. 3D metamaterials composed of split ring resonators with specific orientations in micro-/nanoscale are a perfect choice for toroidal moment realization in optical frequency considering the excellent magnetic confinement and quality factor, which, unfortunately, are currently beyond the reach of existing micro-/nanofabrication techniques. Here, a 3D toroidal metamaterial operating in mid-infrared region constructed by metal patterns and dielectric frameworks is designed, by which high-quality-factor toroidal resonance is observed experimentally. The toroidal dipole excitation is confirmed numerically and further demonstrated by phase analysis. Furthermore, the far-field radiation intensity of the excited toroidal dipoles can be adjusted to be predominant among other multipoles by just tuning the incident angle. The related processing method expands the capability of focused ion beam folding technologies greatly, especially in 3D metamaterial fabrication, showing great flexibility and nanoscale controllability on structure size, position, and orientation.

  18. High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Multiphoton Processes in Atoms and Molecules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-13

    perform photoion-photoelectron coincidence studies using a resonance lamp , is presently operated Independently of the photoelectron spectrometer. The mass...photoionization of excited states of atomic carbon. Atomic carbon in both the 3 p ground state and the 1D excited state was prepared by UV multiphoton...34 Gordon Conference on UV /Visible Multiphoton Ionization and Dissociation Processes, 12-16 July 1982 (no abstract available). 5. P. M. Dehmer, "VUV

  19. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  20. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  1. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G.; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  2. Femtosecond transient infrared and stimulated Raman spectroscopy shed light on the relaxation mechanisms of photo-excited peridinin.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Foggi, Paolo; Hiller, Roger G; Righini, Roberto

    2015-06-07

    By means of one- and two-dimensional transient infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, we investigated the excited state dynamics of peridinin, a carbonyl carotenoid occurring in natural light harvesting complexes. The presence of singly and doubly excited states, as well as of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, makes the behavior of carbonyl carotenoids in the excited state very complex. In this work, we investigated by time resolved spectroscopy the relaxation of photo-excited peridinin in solvents of different polarities and as a function of the excitation wavelength. Our experimental results show that a characteristic pattern of one- and two-dimensional infrared bands in the C=C stretching region allows monitoring the relaxation pathway. In polar solvents, moderate distortions of the molecular geometry cause a variation of the single/double carbon bond character, so that the partially ionic ICT state is largely stabilized by the solvent reorganization. After vertical photoexcitation at 400 nm of the S2 state, the off-equilibrium population moves to the S1 state with ca. 175 fs time constant; from there, in less than 5 ps, the non-Franck Condon ICT state is reached, and finally, the ground state is recovered in 70 ps. That the relevant excited state dynamics takes place far from the Franck Condon region is demonstrated by its noticeable dependence on the excitation wavelength.

  3. Live cell imaging by multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Straub, M; Lodemann, P; Holroyd, P; Jahn, R; Hell, S W

    2000-10-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) permits parallel multiphoton excitation by scanning an array of high numerical aperture foci across a plane in the sample. MMM is particularly suitable for live cell investigations since it combines advantages of standard multiphoton microscopy such as optical sectioning and suppression of out-of-focus phototoxicity with high recording speeds. Here we describe several applications of MMM to live cell imaging using the neuroendocrine cell line PC12 and bovine chromaffin cells. Stainings were performed with the acidophilic dye acridine orange and the lipophilic dyes FM1-43 and Fast DiA as well as by transfection of the cells with GFP. In both bovine chromaffin and PC12 cells structural elements of nuclear chromatin and the 3-D distribution of acidic organelles inside the cells were visualized. In PC12 cells differentiated by nerve growth factor examples of neurites were monitored. Stainings of membranes were used to reconstruct the morphology of cells and neurites in three dimensions by volume-rendering and by isosurface plots. 3-D reconstructions were composed from stacks of about 50 images each with a diameter of 30-100 microm that were acquired within a few seconds. We conclude that MMM proves to be a technically simple and very effective method for fast 3-D live cell imaging at high resolution.

  4. In vivo multiphoton nanosurgery on cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Leonardo; O'Connor, Rodney P; Jasaitis, Audrius; Masi, Alessio; Buffelli, Mario; Pavone, Francesco S

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been used to perform high spatial resolution imaging of spine plasticity in the intact neocortex of living mice. Multiphoton absorption has also been used as a tool for the selective disruption of cellular structures in living cells and simple organisms. In this work, we exploit the spatial localization of multiphoton excitation to perform selective lesions on the neuronal processes of cortical neurons in living mice expressing fluorescent proteins. Neurons are irradiated with a focused, controlled dose of femtosecond laser energy delivered through cranial optical windows. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-D two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. This methodology is applied to dissect single dendrites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. The spatial precision of this method is demonstrated by ablating individual dendritic spines, while sparing the adjacent spines and the structural integrity of the dendrite. The combination of multiphoton nanosurgery and in vivo imaging in mammals represents a promising tool for neurobiology and neuropharmacology research.

  5. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  6. Assessment of Excitation Mechanisms and Temporal Dependencies of Infrared Radiation from Vibrationally Excited Carbon Monoxide and Ozone in EXCEDE Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    2.2.2 Dissociative Excitation of Carbon Dioxide .. ..... .. 15 2.2.3 Vibrational Exchange with N2(v). .... ....... .. 18 2.2.4 Quenching of Metastable...Excitation of Carbon Dioxide As shown in Figures 1-2 and 2-2 the ambient CO2 concentration exceeds that of CO by about a factor of 3 at 100 kin, equals the...ASSESSEMENT OF EXCITATION MECHANSIMS AND TEMPORAL DEPENDENCIES OF INFRAREO RADIATION FROM VIBbRATIONALLY EXCITEO CARBON MONOXIDE AND OZONE IN EXCEDE

  7. Design and commissioning of a directly coupled in-vivo multiphoton microscope for skin imaging in humans and large animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, William J.; Kendall, Mark A.

    2004-02-01

    The application of near infrared multiphoton excitation to the laser-scanning microscope was first conceived by Denk, Strickler and Webb in 1990. Since then, advances in design have seen the multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) applied to a wide range of biological research areas, including skin imaging and vaccine delivery. The technique has the attributes of low phototoxicity, high-resolution functional imaging to depths in scattered tissues. These characteristics have encouraged engineers and scientists to develop in-vivo imaging systems. For these applications, laser excitation pulses can be delivered to the sample through optical fibers. Although this solution provides a number of advantages relating to movement and flexibility of the site of interest relative to the laser source, the peak powers that can be delivered down the fiber are limited. We report on the design and commissioning of a directly coupled in-vivo MPM system, optimised for the imaging of epidermal vaccines delivered to a range of biological models and humans. Specifically, we seek to apply the system to visualise in-vivo, the influence of hand-held, helium powered needle-free systems on skin cells. A standard Nikon E600FN microscope, dissected above the optical plane was cantilevered from a vibration isolated table using rigid support arms. The modified microscope was coupled to an infrared optimised Bio-Rad Radiance 2100MP, multiphoton dedicated laser scanning control and image acquisition system. Femtosecond laser pulses were provided by a 10W Verdi pumped Mira Ti:Sapphire laser, from Coherent Inc. The microscope was modified such that the transmission half may be selectively attached for conventional imaging with ex-vivo and cell culture samples, or removed for in-vivo imaging of skin sites on the body of humans and large animals. Optical performance of the system, and aspects of its design and commissioning are discussed in this paper.

  8. Detection of an infrared near-field optical signal by attaching an infrared-excitable phosphor to the end of a photocantilever.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Fukuzawa, K; Ohwaki, J

    1999-01-01

    To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of near-field scanning optical microscopy, we propose attaching an infrared-excitable phosphor (IEP) to a photocantilever. One source of noise is the light scattered from locations on the sample surface other than that of the probe tip. By detecting only the light scattered from the tip, we can obtain a near-field optical signal without noise. We attached an IEP particle to a photocantilever to convert infrared light to visible light and we used 1550-nm infrared illumination, so the light scattered from the sample was only infrared. The silicon photodiode of the photocantilever is 10(6) times less sensitive to infrared light than to visible light. As a result, only the converted visible light from the IEP particle, i.e. the signal containing the near-field optical information from the tip, was detected. We verified that the photocantilever detected the signal in the evanescent light produced by infrared illumination and that the detected signal was the light converted by the IEP. The experimental results show the feasibility of detecting infrared light and not the background light through the use of the IEP.

  9. H{sub 2} EJECTION FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: INFRARED MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION STUDY OF PROTONATED ACENAPHTHENE AND 9,10-DIHYDROPHENANTHRENE

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin T.; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-20

    The infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of protonated acenaphthene ([ACN+H]{sup +}) and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene ([DHP+H]{sup +}) have been recorded using an infrared free electron laser after the compounds were protonated by electrospray ionization and trapped in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. In both compounds, the loss of two mass units is predominant. Density functional calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) of the infrared spectra of all possible protonated isomers of each species showed that the observed IRMPD spectra are best fit to the isomer with the largest proton affinity and lowest relative electronic energy. Potential energy surfaces of the most stable isomers of [ACN+H]{sup +} and [DHP+H]{sup +} have been calculated for H and H{sub 2} loss. The lowest energy barriers are for loss of H{sub 2}, with predicted energies 4.28 and 4.15 eV, respectively. After H{sub 2} ejection, the adjacent aliphatic hydrogens migrate to the bare ejection site and stabilize the remaining fragment. Single H loss may occur from [ACN+H]{sup +} but the energy required is higher. No single H loss is predicted from [DHP+H]{sup +}, only H migration around the carbon skeleton. The vibrational bands in the parent closed-shell protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are compared to bands observed from the interstellar medium.

  10. Multiphoton FLIM: a reliable FRET detection tool in cell biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Ramanujan V.; Biener, Eva; Centonze, Victoria E.; Gertler, Arieh; Herman, Brian A.

    2004-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using multiphoton excitation is emerging as a reliable quantitative tool for measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in living cells. By virtue of being free from spectroscopic artifacts encountered in conventional FRET detection methods, multiphoton FLIM methods offer the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, faster data acquisition and data analysis. We compare the FRET results obtained by two different methods namely (i) multiphoton excitation lifetime-based FRET and (ii) single photon excitation intensity-based acceptor photobleaching FRET. Using the same biological samples, we apply these two different methods in understanding the growth hormone receptor dimerization kinetics at the cell surface of human embryonic kidney cells. We conclude that the multiphoton FLIM using the streak-camera approach provides the best ability to monitor FRET in dynamic situations where high temporal and spatial resolution are required with minimal photodamage/phototoxicity.

  11. Excitation Mechanisms of Near-Infrared Emission Lines in LINER Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehle, Anna

    2017-01-01

    I will present high spatial resolution, integral field spectroscopic observations of the nearby LINER (low ionization nuclear emission line region) galaxy NGC 404. LINERs are found at the centers of ~1/3 of galaxies within 40 Mpc, but their physical nature is not well understood. Although NGC 404 is thought to host a intermediate mass black hole at its center, it is unclear whether accretion onto the black hole or another mechanism such as shock excitation drives its LINER emission. We use the OSIRIS near-infrared integral field spectrograph at Keck Observatory behind laser guide star adaptive optics to map the strength and kinematics of [FeII], H2, and hydrogen recombination lines in the nucleus of NGC 404. These observations have a spatial pixel sampling of 0.5 pc and span the central 30 pc of the galaxy. We find that the ionized and molecular gas show differences in their morphology and kinematics on parsec scales. In particular, there are regions with line ratios of [FeII]/Pa-β that are much higher than previously seen in spatially integrated spectra, significantly restricting the possible excitation mechanisms of the near-infrared emission lines in this source. We are also applying these analysis techniques to 10 additional nearby LINERs, a part of a larger sample of 14 sources, to understand what drives the emission lines in these active galaxies. As a part of this program, I worked on the upgrade of the detector in the OSIRIS spectrograph, which has allowed observations for this survey obtained since January 2016 to be taken with increased instrument sensitivity of a factor of ~2 at J-band wavelengths (1.2 - 1.4 microns) and ~1.6 at H- and K-band wavelengths (1.5 - 2.4 microns). I will present results from the LINER survey, the OSIRIS detector upgrade, and also touch on related work using stellar orbits around the Milky Way supermassive black hole Sgr A* to constrain the mass and distance to our own Galactic Center.

  12. A novel flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph for early melanoma detection, skin analysis, testing of anti-age products, and in situ nanoparticle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution 3D microscopy based on multiphoton induced autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been introduced in 1990. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have first been launched by JenLab company with the tomography DermaInspect®. This year, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel multiphoton tomograph MPTflex, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. Improved image quality and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are achieved by a very short source-drain spacing, by larger active areas of the detectors and by single photon counting (SPC) technology. Shorter image acquisition time due to improved image quality reduces artifacts and simplifies the operation of the system. The compact folded optical design and the light-weight structure of the optical head eases the handling. Dual channel detectors enable to distinguish between intratissue elastic fibers and collagenous structures simultaneously. Through the use of piezo-driven optics a stack of optical cross-sections (optical sectioning) can be acquired and 3D imaging can be performed. The multiphoton excitation of biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin is done by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key femtosescond near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid high-quality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research.

  13. Identification of glucosinolates in capers by LC-ESI-hybrid linear ion trap with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-LTQ-FTICR MS) and infrared multiphoton dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Lelario, Filomena; Battista, Fabio Giuseppe; Bufo, Sabino A; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2012-09-01

    An liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method using electrospray ionization in negative ion mode coupled with a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was applied to characterize of intact glucosinolates (GLSs) in crude sample extracts of wild bud flowers of Capparis spinosa (Capparis species, family Capparaceae). Structural information of GLSs was obtained upon precursor ions' isolation within the FTICR trapping cell and subsequent fragmentation induced by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD). Such a fragmentation was found very useful in terms of chemical identification of all precursor ions [M-H](-) including sulfur-rich GLSs reported here for the first time. Along with most common GLSs already found in capers such as glucocapparin, isopropyl/n-propyl-GLS, mercapto-glucocapparin, and two indolic GLS, i.e., 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin and glucobrassicin, the occurrence of the uncommon glycinyl-glucocapparin as well as two sulfur-rich GLSs is reported. IRMPD showed an increased selectivity towards disulfide bond cleavages with thiol migration, suggesting the side chain structure of non-targeted compounds, i.e., disulfanyl-glucocapparin and trisulfanyl-glucocapparin. Glucocapparin [2.05 ± 0.25 mg/g, dry weight (dw)] was the most abundant GLS, followed by glucobrassicin (232 ± 18 µg/g, dw) and 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin (89 ± 12 µg/g, dw). All other compounds were present at very low content ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µg/g dw.

  14. Infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy of a gas-phase complex of uranyl and 3-oxa-glutaramide: an extreme red-shift of the [O═U═O](2+) asymmetric stretch.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Hu, Han-Shi; Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Li, Jun

    2015-04-09

    The gas-phase complex UO2(TMOGA)2(2+) (TMOGA = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide) prepared by electrospray ionization was characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The IRMPD spectrum from 700-1800 cm(-1) was interpreted using a computational study based on density functional theory. The predicted vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the measured values, with an average deviation of only 8 cm(-1) (<1%) and a maximum deviation of 21 cm(-1) (<2%). The only IR peak assigned to the linear uranyl moiety was the asymmetric ν3 mode, which appeared at 965 cm(-1) and was predicted by DFT as 953 cm(-1). This ν3 frequency is red-shifted relative to bare uranyl, UO2(2+), by ca. 150 cm(-1) due to electron donation from the TMOGA ligands. Based on the degree of red-shifting, it is inferred that two TMOGA oxygen-donor ligands have a greater effective gas basicity than the four monodentate acetone ligands in UO2(acetone)4(2+). The uranyl ν3 frequency was also computed for uranyl coordinated by two TMGA ligands, in which the central Oether of TMOGA has been replaced by CH2. The computed ν3 for UO2(TMGA)2(2+), 950 cm(-1), is essentially the same as that for UO2(TMOGA)2(2+), suggesting that electron donation to uranyl from the Oether of TMOGA is minor. The computed ν3 asymmetric stretching frequencies for the three actinyl complexes, UO2(TMOGA)2(2+), NpO2(TMOGA)2(2+) and PuO2(TMOGA)2(2+), are comparable. This similarity is discussed in the context of the relationship between ν3 and intrinsic actinide-oxygen bond energies in actinyl complexes.

  15. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy of a Gas-Phase Complex of Uranyl and 3-Oxa-Glutaramide: An Extreme Red-Shift of the [O=U=O]²⁺ Asymmetric Stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Hu, Hanshi; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Li, Jun

    2015-04-09

    The gas-phase complex UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ (TMOGA = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide) prepared by electrospray ionization was characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The IRMPD spectrum from 700–1800 cm⁻¹ was interpreted using a computational study based on density functional theory. The predicted vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the measured values, with an average deviation of only 8 cm⁻¹ (<1%) and a maximum deviation of 21 cm⁻¹ (<2%). The only IR peak assigned to the linear uranyl moiety was the asymmetric ν₃ mode, which appeared at 965 cm⁻¹ and was predicted by DFT as 953 cm⁻¹. This ν₃ frequency is red-shifted relative to bare uranyl, UO₂²⁺, by ca. 150 cm⁻¹ due to electron donation from the TMOGA ligands. Based on the degree of red-shifting, it is inferred that two TMOGA oxygen-donor ligands have a greater effective gas basicity than the four monodentate acetone ligands in UO₂(acetone)₄²⁺. The uranyl ν₃ frequency was also computed for uranyl coordinated by two TMGA ligands, in which the central Oether of TMOGA has been replaced by CH₂. The computed ν₃ for UO₂(TMGA)₂²⁺, 950 cm⁻¹, is essentially the same as that for UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, suggesting that electron donation to uranyl from the Oether of TMOGA is minor. The computed ν₃ asymmetric stretching frequencies for the three actinyl complexes, UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, NpO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ and PuO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, are comparable. This similarity is discussed in the context of the relationship between ν₃ and intrinsic actinide-oxygen bond energies in actinyl complexes.

  16. Highly emitting near-infrared lanthanide "encapsulated sandwich" metallacrown complexes with excitation shifted toward lower energy.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Evan R; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Jankolovits, Joseph; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Petoud, Stéphane; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2014-01-29

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent lanthanide complexes hold great promise for practical applications, as their optical properties have several complementary advantages over organic fluorophores and semiconductor nanoparticles. The fundamental challenge for lanthanide luminescence is their sensitization through suitable chromophores. The use of the metallacrown (MC) motif is an innovative strategy to arrange several organic sensitizers at a well-controlled distance from a lanthanide cation. Herein we report a series of lanthanide “encapsulated sandwich” MC complexes of the form Ln3+ [12-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-4]2[24-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-8] (Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)]) in which the MC framework is formed by the self-assembly of Zn2+ ions and tetradentate chromophoric ligands based on quinaldichydroxamic acid (quinHA). A first-generation of luminescent MCs was presented previously but was limited due to excitation wavelengths in the UV. We report here that through the design of the chromophore of the MC assembly, we have significantly shifted the absorption wavelength toward lower energy (450 nm). In addition to this near-visible inter- and/or intraligand charge transfer absorption, Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)] exhibits remarkably high quantum yields, long luminescence lifetimes (CD3OD; Yb3+, QLn(L) = 2.88(2)%, τobs = 150.7(2) μs; Nd3+, QLn(L) = 1.35(1)%, τobs = 4.11(3) μs; Er3+, QLn(L) = 3.60(6)·10–2%, τobs = 11.40(3) μs), and excellent photostability. Quantum yields of Nd3+ and Er3+ MCs in the solid state and in deuterated solvents, upon excitation at low energy, are the highest values among NIR-emitting lanthanide complexes containing C–H bonds. The versatility of the MC strategy allows modifications in the excitation wavelength and absorptivity through the appropriate design of the ligand sensitizer, providing a highly efficient platform with tunable properties.

  17. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  18. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications.

  19. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  20. Laser induced white emission generated by infrared excitation from Eu3+:Sr2CeO4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanski, M.; Lukaszewicz, M.; Hreniak, D.; Strek, W.

    2017-03-01

    The laser induced white emission (LIWE) was observed from Eu3+:Sr2CeO4 nanocrystals. The samples were obtained in form of powders by the modified sol-gel route. The structure and morphology of the phosphors were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope techniques. The intense LIWE occurred under reduced pressure and focused beam of near infrared laser excitation. The power and pressure dependencies exhibit evident threshold character typical for the avalanche effect. The photoconductivity of the Eu3+:Sr2CeO4 nanocrystals measured as a function of different powers of excitation source was analyzed.

  1. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  2. Intensity dependence of multiphoton dissociation in formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reports a new intensity-dependent measurement of multiple-photon dissociation (MPD) in H2CO, HDCO, and D2CO gases using an intense pulsed CO2 TEA laser. In this measurement the energy and duration of the laser pulses are constant, and the intensity is varied by irradiating the sample with concave mirrors of different focal lengths. A model calculation is used to analyze and fit the MPD data of HDCO and D2CO which assumes that dissociation is obtained by a repeated mechanism in which coherent multiphoton excitation (CME) of the molecule to high vibration-rotation states is followed by intramolecular transfer of the excitation energy (ITEE) to the other molecule modes. It is concluded that the results are consistent with the absorption of 14 plus or minus 4 and 17 plus or minus 5 photons per molecule of HDCO and D2CO, respectively.

  3. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses.

  4. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  5. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  6. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  7. THz and infrared excitation spectrum below the Jahn-Teller transition in Sr3Cr2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Schmidt, Michael; Günther, Axel; Schaile, Sebastian; Pascher, Nikola; Mayr, Franz; Goncharov, Yurii; Krug von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht; Loidl, Alois; Quintero-Castro, Diana; Islam, A. T. M. N.; Lake, Bella; Deisenhofer, Joachim

    2012-02-01

    We report on optical excitations observed recently in Sr3Cr2O8 by THz and infrared spectroscopy. Low-energy excitations below 3 THz are detected by THz time domain spectroscopy. These excitations can be divided into two different classes according to the temperature-dependent properties. One is emergent right below the Jahn-Teller transition temperature, which is determined by specific heat measurement to occur at 285 K [1, 2]. The other appears only below 100 K, where the fluctuations are sufficiently suppressed, consistent with the temperature dependence of low-energy Raman modes [3]. Infrared transmission measurements reveal a broad crystal-field excitation, which can be associated with an electronic transition from E to T2 orbital states. [4pt] [1] Zhe Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 201102 (2011) [0pt] [2] D. L. Quintero-Castro et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 014415 (2010) [0pt] [3] D. Wulferding et al., Phys. Rev. B 84, 064419 (2011)

  8. Influence of Vacuum Cooling on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infiltration in Fresh Leafy Greens via a Multiphoton-Imaging Approach.

    PubMed

    Vonasek, Erica; Nitin, Nitin

    2015-10-16

    Microbial pathogen infiltration in fresh leafy greens is a significant food safety risk factor. In various postharvest operations, vacuum cooling is a critical process for maintaining the quality of fresh produce. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of vacuum cooling-induced infiltration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into lettuce using multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton imaging was chosen as the method to locate E. coli O157:H7 within an intact lettuce leaf due to its high spatial resolution, low background fluorescence, and near-infrared (NIR) excitation source compared to those of conventional confocal microscopy. The variables vacuum cooling, surface moisture, and leaf side were evaluated in a three-way factorial study with E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce. A total of 188 image stacks were collected. The images were analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 association with stomata and E. coli O157:H7 infiltration. The quantitative imaging data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that the low-moisture condition led to an increased risk of microbial association with stomata (P < 0.05). Additionally, the interaction between vacuum cooling levels and moisture levels led to an increased risk of infiltration (P < 0.05). This study also demonstrates the potential of multiphoton imaging for improving sensitivity and resolution of imaging-based measurements of microbial interactions with intact leaf structures, including infiltration.

  9. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  10. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  11. Long-Wavelength Infrared Surface Plasmons on Ga-Doped ZnO Films Excited via 2D Hole Arrays for Extraordinary Optical Transmission (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    wavelength infrared regime. EOT is facilitated by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and can be tuned utilizing the physical...facilitated by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and can be tuned utilizing the physical structure size such as period. Pulse laser deposited...plasmonics, infrared, EOT, doped zinc oxides. 1. INTRODUCTION Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are a means of real-time, label-free biosensing

  12. Development and characterization of non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) for brain tumor margining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir

    During tumor removal surgery, due to the problems associated with obtaining high-resolution, real-time chemical images of where exactly the tumor ends and healthy tissue begins (tumor margining), it is often necessary to remove a much larger volume of tissue than the tumor itself. In the case of brain tumor surgery, however, it is extremely unsafe to remove excess tissue. Therefore, without an accurate image of the tumor margins, some of the tumor's finger-like projections are inevitably left behind in the surrounding parenchyma to grow again. For this reason, the development of techniques capable of providing high-resolution real-time images of tumor margins up to centimeters below the surface of a tissue is ideal for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors, as well as surgical guidance during brain tumor excision. A novel spectroscopic technique, non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), is being developed with the capabilities of obtaining high-resolution subsurface chemical-based images of underlying tumors. This novel technique combines the strengths of multiphoton tissue spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy into a diagnostic methodology that will, ultimately, provide unparalleled chemical information and images to provide the state of sub-surface tissues. The NMPPAS technique employs near-infrared light (in the diagnostic window) to excite ultraviolet and/or visible light absorbing species deep below the tissue's surface. Once a multiphoton absorption event occurs, non-radiative relaxation processes generates a localized thermal expansion and subsequent acoustic wave that can be detected using a piezoelectric transducer. Since NMPPAS employs an acoustic detection modality, much deeper diagnoses can be performed than that is possible using current state of the art high-resolution chemical imaging techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy. NMPPAS was employed to differentiate between excised brain tumors (astrocytoma III

  13. Mid-infrared laser-driven broadband water-window supercontinuum generation from pre-excited medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Hong, Weiyi; Zhang, Qingbin; Wang, Shaoyi; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-11-21

    We theoretically investigate the broadband water-window supercontinuum generation from pre-excited medium with a mid-infrared pulse. We find that the wavelength scaling of the harmonic yield from near-visible (0.8 μm) to mid-infrared (1.8 μm) in single-atom level is λ(-2.7). Using an intense phase-stabilized few-cycle 1.6 μm laser pulse, a broadband water window supercontinuum with bandwidth of approximately 140 eV is obtained. We also investigate the macroscopic effects and find that large initial population of the excited state leads to the high-density of free electrons, which shift the carrier-envelop phase of the driving pulse and further diminish the water-window supercontinuum generation. The highly-ionized medium also results in poor temporal and spatial properties of the attosecond pulse. Instead, small initial population of the excited state can produce well phase-matched xuv supercontinuum in water-window region and an 100-as pulse with central wavelength of 2.8 nm and pulse energy of 0.15 nJ can be filtered out.

  14. Multi-Photon Micro-Spectroscopy of Biological Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro-spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Mesophyll protoplasts of...Micro-spectroscopy, multi-photon fluorescence spectroscopy, second harmonic generation, plant tissues, stem, chloroplast, protoplast , maize, Arabidopsis...noise may be greatly reduced due to the naturally limited excitation volume of the focused laser beam. In this study, leaf protoplasts of Arabidopsis

  15. Quantitative determination of maximal imaging depth in all-NIR multiphoton microscopy images of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Akers, Walter J.; Sudlow, Gail P.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-02-01

    We report two methods for quantitatively determining maximal imaging depth from thick tissue images captured using all-near-infrared (NIR) multiphoton microscopy (MPM). All-NIR MPM is performed using 1550 nm laser excitation with NIR detection. This method enables imaging more than five-fold deep in thick tissues in comparison with other NIR excitation microscopy methods. In this study, we show a correlation between the multiphoton signal along the depth of tissue samples and the shape of the corresponding empirical probability density function (pdf) of the photon counts. Histograms from this analysis become increasingly symmetric with the imaging depth. This distribution transitions toward the background distribution at higher imaging depths. Inspired by these observations, we propose two independent methods based on which one can automatically determine maximal imaging depth in the all-NIR MPM images of thick tissues. At this point, the signal strength is expected to be weak and similar to the background. The first method suggests the maximal imaging depth corresponds to the deepest image plane where the ratio between the mean and median of the empirical photon-count pdf is outside the vicinity of 1. The second method suggests the maximal imaging depth corresponds to the deepest image plane where the squared distance between the empirical photon-count mean obtained from the object and the mean obtained from the background is greater than a threshold. We demonstrate the application of these methods in all-NIR MPM images of mouse kidney tissues to study maximal depth penetration in such tissues.

  16. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  17. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  18. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  19. The excitation of near-infrared H2 emission in NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Israel, F. P.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Because of its large angular size and proximity to the Milky Way, NGC 253, an archetypal starburst galaxy, provides an excellent laboratory to study the intricacies of this intense episode of star formation. Aims: We aim to characterize the excitation mechanisms driving the emission in NGC 253. Specifically we aim to distinguish between shock excitation and ultraviolet (UV) excitation as the dominant driving mechanism, using Brγ, H2 and [FeII] as diagnostic emission line tracers. Methods: Using SINFONI observations, we create linemaps of Brγ, [FeII]1.64, and all detected H2 transitions. By using symmetry arguments of the gas and stellar gas velocity field, we find a kinematic center in agreement with previous determinations. The ratio of the 2-1 S(1) to 1-0 S(1) H2 transitions can be used as a diagnostic to discriminate between shock and fluorescent excitation. Results: Using the 1-0 S(1)/2-1 S(1) line ratio as well as several other H2 line ratios and the morphological comparison between H2 and Brγ and [FeII], we find that excitation from UV photons is the dominant excitation mechanisms throughout NGC 253. We employ a diagnostic energy level diagram to quantitatively differentiate between mechanisms. We compare the observed energy level diagrams to photon-dominated region (PDR) and shock models and find that in most regions and over the galaxy as a whole, fluorescent excitation is the dominant mechanism exciting the H2 gas. We also place an upper limit of the percentage of shock excited H2 at 29%. Conclusions: We find that UV radiation is the dominant excitation mechanism for the H2 emission. The H2 emission does not correlate well with Brγ but closely traces the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, showing that not only is H2 fluorescently excited, but it is predominately excited by slightly lower mass stars than O stars which excite Brγ, such as B stars. Reduced datacubes and extracted images for each line are only available at the CDS via

  20. Advances in renal (patho)physiology using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sipos, A; Toma, I; Kang, J J; Rosivall, L; Peti-Peterdi, J

    2007-11-01

    Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy is a state-of-the-art confocal imaging technique ideal for deep optical sectioning of living tissues. It is capable of performing ultrasensitive, quantitative imaging of organ functions in health and disease with high spatial and temporal resolution which other imaging modalities cannot achieve. For more than a decade, multiphoton microscopy has been successfully used with various in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches to study many functions of different organs, including the kidney. This study focuses on recent advances in our knowledge of renal (patho)physiological processes made possible by the use of this imaging technology. Visualization of cellular variables like cytosolic calcium, pH, cell-to-cell communication and signal propagation, interstitial fluid flow in the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), real-time imaging of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), and renin release mechanisms are reviewed. A brief summary is provided of kidney functions that can be measured by in vivo quantitative multiphoton imaging including glomerular filtration and permeability, concentration, dilution, and activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system using this minimally invasive approach. New visual data challenge a number of existing paradigms in renal (patho)physiology. Also, quantitative imaging of kidney function with multiphoton microscopy has tremendous potential to eventually provide novel non-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic tools for future applications in clinical nephrology.

  1. Ultralow-power near-infrared excited neodymium-doped nanoparticles for long-term in vivo bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qing-Song; Zhang, Pei-Zhi; Sun, Ling-Dong; Shi, Shuo; Chen, Nai-Xiu; Dong, Hao; Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Li, Le-Min; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2017-03-27

    Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanoparticles with both emission and excitation in the near-infrared (NIR-to-NIR) region hold great promise for bioimaging. Herein, core@shell structured LiLuF4:Nd@LiLuF4 (named as Nd@Lu) nanoparticles (NPs) with highly efficient NIR emission were developed for high-performance in vivo bioimaging. Strikingly, the absolute quantum yield of Nd@Lu NPs reached as high as 32%. After coating with polyethylene glycol (PEG), the water-dispersible Nd@Lu NPs showed good bio-compatibility and low toxicity. With efficient NIR emission, the Nd@Lu NPs were clearly detectable in tissues at depths of up to 20 mm. In addition, long-term in vivo biodistribution with a high signal-to-noise ratio of 25.1 was distinctly tracked upon an ultralow-power-density excitation (10 mW cm(-2)) of 732 nm for the first time.

  2. Improving signal levels in intravital multiphoton microscopy using an objective correction collar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriello, Pamela A.; Dunn, Kenneth W.

    2008-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled biologists to collect high-resolution images hundreds of microns into biological tissues, including tissues of living animals. While the depth of imaging exceeds that possible from any other form of light microscopy, multiphoton microscopy is nonetheless generally limited to depths of less than a millimeter. Many of the advantages of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging accrue from the unique nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation. However, the quadratic relationship between illumination level and fluorescence excitation makes multiphoton microscopy especially susceptible to factors that degrade the illumination focus. Here we examine the effect of spherical aberration on multiphoton microscopy in fixed kidney tissues and in the kidneys of living animals. We find that spherical aberration, as evaluated from axial asymmetry in the point-spread function, can be corrected by adjustment of the correction collar of a water immersion objective lens. Introducing a compensatory positive spherical aberration into the imaging system decreases the depth-dependence of signal levels in images collected from living animals, increasing signal by up to 50%.

  3. High-throughput multiphoton-induced three-dimensional ablation and imaging for biotissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Pei-Kao; Cheng, Li-Chung; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a temporal focusing-based high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation system with axially-resolved widefield multiphoton excitation has been successfully applied to rapidly disrupt biotissues. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique features high efficiency for achieving large-area laser ablation without causing serious photothermal damage in non-ablated regions. Furthermore, the rate of tissue processing can reach around 1.6 × 10(6) μm(3)/s in chicken tendon. Moreover, the temporal focusing-based multiphoton system can be efficiently utilized in optical imaging through iterating high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation machining followed by widefield optical sectioning; hence, it has the potential to obtain molecular images for a whole bio-specimen.

  4. High-throughput multiphoton-induced three-dimensional ablation and imaging for biotissues

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Pei-Kao; Cheng, Li-Chung; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a temporal focusing-based high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation system with axially-resolved widefield multiphoton excitation has been successfully applied to rapidly disrupt biotissues. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique features high efficiency for achieving large-area laser ablation without causing serious photothermal damage in non-ablated regions. Furthermore, the rate of tissue processing can reach around 1.6 × 106 μm3/s in chicken tendon. Moreover, the temporal focusing-based multiphoton system can be efficiently utilized in optical imaging through iterating high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation machining followed by widefield optical sectioning; hence, it has the potential to obtain molecular images for a whole bio-specimen. PMID:25780739

  5. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  6. Invited review article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N; Sheetz, Kraig E; Field, Jeffrey J; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences.

  7. Near-infrared emitting ytterbium metal-organic frameworks with tunable excitation properties.

    PubMed

    White, Kiley A; Chengelis, Demetra A; Zeller, Matthias; Geib, Steven J; Szakos, Jessica; Petoud, Stéphane; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2009-08-14

    The design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) incorporating near-infrared emitting ytterbium cations and organic sensitizers allows for the preparation of new materials with tunable and enhanced photophysical properties.

  8. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  9. Multiphoton nanosurgery in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Anhut, Tiemo; Stracke, Frank; Le Harzic, Ronan; Koenig, Karsten

    2005-04-01

    Multiphoton Microscopy with a femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser in the near infrared (NIR) enables the user not only to image cells and tissues with a subcellular resolution but also to perform highly precise nanosurgery. Intratissue compartments, single cells and even cell organelles like mitochondria, membranes or chromosomes can be manipulated and optically knocked out. Working at transient TW/cm2 laser intensities, single cells of tumor-sphaeroids were eliminated efficiently inside the sphaeroid without damaging the neighbour cells. Also single organelles of cells inside tissues could be optically knocked out with the nanoscalpel without collateral damage. Tissue structures inside a human tooth have been ablated with sizes below 1 μm. This method may become a useful instrument for nano-manipulating and surgery in several fields of science, including targeted transfection.

  10. Ultrafast pulse-pair control in multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    De, Arijit Kumar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    In multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy, ultrafast laser pulses [i.e., light pulses having pulse width multiphoton absorption cross-sections of common fluorophores. Because of the broad overlapping two-photon absorption spectra of fluorophores and the large spectral bandwidth of a short pulse, simultaneous excitation of many fluorophores is common, which justifies a persistent demand for selective excitation of individual fluorophores. We describe the use of pulse-pair excitation with possibilities of controlling molecular fluorescence in laser-scanning microscopy and compare it with coherent control using pulse sequence [De and Goswami, "Coherent control in multiphoton fluorescence imaging," Proc. SPIE 7183, 71832B (2009)].

  11. Rapid mesoscale multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope designed for mesoscale imaging of human skin. The system is based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation, and images areas of ~0.8x0.8 mm2 at speeds of 0.8 fps (800x800 pixels; 12 frame averages) for high signal-to-noise ratio, with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5µm and 3.3µm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, optimized relay optics, a beam expander and high NA objective lens. Computed aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide areas in normal human skin. PMID:27895980

  12. Ultrafast, large-field multiphoton microscopy based on an acousto-optic deflector and a spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Qin, Wan; Liu, Honghai; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2013-01-01

    We present an ultrafast, large-field multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscope with high lateral and axial resolutions based on a two-dimensional (2-D) acousto-optical deflector (AOD) scanner and spatial light modulator (SLM). When a phase-only SLM is used to shape the near-infrared light from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser into a multifocus array including the 0-order beam, a 136 μm × 136 μm field of view is achieved with a 60× objective using a 2-D AOD scanner without any mechanical scan element. The two-photon fluorescence image of a neuronal network that was obtained using this system demonstrates that our microscopy permits observation of dynamic biological events in a large field with high-temporal and -spatial resolution. PMID:22743445

  13. Ultrafast, large-field multiphoton microscopy based on an acousto-optic deflector and a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yonghong; Qin, Wan; Liu, Honghai; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-07-01

    We present an ultrafast, large-field multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscope with high lateral and axial resolutions based on a two-dimensional (2-D) acousto-optical deflector (AOD) scanner and spatial light modulator (SLM). When a phase-only SLM is used to shape the near-infrared light from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser into a multifocus array including the 0-order beam, a 136 μm × 136 μm field of view is achieved with a 60× objective using a 2-D AOD scanner without any mechanical scan element. The two-photon fluorescence image of a neuronal network that was obtained using this system demonstrates that our microscopy permits observation of dynamic biological events in a large field with high-temporal and -spatial resolution.

  14. Origin of the low frequency radiation emitted by radiative polaritons excited by infrared radiation in planar La2O3 films.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Anita J; Schwab, Yosyp; Mann, Harkirat S; Francoeur, Mathieu; Hammonds, James S; Scarel, Giovanna

    2013-01-23

    Upon excitation in thin oxide films by infrared radiation, radiative polaritons are formed with complex angular frequency ω, according to the theory of Kliewer and Fuchs (1966 Phys. Rev. 150 573). We show that radiative polaritons leak radiation with frequency ω(i) to the space surrounding the oxide film. The frequency ω(i) is the imaginary part of ω. The effects of the presence of the radiation leaked out at frequency ω(i) are observed experimentally and numerically in the infrared spectra of La(2)O(3) films on silicon upon excitation by infrared radiation of the 0TH type radiative polariton. The frequency ω(i) is found in the microwave to far infrared region, and depends on the oxide film chemistry and thickness. The presented results might aid in the interpretation of fine structures in infrared and, possibly, optical spectra, and suggest the study of other similar potential sources of electromagnetic radiation in different physical scenarios.

  15. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  16. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  17. Excitation of Molecular Hydrogen in the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region from a Deep Near-infrared IGRINS Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle F.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Oh, Heeyoung; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Pavel, Michael D.; Lee, Sungho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Chan; Sok Oh, Jae; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2017-04-01

    We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R∼ {{45,000}}) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45–2.45 μm), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them excellent probes of the excitation mechanisms of H2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50{--}250 K, {n}H={10}5{--}{10}7 cm‑3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250{--}1000 K, {n}H={10}4{--}{10}5 cm‑3). We fit a grid of constant temperature and density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600–650 K and the density to {n}H=2.5× {10}3{--}{10}4 cm‑3. The best-fit model gives T = 625 K and {n}H=5× {10}3 cm‑3. This well-constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar’s lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.

  18. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones.

  19. Infrared/ultraviolet quadruple resonance spectroscopy to investigate structures of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, M.; Bartl, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2012-03-21

    Molecular beam investigations in combination with IR/UV spectroscopy offer the possibility to obtain structural information on isolated molecules and clusters. One of the demanding tasks is the discrimination of different isomers, e.g., by the use of isomer specific UV excitations. If this discrimination fails due to overlaying UV spectra of different isomers, IR/IR methods offer another possibility. Here, we present a new IR/UV/IR/UV quadruple resonance technique to distinguish between different isomers especially in the electronically excited state. Due to the IR spectra, structural changes and photochemical pathways in excited states can be assigned and identified. The method is applied to the dihydrated cluster of 3-hydroxyflavone which has been investigated as photochemically relevant system and proton wire model in the S{sub 1} state. By applying the new IR/UV/IR/UV technique, we are able to show experimentally that both in the electronic ground (S{sub 0}) and the electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) two isomers have to be assigned.

  20. A simple model of multiphoton micromachining in silk hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Alonzo, Carlo; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution three-dimensional voids can be directly written into transparent silk fibroin hydrogels using ultrashort pulses of near-infrared (NIR) light. Here, we propose a simple finite-element model that can be used to predict the size and shape of individual features under various exposure conditions. We compare predicted and measured feature volumes for a wide range of parameters and use the model to determine optimum conditions for maximum material removal. The simplicity of the model implies that the mechanism of multiphoton induced void creation in silk is due to direct absorption of light energy rather than diffusion of heat or other photoproducts, and confirms that multiphoton absorption of NIR light in silk is purely a 3-photon process.

  1. Nanoscale hydroxyl radical generation from multiphoton ionization of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Bisby, Roger H; Crisostomo, Ana G; Botchway, Stanley W; Parker, Anthony W

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of solutions containing both tryptophan and hydrogen peroxide to a pulsed ( approximately 180 fs) laser beam at 750 nm induces luminescence characteristic of 5-hydroxytryptophan. The results indicate that 3-photon excitation of tryptophan results in photoionization within the focal volume of the laser beam. The resulting hydrated electron is scavenged by hydrogen peroxide to produce the hydroxyl radical. The latter subsequently reacts with tryptophan to form 5-hydroxytryptophan. The involvement of hydroxyl radicals is confirmed by the use of ethanol and nitrous oxide as scavengers and their effects on the fluorescence yield in this system. It is postulated that such multiphoton ionization of tryptophanyl residues in cellular proteins may contribute to the photodamage observed during imaging of cells and tissues using multiphoton microscopy.

  2. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from noncancerous lung tissues. Specifically, noncancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure, while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55+/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15, respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13, respectively. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from noncancerous tissues.

  3. The layered resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Jiang, Xingshan; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Rong; Cao, Ning; Zou, Qilian; Xiong, Shuyuan

    2007-08-01

    The layered-resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa are obtained using a combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths. In the keratinizing layer, the keratinocytes microstructure can be characterized and the keratinizing thickness can be measured. The keratin fluorescence signal can be further characterized by emission maxima at 510 nm. In the epithelium, the cellular microstructure can be quantitatively visualized with depth and the epithelium thickness can be determined by multiphoton imaging excited at 730 nm. The study also shows that the epithelial spectra excited at 810 nm, showing a combination of NADH and FAD fluorescence, can be used for the estimation of the metabolic state in epithelium. Interestingly, a second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from DNA was observed for the first time within the epithelial layer in backscattering geometry and provides the possibility of analyzing the chromatin structure. In the stroma, the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis excited at 850 nm in tandem can obtain quantitative information regarding the biomorphology and biochemistry of stroma. Specifically, the microstructure of collagen, minor salivary glands and elastic fibers, and the optical property of the stroma can be quantitatively displayed. Overall, these results suggest that the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths has the potential to provide important and comprehensive information for early diagnosis of oral cancer.

  4. Albumin nanoshell encapsulation of near-infrared-excitable rare-Earth nanoparticles enhances biocompatibility and enables targeted cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Naczynski, Dominik J; Andelman, Tamar; Pal, David; Chen, Suzie; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2010-08-02

    The use of traditional fluorophores for in vivo imaging applications is limited by poor quantum yield, poor tissue penetration of the excitation light, and excessive tissue autofluorescence, while the use of inorganic fluorescent particles that offer a high quantum yield is frequently limited due to particle toxicity. Rare-earth-doped nanoparticles that utilize near-infrared upconversion overcome the optical limitations of traditional fluorophores, but are not typically suitable for biological application due to their insolubility in aqueous solution, lack of functional surface groups for conjugation of biomolecules, and potential cytotoxicity. A new approach to establish highly biocompatible and biologically targetable nanoshell complexes of luminescent rare-earth-doped NaYF(4) nanoparticles (REs) excitable with 920-980 nm near-infrared light for biomedical imaging applications is reported. The approach involves the encapsulation of NaYF(4) nanoparticles doped with Yb and Er within human serum albumin nanoshells to create water-dispersible, biologically functionalizable composite particles. These particles exhibit narrow size distributions around 200 nm and are stable in aqueous solution for over 4 weeks. The albumin shell confers cytoprotection and significantly enhances the biocompatibility of REs even at concentrations above 200 microg REs mL(-1). Composite particles conjugated with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) specifically target both human glioblastoma cell lines and melanoma cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) integrin receptors. These findings highlight the promise of albumin-encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles for imaging cancer cells in vitro and the potential for targeted imaging of disease sites in vivo.

  5. Multiphoton absorption in graphene and metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiqiang, Chen

    Materials possessing large multiphoton absorption are of direct relevance to both photonics applications and materials physics. In this dissertation, we present our investigations into two novel materials: namely, (1) graphene and (2) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The dissertation divides into two parts. The first part of the dissertation reports our systematical Z-scan measurements onto two-photon absorption (2PA) in graphene in the spectral range of 435-1100 nm with femtosecond laser pulses. We report that the measured 2PA coefficients of graphene in the near-infrared (NIR) range of 800-1100 nm can be explained by a theoretical model based on the optical transitions near the Dirac point (K point). We also determine the 2PA coefficients of graphene in the visible spectrum (435-700 nm) and observe an enhancement induced by the excitonic Fano resonance at the saddle point (M point). By applying the second-order, time-dependent perturbation theory on interband transitions among three states near the saddle point, we develop a semi-empirical model to take excitons in graphene into consideration. And the model is in agreement with the photon-energy dependence of the observed 2PA spectrum with a scaling factor of B = (1 5) x 102 cm/MW/eV5. Our results verify, for the first time, that the excitonic Fano resonance plays an important role for the 2PA of graphene in the visible spectrum. Besides, we also detail our measurements on the spectral dependence of one-photon absorption (1PA) saturation in graphene over the visible-NIR range. A quadratic photon energy dependence of the measured saturation intensity/fluence is observed over the investigated spectral range. The underlying photo-dynamics is discussed. In the second part of the dissertation, we investigate multiphoton excited photoluminescence (MEPL) from three solid-state crystals of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): (1) [Zn2(trans,trans-4,4 stilbenedicarboxylic acid (SDC))2(trans, trans-9, 10-bis (4-pyridylethenyl

  6. Selective excitation of photosystems in chloroplasts inside plant leaves observed by near-infrared laser-based fluorescence spectral microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we produced selective images of photosystems in plant chloroplasts in situ. We used a spectroimaging microscope, equipped with a near-infrared (NIR) laser that provided light at wavelengths mainly between 800 and 830 nm, to analyze chlorophyll autofluorescence spectra and images from chloroplasts in leaves of Zea mays at room temperature. Femtosecond laser excitation of chloroplasts in mesophyll cells revealed a spectral shape that was attributable to PSII and its antenna in the centers of grana spots. We found that a continuous wave emitted by the NIR laser at a wavelength as long as 820 nm induced chlorophyll autofluorescence with a high contribution from PSI through a one-photon absorption mechanism. A spectral shape attributable to PSI and its antenna was thus obtained using continuous wave laser excitation of chloroplasts in bundle sheath cells. These highly pure spectra of photosystems were utilized for spectral decomposition at every intrachloroplast space to show distributions of PSI and PSII and their associated antenna. A new methodology using an NIR laser to detect the PSI/PSII ratio in single chloroplasts in leaves at room temperature is described.

  7. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay.

  8. Compact clinical high-NA multiphoton endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging methods are excellent for non-invasive imaging of living tissue without any need of additional contrast agents. The increasing demand for endoscopic techniques has forced the development of multiphoton endoscopes for imaging of areas with reduced accessibility like chronic wounds. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses can miniaturize the bulky distal focusing optics of conventional tomographs to a diameter of less than 1.4 mm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.8. We combined a high NA clinical multiphoton endoscope with existing multiphoton tomographs like the DermaInspect® and the MPTflex® to enable the examination of wound healing processes.

  9. Ground and excited state infrared spectroscopy of jet-cooled radicals: Exploring the photophysics of trihydronaphthyl and inden-2-ylmethyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Korn, Joseph A.; Sibert, Edwin L.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The alkyl and aromatic CH stretch infrared spectra of inden-2-ylmethyl (I2M, C10H9) and trihydronaphthyl (THN, C10H11) radicals have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions in the ground (D0) and first electronically excited (D1) states using resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy. Previously, the vibronic spectroscopy of a series of C10H9 and C10H11 hydronaphthyl radicals were investigated and their thermochemical properties were evaluated with isomer specificity [J. A. Sebree et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 11, 6255-6262 (2010)]. We show here that one of the m/z 129 spectral carriers characterized in that work was misidentified as 2-hydronaphthyl (2-HN) radical, appearing in a discharge of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene in close proximity to 1-hydronaphthyl radical. The D0-RIDIR spectrum in the alkyl CH stretch region positively identifies the m/z 129 isomer as I2M, whose two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) spectrum was recently reported by Schmidt and co-workers [T. P. Troy et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1755-1765 (2011)]. Here, we further characterize the I2M and THN radicals by recording their gas phase IR spectra in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions, and explore the spectroscopic consequences of electronic excitation on the CH stretch absorptions. A local-mode CH stretch Hamiltonian incorporating cubic stretch-bend coupling between anharmonic CH stretches and CH2 scissor modes is utilized to describe their Fermi resonance interactions. Excellent agreement between the experimental and theoretical results facilitates the interpretation of the D0- and D1-state RIDIR spectra of I2M, revealing that upon excitation the alkyl CH stretches decrease in frequency by 70 cm-1, while the allyl-like CH stretches experience a modest blueshift. In comparison, the photophysics of THN are strikingly different in that the IR transitions that possess vibrational motion along the CβH and CδH bonds are absent in the D1-RIDIR spectrum yet are predicted to be present from

  10. Infrared nanospectroscopy and imaging of collective superfluid excitations in anisotropic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, H. T.; Wu, J. S.; Jiang, B. Y.; Fei, Z.; Rodin, A. S.; Chapler, B. C.; McLeod, A. S.; Castro Neto, A.; Lee, Y. S.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate near-field infrared spectroscopy and superfluid polariton imaging experiments on conventional and unconventional superconductors. Our modeling shows that near-field spectroscopy can measure the magnitude of the superconducting energy gap in Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like superconductors with nanoscale spatial resolution. We demonstrate how the same technique can measure the c-axis plasma frequency, and thus the c-axis superfluid density, of layered unconventional superconductors with a similar spatial resolution. Our modeling also shows that near-field techniques can image superfluid surface mode interference patterns near physical and electronic boundaries. We describe how these images can be used to extract the collective mode dispersion of anisotropic superconductors with subdiffractional spatial resolution.

  11. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  12. Femtosecond laser pulse optimization for multiphoton cytometry and control of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Eric Robert

    This body of work encompasses optimization of near infrared femtosecond laser pulses both for enhancement of flow cytometry as well as adaptive pulse shaping to control fluorescence. A two-photon system for in vivo flow cytometry is demonstrated, which allows noninvasive quantification of circulating cell populations in a single live mouse. We monitor fluorescently-labeled red blood cells for more than two weeks, and are also able to noninvasively measure circulation times of two distinct populations of breast cancer cells simultaneously in a single mouse. We build a custom laser excitation source in the form of an extended cavity mode-locked oscillator, which enables superior detection in whole blood or saline of cell lines expressing fluorescent proteins including the green fluorescent protein (GFP), tdTomato and mPlum. A mathematical model explains unique features of the signals. The ability to distinguish different fluorescent species is central to simultaneous measurement of multiple molecular targets in high throughput applications including the multiphoton flow cytometer. We demonstrate that two dyes which are not distinguishable to one-photon measurements can be differentiated and in fact quantified in mixture via phase-shaped two-photon excitation pulses found by a genetic algorithm. We also selectively enhance or suppress two-photon fluorescence of numerous common dyes with tailored pulse shapes. Using a multiplicative (rather than ratiometric) fitness parameter, we are able to control the fluorescence while maintaining a strong signal. With this method, we control the two-photon fluorescence of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP), which is of particular interest in investigations of protein-protein interactions, and has frustrated previous attempts of control. Implementing an acousto-optic interferometer, we use the same experimental setup to measure two-photon excitation cross-sections of dyes and prove that photon-photon interferences are the

  13. Development of infrared sensors using energy transfer/energy upconversion processes: Study of laser excited fluorescence in rare Earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1994-01-01

    A summary is presented of the spectroscopic study of three systems: LaF3:Ho(3+), LaF3:Er(3+) and CaF2:Nd(3+). When the D levels of Ho(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 640 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from J (416 nm), F (485 nm), and E (546 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F and E levels of Ho(3+) when the material was excited with an 800 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Er(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 637 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the E (540 nm) and P (320, 400, and 468 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F, E, and D levels of Er(3+) when the material was resonantly excited with an 804 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Nd(3+) in CaF2 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 577 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the L (360 and 382 nm), K (418 nm), and I (432 nm) levels. Very weak upconverted emissions were detected when this system was irradiated with a near infrared laser. The numbers in parentheses are the wavelengths of the emissions.

  14. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: Inferior colliculus measurements

    PubMed Central

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S.M.; Matic, A.I.; Moreno, E.L.; Fishman, A.J.; Robinson, A.M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 μm-diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima, and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC spatial tuning curves indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic pips. PMID:21828906

  15. Plasma membrane nanoporation as a possible mechanism behind infrared excitation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Hope T.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Musick, Joshua D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses have been used to stimulate action potentials in neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon has remained elusive. In vitro studies have found that pulsed IR exposure generates a nearly instant change in capacitance in the plasma membrane, characterized by inward rectification, a common feature in pore-forming exposures, such as electrical pulses and acoustic shock waves. Based on this similarity, we hypothesize that the mechanism of IR stimulation is the formation of short-lived nanopores in the plasma membrane. These transient, small-diameter pores allow the influx of extracellular ions that lead to action potential generation, possibly through activation of secondary messenger pathways or depolarization of the cell membrane resulting in activation of voltage-gated ion channels. Approach. A variety of fluorescent markers are used to observe the cell response to IR stimulation to monitor for effects indicative of nanoporation in other modalities. Main results. We observe rapid, transient rises in intracellular Ca2+, influx of YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide into the cell signifying membrane permeabilization, cellular blebbing and swelling, and activation of the intracellular phosphoinositides lipid signaling pathway. Significance. This conclusion better explains the experimental observations and limitations of IR-induced neurological stimulation and represents a distinct theoretical shift in the understanding of the mechanism of IR-induced stimulation.

  16. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  17. Multiphoton adaptation of a commercial low-cost confocal microscope for live tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James J; Larson, Adam M; Wensel, Theodore G; Saggau, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Nikon C1 confocal laser scanning microscope is a relatively inexpensive and user-friendly instrument. We describe a straightforward method to convert the C1 for multiphoton microscopy utilizing direct coupling of a femtosecond near-infrared laser into the scan head and fiber optic transmission of emission light to the three-channel detector box. Our adapted system can be rapidly switched between confocal and multiphoton mode, requires no modification to the original system, and uses only a few custom-made parts. The entire system, including scan mirrors and detector box, remain under the control of the user-friendly Nikon EZ-C1 software without modification.

  18. Combining multiphoton and CARS microscopy for skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Kellner-Höfer, M.; Bückle, R.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    Microscopic imaging based on multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging has been realized in one common platform which is appropriate for use in hospitals. The different optical modalities non-invasively provide in vivo images from human skin with subcellular resolution, at different depths based on endogenous fluorescent, SHG-active molecules as well as non-fluorescent molecules with vibrational resonances at 2845 cm-1, in particular lipids. An overview of the system employing a Ti:sapphire laser and photonic crystal fiber to generate the excitation light as well as several imaging examples are presented.

  19. Anomalous multiphoton photoelectric effect in ultrashort time scales.

    PubMed

    Kupersztych, J; Raynaud, M

    2005-09-30

    In a multiphoton photoelectric process, an electron needs to absorb a given number of photons to escape the surface of a metal. It is shown for the first time that this number is not a constant depending only on the characteristics of the metal and light, but varies with the interaction duration in ultrashort time scales. The phenomenon occurs when electromagnetic energy is transferred, via ultrafast excitation of electron collective modes, to conduction electrons in a duration less than the electron energy damping time. It manifests itself through a dramatic increase of electron production.

  20. Rapid diagnosis of liver fibrosis using multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Jong Chul; Tae, Giyoong; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2013-07-01

    A multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical (NLO) microspectroscopy imaging system was developed using a femtosecond laser and a photonic crystal fiber. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy was combined with two-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy in one platform and the system was applied to diagnose liver fibrosis. Normal and liver fibrosis tissues were clearly distinguished with the great difference from CARS spectra as well as multimodal multiphoton NLO images. We expect the system to be a rapid diagnosis tool for liver fibrosis at tissue level with label-free imaging of significant biochemical components.

  1. Multi-photon photoelectron spectromicroscopy of supported polystyrene spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienkamp, Gerhard; Lindla, Florian; Senft, Christoph; Daum, Winfried

    2008-08-01

    Multi-photon photoemission excited by 100 fs, 400 nm laser pulses leads to an unexpected high contrast in photoelectron images of polystyrene spheres on a platinum substrate. The total, energy-integrated photoelectron yield shows clear signatures of two-photon photoemission from the substrate while photoemission from polystyrene is dominated by one-photon processes for low laser power and multi-photon processes for higher laser power. For excitation with UV light from a conventional Hg arc lamp, we observe a marked energy shift of the photoelectron spectrum of polystyrene with respect to that of the substrate. This shift is related to the different surface potentials of the conductive substrate and the dielectric spheres in the strong electric field of the objective lens of the microscope. Laser illumination causes photoconductivity in polystyrene by efficient two-photon excitation of long-lived states and induces a shifting of the surface potential of the polystyrene spheres. Pump-probe experiments support our conclusion that photoemission from polystyrene takes place from these long-lived intermediate states via a one-photon process for sufficiently low laser power. We suggest that photoelectron spectromicroscopy might be useful as a non-scanning method for fast height profiling of supported dielectric structures.

  2. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer.

    PubMed

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J H; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023%; PC5, 0.00095%; PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm(-1)). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  3. Combining near-infrared-excited autofluorescence and Raman spectroscopy improves in vivo diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-06-15

    This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the combined near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) and Raman spectroscopy for improving in vivo detection of gastric cancer at clinical gastroscopy. A rapid Raman endoscopic technique was employed for in vivo spectroscopic measurements of normal (n=1098) and cancer (n=140) gastric tissues from 81 gastric patients. The composite NIR AF and Raman spectra in the range of 800-1800 cm(-1) were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant (LDA) to extract diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic processes of gastric malignancies. High quality in vivo composite NIR AF and Raman spectra can routinely be acquired from the gastric within 0.5s. The integrated intensity over the range of 800-1800 cm(-1) established the diagnostic implications (p=1.6E-14) of the change of NIR AF intensity associated with neoplastic transformation. PCA-LDA diagnostic modeling on the in vivo tissue NIR AF and Raman spectra acquired yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 92.2% (sensitivity of 97.9% and specificity of 91.5%) for identifying gastric cancer from normal tissue. The integration area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve using the combined NIR AF and Raman spectroscopy was 0.985, which is superior to either the Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This work demonstrates that the complementary Raman and NIR AF spectroscopy techniques can be integrated together for improving the in vivo diagnosis and detection of gastric cancer at endoscopy.

  4. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023% PC5, 0.00095% PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm-1). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  5. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved.

  6. Differentiating the two main histologic categories of fibroadenoma tissue from normal breast tissue by using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nie, Y T; Wu, Y; Fu, F M; Lian, Y E; Zhuo, S M; Wang, C; Chen, J X

    2015-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a novel biological imaging technique that allows cellular and subcellular microstructure imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation. In this work, we used multiphoton microscopy to obtain the high-contrast images of human normal breast tissue and two main histologic types of fibroadenoma (intracanalicular, pericanalicular). Moreover, quantitative image analysis was performed to characterize the changes of collagen morphology (collagen content, collagen orientation). The results show that multiphoton microscopy combined with quantitative method has the ability to identify the characteristics of fibroadenoma including changes of the duct architecture and collagen morphology in stroma. With the advancement of multiphoton microscopy, we believe that the technique has great potential to be a real-time histopathological diagnostic tool for intraoperative detection of fibroadenoma in the future.

  7. Autofluorescence Imaging With Near-Infrared Excitation:Normalization by Reflectance to Reduce Signal From Choroidal Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Swider, Malgorzata; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We previously developed reduced-illuminance autofluorescence imaging (RAFI) methods involving near-infrared (NIR) excitation to image melanin-based fluorophores and short-wavelength (SW) excitation to image lipofuscin-based flurophores. Here, we propose to normalize NIR-RAFI in order to increase the relative contribution of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fluorophores. Methods. Retinal imaging was performed with a standard protocol holding system parameters invariant in healthy subjects and in patients. Normalized NIR-RAFI was derived by dividing NIR-RAFI signal by NIR reflectance point-by-point after image registration. Results. Regions of RPE atrophy in Stargardt disease, AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, choroideremia, and Leber congenital amaurosis as defined by low signal on SW-RAFI could correspond to a wide range of signal on NIR-RAFI depending on the contribution from the choroidal component. Retinal pigment epithelium atrophy tended to always correspond to high signal on NIR reflectance. Normalizing NIR-RAFI reduced the choroidal component of the signal in regions of atrophy. Quantitative evaluation of RPE atrophy area showed no significant differences between SW-RAFI and normalized NIR-RAFI. Conclusions. Imaging of RPE atrophy using lipofuscin-based AF imaging has become the gold standard. However, this technique involves bright SW lights that are uncomfortable and may accelerate the rate of disease progression in vulnerable retinas. The NIR-RAFI method developed here is a melanin-based alternative that is not absorbed by opsins and bisretinoid moieties, and is comfortable to view. Further development of this method may result in a nonmydriatic and comfortable imaging method to quantify RPE atrophy extent and its expansion rate. PMID:26024124

  8. Spatiotemporal focusing-based widefield multiphoton microscopy for fast optical sectioning of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Wei-Chung; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Conventional multiphoton microscopy employs beam scanning; however, in this study a microscope based on spatiotemporal focusing offering widefield multiphoton excitation has been developed to provide fast optical sectioning images. The microscope integrates a 10 kHz repetition rate ultrafast amplifier featuring strong instantaneous peak power (maximum 400 μJ/pulse at 90 fs pulse width) with a TE-cooled, ultra-sensitive photon detecting, electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera. This configuration can produce multiphoton excited images with an excitation area larger than 200 × 100 μm2 at a frame rate greater than 100 Hz. Brownian motions of fluorescent microbeads as small as 0.5 μm have been instantaneously observed with a lateral spatial resolution of less than 0.5 μm and an axial resolution of approximately 3.5 μm. Moreover, we combine the widefield multiphoton microscopy with structure illuminated technique named HiLo to reject the background scattering noise to get better quality for bioimaging.

  9. In vivo microscopy of the mouse brain using multiphoton laser scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Elizabeth J.

    2002-06-01

    The use of multiphoton microscopy for imaging mouse brain in vivo offers several advantages and poses several challenges. This tutorial begins by briefly comparing multiphoton microscopy with other imaging modalities used to visualize the brain and its activity. Next, an overview of the techniques for introducing fluorescence into whole animals to generate contrast for in vivo microscopy using two-photon excitation is presented. Two different schemes of surgically preparing mice for brain imaging with multiphoton microscopy are reviewed. Then, several issues and problems with in vivo microscopy - including motion artifact, respiratory and cardiac rhythms, maintenance of animal health, anesthesia, and the use of fiducial markers - are discussed. Finally, examples of how these techniques have been applied to visualize the cerebral vasculature and its response to hypercapnic stimulation are provided.

  10. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  11. Three-dimensional tooth imaging using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min-Huey; Chen, Wei-Liang; Sun, Yen; Fwu, Peter Tramyeon; Lin, Ming-Gu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    Detailed morphological and cellular information relating to the human tooth have traditionally been obtained through histological studies that required decalcification, staining, and fixation. With the recent invention of multiphoton microscopy, it has become possible to acquire high resolution images without histological procedures. Using an epiilluminated multiphoton microscope, we obtained two-photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of ex vivo human tooth. By combining these two imaging modalities we obtained submicron resolution images of the enamel, dentin, and the periodontal ligaments. The enamel emits endogenous two-photon autofluorescence. The structure of the dentin is visible from both the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. The periodontal ligament composed mostly of collagen can be visualized by SHG imaging. We also constructed three dimensional images of the enamel, dentin, and periodontal ligament. The effectiveness of using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy to obtain structural information of teeth suggest its potential use in dental diagnostics.

  12. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P. . UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.)

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  13. Visualizing the podocyte with multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Charbel C.; Khayat, Mark F.; Yeo, Tet-Kin; Pyagay, Petr E.; Wang, Amy; Asuncion, Allan M.; Sharma, Kumar; Yu, Weiming; Chen, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    The podocyte is a highly specialized kidney glomerular epithelial cell that plays an essential role in glomerular filtration and is believed to be the target of numerous glomerular diseases leading to proteinuria. Despite the leaps in our understanding of podocyte biology, new methodologies are needed to facilitate research into the cell. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the nephrin knockout/green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in heterozygote (Nphs1tm1Rkl/J) mouse. The nephrin promoter restricts GFP expression to the podocytes that fluoresce green under excitation. From the exterior of an intact kidney, MPM can peer into the renal parenchyma and visualize the podocytes that outline the globular shape of the glomeruli. Details as fine as the podocyte’s secondary processes can be resolved. In contrast, podocytes exhibit no fluorescence in the wildtype mouse and are invisible to MPM. Phenotypically, there are no significant differences between wildtype and Nphs1tm1Rkl/J mice in body weight, urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, or glomerular depth. Interestingly, the glomeruli are closer to the kidney capsule in female mice, making the gender the preferred choice for MPM. For the first time, green fluorescent podocytes in a mouse model free of confounding phenotypes can be visualized unequivocally and in the “positive” by MPM, facilitating intravital studies of the podocyte. PMID:23022193

  14. Application of Multiphoton Microscopy in Dermatological Studies: a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah; Rowlands, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance. PMID:25075226

  15. Vibrational eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for planar acetylene by wave-packet propagation, and its mode-selective infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Muckerman, James T.

    1997-09-01

    Vibrational eigenvalues with estimated errors <5×10-2 cm-1 and their corresponding eigenfunctions for J=0 5D (planar) acetylene modeled by the Halonen-Child-Carter potential-energy surface are obtained using an energy-shifted, imaginary-time Lanczos propagation of symmetry-adapted wave packets. A lower resolution (˜4 cm-1) vibrational eigenspectrum of the system is also calculated by the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation of an appropriate wave packet. The eigenvalues from both approaches are in excellent agreement. The wave function of the molecule is represented in a direct-product discrete variable representation (DVR) with nearly 300 000 grid points. Our results are compared with the previously reported theoretical and experimental values. We use our 69 computed eigenstates as a basis to perform an optimal control simulation of selective two-photon excitation of the symmetric CH-stretch mode with an infrared, linearly polarized, transform-limited, and subpicosecond-picosecond laser pulse. The resulting optimal laser pulses, which are then tested on the full DVR grid, fall within the capabilities of current powerful, subpicosecond, and tunable light sources.

  16. Nanoscale orbital excitations and the infrared spectrum of a molecular Mott insulator: A15-Cs3C60.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, S S; Fabrizio, M; Qin, T; Tosatti, E

    2016-10-14

    The quantum physics of ions and electrons behind low-energy spectra of strongly correlated molecular conductors, superconductors and Mott insulators is poorly known, yet fascinating especially in orbitally degenerate cases. The fulleride insulator Cs3C60 (A15), one such system, exhibits infrared (IR) spectra with low temperature peak features and splittings suggestive of static Jahn-Teller distortions with a breakdown of orbital symmetry in the molecular site. That is puzzling, since there is no detectable static distortion, and because the features and splittings disappear upon modest heating, which they should not. Taking advantage of the Mott-induced collapse of electronic wavefunctions from lattice-extended to nanoscale localized inside a caged molecular site, we show that the unbroken spin and orbital symmetry of the ion multiplets explains the IR spectrum without adjustable parameters. This demonstrates the importance of a fully quantum treatment of nuclear positions and orbital momenta in the Mott insulator sites, dynamically but not statically distorted. The observed demise of these features with temperature is explained by the thermal population of a multiplet term whose nuclear positions are essentially undistorted, but whose energy is very low-lying. That term is in fact a scaled-down orbital excitation analogous to that of other Mott insulators, with the same spin 1/2 as the ground state, but with a larger orbital momentum of two instead of one.

  17. High-resolution multiphoton tomography of human skin in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Dimitrov, Enrico; Fischer, Peter; Reif, Annette; Kaatz, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Konig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    The novel compact femtosecond NIR (near infrared) laser imaging system DermaInspect was used to perform for the first time in vivo high resolution non-invasive 4D tomography of human skin based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG). Using fast galvoscan mirrors, a time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module and femtosecond 80 MHz laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm-850 nm human skin was analyzed with subcellular spatial resolution (3D) and 250 ps temporal resolution (4D). The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates from naturally endogenous fluorophores and protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, phorphyrins, melanin, elastin and collagen. Collagenous structures were detected using SHG. Tissues of patients with dermatological disorders like nevi and melanoma have been investigated with a clear visualization of cells and intratissue structures. Further characterization of those components was performed by the fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and the determination of two photon excitation spectra. This method of non invasive high resolution optical biopsy provides a painless diagnostic tool for dermatological applications.

  18. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in

  20. Resolving shocked and UV excited components of H2 emission in planetary nebulae with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) form when low and intermediate-mass stars eject their outer layers into the ISM at the end of the AGB phase. Many PNe exhibit near-infrared (NIR) emission from molecular hydrogen (H2). This NIR emission arises from radiative decay out of excited rotation-vibration (rovibrational) states. The rovibrational states can be populated by excitation to higher electronic states through absorption of a far-UV photon followed by a radiative cascade to the electronic ground state, or by collisions (e.g., in a hot gas). The two processes populate the rovibrational levels of H2 differently, so the observed emergent emission spectrum provides an effective probe of the mechanisms that excite the H2. Many PNe display line intensity ratios that are intermediate between these two processes (Otsuka et al. 2013). With the advantages of the high spectral resolution (R~40000), broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), and high spatial resolution of the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, Park et al. 2014), we are able to differentiate components in position-velocity space: we see a slowly expanding UV-excited H2 shell in the PN M 1-11 and two faster moving “bullets” of thermalized H2 that we interpret as shocked gas from a bipolar outflow. We also present observations of several other PNe that exhibit similar morphologies of thermalized and UV-excited H2 components.

  1. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed; Sonobe, Taro; Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  2. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  3. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  4. Two-color multiphoton emission from nanotips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Wei Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2017-02-01

    Two-color multiphoton emission from polycrystalline tungsten nanotips has been demonstrated using two-color laser fields. The two-color photoemission is assisted by a three-photon multicolor quantum channel, which leads to a twofold increase in quantum efficiency. Weak-field control of two-color multiphoton emission was achieved by changing the efficiency of the quantum channel with pulse delay. The result of this study complements two-color tunneling photoemission in strong fields, and has potential applications for nanowire-based photonic devices. Moreover, the demonstrated two-color multiphoton emission may be important for realizing ultrafast spin-polarized electron sources via optically injected spin current.

  5. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  6. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  7. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-02-16

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy: an introduction to gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Jin; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Eun Sun; Cho, Bong Rae

    2011-10-28

    Multiphoton microscopy, relying on the simultaneous absorption of two or more photons by a fluorophore, has come to occupy a prominent place in modern biomedical research with its ability to allow real-time observation of a single cell and molecules in intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy exhibits nonlinear optical contrast properties, which can make it possible to provide an exceptionally large depth penetration with less phototoxicity. This system becomes more and more an inspiring tool for a non-invasive imaging system to realize "optical biopsy" and to examine the functions of living cells. In this review, we briefly present the physical principles and properties of multiphoton microscopy as well as the current applications in biological fields. In addition, we address what we see as the future potential of multiphoton microscopy for gastroenterologic research.

  9. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon

  10. Origin of near to middle infrared luminescence and energy transfer process of Er(3+)/Yb(3+)co-doped fluorotellurite glasses under different excitations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang; Ma, Yaoyao; Kang, Shuai; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2015-02-04

    We report the near to middle infrared luminescence and energy transfer process of Er(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped fluorotellurite glasses under 980, 1550 and 800 nm excitations, respectively. Using a 980 nm laser diode pump, enhanced 1.5 and 2.7 μm emissions from Er(3+):I13/2→(4)I15/2 and I11/2→(4)I13/2 transitions are observed, in which Yb(3+) ions can increase pumping efficiency and be used as energy transfer donors. Meanwhile, Yb(3+) can also be used as an acceptor and intensive upconversion luminescence of around 1000 nm is achieved from Er(3+):I11/2→(4)I15/2 and Yb(3+): F5/2→(4)F7/2 transitions using 1550 nm excitation. In addition, the luminescence properties and variation trendency by 800 nm excitation is similar to that using 1550 nm excitation. The optimum Er(3+) and Yb(3+) ion ratio is 1:1.5 and excess Yb(3+) ions decrease energy transfer efficiency under the two pumpings. These results indicate that Er(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped fluorotellurite glasses are potential middle- infrared laser materials and may be used to increase the efficiency of the silicon solar cells.

  11. Direct measurement of excited-state intervalence transfer in [(tpy)Ru(III)(tppz(*-))Ru(II)(tpy)](4+) by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Hartshorn, Chris M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2002-05-08

    Extension of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) measurements into the near-infrared region has allowed the first direct measurement of a mixed-valence band in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state of a symmetrical ligand-bridged complex. Visible laser flash excitation of [(tpy)Ru(tppz)Ru(tpy)]4+ (tppz is 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine; tpy is 2,2':6',6' '-terpyridine) produces the mixed-valence, MLCT excited state [(tpy)RuIII(tppz*-)RuII(tpy)]4+* with the excited electron localized on the bridging tppz ligand. A mixed-valence band appears at numax = 6300 cm-1 with a bandwidth-at-half- maximum, Deltanu1/2 = 1070 cm-1. In the analogous ground-state complex, [(tpy)Ru(tppz)Ru(tpy)]5+, a mixed-valence band appears at numax = 6550 cm-1 with Deltanu1/2 = 970 cm-1 which allows a comparison to be made of electronic coupling across tppz0 and tppz*- as bridging ligands.

  12. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  13. Promising new wavelengths for multi-photon microscopy: thinking outside the Ti:Sapphire box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Greg; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Amos, William B.; McConnell, Gail

    2013-02-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) imaging is dominated by the Ti:Sapphire laser as the source for excitation. However, it is limited when considering 3PE of common fluorophores and efficient 2PE of UV dyes which require wavelengths beyond the range of the Ti:Sapphire. Two ultra-short pulsed sources are presented as alternatives: a novel optical parametric oscillator (OPO) geometry (1400-1600nm) and the sum-frequency mixing of an OPO and Yb-doped fibre laser, providing a tunable output (626-635nm). For long wavelengths, we report three-photon laser scanning microscopy (3PLSM) using a bi-directional pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with signal wavelength output at 1500 nm. This novel laser was used to overcome the high optical loss in the infrared spectral region observed in laser scanning microscopes and objective lenses that renders them otherwise difficult to use for imaging. To test our system, we performed 3PLSM auto-fluorescence imaging of live plant cells at 1500 nm, specifically Spirogyra, and compared performance with two-photon excitation (2PLSM) imaging using a femtosecond pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser at 780 nm. Analysis of cell viability based on cytoplasmic organelle streaming and structural changes of cells revealed that at similar peak powers, 2PLSM caused gross cell damage after 5 minutes but 3PLSM showed little or no interference with cell function after 15 minutes. The 1500 nm OPO was thus shown to be a practical laser source for live cell imaging. For short wavelengths, we report the use of an all-solid-state ultra-short pulsed source specifically for two-photon microscopy at wavelengths shorter than those of the conventional Ti:Sapphire laser. Our approach involved sumfrequency mixing of the output from the long-wavelength OPO described above with residual pump radiation to generate fs-pulsed output in the red spectral region. We demonstrated the performance of our ultra-short pulsed system using fluorescently labelled and autofluorescent tissue

  14. Infrared, Raman, and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations and structure of 2,6-difluoropyridine in its ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Hong-Li; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2013-12-19

    The infrared and Raman spectra of 2,6-difluoropyridine (26DFPy) along with ab initio and DFT computations have been used to assign the vibrations of the molecule in its S0 electronic ground state and to calculate its structure. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum showed the electronic transition to the S1(π,π*) state to be at 37,820.2 cm(-1). With the aid of ab initio computations the vibrational frequencies for this excited state were also determined. TD-B3LYP and CASSCF computations for the excited states were carried out to calculate the structures for the S1(π,π*) and S2(n,π*) excited states. The CASSCF results predict that the S1(π,π*) state is planar and that the S2(n,π*) state has a barrier to planarity of 256 cm(-1). The TD-B3LYP computations predict a barrier of 124 cm(-1) for the S1(π,π*) state, but the experimental results support the planar structure. Hypothetical models for the ring-puckering potential energy function were calculated for both electronic excited states to show the predicted quantum states. The changes in the vibrational frequencies in the two excited states reflect the weaker π bonding within the pyridine ring.

  15. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  16. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  17. In vivo multiphoton endoscopy of endogenous skin fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Schenkl, Selma; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography offers a painless method to examine patients under natural physiological conditions in vivo. Multiphoton excitation induces a weak autofluorescence of naturally endogenous fluorescent bio-molecules, such as flavines, NAD(P)H, metal-free porphyrines, components of lipofuscin, elastin and keratin. Additionally, collagen can be detected by second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the nonlinearity, the effects occur only in a very tight focus, where the photon density is high enough. This leads to high axial and lateral resolution of <1μm without any need of a confocal detection and avoids out-of-focus damage. The limited depth range, given by the working distance of the focusing optics, is overcome with a gradient index-lens (GRIN-lens) based endoscope. In this work we present the first results of clinical applications in vivo of gradient-index lens endoscopes. Images of e.g. elastin and collagen (SHG) in the dermal layer of human skin are presented.

  18. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  19. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  20. Infrared vibrational spectroscopy of [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ in the excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Fukazawa, Naoto; Murata, Kei; Inagaki, Akiko; Akita, Munetaka; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Onda, Ken

    2014-03-03

    This work involved a detailed investigation into the infrared vibrational spectra of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes, specifically heteroleptic [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine) and homoleptic [Ru(bpy)3](2+), in the excited triplet state. Transient spectra were acquired 500 ps after photoexcitation, corresponding to the vibrational ground state of the excited triplet state, using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. We assigned the observed bands to specific ligands in [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) based on the results of deuterium substitution and identified the corresponding normal vibrational modes using quantum-chemical calculations. Through this process, the more complex vibrational bands of [Ru(bpy)3](2+) were assigned to normal vibrational modes. The results are in good agreement with the model in which excited electrons are localized on a single ligand. We also found that the vibrational bands of both complexes associated with the ligands on which electrons are little localized appear at approximately 1317 and 1608 cm(-1). These assignments should allow the study of the reaction dynamics of various photofunctional systems including ruthenium polypyridyl complexes.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging with near-infrared dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes are used as fluorescence markers in small-animal imaging and in diffuse optical tomography of the human brain. In these applications it is important to know whether the dyes bind to proteins or other tissue constituents, and whether their fluorescence lifetimes depend on the targets they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the lasers nor the detectors of commonly used confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopes allow for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. We therefore upgraded existing confocal TCSPC FLIM systems with NIR lasers and NIR sensitive detectors. In multiphoton systems we used the Ti:Sa laser as a one-photon excitation source in combination with an NIR-sensitive detector in the confocal beam path. We tested a number of NIR dyes in biological tissue. Some of them showed clear lifetime changes depending on the tissue structures they are bound to. We therefore believe that NIR FLIM can deliver supplementary information on the tissue constitution and on local biochemical parameters.

  2. Multi-Photon Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Based on the investigation of multi-photon entanglement, as produced by stimulated parametric down-conversion, a technique is presented to create heralded ``noon'' states. The relevance for interferometry will be discussed. Furthermore we explored the use of photon-number resolving detectors in Mach-Zehnder type of interferometers. Our current detectors can distinguish 0, 1, 2, to7, photon impacts. Although the overall collection and detection efficiency of photons is well below unity (about 0.3) the photon number resolving property is still very useful if combined with coherent input states since those state are eigenstates of the photon annihilation operator. First we analyze the coherent state interferometer with a single photon-number resolving detector, revealing the strong non-linear response of an interferometer in the case of Fock-state projection. Second, we use two such detectors together with a Baysian phase estimation strategy to demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the standard quantum limit independently from the true value of the phase shift. This protocol is unbiased and saturates the Cramer-Rao phase uncertainty bound and, therefore, is an optimal phase estimation strategy. As a final topic it will be shown how quantum interferometry combined with micromechanical structures can be used to investigate quantum superpositions and quantum decoherence of macroscopic objects.

  3. Nanoparticle-assisted-multiphoton microscopy for in vivo brain imaging of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Neuro/brain study has attracted much attention during past few years, and many optical methods have been utilized in order to obtain accurate and complete neural information inside the brain. Relying on simultaneous absorption of two or more near-infrared photons by a fluorophore, multiphoton microscopy can achieve deep tissue penetration and efficient light detection noninvasively, which makes it very suitable for thick-tissue and in vivo bioimaging. Nanoparticles possess many unique optical and chemical properties, such as anti-photobleaching, large multiphoton absorption cross-section, and high stability in biological environment, which facilitates their applications in long-term multiphoton microscopy as contrast agents. In this paper, we will introduce several typical nanoparticles (e.g. organic dye doped polymer nanoparticles and gold nanorods) with high multiphoton fluorescence efficiency. We further applied them in two- and three-photon in vivo functional brain imaging of mice, such as brain-microglia imaging, 3D architecture reconstruction of brain blood vessel, and blood velocity measurement.

  4. Optical biopsy in high-speed handheld miniaturized multifocal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Ki Hean; Yazdanfar, Siavash; So, Peter T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Histological analysis is the clinical standard for assessing tissue health and the identification of pathological states. Its invasive nature dictates that its use should be minimized without compromising diagnostic accuracy. A promising method for minimally invasive histological analysis is optical biopsy, which provides cross sectional or 3D images without any physical sectionings. Optical biopsy method based on multiphoton excitation microscopy can image cross-sectional image for deep tissue structures with subcellular resolution based on tissue endogenous fluorescence molecules. Despite its suitability for tissue imaging, multiphoton microscopy has not been used for in vivo clinical applications due to both compactness and imaging speed problems. We are developing a high-speed, handheld, miniaturized multifocal multiphoton microscope (H2M4) as an optical biopsy probe to enable optical biopsy with subcellular resolution. We incorporate a compact raster scanning actuator based on optimizing a piezo-driven tip tilt mirror by increasing its bandwidth, and reducing its nonlinearity. For flexible light delivery, we choose a photonic bandgap crystal fiber, which transmits ultrashort pulsed laser delivery with reduced spectral distortion and pulse width broadening. We further demonstrate that this fiber produces minimal spatial mode distortion and can achieve comparable image point spread function (PSF) as free space delivery. We further investigate the applicability of multiphoton microscopy for clinical dermal investigation by imaging ex vivo human skins with both normal and abnormal physiologies. This demonstrates the performance of H2M4 and the possibility of optical biopsy for diagnosing skin diseases.

  5. Experimental measurements of multiphoton enhanced air breakdown by a subthreshold intensity excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Jesse; Hummelt, Jason; Scharer, John

    2009-10-01

    This work presents density, spectroscopic temperature, and shockwave measurements of laser induced breakdown plasma in atmospheric air by subthreshold intensity (5.5×109 W/cm2) 193 nm laser radiation. Using molecular spectroscopy and two-wavelength interferometry, it is shown that substantial ionization (>1016 cm-3) occurs that is not predicted by collisional cascade (CC) breakdown theory. While the focused laser irradiance is three orders of magnitude below the theoretical collisional breakdown threshold, the substantial photon energy at 193 nm (6.42 eV/photon) compared with the ionization potential of air (15.6 eV) significantly increases the probability of multiphoton ionization effects. By spectroscopically monitoring the intensity of the N2+ first negative system (B Σu+2-X Σg+2) vibrational bandhead (v'=0,v″=0) at low pressure (20 Torr) where multiphoton effects are dominant, it is shown that two photon excitation, resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization is the primary mechanism for quantized ionization of N2 to the N2+(B Σu+2) state. This multiphoton effect then serves to amplify the collisional breakdown process at higher pressures by electron seeding, thereby reducing the threshold intensity from that required via CC processes for breakdown and producing high density laser formed plasmas.

  6. Detection of the multiphoton signals in stained tissue using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yaping; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Lin, Jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, has become a powerful, important tool for tissue imaging at the molecular level. Recently, MPM is also used to image hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained sections in cancer diagnostics. However, several studies have showed that the MPM images of tissue stained with H and E are significantly different from unstained tissue sections. Our aim was to detect of the multiphoton signals in stained tissue by using MPM. In this paper, MPM was used to image histological sections of esophageal invasive carcinoma tissues stained with H, E, H and E and fresh tissue. To detect of the multiphoton signals in stained tissue, the emission spectroscopic of tissue stained with H, E, H and E were obtained. For comparison, the fresh tissues were also investigated. Our results showed that the tissue stained with H, E, H and E could be detected by their TPEF signals. While the tissue stained with H and fresh tissue could be detected by their TPEF and SHG signals. In this work, we detect of the multiphoton signals in stained tissue. These findings will be useful for choosing suitable staining method so to improve the quality of MPM imaging in the future.

  7. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  8. Efficient blue upconversion emission due to confined radiative energy transfer in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 waveguides under infrared-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Shepherd, D. P.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Hassan, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Intense blue upconversion emission at 480 nm has been obtained at room temperature in Tm 3+-Nd 3+ co-doped Ta 2O 5 channel waveguides fabricated on a Si substrate, when the sample is excited with an infrared laser at 793 nm. The upconversion mechanism is based on the radiative relaxation of the Nd 3+ ions ( 4F 3/2 → 4I 11/2) at about 1064 nm followed by the absorption of the emitted photons by Tm 3+ ions in the 3H 4 excited state. A coefficient of energy transfer rate as high as 3 × 10 -16 cm 3/s has been deduced using a rate equation analysis, which is the highest reported for Tm-Nd co-doped systems. The confinement of the 1064 nm emitted radiation in the waveguide structure is the main reason of the high energy transfer probability between Nd 3+ and Tm 3+ ions.

  9. Near-infrared (808 and 980 nm) excited photoluminescence study in Nd-doped Y2O3 phosphor for bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Sukul, Prasenjit; Kumar, Kaushal

    2016-12-01

    The upconversion (UC) process in lanthanide-doped nanophosphors has attracted great research interest for its extensive application potential in biological in vitro and in vivo imaging due to the high tissue penetration depth of near-infrared excitation and low autofluorescence background. In this article, the authors report the synthesis of oxide nanophosphor of size  ⩽50 nm, which forms stable aqueous dispersion. The photoluminescence study is made on the nanophosphor upon 808 and 980 nm diode laser excitations. The 808 nm excitation resulted in strong emission at 795 nm due to the 4K13/2  →  4I13/2 transition along with other emissions from the Nd3+ ion. The 980 nm excitation has resulted in it turning green in the 525-560 nm range and is assigned to the 4S3/2  →  4I15/2 transition of the Er3+ ion, which is supposed to be present in a trace amount in the sample. The observation of strong UC emission indicates that the sample can be used for UC-based bio-imaging applications.

  10. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  11. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photo-electron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  12. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  14. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  15. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  16. Spatial distribution of far-infrared rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar photodissociation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikka, A.; Habart, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Abergel, A.; Pilleri, P.; Dartois, E.; Joblin, C.; Gerin, M.; Godard, B.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The methylidyne cation (CH+) and hydroxyl (OH) are key molecules in the warm interstellar chemistry, but their formation and excitation mechanisms are not well understood. Their abundance and excitation are predicted to be enhanced by the presence of vibrationally excited H2 or hot gas ( 500-1000 K) in photodissociation regions (PDRs) with high incident far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The excitation may also originate in dense gas (>105 cm-3) followed by nonreactive collisions with H2, H, and electrons. Previous observations of the Orion Bar suggest that the rotationally excited CH+ and OH correlate with the excited CO, which is a tracer of dense and warm gas, and that formation pumping contributes to CH+ excitation. Aims: Our goal is to examine the spatial distribution of the rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar to establish their physical origin and main formation and excitation mechanisms. Methods: We present spatially sampled maps of the CH+J = 3-2 transition at 119.8 μm and the OH Λ doublet at 84 μm in the Orion Bar over an area of 110″× 110″ with Herschel/PACS. We compare the spatial distribution of these molecules with those of their chemical precursors, C+, O and H2, and tracers of warm and dense gas (high-J CO). We assess the spatial variation of the CH+J = 2-1 velocity-resolved line profile at 1669 GHz with Herschel/HIFI spectrometer observations. Results: The OH and especially CH+ lines correlate well with the high-J CO emission and delineate the warm and dense molecular region at the edge of the Bar. While notably similar, the differences in the CH+ and OH morphologies indicate that CH+ formation and excitation are strongly related to the observed vibrationally excited H2. This, together with the observed broad CH+ line widths, indicates that formation pumping contributes to the excitation of this reactive molecular ion. Interestingly, the peak of the rotationally excited OH 84 μm emission coincides

  17. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  18. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  19. Studies on wide-field-of-view multiphoton imaging using the flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph MPTflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging systems are capable of high-resolution 3-D image acquisition of deep tissue. A first commercially available CE-certified biomedical system for subcelluar resolution of human skin has been launched by JenLab company with the DermaInspectR in 2002. The demand for more flexibility caused the development of the MPTflexR, which provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetic examinations. However the high resolution of clinical multiphoton tomographs are adherent with a small field-of-view (FOV) of about 360×360μm2. Especially time-consuming is the relocation of areas of interest (AOI) like lesions, sweat glands or hair shafts during a multiphoton examination. This limitation can be be overcome by macroscopic large-area (wide-field-ofview) multiphoton tomography, which is tested first within this work.

  20. ALMA DETECTION OF THE VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN J = 4-3 EMISSION LINE IN THE AGN-HOSTING LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 20551–4250

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2013-10-01

    We present results from our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, at the frequencies around the HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 transition lines, of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551–4250 at z = 0.043, which is known to host an energetically important obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). In addition to the targeted HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 emission lines, two additional strong emission lines are seen, which we attribute to H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}CN(+CCH). The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio (∼0.7) is higher than in the other starburst-dominated galaxy (∼0.2) observed in our ALMA Cycle 0 program. We tentatively (∼5σ) detected the vibrationally excited (v {sub 2} = 1) HCN J = 4-3 (l = 1f) emission line, which is important for testing an infrared radiative pumping scenario for HCN. This is the second detection of this molecular transition in external galaxies. The most likely reason for this detection is not only the high flux of this emission line, but also the small molecular line widths observed in this galaxy, suggesting that vibrational excitation of HCN may be relatively common in AGN-hosting galaxies.

  1. Observation of two-photon photoemission from cesium telluride photocathodes excited by a near-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuganti, H.; Piot, P.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the nonlinear photoemission in cesium telluride (Cs2Te) photocathodes where an ultrashort (˜100 fs full width at half max) 800-nm infrared laser is used as the drive-laser in lieu of the typical ˜266-nm ultraviolet laser. An important figure of merit for photocathodes, the quantum efficiency, we define here for nonlinear photoemission processes in order to compare with linear photoemission. The charge against drive-laser (infrared) energy is studied for different laser energy and intensity values and cross-compared with previously performed similar studies on copper [P. Musumeci et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 084801 (2010)], a metallic photocathode. We particularly observe two-photon photoemission in Cs2Te using the infrared laser in contrast to the anticipated three-photon process as observed for metallic photocathodes.

  2. Femtosecond Dynamics and Multiphoton Ionization driven with an Intense High Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Allison, Tom; Wright, Travis; Hertlein, Marc; Falcone, Roger; Liu, Yanwei; Merdji, Hamed; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-05-01

    We have constructed a high intensity high order harmonic source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab delivering ˜10^9 extreme ultraviolet photons/shot on a gas target and used it to observe multiphoton ionization and conduct femtosecond EUV-pump IR-probe experiments. Following excitation by 20-25 eV photons, we observed that the excited ethylene cation (H2C-CH2)^+ experienced isomerization to the ethylidene configuration (HC-CH3)^+ in 50±25 fs, followed by an H2 stretch motion. Experimental data and analysis from several experiments as well as a future outlook of our efforts will be presented.

  3. Femtosecond dynamics and multiphoton ionization driven with an intense high order harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Allison, T. K.; Wright, T. W.; Hertlein, M. P.; Liu, Y.; Merdji, H.; Falcone, R. W.; Belkacem, A.

    2009-11-01

    We have constructed a high intensity high order harmonic source delivering ~ 109 extreme ultraviolet photons/shot on a gas target and used it to observe multiphoton ionization and conduct femtosecond EUV-pump IR-probe experiments. Following excitation by 20-25 eV photons, we observed that the excited ethylene cation (H2C-CH2)+ experienced isomerization to the ethylidene configuration (HC-CHs)+ in 50±25 fs, followed by an H2 stretch motion. Experimental data and analysis from several other performed and planned experiments will be presented as well.

  4. Exploring the molecular chemistry and excitation in obscured luminous infrared galaxies. An ALMA mm-wave spectral scan of NGC 4418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costagliola, F.; Sakamoto, K.; Muller, S.; Martín, S.; Aalto, S.; Harada, N.; van der Werf, P.; Viti, S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Spaans, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Extragalactic observations allow the study of molecular chemistry and excitation under physical conditions which may differ greatly from those found in the Milky Way. The compact, obscured nuclei (CON) of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRG) combine large molecular columns with intense infrared (IR), ultra-violet (UV), and X- radiation and represent ideal laboratories for the study of the chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) under extreme conditions. Aims: Our aim was to obtain for the first time a multi-band spectral scan of a LIRG, and to derive molecular abundances and excitation to be compared to other Galactic and extragalactic environments. Methods: We obtained an ALMA Cycle 0 spectral scan of the dusty LIRG NGC 4418, spanning a total of 70.7 GHz in bands 3, 6, and 7. We use a combined local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (NLTE) fit of the spectrum in order to identify the molecular species and to derive column densities and excitation temperatures. We derive molecular abundances and compare them with other Galactic and extragalactic sources by means of a principal component analysis. Results: We detect 317 emission lines from a total of 45 molecular species, including 15 isotopic substitutions and 6 vibrationally excited variants. Our LTE/NLTE fit find kinetic temperatures from 20 to 350 K, and densities between 105 and 107 cm-3. The spectrum is dominated by vibrationally excited HC3N, HCN, and HNC, with vibrational temperatures from 300 to 450 K. We find that the chemistry of NCG 4418 is characterized by high abundances of HC3N, SiO, H2S, and c-HCCCH but a low CH3OH abundance. A principal component analysis shows that NGC 4418 and Arp 220 share very similar molecular abundances and excitation, which clearly set them apart from other Galactic and extragalactic environments. Conclusions: Our spectral scan confirms that the chemical complexity in the nucleus of NGC 4418 is one of the highest ever observed outside our Galaxy. The similar

  5. Experimental observation of multiphoton Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenchao; Golovin, Grigory; Fruhling, Colton; Haden, Daniel; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Banerjee, Sudeep; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of high-power lasers, several multiphoton processes have been reported involving electrons in strong fields. For electrons that were initially bound to atoms, both multiphoton ionization and scattering have been reported. However, for free electrons, only low-order harmonic generation has been observed until now. This limitation stems from past difficulty in achieving the required ultra-high-field strengths in scattering experiments. Highly relativistic laser intensities are required to reach the multiphoton regime of Thomson scattering, and generate high harmonics from free electrons. The scaling parameter is the normalized vector potential (a0). Previous experiments have observed phenomena in the weakly relativistic case (a0 >> 1). In ultra-intense fields (a0 >>1), the anomalous electron trajectory is predicted to produce a spectrum characterized by the merging of multiple high-order harmonic generation into a continuum. This may be viewed as the multiphoton Thomson scattering regime analogous to the wiggler of a synchrotron. Thus, the light produced reflects the electrons behavior in an ultra-intense lase field. We discuss the first experiments in the highly relativistic case (a0 15). This material is based upon work supported by NSF No. PHY-153700; US DOE, Office of Science, BES, # DE-FG02-05ER15663; AFOSR # FA9550-11-1-0157; and DHS DNDO # HSHQDC-13-C-B0036.

  6. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  7. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  8. Near infrared excited micro-Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture and ruby fluorescence at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Shen, Z. X.; Tang, S. H.; Kuok, M. H.

    1999-06-01

    Near infrared (NIR) lasers, as a new excitation source for Raman spectroscopy, has shown its unique advantages and is being increasingly used for some special samples, such as those emitting strong fluorescence in the visible region. This article focuses on some issues related to high-pressure micro-Raman spectroscopy using NIR excitation source. The Raman spectra of 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture (4:1 M-E) show a linear variation in both Raman shifts and linewidths under pressure up to 18 GPa. This result is useful in distinguishing Raman scattering of samples from that of the alcohol mixture, an extensively used pressure-transmitting medium. The R1 fluorescence in the red region induced by two-photon absorption of the NIR laser is strong enough to be used as pressure scale. The frequency and line width of the R1 lines are very sensitive to pressure change and the glass transition of the pressure medium. Our results manifest that it is reliable and convenient to use NIR induced two-photon excited fluorescence of ruby for both pressure calibration and distribution of pressure in the 4:1 M-E pressure transmitting medium.

  9. Near-infrared excited ultraviolet emitting upconverting phosphors as an internal light source in dry chemistry test strips for glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Valta, T; Kale, V; Soukka, T; Horn, C

    2015-04-21

    Upconverting phosphors are inorganic crystals with interesting optical properties, including the ability to convert infrared radiation to emission at shorter wavelengths. In this paper we present the utilization of nanosized β-NaYF4:Yb(3+),Tm(3+), synthesized in the presence of K(+), emitting at 365 nm under 980 nm excitation as an internal light source in glucose sensing dry chemistry test strips. The feasibility of the nanoparticles as an internal UV light source was compared to the use of an external broadband lamp. The results obtained from glucose measurements using UCNPs were in agreement with the traditional method based on measuring reflectance using an external UV light source. In addition the multiple emission peaks of UCNPs offered the possibility of using them as a control signal to account for various sources of error arising in the assay. The high penetration depth of the NIR-excitation made it also possible to excite the UCNPs through a layer of whole blood, giving more freedom to the design of the optical setup.

  10. Multiphoton tomography, transfection, and nanosurgery with <2-nJ, 80-MHz femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten

    2004-06-01

    Biomedical applications of low-energy (< 2nJ) near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulses provided by compact, turn-key Ti:sapphire lasers are presented in this review. Applications include (i) ultrahigh resolution optical diagnostics ("optical biopsies"), (ii) gene therapy by optical targeted transfection of cells, and (iii) ultraprecise laser therapy ("nanosurgery"). The novel femtosecond laser system DermaInspec (JenLab GmbH) enables for the first time in vivo deep tissue imaging of intracellular compartments with submicron spatial and picosecond temporal resolution in patients with dermatological disorders. Using the system FemtOcut, intracellular surgery, optical gene transfer, and intraocular refractive surgery can be performed. The major process behind the diagnostical and therapeutical laser effects is non-resonant multiphoton absorption which results in two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation at transient intensities of GW/cm2 as well as multiphoton ionization and plasma formation at TW/cm2 intensities, respectively.

  11. Label-free discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues using multiphoton fluorescence ratiometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Yang-Fang; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We performed multiphoton excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for the distinction of normal, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) specimens. In addition to morphological distinction, we derived quantitative metrics of cellular redox ratios for cancer discrimination. Specifically, the redox ratios of paired normal/SCC and normal/LAC specimens were found to be 0.53±0.05/0.41±0.06 and 0.56±0.02/0.35±0.06, respectively. The lower redox ratios in cancer specimens, indicating an increase in metabolic activity. These results show that the combination of morphological multiphoton imaging along with redox ratio indices can be used for the discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues.

  12. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  13. Effect of Size-Dependent Photodestructive Efficacy by Gold Nanomaterials with Multiphoton Laser.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Tsan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Liu, Yi-Hsien; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Yang, Chen-Han; Chou, Lawrence Chao-Shan; Chang, Jui-Cheng; Cheng, Li-Chung; Kuo, Wen-Shuo; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2015-08-12

    The photostability, photodestructive efficacy, two-photon excitation cross section, and two-photon fluorescence of gold nanoparticles conjugated with a hydrophilic photosensitizer, indocyanine green, via multiphoton laser exhibited an increased size effect in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and A549 cancer cells that was dependent on the size of multifunctional gold nanomaterials, but the effect only occurred when nanomaterials within 100 nm in diameter were used. Besides, the enhanced effectiveness of photodestruction, photostability, and contrast probe indicated an additive effect in the therapeutic and imaging efficiency of multifunctional gold nanomaterials. Consequently, the preparation of the multifunctional gold nanomaterials and their use in biomedical applications via multiphoton laser is an alternative and potential therapeutic approach for killing bacteria and for ablating cancer cells.

  14. Hydride stretch infrared spectra in the excited electronic states of indole and its derivatives: Direct evidence for the 1πσ* state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dian, Brian C.; Longarte, Asier; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2003-02-01

    The hydride stretch infrared spectra of indole, indole-H2O, 3-methyl indole, 3-methyl indole-H2O, the main conformer of tryptamine (TRA), two conformers of N-acetyl tryptophan amide (NATA), and three conformers of N-acetyl tryptophan methyl amide (NATMA), have been recorded in the electronically excited singlet states using excited-state fluorescence-dip infrared spectroscopy. NATA and NATMA are methyl-capped dipeptides of tryptophan that have conformational flexibility and exhibit sensitivity in their electronic spectra to the conformation of the dipeptide backbone. In the indole monomer, the indole NH stretch fundamental at the S1 origin is shifted from its ground-state value (3525 cm-1) to 3478 cm-1. The corresponding band in the indole-H2O complex appears at 3387 cm-1, shifted by a similar amount from its ground-state position (3436 cm-1). Higher vibronic levels within 1500 cm-1 of the S1 origin, which have been identified previously [B. J. Fender et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 239, 31 (1995)] as being 1Lb or 1La in character, all show similar excited state indole NH stretch absorptions. The corresponding spectra in 3-methyl indole, 3-methyl indole-H2O, TRA, and in the C5 conformers of NATA and NATMA all are missing the indole NH stretch absorption. In its place, a broad background absorption appears, spread over the entire 2800-3800 cm-1 region. In these molecules, other CH stretch or amide NH stretch absorptions remain sharp, appearing in their expected frequency ranges. Finally, the C7 conformations of NATA and NATMA, which possess an intramolecular hydrogen bond in the dipeptide backbone, have all infrared transitions washed out, replaced by a stronger broad background absorption. The entire data set can be explained by the presence of an excited 1πσ* state which is dissociative along the indole NH stretch coordinate, as recently predicted by Sobolewski and Domcke [Chem. Phys. Lett. 315, 293 (1999)]. In the weak coupling case (indole, indole-H2O), the gap

  15. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Ross A.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ascenzi, Daniela; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Scheper, Connie R.; de Lange, Cornelis A.

    1996-08-01

    Rydberg excited states of the OCS molecule in the energy range 70500-86000 cm-1 have been investigated via the two and three photon resonance enhancements they provide in the mass resolved multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectrum of a jet-cooled sample of the parent molecule. Spectral interpretation has been assisted by companion measurements of the kinetic energies of the photoelectrons that accompany the various MPI resonances. The present study supports the earlier conclusions of Weinkauf and Boesl [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 4459 (1993)] regarding five Rydberg origins in the 70500-73000 cm-1 energy range, attributable to, respectively, states of 3Π, 1Π, 3Δ, 1Δ and 1Σ+ symmetry arising from the 4pλ←3π orbital promotion. We also identify a further 21 Rydberg origins at higher energies. These partition into clumps with quantum defects ca. 3.5 and 4.5, which we associate with the orbital promotions npλ←3π (n=5,6), and others with near integer quantum defect which are interpretable in terms of excitation to s,d and (possibly) f Rydberg orbitals. We also identify MPI resonances attributable to CO(X 1Σ+) fragments and to S atoms in both their ground (3P) and excited (1D) electronic states. Analysis of the former resonances confirms that the CO(X) fragments resulting from one photon dissociation of OCS at excitation wavelengths ca. 230 nm are formed with a highly inverted, bimodal rotational state population distribution, whilst the latter are consistent with previous reports of the wavelength dependence for forming ground and excited state S atoms in the near uv photolysis of OCS.

  16. First-principles calculation of multiphoton absorption cross section of α-quartz under femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory-based first-principles calculations have been used to study the ionization process and electron excitation. The results show that the number of excited electrons follows the power law σ k I k at peak intensities of I < 5 × 1013 W/cm2, indicating that the multiphoton ionization plays a key role. The multiphoton absorption cross section of α-quartz σ k is further calculated to be 3.54 × 1011 cm-3 ps-1 (cm2/TW)6. Using the plasma model, the theoretical results of the damage threshold fluences are consistent with the experimental data, which validates the calculated value of multiphoton absorption cross section. By employing the calculated cross section value in the plasma model, the damage threshold fluences are theoretically estimated, being consistent with the experimental data, which validates the calculated value of multiphoton absorption cross section. The preliminary multiscale model shows great potential in the simulation of laser processing.

  17. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy. Progress report, July 15, 1989--October, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  18. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  19. Infrared-Laser Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface m by ’ Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie...Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie Gilles and Thomas F. George 13. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Yr. Mo.. Dayl As...ON A METAL SURFACE h Andr& Peremans , Jacques Darville and Jean-Marie Gilles _ _ _ _ Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Mol6culaire de Surface Accesnion

  20. Probing the conditions within Photo-dissociation Regions with high resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of UV-excited molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-01-01

    UV radiation regulates the energetics, ionization, and chemistry in much of the ISM. Regions between hot ionized and cool molecular gas where non-ionizing far-UV radiation dominates the state of the gas are called Photo-Dissociation or Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs). PDRs are found in regions of high-mass star formation, planetary nebulae, and other environments that contain strong far-UV radiation fields. Hydrogen molecules (H2) are pumped by far-UV photons into excited rotational-vibrational levels of the ground electronic state, which give rise to a rich array of transitions in the near to mid-infrared. These transitions make an excellent probe of the physical conditions within a PDR. I will present near-IR spectra taken with the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS; Park et al. 2014, Proc. SPIE, 9147), a novel, sensitive spectrometer with high spectral resolving power (R~45000) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm). Using IGRINS, I obtained deep spectra and measured up to 100 H2 rotational-vibrational transitions in the well-studied Orion Bar PDR, four other star formation complexes, and over a dozen planetary nebulae. Measurements of many lines from a wide range of vibrational states (v=1 to 13), rotational states (J=1 to 13), and excitation energies provides leverage for constraining the overall level populations and discerning the state of and physical processes within the gas. This combination of high spectral and spatial resolution enables us to distinguish previously unresolved spatio-kinematical components with distinct intrinsic spectra and excitation mechanisms (e.g. shocks vs. radiative excitation) within some individual planetary nebulae. I use the plasma simulation code Cloudy (Ferland et al. 2013, ApJ, 757, 79) as a tool for interpreting the observed H2 line ratios. Some sources are well fit by models with a single temperature and density, consistent with emission from a narrow region of the overall PDR structure

  1. Multiphoton imaging for assessing renal disposition in acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Roberts, Darren M.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of renal function and drug renal disposition in acute kidney injury (AKI), is important for appropriate dosing of drugs and adjustment of therapeutic strategies, but is challenging due to fluctuations in kidney function. Multiphoton microscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in studying drug disposition in liver and can reflect dynamic changes of liver function. We extend this imaging technique to investigate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and tubular transporter functional change in various animal models of AKI, which mimic a broad range of causes of AKI such as hypoxia (renal ischemia- reperfusion), therapeutic drugs (e.g. cisplatin), rhabdomyolysis (e.g. glycerol-induced) and sepsis (e.g. LPSinduced). The MPM images revealed acute injury of tubular cells as indicated by reduced autofluorescence and cellular vacuolation in AKI groups compared to control group. In control animal, systemically injected FITC-labelled inulin was rapidly cleared from glomerulus, while the clearance of FITC-inulin was significantly delayed in most of animals in AKI group, which may reflect the reduced GFR in AKI. Following intravenous injection, rhodamine 123, a fluorescent substrate of p-glycoprotein (one of tubular transporter), was excreted into urine in proximal tubule via p-glycoprotein; in response to AKI, rhodamine 123 was retained in tubular cells as revealed by slower decay of fluorescence intensity, indicating P-gp transporter dysfunction in AKI. Thus, real-time changes in GFR and transporter function can be imaged in rodent kidney with AKI using multiphoton excitation of exogenously injected fluorescent markers.

  2. Quantitative analysis of solids in motion by transient infrared emission spectroscopy using hot-gas jet excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Quantitative compositional analysis of optically thick solids in motion is demonstrated by using transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES). TIRES greatly reduces the self-absorption that normally degrades conventional emission spectra so that they closely resemble blackbody spectra. Quantitative compositional analyses of poly((methyl methacrylate)-co-(butyl methacrylate)) and poly(ethylene-co-(vinyl acetate)) with standard errors of prediction under 1% were achieved with only a few seconds of data acquisition using principal component regression. Use of a hot-gas jet in place of a laser in the TIRES technique allows study of materials that do not absorb strongly at common laser wavelengths while reducing cost and complexity.

  3. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  4. Discrimination of zeolites and beryllium containing silicates using portable Raman spectroscometric equipment with near-infrared excitation.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, J; Vandenabeele, P; Edwards, H G M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper Raman spectra were obtained for a series of zeolites (thomsonite, stilbite, natrolite) and beryllium containing silicates (beryl, chrysoberyl, euclase, phenacite, bavenite, milarite) using a portable Raman specrometer with a 785 nm laser excitation to show the possibility to apply this setting for unambiguous detection and discrimination of these silicate minerals. Obtained spectra contain the most intense Raman bands at the same positions ±2-4 cm(-1) as reported in the literature. The use of these bands permits the unambiguous identification of these phases. Data show the possibility to discriminate individual species of similar whitish color and aspect. Measurements showed an excellent correspondence of Raman bands obtained using the portable system and a laboratory Raman microspectrometer (with the same excitation laser wavelenght). However, for several minerals of these groups (chrysoberyl, bertrandite, chiavennite) Raman spectra were not of sufficient quality to permit unambiguous identification. The reasons are discussed. Raman spectrum of chiavennite CaMnBe(2)Si(5)O(13)(OH)(2)·2(H(2)O) - a transformation product occurring together with bavenite on the surface of beryl crystals was obtained for the first time using the laboratory Raman spectrometer.

  5. Electronically excited molecules: Reaction kinetics and emission of light: Nanosecond infrared spectroscopy, electronic emission from chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. B.

    1992-02-01

    A time-resolved IR absorption spectrometer capable of detecting chemical transients on the nanosecond timescale was designed, constructed, and successfully implemented. The spectrometer was used to characterize the vibrational relaxation of an open shell radical species, CF3, produced with excess energy from the photolysis of the parent CF3I compound. The effects of vibrational excitation in the CF3 radical on the reaction CF3 + Br2 yields CF3Br + Br were measured. Broadband data collection techniques were used to monitor the reactive and relaxation pathways simultaneously. The energetic radicals react no faster than the thermalized CF3 and may actually have a lower cross section for reaction. The spectrometer was also used to detect the gas phase absorption spectra of the polyatomic radicals. A thorough investigation into ozone-olefin reactions in a cryogenic matrix environment was completed. It was possible to complex ozone with various olefinic partners through careful control of the matrix deposition process, despite the very low (1-5 kcal/mole) activation energies for the ozonolysis reactions. The ground state complexes were observed to form a charge-transfer (CT) complex upon excitation.

  6. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  7. Multiphoton imaging of renal regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Toma, Ildikó; Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L

    2009-04-01

    Most physiological functions of the kidneys, including the clearance of metabolic waste products, maintenance of body fluid, electrolyte homeostasis, and blood pressure, are achieved by complex interactions between multiple renal cell types and previously inaccessible structures in many organ parts that have been difficult to study. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy offers a state-of-the-art imaging technique for deep optical sectioning of living tissues and organs with minimal deleterious effects. Dynamic regulatory processes and multiple functions in the intact kidney can be quantitatively visualized in real time, noninvasively, and with submicron resolution. This article reviews innovative multiphoton imaging technologies and their applications that provided the most complex, immediate, and dynamic portrayal of renal function-clearly depicting as well as analyzing the components and mechanisms involved in renal (patho)physiology.

  8. Luminescence quenching of conductive Si nanocrystals via “Linkage emission”: Hopping-like propagation of infrared-excited Auger electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Crowe, Iain F.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Hamilton, Bruce; Knights, Andrew P.; Gwilliam, Russell M.

    2014-08-14

    Phosphorus (P) is an n-type dopant for conductive silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc's), the electrical activation of which may be monitored through a non-radiative Auger recombination process that quenches the Si-nc luminescence. We investigated this quenching mechanism through electrical measurements of Si-nc's. Infrared-excited Auger electron emission as the non-radiative process was directly probed and the dynamics of the process are determined from a frequency response analysis. To explain the dynamics, we propose a model in which Auger electrons with a low kinetic energy establish a local inter-nanocrystal conductance and the repetition of this local conductance results in a constant photocurrent (“linkage emission”). This emission becomes significant by electron filling in the Si-nc's owing to the electrical activation of P, which is consistent with observed luminescence quenching behavior. We found that the IR photo-excited emission is distinct from the thermally induced hopping conduction and show that confined, rather than trapped, charges are the source of the Auger electrons. Thus, the process consumes both confined charges and the recombination energy for Auger emission, which explains the luminescence quenching mechanism of Si-nc:P.

  9. Bioinspired near-infrared-excited sensing platform for in vitro antioxidant capacity assay based on upconversion nanoparticles and a dopamine-melanin hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan; Ke, Xuebin; Kang, Ning; Shen, Yuqing; Liu, Yongliang; Zhou, Xi; Wang, Hongjun; Chen, Changqing; Ren, Lei

    2015-02-11

    A novel core-shell structure based on upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) and dopamine-melanin has been developed for evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of biological fluids. In this approach, dopamine-melanin nanoshells facilely formed on the surface of UCNPs act as ultraefficient quenchers for upconversion fluorescence, contributing to a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism. This spontaneous oxidative polymerization of the dopamine-induced quenching effect could be effectively prevented by the presence of various antioxidants (typically biothiols, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), and Trolox). The chemical response of the UCNPs@dopamine-melanin hybrid system exhibited great selectivity and sensitivity toward antioxidants relative to other compounds at 100-fold higher concentration. A satisfactory correlation was established between the ratio of the "anti-quenching" fluorescence intensity and the concentration of antioxidants. Besides the response of the upconversion fluorescence signal, a specific evaluation process for antioxidants could be visualized by the color change from colorless to dark gray accompanied by the spontaneous oxidation of dopamine. The near-infrared (NIR)-excited UCNP-based antioxidant capacity assay platform was further used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of cell extracts and human plasma, and satisfactory sensitivity, repeatability, and recovery rate were obtained. This approach features easy preparation, fluorescence/visual dual mode detection, high specificity to antioxidants, and enhanced sensitivity with NIR excitation, showing great potential for screening and quantitative evaluation of antioxidants in biological systems.

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet and near-infrared excited luminescence properties of Ca 3(PO 4) 2: RE3+, Na + ( RE=Tb, Yb, Er, Tm, and Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yuhua; Guo, Linna; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Liu, Bitao; Huang, Yan

    2011-08-01

    Tb 3+, Yb 3+, Tm 3+, Er 3+, and Ho 3+ doped Ca 3(PO 4) 2 were synthesized by solid-state reaction, and their luminescence properties were studied by spectra techniques. Tb 3+-doped samples can exhibit intense green emission under VUV excitation, and the brightness for the optimal Tb 3+ content is comparable with that of the commercial Zn 2SiO 4:Mn 2+ green phosphor. Under near-infrared laser excitation, the upconversion luminescence spectra of Yb 3+, Tm 3+, Er 3+, and Ho 3+ doped samples demonstrate that the red, green, and blue tricolored fluorescence could be obtained by codoping Yb 3+-Ho 3+, Yb 3+-Er 3+, and Yb 3+-Tm 3+ in Ca 3(PO 4) 2, respectively. Good white upconversion emission with CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.358, 0.362) is achieved by quadri-doping Yb 3+-Tm 3+-Er 3+-Ho 3+ in Ca 3(PO 4) 2, in which the cross-relaxation process between Er 3+ and Tm 3+, producing the 1D2- 3F4 transition of Tm 3+, is found. The upconversion mechanisms are elucidated through the laser power dependence of the upconverted emissions and the energy level diagrams.

  11. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  12. Superresolving multiphoton interferences with independent light sources.

    PubMed

    Oppel, S; Büttner, T; Kok, P; von Zanthier, J

    2012-12-07

    We propose to use multiphoton interferences from statistically independent light sources in combination with linear optical detection techniques to enhance the resolution in imaging. Experimental results with up to five independent thermal light sources confirm this approach to improve the spatial resolution. Since no involved quantum state preparation or detection is required, the experiment can be considered an extension of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiment for spatial intensity correlations of order N>2.

  13. Unified approach to multiphoton coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanta, P.; Chaturvedi, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Agarwal, G. S.; Mehta, C. L.

    1994-03-01

    We obtain a large class of multiphoton annihilation operator (F) eigenstates by constructing an operator G° such that [F,G°]=1. We show that almost all known coherent states, including the squeezed states and other nonclassical states such as the cat and the kitten states follow from our approach. Further, we show that all of them can be expressed as an exponential operator acting on the vacuum of the operator F. The technique can be easily generalized to deformed bosons.

  14. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  15. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  16. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Saykally, R J

    1998-02-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  17. Simulated infrared emission spectra of highly excited polyatomic molecules: a detailed model of the PAH-UIR hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed description of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/unidentified infrared band (UIR) mechanism is presented in which experimental spectral bandshape functions are used to simulate IR emission spectra for individual molecules. These spectra are additively superimposed to produce a conglomerate spectrum representative of a family of PAH molecules. Ab initio vibrational frequencies and intensities for nine PAHs (neutral and cationic) as large as ovalene are used in conjunction with measured bandshape and temperature-dependent redshift data to simulate the UIR bands. The calculated spectra of cations provide a closer match to the UIRs than do those of the neutrals. However, the PAH cations used in the simulations fail to reproduce the details of the UIR emission spectra. The discrepancies are potentially alleviated if both larger PAHs and a greater number of PAHs were included in the simulation.

  18. Optical temperature sensor through infrared excited blue upconversion emission in Tm3 +/Yb3 + codoped Y2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyu; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Yang, Kun; Liu, Lu; Song, Yinglin

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of the intense blue upconversion emission at 476 and 488 nm in Tm3 +/Yb3 + codoped Y2O3 under excitation power density of 86.7 W/cm2 available from a diode laser emitting at 976 nm, has been undertaken. Fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) variation of temperature-sensitive blue upconversion emission at 476 and 488 nm in this material was recorded in the temperature range from 303 to 753 K. The maximum sensitivity derived from the FIR technique of the blue upconversion emission is approximately 0.0035 K- 1. The results imply that Tm3 +/Yb3 + codoped Y2O3 is a potential candidate for the optical temperature sensor.

  19. Extending the fundamental imaging-depth limit of multi-photon microscopy by imaging with photo-activatable fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhixing; Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Min, Wei

    2012-08-13

    It is highly desirable to be able to optically probe biological activities deep inside live organisms. By employing a spatially confined excitation via a nonlinear transition, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy has become indispensable for imaging scattering samples. However, as the incident laser power drops exponentially with imaging depth due to scattering loss, the out-of-focus fluorescence eventually overwhelms the in-focal signal. The resulting loss of imaging contrast defines a fundamental imaging-depth limit, which cannot be overcome by increasing excitation intensity. Herein we propose to significantly extend this depth limit by multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) of photo-activatable fluorophores. The imaging contrast is drastically improved due to the created disparity of bright-dark quantum states in space. We demonstrate this new principle by both analytical theory and experiments on tissue phantoms labeled with synthetic caged fluorescein dye or genetically encodable photoactivatable GFP.

  20. Ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped lasing from colloidal nanoplatelets in solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjie; Zhi, Min; Zhu, Hai; Wu, Wen-Ya; Xu, Qing-Hua; Jhon, Mark Hyunpong; Chan, Yinthai

    2015-09-30

    Although multiphoton-pumped lasing from a solution of chromophores is important in the emerging fields of nonlinear optofluidics and bio-photonics, conventionally used organic dyes are often rendered unsuitable because of relatively small multiphoton absorption cross-sections and low photostability. Here, we demonstrate highly photostable, ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped biexcitonic lasing from a solution of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets within a cuvette-based Fabry-Pérot optical resonator. We find that colloidal nanoplatelets surprisingly exhibit an optimal lateral size that minimizes lasing threshold. These nanoplatelets possess very large gain cross-sections of 7.3 × 10(-14) cm(2) and ultralow lasing thresholds of 1.2 and 4.3 mJ cm(-2) under two-photon (λexc=800 nm) and three-photon (λexc=1.3 μm) excitation, respectively. The highly polarized emission from the nanoplatelet laser shows no significant photodegradation over 10(7) laser shots. These findings constitute a more comprehensive understanding of the utility of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles as the gain medium in high-performance frequency-upconversion liquid lasers.

  1. Intrinsic Indicator of Photodamage during Label-Free Multiphoton Microscopy of Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Elisabeth F.; Geiger, Kathrin D.; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton imaging has evolved as an indispensable tool in cell biology and holds prospects for clinical applications. When addressing endogenous signals such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or second harmonic generation, it requires intense laser irradiation that may cause photodamage. We report that increasing endogenous fluorescence signal upon multiphoton imaging constitutes a marker of photodamage. The effect was studied on mouse brain in vivo and ex vivo, on ex vivo human brain tissue samples, as well as on glioblastoma cells in vitro, demonstrating that this phenomenon is common to a variety of different systems, both ex vivo and in vivo. CARS microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy were used to analyze the photodamage. The development of a standard easy-to-use model that employs rehydrated cryosections allowed the characterization of the irradiation-induced fluorescence and related it to nonlinear photodamage. In conclusion, the monitoring of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence during label-free multiphoton microscopy enables to estimate damage thresholds ex vivo as well as detect photodamage during in vivo experiments. PMID:25343251

  2. Direct comparison between confocal and multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of unfixed human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Tadayuki; Giacomelli, Michael G.; Cahill, Lucas C.; Schmolze, Daniel B.; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid histopathological examination of surgical specimen margins using fluorescence microscopy during breast conservation therapy has the potential to reduce the rate of positive margins on postoperative histopathology and the need for repeat surgeries. To assess the suitability of imaging modalities, we perform a direct comparison between confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy for imaging unfixed tissue and compare to paraffin-embedded histology. An imaging protocol including dual channel detection of two contrast agents to implement virtual hematoxylin and eosin images is introduced that provides high quality imaging under both one and two photon excitation. Corresponding images of unfixed human breast tissue show that both confocal and multiphoton microscopy can reproduce the appearance of conventional histology without the need for physical sectioning. We further compare normal breast tissue and invasive cancer specimens imaged at multiple magnifications, and assess the effects of photobleaching for both modalities using the staining protocol. The results demonstrate that confocal fluorescence microscopy is a promising and cost-effective alternative to multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of ex vivo breast tissue.

  3. Ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped lasing from colloidal nanoplatelets in solution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingjie; Zhi, Min; Zhu, Hai; Wu, Wen-Ya; Xu, Qing-Hua; Jhon, Mark Hyunpong; Chan, Yinthai

    2015-01-01

    Although multiphoton-pumped lasing from a solution of chromophores is important in the emerging fields of nonlinear optofluidics and bio-photonics, conventionally used organic dyes are often rendered unsuitable because of relatively small multiphoton absorption cross-sections and low photostability. Here, we demonstrate highly photostable, ultralow-threshold multiphoton-pumped biexcitonic lasing from a solution of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets within a cuvette-based Fabry–Pérot optical resonator. We find that colloidal nanoplatelets surprisingly exhibit an optimal lateral size that minimizes lasing threshold. These nanoplatelets possess very large gain cross-sections of 7.3 × 10−14 cm2 and ultralow lasing thresholds of 1.2 and 4.3 mJ cm−2 under two-photon (λexc=800 nm) and three-photon (λexc=1.3 μm) excitation, respectively. The highly polarized emission from the nanoplatelet laser shows no significant photodegradation over 107 laser shots. These findings constitute a more comprehensive understanding of the utility of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles as the gain medium in high-performance frequency-upconversion liquid lasers. PMID:26419950

  4. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  5. Compensation of temporal and spatial dispersion for multiphoton acousto-optic laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay; Saggau, Peter

    2003-10-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy, acousto-optic (AO) deflection provides a means to quickly position a laser beam to random locations throughout the field-of-view. Compared to conventional laser-scanning using galvanometer-driven mirrors, this approach increases the frame rate and signal-to-noise ratio, and reduces time spent illuminating sites of no interest. However, random-access AO scanning has not yet been combined with multi-photon microscopy, primarily because the femtosecond laser pulses employed are subject to significant amounts of both spatial and temporal dispersion upon propagation through common AO materials. Left uncompensated, spatial dispersion reduces the microscope"s spatial resolution while temporal dispersion reduces the multi-photon excitation efficacy. In previous work, we have demonstrated, 1) the efficacy of a single diffraction grating scheme which reduces the spatial dispersion at least 3-fold throughout the field-of-view, and 2) the use of a novel stacked-prism pre-chirper for compensating the temporal dispersion of a pair of AODs using a shorter mechanical path length (2-4X) than standard prism-pair arrangements. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the use of these compensation approaches with a custom-made large-area slow-shear TeO2 AOD specifically suited for the development of a high-resolution 2-D random-access AO scanning multi-photon laser-scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM).

  6. Assessment of multiphoton absorption in inert gases for the measurement of gas temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Natalie J; Walewski, Joachim W; Sanders, Scott T

    2006-03-01

    A spatially resolved optical technique to measure gas temperature was assessed. The technique relies on multiphoton absorption in inert gases. In contrast to laser-induced fluorescence, absorption is insensitive to collisional deactivation, and, in contrast to one-photon absorption, multiphoton absorption only occurs around the focus point of a typical laser beam. Multiphoton absorption features both the merits of being insensitive to quenching and of being a spatially resolved technique. In a case study we assessed two-photon absorption in xenon upon exciting the 5p6 1S0-->5p56p[5/2]2 transition in xenon at a wavelength of 256 nm. The amount of light absorbed by xenon is related to the number density of the gas, and if the gas pressure is known then the gas temperature can be inferred from the number density. Two-photon absorbance was measured as a function of xenon number density and was used to validate a theoretical model of the absorption process. We discuss the circumnavigation of experimental challenges in applying this technique and analyze its precision in terms of the inferred gas temperature.

  7. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography of patients with skin diseases.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-07-01

    We report on the first clinical study based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy. 47 patients with a variety of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art OCT systems for dermatology including multibeam swept source OCT, (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph, and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT images reflect modifications of the intratissue refractive index whereas MPT is based on nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second harmonic generation. A stack of cross-sectional OCT "wide field" images with a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm(2) gave fast information on the depth and the volume of the lesion. Multiphoton tomography provided 0.36 x 0.36 mm(2) horizontal/diagonal optical sections within seconds of a particular region of interest with superior submicron resolution down to a tissue depth of 200 mum. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases as well as for the evaluation of the efficiency of treatments.

  8. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  9. Combined Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation with Ultraviolet Photodissociation for Ubiquitin Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Herein we report the successful implementation of the consecutive and simultaneous photodissociation with high (213 nm) and low (10.6 μm) energy photons (HiLoPD, high-low photodissociation) on ubiquitin in a quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Absorption of high-energy UV photon is dispersed over the whole protein and stimulates extensive C-Cα backbone fragmentation, whereas low-energy IR photon gradually increases the internal energy and thus preferentially dissociates the most labile amide (C-N) bonds. We noticed that simultaneous irradiation of UV and IR lasers on intact ubiquitin in a single MS/MS experiment provides a rich and well-balanced fragmentation array of a/x, b/y, and z ions. Moreover, secondary fragmentation from a/x and z ions leads to the formation of satellite side-chain ions (d, v, and w) and can help to distinguish isomeric residues in a protein. Implementation of high-low photodissociation in a high-resolution mass spectrometer may offer considerable benefits to promote a comprehensive portrait of protein characterization.

  10. Collective excitation of Rydberg-atom ensembles beyond the superatom model.

    PubMed

    Gärttner, Martin; Whitlock, Shannon; Schönleber, David W; Evers, Jörg

    2014-12-05

    In an ensemble of laser-driven atoms involving strongly interacting Rydberg states, the steady-state excitation probability is usually substantially suppressed. In contrast, here we identify a regime in which the Rydberg excited fraction is enhanced by the interaction. This effect is associated with the buildup of many-body coherences induced by coherent multiphoton excitations between collective states. The excitation enhancement should be observable under currently existing experimental conditions and may serve as a direct probe for the presence of coherent multiphoton dynamics involving collective quantum states.

  11. Infrared photochemistry of oxetanes: mechanism of chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Farneth, W.E.; Johnson, D.G.

    1986-02-19

    The infrared multiphoton (IRMP) induced photolysis of several oxetanes is examined at low pressures (ca. 100 mtorr) while experimental variables such as laser frequency, laser energy, bath gas, and bath gas pressure are altered. The products of the IRMP induced photolysis of 2-acyl-3-ethoxy-2-methyloxetane, Ox1, are primary biacetyl and ethyl vinyl ether. When the photolysis is run with the collimated beam of a CO/sub 2/ laser (1-3 J/cm/sup 2/) luminescence is observed. The intensity of the luminescence varies with the efficiency of the unimolecular decomposition of the oxetane. On the basis of the spectral distribution and temporal behavior of the luminescence following irradiation of Ox1, the emitter is believed to be vibrationally hot electronically excited biacetyl. Similar experiments with 2,2-dimethyl-3-ethoxyoxetane give a weaker emission apparently due to excited-state acetone. Results are discussed in terms of the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction - a diabatic retrophotocycloaddition. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Identification of dirty necrosis in colorectal carcinoma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Chen, Zhifen; Feng, Changyin; Li, Hongsheng; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-06-01

    Dirty necrosis within glandular lumina is often considered as a characteristic of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) that is a diagnostically useful feature of CRCs with DNA microsatellite instability (MSI). Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is based on the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence signals, was used to identify dirty necrosis. Our results demonstrated that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of dirty necrosis and the signal intensity as well as an emission spectrum that can help to differentiate dirty necrosis from cancer cells. These findings indicate that MPM may be helpful in distinguishing MSI colorectal carcinoma via the identification of dirty necrosis.

  13. Real-time in vivo imaging collagen in lymphedematous skin using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Liu, Ningfei

    2011-01-01

    Changes of dermal collagen are characteristic for chronic lymphedema. To evaluate these changes, a real-time imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation was developed for investigating collagen of lymphedematous mouse and rat tail skin in vivo. Our findings showed that the technique could image the morphological changes and distribution of collagen in lymphedematous mouse and rat tail skin in vivo. More importantly, it may allow visualization of dynamic collagen alteration during the progression of lymphedema. Our findings demonstrated that multiphoton microscopy may have potential in a clinical setting as an in vivo diagnostic and monitoring system for therapy in lymphology.

  14. Multi-photon microscopy based on resonant four-wave mixing of colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masia, F.; Langbein, W.; Borri, P.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel multi-photon imaging modality based on the detection of four-wave mixing (FWM) from colloidal nanoparticles. Four-wave mixing is a third-order signal which can be excited and detected in resonance with the ground-state excitonic transition of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The coherent FWM signal is detected interferometrically to reject incoherent backgrounds for improved image contrast compared to fluorescence methods. We measure transversal and axial resolutions of 140nm and 590nm respectively, significantly beating the one-photon diffraction limit. We also demonstrate optical imaging of quantum-dot-labeled Golgi structures of HepG2 cells.

  15. Resonant single-photon and multiphoton coherent transitions in a detuned regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, S.; Martens, M.; Egels, M.; Barakel, D.; Chiorescu, I.

    2015-07-01

    We performed quantum manipulations of the multilevel spin system S =5 /2 of a Mn2 + ion, by means of a two-tone pulse drive. The detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses allows one to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase the frequency of this nutation. Thus detuning can lead to a resonant multiphoton process. Our analytical model for a two-photon process as well as a numerical generalization fit well the experimental findings, with implications for the use of multilevel spin systems as tunable solid state qubits.

  16. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopic imaging through double-layer turbid tissue media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoyuan; Gan, Xiaosong; Gu, Min

    2002-04-01

    Image formation in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy through double-layer turbid tissue media is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. With the help of the concept of the effective point spread function, the relationship of image resolution and signal level to the thickness and scattering properties of the double-layer turbid media under single-, two-, and three-photon excitation is revealed. Results show that for a double-layer turbid medium of a given thickness, small particles in the top layer result in a quicker degradation of signal level than large particles in the top layer. This model is then applied to study the penetration depth of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy through human skin tissue which exhibits a layered structure. It is predicated that using 3p excitation leads to a signal level up to two orders of magnitude higher than that under 2p excitation, while diffraction-limited image resolution can be maintained for skin tissue of thickness up to 500 μm.

  17. Characterization of multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy for subsurface brain tissue diagnosis and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-04-01

    The development and demonstration of a multiphoton photoacoustic imaging technique capable of providing high spatial resolution chemical images of subsurface tissue components as deep as 1.4 cm below the tissue surface is described. By combining multiphoton excitation in the diagnostic window (650 to 1100 nm), with ultrasonic detection of nonradiative relaxation events, it is possible to rapidly reconstruct three-dimensional, chemical specific, images of samples underneath overlying structures as well as chemical species of the same material. Demonstration of this technique for subsurface tissue differentiation is shown, with the ability to distinguish between grade III astrocytoma tissue and adjacent healthy tissue in blind studies. By employing photoacoustic signal detection, the high nonradiative relaxation rates of most biological tissue components (>90%) and the minimal signal attenuation of the resulting ultrasound compensate for excitation efficiency losses associated with two-photon absorption. Furthermore, the two-photon absorption process results in a highly localized excitation volume (ca., 60 μm). Characterization of the probing depth, spatial resolution, and ability to image through overlying structures is also demonstrated in this paper using tissue phantoms with well-characterized optical scattering properties, mimicking those of tissues.

  18. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  19. Optimal spectral filtering in soliton self-frequency shift for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Qiu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Tunable optical solitons generated by soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) have become valuable tools for multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Recent progress in MPM using 1700 nm excitation enabled visualizing subcortical structures in mouse brain in vivo for the first time. Such an excitation source can be readily obtained by SSFS in a large effective-mode-area photonic crystal rod with a 1550-nm fiber femtosecond laser. A longpass filter was typically used to isolate the soliton from the residual in order to avoid excessive energy deposit on the sample, which ultimately leads to optical damage. However, since the soliton was not cleanly separated from the residual, the criterion for choosing the optimal filtering wavelength is lacking. Here, we propose maximizing the ratio between the multiphoton signal and the n'th power of the excitation pulse energy as a criterion for optimal spectral filtering in SSFS when the soliton shows dramatic overlapping with the residual. This optimization is based on the most efficient signal generation and entirely depends on physical quantities that can be easily measured experimentally. Its application to MPM may reduce tissue damage, while maintaining high signal levels for efficient deep penetration.

  20. Mapping and controlling ultrafast dynamics of highly excited H2 molecules by VUV-IR pump-probe schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, F. P.; Tong, X. M.; Palacios, A.; Wright, T. W.; Zalyubovskaya, I.; Ray, D.; Shivaram, N.; Martín, F.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Weber, Th.

    2017-01-01

    We used ultrashort femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) pulses in a pump-probe scheme to map the dynamics and nonequilibrium dissociation channels of excited neutral H2 molecules. A nuclear wave packet is created in the B Σ+1u state of the neutral H2 molecule by absorption of the ninth harmonic of the driving infrared laser field. Due to the large stretching amplitude of the molecule excited in the B Σ+1u electronic state, the effective H2+ ionization potential changes significantly as the nuclear wave packet vibrates in the bound, highly electronically and vibrationally excited B potential-energy curve. We probed such dynamics by ionizing the excited neutral molecule using time-delayed VUV-or-IR radiation. We identified the nonequilibrium dissociation channels by utilizing three-dimensional momentum imaging of the ion fragments. We found that different dissociation channels can be controlled, to some extent, by changing the IR laser intensity and by choosing the wavelength of the probe laser light. Furthermore, we concluded that even in a benchmark molecular system such as H2*, the interpretation of the nonequilibrium multiphoton and multicolor ionization processes is still a challenging task, requiring intricate theoretical analysis.

  1. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Nearby Seyfert Galaxies: Is There Evidence for Shock Excitation in Narrow-line Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, K.; Nagao, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Yanagisawa, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Toba, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    One of the important unsettled problems regarding active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is the major ionization mechanism of gas clouds in AGN narrow-line regions (NLRs). In order to investigate this issue, we present our J-band spectroscopic observations of a sample of 26 nearby Seyfert galaxies. In our study, we use the flux ratio of the following two forbidden emission lines, [Fe ii]1.257 μm and [P ii]1.188 μm, because it is known that this ratio is sensitive to the ionization mechanism. We obtain the [Fe ii]/[P ii] flux ratio or its lower limit for 19 objects. In addition to our data, we compile this flux ratio (or its lower limit) for 23 nearby Seyfert galaxies from the literature. Based on the collected data, we find that three Seyfert galaxies show very large lower limits of the [Fe ii]/[P ii] flux ratios (≳10): NGC 2782, NGC 5005, and Mrk 463. It is thus suggested that the contribution of the fast shock in the gas excitation is significantly large for them. However, more than half of the Seyfert galaxies in our sample show moderate [Fe ii]/[P ii] flux ratios (∼2), which is consistent with pure photoionization by power-law ionizing continuum emission. We also find that the [Fe ii]/[P ii] flux ratio shows no clear correlation with the radio loudness, suggesting that the radio jet is not the primary origin of shocks in NLRs of Seyfert galaxies.

  2. Electron Vortices in Femtosecond Multiphoton Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengel, D.; Kerbstadt, S.; Johannmeyer, D.; Englert, L.; Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton ionization of potassium atoms with a sequence of two counter-rotating circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses produces vortex-shaped photoelectron momentum distributions in the polarization plane describing Archimedean spirals. The pulse sequences are produced by polarization shaping and the three-dimensional photoelectron distributions are tomographically reconstructed from velocity map imaging measurements. We show that perturbative ionization leads to electron vortices with c6 rotational symmetry. A change from c6 to c4 rotational symmetry of the vortices is demonstrated for nonperturbative interaction.

  3. Characterization of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery with multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, William J.; Kendall, Mark A. F.; White, Nick; Bellhouse, Brian J.

    2004-11-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) has been adapted to non-invasively characterize hand-held powdered epidermal vaccine delivery technology. A near infrared femtosecond pulsed laser, wavelength at approximately 920 nm, was used to evoke autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores within ex vivo porcine and human skin. Consequently, sub cellular resolution three-dimensional images of stratum corneum and viable epidermal cells were acquired and utilized to observe the morphological deformation of these cells as a result of micro-particle penetration. Furthermore, the distributional pattern of micro-particles within the specific skin target volume was quantified by measuring the penetration depth as revealed by serial optical sections in the axial plane obtained with MPLSM. Additionally, endogenous fluorescence contrast images acquired at the supra-basal layer reveal cellular structures that may pertain to dendritic Langerhans cells of the epidermis. These results show that MPLSM has advantages over conventional histological approaches, since three-dimensional functional images with sub-cellular spatial resolution to depths beyond the epidermis can be acquired non-invasively. Accordingly, we propose that MPLSM is ideal for investigations of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery.

  4. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-05-26

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2..eta.. below the diffraction limit, where ..eta.. is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media.

  5. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  7. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  8. Multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input: nonclassicality and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Wu, Jia-Ni; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a new kind of non-Gaussian state—the Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state (LPECS)—by using multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input. The nonclassical properties of the LPECS are studied in terms of nonclassical depth, Mandel’s parameter, second-order correlation, quadrature squeezing, and the negativity of the Wigner function (WF). It is found that the LPECS is highly nonclassical and its nonclassicality depends on the amplitude of the coherent state, the catalysis photon number, and the parameters of the unbalanced beam splitter (BS). In particular, the maximum degree of squeezing can be enhanced by increasing the catalysis photon number. In addition, we examine the effect of decoherence using the WF, which shows that the negative region, the characteristic time of decoherence, and the structure of the WF are affected by catalysis photon number and the parameters of the unbalanced BS. Our work provides general analysis on how to prepare polynomial quantum states, which may be useful in the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

  9. Label-Free Detection of Breast Masses Using Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Zhu, Weifeng; Qiu, Jingting; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology forms the gold standard for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been proposed to be a potentially powerful adjunct to current histopathological techniques. A label-free imaging based on two- photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation is developed for differentiating normal breast tissues, benign, as well as breast cancer tissues. Human breast biopsies (including human normal breast tissues, benign as well as breast cancer tissues ) that are first imaged (fresh, unfixed, and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine H-E histopathology. Our results suggest that the MPM images, obtained from these unprocessed biopsies, can readily distinguish between benign lesions and breast cancers. In the tissues of breast cancers, MPM showed that the tumor cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. The tumor cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, infiltrated into disrupted connective tissue, leading to the loss of second-harmonic generation signals. For breast cancer, MPM diagnosis was 100% correct because the tissues of breast cancers did not have second-harmonic generation signals in MPM imaging. On the contrary, in benign breast masses, second-harmonic generation signals could be seen easily in MPM imaging. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide label-free noninvasive diagnostic impressions that can guide surgeon in biopsy and patient management. PMID:23755295

  10. Visible and near infra-red up-conversion in Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped silica fibers under 980 nm excitation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, D A; Gibbs, W E; Collins, S F; Blanc, W; Dussardier, B; Monnom, G; Peterka, P; Baxter, G W

    2008-09-01

    The spectroscopic properties of Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped silica fibers under excitation at 980 nm are reported. Three distinct up-conversion fluorescence bands were observed in the visible to near infra-red regions. The blue and red fluorescence bands at 475 and 650 nm, respectively, were found to originate from the (1)G(4) level of Tm(3+). A three step up-conversion process was established as the populating mechanism for these fluorescence bands. The fluorescence band at 800 nm was found to originate from two possible transitions in Tm(3+); one being the transition from the (3)H(4) to (3)H(6) manifold which was found to dominate at low pump powers; the other being the transition from the (1)G(4) to (3)H(6) level which dominates at higher pump powers. The fluorescence lifetime of the (3)H(4) and (3)F(4) levels of Tm(3+) and (2)F(5/2) level of Yb(3+) were studied as a function of Yb(3+) concentration, with no significant energy back transfer from Tm(3+) to Yb(3+) observed.

  11. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  12. Multiphoton imaging with a nanosecond supercontinuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Blanquet, Véronique; Baraige, Fabienne; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a well-established technique for biological imaging of several kinds of targets. It is classically based on multiphoton processes allowing two means of contrast simultaneously: two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Today, the quasi exclusive laser technology used in that aim is femtosecond titanium sapphire (Ti: Sa) laser. We experimentally demonstrate that a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source (STM-250-VIS-IR-custom, Leukos, France; 1 ns, 600-2400 nm, 250 kHz, 1 W) allows to obtain the same kind of image quality in the case of both TPF and SHG, since it is properly filtered. The first set of images concerns the muscle of a mouse. It highlights the simultaneous detection of TPF and SHG. TPF is obtained thanks to the labelling of alpha-actinin with Alexa Fluor® 546 by immunochemistry. SHG is created from the non-centrosymmetric organization of myosin. As expected, discs of actin and myosin are superimposed alternatively. The resulting images are compared with those obtained from a standard femtosecond Ti: Sa source. The physical parameters of the supercontinuum are discussed. Finally, all the interest of using an ultra-broadband source is presented with images obtained in vivo on the brain of a mouse where tumor cells labeled with eGFP are grafted. Texas Red® conjugating Dextran is injected into the blood vessels network. Thus, two fluorophores having absorption wavelengths separated by 80 nm are imaged simultaneously with a single laser source.

  13. Design, synthesis, characterization and applications of multi-photon absorbing chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingdong

    Recent development in multi-photon based applications including optical power limiting, frequency up-conversion lasing, three-dimensional data storage, two-photon fluorescence microscopy and two-photon photodynamic therapy has benefited a lot from a number of chromophores with large multi-photon absorption. This thesis was focused on the development of novel two- and three-photon active chromophores and their applications. Chapter 1 describes a theoretical background of multi-photon absorption, and recent development of multi-photon based applications. Some molecular design strategies were proposed after a literature review of chromophores with large two-photon absorption. In Chapter 2, a series of stilbazolium salts with varying electron donors and anions were synthesized and characterized. The two-photon absorption and two-photon pumped cavity lasing properties for these dyes were studied by using 1064 nm nano-second laser beam. By using tunable femto-second laser, three-photon pumped cavity-less lasing properties of these dyes have also been comprehensively studied. Four-photon pumped stimulated emission was achieved in some of these stilbazolium dyes. Unsymmetrical emission behaviors under 3- and 4-photon pump conditions for all these stilbazolium dyes were observed, explained and verified. In Chapter 3, DNA was successfully used as a matrix for one-, two-, and three-photon pumped stimulated emission or lasing by intercalating a multi-photon active chromophore. In Chapter 4, it is experimentally shown that both two- and three-photon absorption in a highly concentrated chromophore system can be more efficiently utilized to accomplish optical power limiting and stabilization at laser wavelengths of 1.064 mum and ˜1.3 mum, respectively. In Chapter 5, three novel 1,10-phenanthroline containing pi-conjugated chromophores with varied electron donors were synthesized and characterized together with their corresponding nickel(II) chelated complexes. Large two

  14. Molecular photoelectron angular distribution rotations in multi-photon resonant ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by circularly polarized ultraviolet laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Kai-Jun Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-04-14

    We study effects of pulse durations on molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in ultrafast circular polarization ultraviolet resonant ionization processes. Simulations performed on aligned H{sub 2}{sup +} by numerically solving time dependent Schrödinger equations show rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular symmetry axes. It is found that in multi-photon resonant ionization processes, rotation angles are sensitive to pulse durations, which we attribute to the coherent resonant excitation between the ground state and the intermediate excited electronic state induced by Rabi oscillations. Multi-photon nonresonant and single photon ionization processes are simulated and compared which exhibit a constant rotation angle. An asymmetry parameter is introduced to describe the pulse duration sensitivity by perturbation theory models. Influence of pulse frequency detunings on MPADs is also investigated where oscillations of rotations are absent at long pulse durations due to nonresonance excitation.

  15. Multiphoton microscopy using intrinsic signals for pharmacological studies in unstained cardiac and vascular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Boulesteix, Thierry; Pena, Ana-Maria; Pages, Nicole; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2005-03-01

    We report two novel applications of multiphoton microscopy for pharmacological studies of unstained cardiovascular tissue. First, we show that second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of unstained cardiac myocytes can be used to determine the sarcomere length with sub-resolution accuracy, owing to the remarkable contrast of the SHG signal originating from myosin filaments. A measurement precision of 20 nm is achieved, taking the sample variability into account. We used this technique to measure sarcomere contracture in the presence of saxitoxin, and results were in agreement with mechanical measurements of atrial tissue contracture. Second, we characterized multiphoton microscopy of intact unlabeled arteries. We performed simultaneous detection of two-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) from elastin laminae and SHG from collagen fibers upon 860 nm excitation. Combined 2PEF/SHG images provide a highly specific, micron scale description of the architecture of these two major components of the vessel wall. We used this methodology to study the effects of lindane (a pesticide) on the artery wall structure and evidenced structural alteration of the vessel morphology.

  16. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  17. Multiphoton photochemistry of red fluorescent proteins in solution and live cells.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Stoltzfus, Caleb; Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Barnett, Lauren; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2014-08-07

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), and biosensors based on them, provide new insights into how living cells and tissues function. Ultimately, the goal of the bioimaging community is to use these probes deep in tissues and even in entire organisms, and this will require two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), with its greater tissue penetration, lower autofluorescence background, and minimum photodamage in the out-of-focus volume. However, the extremely high instantaneous light intensities of femtosecond pulses in the focal volume dramatically increase the probability of further stepwise resonant photon absorption, leading to highly excited, ionizable and reactive states, often resulting in fast bleaching of fluorescent proteins in TPLSM. Here, we show that the femtosecond multiphoton excitation of red FPs (DsRed2 and mFruits), both in solution and live cells, results in a chain of consecutive, partially reversible reactions, with individual rates driven by a high-order (3-5 photon) absorption. The first step of this process corresponds to a three- (DsRed2) or four-photon (mFruits) induced fast isomerization of the chromophore, yielding intermediate fluorescent forms, which then subsequently transform into nonfluorescent products. Our experimental data and model calculations are consistent with a mechanism in which ultrafast electron transfer from the chromophore to a neighboring positively charged amino acid residue triggers the first step of multiphoton chromophore transformations in DsRed2 and mFruits, consisting of decarboxylation of a nearby deprotonated glutamic acid residue.

  18. Nonperturbative multiphoton processes and electron-positron pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Müller, C.; Keitel, C. H.

    2006-04-01

    Various regimes of pair production in laser fields are analyzed. Particularly, the question of the observability of pair production in a nonperturbative multiphoton regime is discussed. A simple heuristic method is employed which gives order-of-magnitude estimates for probabilities of multiphoton processes and allows to describe its main features. The method is initially probed upon the known process of pair production in a Coulomb and a strong laser field. Then it is applied to the nonperturbative multiphoton regime of the pair production process in a standing laser wave.

  19. Excitation of the low lying vibrational levels of H2O by O(3P) as measured on Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerott, R. E.; Swenson, G. R.; Schweitzer, E. L.; Koch, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    The data from the infrared telescope (IRT), which was flown on space shuttle Challenger Spacelab 2 mission (July 1985), were originally reported by Koch et al. (1987) as originating from near orbital emissions, primarily H2O. In this study, analysis of this data was extended to determine the collisional cross sections for the excitation of the low lying vibrational levels of H2O, present in the orbiter cloud, by atmospheric O(3P). The evaluation of the contribution to the measured signal from solar excitation and ram O excitation of outgassing H2O permits the determination of the H2O column density and the excitation cross section of the (101) level at an O(3P) velocity of approximately 7.75 km/s. Contributions to the radiation in the 1.7-3.0 micron band by transitions from the (100), (001), and multiquantum excited levels are discussed. The findings of the study are (1) the IRT data for the 4.5-9.5 micron and the nighttime data for the 1.7-3.0 micron sensors are consistent with being explained by collision excitation of H2O by O(3P), (2) diurnal variations of 4.5-9.5 micron intensities follow the model predicted O density for a full orbit, (3) daytime increases in the H2O cloud density were not evident, (4) the cross sections for the collisional excitation process are derived and compared to values computated by Johnson (1986) and Redmon et al. (1986), (5) theoretical investigation suggests greater than 60% of the radiation from H2O is a result of multiphoton emission resulting from collisional multiquanta excitation, and (6) the large daytime increase in the 1.7-3.0 micron intensity data suggests that O(+) may likely be instrumental in producing excited H2O(+) through charge exchange.

  20. The kinetics and mechanism of dissociation of metal carbonyls in high infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsam, Y.; Ronn, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    The method of laser induced dielectric breakdown has been used to study the dissociation of three metal carbonyls. Following non-resonant excitation by a TEA CO 2 laser, amorphous micro-metallic particles are deposited. The identity of the various species within a laser induced plasma for a series of related reactant molecules, has been determined using infrared and visible real time fluorescence techniques. Based upon the energetics of dissociation and the relative magnitudes of the rates of activation and deactivation for various collision partners of the plasma fluorescence, an energy transfer map as well as probable mechanisms are proposed. The kinetics of a variety of chemical reactions under plasma conditions are discussed in terms of elementary collision theory. It is shown that the internal vibration manifold of the metal carbonyls is equilibrated prior to the dissociation in agreement with the majority of laser induced multiphoton dissociation experiments.

  1. Generation of extended light-sheets for single and multi-photon fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnapatra, Subhajit B.; Pratim Mondal, Partha

    2013-07-01

    We theoretically propose and computationally demonstrate the generation of extended light-sheet for fluorescence microscopy. This is made possible by the introduction of a specially designed double-window spatial filter that allows the light to pass through the periphery and center of a cylindrical lens. When illuminated with a plane wave, the proposed filter results in an extended depth-of-focus along with side-lobes which are due to other interferences in the transverse focal plane. Computational studies show a maximum extension of light-sheet by 3.38 times for single photon excitation and 3.68 times for multiphoton excitation as compared to state-of-art single plane illumination microscopy system. This technique may facilitate the study of large biological specimens (such as Zebrafish embryo and tissue) with high spatial resolution and reduced photobleaching.

  2. Near infrared and visible luminescence from xerogels covalently grafted with lanthanide [Sm(3+), Yb(3+), Nd(3+), Er(3+), Pr(3+), Ho(3+)] β-diketonate derivatives using visible light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Jin Z; Dang, Song; Feng, Jing; Wang, Zhijuan; Zhang, Hongjie; Shi, Liyi

    2013-10-09

    A series of ternary lanthanide β-diketonate derivatives covalently bonded to xerogels (named as Ln-DP-xerogel, Ln = Sm, Yb, Nd, Er, Pr, Ho) by doubly functionalized alkoxysilane (dbm-Si) was synthesized in situ via a sol-gel process. The properties of these xerogel materials were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The data and analyses suggest that the lanthanide derivatives have been covalently grafted to the corresponding xerogels successfully. Of importance here is that, after excitation with visible light (400-410 nm), the xerogels all show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (NIR; Sm(3+), Yb(3+), Nd(3+), Er(3+), Pr(3+), Ho(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding Ln(3+) ions, which is attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the Ln(3+) ions via an antenna effect. Exciting with visible light is advantageous over UV excitation. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, it is the first observation of NIR luminescence with visible light excitation from xerogels covalently bonded with the Sm(3+), Pr(3+), and Ho(3+) derivatives. Compared to lanthanide complexes (Ln = Er, Nd, Yb) functionalized periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) materials that exhibit similar optical properties reported in our previous work, the Ln-DP-xerogel (Ln = Sm, Yb, Nd, Er, Pr, Ho) in this case offer advantages in terms of ease of synthesis and handling and potentially low cost for emerging technological applications. Development of near-infrared luminescence of the lanthanide materials with visible light excitation is of strong interest to emerging applications such as chemosensors, laser systems, and optical amplifiers.

  3. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, G N; Petin, A N

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF{sub 6} and CF{sub 3}I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF{sub 6} molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation. (laser separation of isotopes)

  4. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  5. Point spread function engineering with multiphoton SPIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsing, Keith A.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende-Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    MultiPhoton SPatIal Frequency modulated Imaging (MP-SPIFI) has recently demonstrated the ability to simultaneously obtain super-resolved images in both coherent and incoherent scattering processes -- namely, second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence, respectively.1 In our previous analysis, we considered image formation produced by the zero and first diffracted orders from the SPIFI modulator. However, the modulator is a binary amplitude mask, and therefore produces multiple diffracted orders. In this work, we extend our analysis to image formation in the presence of higher diffracted orders. We find that tuning the mask duty cycle offers a measure of control over the shape of super-resolved point spread functions in an MP-SPIFI microscope.

  6. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  7. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Daniel H.; Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  8. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-28

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  9. Multi-photon entanglement in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Erhard, Manuel; Huber, Marcus; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Forming the backbone of quantum technologies today, entanglement has been demonstrated in physical systems as diverse as photons, ions and superconducting circuits. Although steadily pushing the boundary of the number of particles entangled, these experiments have remained in a two-dimensional space for each particle. Here we show the experimental generation of the first multi-photon entangled state where both the number of particles and dimensions are greater than two. Two photons in our state reside in a three-dimensional space, whereas the third lives in two dimensions. This asymmetric entanglement structure only appears in multiparticle entangled states with d > 2. Our method relies on combining two pairs of photons, high-dimensionally entangled in their orbital angular momentum. In addition, we show how this state enables a new type of ‘layered’ quantum communication protocol. Entangled states such as these serve as a manifestation of the complex dance of correlations that can exist within quantum mechanics.

  10. Livermore experience: contributions of J. H. Eberly to laser excitation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B W; Kulander, K; Davis, J I

    2000-10-12

    This article summarizes the developing understanding of coherent atomic excitation, as gained through a collaboration of J. H. Eberly with the Laser Isotope Separation Program of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, particularly aspects of coherence, population trapping, multilevel multiphoton excitation sequences, analytic solutions to multistate excitation chains, the quasicontinuum, pulse propagation, and noise. In addition to the discovery of several curious and unexpected properties of coherent excitation, mentioned here, the collaboration provided an excellent example of unexpected benefits from investment into basic research.

  11. Large field of view multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical examination crucially relies on the ability to quickly examine large tissue areas and rapidly zoom in to regions of interest. Skin lesions often show irregularity in color and appearance in general, especially when they start to progress towards malignancy. Large field of view (FOV) and automatic translation of the imaging area are critical in the assessment of the entire lesion. Imaging of limited FOVs of the lesion can easily result in false negative diagnosis. We present a multiphoton microscope based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation that images FOVs of about 0.8 mm2 (without stitching adjacent FOVs) at speeds of 10 frames/second (800 x 800 pixels) with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5 μm and 2.5 μm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, relay optics, a beam expander and a high NA objective lens. We optimized the system based on the Olympus 25x, 1.05NA water immersion lens, that features a long working distance of 1 mm. Proper tailoring of the beam expander, which consists of the scan and tube lens elements, enables scaling of the FOV. The design criteria include a flat wavefront of the beam, minimum field curvature, and suppressed spherical aberrations. All aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide FOVs in normal human skin.

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy - Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation-Inhibition Balance Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E-I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual "forward models" to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E-I-based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E-I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E-I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of neurostimulation with

  13. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; Dimarzio, Charles A

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching.

  14. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  15. Preparation of metallo-dielectric photonic crystals by multi-photon direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, Stephen M.; Tal, Amir; Chen, Yun-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Metallo-dielectric photonic crystals (MDPCs) can exhibit intriguing and potentially useful optical properties, including ultra-wide photonic bandgaps, engineered thermal emission, and negative refractive index. But access to such materials has been limited by the lack of suitable methods for their preparation. We have developed a route to three-dimensional (3D) MDPCs that involves fabricating a polymeric pre-form by multi-photon direct laser writing and then conformally depositing metal onto the pre-form by electroless metallization. We use the approach to prepare silver- and copper-plated "woodpile" PCs having face-centered tetragonal symmetry and unit-cell period of several micrometers. The resulting 3D metallized structures exhibit mid-infrared reflectance that is consistent with theory and experimental observations obtained for MDPCs prepared by other routes. These data indicate that multi-photon direct laser writing coupled with electroless metallization is a viable route to complex 3D MDPCs of many symmetries and basis sets and provides a path for integrating such structures with other micron-scale optical elements.

  16. PScan 1.0: flexible software framework for polygon based multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopes exhibit highly localized nonlinear optical excitation and are powerful instruments for in-vivo deep tissue imaging. Customized multiphoton microscopy has a significantly superior performance for in-vivo imaging because of precise control over the scanning and detection system. To date, there have been several flexible software platforms catered to custom built microscopy systems i.e. ScanImage, HelioScan, MicroManager, that perform at imaging speeds of 30-100fps. In this paper, we describe a flexible software framework for high speed imaging systems capable of operating from 5 fps to 1600 fps. The software is based on the MATLAB image processing toolbox. It has the capability to communicate directly with a high performing imaging card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), thus retaining high speed acquisition. The program is also designed to communicate with LabVIEW and Fiji for instrument control and image processing. Pscan 1.0 can handle high imaging rates and contains sufficient flexibility for users to adapt to their high speed imaging systems.

  17. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    During the proliferation of breast cancer, the desmoplastic can evoke a fibrosis response by invading healthy tissue. Fibrotic focus (FF) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast had been reported to be associated with significantly poorer survival rate than IDC without FF. As an important prognosis indicator, it's difficult to obtain the exact fibrotic information from traditional detection method such as mammography. Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been recently employed for microscopic examination of unstained tissue. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma tissue. The morphology and distribution of collagen in fibrotic focus can be demonstrated by the SHG signal. Variation of collagen between IDC with and without FF will be examined and further characterized, which may be greatly related to the metastasis of breast cancer. Our result suggested that the MPM can be efficient in identifying and locating the fibrotic focus in IDC. Combining with the pathology analysis and other detecting methods, MPM owns potential in becoming an advanced histological tool for detecting the fibrotic focus in IDC and collecting prognosis information, which may guide the subsequent surgery option and therapy procedure for patients.

  18. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the cornea: polarization-resolved second harmonic generation from stromal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, G.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Lamarre, I.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy provides specific and contrasted images of unstained collagenous tissues such as tendons or corneas. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements have been implemented in a laserscanning multiphoton microscope. Distortion of the polarimetric response due to birefringence and diattenuation during propagation of the laser excitation has been shown in rat-tail tendons. A model has been developed to account for these effects and correct polarization-resolved SHG images in thick tissues. This new modality is then used in unstained human corneas to access two quantitative parameters: the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae and the ratio of the main second-order nonlinear tensorial components. Orientation maps obtained from polarization resolution of the trans-detected SHG images are in good agreement with the striated features observed in the raw images. Most importantly, polarization analysis of the epi-detected SHG images also enables to map the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae while epi-detected SHG images of corneal stroma are spatially homogenous and do not enable direct visualization of the fibrils orientation. Depth profiles of the polarimetric SHG response are also measured and compared to models accounting for orientation changes of the collagen lamellae within the focal volume. Finally, in vivo polarization-resolved SHG is performed in rat corneas and structural organization of corneal stroma is determined using epi-detected signals.

  19. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixel and watershed.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weilin; Lin, Jinyong; Wang, Shu; Li, Yan; Liu, Mingyu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong

    2016-04-19

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging technique based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) shows fantastic performance for biological imaging. The automatic segmentation of cellular architectural properties for biomedical diagnosis based on MPM images is still a challenging issue. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixels and watershed (MSW) is presented here to provide good segmentation results for MPM images. The proposed method uses SLIC superpixels instead of pixels to analyze MPM images for the first time. The superpixels segmentation based on a new distance metric combined with spatial, CIE Lab color space and phase congruency features, divides the images into patches which keep the details of the cell boundaries. Then the superpixels are used to reconstruct new images by defining an average value of superpixels as image pixels intensity level. Finally, the marker-controlled watershed is utilized to segment the cell boundaries from the reconstructed images. Experimental results show that cellular boundaries can be extracted from MPM images by MSW with higher accuracy and robustness.

  20. Chronic imaging of amyloid plaques in the live mouse brain using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacskai, Brian J.; Kajdasz, Stephen T.; Christie, R. H.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Kasischke, Karl A.; Webb, Watt W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2001-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) develop amyloid plaques as they age. These plaques resemble those found in the human disease. Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy combined with a novel surgical approach was used to measure amyloid plaque dynamics chronically in the cortex of living transgenic mice. Thioflavine S (thioS) was used as a fluorescent marker of amyloid deposits. Multiphoton excitation allowed visualization of amyloid plaques up to 200 micrometers deep into the brain. The surgical site could be imaged repeatedly without overt damage to the tissue, and individual plaques within this volume could be reliably identified over periods of several days to several months. On average, plaque sizes remained constant over time, supporting a model of rapid deposition, followed by relative stability. Alternative reporters for in vivo histology include thiazine red, and FITC-labeled amyloid-(Beta) peptide. We also present examples of multi-color imaging using Hoechst dyes and FITC-labeled tomato lectin. These approaches allow us to observe cell nuclei or microglia simultaneously with amyloid-(Beta) deposits in vivo. Chronic imaging of a variety of reporters in these transgenic mice should provide insight into the dynamics of amyloid-(Beta) activity in the brain.

  1. Label-free imaging of rat spinal cords based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Linquan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    As an integral part of the central nervous system, the spinal cord is a communication cable between the body and the brain. It mainly contains neurons, glial cells, nerve fibers and fiber tracts. The recent development of the optical imaging technique allows high-resolution imaging of biological tissues with the great potential for non-invasively looking inside the body. In this work, we evaluate the imaging capacity of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) for the cells and extracellular matrix in the spinal cord at molecular level. Rat spinal cord tissues were sectioned and imaged by MPM to demonstrate that MPM is able to show the microstructure including white matter, gray matter, ventral horns, dorsal horns, and axons based on the distinct intrinsic sources in each region of spinal cord. In the high-resolution and high-contrast MPM images, the cell profile can be clearly identified as dark shadows caused by nuclei and encircled by cytoplasm. The nerve fibers in white matter region emitted both SHG and TPEF signals. The multiphoton microscopic imaging technique proves to be a fast and effective tool for label-free imaging spinal cord tissues, based on endogenous signals in biological tissue. It has the potential to extend this optical technique to clinical study, where the rapid and damage-free imaging is needed.

  2. In vivo multi-photon nanosurgery on cortical neurons: focusing on network organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; O'Connor, R. P.; Jasaitis, A.; Masi, A.; Buffelli, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been used to perform high spatial resolution imaging of spine plasticity in the intact neocortex of living mice. Multi-photon absorption has also been used as a tool for the selective disruption of cellular structures in living cells and simple organisms. In this work we exploit the spatial localization of multi-photon excitation to perform selective lesions on the neuronal processes of cortical neurons in living mice expressing fluorescent proteins. This methodology was applied to dissect single dendrites with sub-micrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. The spatial precision of this method was demonstrated by ablating individual dendritic spines, while sparing the adjacent spines and the structural integrity of the dendrite. The morphological consequences were then characterized with time lapse 3D two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. Here we present the results of our systematic study of the morphological response of cortical pyramidal neurons to nanosurgical perturbations. Dendritic branches were followed after transecting distal segments, whilst the plasticity and remodeling of individual dendritic spines on a given branch was also followed after removing of a subset of spines.

  3. Visualization of basement membranes in normal breast and breast cancer tissues using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; CHEN, GANG; QIU, JINGTING; LU, JIANPING; ZHU, WEIFENG; CHEN, JIANXIN; ZHUO, SHUANGMU; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Since basement membranes represent a critical barrier during breast cancer progression, timely imaging of these signposts is essential for early diagnosis of breast cancer. A label-free method using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence signals and second harmonic generation signals for analyzing the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues is likely to enable a better understanding of the pathophysiology of breast cancer and facilitate improved clinical management and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPM has the potential for label-free assessment of the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues. A total of 60 tissue section samples (comprising 30 fresh breast cancer specimens and 30 normal breast tissues) were first imaged (fresh, unfixed and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Comparisons were made between MPM imaging and gold standard sections for each specimen stained with H&E. Simply by visualizing morphological features appearing on multiphoton images, cancerous lesions may be readily identified by the loss of basement membrane and tumor cells characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. These results suggest that MPM has potential as a label-free method of imaging the morphology of basement membranes and cell features to effectively distinguish between normal and cancerous breast tissues. PMID:27313695

  4. New perspectives in laser analytics: Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization in a Paul ion trap combined with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisling, Peter; Heger, Hans Jörg; Michaelis, Walfried; Weitkamp, Claus; Zobel, Harald

    1995-04-01

    A new laser analytical device has been developed that is based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization in the very center of a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap. Applications in speciation anlaysis of biological and enviromental samples and in materials science will all benefit from laser-optical selectivity in the resonance excitation process, combined with mass-spectropic sensivity which is further enhanced by the ion accumulation and storage capability.

  5. Advanced multiphoton methods for in vitro and in vivo functional imaging of mouse retinal neurons (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Noam; Schejter, Adi; Farah, Nairouz; Shoham, Shy

    2016-03-01

    Studying the responses of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations has major significance in vision research. Multiphoton imaging of optogenetic probes has recently become the leading approach for visualizing neural populations and has specific advantages for imaging retinal activity during visual stimulation, because it leads to reduced direct photoreceptor excitation. However, multiphoton retinal activity imaging is not straightforward: point-by-point scanning leads to repeated neural excitation while optical access through the rodent eye in vivo has proven highly challenging. Here, we present two enabling optical designs for multiphoton imaging of responses to visual stimuli in mouse retinas expressing calcium indicators. First, we present an imaging solution based on Scanning Line Temporal Focusing (SLITE) for rapidly imaging neuronal activity in vitro. In this design, we scan a temporally focused line rather than a point, increasing the scan speed and reducing the impact of repeated excitation, while maintaining high optical sectioning. Second, we present the first in vivo demonstration of two-photon imaging of RGC activity in the mouse retina. To obtain these cellular resolution recordings we integrated an illumination path into a correction-free imaging system designed using an optical model of the mouse eye. This system can image at multiple depths using an electronically tunable lens integrated into its optical path. The new optical designs presented here overcome a number of outstanding obstacles, allowing the study of rapid calcium- and potentially even voltage-indicator signals both in vitro and in vivo, thereby bringing us a step closer toward distributed monitoring of action potentials.

  6. Continuous-variable entanglement via multiphoton catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liyun; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the performance of multiphoton catalysis applied on the two-mode squeezed state by examining the entropy of entanglement, logarithmic negativity, Eistein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR), and Hillery-Zubairy (HZ) correlations, and the fidelity of teleportation. It is found that the entanglement increases with the number of catalysis operations if the squeezing parameter is low initially. Our comparisons show that the HZ correlation presents a better performance than the EPR correlation for detecting the entanglement, and the improvement of HZ correlation definitely results in the improvement of entropy of entanglement rather than negativity; the region of enhanced EPR correlation is a subregion of all other entanglement properties. In addition, we consider the performances of the fidelity by comparing such operations applied before or after the amplitude damping channel. It is shown that the catalysis operation of m =n =1 before the channel presents the best performance in the initial-low squeezing regime. This may provide a useful insight for a long-distance quantum communication.

  7. Soliton dynamics in the multiphoton plasma regime

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Combrié, Sylvain; Colman, Pierre; Zheng, Jiangjun; De Rossi, Alfredo; Wong, Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Solitary waves have consistently captured the imagination of scientists, ranging from fundamental breakthroughs in spectroscopy and metrology enabled by supercontinuum light, to gap solitons for dispersionless slow-light, and discrete spatial solitons in lattices, amongst others. Recent progress in strong-field atomic physics include impressive demonstrations of attosecond pulses and high-harmonic generation via photoionization of free-electrons in gases at extreme intensities of 1014 W/cm2. Here we report the first phase-resolved observations of femtosecond optical solitons in a semiconductor microchip, with multiphoton ionization at picojoule energies and 1010 W/cm2 intensities. The dramatic nonlinearity leads to picojoule observations of free-electron-induced blue-shift at 1016 cm−3 carrier densities and self-chirped femtosecond soliton acceleration. Furthermore, we evidence the time-gated dynamics of soliton splitting on-chip, and the suppression of soliton recurrence due to fast free-electron dynamics. These observations in the highly dispersive slow-light media reveal a rich set of physics governing ultralow-power nonlinear photon-plasma dynamics.

  8. A large area liquid scintillation multiphoton detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, V. K.; Cain, M. P.; Caldwell, D. O.; Denby, B. H.; Eisner, A. M.; Joshi, U. P.; Kennett, R. G.; Lu, A.; Morrison, R. J.; Pfost, D. R.; Stuber, H. R.; Summers, D. J.; Yellin, S. J.; Appel, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 layer lead-liquid scintillator shower detector, which we call the SLIC, has been used for multiphoton detection in the Fermilab tagged photon spectrometer. The detector has an unimpeded active area which is 2.44 m by 4.88 m and is segmented, by means of teflon coated channels, into 3.17 cm wide strips. The 60 layers in depth are broken into three directions of alternating readouts so that three position coordinates are determined for each shower. At present the readouts are made by 334 photomultiplier tubes coupled to BBQ doped wavelength shifter bars which integrate the entire depth of the detector. It is relatively straightforward to increase the number of readouts to include longitudinal segmentation and to increase the segmentation of the outer region which are at present read out two strips to a readout. The energy and position resolutions of isolated showers are about {12%}/{√E} and 3 mm., respectively. The SLIC has been used to study the K-π+π0 decay of the D 0 [1], as well as for electron and muon identification in ψ → e +e - and ψ → μ+μ- plus π0 identification in γp → ψχ [8].

  9. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  10. Multiphoton ionization/dissociation dynamics of formyl fluoride by velocity mapping ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyan; Zhang, Yongwei; Wang, Hua; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming

    2009-10-21

    The dissociation dynamics of HFCO(+) ion has been studied using the velocity map ion imaging technique. The HFCO(+) ion is prepared by one-photon resonant three-photon ionization in the region of 43100-43860 cm(-1) excitation energy. The HFCO(+) ions, produced by multiphoton ionization, have sufficient internal energy to dissociate into the F and HCO(+) fragments without further absorption of another photon. Images of HCO(+) have been recorded at various excitation energies. It is noticed that the angular distributions of HCO(+) change dramatically from parallel distribution to perpendicular distribution and then back to parallel distribution in a very narrow excitation energy region of 43 473-43 500 cm(-1). Analysis of anisotropy parameters of beta(n) (n = 2, 4 and 6) reveals that the electronic states in the three-photon excitation of HFCO are mainly: HFCO(X(1)A') --> HFCO(A(1)A'') --> HFCO(A') --> HFCO(+)(A(2)A'';B(2)A'). The purely perpendicular resonant transitions are likely responsible for the perpendicular angular distribution of the HCO(+) ion fragment.

  11. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670 nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490 nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550 nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  12. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  13. Vibrational resonance enhanced broadband multiphoton absorption in a triphenylamine derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Changgui; Cui Yiping; Huang Wei; Yun Binfeng; Wang Zhuyuan; Hu Guohua; Cui Jing; Lu Zhifeng; Qian Ying

    2007-09-17

    Multiphoton absorption of 2,5-bis[4-(2-N,N-diphenylaminostyryl)phenyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole was experimentally studied by using femtosecond laser pulses. This material demonstrates a very broad multiphoton absorption band of around 300 nm width with two peaks of 1250 and 1475 nm. The first peak results from the three-photon absorption process while the second is attributed to the vibrational resonance enhanced four-photon absorption process. Combination of these two processes provides a much broader multiphoton absorption band. In this letter, the analytical solution to nonlinear transmission of a three-photon absorption process is also given when the incident beam has a Gaussian transverse spatial profile.

  14. Pathological process investigation of Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhao, Jingjun; Yang, Yinghong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Jiang, Xingshan; Tian, Wei; Ye, Xiaoyin; Lin, Lihang

    2009-08-01

    Multiphoton microscopy based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) was firstly employed to investigate pathological process from the unaffected skin to the erythematous phase and to finally affected skin of Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma. Our study showed that the normal elastic fibers in unaffected skin were almost completely absent in erthematous skin tissue, then replaced by a lot of elastic fibers with granular morphology in affected skin. The obvious change of collagen fibers and occurrence of inflammatory cell infiltration in erthematous tissue suggested that variation of these two components were also main pathogenesis of anetoderma except for deficiency of elastic fibers. Our results give a sight to noninvasively study the pathological process of skin disease and the other disease with tight relation to variation of collagen and elastic fibers in skin dermis and cell in skin epidermis.

  15. Hypericin-Mediated Destruction of Collagen Fibers Revealed by Multiphoton Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, Ararat Zh.; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    Collagen is the major component of the extracellular matrix in skin, tendon, cartilage, cornea, bone, etc., and as a main structural protein is the key determinant of mechanical and functional properties of tissues and organs. Proper balance between synthesis and degradation of collagen fibers is critical for maintaining normal physiologic function; therefore, the modification of collagen fibers in a controlled manner is of high importance for biomedicine. In this work, using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited auto-fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, we revealed that hypericin, a natural pigment extracted from plant, induced structural modification of collagen based tissues. Dynamics of the process was monitored by time-lapse multiphoton imaging. It was demonstrated that hypericin-mediated process was considerably irreversible and has a potential to be used for destroying of abnormal tissues and treatment of some diseases.

  16. Volumetric imaging of erythrocytes using label-free multiphoton photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan L; Mattison, Scott P; Applegate, Brian E

    2014-10-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is an imaging modality well suited to mapping vasculature and other strong absorbers in tissue. However, one of the primary drawbacks to PAM when used for high-resolution imaging is the relatively poor axial resolution due to the inverse dependence on the transducer bandwidth. While submicron lateral resolution PAM can be achieved by tightly focusing the excitation light, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited to 10s of microns for typical transducer frequencies. Here we present a multiphoton PAM technique called transient absorption ultrasonic microscopy (TAUM), which results in a completely optically resolved voxel with an experimentally measured axial resolution of 1.5 microns. This technique is demonstrated by imaging individual red blood cells in three dimensions in blood smear and ex vivo tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fully resolved, volumetric photoacoustic imaging of erythrocytes.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of neural spike recordings and multi-photon calcium imaging in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyeong; Kang, Shinwon; Kim, Jeehyun

    2012-11-08

    This paper proposes the design and implementation of a micro-electrode array (MEA) for neuroblastoma cell culturing. It also explains the implementation of a multi-photon microscope (MPM) customized for neuroblastoma cell excitation and imaging under ambient light. Electrical signal and fluorescence images were simultaneously acquired from the neuroblastoma cells on the MEA. MPM calcium images of the cultured neuroblastoma cell on the MEA are presented and also the neural activity was acquired through the MEA recording. A calcium green-1 (CG-1) dextran conjugate of 10,000 D molecular weight was used in this experiment for calcium imaging. This study also evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spike recording of neuroblastoma cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in neuroblastoma cells with our proposed imaging modality, we report that neuroblastoma cells can be an important model for epileptic activity studies.

  18. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  19. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  20. Infrared-active quadruple contrast FePt nanoparticles for multiple scale molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shang-Wei; Liu, Chien-Liang; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Shen, Yu-Fang; Kuo, Lun-Chang; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Pei-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Yang, Che-Chang; Chang, Kai-Yao; Lu, Meng-Hua; Li, Pai-Chi; Chen, Shi-Ping; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lu, Chen-Wen; Chen, Yi-An; Huang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Churng-Ren Chris; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Li, Meng-Lin; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-01

    A single nanomaterial with multiple imaging contrasts and functions is highly desired for multiscale theragnosis. Herein, we demonstrate single 1-1.9 μm infrared-active FePt alloy nanoparticles (FePt NPs) offering unprecedented four-contrast-in-one molecular imaging - computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), photoacoustic (PA) imaging, and high-order multiphoton luminescence (HOMPL) microscopy. The PA response of FePt NPs outperforms that of infrared-active gold nanorods by 3- to 5.6-fold under identical excitation fluence and particle concentrations. HOMPL (680 nm) of an isolated FePt NP renders spatial full-width-at-half-maximum values of 432 nm and 300 nm beyond the optical diffraction limit for 1230-nm and 920-nm excitation, respectively. The in vivo targeting function was successfully visualized using HOMPL, PA imaging, CT, and MRI, thereby validating FePt as a single nanomaterial system covering up to four types (Optical/PA/CT/MRI) of molecular imaging contrast, ranging from the microscopic level to whole-body scale investigation.

  1. Unambiguous atomic Bell measurement assisted by multiphoton states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Bernád, József Zsolt; Alber, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate an unambiguous Bell measurement of atomic qubits assisted by multiphoton states. The atoms interact resonantly with the electromagnetic field inside two spatially separated optical cavities in a Ramsey-type interaction sequence. The qubit states are postselected by measuring the photonic states inside the resonators. We show that if one is able to project the photonic field onto two coherent states on opposite sites of phase space, an unambiguous Bell measurement can be implemented. Thus, our proposal may provide a core element for future components of quantum information technology such as a quantum repeater based on coherent multiphoton states, atomic qubits and matter-field interaction.

  2. Advances in time-dependent methods for multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses recent theoretical results on above threshold ionization harmonic generation and high-frequency, high intensity suppression of ionization. These studies of multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules for short, intense pulsed optical lasers have been carried out using techniques which involve the explicit solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Use of multi-photon laser-scanning microscopy to describe the distribution of xenobiotic chemicals in fish early life stages.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Michael W; Cook, Philip M; Flynn, Kevin M; Lothenbach, Doug B; Johnson, Rodney D; Nichols, John W

    2004-03-30

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose-response relationships need to be understood in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this study, a multi-photon laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) was used to determine the multi-photon excitation spectra of several polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to describe chemical distribution among tissues during fish ELS. The multi-photon excitation spectra revealed intense fluorescent signal from the model fluorophore, pentamethyl-difluoro-boro-indacene (BODIPY), less signal from benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene, and no detectable signal from pyrene. The imaging method was tested by exposing newly fertilized medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs to BODIPY or fluoranthene for 6 h, followed by transfer to clean media. Embryos and larvae were then imaged through 5 days post-hatch. The two test chemicals partitioned similarly throughout development and differences in fluorescence intensity among tissues were evident to a depth of several hundred microns. Initially, the most intense signal was observed in the oil droplet within the yolk, while a moderate signal was seen in the portion of the yolk containing the yolk-platelets. As embryonic development progressed, the liver biliary system, gall bladder, and intestinal tract accumulated strong fluorescent signal. After hatch, once the gastrointestinal tract was completely developed, most of the fluorescent signal was cleared. The MPLSM is a useful tool to describe the tissue distribution of fluorescent PBTs during fish ELS.

  4. Subcycle dynamics of high-order-harmonic generation of He atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory, we have performed three-dimensional (3D) ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the dynamical behavior of the subcycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of ˜1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He [M. Chini et al., Sci. Rep. 3, 1105 (2013), 10.1038/srep01105]. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the subcycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several interesting features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra.

  5. Sub-Cycle Dynamics of High Harmonic Generation of He Atoms Excited by Attosecond Pulses and Driven by Near-Infrared Laser Fields: A Self-Interaction-Free TDDFT Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory, we have performed 3D ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the novel dynamical behavior of the sub-cycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of 1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the sub-cycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several new features of the sub-cycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  6. Multiphoton transition moments and absorption cross sections in coupled cluster response theory employing variational transition moment functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hättig, Christof; Christiansen, Ove; Jørgensen, Poul

    1998-05-01

    Based on an analysis of the first residues of coupled cluster response functions we devise variational functionals from which the transition moments for n-photon excitations can be calculated as nth derivatives. Combining these functionals with variational perturbation theory, we obtain a new approach for the derivation of multiphoton transition moments which allows us to utilize the full strengths of variational perturbation theory without the roundabout way via residues of response functions. Coupled cluster multiphoton transition moments derived by this approach are formally equivalent to the one identified from the first residues of the ground state response functions. The introduction of the variational functionals makes the mathematical structure of the transition moments more transparent and provides an interpretation of intermediates in terms of responses of excited state vectors and Lagrangian multipliers. 2n+1 and 2n+2 rules are formulated for the transition moments and build the basis for a straightforward derivation of a computational efficient formulation. The strength of the new approach is demonstrated by the derivation of three- and four-photon transition moments.

  7. Measurement of the resonant polaron effect in the Reststrahlen band of GaAs:Si using far-infrared two-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wenckebach, W.Th.; Planken, P.C.M.; Son, P.C. van

    1995-12-31

    We present the results of photoconductivity measurements of the resonant electron-phonon interaction in the middle of the Reststrahlen band using two-photon excitation with intense picosecond pulses with frequency around 143 cm{sup -1} (70 {mu}m). We use two photons rather than a single photon for the excitation of the resonant-polaron to avoid the problems of strong reflection and dielectric artifacts encountered in direct single-photon excitation in the Reststrahlen band. The sample is a 10 {mu}m thick Si-doped GaAs epitaxial layer on a 400 {mu}m semi-insulating GaAs substrate. The electronic levels of the Si shallow donor can be tuned by the application of a magnetic field. Intense tunable picosecond pulses with a frequency of around 143 cm{sup -1} from the Dutch free-electron laser FELIX are weakly focussed onto the sample, which is kept at 8 K. Electrons excited to the 3d{sup +2} state via the electric-dipole allowed two-photon transition out of the 1s{sub 0-} ground state, decay to the conduction band and give rise to an increase in the photoconductivity. The figure shows the energy-peak position of the 3d{sup +2} transition thus obtained as a function of the magnetic-field strength. The figure clearly shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling between the 3d{sup +2} state and the LO phonon is strongest. Note that the data between 267 cm{sup -1} and 296 cm{sup -1} are extremely difficult to obtain with single-photon excitation because of their position in the middle of the Reststrahlen band.

  8. The Role of Symmetric-Stretch Vibration in Asymmetric-Stretch Vibrational Frequency Shift: the Case of 2CH Excitation Infrared Spectra of Acetylene-Hydrogen Van Der Waals Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dan; Ma, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zhai, Yu; Li, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Direct infrared spectra predictions for van der Waals (vdW) complexes rely on accurate intra-molecular vibrationally excited inter-molecular potential. Due to computational cost increasing with number of freedom, constructing an effective reduced-dimension potential energy surface, which only includes direct relevant intra- molecular modes, is the most feasible way and widely used in the recent potential studies. However, because of strong intra-molecular vibrational coupling, some indirect relevant modes are also play important roles in simulating infrared spectra of vdW complexes. The questions are how many intra-molecular modes are needed, and which modes are most important in determining the effective potential and direct infrared spectra simulations. Here, we explore these issues using a simple, flexible and efficient vibration-averaged approach, and apply the method to vdW complex C_2H_2-H_2. With initial examination of the intra-molecular vibrational coupling, an effective seven-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface(PES) for C_2H_2-H_2, which explicitly takes into account the Q_1,Q_2 symmetric-stretch and Q_3 asymmetric-stretch normal modes of the C_2H_2 monomer, has been generated. Analytic four-dimensional PESs are obtained by least-squares fitting vibrationally averaged interaction energies for νb{3}(C_2H_2)=0 and 1 to the Morse/long-range(MLR) potential function form. We provide the first prediction of the infrared spectra and band origin shifts for C_2H_2-H_2 dimer. We particularly examine the dependence of the symmetric-stretch normal mode on asymmetric-stretch frequency shift for the complex.

  9. The influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Miao; Li, Jing-Lun; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) dynamics, taking the LiH molecule for example. The LiH molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region, and then excited by the femtosecond pump pulse, and finally ionized by the femtosecond probe pulse. We focus on the impact of the pre-orientation on the ionization probability, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distribution (PAD). It is found that the ionization probability and peak intensity of energy-resolved photoelectron spectra are significantly affected by molecular orientation. The angle-resolved photoelectron spectra are related to the molecular orientation. The PAD can be changed by varying the delay time between the THz SCP and pump pulse. We also investigate the effect of temperature on excitation and ionization dynamics.

  10. Identification of Two Allylbenzene Conformers by One- and Two-Photon Resonant Multiphoton Ionization Spectroscopy in a Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine

    1997-02-01

    Two allylbenzene conformers have been identified using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy (REMPI) in a supersonic jet expansion. Their existence has been confirmed by the vibrational analysis of theS1← S0ππ* transition, recorded under (1 + 1) and (2 + 2) REMPI schemes and by the intensity variation of their spectra under various expansion conditions. The conformer with higher excitation energy shows strong dependence on the terminal beam temperature, which is consistent with a shallow potential energy well as predicted by theory. The relative abundance of the two conformers and the frequency values of several vibrational modes in their lower excited singlet electronic stateS1have been determined.

  11. Novel techniques with multiphoton microscopy: Deep-brain imaging with microprisms, neurometabolism of epilepsy, and counterfeit paper money detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Thomas H.

    Multiphoton microscopy is a laser-scanning fluorescence imaging method with extraordinary potential. We describe three innovative multiphoton microscopy techniques across various disciplines. Traditional in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the mammalian brain has a limited penetration depth (<400 microm). We present a method of imaging 1 mm deep into mouse neocortex by using a glass microprism to relay the excitation and emission light. This technique enables simultaneous imaging of multiple cortical layers, including layer V, at an angle typical of slice preparations. At high-magnification imaging using an objective with 1-mm of coverglass correction, resolution was sufficient to resolve dendritic spines on layer V GFP neurons. Functional imaging of blood flow at various neocortical depths is also presented, allowing for quantification of red blood cell flux and velocity. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of NADH reveals information on neurometabolism. NADH, an intrinsic fluorescent molecule and ubiquitous metabolic coenzyme, has a lifetime dependent on enzymatic binding. A novel NADH FLIM algorithm is presented that produces images showing spatially distinct NADH fluorescence lifetimes in mammalian brain slices. This program provides advantages over traditional FLIM processing of multi-component lifetime data. We applied this technique to a GFP-GFAP pilocarpine mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Results indicated significant changes in the neurometabolism of astrocytes and neuropil in the cell and dendritic layers of the hippocampus when compared to control tissue. Data obtained with NADH FLIM were subsequently interpreted based on the abnormal activity reported in epileptic tissue. Genuine U.S. Federal Reserve Notes have a consistent, two-component intrinsic fluorescence lifetime. This allows for detection of counterfeit paper money because of its significant differences in fluorescence lifetime when compared to genuine paper money. We used

  12. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  13. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  14. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  15. High-Excitation OH and H2O Lines in Markarian 231: The Molecular Signatures of Compact Far-Infrared Continuum Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Spinoglio Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, CNR via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma, Italy; luigi.spinoglio@ifsi-roma.inaf.it and...arises from a warm (Tdust ¼ 70 100 K), optically thick (100m ¼ 1 2 ) medium of effective diameter 200–400 pc. In our best-fit model of total...component suggests that its infrared emission is dominated by the AGN. The derived column densities N (OH)k 1017 cm 2 and N (H2O)k 6 ; 1016 cm 2 may

  16. All-optical bidirectional neural interfacing using hybrid multiphoton holographic optogenetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Paluch-Siegler, Shir; Mayblum, Tom; Dana, Hod; Brosh, Inbar; Gefen, Inna; Shoham, Shy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our understanding of neural information processing could potentially be advanced by combining flexible three-dimensional (3-D) neuroimaging and stimulation. Recent developments in optogenetics suggest that neurophotonic approaches are in principle highly suited for noncontact stimulation of network activity patterns. In particular, two-photon holographic optical neural stimulation (2P-HONS) has emerged as a leading approach for multisite 3-D excitation, and combining it with temporal focusing (TF) further enables axially confined yet spatially extended light patterns. Here, we study key steps toward bidirectional cell-targeted 3-D interfacing by introducing and testing a hybrid new 2P-TF-HONS stimulation path for accurate parallel optogenetic excitation into a recently developed hybrid multiphoton 3-D imaging system. The system is shown to allow targeted all-optical probing of in vitro cortical networks expressing channelrhodopsin-2 using a regeneratively amplified femtosecond laser source tuned to 905 nm. These developments further advance a prospective new tool for studying and achieving distributed control over 3-D neuronal circuits both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26217673

  17. Identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in esophageal cancer by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Jiang, Liwei; Kang, Deyong; Wu, Xuejing; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, Jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the gastrointestinal cancers and carries poorer prognosis than other gastrointestinal cancers. In general practice, the depth of tumor infiltration in esophageal wall is crucial to establishing appropriate treatment plan which is established by detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Connective tissue is one of the main structures that form the esophageal wall. So, identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue is helping for detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Our aim is to evaluate whether multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. MPM is well-suited for real-time detecting morphologic and cellular changes in fresh tissues since many endogenous fluorophores of fresh tissues are excited through two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In this work, microstructure of tumor cells and connective tissue are first studied. Then, morphological changes of collagen fibers after the infiltration of tumor cells are shown. These results show that MPM has the ability to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. In the future, MPM may be a promising imaging technique for detecting tumor cells in esophageal cancer.

  18. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Kim, Daekeun; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-08-15

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice.

  19. Evaluation of endogenous species involved in brain tumors using multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that using non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), excised brain tumor (grade III astrocytoma) and healthy tissue can be differentiated from each other, even in neighboring biopsy samples[1, 2]. Because of this, this powerful technique offers a great deal of potential for use as a surgical guidance technique for tumor margining with up to cellular level spatial resolution[3]. NMPPAS spectra are obtained by monitoring the non-radiative relaxation pathways via ultrasonic detection, following two-photon excitation with light in the optical diagnostic window (740nm-1100nm). Based upon significant differences in the ratiometric absorption of the tissues following 970nm and 1100nm excitation, a clear classification of the tissue can be made. These differences are the result of variations in composition and oxidation state of certain endogenous biochemical species between healthy and malignant tissues. In this work, NADH, NAD+ and ATP were measured using NMPPAS in model gelatin tissue phantoms to begin to understand which species might be responsible for the observed spectral differences in the tissue. Each species was placed in specific pH environments to provide control over the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the species. Ratiometric analyses were then conducted to account for variability caused due to instrumental parameters. This paper will discuss the potential roles of each of the species for tumor determination and their contribution to the spectral signature.

  20. Hybrid label-free multiphoton and optoacoustic microscopy (MPOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Dominik; Tserevelakis, George J.; Omar, Murad; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-07-01

    Many biological applications require a simultaneous observation of different anatomical features. However, unless potentially harmful staining of the specimens is employed, individual microscopy techniques do generally not provide multi-contrast capabilities. We present a hybrid microscope integrating optoacoustic microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, including second-harmonic generation, into a single device. This combined multiphoton and optoacoustic microscope (MPOM) offers visualization of a broad range of structures by employing different contrast mechanisms and at the same time enables pure label-free imaging of biological systems. We investigate the relative performance of the two microscopy modalities and demonstrate their multi-contrast abilities through the label-free imaging of a zebrafish larva ex vivo, simultaneously visualizing muscles and pigments. This hybrid microscopy application bears great potential for developmental biology studies, enabling more comprehensive information to be obtained from biological specimens without the necessity of staining.

  1. Differentiation of highly metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhenlin; Sun, Zhenzhen; Li, Jingwen; Ye, Qing; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    The primary hypothesis tested in the study was that nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells at different stage of invasion and metastasis can be differentiated using multiphoton microscopy (MPM). CNE1 and CNE2Z cells were cultured and used in this study. The activity of cell migration and invasion was measured using Transwell assays. At the same time, the morphologic features were quantified from the multiphoton images. The measurements of Transwell migration and invasion showed that the invasion and migration of CNE2Z cells were significantly enhanced when compared with that of CNE1 cells. Also, statistically significant differences in the morphologic features were found between two kinds of cancer cells. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to differentiate cancer cells with different stage of invasion and metastasis.

  2. Phase matching alters spatial multiphoton processes in dense atomic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Adam; Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2017-01-09

    Multiphoton processes in dense atomic vapors such as four-wave mixing or coherent blue light generation are typically viewed from single-atom perspective. Here we study the surprisingly important effect of phase matching near two-photon resonances that arises due to spatial extent of the atomic medium within which the multiphoton process occurs. The non-unit refractive index of the atomic vapor may inhibit generation of light in nonlinear processes, significantly shift the efficiency maxima in frequencies and redirect emitted beam. We present these effects on an example of four-wave mixing in dense rubidium vapors in a double-ladder configuration. By deriving a simple theory that takes into account essential spatial properties of the process, we give precise predictions and confirm their validity in the experiment. The model allows us to improve on the geometry of the experiment and engineer more efficient four-wave mixing.

  3. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  4. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  5. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  6. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  7. 48-channel coincidence counting system for multiphoton experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Wei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Tao; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a coincidence counting system with 48 input channels which is aimed to count all coincidence events, up to 531 441 kinds, in a multiphoton experiment. Using the dynamic delay adjusting inside the Field Programmable Gate Array, the alignment of photon signals of 48 channels is achieved. After the alignment, clock phase shifting is used to sample signal pulses. Logic constraints are used to stabilize the pulse width. The coincidence counting data stored in a 1G bit external random access memory will be sent to the computer to analyze the amount of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coincidence events. This system is designed for multiphoton entanglement experiments with multiple degrees of freedom of photons.

  8. Subcycle dynamics of high harmonic generation in valence-shell and virtual states of Ar atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free TDDFT theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), we have performed an ab initio all-electron study of subcycle structure, dynamics, and spectra of high harmonic generation (HHG) processes of Ar atoms in the presence of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses and near-infrared (NIR) laser fields. The TDDFT equations are solved accurately and efficiently via the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral (TDGPS) method. We focus on the subcycle (with respect to NIR field) temporal behavior of the level shift of the excited energy levels and related dynamics of harmonic photon emission. We observe and identify the subcycle shifts in the harmonic emission spectrum as a function of the time delay between the XUV and NIR pulses. We present and analyze the harmonic emission spectra from 3snp0, 3p0ns, 3p1nd1,3p1np1, 3p0nd0, 3p0np0, and 3p0ns excited states and the 3p04p0-virtual state as functions of the time delay. In addition, we explore the subcycle a.c. Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the harmonic emission process. Our analysis reveals several novel features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and spectra as well as temporal energy level shift. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  9. Multiphoton laser lithography for the fabrication of plasmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passinger, Sven; Koch, Jürgen; Kiyan, Roman; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2006-08-01

    In this contribution, we demonstrate multi-photon femtosecond laser lithography for the fabrication and rapid prototyping of plasmonic components. Using this technology different dielectric and metallic SPP-structures can be fabricated in a low-cost and time-efficient way. Resolution limits of this technology will be discussed. Investigations of the optical properties of the fabricated SPP-structures by far-field leakage radiation microscopy will be reported.

  10. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-01

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H5O2+ cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D2d symmetry, instead of the G16 symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  11. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  12. The near-infrared structure and spectra of the bipolar nebulae M2-9 and AFGL 2688: The role of ultraviolet pumping and shocks in molecular hydrogen excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Latter, William B.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution near-infrared images and moderate resolution spectra were obtained of the bipolar nebulae M2-9 and AFGL 2688. The ability to spatially and spectrally resolve the various components of the nebulae has proved to be important in determining their physical structure and characteristics. In M2-9, the lobes are found to have a double-shell structure. The inner shell is dominated by emission from hydrogen recombination lines, and the outer shell is primarily emission from H2 lines in teh 2-2.5 micron region. Analysis of H2 line ratios indicates that the H2 emission is radiatively excited. A well-resolved photodissociation region is observed in the lobes. The spectrum of the central source is dominated by H recombination lines and a strong continuum rising toward longer wavelengths consistent with a T = 795 K blackbody. Also present are lines of He I and Fe II. In contrast, the N knot and E lobe of M2-9 show little continuum emission. The N knot spectrum consists of lines of (Fe II) and hydrogen recombination lines. In AGFL 2688, the emission from the bright lobes is mainly continuum reflected from the central star. Several molecular features from C2 and CN are present. In the extreme end of the N lobe and in the E equatorial region, the emission is dominated by lines of H2 in the 2-2.5 region. The observed H2 line ratios indicate that the emission is collisionally excited, with an excitation temperature T(sub ex) approixmately = 1600 +/- 100 K.

  13. Light-harvesting ytterbium(III)-porphyrinate-BODIPY conjugates: synthesis, excitation-energy transfer, and two-photon-induced near-infrared-emission studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2013-01-07

    Based on a donor-acceptor framework, several conjugates have been designed and prepared in which an electron-donor moiety, ytterbium(III) porphyrinate (YbPor), was linked through an ethynyl bridge to an electron-acceptor moiety, boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY). Photoluminescence studies demonstrated efficient energy transfer from the BODIPY moiety to the YbPor counterpart. When conjugated with the YbPor moiety, the BODIPY moiety served as an antenna to harvest the lower-energy visible light, subsequently transferring its energy to the YbPor counterpart, and, consequently, sensitizing the Yb(III) emission in the near-infrared (NIR) region with a quantum efficiency of up to 0.73% and a lifetime of around 40 μs. Moreover, these conjugates exhibited large two-photon-absorption cross-sections that ranged from 1048-2226 GM and strong two-photon-induced NIR emission.

  14. Silver nanoparticle based surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissue under near-infrared laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Shi, H.; Feng, S.; Lin, J.; Chen, W.; Huang, Z.; Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lin, D.; Xu, Q.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of high spatial resolution silver nanoparticle based near-infrared surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from rat pancreatic tissue to obtain biochrmical information about the tissue. A high quality SERS signal from a mixture of pancreatic tissues and silver nanoparticles can be obtained within 10 s using a Renishaw micro-Raman system. Prominent SERS bands of pancreatic tissue were assigned to known molecular vibrations, such as the vibrations of DNA bases, RNA bases, proteins and lipids. Different tissue structures of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissues have characteristic features in SERS spectra. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for using SERS imaging to distinguish diabetic and normal pancreatic tissues on frozen sections without using dye labeling of functionalized binding sites.

  15. Nanosecond multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of transition-metal sandwich compounds: a comparative study of nickelocene, ferrocene and bis(η-benzene)chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkov, Sergey Yu.; Selzle, Heinrich L.; Schlag, Edward W.

    Efficient multiphoton ionization of nickelocene, ferrocene and bis(η6-benzene)chromium was achieved on excitation of jet-cooled sandwich molecules with nanosecond pulses of dye lasers via an intermediate low-lying Rydberg 4px,y level. One-colour photoionization mass spectra revealing solely molecular ion signals were obtained. The signal intensity increases significantly when an intense pulse of a second dye laser is used for ionization of the Rydberg-state molecules. Two-colour resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of Cp2Fe (Cp = η5-C5H5) and Bz2Cr (Bz = η6-C6H6) show vibronic structures of the a1g(3dz2) → e1u(R4px,y) transition. The metal-ligand symmetric stretch ν4 wavenumbers for the Rydberg-state molecules are 310 and 263 cm-1, respectively. Multiphoton mass-analysed threshold ionization (MATI) signals appear for Bz2Cr when the TMPH1749math001 ν4 wavenumber for the ground-state Bz2Cr+ cation is 262 cm-1 as determined from the MATI spectrum. The influence of electronic structure on the photoionization behaviour of the sandwich molecules is discussed.

  16. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K.; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J.; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  17. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  18. Theoretical description of circular dichroism in photoelectron angular distributions of randomly oriented chiral molecules after multi-photon photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. E.; Isaev, T. A.; Nikoobakht, B.; Berger, R.; Koch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Photoelectron circular dichroism refers to the forward/backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution with respect to the propagation axis of circularly polarized light. It has recently been demonstrated in femtosecond multi-photon photoionization experiments with randomly oriented camphor and fenchone molecules [C. Lux et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 51, 4755 (2012) and C. S. Lehmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234307 (2013)]. A theoretical framework describing this process as (2+1) resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization is constructed, which consists of two-photon photoselection from randomly oriented molecules and successive one-photon ionization of the photoselected molecules. It combines perturbation theory for the light-matter interaction with ab initio calculations for the two-photon absorption and a single-center expansion of the photoelectron wavefunction in terms of hydrogenic continuum functions. It is verified that the model correctly reproduces the basic symmetry behavior expected under exchange of handedness and light helicity. When applied to fenchone and camphor, semi-quantitative agreement with the experimental data is found, for which a sufficient d wave character of the electronically excited intermediate state is crucial.

  19. N-H Stretching Excitations in Adenosine-Thymidine Base Pairs in Solution: Base Pair Geometries, Infrared Line Shapes and Ultrafast Vibrational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Christian; Preketes, Nicholas K.; Fidder, Henk; Costard, Rene; Koeppe, Benjamin; Heisler, Ismael A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Temps, Friedrich; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We explore the N-H stretching vibrations of adenosine-thymidine base pairs in chloroform solution with linear and nonlinear infrared spectroscopy. Based on estimates from NMR measurements and ab initio calculations, we conclude that adenosine and thymidine form hydrogen bonded base pairs in Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen configurations with similar probability. Steady-state concentration- and temperature dependent linear FT-IR studies, including H/D exchange experiments, reveal that these hydrogen-bonded base pairs have complex N-H/N-D stretching spectra with a multitude of spectral components. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopic results, together with IR-pump-IR-probe measurements, as also corroborated by ab initio calculations, reveal that the number of N-H stretching transitions is larger than the total number of N-H stretching modes. This is explained by couplings to other modes, such as an underdamped low-frequency hydrogen-bond mode, and a Fermi resonance with NH2 bending overtone levels of the adenosine amino-group. Our results demonstrate that modeling based on local N-H stretching vibrations only is not sufficient and call for further refinement of the description of the N-H stretching manifolds of nucleic acid base pairs of adenosine and thymidine, incorporating a multitude of couplings with fingerprint and low-frequency modes. PMID:23234439

  20. Site-Specific Dynamics of β-Sheet Peptides with (D) Pro-Gly Turns Probed by Laser-Excited Temperature-Jump Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Chi, Heng; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2016-05-04

    Turn residues and side-chain interactions play an important role for the folding of β-sheets. We investigated the conformational dynamics of a three-stranded β-sheet peptide ((D) P(D) P) and a two-stranded β-hairpin (WVYY-(D) P) by time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) infrared spectroscopy. Both peptide sequences contain (D) Pro-Gly residues that favor a tight β-turn. The three-stranded β-sheet (Ac-VFITS(D) PGKTYTEV(D) PGOKILQ-NH2 ) is stabilized by the turn sequences, whereas the β-hairpin (SWTVE(D) PGKYTYK-NH2 ) folding is assisted by both the turn sequence and hydrophobic cross-strand interactions. Relaxation times after the T-jump were monitored as a function of temperature and occur on a sub-microsecond time scale, (D) P(D) P being faster than WVYY-(D) P. The Xxx-(D) Pro tertiary amide provides a detectable IR band, allowing us to probe the dynamics site-specifically. The relative importance of the turn versus the intrastrand stability in β-sheet formation is discussed.

  1. Near-infrared excited state dynamics of melanins: the effects of iron content, photo-damage, chemical oxidation, and aggregate size.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mary Jane; Wilson, Jesse W; Robles, Francisco E; Dall, Christopher P; Glass, Keely; Simon, John D; Warren, Warren S

    2014-02-13

    Ultrafast pump-probe measurements can discriminate the two forms of melanin found in biological tissue (eumelanin and pheomelanin), which may be useful for diagnosing and grading melanoma. However, recent work has shown that bound iron content changes eumelanin's pump-probe response, making it more similar to that of pheomelanin. Here we record the pump-probe response of these melanins at a wider range of wavelengths than previous work and show that with shorter pump wavelengths the response crosses over from being dominated by ground-state bleaching to being dominated by excited-state absorption. The crossover wavelength is different for each type of melanin. In our analysis, we found that the mechanism by which iron modifies eumelanin's pump-probe response cannot be attributed to Raman resonances or differences in melanin aggregation and is more likely caused by iron acting to broaden the unit spectra of individual chromophores in the heterogeneous melanin aggregate. We analyze the dependence on optical intensity, finding that iron-loaded eumelanin undergoes irreversible changes to the pump-probe response after intense laser exposure. Simultaneously acquired fluorescence data suggest that the previously reported "activation" of eumelanin fluorescence may be caused in part by the dissociation of metal ions or the selective degradation of iron-containing melanin.

  2. Multiphoton imaging of basal cell carcinoma (BCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Sestini, S.; Stambouli, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2006-02-01

    We used two-photon microscopy towards the imaging of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Our aim was to evaluate the morphology of BCC using two-photon fluorescence excitation and to establish a correlation with histopathology. We built a custom two-photon microscope and we measured the system capabilities. The system allowed to perform a preliminary measurement on a fresh human skin tissue sample. A human skin tissue sample of BCC excised during dermatological surgery procedures were used. The clinical diagnosis of BCC was confirmed by subsequent histopathological examination. The sample was imaged using endogenous tissue fluorescence within 2-3 hours from the excision with a two photon laser scanning fluorescence microscope. The acquired images allowed an obvious discrimination of the neoplastic areas toward normal tissue, based on morphological differences and aberrations of the intensity of the fluorescence signal. Our results showed that BCC tissue has a more homogeneous structure in comparison to normal tissue as well as a higher fluorescent response. The images obtained by two photon microscopy were further compared to the images acquired by an optical microscope after the conventional histopathological examination on one part of the respective sample. Our suggested method may represent a new diagnostic tool that improves the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination alone, enabling the accurate discrimination of basal cell carcinoma from normal tissue.

  3. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  4. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  5. Mechanism of Electron Excitation and Emission from a Nanoribbon under Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Time-Dependent First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Shota; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2017-03-01

    A time-dependent density functional theory simulation demonstrated the sequential dynamics of electron excitation and emission from a silicene nanoribbon under a femtosecond laser pulse. The mechanism for the multiphoton absorption processes that are responsible for the kinetic-energy spectra of emitted electrons was elucidated using Kohn-Sham potentials and the decomposition scheme.

  6. Optimization of multi-photon event discrimination levels using Poisson statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukka, Juri M.; Virkki, Arho; Hänninen, Pekka E.; Soini, Juhani T.

    2004-01-01

    In applications where random multi-photon events must be distinguishable from the background, detection of the signals must be based on either analog current measurement or photon counting and multi-level discrimination of single and multi-photon events. In this paper a novel method for optimizing photomultiplier (PMT) pulse discrimination levels in single- and multi-photon counting is demonstrated. This calibration method is based on detection of photon events in coincidence to short laser pulses. The procedure takes advantage of Poisson statistics of single- and mult-iphoton signals and it is applicable to automatic calibration of photon counting devices on production line. Results obtained with a channel photomultiplier (CPM) are shown. By use of three parallel discriminators and setting the discriminator levels according to the described method resulted in a linear response over wide range of random single- and multi-photon signals.

  7. On second harmonic generation and multiphoton-absorption induced luminescence from laser-reshaped silver nanoparticles embedded in glass.

    PubMed

    Zolotovskaya, S A; Tyrk, M A; Stalmashonak, A; Gillespie, W A; Abdolvand, A

    2016-10-28

    Spherical silver nanoparticles (NPs) of 30 nm diameter embedded in soda-lime glass were uniformly reshaped (elongated) after irradiation by a linearly polarised 250 fs pulsed laser operating within the NPs' surface plasmon resonance band. We observed second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton-absorption-induced luminescence (MAIL) in the embedded laser-reshaped NPs upon picosecond (10 ps) pulsed laser excitation at 1064 nm. A complementary study of SHG and MAIL was conducted in soda-lime glass containing embedded, mechanically-reshaped silver NPs of a similar elongation ratio (aspect ratio) to the laser-reshaped NPs. This supports the notion that the observed difference in SHG and MAIL in the studied nanocomposite systems is due to the shape modification mechanism. The discrete dipole approximation method was used to assess the absorption and scattering cross-sections of the reshaped NPs with different elongation ratios.

  8. In vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Marion, Samuel L.; Rice, Photini Faith; Bentley, David L.; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian neoplasia. We hope to use information regarding early tumor development to create a diagnostic test for high-risk patients. In this study we collect in vivo images using OCT, second harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence from non-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-dosed and VCD-dosed mice. VCD causes follicular apoptosis (simulating menopause) and leads to tumor development. Using OCT and MPM we visualized the ovarian microstructure and were able to see differences between non-VCD-dosed and VCD-dosed animals. This leads us to believe that OCT and MPM may be useful for detecting changes due to early tumor development.

  9. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  10. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research.

  11. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research

  12. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  13. On second harmonic generation and multiphoton-absorption induced luminescence from laser-reshaped silver nanoparticles embedded in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotovskaya, S. A.; Tyrk, M. A.; Stalmashonak, A.; Gillespie, W. A.; Abdolvand, A.

    2016-10-01

    Spherical silver nanoparticles (NPs) of 30 nm diameter embedded in soda-lime glass were uniformly reshaped (elongated) after irradiation by a linearly polarised 250 fs pulsed laser operating within the NPs’ surface plasmon resonance band. We observed second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton-absorption-induced luminescence (MAIL) in the embedded laser-reshaped NPs upon picosecond (10 ps) pulsed laser excitation at 1064 nm. A complementary study of SHG and MAIL was conducted in soda-lime glass containing embedded, mechanically-reshaped silver NPs of a similar elongation ratio (aspect ratio) to the laser-reshaped NPs. This supports the notion that the observed difference in SHG and MAIL in the studied nanocomposite systems is due to the shape modification mechanism. The discrete dipole approximation method was used to assess the absorption and scattering cross-sections of the reshaped NPs with different elongation ratios.

  14. Compact diode laser source for multiphoton biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niederriter, Robert D.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Futia, Gregory L.; Gibson, Emily A.; Gopinath, Juliet T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, pulsed diode laser source suitable for multiphoton microscopy of biological samples. The center wavelength is 976 nm, near the peak of the two-photon cross section of common fluorescent markers such as genetically encoded green and yellow fluorescent proteins. The laser repetition rate is electrically tunable between 66.67 kHz and 10 MHz, with 2.3 ps pulse duration and peak powers >1 kW. The laser components are fiber-coupled and scalable to a compact package. We demonstrate >600 μm depth penetration in brain tissue, limited by laser power. PMID:28101420

  15. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  16. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  17. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  18. Intravital multiphoton imaging of mouse tibialis anterior muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jasmine; Goh, Chi Ching; Devi, Sapna; Keeble, Jo; See, Peter; Ginhoux, Florent; Ng, Lai Guan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital imaging by multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool to gain invaluable insight into tissue biology and function. Here, we provide a step-by-step tissue preparation protocol for imaging the mouse tibialis anterior skeletal muscle. Additionally, we include steps for jugular vein catheterization that allow for well-controlled intravenous reagent delivery. Preparation of the tibialis anterior muscle is minimally invasive, reducing the chances of inducing damage and inflammation prior to imaging. The tibialis anterior muscle is useful for imaging leukocyte interaction with vascular endothelium, and to understand muscle contraction biology. Importantly, this model can be easily adapted to study neuromuscular diseases and myopathies. PMID:28243520

  19. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  20. Multiphoton laser direct writing of two-dimensional silver structures.

    PubMed

    Baldacchini, Tommaso; Pons, Anne-Cécile; Pons, Josefina; Lafratta, Christopher; Fourkas, John; Sun, Yong; Naughton, Michael

    2005-02-21

    We report a novel and efficient method for the laser direct writing of two-dimensional silver structures. Multiphoton absorption of a small fraction of the output of a Ti:sapphire oscillator is sufficient to photoreduce silver nitrate in a thin film of polyvinylpyrrolidone that has been spin-coated on a substrate. The polymer can then be washed away, leaving a pattern consisting of highly interconnected silver nanoparticles. We report the characterization of the silver patterns using scanning electron and atomic force microscopies, and demonstrate the application of this technique in the creation of diffraction gratings.

  1. Monitoring chemically enhanced transdermal delivery of zinc oxide nanoparticles by using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Wu, Chung-Long; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are commonly used in sunscreens to reduce the risk of skin cancer by blocking ultraviolet radiation. ZnO NPs absorption through the transdermal route may not cause high health risk as inhalation or ingestion. However, in practical usage of sunscreens and cosmetics, ZnO NPs are topically applied to a large area of skin with long periods hence the potential absorption amount of ZnO NPs is still need to be concerned. Therefore, if the ZnO NPs are able the pass the barrier of normal skin, the pathways of transdermal delivery and the factors of enhancements become important issues. In this work, multiphoton microscopy provides us a non-invasive visualization of ZnO NPs in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively analyzed the enhancement of oleic acid and ethanol. Due to the fact that photoluminance of ZnO NPs spectrally overlaps autofluorence from skin stratum corneum (SC) and high turbidity of both ZnO NPs and SC, it is difficult to resolve the distribution of ZnO NPs in skin by using fluorescence microscopy. In this work, the second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from ZnO NPs which double the frequency of excitation source to characterize the delivery pathways and penetration depth in skin. Moreover, we quantitatively compare the ZnO NPs delivery efficiency in normal skin and in skins with three chemically enhancing conditions: ethanol, oleic acid and the combination of ethanol and oleic acid.

  2. A phasor approach analysis of multiphoton FLIM measurements of three-dimensional cell culture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakner, P. H.; Möller, Y.; Olayioye, M. A.; Brucker, S. Y.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Monaghan, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a useful approach to obtain information regarding the endogenous fluorophores present in biological samples. The concise evaluation of FLIM data requires the use of robust mathematical algorithms. In this study, we developed a user-friendly phasor approach for analyzing FLIM data and applied this method on three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 models of polarized epithelial luminal cysts in a supporting extracellular matrix environment. These Caco-2 based models were treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), to stimulate proliferation in order to determine if FLIM could detect such a change in cell behavior. Autofluorescence from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) in luminal Caco-2 cysts was stimulated by 2-photon laser excitation. Using a phasor approach, the lifetimes of involved fluorophores and their contribution were calculated with fewer initial assumptions when compared to multiexponential decay fitting. The phasor approach simplified FLIM data analysis, making it an interesting tool for non-experts in numerical data analysis. We observed that an increased proliferation stimulated by EGF led to a significant shift in fluorescence lifetime and a significant alteration of the phasor data shape. Our data demonstrates that multiphoton FLIM analysis with the phasor approach is a suitable method for the non-invasive analysis of 3D in vitro cell culture models qualifying this method for monitoring basic cellular features and the effect of external factors.

  3. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  4. Tunable Fabrication of Molybdenum Disulfide Quantum Dots for Intracellular MicroRNA Detection and Multiphoton Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenhao; Dong, Haifeng; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Cao, Yu; Lu, Huiting; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-09-02

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) quantum dots (QDs) (size <10 nm) possess attractive new properties due to the quantum confinement and edge effects as graphene QDs. However, the synthesis and application of MoS2 QDs has not been investigated in great detail. Here, a facile and efficient approach for synthesis of controllable-size MoS2 QDs with excellent photoluminescence (PL) by using a sulfuric acid-assisted ultrasonic route is developed for this investigation. Various MoS2 structures including monolayer MoS2 flake, nanoporous MoS2 , and MoS2 QDs can be yielded by simply controlling the ultrasonic durations. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic tools demonstrate that the MoS2 QDs have uniform lateral size and possess excellent excitation-independent blue PL. The as-generated MoS2 QDs show high quantum yield of 9.65%, long fluorescence lifetime of 4.66 ns, and good fluorescent stability over broad pH values from 4 to 10. Given the good intrinsic optical properties and large surface area combined with excellent physiological stability and biocompatibility, a MoS2 QDs-based intracellular microRNA imaging analysis system is successfully constructed. Importantly, the MoS2 QDs show good performance as multiphoton bioimaging labeling. The proposed synthesis strategy paves a new way for facile and efficient preparing MoS2 QDs with tunable-size for biomedical imaging and optoelectronic devices application.

  5. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  6. Label-free identification of the hippocampus and surrounding structures by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, Liwei; Du, Huiping; Wang, Xingfu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is one of the essential neuroanatomical substrates and plays an important role in different neurological illnesses. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on intrinsic nonlinear optical processes two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was applied to label-freely detect the entire hippocampus and surrounding structures in high-magnification imaging, as well as acquire large-scale MPM images at subcellular resolution. It was found that MPM has the capability to identify cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus (DG), alveus, and fimbria of the entire hippocampus, choroid plexus in lateral ventricles, and white matter tracts. MPM also can be used to quantitatively describe the differences of the cellular nucleus in the cornu ammonis and the DG, further identify the morphological features of hippocampal subfields. In addition, the surrounding structures of the hippocampus including the lateral ventricles and white matter serve as useful information to determine the position of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that with the development of the clinical feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, MPM has the potential for in vivo intraoperative identification and monitoring of hippocampus-related lesions without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  7. Quantification of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen morphology in Marfan syndrome by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jason Z; Tehrani, Arash Y; Jett, Kimberly A; Bernatchez, Pascal; van Breemen, Cornelis; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2014-09-01

    In a mouse model of Marfan syndrome, conventional Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining displays severe fragmentation, disorganization and loss of the aortic elastic fiber integrity. However, this method involves chemical fixatives and staining, which may alter the native morphology of elastin and collagen. Thus far, quantitative analysis of fiber damage in aorta and skin in Marfan syndrome has not yet been explored. In this study, we have used an advanced noninvasive and label-free imaging technique, multiphoton microscopy to quantify fiber fragmentation, disorganization, and total volumetric density of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Aorta and skin samples were harvested from Marfan and control mice aged 3-, 6- and 9-month. Elastin and collagen were identified based on two-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation signals, respectively, without exogenous label. Measurement of fiber length indicated significant fragmentation in Marfan vs. control. Fast Fourier transform algorithm analysis demonstrated markedly lower fiber organization in Marfan mice. Significantly reduced volumetric density of elastin and collagen and thinner skin dermis were observed in Marfan mice. Cutaneous content of elastic fibers and thickness of dermis in 3-month Marfan resembled those in the oldest control mice. Our findings of early signs of fiber degradation and thinning of skin dermis support the potential development of a novel non-invasive approach for early diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

  8. Fibrillogenesis from nanosurfaces: multiphoton imaging and stereological analysis of collagen 3D self-assembly dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Decencière, Etienne; Machairas, Vaïa; Albert, Claire; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Aimé, Carole

    2014-09-21

    The assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures is an important process that concerns different biological contexts, including molecular medicine and functional biomaterials. Engineering of hybrid biomaterials can advantageously provide synergetic interactions of the biopolymers with an inorganic component to ensure specific supramolecular organization and dynamics. To this aim, we designed hybrid systems associating collagen and surface-functionalized silica particles and we built a new strategy to investigate fibrillogenesis processes in such multicomponents systems, working at the crossroads of chemistry, physics and mathematics. The self-assembly process was investigated by bimodal multiphoton imaging coupling second harmonic generation (SHG) and 2 photon excited fluorescence (2PEF). The in-depth spatial characterization of the system was further achieved using the three-dimensional analysis of the SHG/2PEF data via mathematical morphology processing. Quantitation of collagen distribution around particles offers strong evidence that the chemically induced confinement of the protein on the silica nanosurfaces has a key influence on the spatial extension of fibrillogenesis. This new approach is unique in the information it can provide on 3D dynamic hybrid systems and may be extended to other associations of fibrillar molecules with optically responsive nano-objects.

  9. Resonant IR multi-photon dissociation spectroscopy of a trapped and sympathetically cooled biomolecular ion species.

    PubMed

    Wellers, Ch; Borodin, A; Vasilyev, S; Offenberg, D; Schiller, S

    2011-11-14

    In this work we demonstrate vibrational spectroscopy of polyatomic ions that are trapped and sympathetically cooled by laser-cooled atomic ions. We use the protonated dipeptide tryptophan-alanine (HTyrAla(+)) as a model system, cooled by barium ions to less than 800 mK secular temperature. The spectroscopy is performed on the fundamental vibrational transition of a local vibrational mode at 2.74 μm using a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Resonant IR multi-photon dissociation spectroscopy (R-IRMPD) (without the use of a UV laser) generates charged molecular fragments, which are sympathetically cooled and trapped, and subsequently released from the trap and counted. We measured the cross section for R-IRMPD under conditions of low intensity, and found it to be approximately two orders smaller than the vibrational excitation cross section. The observed rotational bandwidth of the vibrational transition is larger than the one expected from the combined effects of 300 K black-body temperature, conformer-dependent line shifts, and intermolecular vibrational relaxation broadening (J. Stearns et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2007, 127, 154322-154327). This indicates that as the internal energy of the molecule grows, an increase of the rotational temperature of the molecular ions well above room temperature (up to on the order of 1000 K), and/or an appreciable shift of the vibrational transition frequency (approx. 6-8 cm(-1)) occurs.

  10. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  11. Low-excited f-, g- and h-states in Au, Ag and Cu observed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in the 1000-7500 cm-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Matulková, I.; Cihelka, J.; Kubelík, P.; Kawaguchi, K.; Chernov, V. E.

    2011-05-01

    The infrared emission spectra of Au, Ag and Cu resulting from the laser ablation of metal targets in a vacuum were recorded using time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy in the 1200-1600, 1900-3600, 4100-5000 and 5200-7500 cm-1 ranges with a resolution of 0.017 cm-1. The majority of the observed lines correspond to transitions between low-excited Rydberg (Nd10)nlj states of Cu (N = 3), Ag (N = 4) and Au (N = 5) with a principal quantum number n = 4, ..., 10; the most prominent lines being due to transitions between the states with high orbital momenta l = 3, ..., 5. This study reports 32 new lines of Au, 12 of Ag and 20 of Cu (with uncertainties of 0.0003-0.03 cm-1). From the lines observed here and in our previous works, we extract revised energy values for 85 energy levels (uncertainty 0.01-0.03 cm-1) of which eight levels of Au, three of Ag and four of Cu are reported for the first time. These newly reported levels have high orbital momentum l = 3, 4, 5.

  12. Infrared vibrational spectra of tert-butyl halides in dehydrated sodium-X and low-aluminum hydrogen-Y faujasites; vibrational excitation exchange and other effects of guest-host interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jack David

    Experimental, analytical and modeling techniques employed in this study elucidate interactions between adsorbate molecules and the interior surfaces of the porous faujasites (FAU). The vibrational spectroscopy of guest and host offers opportunities to locate the guest site in the host that can otherwise be approached only with low-temperature x-ray and neutron diffraction studies. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies at 295 K of sodium X-type FAU (Na-X, Si/Al = 1.34, NaxSi(192-x)AlxO384) and low-aluminum acidic Y-type FAU (LAHY, Si/Al = 40, HxSi (192-x)AlxO384) supercage-included tert -butyl halides (CH3)3C-X (X = Cl, Br, I) are presented in comparison with the adsorbate molecular gas-phase and unloaded host solid-state spectra. For both FAU formula x = 1921+Si/Al . In the Na-X studies, four observations of tert-butyl halide (TBH) vibrational band changes (nu5, nu6, nu 7, and {nu3, nu16, nu17}, three of them concomitant with Na-X mode changes, together with computational modeling studies, point to a particular preferred siting of TBH at host hexagonal prisms (D6R). The siting involves simultaneous interactions of the host with methyl group axial protons and the halide atom. All three methyl group axial protons interact preferentially with a single D6R oxygen atom (type O1) via C-H···O bonding. The TBH halide atom interacts with a site III' Na cation. In addition, an exchange of quanta of vibrational excitation between TBH C-X stretching/CH 3 rocking skeletal mode nu5 and the Na-X Si-O-Si antisymmetric stretching band is observed. Analysis of the coalesced band is consistent with an interaction model involving one guest and one host mode. In the isostructural LAHY material, where cation-guest interactions are effectively absent, the weaker interactions of TBH with LAHY framework oxygen atoms are manifest in additional propensity toward the exchange of vibrational excitation quanta between both guest and host modes, and between two guest modes. In contrast to

  13. The effect of radial polarization in multiphoton lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Le; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Considering the axially symmetric polarization and intensity distribution, radially polarized (RP) laser beam has comparatively higher axial component of electric field and smaller size of focal spot compared to linearly polarized (LP) laser. In this study, the effect of radial polarization on multiphoton fabrication has been studied, and polymer spots and lines are chosen as the study objects of 2D micro/nano structures of multiphoton lithography. These structures were fabricated with IP-L, a commercial negative photoresist, by RP fs-pulse laser beam which was tightly focused by an objective lens with high numerical aperture. Multiple experimental conditions, such as fabrication power, exposure time and scanning velocity, were verified in order to observe the structural variation of these polymer structures. On the basis of measurement from images of the scanning electron microscope, the transverse and longitudinal sizes of polymer spots and lines could be analyzed, and the relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) and the above experimental conditions could be acquired. The statistical results agree with our predictions that the RP laser beam can significantly reduce the AR, and the AR in RP laser fabrication has little correlation with conditions besides fabrication power, such as exposure time and scanning velocity.

  14. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  15. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  16. Sub-100nm material processing with sub-15 femtosecond picojoule near infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Straub, Martin; Zhang, Huijing; Afshar, Maziar; Feili, Dara; Seidel, Helmut

    2011-03-01

    Ultrabroad band 12 femtosecond near infrared laser pulses at transient TW/cm2 intensities and low picojoule pulse energies (mean powers < 20 mW at 85 MHz repetition rate) have been used to perform material nanoprocessing based on multiphoton ionization and plasma formation. Cut sizes of sub-wavelength, sub-100 nm which is far beyond the Abbe diffraction limit have been realized without any collateral damage effect in silicon wafers, photoresists, glass, polymers, metals, and biological targets. Multiphoton sub-15fs microscopes may become novel non-invasive 3D tools for highly precise nanoprocessing of inorganic and organic targets as well as two-photon 3D imaging.

  17. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  18. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet and near-infrared excited luminescence properties of Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:RE{sup 3+}, Na{sup +} (RE=Tb, Yb, Er, Tm, and Ho)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jia; Wang Yuhua; Guo Linna; Zhang Feng; Wen Yan; Liu Bitao; Huang Yan

    2011-08-15

    Tb{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} were synthesized by solid-state reaction, and their luminescence properties were studied by spectra techniques. Tb{sup 3+}-doped samples can exhibit intense green emission under VUV excitation, and the brightness for the optimal Tb{sup 3+} content is comparable with that of the commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+} green phosphor. Under near-infrared laser excitation, the upconversion luminescence spectra of Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} doped samples demonstrate that the red, green, and blue tricolored fluorescence could be obtained by codoping Yb{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}, and Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} in Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, respectively. Good white upconversion emission with CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.358, 0.362) is achieved by quadri-doping Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+} in Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, in which the cross-relaxation process between Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}, producing the {sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}F{sub 4} transition of Tm{sup 3+}, is found. The upconversion mechanisms are elucidated through the laser power dependence of the upconverted emissions and the energy level diagrams. - Graphical abstract: The CPO:0.25Tb{sup 3+}, 0.25Na{sup +} exhibits a comparable brightness to the commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+} upon 147 nm excitation. Good white light color is achieved in CPO:Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+} under 980 nm excitation. Highlights: > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+},Na{sup +} exhibits a comparable brightness with commercial Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+}. > Red, green and blue colors are achieved in Yb{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. > Good white emission is obtained in Yb{sup 3+}-Ho{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} quadri-doped Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}, Ho

  20. Quantitative structural markers of colorectal dysplasia in a cross sectional study of ex vivo murine tissue using label-free multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Lai, Keith K.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon excitation of label-free tissue is of increasing interest, as advances have been made in endoscopic clinical application of multiphoton microscopy, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) scanning endoscopy used to monitor cervical collagen in mice1. We used C57BL mice as a model to investigate the progression of gastrointestinal structures, specifically glandular area and circularity. We used multiphoton microscopy to image ex-vivo label-free murine colon, focusing on the collagen structure changes over time, in mice ranging from 10 to 20 weeks of age. Series of images were acquired within the colonic and intestinal tissue at depth intervals of 20 microns from muscularis to the epithelium, up to a maximum depth of 180 microns. The imaging system comprised a two-photon laser tuned to 800nm wavelength excitation, and the SHG emission was filtered with a 400/40 bandpass filter before reaching the photomultiplier tube. Images were acquired at 15 frames per second, for 200 to 300 cumulative frames, with a field of view of 261um by 261um, and 40mW at sample. Image series were compared to histopathology H&E slides taken from adjacent locations. Quantitative metrics for determining differences between murine glandular structures were applied, specifically glandular area and circularity.

  1. Generating Nanostructures with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Fardel, Romain; Schmidt, Michael; Arnold, Craig B.

    The need to generate sub 100 nm features is of interest for a variety of applications including optics, optoelectronics, and plasmonics. To address this requirement, several advanced optical lithography techniques have been developed based on either multiphoton absorption polymerization or near-field effects. In this paper, we combine strengths from multiphoton absorption and near field using optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN). A Gaussian beam is used to position a microsphere in a polymer precursor fluid near a substrate. An ultrafast laser is focused by that microsphere to induce multiphoton polymerization in the near field, leading additive direct-write nanoscale processing.

  2. Water-Soluble Quantum Dots for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Daniel R.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Clark, Stephen W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Wise, Frank W.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-05-01

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales.

  3. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Andersen, Peter; Le, Tuan; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become possible.

  4. Water-soluble quantum dots for multiphoton fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larson, Daniel R; Zipfel, Warren R; Williams, Rebecca M; Clark, Stephen W; Bruchez, Marcel P; Wise, Frank W; Webb, Watt W

    2003-05-30

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales.

  5. Fringe-free, Background-free, Collinear Third Harmonic Generation FROG Measurements for Multiphoton Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, R; Spahr, E; Squier, J A; Durfee, C G; Walker, B C; Fittinghoff, D N

    2006-07-21

    Collinear pulse measurement tools useful at the full numerical aperture (NA) of multiphoton microscope objectives are a necessity for a quantitative characterization of the femtosecond pulses focused by these systems. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple new technique, for characterizing the pulse at the focus in a multiphoton microscope. This technique, a background-free, fringe-free, form of frequency-resolved optical gating, uses the third harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip. Here it is used to characterize 100 fs pulses (typical values for a multiphoton microscope) at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  6. Multiphoton Processes: ICOMP VIII: 8th International Conference, AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 525 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Freeman, R.R.; Kulander, K.C.

    2000-12-31

    Topics include: atoms in strong fields; stabilization; double ionization and multi-electron calculations; high-order harmonics; molecules in strong fields; multiphoton processes in clusters; coherent control; light sources; and relativistic effects.

  7. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  8. Multiphoton quantum interference in a multiport integrated photonic device.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Benjamin J; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Spring, Justin B; Kundys, Dmytro; Broome, Matthew A; Humphreys, Peter C; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Gates, James C; Smith, Brian J; Langford, Nathan K; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic devices is essential for many optical information processing applications to reach a regime beyond what can be classically simulated, and integrated photonics has emerged as a leading platform for achieving this. Here we demonstrate three-photon quantum operation of an integrated device containing three coupled interferometers, eight spatial modes and many classical and nonclassical interferences. This represents a critical advance over previous complexities and the first on-chip nonclassical interference with more than two photonic inputs. We introduce a new scheme to verify quantum behaviour, using classically characterised device elements and hierarchies of photon correlation functions. We accurately predict the device's quantum behaviour and show operation inconsistent with both classical and bi-separable quantum models. Such methods for verifying multiphoton quantum behaviour are vital for achieving increased circuit complexity. Our experiment paves the way for the next generation of integrated photonic quantum simulation and computing devices.

  9. Reassignment of scattered emission photons in multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T C

    2014-06-05

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image.

  10. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  11. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; de Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-11-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources.

  12. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration.

  13. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  14. Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (rempi) Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzangwa, Lloyd; Nyambo, Silver; Uhler, Brandon; Reid, Scott A.

    2012-06-01

    We have recently implemented Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy in our laboratory as a spectroscopic probe of transient species. We will report on initial gas-phase studies of the spectra of weakly bound van der Waals and halogen bonded complexes involving aromatic organic donors. The complexes are formed in the rarified environment of a supersonic molecular beam, which is skimmed prior to passing into the differentially pumped flight tube of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ionization is initiated both by 1+1 and 1+1' REMPI schemes; the latter is used to minimize fragmentation. Our initial studies have examined van der Waals and halogen bonded complexes involving the phenol and toluene chromophores. Progress in the coupling of a discharge source into this apparatus will also be discussed.

  15. Molecule-specific darkfield and multiphoton imaging using gold nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powless, Amy J.; Jenkins, Samir V.; McKay, Mary Lee; Chen, Jingyi; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Due to their robust optical properties, biological inertness, and readily adjustable surface chemistry, gold nanostructures have been demonstrated as contrast agents in a variety of biomedical imaging applications. One application is dynamic imaging of live cells using bioconjugated gold nanoparticles to monitor molecule trafficking mechanisms within cells; for instance, the regulatory pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoing endocytosis. In this paper, we have demonstrated a method to track endocytosis of EGFR in MDA-MB-468 breast adenocarcinoma cells using bioconjugated gold nanocages (AuNCs) and multiphoton microscopy. Dynamic imaging was performed using a time series capture of 4 images every minute for one hour. Specific binding and internalization of the bioconjugated AuNCs was observed while the two control groups showed non-specific binding at fewer surface sites, leading to fewer bound AuNCs and no internalization.

  16. Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

  17. In vivo multiphoton tomography in skin aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Köhler, Johannes; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspect has been performed on hundreds of patients and volunteers in Australia, Asia, and Europe. The system enables the in vivo detection of the elastin and the collagen network as well as the imaging of melanin clusters in aging spots. The epidermis-dermis junction can be detected with submicron resolution. One major applications of this novel HighTech imaging tool is the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In particular, the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen can be investigated over long periods of time. The system with its sub-500 nm lateral resolution is able to image age-related modifications of the extracellular matrix on the level of a single elastin fiber.

  18. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  19. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration.

  20. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.