Science.gov

Sample records for infrared space observatory

  1. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George; Kessler, Martin F.

    1995-01-01

    ISO, scheduled to launch in 1995, will carry into orbit the most sophisticated infrared observatory of the decade. Overviews of the mission, instrument payload and scientific program are given, along with a comparison of the strengths of ISO and SOFIA.

  2. The Herschel Space Observatory, Opening the Far Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John C.

    2009-06-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel) is a multi user observatory operated by the European Space Agency with a significant NASA contribution. Herschel features a passively cooled 3.5 meter telescope expected to operate near 78 Kelvin and three cryogenic instruments covering the 670 to 57 μm spectral region. The mission life time, determined by the consumption of 2500 liters of liquid helium, is expected to be at least 3.5 years with at least 3 years of operational lifetime in an L2 orbit. The three payload instruments are the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), and the Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI). SPIRE covers 200-670 μm and is a three band bolometer based photometer and a two band imaging Martin-Puplett FTS with a spectral resolution of up to 600. PACS covers 57-200 μm and is a three band bolometer based photometer and a grating slit spectrometer illuminating photoconductor arrays in two bands with a resolution of up to 5000. HIFI covers 480-1272 GHz and 1440-1910 GHz and is a series of seven dual polarization heterodyne receivers with a spectral resolution up to 5×10^6. The observatory performance, selected science program and upcoming opportunities will be discussed.

  3. Participation in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    All the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data have been transmitted from the ISO Data Centre, reduced, and calibrated. This has been rather labor-intensive as new calibrations for both the ISOPHOT and ISOCAM data have been released and the algorithms for data reduction have improved. We actually discovered errors in the calibration in earlier versions of the software. However the data reduction improvements have now converged and we have a self-consistent, well-calibrated database. It has also been a major effort to obtain the ground-based JHK imaging, 450 micrometer and 850 micrometer imaging and the 1-2.5 micrometer near-infrared spectroscopy for most of the sample galaxies.

  4. Interstellar ices studied with the Infrared Space Observatory.

    PubMed

    Whittet, D C

    1997-06-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was launched by the European Space Agency on 17 November 1995. The availability of spectra from the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on ISO is a landmark in the study of interstellar ices and organics; they provide a wealth of data in the 2-20 microns region of the spectrum covering the principal solid state resonances of condensed matter in interstellar clouds. We thus have the opportunity to study many species likely to be relevant to the inventory of CNO-bearing interstellar material present at the formation of our own and other planetary systems. This paper presents a brief overview of what has been learned from the data available so far. A comparison is made between the compositions of ices in molecular clouds, protostellar condensations and comets. Key areas of uncertainty are highlighted as a basis for future research.

  5. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  6. Planetary system evolution and the Vega stars: The potential for ESA's Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Backman, Dana E.

    1994-01-01

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), scheduled for launch within the next 2-3 years, will place a complement of powerful infrared imagers and spectrometers into high orbit, with an operational life anticipated to be about 18 months. During this time, numerous scientific investigations of every conceivable astrophysical target will be made. The purpose of this paper is to consider the instrumental complement in terms of specific observations of Vega-like systems with cold, infrared excesses, in order to investigate problems relating to the evolution of planetary systems, and to optimize the scientific results possible with ISO on such topics.

  7. A Mid-infrared Space Observatory for Characterizing Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. R.; Scharf, D. P.; Wirz, R.; Purcell, G.; Rodriguez, J.

    2010-10-01

    The TPF-Darwin planet-finding concept is a space-based mid-IR nulling interferometer consisting of four formation flying reflecting mirrors focusing light into a separate beam combiner spacecraft. As a flagship mission it is a highly capable instrument with the principal science goal of detecting Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars (up to 15 parsec) from their thermal emission, and characterizing their physical properties. Measurements can be made of the size, temperature, orbit, and of the presence of an atmosphere with moderate resolution (R = 50) spectra to reveal bio-markers such as ozone, carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor. The sensitivity is such that a whole planetary system down to half Earth-size planets can be detected in a single day and in a five-year mission life, revisits and repeat detections would reveal the system dynamics. For the most interesting objects, longer measurement series would reveal the detailed thermal spectrum; these measurements would take place in the later part of the mission. The system also has a general astrophysics capability for investigations of distant compact objects and the mission timeline provides ample opportunities for such observations. The mission would use a single heavy launch vehicle to place the system at L2 Sun-Earth halo orbit. This poster shows the main mission elements, the spacecraft design and formation flying, and xenon-ion thruster technologies. Many of the ideas have been developed with European colleagues and the mission has potential to be a collaborative effort between the US and European space agencies.

  8. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Key Project: the Birth and Death of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Backman, Dana

    1999-01-01

    This program was designed to continue to analyze observations of stars thought to be forming protoplanets, using the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, as one of NASA Key Projects with ISO. A particular class of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) discovered stars, known after the prototype, Vega, are principal targets for these observations aimed at examining the evidence for processes involved in forming, or failing to form, planetary systems around other stars. In addition, this program continued to provide partial support for related science in the WIRE, SOFIA and Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) projects, plus approved ISO supplementary time observations under programs MCREE1 29 and VEGADMAP. Their goals include time dependent changes in SWS spectra of Long Period Variable stars and PHOT P32 mapping experiments of recognized protoplanetary disk candidate stars.

  9. Cryogenic Far-Infrared Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-07-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 K to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit about the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope's equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared-submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the observatory if stray-light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184, and 496 μm. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities of 0.2-0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2-0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments.

  10. Star Formation in the Infrared Space Observatory Atlas of Bright Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendo, George J.; Joseph, Robert D.; Wells, Martyn; Gallais, Pascal; Haas, Martin; Heras, Ana M.; Klaas, Ulrich; Laureijs, René J.; Leech, Kieron; Lemke, Dietrich; Metcalfe, Leo; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Schulz, Bernhard; Telesco, Charles

    2002-09-01

    We investigate star formation along the Hubble sequence using the Infrared Space Observatory Atlas of Bright Spiral Galaxies. Using mid-infrared and far-infrared flux densities normalized by K-band flux densities as indicators of recent star formation, we find several trends. First, star formation activity is stronger in late-type (Sc-Scd) spirals than in early-type (Sa-Sab) spirals. This trend is seen both in nuclear and disk activity. These results confirm several previous optical studies of star formation along the Hubble sequence but conflict with the conclusions of most of the previous studies using IRAS data, and we discuss why this might be so. Second, star formation is significantly more extended in later type spirals than in early-type spirals. We suggest that these trends in star formation are a result of differences in the gas content and its distribution along the Hubble sequence, and it is these differences that promote star formation in late-type spiral galaxies. We also search for trends in nuclear star formation related to the presence of a bar or nuclear activity. The nuclear star formation activity is not significantly different between barred and unbarred galaxies. We do find that star formation activity appears to be inhibited in low ionization nuclear emission regions and transition objects compared with H II galaxies. The mean star formation rate in the sample is 1.4 Msolar yr-1, based on global far-infrared fluxes. Combining these data with CO data gives a mean gas consumption time of 6.4×108 yr, which is ~5 times lower than the values found in other studies. Finally, we find excellent support for the Schmidt law in the correlation between molecular gas masses and recent star formation in this sample of spiral galaxies. Based on observations with the Infrared Space Observatory, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the

  11. High-Resolution Infrared Space Observatory Spectroscopy of the Unidentified 21 Micron Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kevin; Kwok, Sun; Hrivnak, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    We present Infrared Space Observatory SWS06 mode observations of the 21 micron feature in eight sources, including a first "detection of the feature in IRAS Z02229+6208. The observed feature peak-to-continuum ratios range from 0.13 in IRAS Z02229+6208 to 1.30 in IRAS 07134+1005. The normalized spectra, obtained by the removal of the underlying continua and by scaling the features to the same peak flux value. show that all features have the same intrinsic profile and peak wavelength. There is no evidence for any discrete substructure due to molecular bands in the observed spectra, suggesting that the 21 micron feature is due to either a solid substance or a mixture of many similarly structured large molecules.

  12. Technology and Capibilities of the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, J. C.; Phillips, T. G.

    2004-05-01

    The Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI) on ESA's Herschel Space Observatory is comprised of five SIS receiver channels covering 480-1250 GHz and two HEB receiver channels covering 1410-1910 GHz. Two fixed tuned local oscillator sub-bands are derived from a common synthesizer to provide the front-end frequency coverage for each channel. The local oscillator unit will be passively cooled while the focal plane unit is cooled by superfluid helium and cold helium vapors. The HIFI receivers employ W-band GaAs amplifiers, InP HEMT low noise IF amplifiers, fixed tuned broadband planar diode multipliers, and novel material systems in the SIS and HEB mixers. The HIFI instrument is built by an international consortium lead by Space Research Organization the Netherlands with a substantial contribution by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. HIFI combines the new receiver technology and a variety of potential observing modes into an extremely power system with unprecedented sensitivity and capability. HIFI will be available for all to use through the Herschel open time proposal process. An overview of the HIFI technology, receiver configuration, functionality and observing capabilities will be presented.

  13. THz instrumentation for the Herschel Space Observatory's heterodyne instrument for far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John C.; Mehdi, Imran; Ward, John S.; Maiwald, Frank W.; Ferber, Robert R.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Schlecht, Erich T.; Gill, John J.; Hatch, William A.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Stern, Jeffrey A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Weinreb, Sander; Bumble, Bruce; Pukala, David M.; Javadi, Hamid H.; Finamore, Bradley P.; Lin, Robert H.; Dengler, Robert J.; Velebir, James R.; Luong, Edward M.; Tsang, Raymond; Peralta, Alejandro; Wells, Mary; Chun, William; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Karpov, Alexandre; Phillips, Thomas; Miller, David; Maestrini, Alain E.; Erickson, Neal; Swift, Gerald; Liao, K. T.; Paquette, Michael

    2004-10-01

    The Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared (HIFI) on ESA's Herschel Space Observatory utilizes a variety of novel RF components in its five SIS receiver channels covering 480- 1250 GHz and two HEB receiver channels covering 1410-1910 GHz. The local oscillator unit will be passively cooled while the focal plane unit is cooled by superfluid helium and cold helium vapors. HIFI employs W-band GaAs amplifiers, InP HEMT low noise IF amplifiers, fixed tuned broadband planar diode multipliers, high power W-band Isolators, and novel material systems in the SIS mixers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the development of the highest frequency (1119-1250 GHz) SIS mixers, the local oscillators for the three highest frequency receivers as well as W-band power amplifiers, high power W-band isolators, varactor diode devices for all high frequency multipliers and InP HEMT components for all the receiver channels intermediate frequency amplifiers. The NASA developed components represent a significant advancement in the available performance. This paper presents an update of the performance and the current state of development.

  14. First extragalactic detection of far-infrared CH rotational lines from the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, J.; Wilson, C.; Maloney, P.; Spinoglio, L.; Kamenetzky, J. R.; Schirm, M.; Santaella, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first extragalactic detections of several CH rotational transitions in the far-infrared (FIR) in four nearby galaxies: NGC 1068, Arp 220, M 82 and NGC 253 using the Herschel Space Observatory. The CH lines in all four galaxies are a factor of 2 - 4 brighter than the corresponding HCN and HCO+ J = 6-5 lines (also detected in the same spectra). In the star formation dominated galaxies, M 82, NGC 253 and Arp 220, the CH/CO abundance ratio is low 1E-5), implying that the CH is primarily arising in diffuse and translucent gas where the chemistry is driven by UV radiation as found in the Milky Way ISM. In NGC 1068, which has a luminous AGN, the CH/CO ratio is an order of magnitude higher suggesting that CH formation is driven by an X-ray dominated region. Our XDR models show that both the CH and CO abundances in NGC 1068 can be explained by an XDR-driven chemistry for gas densities and molecular hydrogen column densities that are well constrained by the CO observations. We conclude that the CH/CO ratio may a good indicator of the presence of AGN in galaxies. We also discuss the feasibility of detecting CH in intermediate- to high-z galaxies with ALMA.

  15. Mid-Infrared observations of NGC 1068 with the Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floc'h, E.; Mirabel, I. F.; Laurent, O.; Charmandaris, V.; Gallais, P.; Sauvage, M.; Vigroux, L.; Cesarsky, C.

    2001-02-01

    We report on Mid-Infrared (MIR) observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, obtained with ISOCAM in low-resolution spectro-imaging mode. The spatial resolution ( ~ 5 arcsec) allows us to disentangle the circumnuclear starburst regions from the emission of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). The global spatial distribution of the Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) is similar to the cold dust component, traced by the 450 mu m emission and the gaseous component obtained from the 12CO(1-0) map. However, a shift between the maximum of the UIB and 450 mu m emission is clearly seen in our maps. The UIBs in the MIR (5-16 mu m) originate almost exclusively from the starburst regions in the galactic disk with an emission peaking at the extremity of the stellar/gaseous bar at a distance of 1 kpc from the AGN. The spectrum of the nucleus is characterized over the whole 5-16 mu m range by a strong continuum which can be fitted with a power law of index alpha =-1.7. Moreover, the high [NeIII]/[NeII] ratio (gtapp 2.5) in the nuclear region argues for a hard radiation field from the AGN. Observations indicate that the AGN in NGC 1068 contributes less than ~ 5% to the total integrated UIB emission even though its hot dust continuum contributes as much as 75% to the total MIR flux. On the contrary, the nuclear contribution to the cold dust emission decreases considerably at submillimeter wavelengths and does not represent more than 25% of the total integrated emission at 450 mu m. Based on observations with the ISO satellite, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  16. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    The joint U.S. and German SOFIA project to develop and operate a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP is now well into development. First science flights will begin in 2004 with 20% of the observing time assigned to German investigators. The observatory is expected to operate for over 20 years. The sensitivity, characteristics and science instrument complement are discussed. Present and future instrumentation will allow unique astrobiology experiments to be carried out. Several experiments related to organic molecules in space will be discussed.

  17. Constraints from Infrared Space Observatory Data on the Velocity Law and Clumpiness of WR 136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Quigley, M. F.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    2003-10-01

    Observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) SWS spectrometer are used to constrain the velocity law and wind clumping of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star WR 136 (HD 192163, WN6). Because the free-free continuum opacity in W-R winds increases steadily with wavelength in the IR, each point in the continuous spectrum may be regarded as forming in a pseudophotosphere of larger radius for longer wavelength. Using this idea in combination with an analysis of the Doppler-broadened widths of several He II recombination lines, we can derive information about the velocity law and clumpiness of the stellar wind of WR 136. The observed line emission emerges from the region exterior to the radius of optical depth unity in the free-free opacity, corresponding to v>~0.3v∞ for our shortest-wavelength line. The ISO observations provide the continuum shape, flux level, and seven fairly strong He II emission profiles. Adopting a β-law distribution for the outflow velocity law, we compute the continuous energy distribution and line profiles. We find that there is a broad range of β-values consistent with the continuum data if we also allow the wind temperature to be a free parameter. Interestingly, the continuum data are found to constrain the wind to have fairly low clumping values for the IR-forming region. By using the continuum results in conjunction with line profile modeling, the observational constraints are best satisfied with a clumping factor of Dc=<ρ2>/<ρ>2 of 1-3 and a β-value of 2-3, although higher β-values are not strongly ruled out for a modest wind temperature. The wavelength range of our ISO data allows us to probe only the outer wind acceleration zone, but in combination with radio observations, our finding that the wind clumping is fairly small suggests that the clumping in the wind of WR 136 decreases with increasing radius. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI

  18. GISMO, an ELT in space: a giant (30-m) far-infrared and submillimeter space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarden, Timothy G.; Johnstone, Callum; Johnstone, Graeme

    2004-07-01

    We describe GISMO, a concept for a 30-m class achromatic diffractive Fesnel space telescope operating in the far-IR and submillimeter from ~20 μm to ~700 μm. The concept is based on the precepts of Hyde (1999). It involves two units, the Lens and Instrument spacecraft, 3 km apart in a halo orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 point. The primary lens, L1, is a 30.1-m, 32-zone f/100 Fresnel lens, fabricated from ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE). It is 1.0 to 3.4 mm thick (the features are 2.4 mm high for a "design wavelength" of 1.2 mm) and made in 5 strips linked by fabric hinges. It is stowed for launch by folding and rolling. It is deployed warm, unrolled by pneumatic or mechanical means, unfolded by carbon-fiber struts with Shape Memory Alloy hinges and stiffened until cold by a peripheral inflatable ring. Re-oriented edgeways-on to the Sun behind a 5-layer sunshade, L1 will then cool by radiation to space, approaching ~10K after 200 - 300 days. The low equilibrium temperature occurs because the lens is very thin and has a huge view factor to space but a small one to the sunshade. The Instrument spacecraft resembles a smaller, colder (~4K) version of the James Webb Space Telescope and shares features of a concept for the SAFIR mission. A near-field Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 3-segment off-axis 6m x 3m primary acts as field lens, re-imaging L1 on a 30-cm f/1 Fresnel Corrector lens of equal and opposite dispersion, producing an achromatic beam which is directed to a focal plane equipped with imaging and spectroscopic instruments. The "design wavelength" of the telescope is 1.2 mm and it is employed at its second and higher harmonics. The shortest wavelength, ~20μm, is set by the transmission properties of the lens material (illustrated here) and determines the design tolerances of the optical system. The overall mass is estimated at ~5 tonnes and the stowed length around 14 m. Technical challenges and areas of uncertainty for the design concept

  19. Infrared Emission of Normal Galaxies from 2.5 to 12 Micron: Infrared Space Observatory Spectra, Near-Infrared Continuum, and Mid-Infrared Emission Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nanyao; Helou, George; Werner, Michael W.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Beichman, Charles A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2003-05-01

    We present ISOPHOT spectra of the regions 2.5-4.9 μm and 5.8-11.6 μm for a sample of 45 disk galaxies from the US Infrared Space Observatory Key Project on Normal Galaxies. The galaxies were selected to span the range in global properties of normal, star-forming disk galaxies in the local universe. The spectra can be decomposed into three spectral components: (1) continuum emission from stellar photospheres, which dominates the near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-4.9 μm) spectral region; (2) a weak NIR excess continuum, which has a color temperature of ~103 K, carries a luminosity of a few percent of the total far-infrared (FIR) dust luminosity LFIR and most likely arises from the interstellar medium (ISM); and (3) the well-known broad emission features at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm, which are generally attributed to aromatic carbon particles. These aromatic features in emission (AFEs) dominate the mid-infrared (MIR; 5.8-11.6 μm) part of the spectrum and resemble the so-called type A spectra observed in many nonstellar sources and the diffuse ISM in our own Galaxy. The few notable exceptions include NGC 4418, where a dust continuum replaces the AFEs in MIR, and NGC 1569, where the AFEs are weak and the strongest emission feature is [S IV] 10.51 μm. The relative strengths of the AFEs vary by 15%-25% among the galaxies. However, little correlation is seen between these variations and either IRAS 60 μm/100 μm flux density ratio R(60/100) or the FIR/blue luminosity ratio LFIR/LB, two widely used indicators of the current star formation activity, suggesting that the observed variations are not a consequence of the radiation field differences among the galaxies. We demonstrate that the NIR excess continuum and AFE emission are correlated, suggesting that they are produced by similar mechanisms and similar (or the same) material. On the other hand, as the current star formation activity increases, the overall strengths of the AFEs and the NIR excess continuum drop

  20. The Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Odell, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    A convenient guide to the expected characteristics of the Space Telescope Observatory for astronomers and physicists is presented. An attempt is made to provide enough detail so that a professional scientist, observer or theorist, can plan how the observatory may be used to further his observing programs or to test theoretical models.

  1. The Nature of Ultraluminous Galaxies: Infrared Space Observatory Analysis and Instrument Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyapal, Shobita

    2001-01-01

    The scientific goal of the proposed research was to investigate the physical conditions in the nuclear regions of infrared luminous galaxies by carrying out detailed infrared spectroscopic observations of a large sample of infrared luminous galaxies. During the past year, these observations have been successfully analyzed and extensive modeling using photoionization and photodissociation codes has been carried out. Two first-author publications and a second-author publication have been submitted to the Astrophysical Journal and results were presented at two invited talks. Four additional journal papers are in preparation and will be submitted during year 2 of the grant. The secondary project included in this program was the development of a near-infrared cryogenic Fabry-Perot interferometer for use on future large aperture telescopes. System integration and room temperature testing was successfully carried out for this project during year 1.

  2. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  3. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Eric; Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  4. The Far-Infrared Energy Distributions of Seyfert and Starburst Galaxies in the Local Universe: Infrared Space Observatory Photometry of the 12 Micron Active Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Andreani, Paola; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2002-06-01

    New far-infrared photometry with ISOPHOT aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is presented for 58 galaxies with homogeneous published data for another 32 galaxies, all belonging to the 12 μm galaxy sample-in total, 29 Seyfert 1 galaxies, 35 Seyfert 2 galaxies, and 12 starburst galaxies, or about half of the 12 μm active galaxy sample, plus 14 normal galaxies for comparison. ISO and Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data are used to define color-color diagrams and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Thermal dust emission at two temperatures (one cold at 15-30 K and one warm at 50-70 K) can fit the 60-200 μm SED, with a dust emissivity law proportional to the inverse square of the wavelength. Seyfert 1 galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies are indistinguishable longward of 100 μm, while, as already seen by IRAS, the former have flatter SEDs shortward of 60 μm. A mild anticorrelation is found between the [200-100] color and the ``60 μm excess.'' We infer that this is due to the fact that galaxies with a strong starburst component and thus a strong 60 μm flux have a steeper far-infrared turnover. In non-Seyfert galaxies, increasing the luminosity corresponds to increasing the star formation rate, which enhances the 25 and 60 μm emission. This shifts the peak emission from around 150 μm in the most quiescent spirals to shorter than 60 μm in the strongest starburst galaxies. To quantify these trends further, we identified with the IRAS colors three idealized infrared SEDs: pure quiescent disk emission, pure starburst emission, and pure Seyfert nucleus emission. Even between 100 and 200 μm, the quiescent disk emission remains much cooler than the starburst component. Seyfert galaxies have 100-200 μm SEDs ranging from pure disks to pure starbursts, with no apparent contribution from their active nuclei at those wavelengths. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France

  5. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    SOFIA, (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) is a planned 2.5 meter telescope to be installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 feet. It will permit routine measurement of infrared radiation inaccessible from the ground-based sites, and observation of astronomical objects and transient events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 18 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA would replace.

  6. Mauna Kea Observatory infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Galactic and solar system infrared observations are reported using a broad variety of radiometric and spectroscopic instrumentation. Infrared programs and papers published during this period are listed.

  7. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. L.; Becklin, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), project has been operating airborne astronomy flights from Palmdale, California since 2011. The observatory consists of a modified 747sp aircraft with a 2.5meter telescope in the tail section. In addition to observing flights out of Palmdale, Ca. this airborne observatory has been able to take advantage of its mobility to observe in the southern hemisphere (New Zealand), to perform multi-wavelength observations of the Super Novae (SN 2014b) in 2014, and to intersect the track of a Pluto Occultation in the southern hemisphere just a few weeks prior to the New Horizons mission fly by of the planet in summer 2015. Science results, observatory operations, current instrument status and participation in future instrument developments, over the lifetime of the observatory will be discussed.

  8. SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) with Telescope Configuration Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) with Telescope Configuration Changes Artwork. Concepts: Based on 18 Years of Experience of Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) Operation, Characteristics, Operations and Science

  9. The spectrum of comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) observed with the Infrared Space Observatory at 2.9 astronomical units from the sun.

    PubMed

    Crovisier, J; Leech, K; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Brooke, T Y; Hanner, M S; Altieri, B; Keller, H U; Lellouch, E

    1997-03-28

    Comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) was observed at wavelengths from 2.4 to 195 micrometers with the Infrared Space Observatory when the comet was about 2.9 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. The main observed volatiles that sublimated from the nucleus ices were water, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a ratio (by number) of 10:6:2. These species are also the main observed constituents of ices in dense interstellar molecular clouds; this observation strengthens the links between cometary and interstellar material. Several broad emission features observed in the 7- to 45-micrometer region suggest the presence of silicates, particularly magnesium-rich crystalline olivine. These features are similar to those observed in the dust envelopes of Vega-type stars.

  10. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.

    1992-01-01

    The features and scientific aims of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy), a planned 2.5 m telescope to be installed in an aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 46,000 ft, are discussed. A brief overview of the SOFIA program is given.

  11. The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ford, Linda A.; Zambrano-Marin, Luisa; Petty, Bryan M.; Sternke, Elizabeth; Ortiz, Andrew M.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.

    2015-11-01

    The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy (AOSA) is a ten (10) week pre-college research program for students in grades 9-12. Our mission is to prepare students for academic and professional careers by allowing them to receive an independent and collaborative research experience on topics related to space and aide in their individual academic and social development. Our objectives are to (1) Supplement the student’s STEM education via inquiry-based learning and indirect teaching methods, (2) Immerse students in an ESL environment, further developing their verbal and written presentation skills, and (3) To foster in every student an interest in science by exploiting their natural curiosity and knowledge in order to further develop their critical thinking and investigation skills. AOSA provides students with the opportunity to share lectures with Arecibo Observatory staff, who have expertise in various STEM fields. Each Fall and Spring semester, selected high school students, or Cadets, from all over Puerto Rico participate in this Saturday academy where they receive experience designing, proposing, and carrying out research projects related to space exploration, focusing on four fields: Physics/Astronomy, Biology, Engineering, and Sociology. Cadets get the opportunity to explore their topic of choice while practicing many of the foundations of scientific research with the goal of designing a space settlement, which they present at the NSS-NASA Ames Space Settlement Design Contest. At the end of each semester students present their research to their peers, program mentors, and Arecibo Observatory staff. Funding for this program is provided by NASA SSERVI-LPI: Center for Lunar Science and Exploration with partial support from the Angel Ramos Visitor Center through UMET and management by USRA.

  12. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.

    1989-01-01

    SOFIA will be a three meter class telescope operating in a Boeing 747, offering astronomers routine access to infrared wavelengths unavailable from the ground, and with the means to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 15 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA will replace in the mid 1990's. SOFIA's wavelength range covers nearly four decades of the electromagnetic spectrum: from the visible, throughout the infrared and submillimeter, to the microwave region. Relative to the KAO, SOFIA will be roughly ten times more sensitive for compact sources, enabling observations of fainter objects and measurements at higher spectral resolution. Also, it will have three times the angular resolving power for wavelengths greater than 30 microns, permitting more detailed imaging at far infrared wavelengths.

  13. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, will carry a 3-meter-class telescope onboard a Boeing 747SP aircraft to altitudes of 41,000 to 45,000 ft, above most of the atmosphere's IR-absorbing water vapor. The telescope was developed and built in Germany and has been delivered to the U.S. in September 2002. The integration into the B747SP has been com- pleted and functional tests are under way in Waco, Texas. In early 2005 flight-testing of the observatory will initially be dedi-cated to the re-certification of the modified aircraft, then performance tests of the telescope and the electronics and data systems will commence. Later in 2005 after transferring to its home base, NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, SOFIA will start astrophysical observations. A suite of specialized infrared cameras and spectrometers covering wave-lengths between 1 and 600 ?m is being developed by U.S. and German science institutions. In addition to the infrared instruments, a high-speed visible range CCD camera will use the airborne observatory to chase the shadows of celestial bodies during occultations. Once SOFIA will be in routine operations with a planned observing schedule of up to 960 hours at altitude per year, it might also be available as a platform to serendipitous observations not using the main telescope, such as recordings of meteor streams or the search for extra-solar planets transiting their central stars. These are areas of research in which amateur astronomers with relatively small telescopes and state-of-the-art imaging equipment can contribute.

  14. Joint US-Japan Observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO): Deep Surveys and Observations of High-Z Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Several important milestones were passed during the past year of our ISO observing program: (1) Our first ISO data were successfully obtained. ISOCAM data were taken for our primary deep field target in the 'Lockman Hole'. Thirteen hours of integration (taken over 4 contiguous orbits) were obtained in the LW2 filter of a 3 ft x 3 ft region centered on the position of minimum HI column density in the Lockman Hole. The data were obtained in microscanning mode. This is the deepest integration attempted to date (by almost a factor of 4 in time) with ISOCAM. (2) The deep survey data obtained for the Lockman Hole were received by the Japanese P.I. (Yoshi Taniguchi) in early December, 1996 (following release of the improved pipeline formatted data from Vilspa), and a copy was forwarded to Hawaii shortly thereafter. These data were processed independently by the Japan and Hawaii groups during the latter part of December 1996, and early January, 1997. The Hawaii group made use of the U.S. ISO data center at IPAC/Caltech in Pasadena to carry out their data reduction, while the Japanese group used a copy of the ISOCAM data analysis package made available to them through an agreement with the head of the ISOCAM team, Catherine Cesarsky. (3) Results of our LW2 Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole were first reported at the ISO Workshop "Taking ISO to the Limits: Exploring the Faintest Sources in the Infrared" held at the ISO Science Operations Center in Villafranca, Spain (VILSPA) on 3-4 February, 1997. Yoshi Taniguchi gave an invited presentation summarizing the results of the U.S.-Japan team, and Dave Sanders gave an invited talk summarizing the results of the Workshop at the conclusion of the two day meeting. The text of the talks by Taniguchi and Sanders are included in the printed Workshop Proceedings, and are published in full on the Web. By several independent accounts, the U.S.-Japan Deep Survey results were one of the highlights of the Workshop; these data showed

  15. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (sofia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.

    2009-06-01

    SOFIA is a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP that will begin will begin science flights in mid-2009. Flying in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet, SOFIA will be used to conduct spectroscopic and imaging observations throughout the infrared and sub-mm region with an average transmission of greater than 80 percent. The SOFIA first-generation instrument complement includes broadband imagers, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at km/s resolution. The characteristics and status of the observatory and its instrumentation will be briefly reviewed. SOFIA`s operations schedule and opportunities for observers and instrument developers will be described.

  16. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the great astronomical observatories both space and land based that are now operational. It shows the history of the development of SOFIA, from its conception in 1986 through the contract awards in 1996 and through the planned first flight in 2007. The major components of the observatory are shown and there is a comparison of the SOFIA with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which is the direct predecessor to SOFIA. The development of the aft ramp of the KAO was developed as a result of the wind tunnel tests performed for SOFIA development. Further slides show the airborne observatory layout and the telescope's optical layout. Included are also vies of the 2.5 Meter effective aperture, and the major telescope's components. The presentations reviews the technical challenges encountered during the development of SOFIA. There are also slides that review the wind tunnel tests, and CFD modeling performed during the development of SOFIA. Closing views show many views of the airplane, and views of SOFIA.

  17. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (sofia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.

    2012-06-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5- meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP. SOFIA can conduct photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging observations at wavelengths from 0.3 microns to 1.6 millimeters. At SOFIA's maximum service ceiling of 45,000 feet, the average transmission at these wavelengths is greater than 80 percent. SOFIA flys out of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center aircraft operations facility at Palmdale, CA and the SOFIA Science Mission Operations (SMO) Center is located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. SOFIA's first-generation instrument complement includes broadband imagers and spectrographs that can resolve spectral features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers facilitating kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at km/s resolution. More than 30 science flights of 10 hours length (take-off to landing) were conducted in the past year. About 100 eight to ten hour flights per year are planned by 2014, and the observatory will operate until the mid-2030's.

  18. The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ford, Linda A.; Fernanda Zambrano Marin, Luisa; Aponte Hernandez, Betzaida; Soto, Sujeily; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.

    2016-10-01

    The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy (AOSA) is an intense fifteen-week pre-college research program for qualified high school students residing in Puerto Rico, which includes ten days for hands-on, on site research activities. Our mission is to prepare students for their professional careers by allowing them to receive an independent and collaborative research experience on topics related to the multidisciplinary field of space science. Our objectives are to (1) supplement the student's STEM education via inquiry-based learning and indirect teaching methods, (2) immerse students in an ESL environment, further developing their verbal and written presentation skills, and (3) foster in every student an interest in the STEM fields by harnessing their natural curiosity and knowledge in order to further develop their critical thinking and investigation skills. Students interested in participating in the program go through an application, interview and trial period before being offered admission. They are welcomed as candidates the first weeks, and later become cadets while experiencing designing, proposing, and conducting research projects focusing in fields like Physics, Astronomy, Geology, Chemistry, and Engineering. Each individual is evaluated with program compatibility based on peer interaction, preparation, participation, and contribution to class, group dynamics, attitude, challenges, and inquiry. This helps to ensure that specialized attention can be given to students who demonstrate a dedication and desire to learn. Deciding how to proceed in the face of setbacks and unexpected problems is central to the learning experience. At the end of the semester, students present their research to the program mentors, peers, and scientific staff. This year, AOSA students also focused on science communication and were trained by NASA's FameLab. Students additionally presented their research at this year's International Space Development Conference (ISDC), which was held in

  19. Space-Based Near-Infrared CO2 Measurements: Testing the Orbiting Carbon Observatory Retrieval Algorithm and Validation Concept Using SCIAMACHY Observations over Park Falls, Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosch, H.; Toon, G. C.; Sen, B.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Buchwitz, M.; deBeek, R.; Burrows, J. P.; Crisp, D.; Christi, M.; Connor, B. J.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y. L.

    2006-01-01

    Space-based measurements of reflected sunlight in the near-infrared (NIR) region promise to yield accurate and precise observations of the global distribution of atmospheric CO2. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is a future NASA mission, which will use this technique to measure the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CO2 (XCO2) with the precision and accuracy needed to quantify CO2 sources and sinks on regional scales (approx.1000 x 1000 sq km and to characterize their variability on seasonal timescales. Here, we have used the OCO retrieval algorithm to retrieve XCO2 and surface pressure from space-based Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) measurements and from coincident ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements of the O2 A band at 0.76 mm and the 1.58 mm CO2 band for Park Falls,Wisconsin. Even after accounting for a systematic error in our representation of the O2 absorption cross sections, we still obtained a positive bias between SCIAMACHY and FTS XCO2 retrievals of approx.3.5%. Additionally, the retrieved surface pressures from SCIAMACHY systematically underestimate measurements of a calibrated pressure sensor at the FTS site. These findings lead us to speculate about inadequacies in the forward model of our retrieval algorithm. By assuming a 1% intensity offset in the O2 A band region for the SCIAMACHY XCO2 retrieval, we significantly improved the spectral fit and achieved better consistency between SCIAMACHY and FTS XCO2 retrievals. We compared the seasonal cycle of XCO2 at Park Falls from SCIAMACHY and FTS retrievals with calculations of the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (MATCH/CASA) and found a good qualitative agreement but with MATCH/CASA underestimating the measured seasonal amplitude. Furthermore, since SCIAMACHY observations are similar in viewing geometry and spectral range to those of OCO, this study represents an important

  20. The Extreme Universe Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will describe the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) mission. EUSO is an ESA mission to explore the most powerful energy sources in the universe. The mission objectives of EUSO are to investigate EECRs, those with energies above 3x10(exp 19) eV, and very high-energy cosmic neutrinos. These objectives are directly related to extreme conditions in the physical world and possibly involve the early history of the big bang and the framework of GUTs. EUSO tackles the basic problem posed by the existence of these extreme-energy events. The solution could have a unique impact on fundamental physics, cosmology, and/or astrophysics. At these energies, magnetic deflection is thought to be so small that the EECR component would serve as the particle channel for astronomy. EUSO will make the first measurements of EAS from space by observing atmospheric fluorescence in the Earth's night sky. With measurements of the airshower track, EUSO will determine the energy and arrival direction of these extreme-energy events. EUSO will make high statistics observations of CRs beyond the predicted GZK cutoff energy and widen the channel for high-energy neutrino astronomy. The energy spectra, arrival directions, and shower profiles will be analyzed to distinguish the nature of these events and search for their sources. With EUSO data, we will have the possibility to discover a local EECR source, test Z-burst scenarios and other theories, and look for evidence of the breakdown of the relativity principle at extreme Lorentz factors.

  1. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ˜2.4 km by ˜5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  2. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  3. Long-lived space observatories for astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Becklin, Eric E.; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Cowie, Lennox L.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Elliot, James L.; Gallagher, John S.; Helfand, David J.; Jenkins, Edward F.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's plan to build and launch a fleet of long-lived space observatories that include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Observatory (AXAF), and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are discussed. These facilities are expected to have a profound impact on the sciences of astronomy and astrophysics. The long-lived observatories will provide new insights about astronomical and astrophysical problems that range from the presence of planets orbiting nearby stars to the large-scale distribution and evolution of matter in the universe. An important concern to NASA and the scientific community is the operation and maintenance cost of the four observatories described above. The HST cost about $1.3 billion (1984 dollars) to build and is estimated to require $160 million (1986 dollars) a year to operate and maintain. If HST is operated for 20 years, the accumulated costs will be considerably more than those required for its construction. Therefore, it is essential to plan carefully for observatory operations and maintenance before a long-lived facility is constructed. The primary goal of this report is to help NASA develop guidelines for the operations and management of these future observatories so as to achieve the best possible scientific results for the resources available. Eight recommendations are given.

  4. Cosmic Ray Observatories for Space Weather Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The Mexican Space Weather Service (SCiESMEX) was created in October 2014. Some observatories measure data for the service at different frequencies and particles. Two cosmic ray observatories detect the particle variations attributed to solar emissions, and are an important source of information for the SCiESMEX. The Mexico City Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a neutron monitor (6-NM-64) and a muon telescope, that detect the hadronic and hard component of the secondary cosmic rays in the atmosphere. It has been in continous operation since 1990. The Sierra Negra Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a solar neutron telescope and the scintillator cosmic ray telescope. These telescopes can detect the neutrons, generated in solar flares and the hadronic and hard components of the secondary cosmic rays. It has been in continous operation since 2004. We present the two observatories and the capability to detect variations in the cosmic rays, generated by the emissions of the solar activity.

  5. Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture, space telescope designed to provide imaging and spectroscopy over the near and mid-infrared from 1.0 μm to 28 μm. JWST is a passively cooled infrared telescope, employing a five layer sunshield to achieve an operating temperature of ~40 K. JWST will be launched to an orbit at L2 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher in 2013. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is the lead center for the JWST program and manages the project for NASA. The prime contractor for JWST is Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGST). JWST is an international partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). ESA will contribute the Ariane 5 launch, and a multi-object infrared spectrograph. CSA will contribute the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), which includes the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI). A European consortium, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), builds the mid-infrared imager (MIRI). In this paper we present an overview of the JWST science program, and discuss recent progress in the development of the observatory. In this paper we will discuss the scientific motivations for JWST, and discuss recent progress in the construction of the observatory, focusing on the telescope and its optics, which have recently completed polishing.

  6. Space Weather in Magnetic Observatory Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Truong, F.

    2012-12-01

    Space weather impacts human activity by degrading satellite operation or disrupting electrical power grids. By exploiting small differences in the time stamp between magnetometer pairs to facilitate data filtering, we find that ground-based magnetic observatories are well suited to measure space weather phenomena, and in particular, high frequency fluctuations known as pulsations. Several of the world's consortium of INTERMAGNET observatories are used in the analyses. They show that pulsation amplitudes attain a maximum near local noon over diurnal periods. Long-term trends in pulsation amplitude correlate well with the solar cycle, with the greatest effect occurring during the waning part of the cycle when the derivative of the number of sunspots attains a maximum rate of decrease. Seasonal variability and total amplitude of the diurnal expression of pulsations depends on latitude. Our study highlights the utility of ground-based observatories to understand solar phenomena and suggests how INTERMAGNET data and protocol could be better tuned to monitor space weather.

  7. Science with the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the fourth and final member of NASA's series of Great Observatories, is scheduled to launch on April 15,2003. Together with the Hubbie Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma ray Telescope, and the Chandra X-Ray Telescope this series of observatories offers observational capabilities across the electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared to high-energy gamma rays. SIRTF is based on three focal plane instruments - an infrared spectrograph and two infrared imagers - coupled to a superfluid-helium cooled telescope to achieve unprecedented sensitivity from 3 to 180 microns. Although SIRTF is a powerful general-purpose infrared observatory, its design was based on the capability to address four broad science themes: (1) understanding the structure and composition of the early universe, (2) understanding the nature of brown dwarfs and super-planets, (3) probing protostellar, protoplanetary, and planetary debris disk systems, and (4) understanding the origin and structure of ultraluminous infrared galaxies and active galactic nuclei. This talk will address the design and capabilities of the SIRTF observatory, provide an overview of some of the initial science investigations planned by the SIRTF Guaranteed Time Observers, and give a brief overview of the General Observer proposal process.

  8. The great observatories for space astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.; Neal, V.

    1986-01-01

    Motivated by the ancient urge to observe, measure, compute, and understand the nature of the Universe, the available advanced technology is used to place entire observatories into space for investigations across the spectrum. Stellar evolution, development and nature of the Universe, planetary exploration, technology, NASA's role, and careers in asronomy are displayed.

  9. Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a cryogenic, 6.5 meter diameter space telescope. JWST has a unique architecture, compared to previous space telescopes, that is driven by its science requirements, ia passively cooled cryogenic design, and the need to stow the observatory for launch. JWST's large, segmented mirror meets the requirement for high angular resolution in the infrared coupled with a significant increase in collecting area compared to the Spitzer and Hubble Space telescopes in order to detect the first galaxies. JWST's unique five-layer sunshield allows the telescope and instrument module to passively cool to cryogenic temperatures. JWST will be launched on an Ariane 5, and so both its telescope optics, and the sunshield have to be stowed in order to fit the Ariane 5 fairing. Following launch the sunshield and telescope optics must be deployed, and the primary mirror phased for science operations. In this presentation we will review the design of the observatory and highlight recent progress in the construction of the JWST observatory. In particular, we address recent progress with the telescope optics, sunshield and spacecraft. We will discuss predicted observatory performance in terms of the scientific goals of JWST and address key operational considerations that might bear upon frontier science observations.

  10. SOFIA: The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    1990-01-01

    SOFIA, an airborne observatory intended to be carried aboard a Boeing 747 high performance aircraft, is described. The observatory is predicted to provide a threefold greater aperture than that of the Kuiper telescope. The Boeing aircraft will carry the 2.5 diameter telescope and its observers to altitudes of 14,000 and above where the atmosphere is very nearly transparent at all wavelengths. Various aspects and specific missions of the SOFIA project, a cooperative venture of the U.S. and Germany, are described.

  11. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  12. CALISTO: A Cryogenic Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.; Bradford, C. M.; Dragovan, M.; Khayatian, B.; Huffenberger, K.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Gorski, K.; Yorke, H. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Paine, C.; Satter, C.; Lee, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a design for a cryogenically cooled large aperture telescope for far-infrared astronomy in the wavelength range 30 micrometers to 300 micrometers. The Cryogenic Aperture Large Infrared Space Telescope Observatory, or CALISTO, is based on an off-axis Gregorian telescope having a 4 m by 6 m primary reflector. This can be launched using an Atlas V 511, with the only optical deployment required being a simple hinged rotation of the secondary reflector. The off-axis design, which includes a cold stop, offers exceptionally good performance in terms of high efficiency and minimum coupling of radiation incident from angles far off the direction of maximum response. This means that strong astronomical sources, such as the Milky Way and zodiacal dust in the plane of the solar system, add very little to the background. The entire optical system is cooled to 4 K to make its emission less than even this low level of astronomical emission. Assuming that detector technology can be improved to the point where detector noise is less than that of the astronomical background, we anticipate unprecedented low values of system noise equivalent power, in the vicinity of 10(exp -19) WHz(exp -0.5), through CALISTO's operating range. This will enable a variety of new astronomical investigations ranging from studies of objects in the outer solar system to tracing the evolution of galaxies in the universe throughout cosmic time.

  13. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltsee, Christopher B.; Brooks, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    The system concept for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), as developed by NASA Ames Research Center is described. The SOFIA facility is a 3-meter class optical/infrared/submillimeter telescope mounted in an open cavity in the forebody of a Boeing 747 aircraft, to be operational in 1992. It represents the next generation of Ames' existing airborne IR facilities, and is about ten times more sensitive than the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) with 3 times better angular resolution, and able to detect all the far-infrared point sources discovered by IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) survey in 1983. Major requirements and design attributes of the SOFIA telescope are presented, along with a brief description of the Ground Support/Operations System.

  14. Development of a near-infrared detector and a fiber-optic integral field unit for a space solar observatory SOLAR-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsukawa, Yukio; Kamata, Yukiko; Anan, Tetsu; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Bando, Takamasa; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a high sensitivity and fast readout near-infrared (NIR) detector and an integral field unit (IFU) for making spectro-polarimetric observations of rapidly varying chromospheric spectrum lines, such as He I 1083 nm and Ca II 854 nm, in the next space-based solar mission SOLAR-C. We made tests of a 1.7 μm cutoff H2RG detector with the SIDECAR ASIC for the application in SOLAR-C. It's important to verify its perfor- mance in the temperature condition around -100 °C, which is hotter than the typical temperature environment used for a NIR detector. We built a system for testing the detector between -70 °C and -140 °C. We verified linearity, read-out noise, and dark current in both the slow and fast readout modes. We found the detector has to be cooled down lower than -100 °C because of significant increase of the number of hot pixels in the hotter environment. The compact and polarization maintenance IFU was designed using fiber-optic ribbons consisting of rectangular cores which exhibit good polarization maintenance. A Silicone adhesive DC-SE9187L was used to hold the fragile fiber-optic ribbons in a metal housing. Polarization maintenance property was confirmed though polarization calibration as well as temperature control are required to suppress polarization crosstalk and to achieve the polarization accuracy in SOLAR-C.

  15. EARLY SCIENCE WITH SOFIA, THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. T.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, J. M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Casey, S. C.; Helton, L. A.; Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Temi, P.; Herter, T. L.; Guesten, R.; Dunham, E. W.; Backman, D.; Burgdorf, M.; Caroff, L. J.; Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.; Gehrz, R. D.; Harper, D. A.; Harvey, P. M.; and others

    2012-04-20

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7 m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8% of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und-Raumfahrt, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This Letter provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

  16. Development of the first infrared satellite observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. M.; Squibb, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    A development history is given for the Infrared Astronomical Satelite (IRAS), whose primary mission objective is an unbiased, all-sky survey in the 8-120 micron wavelength range. A point source catalog of more than 200,000 IR sources, to be published later this year, represents the accomplishment of this objective. IRAS has also conducted 10,000 pointed observations of specific objects. Attention is given to the cost increases and schedule slips which resulted from the substantial technical challenges of IRAS hardware and software development, and to the management techniques which had to be employed in this major international project.

  17. SOFIA: A Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Davidson, J. A.; Thorley, G.; Caroff, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    SOFIA is described as it was originally (May 1988) for the Space and Earth Sciences Advisory Committee (SESAC). The format and questions were provided by SESAC as a standard for judging the merit of potential U.S. space science projects. This version deletes Section IIF, which addressed development costs of the SOFIA facility. SOFIA's unique astronomical potential is described and it is shown how it complements and supports existing and planned facilities.

  18. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA): Infrared Sensor Development and Science Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Ruzek, M.

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a unique airborne observatory designed to operate in the lower stratosphere to altitudes as high as 45,000 feet and above 99.8 percent of Earths obscuring atmospheric water vapor. SOFIA's capabilities enable science and observations that will complement and extend past, present and future infrared (IR) telescopes in wavelength range, angular and spectral resolution, and observing flexibility. The joint U.S. and German SOFIA project to develop and operate a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP is nearing readiness for for open door flights and demonstration of early science results. Flying in the stratosphere, SOFIA allows observations throughout the infrared and submillimeter region. The SOFIA instrument complement includes broadband imagers, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at high resolution. First science flights will begin in early 2010. A great strength of SOFIA is the enormous breadth of its capabilities and the flexibility with which those capabilities can be modified and improved to take advantage of advances in infrared technology. This paper and presentation will highlight the following points: A 2.5-meter effective-diameter optical-quality telescope for diffraction-limited imaging beyond 25 micrometers, giving the sharpest view of the sky provided by any current or developmental IR telescope operating in the 30-60 micrometers region; Wavelength coverage from 0.3 micrometers to 1.6 mm and high resolution spectroscopy (R to 105) at wavelengths between 5 and 150 micrometers; An 8 arcmin FOV allowing use of very large detector arrays; Ready observer access to science instruments which can be serviced in flight and changed between flights; A low-risk ability to incorporate new science-enabling instrument

  19. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  20. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) telescope overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schember, Helene; Manhart, Paul; Guiar, Cecilia; Stevens, James H.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will be the first true infrared observatory in space, building upon the technical and scientific experience gained through its two NASA survey-oriented predecessors: the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer. During its minimum five year lifetime, the SIRTF will perform pointed scientific observations at wavelengths from 1.8 to 1200 microns with an increase in sensitivity over previous missions of several orders of magnitude. This paper discusses a candidate design for the SIRTF telescope, encompassing optics, cryostat, and instrument accommodation, which has been undertaken to provide a fulcrum for the development of functional requirements, interface definition, risk assessment and cost. The telescope optics employ a baffled Ritchey-Chretien Cassegrain system with a 1-m class primary mirror, an active secondary mirror, and a stationary facetted tertiary mirror. The optics are embedded in a large superfluid He cryostat designed to maintain the entire telescope-instrument system at temperatures below 3 K.

  1. Planetary Science with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Dana E.; Reach, William T.

    2015-11-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is currently conducting the third annual Cycle of guest investigator observing programs. Programs selected for the fourth Cycle (2016) were announced in October. The planetary science community has made a significant showing in all proposal Cycles, comprising approximately 15% of the time awarded in Cycles 1-3. SOFIA offers observers access to the complete infrared spectrum, with much less atmospheric absorption than from even the finest ground-based telescope sites. New capabilities include high-resolution spectroscopy in the mid-infrared with the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) that allows spectroscopy of molecules from narrow stratospheric lines of planetary atmospheres, plus imaging spectroscopy with the Field Imaging Far-Infrared Line Spectrometer (FIFI-LS) capable, for example, of simultaneous observations in 9 spatial pixels in each of two far-infrared spectral lines. Also, the FLITECAM near-IR and FORCAST mid-IR cameras include grisms that allow moderate-resolution spectral imaging at wavelengths inaccessible from the ground, and HIPO and FPI+ high-speed photometric imagers are capable of high-S/N measurements of stellar occultations and exoplanet transits. Planetary science targets observed to date include comets ISON and PanSTARRS, main belt asteroids, Mars, Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Europa, exoplanets, and debris disks. This poster will showcase science highlights, give details regarding the SOFIA observatory and instrument capabilities, and present observing program statistics.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation from Outer Space and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The universe provides numerous extremely interesting astrophysical sources of synchrotron X radiation. The Chandra X-ray Observatory and other X-ray missions provide powerful probes of these and other cosmic X-ray sources. Chandra is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which also includes the Hubble Space telescope, the Spitzer Infrared Telescope Facility, and the now defunct Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory provides the best angular resolution (sub-arcsecond) of any previous, current, or planned (for the foreseeable near future) space-based X-ray instrumentation. We present here a brief overview of the technical capability of this X-Ray observatory and some of the remarkable discoveries involving cosmic synchrotron sources.

  3. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astornomy and Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reach, William T.; SOFIA Sciece Mission Operations

    2016-10-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy enables observations at far-infrared wavelengths, including the range 30-300 microns that is nearly completely obscured from the ground. By flying in the stratosphere above 95% of atmospheric water vapor, access is opened to photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric observations of Solar System targets spanning small bodies through major planets. Extrasolar planetary systems can be observed through their debris disks or transits, and forming planetary systems through protoplanetary disks, protostellar envelopes, and molecular cloud cores. SOFIA operates out of Southern California most of the year. For the summer of 2016, we deployed to New Zealand with 3 scientific instruments. The HAWC+ far-infrared photopolarimeter was recently flown and is in commissioning, and two projects are in Phase A study to downselect to one new facility instrument. The Cycle 5 observing proposal results are anticipated to be be released by the time of this DPS meeting, and successful planetary proposals will be advertised.

  4. Hinode ``a new solar observatory in space''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneta, S.; Harra, L. K.; Masuda, S.

    2009-05-01

    Since its launch in September 2006, the Japan-US-UK solar physics satellite, Hinode, has continued its observation of the sun, sending back solar images of unprecedented clarity every day. Hinode is equipped with three telescopes, a visible light telescope, an X-ray telescope, and an extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer. The Hinode optical telescope has a large primary mirror measuring 50 centimeters in diameter and is the world's largest space telescope for observing the sun and its vector magnetic fields. The impact of Hinode as an optical telescope on solar physics is comparable to that of the Hubble Space Telescope on optical astronomy. While the optical telescope observes the sun's surface, the Hinode X-ray telescope captures images of the corona and the high-temperature flares that range between several million and several tens of millions of degrees. The telescope has captured coronal structures that are clearer than ever. The Hinode EUV imaging spectrometer possesses approximately ten times the sensitivity and four times the resolution of a similar instrument on the SOHO satellite. The source of energy for the sun is in the nuclear fusion reaction that takes place at its core. Here temperature drops closer to the surface, where the temperature measures about 6,000 degrees. Mysteriously, the temperature starts rising again above the surface, and the temperature of the corona is exceptionally high, several millions of degrees. It is as if water were boiling fiercely in a kettle placed on a stove with no fire, inconceivable as it may sound. The phenomenon is referred to as the coronal heating problem, and it is one of the major astronomical mysteries. The Hinode observatory was designed to solve this mystery. It is expected that Hinode would also provide clues to unraveling why strong magnetic fields are formed and how solar flares are triggered. An overview on the initial results from Hinode is presented. Dynamic video pictures captured by Hinode can be

  5. Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Phase A: System concept description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Infrared astronomers have made significant discoveries using the NASA/Ames Research Center C-141 Kuiper airborne Observatory (KAO) with its 0.91-meter telescope. The need for a 3-meter class airborne observatory has been established to improve astronomy data gathering capability. The new system envisioned by NASA and the international community of astronomers will be known as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The platform of choice for SOFIA is a modified Boeing 747SP. SOFIA is viewed as a logical progression from the KAO. Potentially, a 3-meter telescope operating at the altitude achievable by the 747SP aircraft can be 11 times more sensitive than the KAO, can have 3.3 times better angular resolution, and will allow observations of compact sources in a volume of space up to 36 times that of the KAO. The KAO has enabled detection of about 15 percent of the far infrared IRAS survey point-sources; SOFIA should be able to detect them all. This document presents the results of in-house ARC and contracted concept definition studies for SOFIA. Using the ARC-based Kuiper Airborne Observatory as a basis for both SOFIA design and operations concepts, the SOFIA system concept has been developed with a view toward demonstrating mission and technical feasibility, and preparing preliminary cost estimates. The reference concept developed is not intended to represent final design, and should be treated accordingly. The most important products of this study, other than demonstration of system feasibility, are the understanding of system trade-offs and the development of confidence in the technology base that exists to move forward with a program leading to implementation of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

  6. Near infra-red astronomy with adaptive optics and laser guide stars at the Keck Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1995-08-03

    A laser guide star adaptive optics system is being built for the W. M. Keck Observatory`s 10-meter Keck II telescope. Two new near infra-red instruments will be used with this system: a high-resolution camera (NIRC 2) and an echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC). The authors describe the expected capabilities of these instruments for high-resolution astronomy, using adaptive optics with either a natural star or a sodium-layer laser guide star as a reference. They compare the expected performance of these planned Keck adaptive optics instruments with that predicted for the NICMOS near infra-red camera, which is scheduled to be installed on the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997.

  7. Large deployable reflector: An infrared and submillimeter orbiting observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Kiya, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is to be a dedicated astronomical observatory in space. It will operate in the 1 mm to 30 micron wavelength region where the Earth's atmospheric opacity makes ground-based observations nearly impossible. The primary mirror will be 20 m in diameter, made up of 37 individual segments. The reflector will be actively controlled to provide an overall surface accuracy of less than or approximately 2 microns. The LDR will be placed in orbit by the Space Shuttle and revisited at approximately 2 year intervals during its 10 year lifetime.

  8. Polarimetry from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillancourt, J.; Andersson, B.; Young, E.; Ruzek, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747SP that operates in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet (14 km). A joint project of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), SOFIA can conduct photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging observations at wavelengths from 0.3 micron to 1.6 millimeters with an average atmospheric transmission greater than 80 percent across that range. The first-generation instruments span the range from 0.3 to 240 microns. SOFIA's ability to regularly update its instrument complement over its 20-year lifetime will allow for polarimeters with imaging and spectroscopic capabilities; a second-generation imaging polarimeter is currently planned for far-infrared wavelengths. We discuss a sample of possible investigations of interest to the field of planetary science which can be carried out with an airborne polarimeter in SOFIA's near- and mid-infrared wavelength range including studies of comets, asteroids, and proto-stellar disks. A third-generation instrument call, where new polarimetric capabilities may be proposed, is currently planned for Fiscal Year 2014.

  9. Status of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the largest cryogenic, space telescope ever built, and will address a broad range of scientific goals from first light in the universe and re-ionization, to characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Recently, significant progress has been made in the construction of the observatory with the completion of all 21 flight mirrors that comprise the telescope's optical chain, and the start of flight instrument deliveries to the Goddard Space Flight Center. In this paper we discuss the design of the observatory, and focus on the recent milestone achievements in each of the major observatory sub-systems.

  10. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Robert D.; Sanders, David B.; Stockton, Alan; Hu, Esther

    1999-01-01

    Joseph is an ISO Co-Investigator. His Guaranteed Time Observations include both a major programme for which he is the Principal Investigator, and a number of other prgrammes in collaboration with other ISPHOT Co-Investigators, David Sanders, Alan Stockton, and Esther Hu.

  11. Space-based infrared surveys of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.

    2014-07-01

    Most small bodies in the Solar System are too small and too distant to be spatially resolved, precluding a direct diameter derivation. Furthermore, measurements of the optical brightness alone only allow a rough estimate of the diameter, since the surface albedo is usually unknown and can have values between about 3 % and 60 % or more. The degeneracy can be resolved by considering the thermal emission of these objects, which is less prone to albedo effects and mainly a function of the diameter. Hence, the combination of optical and thermal-infrared observational data provides a means to independently derive an object's diameter and albedo. This technique is used in asteroid thermal models or more sophisticated thermophysical models (see, e.g., [1]). Infrared observations require cryogenic detectors and/or telescopes, depending on the actual wavelength range observed. Observations from the ground are additionally compromised by the variable transparency of Earth's atmosphere in major portions of the infrared wavelength ranges. Hence, space-based infrared telescopes, providing stable conditions and significantly better sensitivities than ground-based telescopes, are now used routinely to exploit this wavelength range. Two observation strategies are used with space-based infrared observatories: Space-based Infrared All-Sky Surveys. Asteroid surveys in the thermal infrared are less prone to albedo-related discovery bias compared to surveys with optical telescopes, providing a more complete picture of small body populations. The first space-based infrared survey of Solar System small bodies was performed with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) for 10 months in 1983. In the course of the 'IRAS Minor Planet Survey' [2], 2228 asteroids (3 new discoveries) and more than 25 comets (6 new discoveries) were observed. More recent space-based infrared all-sky asteroid surveys were performed by Akari (launched 2006) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE

  12. Wind Tunnel Testing for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenberger, Deborah; Alvarez, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is pursuing the development of SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA will consist of a 2.5 meter telescope mounted aft of the wing of a Boeing 747 aircraft. Since a large portion of the infrared spectrum is not visible at ground level due to absorption by water vapor in the atmosphere below 40,000 feet, it is highly desirable to make observations above this altitude. SOFIA will provide the opportunity for astronomers to conduct high-altitude research for extended periods of time. Current study is focused on wind tunnel testing for the open cavity. If not controlled, air would create resonance and damage the telescope. For this reason, SOFIA will design a boundary layer control device to achieve laminar flow over the cavity. This also provides a clearer flow for seeing, thus improving resolution on infrared sources. Other effects being tested in the wind tunnel are aerodynamic torque loads on the telescope, and flutter loads on the tail.

  13. Integration of space geodesy: a US National Geodetic Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Neilan, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In the interest of improving the performance and efficiency of space geodesy a diverse group in the U.S., in collaboration with IGGOS, has begun to establish a unified National Geodetic Observatory (NGO).

  14. Space telescope observatory management system preliminary test and verification plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, J. S.; Kaldenbach, C. F.; Williams, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary plan for the Space Telescope Observatory Management System Test and Verification (TAV) is provided. Methodology, test scenarios, test plans and procedure formats, schedules, and the TAV organization are included. Supporting information is provided.

  15. Fatigue Management Strategies for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    Operation of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy entails a great deal of night-time work, with the potential for both acute and chronic sleep loss, as well as circadian rhythm dysynchrony. Such fatigue can result in performance decrements, with an increased risk of operator error. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center manages this fatigue risk by means of a layered approach, to include: 1) Education and Training 2) Work Schedule Scoring 3) Obtained Sleep Metrics 4) Workplace and Operational Mitigations and 5) Incident or Accident Investigation. Specifically, quantitative estimation of the work schedule score, as well as the obtained sleep metric, allows Supervisors and Managers to better manage the risk of fatigue within the context of mission requirements.

  16. The Infrared-Optical Telescope (IRT) of the Exist Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Bloom, Joshua; Gehrels, Neil; Golisano, Craig; Gong, Quan; Grindlay, Jonathan; Moseley, Samuel; Woodgate, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The IRT is a 1.1m visible and infrared passively cooled telescope, which can locate, identify and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. It will also acquire optical-IR, imaging and spectroscopy of AGN and transients discovered by the EXIST (The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope). The IRT imaging and spectroscopic capabilities cover a broad spectral range from 0.32.2m in four bands. The identical fields of view in the four instrument bands are each split in three subfields: imaging, objective prism slitless for the field and objective prism single object slit low resolution spectroscopy, and high resolution long slit on single object. This allows the instrument, to do simultaneous broadband photometry or spectroscopy of the same object over the full spectral range, thus greatly improving the efficiency of the observatory and its detection limits. A prompt follow up (within three minutes) of the transient discovered by the EXIST makes IRT a unique tool for detection and study of these events, which is particularly valuable at wavelengths unavailable to the ground based observatories.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Astrophysical Gas, Grains, and Ices with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (sofia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.

    2009-06-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will be a premier facility for studying the physics and chemistry of the stellar evolution process for many decades. SOFIA spectroscopic science applications will be discussed, with special emphasis on investigations related to infrared spectroscopy of astrophysical gas, grains, and ices. Examples will be given of spectroscopic studies of the interstellar medium, protostars, obscured sources in molecular cloud cores, circumstellar disks around young stellar objects, remnants of nova and supernova explosions, and winds of evolved stellar systems.

  18. Complementarity of NGST, ALMA, and Far IR Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) will both start operations long before a new far IR observatory to follow SIRTF into space can be launched. What will be unknown even after they are operational, and what will a far IR space observatory be able to add? I will compare the telescope design concepts and capabilities and the advertised scientific programs for the projects and attempt to forecast the research topics that will be at the forefront in 2010.

  19. Infrared divergences in de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Polarski, D. Service d'Astrophysique, CEN Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX, France)

    1991-03-15

    Infrared divergences in de Sitter space are considered. It is shown that symmetry breaking is unavoidable only when the infrared divergence is strong enough. The static vacuum has no symmetry breaking despite the presence of an infrared divergence.

  20. In Brief: Chandra Observatory marks 10 years in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, originally envisioned as a 5-year mission, was deployed into an elliptical orbit around Earth 10 years ago, on 23 July 1999. The most powerful X-ray telescope yet, Chandra has provided a peak into the high-energy universe and has independently confirmed the existence of dark energy. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., said discoveries made possible by the observatory “have made dramatic changes to our understanding of the universe and its constituents.” “The Great Observatories program—of which Chandra is a major part—shows how astronomers need as many tools as possible to tackle the big questions out there,” said Ed Weiler, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The Hubble Space Telescope, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope are NASA's other Great Observatories. For more information, visit http://chandra.harvard.edu/ten/ and http://chandra.nasa.gov.

  1. Space infrared telescope facility project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    The functions undertaken during this reporting period were: to inform the planetary science community of the progress and status of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Project; to solicit input from the planetary science community on needs and requirements of planetary science in the use of SIRTF at such time that it becomes an operational facility; and a white paper was prepared on the use of the SIRTF for solar system studies.

  2. World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet mission: state of art 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, Mikhail; Gomez De Castro, Ana; Shustov, Boris M.

    2016-07-01

    The WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is intended to built and operate an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 300 nm) range, where some of the most important astrophysical processes can be efficiently studied. The observatory includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy and long slit low-resolution spectroscopy with the WUVS instrument; moreover UV imaging will be available with cameras. WSO-UV is a Russian led mission that will be operating in high Earth orbit (geosynchronous with inclination 51.^o6) for five+five years grating access to the UV range to the world-wide astronomical community in the post-Hubble era. Spain is a major partner to the project. Updated information of the WSO-UV project is provided periodically in the COSPAR meetings. Henceforth, this review provides a summary on the project, its status and the major outcomes since the last COSPAR Assembly.

  3. Vibration isolation system for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, T.; Kunz, N.

    1988-01-01

    The Vibration Isolation System for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is studied. Included are discussions of the various concepts, design goals, concerns, and the proposed configuration for the Vibration Isolation System.

  4. Cryogenic Far-IR Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Klaassen, T. O.; Hovenier, J. N.; Jakob, G.; Poglitsch, A.; Sternberg, O.

    2004-05-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared/submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the Observatory, if stray light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 μ m. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities in the range 0.2 -- 0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2 -- 0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments. This work was funded by the ESA Herschel/Planck Project Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Herschel/Planck Project Office at JPL.

  5. Education partnerships at 41,000 feet: The stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) education and outreach program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, Edna

    The SOFIA Education and Public Outreach Program (E/PO) is under development as this unique astronomical observatory is being designed and constructed. SOFIA is an infrared astronomical observatory comprised of a 2.5-meter telescope mounted in a Boeing 747SP aircraft. By flying above the water vapor in Earth's atmosphere, SOFIA will observe the infrared universe, studying the birth place of stars, the formation of planets, and the ecology of galaxies. SOFIA is also the world's largest portable telescope, and will be used to observe events such as occultations that require the observatory be at a particular location on Earth. As an airborne observatory, SOFIA is accessible during research flights; SOFIA will carry on board a compliment of pilots, scientists and their graduate students, observatory staff, and visiting educators, members of the press, and other guests. Unique in the world of major observatories, SOFIA is being designed and constructed to accommodate guests during the research process. Educators (teachers, college faculty, planetarium and museum staff, and others) will have the opportunity to partner with scientists as a part of the E/PO program for SOFIA. Participants will be selected to offer broad participation. Training will be provided, and participants will be supported beyond the immediate research flight experience as a network of Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) in their schools, science centers, and communities. Other EPO activities include partnerships between scientists and educators at universities and research laboratories, internships and fellowships (1-2 years in duration) at the observatory. Research missions begin in late 2004 with AAA participation expected in 2005. SOFIA will be operated for NASA by Universities Space Research Association (USRA) with the USRA-led team: University of California, L3 Communications, United Airlines, Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the SETI Institute. SOFIA is a joint US-German project funded

  6. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) design and thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    The design and performance characteristics of an observatory are compared with those of a storage dewar. The critical design technologies required to increase cryogen dewar lifetime are discussed. In particular, outer shell temperature, vapor cooled shields, multilayer insulation performance, and tank support systems are analyzed to assess their impact on cryogen lifetime for both the observatory and the storage dewar. The cryogen lifetime and cryogen mass loss rate of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are compared with that of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite. A 0.1 percent mass loss per day of superfluid helium dewar can be designed using current state-of-the-art dewar technology. Space-based liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks can be designed for a 5-year lifetime.

  7. SOFIA Project: SOFIA-Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the SOFIA project is shown. The topics include: 1) Aircraft Information; 2) Major Components of SOFIA; 3) Aircraft External View; 4) Airborne Observatory Layout; 5) Telescope Assembly; 6) Uncoated Primary Mirror; 7) Airborne Astronomy; 8) Requirements & Specifications; 9) Technical Challenges; 10) Observatory Operation; and 11) SOFIA Flight Test.

  8. Space Observatories RadioAstron and Millimetron: Results and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, Nikolay

    The Russian Academy of Sciences and Federal Space Agency, together with many international organizations, prepared the launch of the RadioAstron orbiting space observatory from the Baikonur cosmodrome on July 18, 2011. The spacecraft was launched by the Ukrainian Zenit-3F rocket with onboard 10-m reflector radio telescope, four feed and low noise receivers for operating at 1.2-1.6, 6.2, 18 and 92 cm wavelengths and both circular polarizations, a data formatter, a data transmission module and a hydrogen maser frequency standard. The orbital period in 2012-2015 will vary from 8.3 to 9.0 days, the perigee - from 7,065 km to 81,500 km, the apogee - from 280,000 to 353,000 km. Together with ground-based radio telescopes and a set of stations for tracking, collecting, and reducing the data obtained, this space radio telescope forms a multi-antenna ground-space radio interferometer with extremely long baselines, making it possible for the first time to study various objects in the Universe with angular resolutions a million times better than it is possible with the human eye. The project is targeted at systematic studies of compact radio-emitting sources and their dynamics. Objects to be studied include quasars (super massive black holes and relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, pulsars (neutron stars and hypothetical quark stars), cosmic masers (regions of stars and planetary systems formation in our and other galaxies), interplanetary and interstellar plasma, and the gravitational field of the Earth. The fringes with the ground-space interferometer were founded at the baseline projections up to 25 diameters of the Earth, and corresponding models of the sources will be reported. Millimetron is the next space mission with a 10-m cooled space telescope optimized for observations in the millimeter and far infrared wavelengths. This mission will be able to contribute to the explorations of several key problems in astrophysics, such as study of formation and evolution

  9. Handling Qualities Flight Testing of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Scott T.; Strovers, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne infrared astronomy has a long successful history, albeit relatively unknown outside of the astronomy community. A major problem with ground based infrared astronomy is the absorption and scatter of infrared energy by water in the atmosphere. Observing the universe from above 40,000 ft puts the observation platform above 99% of the water vapor in the atmosphere, thereby addressing this problem at a fraction of the cost of space based systems. The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft is the most ambitious foray into the field of airborne infrared astronomy in history. Using a 747SP (The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) aircraft modified with a 2.5m telescope located in the aft section of the fuselage, the SOFIA endeavors to provide views of the universe never before possible and at a fraction of the cost of space based systems. The modification to the airplane includes moveable doors and aperture that expose the telescope assembly. The telescope assembly is aimed and stabilized using a multitude of on board systems. This modification has the potential to cause aerodynamic anomalies that could induce undesired forces either at the cavity itself or indirectly due to interference with the empennage, both of which could cause handling qualities issues. As a result, an extensive analysis and flight test program was conducted from December 2009 through March 2011. Several methods, including a Lower Order Equivalent Systems analysis and pilot assessment, were used to ascertain the effects of the modification. The SOFIA modification was found to cause no adverse handling qualities effects and the aircraft was cleared for operational use. This paper discusses the history and modification to the aircraft, development of test procedures and analysis, results of testing and analysis, lessons learned for future projects and justification for operational certification.

  10. WUVS spectrographs of World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, Igor; Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris M.; Shugarov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 320 nm). It includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy and deep UV and optical imaging. WUVS - the set of three ultraviolet spectrographs are regarded as the main instrument of «Spektr -UF» space mission. The spectrographs unit includes three channels and is intended for acquisition of spectrums of high (R=50000) and low (R=1000) resolution of the observed objects in the electromagnetic radiation's ultraviolet range (115-310 nm). We present the design philosophy of WUVS and summarize its key characteristics. We shall present the main properties of WUVS new structure and current status of its mockups and prototypes manufacturing.

  11. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardimona, D. A.; Huang, D. H.; Cowan, V.; Morath, C.

    2011-05-01

    Two of the main requirements for space situational awareness are to locate and identify dim and/or distant objects. At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate, we are investigating how nanostructured metal surfaces can produce plasmon-enhanced fields to address the first function. We are also investigating quantum interference effects in semiconductor quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities to address the amplification of weak signals. To address the second function of identification of space objects, we are investigating a wavelength-tunable detector scheme that involves a coupled double quantum well structure with a thin middle barrier between the two wells. The photocurrent from this structure will be swept out with a lateral bias. In order to eliminate the diffraction loss of incident photons by a surface grating structure for the z-polarization required in normal quantum well infrared photodetector structures, we will grow an array of self-organized quantum dots buried in one of the quantum wells of a symmetric double quantum well structure. In this paper, we will first describe the requirements for detectors in space, then we will describe our work in the above topics, and finally we will briefly mention our forays into other areas of quantum-structured detectors for use in space.

  12. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  13. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  14. Space Observatory Studies of AGB Stars in Galaxies: from IRAS to JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, M.

    2011-09-01

    The precision measurements of space observatories, particularly infrared missions such as Spitzer, has spawned a renaissance in studies of AGB stars from the Milky Way, to nearby galaxies and beyond. This review summarizes the key areas in AGB star studies impacted by the space observatories of the past two decades, IRAS, ISO, Spitzer, and Akari and speculates on the future promise of the SOFIA, WISE and JWST missions. Drawing from results of IRAS, ISO and Spitzer studies, this review touches on topics such as AGB star identification in stellar populations, AGB mass-loss rate measurements, dust composition, and variability that set the stage for the future work. The past, present and future space missions can be used in combination to tackle some big questions which confront studies of both AGB stars and galaxies. What is the mass-loss return or dust and metal enrichment of galaxies by the AGB stars? How does this mass-loss return depend on the star formation history (i.e. age), metallicity and galactic environment? What is the time evolution of AGB stars and how does mass loss affect it? Improved models of stellar populations that properly include AGB stars will help our understanding of both AGB stars and galaxy evolution. What model results can we prepare now to capitalize on the present and future space observatory missions? How can we improve the period-luminosity relation of AGB stars not only to better understand AGB star physics but also to use as a distance indicator for galaxies?

  15. A Wide-field Camera and Fully Remote Operations at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, Joseph R.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Weger, James S.; Bucher, Gerald A.; Perry, Marvin C.; Myers, Adam D.; Pierce, Michael J.; Vogel, Conrad

    2016-11-01

    Upgrades at the 2.3 meter Wyoming Infrared Observatory telescope have provided the capability for fully remote operations by a single operator from the University of Wyoming campus. A line-of-sight 300 Megabit s‑1 11 GHz radio link provides high-speed internet for data transfer and remote operations that include several realtime video feeds. Uninterruptable power is ensured by a 10 kVA battery supply for critical systems and a 55 kW autostart diesel generator capable of running the entire observatory for up to a week. The construction of a new four-element prime-focus corrector with fused-silica elements allows imaging over a 40‧ field of view with a new 40962 UV-sensitive prime-focus camera and filter wheel. A new telescope control system facilitates the remote operations model and provides 20″ rms pointing over the usable sky. Taken together, these improvements pave the way for a new generation of sky surveys supporting space-based missions and flexible-cadence observations advancing emerging astrophysical priorities such as planet detection, quasar variability, and long-term time-domain campaigns.

  16. Decomposability and scalability in space-based observatory scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Stephen F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues of problem and model decomposition within the HSTS scheduling framework. HSTS was developed and originally applied in the context of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) scheduling problem, motivated by the limitations of the current solution and, more generally, the insufficiency of classical planning and scheduling approaches in this problem context. We first summarize the salient architectural characteristics of HSTS and their relationship to previous scheduling and AI planning research. Then, we describe some key problem decomposition techniques supported by HSTS and underlying our integrated planning and scheduling approach, and we discuss the leverage they provide in solving space-based observatory scheduling problems.

  17. Far-Infrared Astronomy with The Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger, H.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes work made possible by NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The results of the work have appeared in over 80 papers. The publications fall in three main areas: instrumentation, observations, and analysis. Although there is considerable overlap between these categories it will be convenient to group them separately.

  18. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  19. The Newly-named "Herschel Space Observatory" revisits its science goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    In science, new answers often trigger new questions. And in astronomy, new questions often mean new instruments. The ESA 'Herschel Space Observatory', formerly called 'Far Infrared and Submillimetre Telescope' (FIRST), is the instrument that inherits many of the questions triggered by its predecessor, ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). 200 astronomers from all over the world met last week in Toledo, Spain, to discuss how to insert these new questions in Herschel's 'scientific agenda'. Thus, Herschel will study the origin of stars and galaxies -its main goals-, but it will also keep on searching for water in space -as ISO did-, and will help us to understand the formation of our own Solar System through detailed observations of comets and of the poorly known 'transneptunian objects'. A new name for 'FIRST' The new name for FIRST, 'Herschel Space Observatory', or 'Herschel', was announced at the opening of the Toledo conference by ESA's Director of Science, Roger Bonnet. William Herschel was an Anglo-German astronomer who discovered infrared light in 1800. Thanks to his discovery, astronomers can now observe a facet of the Universe that remains hidden to other telescopes. ESA's Herschel is the first space observatory covering a major part of the far-infrared and submillimetre waveband (from 57 to 670 microns) and its new name honours Herschel on the 200th anniversary of his discovery. Roger Bonnet explained: "It strikes me that we are at a key scientific conference devoted to the next ESA infrared space mission, gathering many 'infrared pioneers', 200 years after a famous musician and astronomer discovered that by placing a thermometer in the remote part of the solar spectrum, where apparently there was no light, he could detect heat. What we call now infrared radiation. This meeting marks two events: the beginning of a very promising utilisation of FIRST, and the adoption of a new name for the telescope: the Herschel Space Observatory". Roger Bonnet also

  20. Damping SOFIA: passive and active damping for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Keas, Paul J.; Glaese, Roger M.

    2001-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA is being developed by NASA and the German space agency, Deutschen Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), with an international contractor team. The 2.5-meter reflecting telescope of SOFIA will be the world's largest airborne telescope. Flying in an open cavity on a modified 747 aircraft, SOFIA will perform infrared astronomy while cruising at 41,000 feet and while being buffeted by a 550- mile-per-hour slipstream. A primary system requirement of SOFIA is tracking stability of 0.2 arc-seconds, and a 3-axis pointing control model has been used to evaluate the feasibility of achieving this kind of stability. The pointing control model shows that increased levels of damping in certain elastic modes of the telescope assembly will help achieve the tracking stability goal and also expand the bandwidth of the attitude controller. This paper describes the preliminary work that has been done to approximate the reduction in image motion yielded by various structure configurations that use reaction masses to attenuate the flexible motions of the telescope structure. Three approaches are considered: passive tuned-mass dampers, active-mass dampers, and attitude control with reaction-mass actuators. Expected performance improvements for each approach, and practical advantages and disadvantages associated with each are presented.

  1. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  2. Vacuum Strength of Two Candidate Glasses for a Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Timothy Andrew; Tucker, Dennis S.; Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2007-01-01

    The strengths of two candidate glass types for use in a space observatory were measured. Samples of ultra-low expansion glass (ULE) and borosilicate (Pyrex) were tested in air and in vacuum at room temperature (20 degrees C) and in vacuum after being heated to 200 degrees C. Both glasses tested in vacuum showed a significant increase in strength over those tested in air. However, there was no statistical difference between the strength of samples tested in vacuum at room temperature and those tested in vacuum after heating to 200 degrees C.

  3. Vacuum Strength of Two Candidate Glasses for a Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, T. a.; Tucker, D. S.; Herren, K. A.; Gregory, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The strengths of two candidate glass types for use in a space observatory were measured. Samples of ultra-low expansion glass (ULE) and borosilicate (Pyrex) were tested in air and in vacuum at room temperature (20 C) and in vacuum after being heated to 200 C. Both glasses tested in vacuum showed an increase in strength over those tested in air. However, there was no statistical difference between the strength of samples tested in vacuum at room temperature and those tested in vacuum after heating to 200 C.

  4. Contributions of the Onsala Space Observatory to the GGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Rüdiger; Elgered, Gunnar; Hobiger, Thomas; Scherneck, Hans-Georg

    2015-04-01

    The Onsala Space Observatory on the Swedish west coast is the fundamental geodetic station of Sweden and operates several geodetic and geophysical infrastructures that contribute to the GGOS. Onsala is the European observatory with the longest history in Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Already 1968 Onsala was involved in geodetic/astrometric VLBI observations, at that time with the 25 m telescope. Since 1979 the 20 m telescope is used for geodetic/astrometric VLBI, and currently about 40-50 sessions per year are observed in the programs of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). Onsala also participated in all continuous (CONT) campaigns of the IVS. In 2011 we received funding for twin telescopes at Onsala, to be part of the VLBI2010 Global Observing System (VGOS) network. The project has been delayed due to difficulties to get the necessary building permits, but finally a contract to purchase the new telescopes has been signed in late 2014. We expect that the Onsala Twin Telescopes will become operational in 2016/2017. In parallel to the VLBI activities, the observatory operates other instrumentation for geosciences, in particular receivers for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), and ground-based microwave radiometers. There are several monuments used for GNSS measurements, and Onsala is actively contributing to the International GNSS Service (IGS). Recently a GNSS array consisting of six new GNSS monuments, in the area around the Onsala Twin Telescopes, has been installed. Also several microwave radiometers are operated for tropospheric measurements. A superconducting gravimeter is operated at the observatory since 2009 in a dedicated gravity laboratory which is also hosting visiting absolute gravimeters, and in 2011 a seismometer station has been installed that is part of the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). Since 2010 we operate a so-called GNSS-R tide gauge, based on the principle of reflectometry. Additional

  5. Development of Short Wavelength Infrared Array Detectors for Space Astronomy Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1997-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and its team - the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Rochester (UR), Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - are carrying out a research program with the goal of developing and optimizing infrared arrays in the 2-27 micron range for space infrared astronomy. This report summarizes research results for the entire grant period 1 January 1992 through 30 June 1996.

  6. The Invisible Monster Has Two Faces: Observations of epsilon Aurigae with the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, D. W.; Ladjal, D.; Stencel, R. E.; Howell, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present Herschel Space Observatory photometric observations of the unique, long-period eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae. Its extended spectral energy distribution is consistent with our previously published cool (550 K) dust disk model. We also present an archival infrared spectral energy distribution of the side of the disk facing the bright F-type star in the binary, which is consistent with a warmer (1150 K) disk model. The lack of strong molecular emission features in the Herschel bands suggests that the disk has a low gas-to-dust ratio. The spectral energy distribution and Herschel images imply that the 250 GHz radio detection reported by Altenhoff et al. is likely contaminated by infrared-bright, extended background emission associated with a nearby nebular region and should be considered an upper limit to the true flux density of epsilon Aur.

  7. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) science rationale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Erickson, Edwin F.

    1989-01-01

    SOFIA, a proposed 3-meter class telescope in a Boeing 747 aircraft, would have the ability to make astronomical observations over a wavelength range from 0.3 microns to 1.6mm. Relative to the KAO (Kuiper Airborne Observatory) the larger telescope on SOFIA would provide a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity for compact sources and a factor of 3 improvement in (diffraction-limited) angular resolution at wavelengths beyond 30 microns. In addition, SOFIA will retain the major features of the KAO which have made the airborne astronomy program so successful. Among these are continuous in-flight access to focal plane instruments while flying at or above 41,000 ft altitude; pointing stability of 0.2 arcseconds; and mobility and scheduling flexibility to accommodate targets of opportunity such as comets, eclipses, occultations, and novae.

  8. Launch and Commissioning of the Deep Space Climate Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Nicholas P.; Davis, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), formerly known as Triana, successfully launched on February 11th, 2015. To date, each of the five space-craft attitude control system (ACS) modes have been operating as expected and meeting all guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) requirements, although since launch, several anomalies were encountered. While unplanned, these anomalies have proven to be invaluable in developing a deeper understanding of the ACS, and drove the design of three alterations to the ACS task of the flight software (FSW). An overview of the GN&C subsystem hardware, including re-furbishment, and ACS architecture are introduced, followed by a chronological discussion of key events, flight performance, as well as anomalies encountered by the GN&C team.

  9. Briefings Set for Launch of Next "Great Observatory" in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    NASA's next Space Shuttle flight will provide astronomers with a new look at the universe and make history with NASA's first female mission commander. Reporters can get an overview of the mission at a series of briefings July 7. The briefings will begin at 9 a.m. EDT at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. The five-day flight is scheduled for launch no earlier than July 20. STS-93 will be led by U.S. Air Force Colonel Eileen Collins, the first woman to command an American space mission. The flight's primary objective will be to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the third of NASA's Great Observatories. Collins and her crew of four will carry Chandra, the heaviest payload ever deployed from the shuttle, into orbit and deploy it approximately seven hours after launch. An upper stage will carry the observatory to its final orbit, more than one-third of the way to the Moon. Chandra will allow scientists to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exploding stars, black holes and other exotic environments to help them understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The first two briefings will provide an overview of mission operations and science to be conducted by Chandra. The NASA Television Video File will follow at noon. The crew press conference will begin at 2 p.m. EDT. The briefings will be carried live on NASA Television, with question-and-answer capability for reporters covering the event from participating NASA centers. NASA Television is available on transponder 9C of the GE-2 satellite at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical polarization, frequency 3880 MHz, audio of 6.8 MHz. Media planning to attend the briefings must notify the Johnson Space Center newsroom by June 28 to ensure proper badging. Each reporter's name, affiliation and country of citizenship should be faxed to the newsroom at 281/483-2000. IMPORTANT NOTE: Reporters can schedule in-person or telephone interviews STS-93 crew. These interviews will begin at about 3:15 p.m. EDT. Media

  10. 20-micron transparency and atmospheric water vapor at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.; Freedman, R.

    1985-01-01

    The atmospheric transparency at 19.5 and 23 microns from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory over the past six years has been examined. It is found that the transparency is largely controlled by the season. Four months: June, July, August, and September have very poor 20-micron transparency. During the rest of the year the transparency is usually quite good at 19.5 microns and moderately good at 23 microns. Using rawinsonde data and theoretical calculations for the expected infrared transparency, the measures of 20-micron transparency were calibrated in terms of atmospheric water-vapor content. The water vapor over the Wyoming Infrared Observatory is found to compare favorably with that above other proposed or developed sites: Mauna Kea, Mount Graham, and Wheeler Peak.

  11. Footprint Database and web services for the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verebélyi, Erika; Dobos, László; Kiss, Csaba

    2015-08-01

    Using all telemetry and observational meta-data, we created a searchable database of Herschel observation footprints. Data from the Herschel space observatory is freely available for everyone but no uniformly processed catalog of all observations has been published yet. As a first step, we unified the data model for all three Herschel instruments in all observation modes and compiled a database of sky coverage information. As opposed to methods using a pixellation of the sphere, in our database, sky coverage is stored in exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. Indexing of the footprints allows for very fast search among observations based on pointing, time, sky coverage overlap and meta-data. This enables us, for example, to find moving objects easily in Herschel fields. The database is accessible via a web site and also as a set of REST web service functions which makes it usable from program clients like Python or IDL scripts. Data is available in various formats including Virtual Observatory standards.

  12. Monitoring CO2 sources and sinks from space : the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) will make the first space-based measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the geographic distribution of CO2 sources and sinks and quantify their variability over the seasonal cycle. OCO is currently scheduled for launch in 2008. The observatory will carry a single instrument that incorporates three high-resolution grating spectrometers designed to measure the near-infrared absorption by CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) in reflected sunlight. OCO will fly 12 minutes ahead of the EOS Aqua platform in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation (A-Train). The in-strument will collect 12 to 24 soundings per second as the Observatory moves along its orbit track on the day side of the Earth. A small sampling footprint (<3 km2 at nadir) was adopted to reduce biases in each sounding associated with clouds and aerosols and spatial variations in surface topography. A comprehensive ground-based validation program will be used to assess random errors and biases in the XCO2 product on regional to continental scales. Measurements collected by OCO will be assimilated with other environmental measurements to retrieve surface sources and sinks of CO2. This information could play an important role in monitoring the integrity of large scale CO2 sequestration projects.

  13. Science Promise and Conceptual Mission Design for SAFIR - the Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D.; Benford, D. J.; Blain, A.; Bradford, M.; Dragovan, M.; Langer, W.; Leisawitz, D.; Lawrence, C.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H.; Mundy, L.; Rieke, G.; Stacey, G.; Yorke, H.; Young, E.

    2003-12-01

    SAFIR is a large (10m-class), cold (4-10K) space telescope for wavelengths between 20μm and 1mm. It will provide sensitivity of a factor of a hundred or more over that of SIRTF and Herschel, leveraging their capabilities and building on their scientific legacies. Covering this scientifically critical wavelength regime, it will complement the expected wavelength performance of the future flagship endeavors JWST and ALMA. This vision mission will probe the origin of stars and galaxies in the early universe, and explore the formation of solar systems around nearby young stars. Endorsed as a priority by the Decadal Study and successive OSS roadmaps, SAFIR represents a huge science need that is matched by promising and innovative technologies that will allow us to satisfy it. In exercising those technologies it will create the path for future infrared missions. Efforts are underway to refine the scientific goals of the mission, explore promising approaches for it's architecture, and sharpen understanding about remaining technological challenges that will recommend optimal strategic investments. We show how SAFIR responds to the scientific challenges in the OSS Strategic Plan, and how the observatory can be brought within technological reach.

  14. Architectures for a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the ``Gravitational Universe,'' for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, thereby augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described.

  15. Infrared spectral measurement of space shuttle glow

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadijian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of the space shuttle glow were successfully conducted during the STS-39 space shuttle mission. Analysis indicates that NO, NO[sup +], OH, and CO are among the molecules associated with the infrared glow phenomenon. During orbiter thruster firings the glow intensities in the infrared are enhanced by factors of 10x to 100x with significant changes in spectral distribution. These measurements were obtained with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) payload which included a cryogenic infrared circular variable filter (CVF) spectrometer (0.6 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]) and a number of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometers (0.2 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]m and 9.9 [mu]m to 10.4 [mu]m). In addition, glow measurements were unsuccessfully attempted with the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) with its 2.5 [mu]m to 25 [mu]m Fourier transform interferometer. SKIRT CVF obtained over 14,000 spectra of quiescent shuttle glow, thruster enhanced shuttle glow, upper atmosphere airglow, aurora, orbiter environment, and deep space non-glow backgrounds during its eight day mission. The SKIRT radiometers operated almost continuously throughout the mission to provide a detailed history of the IR/VIS/UV optical environment associated with the operation of large spacecraft structures in low earth orbit. This dissertation will primarily address those measurements conducted by the SKIRT spectrometer as they relate to space shuttle glow in the infrared. The STS-39 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched from the NASA Kennedy Space Center on 28 April 1991 into a 57 degree inclination circular orbit at an altitude of 260 km.

  16. Prototype Secondary Mirror Assembly For The Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, M.; Duffy, M.; Gullapalli, S.; Rockwell, R.; Sileo, F.; Krim, M.

    1988-04-01

    We describe our concept for a liquid helium temperature prototype secondary mirror assembly (PSMA) for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. SIRTF, a NASA "Great Observatory" to be launched in the 1990's, is a superfluid heliumcooled 1-meter class telescope with much more stringent performance requirements than its precursor the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). The SIRTF secondary mirror assembly must operate near 4 K and provide the functions of 2-axis dynamic tilting ("chopping") in addition to the conventional functions of focus and centering. The PSMA must be able to withstand random vibration testing and provide all of the functions needed by the SIRTF observatory. Our PSMA concept employs a fused quartz mirror kinematically attached at its center to an aluminum cruciform. The mirror/cruciform assembly is driven in tilt about its combined center of mass using a unique flexure pivot and a four-actuator control system with feed-back provided by pairs of eddy current position sensors. The actuators are mounted on a second flexure-pivoted mass providing angular momentum compensation and isolating the telescope from vibration-induced disturbances. The mirror/cruciform and the reaction mass are attached to opposite sides of an aluminum mounting plate whose AL/L characteristics are nominally identical to that of the aluminum flexure pivot material. The mounting plate is connected to the outer housing by a focus and centering mechanism based upon the six degree of freedom secondary mirror assembly developed for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  17. The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, H.; Bock, J.; Freund, M. M.; Guo, H.; Hirao, T.; Lange, A. E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Mcmahon, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) is a cryogenically cooled small infrared telescope that will fly aboard the small space platform Space Flyer Unit. It will survey approximately 10% of the sky with a relatively wide beam during its 20 day emission. Four focal-plane instruments will make simultaneous observations of the sky at wavelengths ranging from 1 to 1000 microns. The IRTS will provide significant information on cosmology, interstellar matter, late-type stars, and interplanetary dust. This paper describes the instrumentation and mission.

  18. The development of infrared detectors and mechanisms for use in future infrared space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The environment above earth's atmosphere offers significant advantages in sensitivity and wavelength coverage in infrared astronomy over ground-based observatories. In support of future infrared space missions, technology development efforts were undertaken to develop detectors sensitive to radiation between 2.5 micron and 200 micron. Additionally, work was undertaken to develop mechanisms supporting the imaging and spectroscopy requirements of infrared space missions. Arsenic-doped-Silicon and Antimony-doped-Silicon Blocked Impurity Band detectors, responsive to radiation between 4 micron and 45 micron, were produced in 128x128 picture element arrays with the low noise, high sensitivity performance needed for space environments. Technology development continued on Gallium-doped-Germanium detectors (for use between 80 micron and 200 micron), but were hampered by contamination during manufacture. Antimony-doped-Indium detectors (for use between 2.5 micron and 5 micron) were developed in a 256x256 pixel format with high responsive quantum efficiency and low dark current. Work began on adapting an existing cryogenic mechanism design for space-based missions; then was redirected towards an all-fixed optical design to improve reliability and lower projected mission costs.

  19. Space Weathering Investigations Enabled by NASA's Virtual Heliophysical Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; King, Joseph H.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Lal, Nand; Sittler, Edward C.; Sturner, Steven J.; Hills, Howard K.; Lipatov, Alexander S.; Kovalick, Tamara J.; Johnson, Rita C.; McGuire, Robert E.; Narock, Thomas W.; Szabo, Adam; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; McKibben, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Structural and chemical impact of the heliospheric space environment on exposed planetary surfaces and interplanetary dust grains may be generally defined as space weathering . In the inner solar system, from the asteroid belt inwards towards the Sun, the surface regolith structures of airless bodies are primarily determined by cumulative meteoritic impacts over billions of years, but the molecular composition to meters in depth can be substantially modified by irradiation effects. Plasma ions at eV to keV energies may both erode uppermost surfaces by sputtering, and implant or locally produce exogenic material, e.g. He-3 and H2O, while more energetic ions drive molecular change through electronic ionization. Galactic cosmic ray ions and more energetic solar ions can impact chemistry to meters in depth. High energy cosmic ray interactions produce showers of secondary particles and energetic photons that present hazards for robotic and human exploration missions but also enable detection of potentially useable resources such as water ice, oxygen, and many other elements. Surface sputtering also makes ejected elemental and molecular species accessible for in-situ compositional analysis by spacecraft with ion and neutral mass spectrometers. Modeling of relative impacts for these various space weathering processes requires knowledge of the incident species-resolved ion flux spectra at plasma to cosmic ray energies and as integrated over varying time scales. Although the main drivers for investigations of these processes come from NASA's planetary science and human exploration programs, the NASA heliophysics program provides the requisite data measurement and modeling resources to enable specification of the field & plasma and energetic particle irradiation environments for application to space weather and surface weathering investigations. The Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO), Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO), Lunar Solar Origins Exploration (Luna

  20. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; Dinerstein, H.; Thronson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  1. TWINKLE – A Low Earth Orbit Visible and Infrared Exoplanet Spectroscopy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessenyi, Marcell; Savini, Giorgio; Tinetti, Giovanna; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dhesi, Mekhi; Joshua, Max

    2016-10-01

    Twinkle is a space mission designed for visible and near-IR spectroscopic observations of extrasolar planets. Twinkle's highly stable instrument will allow the photometric and spectroscopic observation of a wide range of planetary classes around different types of stars, with a focus on bright sources close to the ecliptic. The planets will be observed through transit and eclipse photometry and spectroscopy, as well as phase curves, eclipse mapping and multiple narrow-band time-series. The targets observed by Twinkle will be composed of known exoplanets mainly discovered by existing and upcoming ground surveys in our galaxy and will also feature new discoveries by space observatories (K2, GAIA, Cheops, TESS).Twinkle is a small satellite with a payload designed to perform high-quality astrophysical observations while adapting to the design of an existing Low Earth Orbit commercial satellite platform. The SSTL-300 bus, to be launched into a low-Earth sun-synchronous polar orbit by 2019, will carry a half-meter class telescope with two instruments (visible and near-IR spectrographs - between 0.4 and 4.5µm - with resolving power R~300 at the lower end of the wavelength scale) using mostly flight proven spacecraft systems designed by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd and a combination of high TRL instrumentation and a few lower TRL elements built by a consortium of UK institutes.The Twinkle design will enable the observation of the chemical composition and weather of at least 100 exoplanets in the Milky Way, including super-Earths (rocky planets 1-10 times the mass of Earth), Neptunes, sub-Neptunes and gas giants like Jupiter. It will also allow the follow-up photometric observations of 1000+ exoplanets in the visible and infrared, as well as observations of Solar system objects, bright stars and disks.

  2. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb groundbased observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  3. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Study Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Thronson, Harley A.; Feinberg, Lee; Redding, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The scientific drivers for very high angular resolution coupled with very high sensitivity and wavefront stability in the UV and optical wavelength regime have been well established. These include characterization of exoplanets in the habitable zones of solar type stars, probing the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium around z < 2 galaxies, and resolving stellar populations across a broad range of galactic environments. The 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the 2013 NASA Science Mission Directorate 30-Year Roadmap identified a large-aperture UVOIR observatory as a priority future space mission. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI team has extended several earlier studies of the technology and engineering requirements needed to design and build a single filled aperture 10-meter class space-based telescope that can enable these ambitious scientific observations. We present here an overview of our new technical work including a brief summary of the reference science drivers as well as in-depth investigations of the viable telescope architectures, the requirements on thermal control and active wavefront control systems, and the range of possible launch configurations.

  4. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970’s and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  5. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Mercury from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Witteborn, F. C.; Kozlowski, R. W. H.; Wooden, D. H.

    1996-03-01

    We present mid-infrared (5 - 10mic) spectroscopic measurements of the planet Mercury obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) using the High Efficiency Infrared Faint Object Grating Spectrograph (HIFOGS). Spectra show features characteristic of plagioclase feldspar that was previously observed near 120 deg mercurian longitude. The spectra also show spectral features that could be interpreted indicative of the presence of pyrrhotite (pyrr). An analysis that fully accounts for the effects of large field of view (FOV), thermal gradients, rough surface and absolute calibration is still underway.

  6. Space γ-observatory GAMMA-400 Current Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Topchiev, N. P.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu. T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    nuclei and gamma-quanta in energy range E>1.0 GeV. But using lateral aperture it is possible to detect low-energy gammas in the ranges 0.2 - 10 MeV and 10 MeV - 1.0 GeV with energy resolution 8% - 2% and 2% correspondingly accordingly to GAMMA-400 "Technical Project" stage results. Angular resolution in the lateral aperture provides only for low-energy gamma-quanta from non-stationary events (GRB, solar flares and so on) due segments of CC2 count rate analysis. GAMMA-400 γ-ray telescope will be installed onboard the Russian Space Observatory GAMMA-400. The lifetime of the space observatory will be at least seven years. The launch of the space observatory is scheduled for the early 2020s.

  7. Infrared monitoring of the Space Station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Jennings, Donald E.; Mumma, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement and monitoring of infrared emission in the environment of the Space Station has a twofold importance - for the study of the phenomena itself and as an aid in planning and interpreting Station based infrared experiments. Spectral measurements of the infrared component of the spacecraft glow will, along with measurements in other spectral regions, provide data necessary to fully understand and model the physical and chemical processes producing these emissions. The monitoring of the intensity of these emissions will provide background limits for Space Station based infrared experiments and permit the determination of optimum instrument placement and pointing direction. Continuous monitoring of temporal changes in the background radiation (glow) will also permit better interpretation of Station-based infrared earth sensing and astronomical observations. The primary processes producing infrared emissions in the Space Station environment are: (1) Gas phase excitations of Station generated molecules ( e.g., CO2, H2O, organics...) by collisions with the ambient flux of mainly O and N2. Molecular excitations and generation of new species by collisions of ambient molecules with Station surfaces. They provide a list of resulting species, transition energies, excitation cross sections and relevant time constants. The modeled spectrum of the excited species occurs primarily at wavelengths shorter than 8 micrometer. Emissions at longer wavelengths may become important during rocket firing or in the presence of dust.

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics Needs of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    The science teams of the Herschel Space Observatory have identified a number of areas where laboratory study is required for proper interpretation of Herschel observational data. The most critical is the collection and compilation of laboratory data on spectral line frequencies, transition probabilities and energy levels for the known astrophysical atomic and molecular species in 670 to 57 micron wavelength range of Herschel. The second most critical need is the compilation of collisional excitation cross sections for the species known to dominate the energy balance in the ISM and the temperature dependent chemical reaction rates. On the theoretical front, chemical and radiative transfer models need to be prepared in advance to assess calibration and identify instrument anomalies. In the next few years there will be a need to incorporate spectroscopists and theoretical chemists into teams of astronomers so that the spectroscopic surveys planned can he properly calibrated and rapidly interpreted once the data becomes available. The science teams have also noted that the enormous prospects for molecular discovery will be greatly handicapped by the nearly complete lack of spectroscopic data for anything not already well known in the ISM. As a minimum, molecular species predicted to exist by chemical models should be subjected to detailed laboratory study to ensure conclusive detections. This has the greatest impact on any astrobiology program that might be proposed for Herschel. Without a significant amount of laboratory work in the very near future Herschel will not be prepared for many planned observations, much less addressing the open questions in molecular astrophysics.

  9. An introduction to the World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanutz, S.; Barnstedt, J.; Diebold, S.; Elsener, H. R.; Ganz, P. R.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Pfeifer, M.; Tanirah, O.; Sachkov, M.; Schaadt, D. M.; Schanz, T.; Shustov, B. M.; Werner, K.

    2012-09-01

    The World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a multinational mission under the leadership of Russia with contributions of Spain and Germany. The mission is part of the Spektrum series and launch is currently scheduled for 2016. It consists of a 1.7m mirror focusing on spectrographs in the range of 102-310 nm withh a resolution of R >= 55,000 for high resolution spectral observations, a long-slit-spectrograph for spatially resolved observations and an imager. According to the Phase-B-Study all spectrographs will use the same detectors built by the IAAT. These spectrographs are designed to observe cosmic plasma with temperatures of several ten thousands Kelvin and atomic transition lines of all important atoms and molecuules like H2, CO, OH eetc. In knowledge about the formation of galaxies and analyze the atmospheres of extrasolar planets and protoplanetary discs. To achieve these goals the IAAT designed in cooperation with the Leibniz-Institute for Analytical Sciences (ISAS Berlin) the spectrographs. In addition Tubingen develops and builds a new type of michrchannel plate detector based on gallim nitride cathods and a cross-strip-anode.

  10. NASA Space Observatories Glimpse Faint Afterglow of Nearby Stellar Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    Intricate wisps of glowing gas float amid a myriad of stars in this image created by combining data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory. The gas is a supernova remnant, cataloged as N132D, ejected from the explosion of a massive star that occurred some 3,000 years ago. This titanic explosion took place in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby neighbor galaxy of our own Milky Way. The complex structure of N132D is due to the expanding supersonic shock wave from the explosion impacting the interstellar gas of the LMC. Deep within the remnant, the Hubble visible light image reveals a crescent-shaped cloud of pink emission from hydrogen gas, and soft purple wisps that correspond to regions of glowing oxygen emission. A dense background of colorful stars in the LMC is also shown in the Hubble image. The large horseshoe-shaped gas cloud on the left-hand side of the remnant is glowing in X-rays, as imaged by Chandra. In order to emit X-rays, the gas must have been heated to a temperature of about 18 million degrees Fahrenheit (10 million degrees Celsius). A supernova-generated shock wave traveling at a velocity of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) is continuing to propagate through the low-density medium today. The shock front where the material from the supernova collides with ambient interstellar material in the LMC is responsible for these high temperatures. Chandra image of N132D Chandra image of N132D, 2002 It is estimated that the star that exploded as a supernova to produce the N132D remnant was 10 to 15 times more massive than our own Sun. As fast-moving ejecta from the explosion slam into the cool, dense interstellar clouds in the LMC, complex shock fronts are created. A supernova remnant like N132D provides a rare opportunity for direct observation of stellar material, because it is made of gas that was recently hidden deep inside a star. Thus it provides information on stellar evolution and the

  11. Space-Borne Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Andrew E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this grant is to develop the Far IR Photometer (FIRP), one of four focal plane instruments on the IR Telescope in Space (IRTS). The IRTS was successfully launched in March 18, 1995 aboard the Japanese SFU platform. It surveyed the IR sky for approximately 40 days, and was eventually retrieved by NASA's STS. The FIRP succeeded in surveying approximately 5% of the sky in four bands centered at 150, 250, 400 and 700 microns. Several new technologies were developed using the funds from this grant, including: (1) a high performance gas-gap heat-switch, (2) a He-3 sorption refrigerator that is, to date, the only refrigerator to achieve sub-Kelvin temperatures in orbit, (3) high-sensitivity bolometric detectors with NEP less than 10-16 W(Hz(exp l/2)exp 1/2) when operated from a 300 mK heat sink, (4) readout electronics capable of providing DC stability for the bolometric detectors. Excess noise of unknown origin significantly reduced the sensitivity of the FIRP on orbit. Nevertheless, scientifically significant observations of the spectrum and temperature of the interstellar dust were made, and have been reported.

  12. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared astrophysics community is eager to follow up Spitzer and Herschel observations with sensitive, high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, for such measurements are needed to understand merger-driven star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies, star and planetary system formation, and the development and prevalence of water-bearing planets. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a wide field-of-view space-based spatio-spectral interferometer designed to operate in the 25 to 400 micron wavelength range. This talk will summarize the SPIRIT mission concept, with a focus on the science that motivates it and the technology that enables it. Without mentioning SPIRIT by name, the astrophysics community through the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap Committee recently recommended this mission as the first in a series of space-based interferometers. Data from a laboratory testbed interferometer will be used to illustrate how the spatio-spectral interferometry technique works.

  13. Single Crystal DMs for Space-Based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierden, Paul

    We propose to demonstrate the feasibility of a new manufacturing process for large aperture, high-actuator count microelectromechanical deformable mirrors (MEMS-DMs). These DMs are designed to fill a critical technology gap in NASA s plan for high- contrast space-based exoplanet observatories. We will manufacture a prototype DM with a continuous mirror facesheet, having an active aperture of 50mm diameter, supported by 2040 electrostatic actuators (50 across the diameter of the active aperture), spaced at a pitch of 1mm. The DM will be manufactured using silicon microfabrication tools. The strategic motivation for the proposed project is to advance MEMS DMs as an enabling technology in NASA s rapidly emerging program for extrasolar planet exploration. That goal is supported by an Astro2010 white paper on Technologies for Direct Optical Imaging of Exoplanets, which concluded that DMs are a critical component for all proposed internal coronagraph instrument concepts. That white paper pointed to great strides made by DM developers in the past decade, and acknowledged the components made by Boston Micromachines Corporation to be the most notable MEMS-based technology option. The principal manufacturing innovation in this project will be assembly of the DM through fusion bonding of three separate single crystal silicon wafers comprising the device s substrate, actuator array, and facesheet. The most significant challenge of this project will be to develop processes that allow reliable fusion bonds between multiple compliant silicon layers while yielding an optically flat surface and a robust electromechanical system. The compliance of the DM, which is required for its electromechanical function, will make it challenging to achieve the intimate, planar contact that is generally needed for success in fusion bonding. The manufacturing approach will use photolithography and reactive ion etching to pattern structural layers. Three wafer-scale devices will be patterned and

  14. A deployable, annular, 30m telescope, space-based observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Justin J.; Wirth, Allan; Jankevics, Andrew; Landers, Franklin; Rohweller, David; Chen, C. Bill; Bronowicki, Allen

    2014-08-01

    High resolution imaging from space requires very large apertures, such as NASA's current mission the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) which uses a deployable 6.5m segmented primary. Future missions requiring even larger apertures (>>10m) will present a great challenge relative to the size, weight and power constraints of launch vehicles as well as the cost and schedule required to fabricate the full aperture. Alternatively, a highly obscured annular primary can be considered. For example, a 93.3% obscured 30m aperture having the same total mirror area (91m2) as a 10.7m unobscured telescope, can achieve ~3X higher limiting resolution performance. Substantial cost and schedule savings can be realized with this approach compared to fully filled apertures of equivalent resolution. A conceptual design for a ring-shaped 30m telescope is presented and the engineering challenges of its various subsystems analyzed. The optical design consists of a 20X annular Mersenne form beam compactor feeding a classical 1.5m TMA telescope. Ray trace analysis indicates the design can achieve near diffraction limited images over a 200μrad FOV. The primary mirror consists of 70 identical rectangular 1.34x1.0m segments with a prescription well within the demonstrated capabilities of the replicated nanolaminate on SiC substrate technology developed by AOA Xinetics. A concept is presented for the deployable structure that supports the primary mirror segments. A wavefront control architecture consisting of an optical metrology subsystem for coarse alignment and an image based fine alignment and phasing subsystem is presented. The metrology subsystem is image based, using the background starfields for distortion and pointing calibration and fiducials on the segments for measurement. The fine wavefront control employs a hill climbing algorithm operating on images from the science camera. The final key technology required is the image restoration algorithm that will compensate for the highly

  15. Probing minimal supergravity via the Extreme Universe Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis; Goldberg, Haim; Nath, Pran

    2004-07-01

    An analysis is carried out within mSUGRA of the estimated number of events originating from upward moving ultrahigh energy neutralinos passing through Earth’s crust that could be detected by the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO). The analysis exploits a recently proposed technique that differentiates ultrahigh energy neutralinos from ultrahigh energy neutrinos using their different absorption lengths in the Earth’s crust. It is shown that for the part of the parameter space, where the neutralino is mostly a B-ino and with squark mass ˜1 TeV, EUSO could see ultrahigh energy neutralino events within mSUGRA models with essentially no background. In the energy range 109 GeV1.1×10-6 (Eχ˜/GeV)-1.3 GeV-1 cm-2 yr-1 sr-1, at the 95% confidence limit (CL). Such a hard spectrum is characteristic of supermassive particles’ N-body hadronic decay. The case in which the flux of ultrahigh energy neutralinos is produced via decay of metastable heavy (mX=2×1012 GeV) particles with uniform distribution throughout the Universe, and primary decay mode into 5 quarks + 5 squarks, is analyzed in detail. The normalization of the ratio of the relics’ density to their lifetime has been fixed so that the baryon flux produced in the supermassive particle decays contributes to about 1/3 of the events reported by the AGASA Collaboration below 1011 GeV, and hence the associated GeV γ-ray flux is in complete agreement with EGRET data. For this particular case, EUSO will collect between 4 and 5 neutralino events (with 0.3 of background) in ≈3 yr of running. NASA’s planned mission, the Orbiting Wide-angle Light-collectors (OWL), is also briefly discussed in this context.

  16. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Acoustical Resonance Technical Assessment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Kehoe, Michael W.; Gupta, Kajal K.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Ginsberg, Jerry H.; Kolar, Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    A request was submitted on September 2, 2004 concerning the uncertainties regarding the acoustic environment within the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) cavity, and the potential for structural damage from acoustical resonance or tones, especially if they occur at or near a structural mode. The requestor asked for an independent expert opinion on the approach taken by the SOFIA project to determine if the project's analysis, structural design and proposed approach to flight test were sound and conservative. The findings from this assessment are recorded in this document.

  17. Charting the Winds that Change the Universe, II The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    2003-01-01

    The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR) will study the birth and evolution of stars and planetary systems so young that they are invisible to optical and near-infrared telescopes such as NGST. Not only does the far-infrared radiation penetrate the obscuring dust clouds that surround these systems, but the protoplanetary disks also emit much of their radiation in the far infrared. Furthermore, the dust reprocesses much of the optical emission from the newly forming stars into this wavelength band. Similarly, the obscured central regions of galaxies, which harbor massive black holes and huge bursts of star formation, can be seen and analyzed in the far infrared. SAFIR will have the sensitivity to see the first dusty galaxies in the universe. For studies of both star-forming regions in our galaxy and dusty galaxies at high redshifts, SAFIR will be essential in tying together information that NGST will obtain on these systems at shorter wavelengths and that ALMA will obtain at longer wavelengths.

  18. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  19. Project of space research and technology center in Engelhardt astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Y.; Gusev, A.; Sherstukov, O.; Kascheev, R.; Zagretdinov, R.

    2012-09-01

    Today on the basis of Engelhardt astronomical observatory (EAO) is created Space research and technology center as consistent with Program for expansion of the Kazan University. The Centre has the following missions: • EDUCATION • SCIENCE • ASTRONOMICAL TOURISM

  20. The NASA Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, T. N.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will begin definition phase funding in November of 1996. The instrumentation is being designed to accomodate scientific investigation programs in four key areas: discovery and study of brown dwarfs and super planets, discovery and study of protoplanetary and planetary debris disks, study of ultra-luminous galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) and study of the early universe.

  1. An Engineering Concept and Enabling Technologies for a Large Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Michael J.; Benford, Dominic J.; Moseley, Harvey S.; Roman, Juan

    2003-03-01

    "To take the next step in exploring this important part of the spectrum [30-300μm], the committee recommends the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)." - Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium, 2001. In response to this recommendation, we have undertaken a study of the enabling technologies for a large single aperture far-infrared telescope such as SAFIR. A broad list of science investigations was produced and used to generate an explicit list of science requirements, from which top-level engineering requirements were derived. From these requirements, we developed a conceptual design for the SAFIR observatory based on NGST's current designs. A detailed analysis has been made of the changes and technologies necessary to produce SAFIR. Crucial technologies requiring innovation include lightweight deployable optics, cryogenic cooling of optical elements and instruments, and large arrays of sensitive detectors. Cryogen-free refrigeration technologies are necessary for SAFIR's long mission lifetime, and will have to provide significant (~100mW) cooling power at 4K to cool the mirrors while providing very low temperatures (~50mK) for detector arrays. The detector arrays require wide wavelength coverage, thousands of continuum elements, and compatibility with broadband and spectroscopic instruments.

  2. Fiber-coupled high resolution infrared array spectrometer for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, D. A.; Reuter, D.; Mumma, M. J.; Chin, G.; Wiedemann, G.; Jennings, D.

    1990-01-01

    A novel cryogenic grating spectrometer (FCAS) is being designed for observations of volatiles in cometary and planetary atmospheres, and in newly forming planetary systems. The instrument features two-dimensional detector arrays coupled to a high-dispersion echelle by infrared fibers, and will achieve a spectral resolving power of about 40,000. The primary observational platform for this instrument will be the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, but it will also be configured for use at ground-based observatories. Initially, the spectrometer will use a 58 x 62, 1- to 5-micron InSb array. Larger-format IR arrays and arrays of different composition, will later be incorporated as they become available. The instrument will be used in two modes. The first uses a large format IR array in the spectral image plane for the customary one-dimensional spectral-one-dimensional spatial coverage. In the second mode, a massive, coherent bundle of infrared transmitting ZrF4 fibers will be installed after the dispersive element, to reformat the two-dimensional array into an elongated one-dimensional array for wide spectral coverage, allowing multiple lines to be measured in a single integration with high sensitivity. The overall instrument design is discussed, and the system sensitivity is estimated.

  3. Infrared near-Earth-object survey modeling for observatories interior to the Earth's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M.

    2014-07-01

    The search for and dynamical characterization of the near-Earth population of objects (NEOs) has been a busy topic for surveys for many years. Most of the work thus far has been from ground-based optical surveys such as the Catalina Sky Survey and LINEAR. These surveys have essentially reached a complete inventory of objects down to 1 km diameter and have shown that the known objects do not pose any significant impact threat. Smaller objects are correspondingly smaller threats but there are more of them and fewer of them have so far been discovered. The next generation of surveys is looking to extend their reach down to much smaller sizes. From an impact risk perspective, those objects as small as 30--40 m are still of interest (similar in size to the Tunguska bolide). Smaller objects than this are largely of interest from a space resource or in-situ analysis efforts. A recent mission concept promoted by the B612 Foundation and Ball Aerospace calls for an infrared survey telescope in a Venus-like orbit, known as the Sentinel Mission. This wide-field facility has been designed to complete the inventory down to a 140 m diameter while also providing substantial constraints on the NEO population down to a Tunguska-sized object. I have been working to develop a suite of tools to provide survey modeling for this class of survey telescope. The purpose of the tool is to uncover hidden complexities that govern mission design and operation while also working to quantitatively understand the orbit quality provided on its catalog of objects without additional followup assets. The baseline mission design calls for a 6.5 year survey lifetime. This survey model is a statistically based tool for establishing completeness as a function of object size and survey duration. Effects modeled include the ability to adjust the field-of-regard (includes all pointing restrictions), field-of-view, focal plane array fill factor, and the observatory orbit. Consequences tracked include time

  4. Calculation of Precipitable Water for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy Aircraft (SOFIA): Airplane in the Night Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Pey Chun; Busby, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the new generation airborne observatory station based at NASA s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA, to study the universe. Since the observatory detects infrared energy, water vapor is a concern in the atmosphere due to its known capacity to absorb infrared energy emitted by astronomical objects. Although SOFIA is hoping to fly above 99% of water vapor in the atmosphere it is still possible to affect astronomical observation. Water vapor is one of the toughest parameter to measure in the atmosphere, several atmosphere modeling are used to calculate water vapor loading. The water vapor loading, or Precipitable water, is being calculated by Matlab along the planned flight path. Over time, these results will help SOFIA to plan flights to regions of lower water vapor loading and hopefully improve the imagery collection of these astronomical features.

  5. ESA's X-ray space observatory XMM takes first pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    functioning of the observatory. The Optical Monitor also simultaneously viewed the same regions. One RGS spectrometer obtained its first spectra on 25 January; the other will be commissioned at the start of February. This initial series of short and long duration exposures have delighted the Project management team and the scientists even more. First analyses confirm that the spacecraft is extremely stable, the XMM telescopes are focusing perfectly, and the EPIC cameras, Optical Monitor and RGS spectrometers are working exactly as expected. The Science Operations Centre infrastructure, processing and archiving the science data telemetry from the spacecraft, is also performing well. Initial inspection of the first commissioning images immediately showed some unique X-ray views of several celestial objects, to be presented on 9 February. The occasion will give Principal Investigators and Project management the opportunity to comment on the pictures and the excellent start of the XMM mission. The Calibration and Performance Verification phase for XMM's science instruments is to begin on 3 March, with routine science operations starting in June. Press is invited to attend to the press conference that will be held at the Villafranca/ Madrid- Vilspa facility (ESA's Satellite Tracking Station) Apartado 50727, E-2 080 MADRID, Spain. The press event will be broadcast to the other ESA establishments: ESA Headquarters, Paris; ESA/ ESTEC (Space Expo), Noordwijk, the Netherlands; ESA/ESOC, Darmstadt, Germany and ESA/ESRIN, Frascati, Italy. Media representatives wishing to attend the event are kindly requested to fill out the attached reply from and fax it back to the establishment of their choice.

  6. Astrometric Support for Space Situational Awareness and Space Control: The U.S. Naval Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J.

    The United States Naval Observatory (USNO), founded in 1830 as the progenitor of warfighting Position, Time and Navigation (PNT) operations, is the DoD agency mandated by the Joint Chiefs to establish, maintain, and coordinate Precise Time (such as for GPS) and Astronomical Reference Frames used by all components for navigation, precise positioning and orientation, space operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR). Specifically, the USNO-charged astrometric programs address fundamental needs gaps in several key aspects of Space Situational Awareness (SSA), Space Control (SC), and space-borne Target Location Error/CEP -reduction systems. As part of its responsibility, the USNO is the developer and synthesizer of all astronomical catalogs, surveys, and databases used by the DoD. USNO then produces the products needed to satisfy both broad and mission-specific needs gaps for the warfighter in the field, the air, at sea, or on the high frontier of Space. USNO DoD programs specifically applicable to the latter include space object tracking, extreme accuracy/rapid orbit determination, offensive/defensive counterspace (OCS/DCS), multi-waveband non-resolved object characterization, space sensor calibration, and astrometric reference frame and stellar catalog definition, maintenance, and improvement. Indeed, USNO's unique capability to produce milli-arcsecond guidance data is foundational to SSA/SC, and precision targeting and munitions. USNO capabilities will be discussed, and a vision presented of how advancements in astrometric programs will close need gaps, enable future capabilities in Space Situational Awareness, Space Control and spaceborne ISR.

  7. Maximizing Science Capability for Far-Infrared Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Leisawitz, Dave; Moseley, Harvey; Staguhn, Johannes; Voellmer, George

    2004-01-01

    The far-infrared and submillimeter region (20 microns-800 microns) has perhaps the greatest potential of all wavelengths for advancement in astronomy. When viewed in terms of the cosmic backgrounds, the far-IR is extremely important: half of the total luminosity in the Universe is emitted at rest wavelengths approximately 80-100 microns. At the highest known galaxy redshifts (z approximately equal to 6) this energy is redshifted to approximately 600 microns. Existing and planned missions have a broad range of capabilities, defined in terms of their spectral coverage, spectral resolution, angular resolution, mapping speed, and sensitivity. In this 5-dimensional parameter space, the far-IR is substantially be-hind most other wavelength bands. The opportunity for future missions with great discovery potential is evident. Such missions will be well-suited to answering fundamental questions about the history of energy release in the Universe, the formation and evolution of galaxies, and formation of stellar and protoplanetary systems. We discuss the parameter space that can be filled by a few well-chosen space missions, specifically a submillimeter all-sky survey and a far-IR to submillimeter observatory. Ultimately, a long baseline submillimeter interferometer is necessary to provide sensitivity and angular resolution.

  8. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Cliatt, Larry James; Frederick, Michael A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5 meter telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the airplanes operating envelope for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 39,000 feet and 45,000 feet. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  9. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  10. Effect of jet engine exhaust on SOFIA straylight performance. [Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair Dinger, Ann

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is being designed at NASA's Ames Research Center as a replacement for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). A 2.5-m Nasmyth telescope will be mounted in a Boeing 747 SP and flown at 41,000 ft, above most of the H2O in the earth's atmosphere. In the original SOFIA design, the telescope is located in front of the wings, as it is in the KAO. An alternative design with the telescope placed behind the wings is being studied as part of an effort to reduce cost and weight. In this location, the emission from the engines and the hot H2O molecules in the exhaust become significant straylight sources. The engines and exhaust radiate into the telescope cavity, and illuminate the primary and tertiary mirrors at low telescope elevation angles. The APART/PADE program was used to analyze the straylight at the SOFIA focal plane as a function of wavelength and telescope elevation angle. The emission from the engines and exhaust gas is compared to that from the earth and the telescope itself. Based on the results of this analysis, the SOFIA telescope has been moved behind the wings.

  11. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    2005-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a study of the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), a candidate Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a two-element Michelson interferometer operating over a nominal wavelength range 25 to 400 microns and offering a powerful combination of spectroscopy and sub-arcsecond angular resolution imaging in a single instrument. With angular resolution comparable to that of JWST and far-IR sensitivity nearly two orders of magnitude better than that of the Spitzer Space Telescope, SPIRIT will measure the resonant structures in exozodi debris disks to find and characterize extrasolar planets; characterize the atmospheres of selected extrasolar gas giant planets; elucidate the evolution of young stellar systems and their planet-forming potential; and track the luminosity evolution and chemical and dust enrichment of galaxies on a cosmological timescale. SPIRIT could be ready to launch as early as 2015. The SPIRIT study is sponsored by NASA under the Origins Science Mission Concept study program.

  12. First Extragalactic Detection of Submillimeter CH Rotational Lines from the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Wilson, Christine D.; Kamenetzky, Julia; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira Santaella, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    We present the first extragalactic detections of several CH rotational transitions in the far-infrared in four nearby galaxies, NGC 1068, Arp 220, M82, and NGC 253, using the Herschel Space Observatory. The CH lines in all four galaxies are a factor of 2-4 brighter than the adjacent HCN and HCO+ J = 6-5 lines (also detected in the same spectra). In the star-formation-dominated galaxies, M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220, the CH/CO abundance ratio is low (~10-5), implying that the CH is primarily arising in diffuse and translucent gas where the chemistry is driven by UV radiation as found in the Milky Way interstellar matter. In NGC 1068, which has a luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the CH/CO ratio is an order of magnitude higher, suggesting that CH formation is driven by an X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Our XDR models show that both the CH and CO abundances in NGC 1068 can be explained by an XDR-driven chemistry for gas densities and molecular hydrogen column densities that are well constrained by the CO observations. We conclude that the CH/CO ratio may a good indicator of the presence of AGN in galaxies. We also discuss the feasibility of detecting CH in intermediate- to high-z galaxies with ALMA.

  13. First extragalactic detection of submillimeter CH rotational lines from the Herschel space observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira Santaella, Miguel

    2014-06-20

    We present the first extragalactic detections of several CH rotational transitions in the far-infrared in four nearby galaxies, NGC 1068, Arp 220, M82, and NGC 253, using the Herschel Space Observatory. The CH lines in all four galaxies are a factor of 2-4 brighter than the adjacent HCN and HCO{sup +} J = 6-5 lines (also detected in the same spectra). In the star-formation-dominated galaxies, M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220, the CH/CO abundance ratio is low (∼10{sup –5}), implying that the CH is primarily arising in diffuse and translucent gas where the chemistry is driven by UV radiation as found in the Milky Way interstellar matter. In NGC 1068, which has a luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the CH/CO ratio is an order of magnitude higher, suggesting that CH formation is driven by an X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Our XDR models show that both the CH and CO abundances in NGC 1068 can be explained by an XDR-driven chemistry for gas densities and molecular hydrogen column densities that are well constrained by the CO observations. We conclude that the CH/CO ratio may a good indicator of the presence of AGN in galaxies. We also discuss the feasibility of detecting CH in intermediate- to high-z galaxies with ALMA.

  14. The Astrobiology Space Infrared Explorer (ASPIRE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, S. A.; Roellig, T. L.; ASPIRE Team

    2009-01-01

    The Astrobiology Space Infrared Explorer (ASPIRE) Mission is one of the Origins Probe Mission Concepts that is currently being studied in preparation for inputs to the upcoming Decadal Survey. The mission is a cooled 1-m class telescope optimized to efficiently obtain high quality infrared spectra in the 2.5-36 micron wavelength region. The principal goal of the mission is to detect, identify, and determine the abundance of molecular species, particularly organics, throughout the universe. This will be done by obtaining spectra for a comprehensive range of Solar System, galactic, and extra-galactic environments and the interfaces between them. ASPIRE will be capable of obtaining continuous moderate resolution spectra from 2.5-36 microns at spectral resolutions of about 2500 (2.5-20 microns) and 900 (20-36 microns). ASPIRE will also be able to obtain high resolution spectra (resolutions of 25,000) over selected windows in the 3.1-18 micron region. The ASPIRE suite of instruments provides the ability to study both gas-phase and solid-state materials in space. The PI for the mission is Scott Sandford and major mission partners include NASA-Ames, JPL, and Ball Aerospace.

  15. Characterization of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) ability to serve as an infrared satellite intercalibration reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, David; Holz, Robert; Nagle, Fred; Revercomb, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a future mission employing an infrared spectrometer with unprecedented calibration accuracy and the ability to assess its calibration on-orbit using a novel verification system. Utilizing this capability for satellite intercalibration is a primary objective of the mission. This paper presents a new infrared intercalibration methodology that minimizes the intercalibration uncertainties and provides uncertainty estimates resulting from the scene variability and instrument noise. Results of a simulation study to characterize realistic spatial and temporal matching differences for simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs) of CLARREO and existing hyperspectral sounders are presented. This study, along with experience with intercalibration of real data, finds that intercalibration uncertainties are minimized when the SNOs are not screened for sky conditions but instead weighted based on the observed scene variability. Intercalibration performance is investigated for a 90° polar orbit mission and for a Pathfinder mission on the International Space Station, for various potential CLARREO footprint sizes, and as a function of mission length, scene brightness temperature, and wavelength. The results are encouraging and suggest that biases between CLARREO and sounder observations can be determined with low uncertainty and with high time frequency during a CLARREO mission. For example, the simulations suggest that a CLARREO footprint of 50 to 100 km in diameter is optimal for intercalibration, and that the 3 sigma intercalibration uncertainty is less than 0.1 K for channels at infrared window wavelengths using 2 months of accumulated SNOs, and for more absorbing channels with less scene variability the uncertainties are less than 50 mK.

  16. Observatory Improvements for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Robert A.; Jensen, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint project between NASA and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), the German Space Agency. SOFIA is based in a Boeing 747 SP and flown in the stratosphere to observe infrared wavelengths unobservable from the ground. In 2007 Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) inherited and began work on improving the plane and its telescope. The improvements continue today with upgrading the plane and improving the telescope. The Observatory Verification and Validation (V&V) process is to ensure that the observatory is where the program says it is. The Telescope Status Display (TSD) will provide any information from the on board network to monitors that will display the requested information. In order to assess risks to the program, one must work through the various threats associate with that risk. Once all the risks are closed the program can work towards improving the observatory.

  17. Features Of Cavity Flow And Acoustics Of Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Klotz, S. P.; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 meter aperture Cassegrain telescope with a Nasmyth focus that will be housed in an open cavity in the Boeing 747-SP aircraft and operated at altitudes around 41,000 feet for infrared (IR) viewing of celestial events of astronomical nature. At these altitudes the IR viewing capability of SOFIA far exceeds that of any ground based system. To minimize IR transmission losses, SOFIA will operate with an open cavity. Such an open cavity during flight creates several challenging aerodynamic and aeroacoustic design problems. Foremost of these are: the shear layer over the cavity may cause unwanted resonance if the cavity is untreated; this might give rise to excessive sound pressure levels (SPL) in the cavity and thus affect the unsteady loads on the telescope; the unsteady flow within the cavity produces large dynamic loads and moments that will impact the pointing accuracy of the telescope; the open cavity and the shear layer control devices produce additional drag that will affect directly the time of flight of the mission; the aft location of the cavity down stream of port wing will affect the the flow on the aircraft control surfaces and thus the stability of the aircraft. Also, the highly turbulent shear layer over the cavity and the temperature gradients and 'hot spots' within the cavity can produce a wave front error of the image when it reaches the focal plane of the recorder.

  18. LST: The National Space Observatory concept - An observatory for future astronomer involvement in planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Large Space Telescope (LST) will be a unique facility which must be designed to serve the needs of all potential users throughout the world. This requires that a representative group of astronomers work intimately with the engineers in the early design of the telescope and that astronomers continue to be closely involved in the planning throughout the life of the project. Forty scientists are now defining the auxiliary instruments and their operation. Later, others will build instruments and participate in assigning observing time on the telescope, on the basis of the scientific merit of the proposed observation.

  19. Gas and dust in the beta Pictoris moving group as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Barrado, D.; Montesinos, B.; Duchêne, G.; Bouy, H.; Pinte, C.; Menard, F.; Donaldson, J.; Eiroa, C.; Krivov, A. V.; Kamp, I.; Mendigutía, I.; Dent, W. R. F.; Lillo-Box, J.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Debris discs are thought to be formed through the collisional grinding of planetesimals, and then can be considered as the outcome of planet formation. Understanding the properties of gas and dust in debris discs can help us comprehend the architecture of extrasolar planetary systems. Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared (IR) photometry and spectroscopy have provided a valuable dataset for the study of debris discs gas and dust composition. This paper is part of a series of papers devoted to the study of Herschel-PACS observations of young stellar associations. Aims: This work aims at studying the properties of discs in the beta Pictoris moving group (BPMG) through far-IR PACS observations of dust and gas. Methods: We obtained Herschel-PACS far-IR photometric observations at 70, 100, and 160 μm of 19 BPMG members, together with spectroscopic observations for four of them. These observations were centred at 63.18 μm and 157 μm, aiming to detect [OI] and [CII] emission. We incorporated the new far-IR observations in the SED of BPMG members and fitted modified blackbody models to better characterise the dust content. Results: We have detected far-IR excess emission towards nine BPMG members, including the first detection of an IR excess towards HD 29391.The star HD 172555, shows [OI] emission, while HD 181296 shows [CII] emission, expanding the short list of debris discs with a gas detection. No debris disc in BPMG is detected in both [OI] and [CII]. The discs show dust temperatures in the range 55-264 K, with low dust masses (<6.6 × 10-5 M⊕ to 0.2 M⊕) and radii from blackbody models in the range 3 to ~82 AU. All the objects with a gas detection are early spectral type stars with a hot dust component. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  20. Proceedings of the Second Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The workshop focused on infrared detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers are organized into the following categories: discrete infrared detectors and readout electronics; advanced bolometers; intrinsic integrated infrared arrays; and extrinsic integrated infrared arrays. Status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) programs are also included.

  1. Progress and Prospects toward a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been much activity in the effort to produce a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. These efforts have enriched the understanding of the scientific capabilities of such an observatory leading to broad recognition of its value as an astronomical instrument. At the same time, rapidly developing events in the US and Europe have lead to a more complicated outlook than the baseline Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project plan of a few years ago. I will discuss recent progress and developments resulting from the European eLISA study and the SGO study in the US and prospects looking forward.

  2. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  3. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a candidate NASA Origins Probe Mission. SPIRIT is a two-telescope Michelson interferometer covering wavelengths from 25-400 microns, providing simultaneously high spectral resolution and high angular resolution. With comparable sensitivity to Spitzer, but two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution, SPIRIT will enable us to address a wide array of compelling scientific questions, including how planetary systems form in disks and how new planets interact with the disk. Further, SPIRIT will lay the technological groundwork for an array of future interferometry missions with ambitious scientific goals, including the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer / Darwin, and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure.

  4. Need for a network of observatories for space debris dynamical and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio; Castronuovo, Marco; Portelli, Claudio; Cardona, Tommaso; Arena, Lorenzo; Sciré, Gioacchino; Seitzer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Space debris represents a major concern for space missions since the risk of impact with uncontrolled objects has increased dramatically in recent years. Passive and active mitigation countermeasures are currently under consideration but, at the base of any of such corrective actions is the space debris continuous monitoring through ground based surveillance systems.At the present, many space agencies have the capability to get optical measurements of space orbiting objects mainly relaying on single observatories. The recent research in the field of space debris, demonstrated how it is possible to increase the effectiveness of optical measurements exploitation by using joint observations of the same target from different sites.The University of Rome "La Sapienza", in collaboration with Italian Space Agency (ASI), is developing a scientific network of observatories dedicated to Space Debris deployed in Italy (S5Scope at Rome and SPADE at Matera) and in Kenya at the Broglio Space Center in Malindi (EQUO). ASI founded a program dedicated to space debris, in order to spread the Italian capability to deal with different aspects of this issue. In this framework, the University of Rome is in charge of coordinating the observatories network both in the operation scheduling and in the data analysis. This work describes the features of the observatories dedicated to space debris observation, highlighting their capabilities and detailing their instrumentation. Moreover, the main features of the scheduler under development, devoted to harmonizing the operations of the network, will be shown. This is a new system, which will autonomously coordinate the observations, aiming to optimize results in terms of number of followed targets, amount of time dedicated to survey, accuracy of orbit determination and feasibility of attitude determination through photometric data.Thus, the authors will describe the techniques developed and applied (i) to implement the multi-site orbit

  5. A Small, Rapid Optical-IR Response Gamma-Ray Burst Space Observatory Concept: The NGRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Kumar, P.; Perley, D.; Smoot, G. F.

    2014-10-01

    After Swift, there is no sure plan to furnish a replacement for the rapidly disseminated, high-precision GRB positions it provides, nor a new type of observatory to probe new GRB parameter space. We propose a new GRB mission concept, the Next Generation Rapid Optical-NIR (near infrared) Response GRB Observatory (NGRG) concept, and demonstrate, through analysis of Swift BAT data, studies of new GRB samples, and extinction predictions, that a relatively modest size observatory will produce valuable new measurements and good GRB detection rates. As with Swift, GRBs are initially located with a coded-mask X-ray camera. However, the NGRG has two distinguishing features: first, a beam-steering system to begin optical observations within ~1 s after location; second, in addition to the optical camera, a separate near-IR (NIR) camera viewing the same field, greatly increasing sensitivity to extinguished bursts. These features yield the unique capability of exploring the rise phase of GRB optical-NIR emission. Thus far, among GRBs with optical afterglow detections, a peak is measured in only ~26-40% of the light curves. The rise time for prompt, or pre-afterglow, optical emission is rarely measured, as is the transition to afterglow emission. Prompt or pre-afterglow NIR emission is even less frequently measured. Rapid-response measurements give new tools for exploration of many science topics, including optical emission mechanisms (synchrotron vs. SSC, photospheric emission) and jet characteristics (reverse vs. forward shock emission, baryon-dominated vs. magnetic dominated). The rapid-response capability also allows measurement of dynamic evolution of extinction due to vaporization of progenitor system dust. This dynamic dust measurement is the only tool we know of to separate the effects of star-system-scale dust and galactic-structure-scale dust; it is remarkable that this probe of small-scale phenomena can be used at the high redshifts where GRBs are observed. In this

  6. NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA): Capabilities for Planetary and Exoplanetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Dana E.; Reach, W. T.; Dunham, E. W.; Wolf, J.; Rho, J.; SOFIA Science Team

    2012-10-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) enables high angular and spectral resolution observations with its seven first-generation instruments: 3 cameras, 3 spectrometers, and a high-speed photometer. These capabilities make SOFIA a powerful facility for advancing understanding of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres, star and planet formation processes, and chemistry of the protosolar nebula and protoplanetary disks. SOFIA's Early Science program, using the FORCAST mid-IR camera (PI Terry Herter, Cornell), the GREAT far-IR spectrometer (PI Rolf Guesten, MPIfR), and the HIPO occultation photometer (PI Ted Dunham, Lowell Observatory), is now complete. Some Early Science results were published in special issues of Ap.J.Letters (v.749) and Astronomy & Astrophysics (v.542). Regarding solar system targets, SOFIA obtained mid-IR images of Jupiter and of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 (the latter observations were part of Earth-based support for the EPOXI mission). On 23 June 2011, SOFIA intercepted the center of Pluto's shadow that crossed the Pacific at nearly 30 km/sec. The occultation light curve was observed from SOFIA simultaneously by the HIPO photometer and the Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC; PI Juergen Wolf, DSI). HIPO is specifically intended for planetary science, including stellar occultations by solar system bodies and extrasolar planet transits. HIPO can be co-mounted with the near-IR camera FLITECAM (PI Ian McLean, UCLA) to provide simultaneous photometric coverage in two bands (0.3-1 and 1-5 microns); this was first demonstrated in October 2011. At longer wavelengths SOFIA will make unique contributions to the characterization of astrochemical processes and molecular contents of planets, exoplanets, and protoplanetary disks with a mid-IR spectrometer, a far-IR imaging spectrometer, and a far-IR camera with grism that are soon to be commissioned.

  7. The Challenge of Data Reduction for Multiple Instruments on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charcos-Llorens, M. V.; Krzaczek, R.; Shuping, R. Y.; Lin, L.

    2011-07-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, presents a number of interesting challenges for the development of a data reduction environment which, at its initial phase, will have to incorporate pipelines from seven different instruments developed by organizations around the world. Therefore, the SOFIA data reduction software must run code which has been developed in a variety of dissimilar environments, e.g., IDL, Python, Java, C++. Moreover, we anticipate this diversity will only increase in future generations of instrumentation. We investigated three distinctly different situations for performing pipelined data reduction in SOFIA: (1) automated data reduction after data archival at the end of a mission, (2) re-pipelining of science data with updated calibrations or optimum parameters, and (3) the interactive user-driven local execution and analysis of data reduction by an investigator. These different modes would traditionally result in very different software implementations of algorithms used by each instrument team, in effect tripling the amount of data reduction software that would need to be maintained by SOFIA. We present here a unique approach for enfolding all the instrument-specific data reduction software in the observatory framework and verifies the needs for all three reduction scenarios as well as the standard visualization tools. The SOFIA data reduction structure would host the different algorithms and techniques that the instrument teams develop in their own programming language and operating system. Ideally, duplication of software is minimized across the system because instrument teams can draw on software solutions and techniques previously delivered to SOFIA by other instruments. With this approach, we minimize the effort for analyzing and developing new software reduction pipelines for future generation instruments. We also explore the potential benefits of this approach in the portability of the software to an ever

  8. Preliminary Parallaxes of 40 L and T Dwarfs from the US Naval Observatory Infrared Astronometry Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Liginbuhl, C. B.; Guetter, H. H.; Munn, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for 22 L dwarfs and 18 T dwarfs measured using the ASTROCAM infrared imager on the US naval Observatory (USNO) 1.55 m Strand Astrometric Reflector. The results presented here are based on observations obtained between 2000 September and 2002 November; about half of the objects have an observational time baseline of t 1:3 yr and half t 2:0 yr. Despite these short time baselines, the astrometric quality is sufficient to produce significant new results, especially for the nearer T dwarfs. Seven objects are in common with the USNO optical CCD parallax program for quality control and seven in common with the European Southern Observatory 3.5 m New Technology Telescope parallax program. We compare astrometric quality with both of these programs. Relative to absolute parallax corrections are made by employing Two Micron All Sky Survey and/or Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry for reference-frame stars. We combine USNO infrared and optical parallaxes with the best available California Institute of Technology (CIT) system photometry to determine MJ , MH, and MK values for 37 L dwarfs between spectral types L0 and L8 and 19 T dwarfs between spectral types T0.5 and T8 and present selected absolute magnitude versus spectral type and color diagrams, based on these results. Luminosities and temperatures are estimated for these objects. Of special interest are the distances of several objects that are at or near the L-T dwarf boundary so that this important transition can be better understood. The previously reported early to mid T dwarf luminosity excess is clearly confirmed and found to be present at J, H, and K. The large number of objects that populate this luminosity-excess region indicate that it cannot be due entirely to selection effects. The T dwarf sequence is extended to MJ 16:9 by 2MASS J041519 0935, which, at d 5:74 pc, is found to be the lluminous LOG (L=L )pa

  9. The Astrometric Imaging Telescope - A space-based observatory for extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the objectives, techniques, instrumentation, and mission of the planned Astrometric Imaging Telescope. This space-based observatory is designed to detect and characterize extra-solar planetary systems. Results will contribute to the understanding of the astrophysics of stellar and planetary formation and provide an impetus for the study of exobiology.

  10. Surveying the Inner Solar System with an Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Reitsema, Harold J.; Linfield, Roger P.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of surveying the inner solar system for objects that may pose some threat to Earth. Most of the analysis is based on understanding the capability provided by Sentinel, a concept for an infrared space-based telescope placed in a heliocentric orbit near the distance of Venus. From this analysis, we show that (1) the size range being targeted can affect the survey design, (2) the orbit distribution of the target sample can affect the survey design, (3) minimum observational arc length during the survey is an important metric of survey performance, and (4) surveys must consider objects as small as D=15{--}30 m to meet the goal of identifying objects that have the potential to cause damage on Earth in the next 100 yr. Sentinel will be able to find 50% of all impactors larger than 40 m in a 6.5 yr survey. The Sentinel mission concept is shown to be as effective as any survey in finding objects bigger than D = 140 m but is more effective when applied to finding smaller objects on Earth-impacting orbits. Sentinel is also more effective at finding objects of interest for human exploration that benefit from lower propulsion requirements. To explore the interaction between space and ground search programs, we also study a case where Sentinel is combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and show the benefit of placing a space-based observatory in an orbit that reduces the overlap in search regions with a ground-based telescope. In this case, Sentinel+LSST can find more than 70% of the impactors larger than 40 m assuming a 6.5 yr lifetime for Sentinel and 10 yr for LSST.

  11. (abstract) Infrared Cirrus and Future Space Based Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the known properties of the distribution of infrared cirrus is followed by a discussion of the implications of cirrus on observations from space. Probable limitations on space observations due to IR cirrus.

  12. Exploring science and technology through the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, V.; Rouzé, M.

    2015-03-01

    Because modern astronomy associates the quest of our origins and high-tech instruments, communicating and teaching astronomy explore both science and technology. We report here on our work in communicating astronomy to the public through Web sites (www.herschel.fr), movies on Dailymotion (www.dailymotion.com/AstrophysiqueTV) and new ITC tools that describe interactively the technological dimension of a space mission for astrophysics.

  13. NASA X-Ray Observatory Completes Tests Under Harsh Simulated Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    NASA's most powerful X-ray observatory has successfully completed a month-long series of tests in the extreme heat, cold, and airless conditions it will encounter in space during its five-year mission to shed new light on some of the darkest mysteries of the universe. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was put through the rigorous testing as it was alternately heated and cooled in a special vacuum chamber at TRW Space and Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif., NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. "Successful completion of thermal vacuum testing marks a significant step in readying the observatory for launch aboard the Space Shuttle in January," said Fred Wojtalik, manager of the Observatory Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "The observatory is a complex, highly sophisticated, precision instrument," explained Wojtalik. "We are pleased with the outcome of the testing, and are very proud of the tremendous team of NASA and contractor technicians, engineers and scientists that came together and worked hard to meet this challenging task." Testing began in May after the observatory was raised into the 60-foot thermal vacuum chamber at TRW. Testing was completed on June 20. During the tests the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was exposed to 232 degree heat and 195 degree below zero Fahrenheit cold. During four temperature cycles, all elements of the observatory - the spacecraft, telescope, and science instruments - were checked out. Computer commands directing the observatory to perform certain functions were sent from test consoles at TRW to all Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility components. A team of contractor and NASA engineers and scientists monitored and evaluated the results. Commands were also sent from, and test data monitored at, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Mass., as part of the test series. The observatory will be managed and controlled from

  14. Information Telecommunications of Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumsky, V.; Isaev, E. A.; Samodurov, V. A.; Likhachev, S. F.; Shatskaya, M. V.; Kitaeva, M. A.; Zaytcev, A. Yu.; Ovchinnikov, I. L.; Kornilov, V. V.

    Buffer data center was created in the territory of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory three years ago. The necessity of its creation was caused by the high requirements to the speed and quality of the transmission large amounts of scientific and telemetry data received by tracking station RT-22 from the space radio telescope of the international project "Radioastron". The transfer of this data is carried out over a long distance over 100 km from the Pushchino to Moscow center of processing and storage ASC FIAN. And now we use the data center as a center of local network of the Observatory.

  15. Nanosats for a Radio Interferometer Observatory in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Katsanevras, S.; Puy, D.; Bentum, M.

    2015-10-01

    During the last decades, astronomy and space physics changed dramatically our knowledge of the evolution of the Universe. However, our view is still incomplete in the very low frequency range (1- 30 MHz), which is thus one of the last unexplored astrophysical spectral band. Below 30 MHz, ionospheric fluctuations severely perturb groundbased observations. They are impossible below 10 MHz due to the ionospheric cutoff. In addition, man made radio interferences makes it even more difficult to observe from ground at low frequencies. Deploying a radio instrument in space is the only way to open this new window on the Universe. Among the many science objectives for such type of instrumentations, we can find cosmological studies such as the Dark Ages of the Universe, the remote astrophysical objects, pulsars and fast transients, the interstellar medium. The following Solar system and Planetary objectives are also very important: - Sun-Earth Interactions: The Sun is strongly influencing the interplanetary medium (IPM) and the terrestrial geospatial environment. The evolution mechanisms of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their impact on solar system bodies are still not fully understood. This results in large inaccuracies on the eruption models and prediction tools, and their consequences on the Earth environment. Very low frequency radio imaging capabilities (especially for the Type II solar radio bursts, which are linked with interplanetary shocks) should allow the scientific community to make a big step forward in understanding of the physics and the dynamics of these phenomena, by observing the location of the radio source, how they correlate with their associated shocks and how they propagate within the IPM. - Planets and Exoplanets: The Earth and the fourgiant planets are hosting strong magnetic fields producing large magnetospheres. Particle acceleration are very efficient therein and lead to emitting intense low frequency radio waves in their auroral regions. These

  16. Data Processing of the magnetograms for the Near InfraRed Imaging Spectropolarimeter at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Cao, Wenda; Shumko, Sergiy; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-05-01

    We want to present the processing result of the vector magnetograms from the Near InfraRed Imaging Spectropolarimeter (NIRIS) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NIRIS is a successor of an old magnetograph system at BBSO, which equips with the new infrared detector and the improved Fabry-Perot filter system. While there are several upgrades to the new hardware, there are also some challenges as the data acquisition rate increases and we deal with the a larger detector array. The overall process includes dark and flat correction, image alignment, de-stretch, Stokes parameter selection, calibration of instrumental crosstalk, and Milne-Eddington inversion.

  17. CALET: High energy cosmic ray observatory on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masaki; CALET Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The CALorimeteric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a Japanese-led international mission being developed as part of the utilization plan for the International Space Station (ISS). CALET will be launched by an H-II B rocket utilizing the Japanese developed HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) in 2014. The instrument will be robotically emplaced upon the Exposed Facility attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EF). CALET is a calorimeter based instrument which will have superior energy resolution and excellent separation between hadrons and electrons and between charged particles and gamma rays in the GeV to trans-TeV energy range. CALET will address many questions in high energy astrophysics, including (1) the nature of the sources of high energy particles and photons, through the high energy electron spectrum, (2) signatures of dark matter, in either the high energy electron or gamma ray spectrum, (3) the details of particle propagation in the Galaxy, by a combination of energy spectrum measurements of electrons, protons and highercharged nuclei. In this paper the outline and current status of CALET are summarized.

  18. TRW Ships NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory To Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    Two U.S. Air Force C-5 Galaxy transport planes carrying the observatory and its ground support equipment landed at Kennedy's Space Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:40 p.m. EST this afternoon. REDONDO BEACH, CA.--(Business Wire)--Feb. 4, 1999--TRW has shipped NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory ("Chandra") to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), in Florida, in preparation for a Space Shuttle launch later this year. The 45-foot-tall, 5-ton science satellite will provide astronomers with new information on supernova remnants, the surroundings of black holes, and other celestial phenomena that produce vast quantities of X-rays. Cradled safely in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System (SCTS), NASA's newest space telescope was ferried on Feb. 4 from Los Angeles International Airport to KSC aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter. The SCTS, an Air Force container, closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests at KSC and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. A launch date for the Space Shuttle STS-93 mission is expected to be announced later this week. The third in NASA's family of Great Observatories that includes the Hubble Space Telescope and the TRW-built Compton Gamma Ray observatory, Chandra will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to allow scientists to "see" and monitor cosmic events that are invisible to conventional optical telescopes. Chandra's X-ray images will yield new insight into celestial phenomena such as the temperature and extent of gas clouds that comprise clusters of galaxies and the superheating of gas and dust particles as they swirl into black holes. A TRW-led team that includes the Eastman Kodak Co., Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. designed and built the Chandra X-ray Observatory for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The

  19. Site Selection and Deployment Scenarios for Servicing of Deep-Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willenberg, Harvey J.; Fruhwirth, Michael A.; Potter, Seth D.; Leete, Stephen J.; Moe, Rud V.

    2001-01-01

    The deep-space environment and relative transportation accessibility of the Weak Stability Boundary (WSB) region connecting the Earth-Moon and Sun-Earth libration points makes the Sun-Earth L2 an attractive operating location for future observatories. A summary is presented of key characteristics of future observatories designed to operate in this region. The ability to service observatories that operate within the region around the Lagrange points may greatly enhance their reliability, lifetime, and scientific return. The range of servicing missions might begin with initial deployment, assembly, test, and checkout. Post-assembly servicing missions might also include maintenance and repair, critical fluids resupply, and instrument upgrades. We define the range of servicing missions that can be performed with extravehicular activity, with teleoperated robots, and with autonomous robots. We then describe deployment scenarios that affect payload design. A trade study is summarized of the benefits and risks of alternative servicing sites, including at the International Space Station, at other low-Earth-orbit locations, at the Earth-Moon L1 location, and on-site at the Sun-Earth L2 location. Required technology trades and development issues for observatory servicing at each site, and with each level of autonomy, are summarized.

  20. Exploration an the Search for Origins: A Vision for Ultraviolet-Optical-Infrared Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, Alan (Editor); Brown, Robert A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Ellis, Richard S.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Green, Richard F.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Lilly, Simon J.; Margon, Bruce H.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Richstone, Douglas O.; Stockman, H. S.; Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Tonry, John L.; Truran, James; Weiler, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    Public support and enthusiasm for astronomy have been strong in the final decades of the twentieth century. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than with the Hubble Space Telescope (HCT), a grand endeavor, which is enabling astronomers to make giant strides in understanding our universe, our place in it, and our relation to it. The NASAs first infrared observatory, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), promises to take the crucial next steps towards understanding the formation of stars and galaxies. Toward their completion, the HST and Beyond Committee identifies major goals, whose accomplishment will justify a commitment well into the next century: (1) the detailed study of the birth and evolution of normal galaxies such as the Milky Way; (2) the detection of Earth-like planets around other stars and the search for evidence of life on them; (3) NASA should develop a space observatory of aperture 4m or larger, optimized for imaging and spectroscopy over the wavelength range 1-5 microns; and (4) NASA should develop the capability for space interferometry.

  1. Exploration an the Search for Origins: A Vision for Ultraviolet-Optical-Infrared Space Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, Alan; Brown, Robert A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Ellis, Richard S.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Green, Richard F.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Lilly, Simon J.; Margon, Bruce H.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Richstone, Douglas O.; Stockman, H. S.; Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Tonry, John L.; Truran, James; Weiler, Edward J.

    1996-05-01

    Public support and enthusiasm for astronomy have been strong in the final decades of the twentieth century. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than with the Hubble Space Telescope (HCT), a grand endeavor, which is enabling astronomers to make giant strides in understanding our universe, our place in it, and our relation to it. The NASAs first infrared observatory, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), promises to take the crucial next steps towards understanding the formation of stars and galaxies. Toward their completion, the HST and Beyond Committee identifies major goals, whose accomplishment will justify a commitment well into the next century: (1) the detailed study of the birth and evolution of normal galaxies such as the Milky Way; (2) the detection of Earth-like planets around other stars and the search for evidence of life on them; (3) NASA should develop a space observatory of aperture 4m or larger, optimized for imaging and spectroscopy over the wavelength range 1-5 microns; and (4) NASA should develop the capability for space interferometry.

  2. Space-shuttle interfaces/utilization. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The economic aspects of space shuttle application to a representative Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) operational mission in the various candidate Shuttle modes of launch, retrieval, and resupply are discussed. System maintenance of the same mission capability using a conventional launch vehicle is also considered. The studies are based on application of sophisticated Monte Carlo mission simulation program developed originally for studies of in-space servicing of a military satellite system. The program has been modified to permit evaluation of space shuttle application to low altitude EOS missions in all three modes. The conclusions generated by the EOS system study are developed.

  3. Spitzer Space Telescope Leads NASA's Great Observatories to Uncover Black Holes and Other Hidden Objects in the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers unveiled the deepest images from NASA's new Spitzer Space Telescope today, and announced the detection of distant objects -- including several supermassive black holes -- that are nearly invisible in even the deepest images from telescopes operating at other wavelengths. Mark Dickinson, of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Ariz., and Principal Investigator for the new observations, says, "With these ultra-deep Spitzer images, we are easily seeing objects throughout time and space, out to redshifts of 6 or more, where the most distant known galaxies lie. Moreover, we see some objects that are completely invisible to optical telescopes, but whose existence was hinted at by previous observations from the Chandra and Hubble Observatories." Seven of the objects detected in the Spitzer images may be part of the long-sought population of "missing" supermassive black holes that powered the bright cores of the earliest active galaxies. The discovery finally completes a full accounting of all the X-ray sources seen in one of the deepest surveys of the universe ever taken. This detective story required no less than the combined power of NASA's three Great Observatories in space -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Each observatory works with different wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, from the high-energy X-rays that Chandra detects, through visible light with Hubble, and into the infrared with Spitzer. The combination of these telescopes yields far more information than any single instrument would. All three telescopes peered out to distances of up to 13 billion light-years toward a small patch of the southern sky containing more than 10,000 galaxies, in a coordinated project called the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (or GOODS, for short). Chandra images detected over two hundred X-ray sources believed to be supermassive black holes lying in the centers of young

  4. Irish astronomers eager to use European gamma-ray space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Space observatories are today helping astronomers discover and understand the furthest reaches of the Universe. But the origin of gamma-ray bursts, brief but extremely powerful explosions, is still one of the great cosmic mysteries. INTEGRAL will be a space observatory whose objective is to gather gamma rays, the most energetic radiation that comes from space, pinpointing and studying their sources with an unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In addition to tracking down gamma-ray bursts, the observatory will bring much new information on stellar explosions, black holes and the formation of elements. With no other dedicated gamma-ray mission on the horizon, the world's scientists are eagerly awaiting the start of the mission, just 12 months away. Ireland's astronomers and astrophysicists will be privileged users. Professor Brian McBreen of University College Dublin, and Professor Evert Meurs of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) and Director of Dunsink Observatory, are both co-investigators for the Optical Monitor Camera (OMC), one of INTEGRAL's four science instruments. Their teams have also contributed to the science analysis software to be used at the INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC). Professor McBreen, an authority in the field of gamma-ray bursts, was one of the founding fathers of the project in the 1980s that subsequently led to INTEGRAL. The spacecraft is currently undergoing environmental tests at ESA's Technical and Research Centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands. The launch, on a Russian Proton rocket from Baïkonour, is scheduled for October 2002. Speakers at the press conference will include , Ireland's Minister for Commerce, Science and Technology Mr. Noel Treacy, the President of RIA Professor T.D. Spearman, and Professor David Southwood, Director of Science at the European Space Agency and the Irish co-investigators.

  5. Go-ahead for ESA's new millennium space observatories Planck and FIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-03-01

    by a Consortium of about 20 institutes led by Reno Mandolesi of the Istituto di Tecnologie e Studio delle Radiazioni Extraterrestri in Bologna (Italy). FIRST, the "Far InfraRed and Submillimetre Telescope", is the successor of ESA's Infrared Space Observatory ISO. It will be more powerful than any of its predecessors, with a primary mirror of 3.5 metres in diameter - the largest ever for an infrared space telescope. It will observe at wavelength's range never covered before (from 80 to 670 microns). Like Planck, it will be located about 1.5 million kilometres away from Earth. FIRST will look for planetary systems and study processes like the evolution of galaxies in the early universe. It will provide very detailed information about the coldest objects in the Universe, and those enshrouded by dust. The pre-stellar cores from which the stars hatch at nearly minus 260 degrees C, or the dusty distant galaxies undergoing violent collisions are some examples. Also, FIRST will show the composition, temperature, density and motion of the gas and dust of the clouds in the interstellar space. Its payload will consist of three instruments: two cameras called PACS and SPIRE, and HIFI, a high-resolution spectrometer. "They are real technological challenges. Instruments like these have never been used in a space telescope", says FIRST Project Scientist Goeran Pilbratt, at ESA/ESTEC. To avoid the "noise" caused by the emission of the instruments themselves, a cryostat full of superfluid liquid helium will cool them down to a temperature below minus 271 degrees C, very close to the absolute zero (at -273 degrees C). The Heterodyne Instrument for FIRST (HIFI) takes very high resolution spectra of the astronomical objects in thousands of frequencies simultaneously. It will be designed and built by a consortium led by Thijs de Graauw, SRON, Groningen, in The Netherlands. The Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instrument is an infrared camera and a spectrometer that

  6. Diverse Electron-Induced Optical Emissions from Space Observatory Materials at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J.R.; Jensen, Amberly Evans; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Electron irradiation experiments have investigated the diverse electron-induced optical and electrical signatures observed in ground-based tests of various space observatory materials at low temperature. Three types of light emission were observed: (i); long-duration cathodoluminescence which persisted as long as the electron beam was on (ii) short-duration (<1 s) arcing, resulting from electrostatic discharge; and (iii) intermediate-duration (100 s) glow-termed "flares". We discuss how the electron currents and arcing-as well as light emission absolute intensity and frequency-depend on electron beam energy, power, and flux and the temperature and thickness of different bulk (polyimides, epoxy resins, and silica glasses) and composite dielectric materials (disordered SiO2 thin films, carbon- and fiberglass-epoxy composites, and macroscopically-conductive carbon-loaded polyimides). We conclude that electron-induced optical emissions resulting from interactions between observatory materials and the space environment electron flux can, in specific circumstances, make significant contributions to the stray light background that could possibly adversely affect the performance of space-based observatories.

  7. Diverse electron-induced optical emissions from space observatory materials at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Evans Jensen, Amberly; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Electron irradiation experiments have investigated the diverse electron-induced optical and electrical signatures observed in ground-based tests of various space observatory materials at low temperature. Three types of light emission were observed: (i); long-duration cathodoluminescence which persisted as long as the electron beam was on (ii) short-duration (<1 s) arcing, resulting from electrostatic discharge; and (iii) intermediate-duration (~100 s) glow—termed "flares". We discuss how the electron currents and arcing—as well as light emission absolute intensity and frequency—depend on electron beam energy, power, and flux and the temperature and thickness of different bulk (polyimides, epoxy resins, and silica glasses) and composite dielectric materials (disordered SiO2 thin films, carbon- and fiberglass-epoxy composites, and macroscopically-conductive carbon-loaded polyimides). We conclude that electron-induced optical emissions resulting from interactions between observatory materials and the space environment electron flux can, in specific circumstances, make significant contributions to the stray light background that could possibly adversely affect the performance of space-based observatories.

  8. The World Space Observatory–UV Project as a Tool for Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, Boris M.; Sachkov, Mikhail E.; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; de Castro, Ana-Ines Gómez

    During last three decades, astronomers have had practically continuous access to the 100-300 nm spectral range that is unreachable with ground-based instruments but where astrophysical processes can be efficiently studied with unprecedented capability. The successful International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory, Russian ASTRON mission and successor instruments such as the COS and STIS spectrographs on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) demonstrate the major impact that observations in the UV wavelength range have had on modern astronomy. Many exoplanetary studies have been performed in the UV domain, both Far-UV and Near-UV. This spectral region contains many resonance lines of common elements, including Ly α, which provided a unique possibility to study physical and chemical properties of planetary atmospheres. Future access to space-based observatories is expected to be very limited. For the next decade, the post-HST era, the World Space Observatory UltraViolet (WSO-UV) will be the only large telescope class mission for UV observations, both spectroscopic and imaging. In its potential, the WSO-UV mission is similar to the HST, but all the observing time will be available for UV astronomy. In this chapter, we briefly outline the WSO-UV mission model, instrumentation description, science management plan as well as some of the key science issues that WSO-UV will address during its lifetime. This information should help exoplanet researchers to start to prepare their future observations with WSO-UV.

  9. Grand Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.

    2002-01-01

    Various concepts have been recently presented for a 100 m class astronomical observatory. The science virtues of such an observatory are many: resolving planets orbiting around other stars, resolving the surface features of other stars, extending our temporal reach back toward the beginning (at and before stellar and galactic development), improving on the Next Generation Space Telescope, and other (perhaps as yet) undiscovered purposes. This observatory would be a general facility instrument with wide spectral range from at least the near ultraviolet to the mid infrared. The concept espoused here is based on a practical, modular design located in a place where temperatures remain (and instruments could operate) within several degrees of absolute zero with no shielding or cooling. This location is the bottom of a crater located near the north or south pole of the moon, most probably the South Polar Depression. In such a location the telescope would never see the sun or the earth, hence the profound cold and absence of stray light. The ideal nature of this location is elaborated herein. It is envisioned that this observatory would be assembled and maintained remotely through the use of expert robotic systems. A base station would be located above the crater rim with (at least occasional) direct line-of-sight access to the earth. Certainly it would be advantageous, but not absolutely essential, to have humans travel to the site to deal with unexpected contingencies. Further, observers and their teams could eventually travel there for extended observational campaigns. Educational activities, in general, could be furthered thru extended human presence. Even recreational visitors and long term habitation might follow.

  10. Pre main sequence stars as UV sources for the World Space Observatory-UV mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez de Castro, Ana I.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2011-09-01

    Pre-main sequence stars are bright UV (UV) sources compared with their main sequence analogues. The source of this excess is the high energy processes associated with the physics of accretion/outflow during early stellar evolution. In this review, the main sources of UV excess are described as well as the most significant "unknowns" in the field. Special emphasis is made on the results from the last observations carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope and on the relevance of future dedicated monitoring programs with the World Space Observatory-UV.

  11. A Global Upper Atmosphere Observatory Using of Lidar on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. H.; Beck, S. M.; Hecht, J. H.; Corey, C. F.; McLeroy, J. C.; Ferrone, K. L.; Spann, J. F.; Swenson, G. R.; Janches, D.; Giles, B.; Krainak, M.; Yu, A.; Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    A concept for hosting a lidar facility for the upper atmosphere on the International Space Station (ISS) is presented and discussed. The concept is based on utilizing an existing Large Space Optics mirror having a 2.37-m aperture as the primary mirror in its receiver. This large aperture provides for hosting several transmitter systems to retrieve density, temperature, and wind measurements for several upper atmospheric species. Thus the concept provides for measurements over a wide altitude range (80-600 km), at various time and spatial resolutions, and hosting on the ISS provides nearly global coverage. The baseline concept includes transmitters and receivers for atomic oxygen (80-500 km), metastable helium (400-600 km), and sodium (80-110 km). The facility is conceived as being flexible such that other transmitter/receiver systems could be added to allow the possibility of other species to be studied, such as iron. The presentation discusses the transformative science that would be gained by such an observatory by combining the nearly global coverage afforded by the ISS orbit with the extension of powerful lidar techniques to high altitudes. The challenges in realizing such an observatory are discussed, as are current plans and partnerships to meet those challenges. The presentation also reports on the development status of several components, primarily various independent transmitter/receiver systems, that are under consideration for the baseline observatory. Several institutions are performing these developments.

  12. NASA Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program Evaluation Results To Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela K.; Backman, Dana E.; Clark, Coral

    2015-08-01

    SOFIA is an airborne observatory, capable of making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes, and inspires instrumention development.SOFIA is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), consisting of a modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches) reflecting telescope. The SOFIA aircraft is based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Building 703, in Palmdale, California. The Science Program Office and Outreach Office is located at NASA Ames Research center. SOFIA is one of the programs in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division.SOFIA will be used to study many different kinds of astronomical objects and phenomena, including star birth and death, formation of new solar systems, identification of complex molecules in space, planets, comets and asteroids in our solar system, nebulae and dust in galaxies, and ecosystems of galaxies.Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program:The SOFIA Education and Communications program exploits the unique attributes of airborne astronomy to contribute to national goals for the reform of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and to the elevation of public scientific and technical literacy.SOFIA’s Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) effort is a professional development program aspiring to improve teaching, inspire students, and inform the community. To date, 55 educators from 21 states; in three cohorts, Cycles 0, 1 and 2; have completed their astronomy professional development and their SOFIA science flight experience. Cycle 3 cohort of 28 educators will be completing their flight experience this fall. Evaluation has confirmed the program’s positive impact on the teacher participants, on their students, and in their communities. Teachers have incorporated content knowledge and specific components of their experience into their curricula, and have given hundreds of presentations and

  13. Space Infrared Astronomy in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    New technology and design approaches have enabled revolutionary improvements in astronomical observations from space. Worldwide plans and dreams include orders of magnitude growth in sensitivity and resolution for all wavelength ranges, and would give the ability to learn our history, from the Big Bang to the conditions for life on Earth. The Next Generation Space Telescope, for example, will be able to see the most distant galaxies as they were being assembled from tiny fragments. It will be 1/4 as massive as the Hubble, with a mirror 3 times as large, cooled to about 30 Kelvin to image infrared radiation. I will discuss plans for NGST and hopes for future large space telescopes, ranging from the Space UV Optical (SUVO) telescope to the Filled Aperture Infrared (FAIR) Telescope, the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS).

  14. Telescope Technology Development Results for a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories will enable the systematic study of the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. Optical telescopes play an important role in these observatories by enabling displacement measurements between pairs of freely falling proof masses. The telescopes deliver laser light efficiently from one sciencecraft to another over million-kilometer scale separations and must transmit and receive light simultaneously. Transmitting and receiving at the same time puts tight constraints on the scattered light performance. In addition, the required displacement measurement accuracy requires ~ 1 pm/√Hz pathlength stability through the telescope in the measurement band. We report preliminary measurements on a prototype telescope.This work was funded in part by NASA SAT grant 11-SAT11-0027.

  15. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): The Mission Design Solution Space and the Art of the Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David; Hyde, T. Tupper; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Weiss, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Although the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) was studied as a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission, the real world presents a broader set of options, pressures, and constraints. Fundamentally, SPIRIT is a far-IR observatory for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy designed to address a variety of compelling scientific questions. How do planetary systems form from protostellar disks, dousing some planets in water while leaving others dry? Where do planets form, and why are some ice giants while others are rocky? How did high-redshift galaxies form and merge to form the present-day population of galaxies? This paper takes a pragmatic look at the mission design solution space for SPIRIT, presents Probe-class and facility-class mission scenarios, and describes optional design changes. The costs and benefits of various mission design alternatives are roughly evaluated, giving a basis for further study and to serve as guidance to policy makers.

  16. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  17. Space Station Freedom - Its role as an international research laboratory and observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The international partnership agreed to just a year ago among the United States, Canada, Japan and nations participating in the European Space Agency bring us one giant leap closer to unprecedented opportunities in space science and observation. While the driving force of Space Station Freedom has been and continues to be an expansion of human presence in space, the goals of the program go far beyond support of exploration. Integral to the international program is research, conducted on four spacecraft, centering on laboratory and observatory experiments. Research onboard the station's manned base, two polar orbiting observation platforms and the Columbus Free Flying Laboratory will offer research opportunities never available before in life sciences, materials sciences, earth observation, astrophysics and planetary sciences for a wide variety of users over a period of three decades. As such, Space Station Freedom, the world's largest and most useful facility in space, is expected to stimulate advanced technologies, promote the commercial use of space, and increase international cooperation in the peaceful utilization of outer space.

  18. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Key Technologies and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew Ryan; Stahle, Carl M.; Balasubramaniam, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.; Mosier, Gary E.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David C.; Rioux, Norman M.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 20 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  19. Aditya: India’s First Observatory in Space to Study the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Dibyendu

    2015-08-01

    Recognizing the need and advantages of continuous solar observations from space, and to further its goal of supporting scientific and technological advances, the Indian Space Research Organization is planning India’s first space mission to observe the Sun. Nicknamed Aditya, this ambitious project aims to place a comprehensive solar observatory at the Lagrange point L1 which will allow uninterrupted views of the Sun. The diverse set of instruments being planned to fly onboard this mission includes a visible emission line coronagraph, a solar ultraviolet imaging telescope, high- and low-energy X-ray spectrometers, a plasma analyzer and a particle detector package for in-situ measurements. In this talk I will provide a brief overview of these instruments and discuss the science objectives of this mission.

  20. The Spitzer Space Telescope's performance: getting the most out of a great observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Suzanne R.; Levine, Deborah A.

    2006-06-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope was launched on August 25 th, 2003, and has been operating virtually flawlessly for over two years. The projected cryogenic lifetime for Spitzer is currently 5.5 years, substantially exceeding the required lifetime of 2.5 years and the pre-launch prediction of 5 years. The Spitzer Project has made a singular effort to extend Spitzer's lifetime through operational changes to conserve helium. Additionally, many updates to calibration and scheduling activities have been made in order to maximum the scientific return from Spitzer. Spitzer has met its level one science time requirement of 90%, and routinely exceeds it today. All this has been achieved with an operating budget that is substantially smaller than that of NASA's other Great Observatories. This paper will describe the overall performance of the Spitzer Space Telescope Science Operations System and detail the modifications made to increase both the helium lifetime and the science data return. It will also discuss trades made between performance improvements and cost. Lessons learned which can be applied to future observatory operations will be included in the paper. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Constraint-based integration of planning and scheduling for space-based observatory management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Steven F.

    1994-01-01

    Progress toward the development of effective, practical solutions to space-based observatory scheduling problems within the HSTS scheduling framework is reported. HSTS was developed and originally applied in the context of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) short-term observation scheduling problem. The work was motivated by the limitations of the current solution and, more generally, by the insufficiency of classical planning and scheduling approaches in this problem context. HSTS has subsequently been used to develop improved heuristic solution techniques in related scheduling domains and is currently being applied to develop a scheduling tool for the upcoming Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) mission. The salient architectural characteristics of HSTS and their relationship to previous scheduling and AI planning research are summarized. Then, some key problem decomposition techniques underlying the integrated planning and scheduling approach to the HST problem are described; research results indicate that these techniques provide leverage in solving space-based observatory scheduling problems. Finally, more recently developed constraint-posting scheduling procedures and the current SWAS application focus are summarized.

  2. Lessons Learned to Date in Developing the Virtual Space Physics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, C.; Roberts, D. A.; King, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-12-01

    We now have an operational Virtual Space Physics Observatory that provides users the ability to search for and retrieve data from hundreds of space and solar physics data products based on specific terms or a Google-like interface. Lessons learned in building VSPO include: (a) A very close and highly interactive collaboration between scientists and information technologists in the definition and development of services is essential. (b) Constructing a Data Model acceptable to a broad community is very important but very difficult. Variations in usage are inevitable and must be dealt with through translations; this is especially true for the description of variables within data products. (c) Higher-order queries (searches based on events, positions, comparisons of measurements, etc.) are possible, and have been implemented in various systems; currently we see these as being separate from the basic data finding and retrieval services. (d) Building a Virtual Observatory is often more a matter of the tedious details of product descriptions than an exercise in implementing fancy middleware. Paying a knowledgeable third party to build registries can be more efficient than working directly with providers, and automated tools can help but do not solve all the problems. (e) The success of the VO effort in space and solar physics, as elsewhere, will depend on whether the scientific communities involved use and critique the services so that they will come to meet a real need for the integration of resources to solve new scientific problems of perceived importance.

  3. The development and mission of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, David B.; Irace, William R.; Werner, Michael W.

    2004-10-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was successfully launched on August 25, 2003. SIRTF is an observatory for infrared astronomy from space. It has an 85cm diameter beryllium telescope operating at 5.5 K and a projected cryogenic lifetime of 4 to 6 years based on early flight performance. SIRTF has completed its in-orbit checkout and has become the first mission to execute astronomical observations from a solar orbit. SIRTF's three instruments with state of the art detector arrays provide imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy over the 3-180 micron wavelength range. SIRTF is achieving major advances in the study of astrophysical phenomena from the solar system to the edge of the Universe. SIRTF completes NASA's family of Great Observatories and serves as a cornerstone of the Origins program. Over 75% of the observing time will be awarded to the general scientific community through the usual proposal and peer review cycle. SIRTF has demonstrated major advances in technology areas critical to future infrared missions. These include lightweight cryogenic optics, sensitive detector arrays, and a high performance thermal system, combining radiative and cryogenic cooling, which allows a telescope to be launched warm and to be cooled in space. These thermal advances are enabled by the use of an Earth-trailing solar orbit which will carry SIRTF to a distance of ~0.6 AU from Earth in 5 years. The SIRTF project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory which employs a novel JPL-industry team management approach. This paper provides an overview of the SIRTF mission, telescope, cryostat, instruments, spacecraft, orbit, operations and project management approach; and this paper serves as an introduction to the accompanying set of detailed papers about specific aspects of SIRTF.

  4. Space-Borne Radio-Sounding Investigations Facilitated by the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza,Dieter; Garcia, Leonard N.; Shao, Xi; Galkin, Ivan A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) is to provide userfriendly access to heliophysics wave data. While the VWO initially emphasized the vast quantity of wave data obtained from passive receivers, the VWO infrastructure can also be used to access active sounder data sets. Here we use examples from some half-million Alouette-2, ISIS-1, and ISIS-2 digital topside-sounder ionograms to demonstrate the desirability of such access to the actual ionograms for investigations of both natural and sounder-stimulated plasma-wave phenomena. By this demonstration, we wish to encourage investigators to make other valuable space-borne sounder data sets accessible via the VWO.

  5. An analysis of water in galactic infrared sources using the NASA Lear Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Hilgeman, T.

    1979-01-01

    The Michelson interferometer system on the NASA Lear Jet Airborne Observatory is described as well as the data reduction procedures. The objects observed (standard stars, M stars, a nebula, planets, and the moon) are discussed and the observing parameters are listed for each flight date. The spectra obtained from these data flights are presented, grouped by class of object.

  6. A Technical Overview and Description of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Nans

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a technical overview of SOFIA, a unique airborne observatory, from an engineering perspective. It will do this by describing several of the systems of this observatory that are common with mountain top ground based observatories but mostly emphasize those more unique features and systems that are required to facilitate world class astronomy from a highly modified Boeing 747-SP flying at Mach 0.84 in the Stratosphere. This paper provides a technical overview of SOFIA by reviewing each of the performance specifications (the level one requirements for development) and describing some of the technical advancements for the telescope as well as the platform required to achieve these performance specifications. The technical advancements involved include mirror technologies, control system features, the telescope suspension system, and the aircraft open port cavity with associated cavity door that opens in flight and tracks the telescope elevation angle. For background this paper will provide a brief programmatic overview of the SOFIA project including the joint project arrangement between the US and Germany (NASA and DLR). Additionally, this paper will describe the up to date status of the development of SOFIA as the Observatory nears the date of the first test flight in the summer of 2004.

  7. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Automated star pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Vanbezooijen, R. W. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a free flying spacecraft carrying a 1 meter class cryogenically cooled infrared telescope nearly three oders of magnitude most sensitive than the current generation of infrared telescopes. Three automatic target acquisition methods will be presented that are based on the use of an imaging star tracker. The methods are distinguished by the number of guidestars that are required per target, the amount of computational capability necessary, and the time required for the complete acquisition process. Each method is described in detail.

  8. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  9. The Footprint Database and Web Services of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, László; Varga-Verebélyi, Erika; Verdugo, Eva; Teyssier, David; Exter, Katrina; Valtchanov, Ivan; Budavári, Tamás; Kiss, Csaba

    2016-07-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory is freely available to the public but no uniformly processed catalogue of the observations has been published so far. To date, the Herschel Science Archive does not contain the exact sky coverage (footprint) of individual observations and supports search for measurements based on bounding circles only. Drawing on previous experience in implementing footprint databases, we built the Herschel Footprint Database and Web Services for the Herschel Space Observatory to provide efficient search capabilities for typical astronomical queries. The database was designed with the following main goals in mind: (a) provide a unified data model for meta-data of all instruments and observational modes, (b) quickly find observations covering a selected object and its neighbourhood, (c) quickly find every observation in a larger area of the sky, (d) allow for finding solar system objects crossing observation fields. As a first step, we developed a unified data model of observations of all three Herschel instruments for all pointing and instrument modes. Then, using telescope pointing information and observational meta-data, we compiled a database of footprints. As opposed to methods using pixellation of the sphere, we represent sky coverage in an exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. For easier handling of Herschel observation footprints with rather complex shapes, two algorithms were implemented to reduce the outline. Furthermore, a new visualisation tool to plot footprints with various spherical projections was developed. Indexing of the footprints using Hierarchical Triangular Mesh makes it possible to quickly find observations based on sky coverage, time and meta-data. The database is accessible via a web site http://herschel.vo.elte.hu and also as a set of REST web service functions, which makes it readily usable from programming environments such as Python or IDL. The web service allows downloading footprint data

  10. The Footprint Database and Web Services of the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, László; Varga-Verebélyi, Erika; Verdugo, Eva; Teyssier, David; Exter, Katrina; Valtchanov, Ivan; Budavári, Tamás; Kiss, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory is freely available to the public but no uniformly processed catalogue of the observations has been published so far. To date, the Herschel Science Archive does not contain the exact sky coverage (footprint) of individual observations and supports search for measurements based on bounding circles only. Drawing on previous experience in implementing footprint databases, we built the Herschel Footprint Database and Web Services for the Herschel Space Observatory to provide efficient search capabilities for typical astronomical queries. The database was designed with the following main goals in mind: (a) provide a unified data model for meta-data of all instruments and observational modes, (b) quickly find observations covering a selected object and its neighbourhood, (c) quickly find every observation in a larger area of the sky, (d) allow for finding solar system objects crossing observation fields. As a first step, we developed a unified data model of observations of all three Herschel instruments for all pointing and instrument modes. Then, using telescope pointing information and observational meta-data, we compiled a database of footprints. As opposed to methods using pixellation of the sphere, we represent sky coverage in an exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. For easier handling of Herschel observation footprints with rather complex shapes, two algorithms were implemented to reduce the outline. Furthermore, a new visualisation tool to plot footprints with various spherical projections was developed. Indexing of the footprints using Hierarchical Triangular Mesh makes it possible to quickly find observations based on sky coverage, time and meta-data. The database is accessible via a web site http://herschel.vo.elte.hu and also as a set of REST web service functions, which makes it readily usable from programming environments such as Python or IDL. The web service allows downloading footprint data

  11. Virtual Observatories for Space Physics Observations and Simulations: New Routes to Efficient Access and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    New tools for data access and visualization promise to make the analysis of space plasma data both more efficient and more powerful, especially for answering questions about the global structure and dynamics of the Sun-Earth system. We will show how new existing tools (particularly the Virtual Space Physics Observatory-VSPO-and the Visual System for Browsing, Analysis and Retrieval of Data-ViSBARD; look for the acronyms in Google) already provide rapid access to such information as spacecraft orbits, browse plots, and detailed data, as well as visualizations that can quickly unite our view of multispacecraft observations. We will show movies illustrating multispacecraft observations of the solar wind and magnetosphere during a magnetic storm, and of simulations of 3 0-spacecraft observations derived from MHD simulations of the magnetosphere sampled along likely trajectories of the spacecraft for the MagCon mission. An important issue remaining to be solved is how best to integrate simulation data and services into the Virtual Observatory environment, and this talk will hopefully stimulate further discussion along these lines.

  12. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar observatory report, January - June 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Given here is a summary of the solar vector magnetic field, H-alpha, and white-light observations made at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory during its daily periods of operation. The MSFC Solar Observatory facilities consist of the Solar Magnetograph, an f/13, 30-cm Cassegrain system with a 3.5-cm image of the Sun, housed on top of a 12.8-meter tower; a 12.5-cm Razdow H-alpha telescope housed at the base of the tower; an 18-cm Questar telescope with a full aperture white-light filter mounted at the base of the tower; a 30-cm Cassegrain telescope located in a second metal dome; and a 16.5-cm H-alpha telescope mounted on side of the Solar Vector Magnetograph. A concrete block building provides office space, a darkroom for developing film and performing optical testing, a workshop, video displays, and a computer facility for data reduction.

  13. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  14. Dissemination of Space Geodesy Data-Related Products Through a Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Deleflie, F.; Portmann, C.; Soudarin, L.; Carache, C.; Berthier, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the astronomical so-called Virtual Observatory (VO), and gives some examples of Webservices hosted by GRGS Analysis Center webpages, that can be used for Earth sciences applications, and for stations operations (among them Satellite Laser Ranging Stations). Astronomers using this VO are now organized within an international association called the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), which was formed in June 2002 with a mission to "facilitate the international coordination and collaboration necessary for the development and deployment of the tools, systems and organizational structures necessary to enable the international utilization of astronomical archives." GRGS, Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale, France, now routinely delivers geodetic products to most of the space geodetic services of the International Association of Geodesy. Some of these products are now natively archived following the data format recommended by IVOA, the VO-Table format, an improved version of the XML format. We pay a particular attention on (i) Space Station Coordinates time series deduced from SLR, DORIS and GPS data, (ii) EOP time series deduced from SLR and VLBI data, (iii) SLR station biases.

  15. New Concepts for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J. (Editor); Leisawitz, David T. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The Second Workshop on New Concepts for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Space Astronomy aimed to highlight the groundbreaking opportunities available for astronomical investigations in the far-infrared to submillimeter using advanced, space-based telescopes. Held at the University of Maryland on March 7-8, 2002, the Workshop was attended by 130 participants from 50 institutions, and represented scientists and engineers from many countries and with a wide variety of experience. The technical content featured 17 invited talks and 44 contributed posters, complemented by two sixperson panels to address questions of astronomy and technology.

  16. Charting the Winds that Change the Universe, II: The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Benford, D. J.; Harvey, P. M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Lester, D. F.; Mather, J. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Werner, M. W.; Yorke, H. W.

    2004-01-01

    SAFIR will study the birth and evolution of stars and planetary systems so young that they are invisible to optical and near-infrared telescopes such as NGST. Not only does the far-infrared radiation penetrate the obscuring dust clouds that surround these systems, but the protoplanetary disks also emit much of their radiation in the far infrared. Furthermore, the dust reprocesses much of the optical emission from the newly forming stars into this wavelength band. Similarly, the obscured central regions of galaxies, which harbor massive black holes and huge bursts of star formation, can be seen and analyzed in the far infrared. SAFIR will have the sensitivity to see the first dusty galaxies in the universe. For studies of both star-forming regions in our galaxy and dusty galaxies at high redshifts, SAFIR will be essential in tying together information that NGST will obtain on these systems at shorter wavelengths and that ALMA will obtain at longer wavelengths.

  17. Building a new space weather facility at the National Observatory of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Belehaki, Anna; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Papaioannou, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    The PROTEAS project has been initiated at the Institute of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing (IAASARS) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA). One of its main objectives is to provide observations, processed data and space weather nowcasting and forecasting products, designed to support the space weather research community and operators of commercial and industrial systems. The space weather products to be released by this facility, will be the result of the exploitation of ground-based, as well as space-borne observations and of model results and tools already available or under development by IAASARS researchers. The objective will be achieved through: (a) the operation of a small full-disk solar telescope to conduct regular observations of the Sun in the H-alpha line; (b) the construction of a database with near real-time solar observations which will be available to the community through a web-based facility (HELIOSERVER); (c) the development of a tool for forecasting Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in relation to observed solar eruptive events; (d) the upgrade of the Athens Digisonde with digital transceivers and the capability of operating in bi-static link mode and (e) the sustainable operation of the European Digital Upper Atmosphere Server (DIAS) upgraded with additional data sets integrated in an interface with the HELIOSERVER and with improved models for the real-time quantification of the effects of solar eruptive events in the ionosphere.

  18. Infrared focal plane detector modules for space applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Dominique; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard; Gassmann, Kai-Uwe; Haiml, Markus; Weber, Andreas; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Ziegler, Johann; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Fick, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of this paper, AIM presents the actual status of some of its currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments for space applications covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP will be elaborated. Additionally dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC will be addressed.

  19. Reproducing kernel hilbert space based single infrared image super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liangliang; Deng, Liangjian; Shen, Wei; Xi, Ning; Zhou, Zhanxin; Song, Bo; Yang, Yongliang; Cheng, Yu; Dong, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The spatial resolution of Infrared (IR) images is limited by lens optical diffraction, sensor array pitch size and pixel dimension. In this work, a robust model is proposed to reconstruct high resolution infrared image via a single low resolution sampling, where the image features are discussed and classified as reflective, cooled emissive and uncooled emissive based on infrared irradiation source. A spline based reproducing kernel hilbert space and approximative heaviside function are deployed to model smooth part and edge component of image respectively. By adjusting the parameters of heaviside function, the proposed model can enhance distinct part of images. The experimental results show that the model is applicable on both reflective and emissive low resolution infrared images to improve thermal contrast. The overall outcome produces a high resolution IR image, which makes IR camera better measurement accuracy and observes more details at long distance.

  20. Space applications of superconductivity - Microwave and infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth of a seven part series on the potential applications of superconductivity in space. The potential of superconducting microwave and infrared detectors for space applications is reviewed. The devices considered include bolometers, super-Schottky diodes and Josephson junctions operating as oscillators, mixers, and parametric amplifiers. In each case the description includes the physical mechanism, theoretical limits and the current state of the art for the superconducting device as well as its nonsuperconducting competitors.

  1. Linking space observations to volcano observatories in Latin America: Results from the CEOS DRM Volcano Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Pritchard, M. E.; Biggs, J.; Arnold, D. W. D.; Poland, M. P.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Wauthier, C.; Wnuk, K.; Parker, A. L.; Amelug, F.; Sansosti, E.; Mothes, P. A.; Macedo, O.; Lara, L.; Zoffoli, S.; Aguilar, V.

    2015-12-01

    Within Latin American, about 315 volcanoes that have been active in the Holocene, but according to the United Nations Global Assessment of Risk 2015 report (GAR15) 202 of these volcanoes have no seismic, deformation or gas monitoring. Following the 2012 Santorini Report on satellite Earth Observation and Geohazards, the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a 3-year pilot project to demonstrate how satellite observations can be used to monitor large numbers of volcanoes cost-effectively, particularly in areas with scarce instrumentation and/or difficult access. The pilot aims to improve disaster risk management (DRM) by working directly with the volcano observatories that are governmentally responsible for volcano monitoring, and the project is possible thanks to data provided at no cost by international space agencies (ESA, CSA, ASI, DLR, JAXA, NASA, CNES). Here we highlight several examples of how satellite observations have been used by volcano observatories during the last 18 months to monitor volcanoes and respond to crises -- for example the 2013-2014 unrest episode at Cerro Negro/Chiles (Ecuador-Colombia border); the 2015 eruptions of Villarrica and Calbuco volcanoes, Chile; the 2013-present unrest and eruptions at Sabancaya and Ubinas volcanoes, Peru; the 2015 unrest at Guallatiri volcano, Chile; and the 2012-present rapid uplift at Cordon Caulle, Chile. Our primary tool is measurements of ground deformation made by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) but thermal and outgassing data have been used in a few cases. InSAR data have helped to determine the alert level at these volcanoes, served as an independent check on ground sensors, guided the deployment of ground instruments, and aided situational awareness. We will describe several lessons learned about the type of data products and information that are most needed by the volcano observatories in different countries.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

  3. Monitoring the Near-infrared Volcanic Flux from Io's Jupiter-facing Hemisphere from Fan Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, Michael F.; Nelson, Matthew J.; Schmidt, Carl

    2016-10-01

    Fan Mountain Observatory, near Charlottesville, Virginia, is a dark-sky site that supports a number of telescopes including a 31-inch reflecting telescope equipped with a 1024x1024 HgCdTe 1-2.5 um (YJHK) imager. Reflected sunlight ordinarily overwhelms Io's comparatively weak K-band (2.0-2.4 um) volcanic emission in unresolved observations, however when Io is eclipsed in Jupiter's shadow even a small infrared-equipped telescope can detect Io's volcanic emission. The Fan Mountain Infrared Camera observed Io in eclipse at regular intervals, typically weekly, during the few months before and after Jupiter's March 2016 opposition. When in eclipse Io's Jupiter-facing hemisphere is oriented toward Earth with sub-Earth longitudes at the time of observation ranging from 345 - 360 degrees (pre-opposition) to 0 - 15 degrees (post-opposition). A K-band filter (2.04-2.42 um) provided a bulk measurement of Io's volcanic flux weighted largely toward the 2.4 um end of this filter given the typical 500K color temperature of the volcanic emission. Most epochs also included observation in a narrowband filter centered at 2.12 um that, when combined with the broadband "long" wavelength measurement, provided a proxy for color temperature. The K-band flux of Io varied by more than 2 magnitudes during the 7 month observation interval. The [2.12 um - K-band] color of the emission strongly correlated with the K-band flux in the expected sense that the color temperature of the emission increased when Io's broadband volcanic flux was the greatest. One epoch of TripleSpec near-IR Io eclipse spectroscopy (0.90 - 2.45 um; R~3000) from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-meter telescope provided ground truth for transforming the filter photometry into quantitative temperatures.

  4. Multi-wavelength Solar Flare Observations with Ground- and Space-based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares affect a wide range of atmospheric heights from the corona to the photosphere. Solar instruments are generally designed for high-resolution observations in limited spectral windows and therefore only capture part of the flare. To obtain a more complete flare picture from coronal reconnection to the atmospheric response of the chromosphere and photosphere, it is necessary to combine data from multiple instruments. I will review multi-wavelength flare observations with ground- and space-based observatories. By taking the X1 flare on March 29, 2014 as an example, which was observed with an unprecedented number of telescopes, I will demonstrate how to investigate the origin of the flare by looking at a filament eruption, the chromospheric evaporation by means of spectroscopy, the flare heating by analyzing continuum emission, and the changes of chromospheric magnetic fields using polarimetric data.

  5. The Wonderful World of Water: New Insights into Star Formation from the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Ruud

    2011-10-01

    Water is one of the most versatile tools in astrochemical studies of low-mass star formation. Its high abundance of ~10-4 in shocks and in hot gas (T>100 K) make water an excellent probe of the energetic feedback of a young star onto its environment. In addition, spectrally resolved observations provide important information on the kinematics and dynamics of protostars. In this talk we present highlights from water spectra observed with the Herschel Space Observatory toward a sample of 29 Class 0 and I protostars. The line profiles are very complex, showing broad emission from shocks, narrow absorption from the cold outer envelopes, and occasionally high-velocity "bullets." We interpret the spectra in the context of a new suite of evolutionary models, following changes in the chemical composition from pre-stellar cores to circumstellar disks.

  6. Overview and initial results of the very long baseline interferometry space observatory programme

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi; Hirosawa; Kobayashi; Murata; Edwards; Fomalont; Fujisawa; Ichikawa; Kii; Lovell; Moellenbrock; Okayasu; Inoue; Kawaguchi; Kameno; Shibata; Asaki; Bushimata; Enome; Horiuchi; Miyaji; Umemoto; Migenes; Wajima; Nakajima; et

    1998-09-18

    High angular resolution images of extragalactic radio sources are being made with the Highly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy (HALCA) satellite and ground-based radio telescopes as part of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Programme (VSOP). VSOP observations at 1.6 and 5 gigahertz of the milli-arc-second-scale structure of radio quasars enable the quasar core size and the corresponding brightness temperature to be determined, and they enable the motions of jet components that are close to the core to be studied. Here, VSOP images of the gamma-ray source 1156+295, the quasar 1548+056, the ultraluminous quasar 0014+813, and the superluminal quasar 0212+735 are presented and discussed.

  7. Development of Radio Astronomy at Centre for Basic Space Science Observatory, Nsukka Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyu, Nasiru; Okere, Bonaventure I.; Lanre, Daniyan O.; Ezechi, Nwachukwu E.

    2015-08-01

    Radio telescopes for research, teaching and learning at Centre for Basic Space Science (CBSS) observatory are currently in place of development. A small parabolic radio telescope with diameter of 3.0 m working at 1420 MHz is already available for general purpose of radio astronomical observations. In addition, a Radio Jove telescope with dual dipole antenna working at 20 MHz and Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitor working at 24 KHz are also available. It is suitable to monitor daily solar burst, solar flares as well as Jupiter decametric emission. More over, CBSS radio interferometers are now under construction. It consists of non-tracking Radio Jove array and SID monitor as well as two radio telescope tracking interferometers. The latter is planned to utilize up to 4 antennas. Multi frequency receivers are made available at 24 KHz, 20 and 1420 MHz and will be used for VLBI in the near future.

  8. Community Plan for Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ade, Peter; Akeson, Rachel; Ali, Shafinaz; Amato, Michael; Arendt, Richard; Baker, Charles; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bock, James; Borne, Kirk

    2004-01-01

    This paper represents the consensus view of the 124 participants in the Second Workshop on New Concepts for Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Space Astronomy.We recommend that NASA pursue the vision for far-IR astronomy outlined in the NAS Decadal Survey, which said: A rational coordinated program for space optical and infrared astronomy would build on the experience gained with NGST1 to construct [a JWST-scale filled-aperture far-IR telescope SAFIR, and then ultimately, in the decade 2010 to 2020, build on the SAFIR, TPF, and SIM experience to assemble a space-based, far-infrared interferometer. SAFIR will study star formation in the young universe, the buildup of elements heavier than hydrogen over cosmic history, the process of galaxy formation, and the early phases of star formation, which occur behind a veil of dust that precludes detection at mid IR and shorter wavelengths. The far-infrared interferometer will resolve distant galaxies to study protogalaxy interactions and mergers and the processes that led to enhanced star formation activity and the formation of Active Galactic Nuclei, and will resolve protostars and debris disks in our Galaxy to study how stars and planetary systems form.

  9. Heliophysics/Geospace System Observatory: System level science by large-scale space-ground coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Moore, T. E.; Samara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent multi-satellite and ground-based network measurements have revealed importance of cross-scale and cross-regional coupling processes for understanding key issues in geospace such as magnetic reconnection, substorms and particle acceleration. In particular, localized and fast plasma transport in a global scale has been recognized to play a fundamental role in regulating evolution of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling. Those results call for coordinated measurements multi-missions and facilities in a global scale for understanding global coupling processes in a system level. In fact, the National Research Council recommends to use NASA's existing heliophysics flight missions and NSF's ground-based facilities by forming a network of observing platforms that operate simultaneously to investigate the solar system. This array can be thought of as a single observatory, the Heliophysics/Geospace System Observatory (H/GSO). Motivated by the successful launch of MMS and the healthy status of THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and other missions, we plan a strategic use of existing and upcoming assets in space and ground in the next two years. In the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 northern winter seasons, MMS will be in the dayside over northern Europe, and THEMIS will be in the nightside over North America. In the 2016 and 2017 southern winter seasons, THEMIS will be in the dayside over the South Pole, and MMS will be in the nightside in the Australian sector. These are favorable configurations for simultaneous day-night coupling measurements of magnetic reconnection and related plasma transport both in space and on the ground, and also provide excellent opportunities for cross-scale coupling, global effects of dayside transients, tail-inner magnetosphere coupling, and other global processes. This presentation will give the current status and plan of the H/GSO and these science targets.

  10. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA. PMID:27341221

  11. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  12. Effect of space exposure on pyroelectric infrared detectors (A0135)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Clark, I. O.; Crouch, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of long-duration space exposure and launch environment on the performance of pyroelectric detectors which is important for the prediction of performance degradation, setting exposure limits, or determining shielding requirements was investigated. Air pollution monitoring and thermal mapping of the Earth, which includes the remote sensing of aerosols and limb scanning infrared radiometer projects, requires photodetection in the 6- to 20 micro m region of the spectrum. Pyroelectric detectors can detect radiation in the 1- to 100 micro m region while operating at room temperature. This makes tahe pyroelectric detector a prime candidate to fill the thermal infrared detector requirements.

  13. The next-generation infrared space telescope SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro

    2012-09-01

    We present the overview and the current status of SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics), which is a mission optimized for mid- and far-infrared astronomy with a cryogenically cooled 3.2 m telescope. SPICA has high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity in the mid- and far-infrared, which will enable us to address a number of key problems in present-day astronomy, ranging from the star-formation history of the universe to the formation of planets. To reduce the mass of the whole mission, SPICA will be launched at ambient temperature and cooled down on orbit by mechanical coolers on board with an efficient radiative cooling system, a combination of which allows us to have a 3-m class cooled (6 K) telescope in space with moderate total weight (3.7t). SPICA is proposed as a Japanese-led mission together with extensive international collaboration. ESA's contribution to SPICA has been studied under the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision. The consortium led by SRON is in charge of a key focal plane instrument SAFARI (SPICA Far-Infrared Instrument). Korea and Taiwan are also important partners for SPICA. US participation to SPICA is under discussion. The SPICA project is now in the "risk mitigation phase". The target launch year of SPICA is 2022.

  14. U.S. Participation in the Extreme Universe Space Observatory on the Japanese Experiment Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiencke, Lawrence

    This is the lead Institution proposal submitted by the University of Chicago (Angela Olinto, PI) for the U.S. Participation in the Extreme Universe Space Observatory on the Japanese Experiment Module. We propose to discover the origin of extreme energy cosmic rays, those with energies in excess of 60 EeV, produced by the most powerful cosmic accelerators in the universe. We will use the Extreme-Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) instrument, which is to be attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). JEM-EUSO is being developed by an international collaboration for launch on the Japanese H2 Transfer Vehicle in 2017. This proposal is for the US contribution to the mission which consists of monitoring and calibration with a Global Light System (GLS) of lasers and xenon light sources, data acquisition and analysis software, data archiving, and science results for the first year of the mission. We also propose that NASA make a contribution to the upmass needed to launch JEM-EUSO and attachment point resources. The GLS for JEM-EUSO will be located at 12 sites around the world, supplemented with an aircraft system. The calibrated UV lasers and Xenon flash lamps will generate calibrated optical signatures in the atmosphere within the field of view of JEM-EUSO with similar characteristics to the optical signals of cosmic ray extensive air showers. Throughout its pioneering mission, JEM-EUSO will reconstruct the pointing directions of the lasers and the energy of the lasers and flash lamps to monitor the detector s triggers, and accuracy of energy and direction reconstruction. These are the critical parameters for identifying the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays and for evaluating the scientific performance of this pioneering instrument. Starting in 2014, a prototype of the JEM-EUSO instrument will be flown on a balloon to test its design. We propose to build prototypes of the GLS and use them to test and calibrate the

  15. Arm locking for space-based laser interferometry gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Laser frequency stabilization is a critical part of the interferometry measurement system of space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Arm locking as a proposed frequency stabilization technique transfers the stability of the long arm lengths to the laser frequency. The arm locking sensor synthesizes an adequately filtered linear combination of the interspacecraft phase measurements to estimate the laser frequency noise, which can be used to control the laser frequency. At the University of Florida we developed the hardware-based University of Florida LISA Interferometer Simulator to study and verify laser frequency noise reduction and suppression techniques under realistic LISA-like conditions. These conditions include the variable Doppler shifts among the spacecraft, LISA-like signal travel times, optical transponders, realistic laser frequency, and timing noise. We review the different types of arm locking sensors and discuss their expected performance in LISA. The presented results are supported by results obtained during experimental studies of arm locking under relevant LISA-like conditions. We measured the noise suppression as well as initial transients and frequency pulling in the presence of Doppler frequency errors. This work has demonstrated the validity and feasibility of arm locking in LISA.

  16. A Space Weather mission concept: Observatories of the Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Janitzek, Nils; Lee, Arrow; Löschl, Philipp; Seifert, Bernhard; Hoilijoki, Sanni; Kraaikamp, Emil; Isha Mrigakshi, Alankrita; Philippe, Thomas; Spina, Sheila; Bröse, Malte; Massahi, Sonny; O'Halloran, Liam; Pereira Blanco, Victor; Stausland, Christoffer; Escoubet, Philippe; Kargl, Günter

    2015-02-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are major sources of magnetic storms on Earth and are therefore considered to be the most dangerous space weather events. The Observatories of Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR) mission is designed to identify the 3D structure of coronal loops and to study the trigger mechanisms of CMEs in solar Active Regions (ARs) as well as their evolution and propagation processes in the inner heliosphere. It also aims to provide monitoring and forecasting of geo-effective CMEs and CIRs. OSCAR would contribute to significant advancements in the field of solar physics, improvements of the current CME prediction models, and provide data for reliable space weather forecasting. These objectives are achieved by utilising two spacecraft with identical instrumentation, located at a heliocentric orbital distance of 1 AU from the Sun. The spacecraft will be separated by an angle of 68° to provide optimum stereoscopic view of the solar corona. We study the feasibility of such a mission and propose a preliminary design for OSCAR.

  17. Tectonic motion vizualisation through a Virtual Observatory, from space geodesy techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleflie, Florent; Soudarin, Laurent; Coulot, David; Barache, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the astronomical so-called Virtual Observatory (VO), and gives some examples of Webservices hosted by GRGS Analysis Center webpages, that can be used for Earth sciences applications, and for stations operations. GRGS, Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale, France, routinely delivers geodetic products to most of the space geodetic services of the International Association of Geodesy. Some of these products are now natively archived following the data format recommended by IVOA, the VO-Table format, an improved version of the XML format. In this paper, we pay a particular attention on the capabilities suitable to extract and use time series of (i) Space Station Coordinates deduced from SLR, DORIS and GPS data, (ii) EOP deduced from SLR and VLBI data. We show how to use all these on-line tools through the web to: select charts to plot, display and edit the data (scale, appearance) ; download data, plots and graph statistics in several formats. The examples will be based on some stations of interest with coordinates (latitudes, longitudes, altitudes) affected by several features such as earthquakes or technological evolutions.

  18. Constructing infrared finite propagators in inflating space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaraman, Arvind; Kumar, Jason; Leblond, Louis

    2010-07-15

    The usual (Bunch-Davies) Feynman propagator of a massless field is not well defined in an expanding universe due to the presence of infrared divergences. We propose a new propagator which yields IR finite answers to any correlation function. The key point is that in a de Sitter space-time there is an ambiguity in the zero mode of the propagator. This ambiguity can be used to cancel the apparent divergences which arise in some loop calculations in eternally (or semieternally) inflating space-time. We refer to this process as zero-mode modification. The residual ambiguity is fixed by observational measurement.

  19. A Dedicated Space Observatory For Time-domain Solar System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Ádámkovics, M.; Benecchi, S.; Bjoraker, G.; Clarke, J. T.; de Pater, I.; Hendrix, A. R.; Marchis, F.; McGrath, M.; Noll, K.; Rages, K. A.; Retherford, K.; Smith, E. H.; Strange, N. J.

    2009-09-01

    Time-variable phenomena with scales ranging from minutes to decades have led to a large fraction of recent advances in many aspects of solar system science. We present the scientific motivation for a dedicated space observatory for solar system science. This facility will ideally conduct repeated imaging and spectroscopic observations over a period of 10 years or more. It will execute a selection of long-term projects with interleaved scheduling, resulting in the acquisition of data sets with consistent calibration, long baselines, and optimized sampling intervals. A sparse aperture telescope would be an ideal configuration for the mission, trading decreased sensitivity for reduced payload mass, while preserving spatial resolution. Ultraviolet capability is essential, especially once the Hubble Space Telescope retires. Specific investigations will include volcanism and cryovolcanism (on targets including Io, Titan, Venus, Mars, and Enceladus); zonal flow, vortices, and storm evolution on the giant planets; seasonal cycles in planetary atmospheres; mutual events and orbit determination of multiple small solar system bodies; auroral activity and solar wind interactions; and cometary evolution. The mission will produce a wealth of data products--such as multi-year time-lapse movies of planetary atmospheres--with significant education and public outreach potential. Existing and planned ground- and space-based facilities are not suitable for these time-domain optimized planetary dynamics studies for numerous reasons, including: oversubscription by astrophysical users, field-of-regard limitations, sensitive detector saturation limits that preclude bright planetary targets, and limited mission duration. The abstract author list is a preliminary group of scientists who have shown interest in prior presentations on this topic; interested parties may contact the lead author by 1 September to sign the associated Planetary Science Decadal Survey white paper or by 1 October to

  20. Wireless infrared communications for space and terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Voice and data communications via wireless (and fiberless) optical means has been commonplace for many years. However, continuous advances in optoelectronics and microelectronics have resulted in significant advances in wireless optical communications over the last decade. Wilton has specialized in diffuse infrared voice and data communications since 1979. In 1986, NASA Johnson Space Center invited Wilton to apply its wireless telecommunications and factory floor technology to astronaut voice communications aboard the shuttle. In September, 1988 a special infrared voice communications system flew aboard a 'Discovery' Shuttle mission as a flight experiment. Since then the technology has been further developed, resulting in a general purpose of 2Mbs wireless voice/data LAN which has been tested for a variety of applications including use aboard Spacelab. Funds for Wilton's wireless IR development were provided in part by NASA's Technology Utilization Office and by the NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program. As a consequence, Wilton's commercial product capability has been significantly enhanced to include diffuse infrared wireless LAN's as well as wireless infrared telecommunication systems for voice and data.

  1. Near-infrared Detection of WD 0806-661 B with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Morley, C. V.; Burgasser, A. J.; Esplin, T. L.; Bochanski, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    WD 0806-661 B is one of the coldest known brown dwarfs (T eff = 300-345 K) based on previous mid-infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope. In addition, it is a benchmark for testing theoretical models of brown dwarfs because its age and distance are well constrained via its primary star (2 ± 0.5 Gyr, 19.2 ± 0.6 pc). We present the first near-infrared detection of this object, which has been achieved through F110W imaging (~Y + J) with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure a Vega magnitude of m 110 = 25.70 ± 0.08, which implies J ~ 25.0. When combined with the Spitzer photometry, our estimate of J helps to better define the empirical sequence of the coldest brown dwarfs in M 4.5 versus J - [4.5]. The positions of WD 0806-661 B and other Y dwarfs in that diagram are best matched by the cloudy models of Burrows et al. and the cloudless models of Saumon et al., both of which employ chemical equilibrium. The calculations by Morley et al. for 50% cloud coverage differ only modestly from the data. Spectroscopy would enable a more stringent test of the models, but based on our F110W measurement, such observations are currently possible only with Hubble, and would require at least ~10 orbits to reach a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope through program 12815, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and observations with the ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory under programs ID 089.C-0428 and ID 089.C-0597.

  2. Primary mirror and mount technology for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Chang, L. S.; Mansfield, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.

    1989-01-01

    Candidate technologies for a lightweight primary mirror for the SOFIA telescope are evaluated for both mirror blank fabrication and polishing. Two leading candidates for the type mirror blank are considered: the frit-bonded, structured form, and the thin meniscus form. The feasible mirror is required to be very lightweight with an areal density of approximately 100 kg/sq m, have an f/ratio near 1.0, and have surface quality that permits imaging in the visible as well as the infrared. Also considered are the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility of designing a suitable mounting system for the primary mirror. The requirements for the mount design are given both in terms of the environmental conditions and the expected optical performance. PATRAN and NASTRAN programs are used to model mirror and mounting. The sandwich-type mirror made of ultra low expansion silica with square cells in the core, is modeled using equivalent solid elements for the core. The design study produces primary mirror surface deflections in 1g as a function of mirror elevation angles. The surface is analyzed using an optical analysis program, FRINGE, to give a prediction of the mirror optical performance. Results from this analysis are included.

  3. ESA’s L3 mission: A space-based gravitational-wave observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    2016-04-01

    ESA selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for one of its future L-class missions. L3 will measure gravitational waves in the 10µHz to 100mHz window; probably the richest of all gravitational wave windows. Expected sources in this frequency band range from massive black hole mergers to extreme mass ratio inspirals to compact galactic binary systems.The L3 mission is expected to be based on the eLISA/LISA design which was submitted by the eLISA consortium as a notional mission concept. NASA started discussions with ESA how to join L3 and participates in ESA’s Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team. NASA is also in the process of setting up its own L3-Study team to look at potential US contributions to L3. This group will also act as the US partner for the eLISA consortium. In summary, the space component of the GW community has gained significant momentum over the last 12 months and a successful pathfinder mission and potential GW discoveries by Advanced LIGO and/or pulsar timing arrays should further strengthen the case for LISA.

  4. Measuring CO2 from Space: The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was the first NASA satellite designed to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from space with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to detect CO2 surface fluxes. OCO was designed to collect 0.5 to 1 million soundings each day. Typical measurements over land were expected to have precisions of 0.3% within surface footprints smaller less than 3 square km. This project suffered a major setback in February 2009 when the OCO launch vehicle failed to achieve orbit and the satellite was lost. The U.S. Congress has since authorized a restart of the OCO project, and the President's 2010 budget proposal includes funding to develop and fly a replacement for OCO that could be ready for launch no later than February 2013. This mission has been designated OCO-2. While this mission will be a near "carbon copy" of OCO, some changes were needed to replace components that were no longer available. Here, we describe the capabilities, of the OCO-2 mission, highlighting its differences from OCO.

  5. Hot-electron bolometer terahertz mixers for the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, Sergey; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Berg, Therese; Khosropanah, Pourya; Kollberg, Erik

    2008-03-01

    We report on low noise terahertz mixers (1.4-1.9THz) developed for the heterodyne spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The mixers employ double slot antenna integrated superconducting hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) made of thin NbN films. The mixer performance was characterized in terms of detection sensitivity across the entire rf band by using a Fourier transform spectrometer (from 0.5to2.5THz, with 30GHz resolution) and also by measuring the mixer noise temperature at a limited number of discrete frequencies. The lowest mixer noise temperature recorded was 750K [double sideband (DSB)] at 1.6THz and 950K DSB at 1.9THz local oscillator (LO) frequencies. Averaged across the intermediate frequency band of 2.4-4.8GHz, the mixer noise temperature was 1100K DSB at 1.6THz and 1450K DSB at 1.9THz LO frequencies. The HEB heterodyne receiver stability has been analyzed and compared to the HEB stability in the direct detection mode. The optimal local oscillator power was determined and found to be in a 200-500nW range.

  6. A comparison of vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center and Mees Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Orrall, F. Q.; Mickey, D. L.; West, E. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper compares completely independent vector magnetic field measurements from two very different polarimetric instruments. The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) imaging vector magnetograph is based on a birefringent filter, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters integrated over the filter bandpass (1/8 A) which is tunable across the Fe I 5250 line in 10 mA steps. The Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter of the Mees Solar Observatory (MSO) is based on a spectrometer, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters of the Fe I 6302.5 line simultaneously and then spatially scanning to build up a vector magnetogram. Active region magnetic field data were obtained with both the MSFC and MSO systems on five days during June 1985. After interpolating the MSFC vector fields onto the more coarse spatial grid of MSO, a point-by-point comparison of the two vector fields is made for data obtained on two of these days (June 8 and 9). From this comparison it is concluded that the spatially-averaged line-of-sight components agree quite well, and that although the MSO spatial grid is coarser, the quality of the MSO image is better than that of the MSFC data because of better seeing conditions.

  7. Hot-electron bolometer terahertz mixers for the Herschel Space Observatory.

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, Sergey; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Berg, Therese; Khosropanah, Pourya; Kollberg, Erik

    2008-03-01

    We report on low noise terahertz mixers (1.4-1.9 THz) developed for the heterodyne spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The mixers employ double slot antenna integrated superconducting hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) made of thin NbN films. The mixer performance was characterized in terms of detection sensitivity across the entire rf band by using a Fourier transform spectrometer (from 0.5 to 2.5 THz, with 30 GHz resolution) and also by measuring the mixer noise temperature at a limited number of discrete frequencies. The lowest mixer noise temperature recorded was 750 K [double sideband (DSB)] at 1.6 THz and 950 K DSB at 1.9 THz local oscillator (LO) frequencies. Averaged across the intermediate frequency band of 2.4-4.8 GHz, the mixer noise temperature was 1100 K DSB at 1.6 THz and 1450 K DSB at 1.9 THz LO frequencies. The HEB heterodyne receiver stability has been analyzed and compared to the HEB stability in the direct detection mode. The optimal local oscillator power was determined and found to be in a 200-500 nW range.

  8. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) high-resolution near-infrared multi-object fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, Fred; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Majewski, Steven; Schiavon, Ricardo; Eisenstein, Daniel; Gunn, Jim; Blank, Basil; Henderson, Chuck; Smee, Stephen; Barkhouser, Robert; Harding, Al; Fitzgerald, Greg; Stolberg, Todd; Arns, Jim; Nelson, Matt; Brunner, Sophia; Burton, Adam; Walker, Eric; Lam, Charles; Maseman, Paul; Barr, Jim; Leger, French; Carey, Larry; MacDonald, Nick; Horne, Todd; Young, Erick; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia; O'Brien, Tom; Hope, Steve; Krakula, John; Crane, Jeff; Zhao, Bo; Carr, Mike; Harrison, Craig; Stoll, Robert; Vernieri, Mary A.; Holtzman, Jon; Shetrone, Matt; Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Johnson, Jennifer; Frinchaboy, Peter; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Gillespie, Bruce; Weinberg, David

    2010-07-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) will use a dedicated 300-fiber, narrow-band (1.5-1.7 micron), high resolution (R~30,000), near-infrared spectrograph to survey approximately 100,000 giant stars across the Milky Way. This survey, conducted as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III), will revolutionize our understanding of kinematical and chemical enrichment histories of all Galactic stellar populations. The instrument, currently in fabrication, will be housed in a separate building adjacent to the 2.5 m SDSS telescope and fed light via approximately 45-meter fiber runs from the telescope. The instrument design includes numerous technological challenges and innovations including a gang connector that allows simultaneous connection of all fibers with a single plug to a telescope cartridge that positions the fibers on the sky, numerous places in the fiber train in which focal ratio degradation must be minimized, a large (290 mm x 475 mm elliptically-shaped recorded area) mosaic-VPH, an f/1.4 sixelement refractive camera featuring silicon and fused silica elements with diameters as large as 393 mm, three near-within a custom, LN2-cooled, stainless steel vacuum cryostat with dimensions 1.4 m x 2.3 m x 1.3 m.

  9. System Engineering the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tristram T.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) was designed to accomplish three scientific objectives: (1) learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks and how they acquire their inhomogeneous chemical composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. SPIRIT will accomplish these objectives through infrared observations with a two aperture interferometric instrument. This paper gives an overview of SPIRIT design and operation, and how the three design cycle concept study was completed. The error budget for several key performance values allocates tolerances to all contributing factors, and a performance model of the spacecraft plus instrument system demonstrates meeting those allocations with margin.

  10. The large deployable reflector: A NASA submillimeter-infrared orbiting observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Paul N.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) concept is outlined. The LDR telescope is based on a 20-m diameter reflector. The primary mirror is a filled aperture made up of 84 hexagonal panels, each 2 m edge-to-edge. The panels are based on lightweight structural composite materials. The optical configuration is a four mirror two stage system. The primary mirror is passive. The active optical elements for figure control are at the quaternary mirror. The primary mirror panels are supported by a deployable PAC truss backup structure at the vertices of each hexagon. The four focal plane instruments covering the range of 30 to 1000 microns are located near the vertex of the primary mirror. Some instruments will be cooled with stored cryogens to liquid helium temperatures, others to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The spacecraft functions will be located in a resource module behind the primary mirror. The LDR will be transferred to orbit by the space transportation system and assembled and tested at the space station. It will then be boosted to an orbit of greater than or = 700 km as a free flyer.

  11. Future space missions and ground observatory for measurements of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Gibson, Sarah; Bemporad, Alessandro; Zhukov, Andrei; Damé, Luc; Susino, Roberto; Larruquert, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives for probing coronal magnetism from space missions (i.e., SCORE and ASPIICS) and ground-based observatory (ESCAPE). Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter. The CorMag filter is part of the ESCAPE experiment to be based at the French-Italian Concordia base in Antarctica. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include new generation, high-efficiency UV polarizer with the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-α, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. The second lauch is scheduled in 2016. Proba-3 is the other future solar mission that would provide the opportunity of diagnosing the coronal magnetic field. Proba-3 is the first precision formation-flying mission to launched in 2019). A pair of satellites will fly together maintaining a fixed configuration as a 'large rigid

  12. Properties of Cathodoluminescence for Cryogenic Applications of SiO2-based Space Observatory Optics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Amberly; Dennison, J.R.; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers Charles W.; Meloy, Robert; Heaney, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Disordered thin film SiO2SiOx coatings undergoing electron-beam bombardment exhibit cathodoluminescence, which can produce deleterious stray background light in cryogenic space-based astronomical observatories exposed to high-energy electron fluxes from space plasmas. As future observatory missions push the envelope into more extreme environments and more complex and sensitive detection, a fundamental understanding of the dependencies of this cathodoluminescence becomes critical to meet performance objectives of these advanced space-based observatories. Measurements of absolute radiance and emission spectra as functions of incident electron energy, flux, and power typical of space environments are presented for thin (60-200 nm) SiO2SiOx optical coatings on reflective metal substrates over a range of sample temperatures (40-400 K) and emission wavelengths (260-5000 nm). Luminescent intensity and peak wavelengths of four distinct bands were observed in UVVISNIR emission spectra, ranging from 300 nm to 1000 nm. A simple model is proposed that describes the dependence of cathodoluminescence on irradiation time, incident flux and energy, sample thickness, and temperature.

  13. Properties of cathodoluminescence for cryogenic applications of SiO2-based space observatory optics and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans Jensen, Amberly; Dennison, J. R.; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert; Heaney, James B.

    2013-09-01

    Disordered thin film SiO2/SiOx coatings undergoing electron-beam bombardment exhibit cathodoluminescence, which can produce deleterious stray background light in cryogenic space-based astronomical observatories exposed to high energy electron fluxes from space plasmas. As future observatory missions push the envelope into more extreme environments and more complex and sensitive detection, a fundamental understanding of the dependencies of this cathodoluminescence becomes critical to meet performance objectives of these advanced space-based observatories. Measurements of absolute radiance and emission spectra as functions of incident electron energy, flux, and power typical of space environments are presented for thin (~60-200 nm) SiO2/SiOx optical coatings on reflective metal substrates over a range of sample temperatures (~40-400 K) and emission wavelengths (~260-5000 nm). Luminescent intensity and peak wavelengths of four distinct bands were observed in UV/VIS/NIR emission spectra, ranging from 300 nm to 1000 nm. A simple model is proposed that describes the dependence of cathodoluminescence on irradiation time, incident flux and energy, sample thickness, and temperature.

  14. Luciola Hypertelescope Space Observatory. Versatile, Upgradable High-Resolution Imaging,from Stars to Deep-Field Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeyrie, Antoine; Le Coroller, Herve; Dejonghe, Julien; Lardiere, Olivier; Aime, Claude; Dohlen, Kjetil; Mourard, Denis; Lyon, Richard; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2008-01-01

    Luciola is a large (one kilometer) "multi-aperture densified-pupil imaging interferometer", or "hypertelescope" employing many small apertures, rather than a few large ones, for obtaining direct snapshot images with a high information content. A diluted collector mirror, deployed in space as a flotilla of small mirrors, focuses a sky image which is exploited by several beam-combiner spaceships. Each contains a pupil densifier micro-lens array to avoid the diffractive spread and image attenuation caused by the small sub-apertures. The elucidation of hypertelescope imaging properties during the last decade has shown that many small apertures tend to be far more efficient, regarding the science yield, than a few large ones providing a comparable collecting area. For similar underlying physical reasons, radio-astronomy has also evolved in the direction of many-antenna systems such as the proposed Low Frequency Array having hundreds of thousands of individual receivers . With its high limiting magnitude, reaching the mv=30 limit of HST when 100 collectors of 25cm will match its collecting area, high-resolution direct imaging in multiple channels, broad spectral coverage from the 1200 Angstrom ultra-violet to the 20 micron infra-red, apodization, coronagraphic and spectroscopic capabilities, the proposed hypertelescope observatory addresses very broad and innovative science covering different areas of ESA s Cosmic Vision program. In the initial phase, a focal spacecraft covering the UV to near IR spectral range of EMCCD photon-counting cameras ( currently 200 to 1000nm), will image details on the surface of many stars, as well as their environment, including multiple stars and clusters. Spectra will be obtained for each resel. It will also image neutron star, black-hole and micro-quasar candidates, as well as active galactic nuclei, quasars, gravitational lenses, and other Cosmic Vision targets observable with the initial modest crowding limit. With subsequent upgrade

  15. An investigation of the optimization of parameters affecting the implementation of fourier transform spectroscopy at 20-500 micron from the C-141 airborne infrared observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. I.; Erickson, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    A program for 20-500 micron spectroscopy from the NASA flying C141 infrared observatory is being carried out with a Michelson interferometer. The parameters affecting the performance of the instrument are studied and an optimal configuration for high performance on the C-141 aircraft is recommended. As each parameter is discussed the relative merits of the two modes of mirror motion (rapid scan or step and integrate) are presented.

  16. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-Ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Miller, J. Scott; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz. Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ( soft , 100 500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth s magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (< 1 MeV) flux in Chandra s high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite at L1

  17. Space Object Characterization Studies and the Magdalena Ridge Observatory's 2.4-meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E.; Ryan, W.

    The Magdalena Ridge Observatory's (MRO) fast-tracking 2.4-meter telescope is located at 10,612 feet atop the Magdalena Mountains in Central New Mexico, and is presently transitioning to an operational status. The MRO 2.4-meter is one of the largest telescopes in the world that has as its primary mission the physical characterization of small bodies (both natural and artificial) in the Solar System. The 2.4-meter's control system is designed to provide convenient and accurate non-sidereal tracking, and the telescope is capable of rapid movement (slew rates are up to 15 degrees/sec) making it an ideal instrument for non-resolved imaging of low-Earth orbit (LEO) space objects. The 2.4-meter telescope can accommodate a wide variety of instrument systems, and support the fabrication, integration, and operation of new instrumentation as well as the development of new and innovative techniques in space object identification studies. Currently, we are investigating various methods to enhance and improve existing capabilities for unique discrimination of resident space objects. The temporal brightness variations (i.e., lightcurves) of unresolved targets such as artificial satellites can be used to develop a powerful tool for general characterization studies. Analysis of these temporal signatures permits the extraction of pertinent distinguishing features, and may also be an indicator for a change in general health status of a satellite. Payne (2005) and Gregory (2005) have demonstrated what can be obtained by adding multi-color information to traditional photometric intensity measurements for geosynchronous satellites. Our current focus is to introduce supplementary discriminators, including polarization data and simultaneously obtained spectral and temporal data. We will discuss new methods for incorporating such data, with a specific emphasis toward LEOs as our target objects. Our observing strategy will be to choose a statistically robust target set with know properties

  18. Infrared Fibers for Use in Space-Based Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared optical fibers are finding a number of applications including laser surgery, remote sensing, and nuclear radiation resistant links. Utilizing these fibers in space-based structures is another application, which can be exploited. Acoustic and thermal sensing are two areas in which these fibers could be utilized. In particular, fibers could be embedded in IM7/8552 toughened epoxy and incorporated into space structures both external and internal. ZBLAN optical fibers are a candidate, which have been studied extensively over the past 20 years for terrestrial applications. For the past seven years the effects of gravity on the crystallization behavior of ZBLAN optical fiber has been studied. It has been found that ZBLAN crystallization is suppressed in microgravity. This lack of crystallization leads to a fiber with better transmission characteristics than its terrestrial counterpart.

  19. Precision Attitude Determination for an Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed performance simulations for a precision attitude determination system using a focal plane star tracker on an infrared space telescope. The telescope is being designed for the Destiny mission to measure cosmologically distant supernovae as one of the candidate implementations for the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Repeat observations of the supernovae require attitude control at the level of 0.010 arcseconds (0.05 microradians) during integrations and at repeat intervals up to and over a year. While absolute accuracy is not required, the repoint precision is challenging. We have simulated the performance of a focal plane star tracker in a multidimensional parameter space, including pixel size, read noise, and readout rate. Systematic errors such as proper motion, velocity aberration, and parallax can be measured and compensated out. Our prediction is that a relative attitude determination accuracy of 0.001 to 0.002 arcseconds (0.005 to 0.010 microradians) will be achievable.

  20. Composite Image of the Cat's Eye From Chandra X-Ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Left image: The x-ray data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) has revealed a bright central star surrounded by a cloud of multimillion-degree gas in the planetary nebula known as the Cat's Eye. This CXO image, where the intensity of the x-ray emission is correlated to the brightness of the orange coloring, captures the expulsion of material from a star that is expected to collapse into a white dwarf in a few million years. The intensity of x-rays from the central star was unexpected, and it is the first time astronomers have seen such x-ray emission from the central star of a planetary nebula. Right image: An image of Cat's Eye taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By comparing the CXO data with that from the HST, researchers are able to see where the hotter, x-ray emitting gas appears in relation to the cooler material seen in optical wavelengths by the HST. The CXO team found that the chemical abundance in the region of hot gas (its x-ray intensity is shown in purple) was not like those in the wind from the central star and different from the outer cooler material (the red and green structures.) Although still incredibly energetic and hot enough to radiate x-rays, CXO shows the hot gas to be somewhat cooler than scientists would have expected for such a system. CXO image credit: (NASA/UIUC/Y. Chu et al.) HST image credit: (NASA/HST)

  1. Space Object Temperature Determination from Multi-Band Infrared Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, C.; Snell, H.; Griffin, J.; Kraemer, K.; Price, S.; Kendra, M.; Mizuno, D. %P. E37

    We describe a technique to determine the temperature of a Resident Space Object (RSO) from multiple infrared (IR) bands. The characteristic temperature of an object is the temperature of the Planck function that has the closest least squares fit to the observed irradiance in at least three infrared bands. The characteristic temperature and the effective solid angle are free parameters in a formulation that requires simultaneous minimization, across all bands, of chi-square expressions using modeled irradiances and the measured irradiances and their errors. Solutions are determined from a multi-dimensional Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm. The advantage of this approach is that it provides a single, best-fit solution to the RSO modeled as a gray body radiator. In contrast, a 2-band (color) temperature approach using three or more bands produces different solutions for different band combinations with no objective way of determining which solution is best. We apply this technique to IR measurements of RSOs obtained by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite. The AFRL MSX database of serendipitous RSO observations contains multi-band IR measurements for hundreds of objects, including payloads, rocket bodies, and debris. Using this technique, we have obtained object characteristic temperatures and Infrared Cross Sections (IRCS) under a large variety of phase angle and solar illumination conditions, including eclipse. We examine specific cases in detail. We also compare and contrast results for population groups based on orbit type (LEO - low earth orbit, MEO - medium earth orbit, and GEO - geostationary earth orbit) and other parameters of interest. In addition, we look at a number of cases where color and characteristic temperatures and solid angles have been determined for the same object measurements and show that the characteristic parameters are more consistent with the Planck function model when expressed as their equivalent isophotal emissions.

  2. OPTICAL POLARIMETRY OF THE BLAZAR CGRaBS J0211+1051 FROM MOUNT ABU INFRARED OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sunil; Baliyan, Kiran S.; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Joshi, Umesh C.

    2012-02-10

    We report the detection of high polarization in the first detailed optical linear polarization measurements on the BL Lac object CGRaBS J0211+1051, which flared in {gamma}-rays on 2011 January 23 as reported by Fermi. The observations were made during 2011 January 30-February 3 using a photo-polarimeter mounted at the 1.2 m telescope of Mount Abu Infrared Observatory. CGRaBS J0211+1051 was detected to have a {approx}21.05% {+-} 0.41% degree of polarization (DP) with a steady position angle (P.A.) at 43 Degree-Sign on 2011 January 30. During January 31 and February 1, while polarization shows some variation, the P.A. remained steady through the night. Several polarization flashes occurred during February 2 and 3 resulting in changes in the DP by more than 4% at short timescales ({approx}17-45 minutes). The intra-night variability shown by the source appears to be related to the turbulence in the relativistic jet. A mild wavelength dependence of polarization is not ruled out during the nights of February 2 and 3. The source exhibited significant inter-night variations in the DP (changing by about 2%-9%) and P.A. (changing by 2 Degree-Sign -22 Degree-Sign ) during the five nights of observations. A sudden change in the P.A. accompanied by a rise in the DP could be indicative of the fresh injection of plasma in the jet. The detection of a high and variable DP suggests that the source is a low-energy peaked blazar.

  3. Optical Polarimetry of the Blazar CGRaBS J0211+1051 from Mount Abu Infrared Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sunil; Baliyan, Kiran S.; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Joshi, Umesh C.

    2012-02-01

    We report the detection of high polarization in the first detailed optical linear polarization measurements on the BL Lac object CGRaBS J0211+1051, which flared in γ-rays on 2011 January 23 as reported by Fermi. The observations were made during 2011 January 30-February 3 using a photo-polarimeter mounted at the 1.2 m telescope of Mount Abu Infrared Observatory. CGRaBS J0211+1051 was detected to have a ~21.05% ± 0.41% degree of polarization (DP) with a steady position angle (P.A.) at 43° on 2011 January 30. During January 31 and February 1, while polarization shows some variation, the P.A. remained steady through the night. Several polarization flashes occurred during February 2 and 3 resulting in changes in the DP by more than 4% at short timescales (~17-45 minutes). The intra-night variability shown by the source appears to be related to the turbulence in the relativistic jet. A mild wavelength dependence of polarization is not ruled out during the nights of February 2 and 3. The source exhibited significant inter-night variations in the DP (changing by about 2%-9%) and P.A. (changing by 2°-22°) during the five nights of observations. A sudden change in the P.A. accompanied by a rise in the DP could be indicative of the fresh injection of plasma in the jet. The detection of a high and variable DP suggests that the source is a low-energy peaked blazar.

  4. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Miller, J. Scott; Minow, Joseph I.; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ("soft", 100-500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth's magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (less than 1 MeV) flux in Chandra s high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE

  5. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Miller, S.; Minow, J. I.; Wolk, S.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Spitzbart, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ("soft", 100-500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth's radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth's magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (< 1 MeV) flux in Chandra's high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite at L1

  6. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John; Webster, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory mission launched on February 11, 2015, and inserted onto a transfer trajectory toward a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. This paper presents an overview of the baseline transfer orbit and early mission maneuver operations leading up to the start of nominal science orbit operations. In particular, the analysis and performance of the spacecraft insertion, mid-course correction maneuvers, and the deep-space Lissajous orbit insertion maneuvers are discussed, com-paring the baseline orbit with actual mission results and highlighting mission and operations constraints..

  7. ESA presents INTEGRAL, its space observatory for Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    more strange than the energetic radiation coming from the centre of distant galaxies are flashes of extremely powerful radiation that suddenly appear somewhere on the gamma-sky and disappear again after a short time. These gamma-bursts seem to be the biggest observed explosions in the Universe. But nobody knows their source. Integral will help to solve this long-standing mystery. ESA, the pioneer in gamma-ray astronomy The satellite as it can now be seen at ESA's test centre is five meters high and weighs more than four tonnes. Two main instruments observe the gamma-rays. An imager will give the sharpest gamma-ray images. It is provided by a consortium led by an Italian scientist. Gamma-rays ignore lenses and mirror, so INTEGRAL makes its images with so-called coded-masks. A coded-mask telescope is basically a pinhole camera, but with a larger aperture, i.e. many pinholes. A spectrometer will gauge gamma-ray energies extremely precisely. It is developed by a team of scientists under joint French-German leadership and will be a 100 times more sensitive than the previous high spectral resolution space instrument. It is made of a high-purity Germanium detector that has to be cooled down to minus 188 degree Celsius. These two gamma-ray-instruments are supported by two monitor instruments that play a crucial role in the detection and identification of the gamma-ray sources. An X-ray monitor developed in Denmark will observe X-rays, still powerful but less energetic than gamma-rays. An optical telescope provided by Spain will observe the visible light emitted by the energetic objects. Switzerland will host the Integral Science Data Centre which will preprocess and distribute the scientific data. The mission is conceived as an observatory led by ESA with Russia contributing the launcher and NASA providing tracking support with its Deep Space Network. Alenia Aerospazio in Turin, Italy is ESA's prime contractor for building INTEGRAL. Launch by a Russian Proton rocket from

  8. Experimental and Metrological Basis for SI-Traceable Infrared Radiance Measurements From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P. J.; Dykema, J. A.; Anderson, J. G.; Leroy, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    In order to establish a climate benchmark record and to be useful in interdecadal climate forecast testing, satellite measurements of high spectral resolution infrared radiance must have uncertainty estimates that can be proven beyond a doubt. An uncertainty in radiance of about 1 part in 1000 is required for climate applications. This can be accomplished by appealing to the best measurement practices of the metrology community. The International System of Units (SI) are linked to fundamental physical properties of matter, and can be realized anywhere in the world without bias. By doing so, one can make an accurate observation to within a specified uncertainty. Achieving SI-traceable radiance measurements from space is a novel requirement, and requires specialized sensor design and a disciplined experimental approach. Infrared remote sensing satellite instruments typically employ blackbody calibration targets, which are tied to the SI through Planck's law and the definition of the Kelvin. The blackbody temperature and emissivity, however, must be determined accurately on- orbit, in order for the blackbody emission scale to be SI-traceable. We outline a methodology of instrument design, pre-flight calibration and on-orbit diagnostics for realizing SI- traceable infrared radiance measurements. This instrument is intended as a component of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Earth Observatory (CLARREO), a high priority recommendation of the National Research Council decadal survey. Calibration blackbodies for remote sensing differ from a perfect Planckian blackbody; thus the component uncertainties must be evaluated in order to confer traceability. We have performed traceability experiments in the laboratory to verify blackbody temperature, emissivity and the end-to-end radiance scale. We discuss the design of the Harvard standard blackbody and an intercomparison campaign that will be conducted with the GIFTS blackbody (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and

  9. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Infrared telescope tracking in the presence of target motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schneider, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The use of charge-coupled-devices, or CCD's, has been documented by a number of sources as an effective means of providing a measurement of spacecraft attitude with respect to the stars. A method exists of defocussing and interpolation of the resulting shape of a star image over a small subsection of a large CCD array. This yields an increase in the accuracy of the device by better than an order of magnitude over the case when the star image is focussed upon a single CCD pixel. This research examines the effect that image motion has upon the overall precision of this star sensor when applied to an orbiting infrared observatory. While CCD's collect energy within the visible spectrum of light, the targets of scientific interest may well have no appreciable visible emissions. Image motion has the effect of smearing the image of the star in the direction of motion during a particular sampling interval. The presence of image motion is incorporated into a Kalman filter for the system, and it is shown that the addition of a gyro command term is adequate to compensate for the effect of image motion in the measurement. The updated gyro model is included in this analysis, but has natural frequencies faster than the projected star tracker sample rate for dim stars. The system state equations are reduced by modelling gyro drift as a white noise process. There exists a tradeoff in selected star tracker sample time between the CCD, which has improved noise characteristics as sample time increases, and the gyro, which will potentially drift further between long attitude updates. A sample time which minimizes pointing estimation error exists for the random drift gyro model as well as for a random walk gyro model.

  10. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  11. Space Weathering Effects in the Thermal Infrared: Lessons from LRO Diviner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Song, E.; Arnold, J. A.; Lemelin, M.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Glotch, T. D.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the degree to which space weathering affects the thermal infrared Christiansen Feature measured by LRO Diviner, and presents techniques to normalize space weathering effects and enable examination of the underlying composition.

  12. ASTRO-1: a 1.8m unobscured space observatory for next generation UV/visible astrophysics and exoplanet exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Egerman, Robert; Morse, Jon A.; Wilkes, Belinda

    2016-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been a scientific marvel that has provided unimaginable imagery and scientific discovery. Its exquisite UV/Visible imaging performance is unmatched from the ground. In NASA's future planning, the earliest possible successor mission would be in the 3030s, well beyond the expected lifetime of Hubble. The ASTRO-1 space telescope is a 1.8m off-axis (unobscured) observatory that looks to fill this critical void with Hubble-like performance to continue the scientific quest while also providing the possibility for exoplanet research with a coronagraphic instrument and/or a free flying starshade. BoldlyGo Institute seeks to reach beyond NASA funding to leverage the high public interest in space research and exploration, and the search for life beyond Earth.

  13. Computation of the Fluid and Optical Fields About the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the Coupling of Fluids, Dynamics, and Control Laws on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The June 1992 to May 1993 grant NCC-2-677 provided for the continued demonstration of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). While earlier grant years allowed validation of CFD through comparison against experiments, this year a new design proposal was evaluated. The new configuration would place the cavity aft of the wing, as opposed to the earlier baseline which was located immediately aft of the cockpit. This aft cavity placement allows for simplified structural and aircraft modification requirements, thus lowering the program cost of this national astronomy resource. Three appendices concerning this subject are presented.

  14. Observations of Blazar S5 0716+714 With Ground Based Telescopes and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Jeffery; Lacy, M.; Morton, A.; Travagli, T.; Mulaveesala, M.; Santiago, J.; Rapp, S.; Stefaniak, L.

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to be launched in 2007 has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the Global Telescope Network (GTN). One of our targets, S5 0716+714, was observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS and IRAC instruments and also using ground based telescopes. Observations were made in seven infrared bands with Spitzer. Additional observations made from the ground by students, amateur astronomers, and college observatories in R,V, and I were nearly simultaneous with the Spitzer observations. This data were used to construct light curves over the course of the observation and the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of the target using all the sources. These data were compared to models of the dust emission from the torus, synchrotron emission from the radio core, and thermal emission from the accretion disk to determine the relative importance of the different emission mechanisms in this object as a function of wavelength. Results were compared to observations of 4C 29.45 made last year. This research was supported by the Spitzer Science Center, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and the California Department of Education's Specialized Secondary Program.

  15. Molecular Shocks Associated with Massive Young Stars: CO Line Images with a New Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Camera on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Dan M.

    1997-01-01

    Under the terms of our contract with NASA Ames Research Center, the University of Rochester (UR) offers the following final technical report on grant NAG 2-958, Molecular shocks associated with massive young stars: CO line images with a new far-infrared spectroscopic camera, given for implementation of the UR Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Camera (FISC) on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and use of this camera for observations of star-formation regions 1. Two KAO flights in FY 1995, the final year of KAO operations, were awarded to this program, conditional upon a technical readiness confirmation which was given in January 1995. The funding period covered in this report is 1 October 1994 - 30 September 1996. The project was supported with $30,000, and no funds remained at the conclusion of the project.

  16. Review of black surfaces for space-borne infrared systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persky, M. J.

    1999-05-01

    Low reflectivity (``black'') surface treatments for space-borne infrared systems are reviewed. The uses of black surfaces in general, as well as for specific space-borne applications are discussed. Compositions of a wide variety of surface treatments with examples of experimental data to characterize performances are provided. Specific treatments included are: Ames 24E paint; AZKO 463 (Sikkens, Cat-A-Lac) paint; Ball IR black paint; Chemglaze (Aeroglaze) Z306 and Z302 paints; Eccosorb 268E paint; Parsons Black paint; black anodize; black Hardlub; black Hardcoat; Martin Black; InfraBlack; Enhanced Martin Black; Ebonal C; Teflon; ion beam textured; appliqués black chrome; black etched beryllium on beryllium; plasma sprayed boron on beryllium; plasma sprayed beryllium on beryllium; boron carbide on POCO graphite; and Kapton. Data presented for some but not all of the surfaces include: spectrally integrated, 5-25 μm hemispherical-directional reflectance; spectral reflectance at wavelengths between 2 and 500 μm for a variety of incident angles from 5° to 80° and bidirectional reflectance at a number of wavelengths between 5 and 300 μm for a variety of incident angles from 0° to 80°. The instrumentation employed to obtain these data is briefly described. Long term stability of optical performance, as well as manufacturing reproducibility is demonstrated for several of the surfaces. Outgassing and atomic oxygen interaction information is also included. Methodology for calorimetric measurement of hemispherical emittance as an alternative to optical measurements is given.

  17. An infrared high resolution silicon immersion grating spectrometer for airborne and space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Powell, Scott; Jiang, Peng; Uzakbaiuly, Berik; Tanner, David

    2014-08-01

    Broad-band infrared (IR) spectroscopy, especially at high spectral resolution, is a largely unexplored area for the far IR (FIR) and submm wavelength region due to the lack of proper grating technology to produce high resolution within the very constrained volume and weight required for space mission instruments. High resolution FIR spectroscopy is an essential tool to resolve many atomic and molecular lines to measure physical and chemical conditions and processes in the environments where galaxy, star and planets form. A silicon immersion grating (SIG), due to its over three times high dispersion over a traditional reflective grating, offers a compact and low cost design of new generation IR high resolution spectrographs for space missions. A prototype SIG high resolution spectrograph, called Florida IR Silicon immersion grating spectromeTer (FIRST), has been developed at UF and was commissioned at a 2 meter robotic telescope at Fairborn Observatory in Arizona. The SIG with 54.74 degree blaze angle, 16.1 l/mm groove density, and 50x86 mm2 grating area has produced R=50,000 in FIRST. The 1.4-1.8 um wavelength region is completely covered in a single exposure with a 2kx2k H2RG IR array. The on-sky performance meets the science requirements for ground-based high resolution spectroscopy. Further studies show that this kind of SIG spectrometer with an airborne 2m class telescope such as SOFIA can offer highly sensitive spectroscopy with R~20,000-30,000 at 20 to 55 microns. Details about the on-sky measurement performance of the FIRST prototype SIG spectrometer and its predicted performance with the SOFIA 2.4m telescope are introduced.

  18. Mission and Instrument Design Trades for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory to Maximize Science Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Baker, John; Stebbins, Robin; Thorpe, James; Larson, Shane; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    A space-based gravitational wave observatory is required to access the rich array of astrophysical sources expected at frequencies between 0.0001 and 0.1 Hz. The European Space Agency (ESA) chose the Gravitational Universe as the science theme of its L3 launch opportunity. A call for mission proposals will be released soon after the completion of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission. LPF is scheduled to start science operations in March 2016, and finish by the end of the year, so an optimized mission concept is needed now. There are a number of possible design choices for both the instrument and the mission. One of the goals for a good mission design is to maximize the science return while minimizing risk and keeping costs low. This presentation will review some of the main design choices for a LISA-like laser interferometry mission and the impact of these choices on cost, risk, and science return.

  19. Improved Parallaxes and Near-Infrared Photometry of L- and T-Dwarfs From the U.S. Naval Observatory Infrared Astrometry Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Munn, J. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.; Henden, A. A.; Tilleman, T. M.; Guetter, H. H.; Canzian, B.

    2015-01-01

    We present an update on the status of the USNO infrared astrometry program for low mass stars and brown dwarfs. Selected results from the 2000-2006 program and its accompanying infrared photometry are presented along with an overview of the current astrometry program. Listings of the objects on both infrared programs are given along with a discussion of when the final results from these programs should become available.

  20. Scientific and Mission Requirements of Next-generation Space Infrared Space Telescope SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Ichikawa, Takashi; Takami, Michihiro; Sakon, Itsuki

    SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology Astrophysics) is a next-generation space tele-scope for mid-and far-infrared astronomy, based on the heritage of AKARI, Spitzer, and Her-schel, Here we introduce Mission Requirement Document (MRD), where scientific and mission requirement of SPICA are described. The MRD clarifies the objectives of the SPICA mission. These objectives are more concretely expressed by various scientific targets, and based on these targets, the mission requirements, such as required specifications of the mission instrumenta-tions, scientific operations etc. are defined. Also the success criteria, by which the evaluation of the mission achievement will be addressed, are clearly described. The mission requirements described here will give the baseline of the study of the system requirements. In the future, The MRD will also be used to confirm the development status, system performance, and operational results on orbit etc. are well in-line with the mission requirements. To summarize, the most important mission requirement of SPICA is to realize a large, mono-lithic (not segmented) 3-m class or larger mirror cooled down below 6K, in order to perform extremely deep imaging and spectroscopy at 5-210µm.

  1. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

  2. About using wide field lens optics for Space Surveillance Systems in Odessa Astronomical observatory (Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Volkoff, S. K.; Karpenko, G. F.; Titenko, V. V.; Yamnitsky, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    On base results of the observations in Odessa astronomical observatory, is shown obvious fact. The possibility of the using domestic wide field lens optics for monitoring high orbital artificial Earth satellite objects for the calculations elements of orbits. With wide field lens optics "Tair-19 5003", limited magnitude consist 15m.5 per 10 seconds of the accumulation, average square-error (ASE) of the measurements of the coordinates slowly move GSS consist not more than 2 arcsec. Beside 90% measurements has ASE not more 1 arcsec. At surveillance of the area of the equator by width 5° areas 500 deg2 are discovered all 40 active "standing" GSS, 12 passive GSS and 2 high elliptical orbital satellites (HEO). Is shown perspective possibility of the use WFO for monitoring LEO height before of 2 000 km. 90% of 39 object LEO fixed in mode "beam-park" (the still telescope) in current 1 hour, surelay are identified using catalog NORAD.

  3. NASA's future plans for space astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Mike

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of plans for the future NASA astrophysics missions called SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility), SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy), SMIM (Submillimeter Intermdiate Mission), and AIM (Astrometric Interferometry Mission), the Greater Observatories, and MFPE (Mission From Planet Earth). Technology needs for these missions are briefly described.

  4. Space Weathering in the Thermal Infrared: Lessons from LRO Diviner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.; Bandfield, J. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Hayne, P. O.; Lemelin, M.; Shirley, K. A.; Song, E.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Before LRO, it was suggested that TIR spectroscopy would be less susceptible to the effects of space weathering. Diviner has shown the TIR is affected by space weathering. We will discuss this unanticipated space weathering dependence.

  5. infra-red view of Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    infra-red view of Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center, Florida, (28.5N, 80.5W). Compare this scene with STS030-76-042. In infra-red color imagery, the chlorophyl in vegetation is depicted as shades of red, the intensity varying with the amount and health of the vegetation. This photo shows that color infra-red imagery provides additional information when compared to normal color film and also penetrates atmospheric haze for a sharper image.

  6. Great Observatories Present Rainbow of a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra space observatories teamed up to create this multi-wavelength, false-colored view of the M82 galaxy. The lively portrait celebrates Hubble's 'sweet sixteen' birthday.

    X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears in blue; infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red; Hubble's observations of hydrogen emission appear in orange, and the bluest visible light appears in yellow-green.

    About the Movie M82 is shown in all its wavelength glory. Dissolving from Chandra X-ray Observatory images of three X-ray energy bands to images in three bands of the infrared spectrum taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope, and ending with the Hubble Space Telescope's visible- and near-infrared-light image. The three observatories' images were composited to reveal the galaxy's stars, as well as gas and dust features.

    Note: The size of the Full-Res TIFF for the still image is 4299 samples x 3490 lines.

  7. Ice Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  8. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; McNamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a space-based gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return.

  9. Research in space physics at the University of Iowa. [astronomical observatories, spaceborne astronomy, satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanallen, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Various research projects in space physics are summarized. Emphasis is placed on: (1) the study of energetic particles in outer space and their relationships to electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields associated with the earth, the sun, the moon, the planets, and interplanetary medium; (2) observational work on satellites of the earth and the moon, and planetary and interplanetary spacecraft; (3) phenomenological analysis and interpretation; (4) observational work by ground based radio-astronomical and optical techniques; and (5) theoretical problems in plasma physics. Specific fields of current investigations are summarized.

  10. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, July - October 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during June-October 1993. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  11. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, January - June 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during Jan. to Jun. 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, and H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  12. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory Report, July to December 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during July-December 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  13. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, March - May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during March-May 1994. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  14. Proceedings of the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, Craig R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    This volume consists of 37 papers which summarize results presented at the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop, held February 7-9, 1989, at Ames Research Center. The workshop focused on infrared (IR) detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers on discrete IR detectors, cryogenic readouts, extrinsic and intrinsic IR arrays, and recent results from ground-based observations with integrated arrays were given. Recent developments in the second-generation Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared spectrometer and in detectors and arrays for the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are also included, as are status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) projects.

  15. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  16. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  17. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  18. Solar-Heliospheric-Interstellar Cosmic Ray Tour with the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory and the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    NASA now has a large collection of solar, heliospheric, and local interstellar (Voyager 1) cosmic ray particle data sets that can be accessed through the data system services of the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) in collaboration with the NASA Space Physics Data Facility SPDF), respectively led by the first and last authors. The VEPO services were developed to enhance the long-existing OMNIWeb solar wind and energetic particle services of SPDF for on-line browse, correlative, and statistical analysis of NASA and ESA mission fields, plasma, and energetic particle data. In this presentation we take of tour through VEPO and SPDF of SEP reservoir events, the outer heliosphere earlier surveyed by the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses spacecraft and now being probed by New Horizons, and the heliosheath-heliopause-interstellar regions now being explored by the Voyagers and IBEX. Implications of the latter measurements are also considered for the flux spectra of low to high energy cosmic rays in interstellar space.

  19. Terahertz calorimetry: an absolute power meter for terahertz radiation and the absorptivity of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, Tjeerd O.; Hovenier, J. Niels; Fischer, Jacqueline; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-04-01

    A new calorimetric absolute power meter has been developed for THz radiation. This broad band THz power meter measures average power at ambient temperature and pressure, does not use a window, and is insensitive to polarization and time structure of THz radiation. The operation of the power meter is based on the calorimetric method: in order to determine the power of a beam of THz radiation, the beam is used to illuminate a highly absorbing surface with known BRDF characteristics until a stable temperature is reached. The power in the incident beam can then be determined by measuring the electric power needed to cause the sample temperature rise. The new power meter was used with laser calorimetry to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. The absorptivity of both clean and dust-contaminated samples was measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 mm and found to be in the range 0.2 - 0.8%.

  20. Maximum Expected Wall Heat Flux and Maximum Pressure After Sudden Loss of Vacuum Insulation on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Liquid Helium (LHe) Dewars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared observation experiments. The experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium (LHe) temperatures. A question arose regarding the heat input and peak pressure that would result from a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation. Owing to concerns about the adequacy of dewar pressure relief in the event of a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation, the SOFIA Program engaged the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This report summarizes and assesses the experiments that have been performed to measure the heat flux into LHe dewars following a sudden vacuum insulation failure, describes the physical limits of heat input to the dewar, and provides an NESC recommendation for the wall heat flux that should be used to assess the sudden loss of vacuum insulation case. This report also assesses the methodology used by the SOFIA Program to predict the maximum pressure that would occur following a loss of vacuum event.

  1. Trigger and Reconstruction Algorithms for the Japanese Experiment Module- Extreme Universe Space Observatory (JEM-EUSO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Andreev, Valeri; Christl, M. J.; Cline, David B.; Crawford, Hank; Judd, E. G.; Pennypacker, Carl; Watts, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    The JEM-EUSO collaboration intends to study high energy cosmic ray showers using a large downward looking telescope mounted on the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station. The telescope focal plane is instrumented with approx.300k pixels operating as a digital camera, taking snapshots at approx. 1MHz rate. We report an investigation of the trigger and reconstruction efficiency of various algorithms based on time and spatial analysis of the pixel images. Our goal is to develop trigger and reconstruction algorithms that will allow the instrument to detect energies low enough to connect smoothly to ground-based observations.

  2. A Cluster Of Activities On Coma From The Hubble Space Telescope, StarDate, And McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jogee, S.; Fricke, K.; Preston, S.

    2011-01-01

    With a goal of providing a vast audience of students, teachers, the general public, and Spanish-speakers with activities to learn about research on the Coma cluster of galaxies based on the HST ACS Treasury survey of Coma, McDonald Observatory used a many-faceted approach. Since this research offered an unprecedented legacy dataset, part of the challenge was to convey the importance of this project to a diverse audience. The methodology was to create different products for different (overlapping) audiences. Five radio programs were produced in English and Spanish for distribution on over 500 radio stations in the US and Mexico with a listening audience of over 2 million; in addition to the radio listeners, there were over 13,000 downloads of the English scripts and almost 6000 of the Spanish. Images were prepared for use in the StarDate Online Astronomy Picture of the Week, for ViewSpace (used in museums), and for the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. A high-school level activity on the Coma Cluster was prepared and distributed both on-line and in an upgraded printed version of the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. This guide has been distributed to over 1700 teachers nationally. A YouTube video about careers and research in astronomy using the Coma cluster as an example was produced. Just as the activities were varied, so were the evaluation methods. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant/Contract/Agreement No. HST-EO-10861.35-A issued through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  3. Developing an Efficient Planetary Space Weather Alert Service using Virtual Observatory Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Benson, Kevin; Le Sidaner, Pierre; André, Nicolas; Tomasik, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this Task is to identify user requirements, develop the way to implement event alerts, and chain those to the 1) planetary event and 2) planetary space weather predictions. The expected service of alerts will be developed with the objective to facilitate discovery or prediction announcements within the PSWD user community in order to watch or warn against specific events. The ultimate objective is to set up dedicated amateur and/or professional observation campaigns, diffuse contextual information for science data analysis, and enable safety operations of planet-orbiting spacecraft against the risks of impacts from meteors or solar wind disturbances. OBSPARIS and UCL will study and adapt VOEvent to those purposes. CNRS-IRAP and SRC will study the way to implement VOEvent as a service for the PSWD tools.

  4. Restoration, Enhancement, and Distribution of the ATLAS-1 Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) Space Science Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The primary goal of the funded task was to restore and distribute the ISO ATLAS-1 space science data set with enhanced software and database utilities. The first year was primarily dedicated to physically transferring the data from its original format to its initial CD archival format. The remainder of the first year was devoted to the verification of the restored data set and database. The second year was devoted to the enhancement of the data set, especially the development of IDL utilities and redesign of the database and search interface as needed. This period was also devoted to distribution of the rescued data set, principally the creation and maintenance of a web interface to the data set. The final six months was dedicated to working with NSSDC to create a permanent, off site, hive of the data set and supporting utilities. This time was also used to resolve last minute quality and design issues.

  5. Developing an Efficient Planetary Space Weather Alert Service using Virtual Observatory Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Benson, K.; André, N.; Tomasik, L.

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this Task is to identify user requirements, develop the way to implement event alerts, and chain those to the 1) planetary event and 2) planetary space weather predictions. The expected service of alerts will be developed with the objective to facilitate discovery or prediction announcements within the PSWD user community in order to watch or warn against specific events. The ultimate objective is to set up dedicated amateur and/or professional observation campaigns, diffuse contextual information for science data analysis, and enable safety operations of planet-orbiting spacecraft against the risks of impacts from meteors or solar wind disturbances. OBSPARIS and UCL will study and adapt VOEvent to those purposes. CNRS-IRAP and SRC will study the way to implement VOEvent as a service for the PSWD tools.

  6. Infrared astronomy takes center stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick C.; Gatley, Ian; Hollenbach, David

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of infrared astronomy, including the ability to detect cool matter, explore the hidden universe, reveal a wealth of spectral lines, and reach back to the beginning of time are outlined. Ground-based infrared observations such as observations in the thermal infrared region are discussed as well as observations utilizing infrared telescopes aboard NASA aircraft and orbiting telescopes. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy are described, and it is pointed out that infrared astronomers can penetrate obscuring dust to study stars and interstellar matter throughout the Milky Way galaxy. Application of various infrared instruments to the investigation of stars and planets is emphasized, and focus is placed on the discovery of clouds or disks of particles around mature stars and acquisition of high-resolution spectra of the gaseous and solid materials orbiting on the fringes of the solar system.

  7. NASA's Great Observatories: Paper Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational brief discusses observatory stations built by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for looking at the universe. This activity for grades 5-12 has students build paper models of the observatories and study their history, features, and functions. Templates for the observatories are included. (MVL)

  8. Description and preliminary test results of a detector prototype for the TUS space fluorescence observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, A.; Garipov, G.; Khrenov, B.; Martinez, O.; Murrieta, T.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, L.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    We discuss a general scheme of the optics and electronics read out as well as preliminary test results of a detector prototype for the space fluorescence telescope TUS (FD-TUS). The mirror of this prototype is coupled to an 8 by 8 pixel camera. Each of the 64 pixels is read by one PMT of 13 mm diameter (Hamamatsu model R1463) . The optics design is a multi-hexagonal segmented telescope with focal distance of 1.5m and 2 square meter area. The optics design is optimized to have a light collection efficiency greater then 50% for all the pixel positions. The fluorescence detector is being tested at the high mountain site Sierra La Negra near Puebla City in Mexico (600g/cm2). The FD-TUS will observe EAS tracks at energies of about 1 EeV at distances 25-50km,and zenith angles greater than 45 degree with direction tracks perpendicular to the FD axis.

  9. Next space solar observatory SOLAR-C: mission instruments and science objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsukawa, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Hara, H.; Ichimoto, K.; Kubo, M.; Kusano, K.; Sakao, T.; Shimizu, T.; Suematsu, Y.; Tsuneta, S.

    2012-12-01

    SOLAR-C, the fourth space solar mission in Japan, is under study with a launch target of fiscal year 2018. A key concept of the mission is to view the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona as one system coupled by magnetic fields along with resolving the size scale of fundamental physical processes connecting these atmospheric layers. It is especially important to study magnetic structure in the chromosphere as an interface layer between the photosphere and the corona. The SOLAR-C satellite is equipped with three telescopes, the Solar UV-Visible-IR Telescope (SUVIT), the EUV/FUV High Throughput Spectroscopic Telescope (EUVS/LEMUR), and the X-ray Imaging Telescope (XIT). Observations with SUVIT of photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields make it possible to infer three dimensional magnetic structure extending from the photosphere to the chromosphere and corona.This helps to identify magnetic structures causing magnetic reconnection, and clarify how waves are propagated, reflected, and dissipated. Phenomena indicative of or byproducts of magnetic reconnection, such as flows and shocks, are to be captured by SUVIT and by spectroscopic observations using EUVS/LEMUR, while XIT observes rapid changes in temperature distribution of plasma heated by shock waves.

  10. Exo-C: a probe-scale space observatory for direct imaging and spectroscopy of extrasolar planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Dekens, Frank G.; Brenner, Michael P.; Warfield, Keith R.; Belikov, Ruslan; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Dubovitsky, Serge; Effinger, Robert T.; Hirsch, Brian; Kissil, Andrew; Krist, John E.; Lang, Jared J.; Marley, Mark S.; McElwain, Michael W.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Nissen, Joel; Oseas, Jeffrey M.; Pong, Chris; Serabyn, Eugene; Sunada, Eric; Trauger, John T.; Unwin, Stephen C.

    2015-09-01

    "Exo-C" is NASAs first community study of a modest aperture space telescope mission that is optimized for high contrast observations of exoplanetary systems. The mission will be capable of taking optical spectra of nearby exoplanets in reflected light, discovering previously undetected planets, and imaging structure in a large sample of circumstellar disks. It will obtain unique science results on planets down to super-Earth sizes and serve as a technology pathfinder toward an eventual flagship-class mission to find and characterize habitable Earth-like exoplanets. We present the mission/payload design and highlight steps to reduce mission cost/risk relative to previous mission concepts. Key elements are an unobscured telescope aperture, an internal coronagraph with deformable mirrors for precise wavefront control, and an orbit and observatory design chosen for high thermal stability. Exo-C has a similar telescope aperture, orbit, lifetime, and spacecraft bus requirements to the highly successful Kepler mission (which is our cost reference). Much of the needed technology development is being pursued under the WFIRST coronagraph study and would support a mission start in 2017, should NASA decide to proceed. This paper summarizes the study final report completed in March 2015.

  11. Utilization of Solar Dynamics Observatory space weather digital image data for comparative analysis with application to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekoyan, V.; Dehipawala, S.; Liu, Ernest; Tulsee, Vivek; Armendariz, R.; Tremberger, G.; Holden, T.; Marchese, P.; Cheung, T.

    2012-10-01

    Digital solar image data is available to users with access to standard, mass-market software. Many scientific projects utilize the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) format, which requires specialized software typically used in astrophysical research. Data in the FITS format includes photometric and spatial calibration information, which may not be useful to researchers working with self-calibrated, comparative approaches. This project examines the advantages of using mass-market software with readily downloadable image data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for comparative analysis over with the use of specialized software capable of reading data in the FITS format. Comparative analyses of brightness statistics that describe the solar disk in the study of magnetic energy using algorithms included in mass-market software have been shown to give results similar to analyses using FITS data. The entanglement of magnetic energy associated with solar eruptions, as well as the development of such eruptions, has been characterized successfully using mass-market software. The proposed algorithm would help to establish a publicly accessible, computing network that could assist in exploratory studies of all FITS data. The advances in computer, cell phone and tablet technology could incorporate such an approach readily for the enhancement of high school and first-year college space weather education on a global scale. Application to ground based data such as that contained in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey is discussed.

  12. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  13. SOFIA Observatory Obtains 'First Light' Images

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, successfully obtained its "First Light"" images during an overnight flight May 26. Scientists are now processing the data gathered...

  14. The dark side of Venus: near-infrared images and spectra from the Anglo-Australian observatory.

    PubMed

    Crisp, D; Allen, D A; Grinspoon, D H; Pollack, J B

    1991-09-13

    Near-infrared images and spectra of the night side of Venus taken at the Anglo-Australian Telescope during February 1990 reveal four new thermal emission windows at 1.10, 1.18, 1.27, and 1.31 micrometers, in addition to the previously discovered windows at 1.74 and 2.3 micrometers. Images of the Venus night side show similar bright and dark markings in all windows, but their contrast is much lower at short wavelengths. The 1.27-micrometers window includes a bright, high-altitude O2 airglow feature in addition to a thermal contribution from the deep atmosphere. Simulations of the 1.27- and 2.3 micrometers spectra indicate water vapor mixing ratios near 40 +/- 20 parts per million by volume between the surface and the cloud base. No large horizontal gradients in the water vapor mixing ratios were detected at these altitudes.

  15. The Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) in the New Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Charles; SPICA Consortium, the SAFARI Consortium

    2016-01-01

    SPICA is a cryogenic space-borne observatory designed for optimal sensitivity in the mid-infrared through submillimeter range: 17-230 microns. The mission is an ESA / JAXA collaboration, now considered for the ESA Cosmic Visions M5 opportunity. SPICA will feature a 2.5-meter telescope cooled to below 8K, this offers the potential for 100-1000-fold advances in sensitivity beyond that obtained with Herschel and SOFIA in the far-IR. With a line sensitivity of ~5x10^-20 W/m^2 (1 h, 5 sigma), SPICA will be a complement to JWST and ALMA for deep spectroscopic observations. Integrated over cosmic history, star formation has occurred predominantly in dust-obscured regions which are inaccessible in the rest-frame UV and optical. Both the luminosity history and the detailed physics that govern it can only be directly measured in the mid-IR-submillimeter. Similarly, forming stars and planetary systems cool primarily through the far-IR. By taking advantage of the low-background platform, the SPICA instruments are designed for these topics. The SPICA mid-IR instrument (SMI) will provide R~50 imaging spectroscopy and R~1,000 full-band slit-fed spectroscopy from 17 to 36 microns, with a high-resolution (R=25,000) capability from 12-18 microns. The SPICA far-IR instrument (SAFARI) will cover 34 to at least 230 microns with multiple R~300 wide-band grating spectrometer modules coupling to high-sensitivity far-IR detectors. A R~3,000 scanned-etalon module will also be available for Galactic targets with bright continua and/or dense line spectra. SPICA has emerged with a new ESA-JAXA collaborative framework. In the current division of responsibilities, ESA will take the lead role, provide the telescope, the fine-attitude sensor, and the spacecraft bus. JAXA will provide the cryogenic system, the SMI instrument, integrate the telescope and instruments, and provide the launch vehicle. The SAFARI instrument will be provided by a consortium funded by the European national agencies led by

  16. A solar infrared photometer for space flight application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Deming, Drake

    1991-01-01

    A photometer concept which is capable of nearly simultaneous measurements of solar radiation from 1.6 to 200 microns in seven wavelength bands is described. This range of wavelengths can probe the solar photosphere from below the level of unit optical depth in the visible to the temperature minimum, about 500 km above it. An instrument package including a 20-cm Gregorian telescope and a filter wheel photometer utilizing noncryogenic pyroelectric infrared detectors is described. Approaches to the rejection of the visible solar spectrum in the instrument, the availability of optical and mechanical components, and the expected instrumental sensitivity are discussed. For wavelengths below 35 microns, the projected instrumental sensitivity is found to be adequate to detect the intensity signature of solar p-mode oscillations during 5 min of integration. For longer wavelengths, clear detection is expected through Fourier analysis of modest data sets.

  17. Golden legacy from ESA's observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    ISO was the first space observatory able to see the sky in infrared light. Using its eyes, we have discovered many new phenomena that have radically changed our view of the Universe. Everybody knows that when something is heated it glows. However, things also glow with a light our eyes cannot detect at room temperature: infrared light. Infrared telescopes do not work well on the Earth’s surface because such light is absorbed by the atmosphere. ISO looked at the cold parts of the universe, usually the 'cold and dusty' parts. It peered into clouds of dust and gas where stars were being born, observing for the first time the earliest stages of star formation. It discovered, for example, that stars begin to form at temperatures as low as -250°C or less. Scientists were able to follow the evolution of dust from where it is produced (that is, old stars - the massive 'dust factories') to the regions where it forms new planetary systems. ISO found that most young stars are surrounded by discs of dust that could harbour planets. The observatory also analysed the chemical composition of cosmic dust, thereby opening up a new field of research, ‘astromineralogy’. With ISO we have been able to discover the presence of water in many different regions in space. Another new discipline, 'astrochemistry', was boosted when ISO discovered that the water molecule is common in the Universe, even in distant galaxies, and complex organic molecules like benzene readily form in the surroundings of some stars. "ISO results are impacting most fields of astronomical research, almost literally from comets to cosmology," explains Alberto Salama, ISO Project Scientist. "Some results answer questions. Others open new fields. Some are already being followed up by existing telescopes; others have to await future facilities." When ISO's operational life ended, in 1998, its observations became freely available to the world scientific community via ISO’s data archive. In May 2003 the

  18. Performance of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) high-resolution near-infrared multi-object fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, F.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R.; Eisenstein, D.; Gunn, J.; Holtzman, J.; Nidever, D.; Gillespie, B.; Weinberg, D.; Blank, B.; Henderson, C.; Smee, S.; Barkhouser, R.; Harding, A.; Hope, S.; Fitzgerald, G.; Stolberg, T.; Arns, J.; Nelson, M.; Brunner, S.; Burton, A.; Walker, E.; Lam, C.; Maseman, P.; Barr, J.; Leger, F.; Carey, L.; MacDonald, N.; Ebelke, G.; Beland, S.; Horne, T.; Young, E.; Rieke, G.; Rieke, M.; O'Brien, T.; Crane, J.; Carr, M.; Harrison, C.; Stoll, R.; Vernieri, M.; Shetrone, M.; Allende-Prieto, C.; Johnson, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Zasowski, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V.; Meszaros, Sz.; Zhao, B.; Hayden, M.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Andrews, B.; Loomis, C.; Owen, R.; Klaene, M.; Brinkmann, J.; Stauffer, F.; Long, D.; Jordan, W.; Holder, D.; Cope, F.; Naugle, T.; Pfaffenberger, B.; Schlegel, D.; Blanton, M.; Muna, D.; Weaver, B.; Snedden, S.; Pan, K.; Brewington, H.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Simmons, A.; Oravetz, D.; Mahadevan, S.; Halverson, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) uses a dedicated 300-fiber, narrow-band near-infrared (1.51-1.7 μm), high resolution (R~22,500) spectrograph to survey approximately 100,000 giant stars across the Milky Way. This three-year survey, in operation since late-summer 2011 as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III), will revolutionize our understanding of the kinematical and chemical enrichment histories of all Galactic stellar populations. We present the performance of the instrument from its first year in operation. The instrument is housed in a separate building adjacent to the 2.5-m SDSS telescope and fed light via approximately 45-meter fiber runs from the telescope. The instrument design includes numerous innovations including a gang connector that allows simultaneous connection of all fibers with a single plug to a telescope cartridge that positions the fibers on the sky, numerous places in the fiber train in which focal ratio degradation had to be minimized, a large mosaic-VPH (290 mm x 475 mm elliptically-shaped recorded area), an f/1.4 six-element refractive camera featuring silicon and fused silica elements with diameters as large as 393 mm, three near-infrared detectors mounted in a 1 x 3 mosaic with sub-pixel translation capability, and all of these components housed within a custom, LN2-cooled, stainless steel vacuum cryostat with dimensions 1.4-m x 2.3-m x 1.3-m.

  19. Reflection grating spectrometer for the x-ray multi-mirror (XMM) space observatory: design and calculated performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.; Kahn, S.M.

    1985-10-01

    A spectrometer design candidate is presented for the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM) observatory, being planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) as a long-lived large-area of telescopes. The science requirement of moderate resolution (E/..delta..E approx.100) spectroscopy in a two octave region (0.5 to 2 keV) with extremely high throughput (effective area > 500 cm/sup 2/) results in the use of grazing incidence reflection gratings. Due to the low image quality of the telescopes (approx. 1 minute of arc), the grating dispersion must be maximized by use of the classical grating mount in which the spectrum is dispersed within the plane of incident radiation. Due to the small field of view by the x-ray telescopes, the gratings must be situated in the converging beam at the exit of the telescope. A spectrometer module consists of a thin-foil conical mirror telescope, a stack of plane varied-space reflection gratings and an imaging proportional counter. This system is analyzed on the basis of dispersion, geometric aberrations and efficiency. At a spectral resolution of 0.15 A, a twenty module XMM would attain an average effective area of approx.900 cm/sup 2/, reaching twice this value at the peak wavelength (15 A). Similar throughput is obtained in second order centered at 7.5 A, the two spectral orders separated by the non-dispersive energy resolution of the proportional counter. Continuous spectra are obtained in the 6-25 A band (0.5 to 2 keV), and can be extended to 45 A if desired by tuning of the grating. The instrument sensitivity is sufficient to allow the first spectral detection of soft x-ray features in external galaxies, with access to an estimated population of several hundred active galactic nuclei. Such observations will expand vastly the roles feasible for spectroscopy in x-ray astrophysics, marking the beginning of a new era in space astronomy.

  20. The Early Infrared Temporal Development of Nova Delphini 2013 (V339 DEL) Observed with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and from the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Evans, A.; Helton, L. A.; Shenoy, D. P.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Woodward, C. E.; Vacca, W. D.; Dykhoff, D. A.; Ashok, N. M.; Cass, A. C.; Carlon, R. L.; Corgan, D. T.; Eyres, S. P. S.; Joshi, V.; Keller, Luke D.; Krautter, J.; Liimets, T.; Rushton, M.; Starrfield, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present ground-based infrared photometry, JHK spectroscopy, and 5-28 μm SOFIA FORCAST spectroscopy documenting the early temporal development of Nova Delphini 2013 (V339 Del). We derive a distance of ˜4.5 kpc using data available from the early expansion of the fireball. This distance gives an outburst luminosity of ˜8.3 × 105 {L}⊙ making V339 Del the most luminous CO nova on record. Our data provide new constraints on the ejected gas mass and the dust yield in fast CO novae. The ejected gas mass as estimated by the cutoff wavelength during the free-free emission phase is ˜7.5 × 10-5 {M}⊙ . There is evidence for the formation of ˜1.2(±0.4) × 10-7 {M}⊙ of dust about 102 days after outburst. The gas to dust ratio of ˜470/1-940/1 implies that dust production was much less efficient in V339 Del than is the case for most CO novae.

  1. GISMO: A Giant (30m) cold (10K) far-Ir and Submm space Observatory using Fresnel optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarden, T. G.; Stevens, J. A.; Cliffe, M. R.; Henry, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    We have examined the possibility of applying difractive Fresnel optical concepts developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a possible O/NIR space telescope to the much more relaxed tolerance regimes of the far-IR and sub-millimetre. We conclude that the approach is indeed applicable and that a powerful FIR-submm observatory (GISMO) could be built around a 30m primary lens of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) 2.3mm thick.This would be the main component of a "Lens" Spacecraft (LSC) which would be located 3 km from a second "Instrument" spacecraft (ISC) carrying field optics, a Fresnel corrector lens, re-imaging optics and focal plane instruments. In its Sun-Earth L2 halo orbit, the Lens would cool by radiation to 10K; the ISC optics would be actively cooled to a few K and would resemble a simplified version of current plans for SAFIR, the Single-Aperture Far-IR mission under study by NASA. GISMO could be a good deal cheaper to build than the current 10m, 4K SAFIR concept. Relative positioning of the two spaceraft needs to be accurate to a few millimetres laterally and a tens of centimetres in separation (focus). We highlight some technical uncertainties. For most observations at wavelengths between 20 and 600 microns GISMO should be between 3 and 10 times more sensitive than the 10m, 4K SAFIR concept. The possible exception is spectroscopy betwen 250 and 450 microns, where its sensitivity should be about the same. GISMO's 30m aperture would of course offer a three-fold improvement in spatial resolution at all wavelengths. As a result GISMO is expected to achieve almost complete resolution of the FIR background, reaching sources below 100 micro-Jansky in seconds, and would be an immensely powerful facility throughout its wavelength range of operation.

  2. Cloud Height Retrieval with Oxygen A and B Bands for the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Mao, Jianping; Lyapustin, Alexei; Herman, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Planned to fly in 2014, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) would see the whole sunlit half of the Earth from the L 1 Lagrangian point and would provide simultaneous data on cloud and aerosol properties with its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC). EPIC images the Earth on a 2Kx2K CCD array, which gives a horizontal resolution of about 10 km at nadir. A filter-wheel provides consecutive images in 10 spectral channels ranging from the UV to the near-IR, including the oxygen A and B bands. This paper presents a study of retrieving cloud height with EPIC's oxygen A and B bands. As the first step, we analyzed the effect of cloud optical and geometrical properties, sun-view geometry, and surface type on the cloud height determination. Second, we developed two cloud height retrieval algorithms that are based on the Mixed Lambertian-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept: one utilizes the absolute radiances at the Oxygen A and B bands and the other uses the radiance ratios between the absorption and reference channels of the two bands. Third, we applied the algorithms to the simulated EPIC data and to the data from SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) observations. Results show that oxygen A and B bands complement each other: A band is better suited for retrievals over ocean, while B band is better over vegetated land due to a much darker surface. Improvements to the MLER model, including corrections to surface contribution and photon path inside clouds, will also be discussed.

  3. Sensitivity Studies on Cloud Measurement Using Oxygen A- and B-band for the Deep Space Climate Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Herman, J. R.; Marshak, A.; Yang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth Poly-Chromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory will have 10 channels with spectral resolutions from 1 to 3 nm to measure aerosols, clouds, ozone, SO2, vegetation and Earth's radiation budget on the dayside of Earth from the Earth's L1 Lagrangian point, a stable gravity-neutral point 1.5 million km away from Earth. EPIC is in refurbishing stage to optimize original design toward a future mission. Among the EPIC channels, one pair of O2 A-band channels (on-line and off-line) and one pair of O2 B-band channels have been chosen to measure cloud fraction and cloud top height at a nominal spatial resolution of approximately 10-km. A set of sensitivity studies has been performed for these two pairs of channels using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model, the HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption database (HITRAN) 2008 and the up-to-date sensor specifications. This paper will present the sensitivity study results which include the measurement sensitivities to cloud top height, cloud fraction, optical depth and phase, the sensor filter center position and wavelength shift due to the Angles of Incidence, and the sensitivities to surface properties, atmospheric temperature and moisture profile. Given the sensor filter nominal spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, O2 A-band provides greater sensitivity to cloud top height change than O2 B-band. However, over vegetation A-band has much higher surface returns and is much more sensitive to atmospheric temperature than B-band. Using the radiance ratio of on-line and off-line channels and combining information from both bands will lead to high-quality measurements of cloud top height and cloud fraction and will help the retrievals of aerosols, SO2, ozone, vegetation and Earth's radiation from other channels in high temporal resolution for weather and climate studies.

  4. Developing Wide-Field Spatio-Spectral Interferometry for Far-Infrared Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

  5. NASA's future plans for space astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's plans in the field of space astronomy and astrophysics through the first decade of the next century are reviewed with reference to specific missions and mission concepts. The missions discussed include the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the Submillimeter Intermediate Mission, the Astrometric Interferometry Mission, the Greater Observatories program, and Mission from Planet Earth. Plans to develop optics and sensors technology to enable these missions are also discussed.

  6. The Descent of the Serpent: Using a Successful Ancient Solar Observatories Webcast from Chichen Itza to Highlight Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Higdon, R.; Cline, T.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past seven years, NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education and public outreach events to highlight NASA's heliophysics research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial events, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus, as well as Sun-Earth Day during the March Equinox, to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium and other museums, Ideum, NASA TV, NASA heliophysics missions, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide and internationally. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. As part of an Ancient Observatories theme in 2005, we have successfully featured solar alignments with ancient structures made by indigenous cultures that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices in cultural and historical parks in the Americas. In partnership with the Exploratorium, we produced broadcast-quality and webcast programming during the March equinox that shared heliophysics within a broad cultural context with formal and informal education audiences internationally. The program: "Descent of the Serpent" featured the light and shadow effect at sunset that takes place during the spring equinox at the Pyramid of El Castillo, in Chichén Itzá (México). This program made unique and authentic cultural connections to the knowledge of solar astronomy of the Maya, the living Mayan culture of today, and the importance of the Sun across the ages. We involved Sun-Earth Connection scientists, their missions, and research

  7. Near infrared camera and multi-object spectrometer for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between science goals and design responses for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). NICMOS is one of three astronomical instruments being considered for orbital replacement on the Hubble Space Telescope scheduled for launch in the summer of 1989.

  8. Regulating the infrared by mode matching: A massless scalar in expanding spaces with constant deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, T. M.; Prokopec, T.

    2011-04-15

    In this paper we consider a massless scalar field, with a possible coupling {xi} to the Ricci scalar in a D dimensional Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-time with a constant deceleration parameter q={epsilon}-1, {epsilon}=-H/H{sup 2}. Correlation functions for the Bunch-Davies vacuum of such a theory have long been known to be infrared divergent for a wide range of values of {epsilon}. We resolve these divergences by explicitly matching the space-time under consideration to a space-time without infrared divergencies. Such a procedure ensures that all correlation functions with respect to the vacuum in the space-time of interest are infrared finite. In this newly defined vacuum we construct the coincidence limit of the propagator and as an example calculate the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor. We find that this approach gives both in the ultraviolet and in the infrared satisfactory results. Moreover, we find that, unless the effective mass due to the coupling to the Ricci scalar {xi}R is negative, quantum contributions to the energy density always dilute away faster, or just as fast, as the background energy density. Therefore, quantum backreaction is insignificant at the one-loop order, unless {xi}R is negative. Finally we compare this approach with known results where the infrared is regulated by placing the Universe in a finite box. In an accelerating universe, the results are qualitatively the same, provided one identifies the size of the Universe with the physical Hubble radius at the time of the matching. In a decelerating universe, however, the two schemes give different late time behavior for the quantum stress-energy tensor. This happens because in this case the length scale at which one regulates the infrared becomes sub-Hubble at late times.

  9. Design of a nano-satellite demonstrator of an infrared imaging space interferometer: the HyperCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlen, Kjetil; Vives, Sébastien; Rakotonimbahy, Eddy; Sarkar, Tanmoy; Tasnim Ava, Tanzila; Baccichet, Nicola; Savini, Giorgio; Swinyard, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    The construction of a kilometer-baseline far infrared imaging interferometer is one of the big instrumental challenges for astronomical instrumentation in the coming decades. Recent proposals such as FIRI, SPIRIT, and PFI illustrate both science cases, from exo-planetary science to study of interstellar media and cosmology, and ideas for construction of such instruments, both in space and on the ground. An interesting option for an imaging multi-aperture interferometer with km baseline is the space-based hyper telescope (HT) where a giant, sparsely populated primary mirror is constituted of several free-flying satellites each carrying a mirror segment. All the segments point the same object and direct their part of the pupil towards a common focus where another satellite, containing recombiner optics and a detector unit, is located. In Labeyrie's [1] original HT concept, perfect phasing of all the segments was assumed, allowing snap-shot imaging within a reduced field of view and coronagraphic extinction of the star. However, for a general purpose observatory, image reconstruction using closure phase a posteriori image reconstruction is possible as long as the pupil is fully non-redundant. Such reconstruction allows for much reduced alignment tolerances, since optical path length control is only required to within several tens of wavelengths, rather than within a fraction of a wavelength. In this paper we present preliminary studies for such an instrument and plans for building a miniature version to be flown on a nano satellite. A design for recombiner optics is proposed, including a scheme for exit pupil re-organization, is proposed, indicating the focal plane satellite in the case of a km-baseline interferometer could be contained within a 1m3 unit. Different options for realization of a miniature version are presented, including instruments for solar observations in the visible and the thermal infrared and giant planet observations in the visible, and an

  10. Carnegie Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carnegie Observatories were founded in 1902 by George Ellery Hale. Their first facility was the MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY, located in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, California. Originally a solar observatory, it moved into stellar, galactic and extragalactic research with the construction of the 60 in (1.5 m), and 100 in (2.5 m) telescopes, each of which was the largest in the world...

  11. WFIRST Observatory Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST observatory will be a powerful and flexible wide-field near-infrared facility. The planned surveys will provide data applicable to an enormous variety of astrophysical science. This presentation will provide a description of the observatory and its performance characteristics. This will include a discussion of the point spread function, signal-to-noise budgets for representative observing scenarios and the corresponding limiting sensitivity. Emphasis will be given to providing prospective Guest Observers with information needed to begin thinking about new observing programs.

  12. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Ceryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Xia-Serafino, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) incorporates two 5 micron cutoff (lambda(sub co) = 5 microns) 2048x2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. These detector arrays, and the two Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuits that control them, are operated in space at T approx. 37 K. In this article, we provide a brief introduction to NIRSpec, its detector subsystem (DS), detector readout in the space radiation environment, and present a snapshot of the developmental status of the NIRSpec DS as integration and testing of the engineering test unit begins.

  13. Innovative design of a calibration mechanism for the space infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, De-wei; Li, Bo; Liu, Jian-feng; Ruan, Ning-juan

    2013-09-01

    A new style calibration mechanism is designed for the infrared camera working in space. This calibration mechanism adds a locking device, which will produce magnetic force to fix the moving parts on the stage of launch. It has not been taken into account in past calibration mechanism of space infrared camera. In order to simplify structure and control system, an alnico is adopted in locking device as the source of magnetic field, which interacts with magnetic material and produces locking force. In addition, there is also a special structural design, which makes magnetic circuit closeitself to control magnetic leakage interfering with other equipment. Besides, another important component of calibration mechanism is a permanent magnet torquer. It can provide driving force for the blackbody to complete two state conversions of calibration and Non-calibration. High magnetic induction intensity and coercivity alnico is used as the stator, which will lighten the weight of torquer. On-off control strategy is selected in order to simplify the control system. Because calibration is only a temporary state, temperature rise has little influence on torquer. This setup is favorable to increase its reliability. There are guard plates on the axial direction shielding electromagnetism, also reducing magnetic leakage. Experimental investigations have been carried out to verify the feasibility and reliability of design. Result indicates the calibration mechanism can primely complete the calibration task of the space infrared detector. It has an important application value on the field of infrared detection.

  14. Contamination control requirements implementation for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), part 2: spacecraft, sunshield, observatory, and launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.; Schweiss, Andrea; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly; Woronowicz, Michael; Patel, Jignasha; Macias, Matthew; McGregor, R. Daniel; Farmer, Greg; Schmeitzky, Olivier; Jensen, Peter; Rumler, Peter; Romero, Beatriz; Breton, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    This paper will continue from Part 1 of JWST contamination control implementation. In addition to optics, instruments, and thermal vacuum testing, JWST also requires contamination control for a spacecraft that must be vented carefully in order to maintain solar array and thermal radiator thermal properties; a tennis court-sized sunshield made with 1-2 mil Kapton™ layers that must be manufactured and maintained clean; an observatory that must be integrated, stowed and transported to South America; and a rocket that typically launches commercial payloads without contamination sensitivity. An overview of plans developed to implement contamination control for the JWST spacecraft, sunshield, observatory and launch vehicle will be presented.

  15. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Gehrz, R D; Roellig, T L; Werner, M W; Fazio, G G; Houck, J R; Low, F J; Rieke, G H; Soifer, B T; Levine, D A; Romana, E A

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) is the fourth and final facility in the Great Observatories Program, joining Hubble Space Telescope (1990), the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991-2000), and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (1999). Spitzer, with a sensitivity that is almost three orders of magnitude greater than that of any previous ground-based and space-based infrared observatory, is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the creation of the universe, the formation and evolution of primitive galaxies, the origin of stars and planets, and the chemical evolution of the universe. This review presents a brief overview of the scientific objectives and history of infrared astronomy. We discuss Spitzer's expected role in infrared astronomy for the new millennium. We describe pertinent details of the design, construction, launch, in-orbit checkout, and operations of the observatory and summarize some science highlights from the first two and a half years of Spitzer operations. More information about Spitzer can be found at http://spitzer.caltech.edu/.

  16. The NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Gehrz, R D; Roellig, T L; Werner, M W; Fazio, G G; Houck, J R; Low, F J; Rieke, G H; Soifer, B T; Levine, D A; Romana, E A

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) is the fourth and final facility in the Great Observatories Program, joining Hubble Space Telescope (1990), the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991-2000), and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (1999). Spitzer, with a sensitivity that is almost three orders of magnitude greater than that of any previous ground-based and space-based infrared observatory, is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the creation of the universe, the formation and evolution of primitive galaxies, the origin of stars and planets, and the chemical evolution of the universe. This review presents a brief overview of the scientific objectives and history of infrared astronomy. We discuss Spitzer's expected role in infrared astronomy for the new millennium. We describe pertinent details of the design, construction, launch, in-orbit checkout, and operations of the observatory and summarize some science highlights from the first two and a half years of Spitzer operations. More information about Spitzer can be found at http://spitzer.caltech.edu/. PMID:17503900

  17. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  18. NASA'S Great Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Why are space observatories important? The answer concerns twinkling stars in the night sky. To reach telescopes on Earth, light from distant objects has to penetrate Earth's atmosphere. Although the sky may look clear, the gases that make up our atmosphere cause problems for astronomers. These gases absorb the majority of radiation emanating from celestial bodies so that it never reaches the astronomer's telescope. Radiation that does make it to the surface is distorted by pockets of warm and cool air, causing the twinkling effect. In spite of advanced computer enhancement, the images finally seen by astronomers are incomplete. NASA, in conjunction with other countries' space agencies, commercial companies, and the international community, has built observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory to find the answers to numerous questions about the universe. With the capabilities the Space Shuttle provides, scientist now have the means for deploying these observatories from the Shuttle's cargo bay directly into orbit.

  19. Recent Progress with the JWST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 micrometers - 28 micrometers. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. JWST is a segmented mirror telescope operating at (is) approximately 40K, a temperature achieved by passive cooling of the observatory, via a large, 5-layer membrane-based sunshield. We present an overview of the observatory systems design, the science instruments and the mission science objectives. With the completion of the Spacecraft Critical Design Review, the spacecraft has also fully transitioned to fabrication. We will discuss recent highlights associated with the Observatory, including completion and delivery of the primary mirror segments, delivery of the primary mirror backplane and its wings, and the delivery of five template membrane layers. We will also summarize the current predicted performance of the telescope, including stray light, pointing and image quality following the completion of the final design review. Finally, the current schedule through to launch will be presented with a summary of integration and test activities planned when the science payload is delivered to Northrop Grumman following cryo-optical testing at the Johns Space Flight Center.

  20. Recent progress with the JWST Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 μm - 28 μm. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. JWST is a segmented mirror telescope operating at ~40K, a temperature achieved by passive cooling of the observatory, via a large, 5-layer membrane-based sunshield. We present an overview of the observatory systems design, the science instruments and the mission science objectives. With the completion of the Spacecraft Critical Design Review, the spacecraft has also fully transitioned to fabrication. We will discuss recent highlights associated with the Observatory, including completion and delivery of the primary mirror segments, delivery of the primary mirror backplane and its wings, and the delivery of five template membrane layers. We will also summarize the current predicted performance of the telescope, including stray light, pointing and image quality following the completion of the final design review. Finally, the current schedule through to launch will be presented with a summary of integration and test activities planned when the science payload is delivered to Northrop Grumman following cryo-optical testing at the Johns Space Flight Center.

  1. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  2. Architecture and performance of the space-based Far-Infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanola-Parramon, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Savini, G.

    2016-04-01

    FIRI (Far Infra-Red Interferometer) is a spatial and spectral space interferometer with an operating wavelength range of 25-400 μm and sub-arcsecond angular resolution. It is based on the combination of stellar interferometry and Fourier transform spectroscopy to perform spectroscopy at high angular resolution in the far-infrared. The resulting technique is referred to as double Fourier spatio-spectral interferometry. With increased spatial and spectral resolution come a number of interesting science cases such as the formation and evolution of AGN and the characterization of gas, ice and dust in discs undergoing planetary formation, among others. To study the feasibility of a FIRI system, the Far-Infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator (FIInS) has been developed. With FIInS, once a set of modelled scientific data is available, one can compare an input sky map with the synthesized one after data reduction algorithms have been applied.

  3. Prototype optical SETI observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Stuart A.

    1996-06-01

    The Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OSETI) is based on the premise that there are ETIs within our galaxy which are targeting star systems like our own with free-space beams. Upon these beams will ride attention- getting beacon signals and wideband data channels. Perhaps the wideband channels form part of a Galactic Information Superhighway, a Galactic Internet to which we are presently oblivious. The Columbus Optical SETI Observatory described in this paper is intended to be a prototype observatory which might lead to a new renaissance in both optical SETI and optical astronomy. It is hoped that the observatory design will be emulated by both the professional and amateur communities. The modern-day OSETI observatory is one that is more affordable than ever. With the aid of reasonably priced automatic telescopes, low-cost PCs, software and signal processing boards, Optical SETI can become accessible to all nations, professional scientific groups, amateur astronomy societies and even individuals.

  4. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  5. TALC: a new deployable concept for a 20m far-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Gilles; Sauvage, Marc; Bonnet, Aymeric; Rodriguez, Louis; Ronayette, Samuel; Chanial, Pierre; Scola, Loris; Révéret, Vincent; Aussel, Hervé; Carty, Michael; Durand, Matthis; Durand, Lancelot; Tremblin, Pascal; Pantin, Eric; Berthe, Michel; Martignac, Jérôme; Motte, Frédérique; Talvard, Michel; Minier, Vincent; Bultel, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    TALC, Thin Aperture Light Collector is a 20 m space observatory project exploring some unconventional optical solutions (between the single dish and the interferometer) allowing the resolving power of a classical 27 m telescope. With TALC, the principle is to remove the central part of the prime mirror dish, cut the remaining ring into 24 sectors and store them on top of one-another. The aim of this far infrared telescope is to explore the 600 μm to 100 μm region. With this approach we have shown that we can store a ring-telescope of outer diameter 20m and ring thickness of 3m inside the fairing of Ariane 5 or Ariane 6. The general structure is the one of a bicycle wheel, whereas the inner sides of the segments are in compression to each other and play the rule of a rim. The segments are linked to each other using a pantograph scissor system that let the segments extend from a pile of dishes to a parabolic ring keeping high stiffness at all time during the deployment. The inner corners of the segments are linked to a central axis using spokes as in a bicycle wheel. The secondary mirror and the instrument box are built as a solid unit fixed at the extremity of the main axis. The tensegrity analysis of this structure shows a very high stiffness to mass ratio, resulting into 3 Hz Eigen frequency. The segments will consist of two composite skins and honeycomb CFRP structure build by replica process. Solid segments will be compared to deformable segments using the controlled shear of the rear surface. The adjustment of the length of the spikes and the relative position of the side of neighbor segments let control the phasing of the entire primary mirror. The telescope is cooled by natural radiation. It is protected from sun radiation by a large inflatable solar screen, loosely linked to the telescope. The orientation is performed by inertia-wheels. This telescope carries a wide field bolometer camera using cryocooler at 0.3K as one of the main instruments. This

  6. Scale-space point spread function based framework to boost infrared target detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Saed; Moallem, Payman; Sabahi, Mohamad Farzan

    2016-07-01

    Small target detection is one of the major concern in the development of infrared surveillance systems. Detection algorithms based on Gaussian target modeling have attracted most attention from researchers in this field. However, the lack of accurate target modeling limits the performance of this type of infrared small target detection algorithms. In this paper, signal to clutter ratio (SCR) improvement mechanism based on the matched filter is described in detail and effect of Point Spread Function (PSF) on the intensity and spatial distribution of the target pixels is clarified comprehensively. In the following, a new parametric model for small infrared targets is developed based on the PSF of imaging system which can be considered as a matched filter. Based on this model, a new framework to boost model-based infrared target detection algorithms is presented. In order to show the performance of this new framework, the proposed model is adopted in Laplacian scale-space algorithms which is a well-known algorithm in the small infrared target detection field. Simulation results show that the proposed framework has better detection performance in comparison with the Gaussian one and improves the overall performance of IRST system. By analyzing the performance of the proposed algorithm based on this new framework in a quantitative manner, this new framework shows at least 20% improvement in the output SCR values in comparison with Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) algorithm.

  7. Conceiving and Marketing NASA's Great Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In late 1984, Dr. Charles P. (Charlie) Pellerin Jr., director of the Astrophysics Division of NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) faced a dilemma. Congress and the White House had given approval to work that would lead to the launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope, but competing segments of the astronomical community were clamoring for two additional missions, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). Pellerin knew that Congress would not countenance a request for another costly astronomical space observatory so soon after approving GRO and HST. He also foresaw that if he arbitrarily assigned priority to either AXAF or SIRTF he would split the astronomical community. The losing faction would be up on Capitol Hill, lobbying Congress to reverse the decision; and Congress would do what it always does with split communities --- nothing. Pellerin called a meeting of leading astrophysicists to see how a persuasive argument could be made for both these new observatories and to market them as vital to a first comprehensive inventory of the universe conducted across all wavelength ranges. The group provided Pellerin a rotating membership of astrophysicists, who could debate and resolve issues so that decisions he reached would have solid community support. It also helped him to market his ideas in Congress. Ultimately, the concept of the Great Observatories came to be accepted; but its implementation faced myriad difficulties. False starts, political alliances that never worked out, and dramatic changes of direction necessitated by the Challenger disaster of early 1986 continually kept progress off balance. My paper follows these twists and turns from late 1984 to the announcement, on February 1, 1988, that President Reagan's FY89 budget proposal to Congress had designated AXAF for a new start.

  8. Phenomenological Modeling of Infrared Sources: Recent Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Chun Ming; Kwok, Sun (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Infrared observations from planned space facilities (e.g., ISO (Infrared Space Observatory), SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility)) will yield a large and uniform sample of high-quality data from both photometric and spectroscopic measurements. To maximize the scientific returns of these space missions, complementary theoretical studies must be undertaken to interpret these observations. A crucial step in such studies is the construction of phenomenological models in which we parameterize the observed radiation characteristics in terms of the physical source properties. In the last decade, models with increasing degree of physical realism (in terms of grain properties, physical processes, and source geometry) have been constructed for infrared sources. Here we review current capabilities available in the phenomenological modeling of infrared sources and discuss briefly directions for future research in this area.

  9. A space telescope for infrared spectroscopy of earth-like planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Cheng, A. Y. S.; Woolf, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that a space telescope of 16 m diameter, apodized in a new way, could image and measure oxygen n in the thermal infrared spectral of earthlike planets up to 4 pc away. The problems of visible light imaging for this case are discussed, and it is argued that imaging the thermal emission, with greatly reduced requirements for gain and hence surface accuracy, is preferable. The requirements for such imaging are discussed, including the apodization solution.

  10. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space-borne cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the reduction of the refrigeration requirements for infrared sensors operating in space through the use of high temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as electronic leads between the cooled sensors and the relatively warmer data acquisition components. Specifically, this initial study was directed towards the design of an experiment to quantify the thermal performance of these materials in the space environment. First, an intensive review of relevant literature was undertaken, and then, design requirements were formulated. From this background information, a preliminary experimental design was developed. Additional studies will involve a thermal analysis of the experiment and further modifications of the experimental design.

  11. The Liverpool Bay Coastal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, John; Palmer, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    A pilot Coastal Observatory has been established in Liverpool Bay which integrates (near) real-time measurements with coupled models and whose results are displayed on the web. The aim is to understand the functioning of coastal seas, their response to natural forcing and the consequences of human activity. The eastern Irish Sea is an apt test site, since it encompasses a comprehensive range of processes found in tidally dominated coastal seas, including near-shore physical and biogeochemical processes influenced by estuarine inflows, where both vertical and horizontal gradients are important. Applications include hypernutrification, since the region receives significantly elevated levels of nutrient inputs, shoreline management (coastal flooding and beach erosion/accretion), and understanding present conditions to predict the impact of climate change (for instance if the number and severity of storms, or of high or low river flows, change). The integrated measurement suite which started in August 2002 covers a range of space and time scales. It includes in situ time series, four to six weekly regional water column surveys, an instrumented ferry, a shore-based HF radar system measuring surface currents and waves, coastal tide gauges and visible and infra-red satellite data. The time series enable definition of the seasonal cycle, its inter-annual variability and provide a baseline from which the relative importance of events can be quantified. A suite of nested 3D hydrodynamic, wave and ecosystem models is run daily, focusing on the observatory area by covering the ocean/shelf of northwest Europe (at 12-km resolution) and the Irish Sea (at 1.8 km), and Liverpool Bay at the highest resolution of 200 m. The measurements test the models against events as they happen in a truly 3D context. All measurements and model outputs are displayed freely on the Coastal Observatory website (http://cobs.pol.ac.uk) for an audience of researchers, education, coastal managers and the

  12. Tartu Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Tartu Observatory (TO) is a research institution in Estonia accommodating the northernmost 1.5 m telescope in the world. It is located in Estonia, about 20 km south-west of Tartu in the village of Tõravere (58°16'08''.4 N, 26°27'32''.4 E). TO performs research in astrophysics and atmospheric physics and popularizes those branches of science. TO was founded in 1808 as an observatory of Tartu Unive...

  13. Taosi Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Taosi observatory is the remains of a structure discovered at the later Neolithic Taosi site located in Xiangfen County, Shanxi Province, in north-central China. The structure is a walled enclosure on a raised platform. Only rammed-earth foundations of the structure remained. Archaeoastronomical studies suggest that this structure functioned as an astronomical observatory. Historical circumstantial evidence suggests that it was probably related to the legendary kingdom of Yao from the twenty-first century BC.

  14. Electromagnetic modelling of a space-borne far-infrared interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Bracken, Colm; Savini, Giorgio; Pascale, Enzo; Ade, Peter; Sudiwala, Rashmi; Hornsby, Amber

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I will describe work done as part of an EU-funded project `Far-infrared space interferometer critical assessment' (FISICA). The aim of the project is to investigate science objectives and technology development required for the next generation THz space interferometer. The THz/FIR is precisely the spectral region where most of the energy from stars, exo-planetary systems and galaxy clusters deep in space is emitted. The atmosphere is almost completely opaque in the wave-band of interest so any observation that requires high quality data must be performed with a space-born instrument. A space-borne far infrared interferometer will be able to answer a variety of crucial astrophysical questions such as how do planets and stars form, what is the energy engine of most galaxies and how common are the molecule building blocks of life. The FISICA team have proposed a novel instrument based on a double Fourier interferometer that is designed to resolve the light from an extended scene, spectrally and spatially. A laboratory prototype spectral-spatial interferometer has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of the double-Fourier technique at far infrared wavelengths (0.15 - 1 THz). This demonstrator is being used to investigate and validate important design features and data-processing methods for future instruments. Using electromagnetic modelling techniques several issues related to its operation at long baselines and wavelengths, such as diffraction, have been investigated. These are critical to the design of the concept instrument and the laboratory testbed.

  15. Radio quite site qualification for the Brasilian Southern Space Observatory by monitoring the low frequency 10-240 MHz Eletromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rosa, Guilherme Simon; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Espindola Antunes, Cassio; Gomes, Natanael

    The monitoring of the level of the radio interference in the Site of the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory - SSO/CRS/CIE/INPE - MCT, (29S, 53W), São Martinho da Serra, RS, in south a of Brazil, aims to gather spectral data for the Observatory's Site qualification as a radio quite site for installation of Radio Astronomy instrumentation, free of radio noise. The determination of the radio interference level is being conducted by using a spectrum analyzer and Omni directional antennas remotely controlled through a GPIB interface, via IEEE 488 bus, and programs written in C language. That procedure allows the scanning of the Electromagnetic Spectrum power over the examined frequency range from 10 - 240MHz. The methodology for these tests was to amplify the radio signal from the antenna by a block amplifier. Subsequently, the received signals are evaluated by the spectrum analyzer. A dedicated PC computer is used for the control and data acquisition, with the developed software. The data are instantly stored in digital format and remotely transferred via VNC software from the SSO-Observatory Site to the Radio Frequency and Telecommunication Laboratory at the Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRS/CIE/INPE - MCT, in Santa Maria, RS, for analysis and storage on the radio interference data base for long period. It is compared the SSO's Electromagnetic Spectrum data obtained since the beginning of the 1990's decade, before the Site constructions, with the current observed data. Some radio transmissions were found in the observed frequency range due to some local FMs, mostly between 93.5 MHz to 105.7 MHz, which were observed in previous monitoring. A good evidence of the site quality is the fact that the power of the Electromagnetic Spectrum is much lower than that measured at the Radio Frequency and Telecommunication Laboratory, in Santa Maria, RS, where the signals do not exceed -60 dB. On the Site of the SSO, due to the low power observed, weak radio signals

  16. Invited review article: The Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is an orbiting x-ray telescope facility. It is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's four "Great Observatories" that collectively have carried out astronomical observations covering the infrared through gamma-ray portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Chandra is used by astronomers world-wide to acquire imaging and spectroscopic data over a nominal 0.1-10 keV (124-1.24 Å) range. We describe the three major parts of the observatory: the telescope, the spacecraft systems, and the science instruments. This article will emphasize features of the design and development driven by some of the experimental considerations unique to x-ray astronomy. We will update the on-orbit performance and present examples of the scientific highlights.

  17. Invited review article: The Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is an orbiting x-ray telescope facility. It is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's four "Great Observatories" that collectively have carried out astronomical observations covering the infrared through gamma-ray portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Chandra is used by astronomers world-wide to acquire imaging and spectroscopic data over a nominal 0.1-10 keV (124-1.24 Å) range. We describe the three major parts of the observatory: the telescope, the spacecraft systems, and the science instruments. This article will emphasize features of the design and development driven by some of the experimental considerations unique to x-ray astronomy. We will update the on-orbit performance and present examples of the scientific highlights. PMID:24985792

  18. The Spitzer Space Telescope Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, NASA's Great Observatory for infrared astronomy, was launched 2003 August 25 and is returning excellent scientific data from its Earth-trailing solar orbit. Spitzer combines the intrinsic sensitivity achievable with a cryogenic telescope in space with the great imaging and spectroscopic power of modern detector arrays to provide the user community with huge gains in capability for exploration of the cosmos in the infrared. The observatory systems are largely performing as expected, and the projected cryogenic lifetime is about five years. Spitzer is thus both a scientific and a technical precursor to the infrared astronomy missions of the future. This very brief paper refers interested readers to several sets of recent publications which describe both the scientific and the technical features of Spitzer in detail. Note that, until 2003 December, Spitzer was known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

  19. Space-based infrared scanning sensor LOS determination and calibration using star observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Zhan; An, Wei; Deng, Xin-Pu; Yang, Jun-Gang

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology for removing sensor bias from a space based infrared (IR) system (SBIRS) through the use of stars detected in the background field of the sensor. Space based IR system uses the LOS (line of sight) of target for target location. LOS determination and calibration is the key precondition of accurate location and tracking of targets in Space based IR system and the LOS calibration of scanning sensor is one of the difficulties. The subsequent changes of sensor bias are not been taking into account in the conventional LOS determination and calibration process. Based on the analysis of the imaging process of scanning sensor, a theoretical model based on the estimation of bias angles using star observation is proposed. By establishing the process model of the bias angles and the observation model of stars, using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the bias angles, and then calibrating the sensor LOS. Time domain simulations results indicate that the proposed method has a high precision and smooth performance for sensor LOS determination and calibration. The timeliness and precision of target tracking process in the space based infrared (IR) tracking system could be met with the proposed algorithm.

  20. A Compact Infrared Space Telescope MIRIS and its Preliminary Observational Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Kim, Il-Joong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Moon, Bongkon; Park, Youngsik; Park, Sung-Joon; Lee, Dukhang; Park, Won-Kee; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Kim, Min Gyu; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Hong-Young; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-08-01

    The first Korean infrared space telescope MIRIS (Milti-purpose InfraRed Imaging System) was successfully launched in November 2013, as the main payload of Korean STSAT-3 (Science and Technology Satellite-3). After the initial on-orbit operation for verification, the observations are made with MIRIS for the fluctuation of Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and the Galactic Plane survey. For the study of near-infrared background, MIRIS surveyed large areas (> 10° x 10°) around the pole regions: the north ecliptic pole (NEP), the north and south Galactic poles (NGP, SGP), while the NEP region is continually monitored for the instrumental calibration and the zodiacal light study. In addition, the Paschen-α Galactic plane survey has been made with two narrow-band filters (at 1.88 μm and 1.84+1.92 μm) for the study of warm interstellar medium. We plan to continue surveying the entire galactic plane with the latitude of ±3°, and expect to be completed by 2015. The data are still under the stage of reduction and analysis, and guest observations are on-going. We present some of the preliminary results.

  1. Remote Infrared Imaging of the Space Shuttle During Hypersonic Flight: HYTHIRM Mission Operations and Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; McCrea, Andrew C.; Gruber, Jennifer R.; Hensley, Doyle W.; Verstynen, Harry A.; Oram, Timothy D.; Berger, Karen T.; Splinter, Scott C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robert V.

    2011-01-01

    The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) project has been responsible for obtaining spatially resolved, scientifically calibrated in-flight thermal imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry. Starting with STS-119 in March of 2009 and continuing through to the majority of final flights of the Space Shuttle, the HYTHIRM team has to date deployed during seven Shuttle missions with a mix of airborne and ground based imaging platforms. Each deployment of the HYTHIRM team has resulted in obtaining imagery suitable for processing and comparison with computational models and wind tunnel data at Mach numbers ranging from over 18 to under Mach 5. This paper will discuss the detailed mission planning and coordination with the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Control Center that the HYTHIRM team undergoes to prepare for and execute each mission.

  2. The Hubble Space Telescope: UV, Visible, and Near-Infrared Pursuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope continues to push the limits on world-class astrophysics. Cameras including the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the new panchromatic Wide Field Camera 3 which was installed nu last year's successful servicing mission S2N4,o{fer imaging from near-infrared through ultraviolet wavelengths. Spectroscopic studies of sources from black holes to exoplanet atmospheres are making great advances through the versatile use of STIS, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, also installed last year, is the most sensitive UV spectrograph to fly io space and is uniquely suited to address particular scientific questions on galaxy halos, the intergalactic medium, and the cosmic web. With these outstanding capabilities on HST come complex needs for laboratory astrophysics support including atomic and line identification data. I will provide an overview of Hubble's current capabilities and the scientific programs and goals that particularly benefit from the studies of laboratory astrophysics.

  3. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Georgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.

    2004-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope's primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted lambda (sub co) approximately 5 micrometer Rockwell HAWAII- 2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  4. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.; Brambora, Clifford; Connelly, Joe; Derro, Rebecca; DiPirro, Michael J.; Doria-Warner, Christina; Ericsson, Aprille; Glazer, Stuart D.; Greene, Charles; Hall, Donald N.; Jacobson, Shane; Jakobsen, Peter; Johnson, Eric; Johnson, Scott D.; Krebs, Carolyn; Krebs, Danny J.; Lambros, Scott D.; Likins, Blake; Manthripragada, Sridhar; Martineau, Robert J.; Morse, Ernie C.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Mott, D. Brent; Muench, Theo; Park, Hongwoo; Parker, Susan; Polidan, Elizabeth J.; Rashford, Robert; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin; Sharma, Rajeev; Strada, Paolo; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wong, Selmer; Yagelowich, John; Zuray, Monica

    2004-10-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope"s primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted λco ~ 5 μm Rockwell HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  5. Development of sensitive long-wave infrared detector arrays for passively cooled space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Craig; Lee, Donald; Beletic, James; Chen, Chi-Yi A.; Demers, Richard T.; Dorn, Meghan; Edwall, Dennis; Fazar, Candice Bacon; Forrest, William J.; Liu, Fengchuan; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Pipher, Judith L.; Yulius, Aristo

    2013-09-01

    The near-earth object camera (NEOCam) is a proposed infrared space mission designed to discover and characterize most of the potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 140 m in diameter that orbit near the Earth. NASA has funded technology development for NEOCam, including the development of long wavelength infrared detector arrays that will have excellent zodiacal background emission-limited performance at passively cooled focal plane temperatures. Teledyne Imaging Sensors has developed and delivered for test at the University of Rochester the first set of approximately 10 μm cutoff, 1024×1024 pixel HgCdTe detector arrays. Measurements of these arrays show the development to be extremely promising: noise, dark current, quantum efficiency, and well depth goals have been met by this technology at focal plane temperatures of 35 to 40 K, readily attainable with passive cooling. The next set of arrays to be developed will address changes suggested by the first set of deliverables.

  6. Infrared Telescope Facility's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, K.; Buckalew, B.; Abell, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2006 to 2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 20 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials, thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons, silicon, and thermal emission. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels, whereas the rocket bodies do not. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  7. Keele Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Albinson, James; Bagnall, Alan; Bryant, Lian; Caisley, Dave; Doody, Stephen; Johnson, Ian; Klimczak, Paul; Maddison, Ron; Robinson, StJohn; Stretch, Matthew; Webb, John

    2015-08-01

    Keele Observatory was founded by Dr. Ron Maddison in 1962, on the hill-top campus of Keele University in central England, hosting the 1876 Grubb 31cm refractor from Oxford Observatory. It since acquired a 61cm research reflector, a 15cm Halpha solar telescope and a range of other telescopes. Run by a group of volunteering engineers and students under directorship of a Keele astrophysicist, it is used for public outreach as well as research. About 4,000 people visit the observatory every year, including a large number of children. We present the facility, its history - including involvement in the 1919 Eddington solar eclipse expedition which proved Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity - and its ambitions to erect a radio telescope on its site.

  8. NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Steven

    2016-04-01

    NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data, and modeling development services to national and international space weather efforts utilizing a coordinated and complementary fleet of spacecraft, called the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), to understand the Sun and its interactions with Earth and the solar system, including space weather. This presentation will focus on NASA's role in space weather research and the contributions the agency continues to provide to the science of space weather, leveraging inter-agency and international collaborations for the benefit of society.

  9. An ISO far-infrared survey of line and continuum emission for 227 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauher, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared line and continuum fluxes are presented for a sample of 227 galaxies observed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory, selected from the ISO Data Archive and having an IRAS 60/100 mu m color ration of 0.2-1.4 and IRAS 60 mu m flux density between 0.1 Jy and 1300 Jy.

  10. SpaceWire-based thermal-infrared imager system for asteroid sample return mission HAYABUSA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihara, Hiroki; Iwase, Kaori; Sano, Junpei; Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Kashikawa, Ryoichi; Higashino, Isamu; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    A thermal-infrared (TIR) imager system is developed for HAYABUSA2, which is planned to be launched in 2014 and aims at sample-return from a C-class near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999JU3) considered to contain organic or hydrated materials. The system consists of a TIR imager and digital electronics, which are used not only for the scientific investigation of physical properties of the asteroid surface, but also for the assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface with in situ measurement. TIR adopts an uncooled bolometer. Image operations such as multiple images summation, dark image subtraction, and the compensation of dead pixels are processed onboard. A processing module is connected to sensor interfaces through SpaceWire in order to provide deterministic processing time. Data compression is also provided to reduce the restriction of transmission time, which provides the equivalent compression ratio as JPEG2000 in 1/30 processing time in average. A high-speed data recorder is connected through SpaceWire in order to record TIR data in parallel with other sensor data. The modularity of SpaceWire enables us to use these as built devices for TIR and inherits the same design as the long-wavelength infrared imager developed for the Venus climate orbiter Akatsuki.

  11. A Spitzer Space Telescope Far-infrared Spectral Atlas of Compact Sources in the Magellanic Clouds. II. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Sloan, G. C.; Engelbracht, C. W.

    2010-04-01

    We present far-infrared spectra, λ = 52-93 μm, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope in the spectral energy distribution mode of its Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer instrument, of a selection of luminous compact far-infrared sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These comprise nine young stellar objects (YSOs), the compact H II region N 81 and a similar object within N 84, and two red supergiants (RSGs). We use the spectra to constrain the presence and temperature of cool dust and the excitation conditions within the neutral and ionized gas, in the circumstellar environments and interfaces with the surrounding interstellar medium. We compare these results with those obtained in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The spectra of the sources in N 81 (of which we also show the Infrared Space Observatory-Long-wavelength Spectrograph spectrum between 50 and 170 μm) and N 84 both display strong [O I] λ63 μm and [O III] λ88 μm fine-structure line emission. We attribute these lines to strong shocks and photo-ionized gas, respectively, in a "champagne flow" scenario. The nitrogen content of these two H II regions is very low, definitely N(N)/N(O) < 0.04 but possibly as low as N(N)/N(O) < 0.01. Overall, the oxygen lines and dust continuum are weaker in star-forming objects in the SMC than in the LMC. We attribute this to the lower metallicity of the SMC compared to that of the LMC. While the dust mass differs in proportion to metallicity, the oxygen mass differs less; both observations can be reconciled with higher densities inside star-forming cloud cores in the SMC than in the LMC. The dust in the YSOs in the SMC is warmer (37-51 K) than in comparable objects in the LMC (32-44 K). We attribute this to the reduced shielding and reduced cooling at the low metallicity of the SMC. On the other hand, the efficiency of the photo-electric effect to heat the gas is found to be indistinguishable to that measured in the same manner in the LMC, ≈0

  12. Tools for Coordinated Planning Between Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Fishman, Mark; Grella, Vince; Kerbel, Uri; Maks, Lori; Misra, Dharitri; Pell, Vince; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the realization of NASA's era of great observatories, there are now more than three space-based telescopes operating in different wavebands. This situation provides astronomers with a unique opportunity to simultaneously observe with multiple observatories. Yet scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously is highly inefficient when compared to observations using only one single observatory. Thus, programs using multiple observatories are limited not due to scientific restrictions, but due to operational inefficiencies. At present, multi-observatory programs are conducted by submitting observing proposals separately to each concerned observatory. To assure that the proposed observations can be scheduled, each observatory's staff has to check that the observations are valid and meet all the constraints for their own observatory; in addition, they have to verify that the observations satisfy the constraints of the other observatories. Thus, coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among the observatory staff at each observatory. Due to the lack of automated tools for coordinated observations, this process is time consuming, error-prone, and the outcome of the requests is not certain until the very end. To increase observatory operations efficiency, such manpower intensive processes need to undergo re-engineering. To overcome this critical deficiency, Goddard Space Flight Center's Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch is developing a prototype effort called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of the VOLT project is to provide visual tools to help automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories, as well as to increase the scheduling probability of all observations.

  13. The SpaceWire-based thermal infrared imager system for asteroid sample return mission HAYABUSA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Hihara, Hiroki; Sano, Junpei; Iwase, Kaori; Kashikawa, Ryoichi; Higashino, Isamu; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    Thermal infrared imager system is developed for HAYABUSA2, which is planned to be launched in 2014 and aims at sample-return from a C class near-Earth asteroid 1999JU3 considered to contain organic or hydrated materials. The system consists of a thermal-infrared imager (TIR) and a digital electronics, which is used not only for the scientific investigation of physical properties of the asteroid surface, but also for the assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface with in situ measurement. Since round trip communication time between the asteroid and the Earth is more than thirty minutes, onboard automatic data processing function and high speed data recording capability are provided to exploit the limited downlink capacity which is up to 32kbps. TIR adopts an uncooled bolometer with 320 x 240 effective pixels. Image operations as multiple images summation, dark image subtraction, and the compensation of dead pixels are processed onboard. A processing module is connected to sensor interfaces through SpaceWire in order to provide deterministic processing time. Data compression is also provided to reduce restriction on storage capacity and operation time, which provides the equivalent compression ratio as JPEG2000 in 1/30 processing time in average. A high speed data recorder is also connected through SpaceWire in 50Mbps in order to record TIR data in parallel with other sensor data. The modularity of SpaceWire enables to use as built devices for TIR and inherits the same design as the long-wavelength infrared imager developed for the Venus climate orbiter Akatsuki.

  14. Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The NGST wavefront sensing and control system will be developed to TRL6 over the next few years, including testing in a cryogenic vacuum environment with traceable hardware. Doing this in the far-infrared and submillimeter is probably easier, as some aspects of the problem scale with wavelength, and the telescope is likely to have a more stable environment; however, detectors may present small complications. Since this is a new system approach, it warrants a new look. For instance, a large space telescope based on the DART membrane mirror design requires a new actuation approach. Other mirror and actuation technologies may prove useful as well.

  15. Design and fabrication of step mirrors used in space-modulated Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Liang, Jingqiu; Liang, Zhongzhu

    2013-01-14

    A model of miniaturized space-modulated Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) is given. The two step mirrors as the key components are designed and a lithography-electroplating technique used to fabricate the small step mirror is proposed. We analyze the effect of the experiment results resulted from fabricating technics on the recovery spectrum in theory, and demonstrate that the lithography-electroplating technique is an effective method to fabricate the step mirror, which make miniaturized FTIR realized. We believe that the performances of FTIR can be better realized by optimizing experimental conditions to make this fabricating method more attractive.

  16. The Space High Angular Resolution Probe for the Infrared (SHARP-IR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Rizzo, M. J.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Staguhn, J. G.; DiPirro, M.; Mentzell, J. E.; Juanola-Parramon, R.; Dhabal, A.; Mundy, L. G.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Roberge, A.; Cordiner, M.; Milam, S.; Veach, T.; Fixsen, D.

    2016-07-01

    The Space High Angular Resolution Probe for the Infrared (SHARP-IR) is a new mission currently under study. As part of the preparation for the Decadal Survey, NASA is currently undertaking studies of four major missions, but interest has also been shown in determining if there are feasible sub-$1B missions that could provide significant scientific return. SHARP-IR is being designed as one such potential probe. In this talk, we will discuss some of the potential scientific questions that could be addressed with the mission, the current design, and the path forward to concept maturation.

  17. Visible and infrared detector developments supported by the European Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, N.; Minoglou, K.; Voland, C.; Levillain, Y.; Meynart, R.; Bezy, J.-L.; Duvet, L.; Zahir, M.; Leone, B.; Ciapponi, A.; Crouzet, P.-E.

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing is a priority activity for the European Space Agency and detector performance is a crucial factor in determining how well this role is performed. Consequently, the Agency has a strong interest in continuous improvement of both detector capabilities and availability within Europe. To this end, ESA maintains a number of strategic detector development plans combining both technology-push and technology-pull. The visible and infrared wavebands are of particular interest for remote sensing activities and this paper sets out the requirements for current and future missions and presents details of the Agency's current and planned detector developments.

  18. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  19. MOOSE: A Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs for innovative research in space physics and aeronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Hampton, D. L.; Trondsen, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs (MOOSE) consists of 5 imaging systems and is the result of an NSF-funded Major Research Instrumentation project. The main objective of MOOSE is to provide a resource to all members of the scientific community that have interests in imaging low-light-level phenomena, such as aurora, airglow, and meteors. Each imager consists of an Andor DU-888 Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), combined with a telecentric optics section, made by Keo Scientific Ltd., with a selection of available angular fields of view. During the northern hemisphere winter the system is typically based and operated at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, but any or all imagers can be shipped anywhere in individual stand-alone cases. We will discuss the main components of the MOOSE project, including the imagers, optics, lenses and filters, as well as the Linux-based control software that enables remote operation. We will also discuss the calibration of the imagers along with the initial deployments and testing done. We are requesting community input regarding operational modes, such as filter and field of view combinations, frame rates, and potentially moving some imagers to other locations, either for tomography or for larger spatial coverage. In addition, given the large volume of auroral image data already available, we are encouraging collaborations for which we will freely distribute the data and any analysis tools already developed. Most significantly, initial science highlights relating to aurora, airglow and meteors will be discussed in the context of the creative and innovative ways that the MOOSE observatory can be used in order to address a new realm of science topics, previously unachievable with traditional single imager systems.

  20. Technology Development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a Candidate Large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10?10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing & control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 µm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  1. Technology development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a candidate large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10-10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing and control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 μm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (~290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  2. An Overview of the Performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Bautz, M.; Cameron, R. A.; Dewey, D.; Drake, J. J.; Grant, C. E.; Marshall, H. L.; Murray, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which includes the recently launched Spitzer Infrared Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for observations in the visible, and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) which, after providing years of useful data has reentered the atmosphere. All these facilities provide, or provided, scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to peer-reviewed proposals for their use. The Chandra X-ray Observatory was the result of the efforts of many academic, commercial, and government organizations primarily in the United States but also in Europe. NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the Project and provides Project Science; Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST - formerly TRW) served as prime contractor responsible for providing the spacecraft, the telescope, and assembling and testing the Observatory; and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) provides technical support and is responsible for ground operations including the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). Telescope and instrument teams at SAO, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Pennsylvania State University (PSU), the Space Research Institute of the Netherlands (SRON), the Max-Planck Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), and the University of Kiel support also provide technical support to the Chandra Project. We present here a detailed description of the hardware, its on-orbit performance, and a brief overview of some of the remarkable discoveries that illustrate that performance.

  3. WNCC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, L. F.

    2003-05-01

    Western Nevada Community College (WNCC), located in Carson City, Nevada, is a small two year college with only 6,000 students. Associate degrees and Cer- tificates of Achievement are awarded. The college was built and started classes in 1971 and about 12 years ago the chair of the physics department along with a few in administration had dreams of building a small observatory for education. Around that time a local foundation, Nevada Gaming Foundation for Education Excellence, was looking for a beneficiary in the education field to receive a grant. They decided an observatory at the college met their criteria. Grants to the foundation instigated by Senators, businesses, and Casinos and donations from the local public now total $1.3 million. This paper will explain the different facets of building the observatory, the planning, construction, telescopes and equipment decisions and how we think it will operate for the public, education and research. The organization of local volunteers to operate and maintain the observatory and the planned re- search will be explained.

  4. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  5. Infrared transfer radiometer for broadband and spectral calibration of space chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy M.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Woods, Solomon I.; Kaplan, Simon G.; Datla, Raju U.

    2010-04-01

    The Low-Background Infrared (LBIR) facility at NIST has recently completed construction of an infrared transfer radiometer with an integrated cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer (Cryo-FTS). This mobile system can be deployed to customer sites for broadband and spectral calibrations of space chambers and low-background HWIL testbeds. The Missile Defense Transfer Radiometer (MDXR) has many of the capabilities of a complete IR calibration facility and will replace our existing filter-based transfer radiometer (BXR) as the NIST standard detector deployed to MDA facilities. The MDXR features numerous improvements over the BXR, including: a cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer, an on-board absolute cryogenic radiometer (ACR), an internal blackbody reference, and an integrated collimator. The Cryo-FTS can be used to measure high resolution spectra from 4 to 20 micrometers, using a Si:As blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector. The on-board ACR can be used for self-calibration of the MDXR BIB as well as for absolute measurements of infrared sources. A set of filter wheels and a rotating polarizer within the MDXR allow for filter-based and polarization-sensitive measurements. The optical design of the MDXR makes both radiance and irradiance measurements possible and enables calibration of both divergent and collimated sources. Details of the various MDXR components will be presented as well as initial testing data on their performance.

  6. Predicting future space near-IR grism surveys using the WFC3 infrared spectroscopic parallels survey

    SciTech Connect

    Colbert, James W.; Atek, Hakim; Teplitz, Harry; Rafelski, Marc; Bunker, Andrew; Ross, Nathaniel; Malkan, Matt; Scarlata, Claudia; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Dominguez, Alberto; Masters, Dan; Siana, Brian; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick; Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.

    2013-12-10

    We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields (0.037 deg{sup 2}) observed using both the G102 and G141 grism. Altogether we identify 1048 emission line galaxies with observed equivalent widths greater than 40 Å, 467 of which have multiple detected emission lines. We use simulations to correct for significant (>20%) incompleteness introduced in part by the non-dithered, non-rotated nature of the grism parallels. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels ((3-5) × 10{sup –17} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}) than the future space near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology ((1-4) × 10{sup –16} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}), allowing us to probe the fainter emission line galaxies that the shallower future surveys may miss. Cumulative number counts of 0.7 < z < 1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 deg{sup –2} above an Hα flux of 2 × 10{sup –16} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Hα-emitting galaxies with comparable [O III] flux are roughly five times less common than galaxies with just Hα emission at those flux levels. Galaxies with low Hα/[O III] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with Hα/[O III] < 0.95 that have Hα flux greater than 3 × 10{sup –16} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Our Hα luminosity function contains a comparable number density of faint line emitters to that found by the Near IR Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer near-infrared grism surveys, but significantly fewer (factors of 3-4 less) high-luminosity emitters. We also find that our high-redshift (z = 0.9-1.5) counts are in agreement with the high-redshift (z = 1.47) narrowband Hα survey of HiZELS (Sobral et al.), while our lower redshift luminosity function (z = 0.3-0.9) falls slightly below their z = 0.84 result. The evolution

  7. Predicting Future Space Near-IR Grism Surveys Using the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, James W.; Teplitz, Harry; Atek, Hakim; Bunker, Andrew; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Scarlata, Claudia; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Dominguez, Alberto; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Martin, Crystal L.; Masters, Dan; McCarthy, Patrick; Siana, Brian

    2013-12-01

    We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields (0.037 deg2) observed using both the G102 and G141 grism. Altogether we identify 1048 emission line galaxies with observed equivalent widths greater than 40 Å, 467 of which have multiple detected emission lines. We use simulations to correct for significant (>20%) incompleteness introduced in part by the non-dithered, non-rotated nature of the grism parallels. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels ((3-5) × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2) than the future space near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology ((1-4) × 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2), allowing us to probe the fainter emission line galaxies that the shallower future surveys may miss. Cumulative number counts of 0.7 < z < 1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 deg-2 above an Hα flux of 2 × 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2. Hα-emitting galaxies with comparable [O III] flux are roughly five times less common than galaxies with just Hα emission at those flux levels. Galaxies with low Hα/[O III] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with Hα/[O III] < 0.95 that have Hα flux greater than 3 × 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2. Our Hα luminosity function contains a comparable number density of faint line emitters to that found by the Near IR Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer near-infrared grism surveys, but significantly fewer (factors of 3-4 less) high-luminosity emitters. We also find that our high-redshift (z = 0.9-1.5) counts are in agreement with the high-redshift (z = 1.47) narrowband Hα survey of HiZELS (Sobral et al.), while our lower redshift luminosity function (z = 0.3-0.9) falls slightly below their z = 0.84 result. The evolution in both the Hα luminosity function from z = 0.3-1.5 and the [O III] luminosity function from z = 0.7-2.3 is

  8. Infrared cloud imaging in support of Earth-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Paul W; Shaw, Joseph A; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2009-05-11

    The increasing need for high data return from near-Earth and deep-space missions is driving a demand for the establishment of Earth-space optical communication links. These links will require a nearly obstruction-free path to the communication platform, so there is a need to measure spatial and temporal statistics of clouds at potential ground-station sites. A technique is described that uses a ground-based thermal infrared imager to provide continuous day-night cloud detection and classification according to the cloud optical depth and potential communication channel attenuation. The benefit of retrieving cloud optical depth and corresponding attenuation is illustrated through measurements that identify cloudy times when optical communication may still be possible through thin clouds.

  9. Infrared cloud imaging in support of Earth-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Paul W; Shaw, Joseph A; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2009-05-11

    The increasing need for high data return from near-Earth and deep-space missions is driving a demand for the establishment of Earth-space optical communication links. These links will require a nearly obstruction-free path to the communication platform, so there is a need to measure spatial and temporal statistics of clouds at potential ground-station sites. A technique is described that uses a ground-based thermal infrared imager to provide continuous day-night cloud detection and classification according to the cloud optical depth and potential communication channel attenuation. The benefit of retrieving cloud optical depth and corresponding attenuation is illustrated through measurements that identify cloudy times when optical communication may still be possible through thin clouds. PMID:19434118

  10. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, I: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Wright, G. S.; Böker, T.; Bouwman, J.; Colina, L.; Glasse, Alistair; Gordon, K. D.; Greene, T. P.; Güdel, Manuel; Henning, Th.; Justtanont, K.; Lagage, P.-O.; Meixner, M. E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.-U.; Ray, T. P.; Ressler, M. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Waelkens, C.

    2015-07-01

    MIRI (the Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope [JWST]) operates from 5 to 28.5 μm and combines over this range: (1) unprecedented sensitivity levels; (2) subarcsecond angular resolution; (3) freedom from atmospheric interference; (4) the inherent stability of observing in space; and (5) a suite of versatile capabilities including imaging, low- and medium-resolution spectroscopy (with an integral field unit), and coronagraphy. We illustrate the potential uses of this unique combination of capabilities with various science examples: (1) imaging exoplanets; (2) transit and eclipse spectroscopy of exoplanets; (3) probing the first stages of star and planet formation, including identifying bioactive molecules; (4) determining star formation rates and mass growth as galaxies are assembled; and (5) characterizing the youngest massive galaxies.

  11. The Case for Space-Borne Far-Infrared Line Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Dragovan, M.; Earle, L.; Glenn, J.; Naylor, B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The combination of sensitive direct detectors and a cooled aperture promises orders of magnitude improvement in the sensitivity and survey time for far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopy compared to existing or planned capabilities. Continuing advances in direct detector technology enable spectroscopy that approaches the background limit available only from space at these wavelengths. Because the spectral confusion limit is significantly lower than the more familiar spatial confusion limit encountered in imaging applications, spectroscopy can be carried out to comparable depth with a significantly smaller aperture. We are developing a novel waveguide-coupled grating spectrometer that disperses radiation into a wide instantaneous bandwidth with moderate resolution (R 1000) in a compact 2-dimensional format. A line survey instrument coupled to a modest cooled single aperture provides an attractive scientific application for spectroscopy with direct detectors. Using a suite of waveguide spectrometers, we can obtain complete coverage over the entire far-infrared and sub-millimeter. This concept requires no moving parts to modulate the optical signal. Such an instrument would be able to conduct a far-infrared line survey 10 6 times faster than planned capabilities, assuming existing detector technology. However, if historical improvements in bolometer sensitivity continue, so that photon-limited sensitivity is obtained, the integration time can be further reduced by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude, depending on wavelength. The line flux sensitivity would be comparable to ALMA, but at shorter wavelengths and with the continuous coverage needed to extract line fluxes for sources at unknown redshifts. For example, this capability would break the current spectroscopic bottleneck in the study of far-infrared galaxies, the recently discovered, rapidly evolving objects abundant at cosmological distances.

  12. Observatories in earth orbit and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on observations in earth orbit and beyond discusses current and future missions, launch vehicles, the relative merits of various observatories, and long-term future issues. Attention is given to the Granat automatic spacecraft, the prospects of the Hipparcos mission, EUV and FUV astronomy from Voyagers 1 and 2, and the X-ray Timing Explorer. Topics addressed include the SAX mission for X-ray astronomy, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, the Ulysses mission in the high-latitude heliosphere, and science operations for future space astrophysics missions. Also discussed are science observations with the IUE using the one-gyro mode, new methods of determining spacecraft attitude, cryogenic testing of optics for ISOCAM, and the stellar X-ray polarimeter for the Spectrum-X-Gamma mission.

  13. Thermographic Imaging of the Space Shuttle During Re-Entry Using a Near Infrared Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robbie V.; Burke, Eric R.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Spisz, Tom; Gibson, David M.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric re-entry of the STS-119, STS-125, STS-128, STS-131, STS-132, STS-133, and STS-134 missions. This data has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. The thermal imagery complemented data collected with onboard surface thermocouple instrumentation. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Orbiter s hypersonic re-entry will provide critical flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is critical for the validation of physics-based, semi-empirical boundary-layer transition prediction methods as well as stimulating the validation of laminar numerical chemistry models and the development of turbulence models supporting NASA s next-generation spacecraft. In this paper we provide details of the NIR imaging system used on both air and land-based imaging assets. The paper will discuss calibrations performed on the NIR imaging systems that permitted conversion of captured radiant intensity (counts) to temperature values. Image processing techniques are presented to analyze the NIR data for vignetting distortion, best resolution, and image sharpness. Keywords: HYTHIRM, Space Shuttle thermography, hypersonic imaging, near infrared imaging, histogram analysis, singular value decomposition, eigenvalue image sharpness

  14. The Infrared Solar Spectrum Measured by the SOLSPEC Spectrometer Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Harder, J. W.; Shapiro, A.; Woods, T. N.; Perrin, J.-M.; Snow, M.; Sukhodolov, T.; Schmutz, W.

    2015-06-01

    A solar spectrum extending from the extreme ultraviolet to the near-infrared is an important input for solar physics, climate research, and atmospheric physics. Ultraviolet measurements have been conducted since the beginning of the space age, but measurements throughout the contiguous visible and infrared (IR) regions are much more sparse. Ageing is a key problem throughout the entire spectral domain, but most of the effort extended to understand degradation was concentrated on the ultraviolet spectral region, and these mechanisms may not be appropriate in the IR. This problem is further complicated by the scarcity of long-term data sets. Onboard the International Space Station, the SOLSPEC spectrometer measured an IR solar spectral irradiance lower than the one given by ATLAS 3, e.g. by about 7 % at 1 700 nm. We here evaluate the consequences of the lower solar spectral irradiance measurements and present a re-analysis of the on-orbit calibration lamp and solar data trend, which lead to a revised spectrum.

  15. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons from the International Space Station and High Mountain Observatories in Association with a Flare on July 8, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraki, Y.; Lopez, D.; Koga, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Goka, T.; González, L. X.; Masuda, S.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Miranda, P.; Okudaira, O.; Obara, T.; Salinas, J.; Sako, T.; Shibata, S.; Ticona, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-04-01

    An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 on the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with the flare, two neutron detectors located at high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico and Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, recorded two neutron pulses, separated approximately by 30 min. Moreover, enhancements were also observed by the solar neutron detector onboard the International Space Station. We analyzed these data combined with solar images from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From these we noticed that the production mechanism of neutrons cannot be explained by a single model; at least one of the enhancements may be explained by an electric field generated by the collision of magnetic loops and the other by the shock acceleration mechanism at the front side of the CME.

  16. SOFIA Observatory Conducts Night Checkout Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    This spectacular video captures NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy as it flew a nighttime checkout flight over northern and central California the first week of March 2013. The...

  17. Characterization of direct readout Si:Sb and Si:Ga infrared detector arrays for space-based astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, Mark E.; Mccreight, Craig R.; Goebel, John H.; Moss, Nicolas N.; Savage, Maureen L.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary test results from the evaluation of Si:Sb and Si:Ga 58 x 62-element infrared detector arrays are presented. These devices are being characterized under background conditions and readout rates representative of operation in orbiting, crogenically-cooled infrared observatories. The arrays are hybridized to silicon direct-readout multiplexers which allow random-access and nondestructive readout. Array performance optimization is being conducted with a flexible microcomputer-based drive and readoaut electronics system. Preliminary Si:Sb measurements indicate a sense node capacitance of 0.06 pF, peak (28-micron) responsivity above 3 A/W at 2V bias, read noise of 130 rms e(-), dark current approximately 10 e(-)/s, and a well capacity greater than 10 to the 5th e(-). The limited test data available on the performance of the Si:Ga array are also discussed.

  18. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  19. Far-Infrared Space Interferometers: Future Windows on Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    2004-01-01

    Far-IR space interferometers will provide observational access to a spectral region containing many important cooling and diagnostic spectral lines and the bulk of the thermal emission from dust at angular scales critical to advancing our understanding of the star and planet formation process. We will describe concepts for the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). Both of these candidate NASA missions are imaging and spectral Michelson interferometers operating in the wavelength range -40 - 800 microns. SPIRIT, which could be launched in a decade as a NASA Origins Probe, is built on a deployable boom and has a maximum baseline length of -30 - 50 m, yielding sub-arcsecond resolution in the far-IR. SPIRIT will thus provide far-IR/sub-mm measurements complementary to the near- and mid-IR measurements obtainable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and well matched to JWST observations in angular resolution. Ultimately SPECS, a NASA Vision Mission, will use formation flying to attain baseline lengths up to 1 km, and thus angular resolution comparable to that of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. We will report preliminary results of the NASA-sponsored SPIRIT and SPECS mission studies, which are now underway.

  20. Space Studies Board, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1994 report of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council summarizes the charter and organization of the board, activities and membership, major and short reports, and congressional testimony. A cumulative bibliography of the Space Studies (formerly Space Science) Board and its committees is provided. An appendix contains reports of the panel to review Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) plans. Major reports cover scientific opportunities in the human exploration of space, the dichotomy between funding and effectiveness in space physics, an integrated strategy for the planetary sciences for the years 1995-2010, and Office of Naval Research (ONR) research opportunities in upper atmospheric sciences. Short reports cover utilization of the space station, life and microgravity sciences and the space station program, Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Cassini Saturn Probe.

  1. A Giant Leap Towards a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory: LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Test Package, and ST7-DRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; McNamara, Paul; Ziemer, John; LPF Team, LTP Team, ST7-DRS Team

    2015-01-01

    The science case for a space-based gravitational wave instrument observing in the milliHertz band covers a wide area of topics in astrophysics and fundamental physics including galaxy formation and evolution, black hole growth, compact object demographics, gravitational physics, and cosmology. This strong science case is largely responsible for the high rankings received by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in major reviews in both the US and Europe. A key element of the development of LISA is the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) technology demonstrator mission, which will launch in the coming year. Led by ESA and a consortium of European national agencies and with a minority contribution from NASA, LPF will demonstrate several key technologies for the LISA concept. LPF includes two scientific payloads: the European LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA-provided ST7-DRS. The mission will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, the LTP and ST7-DRS payloads, and their expected impact on the larger effort to realize a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  2. Infrared Astronomy and Education: Linking Infrared Whole Sky Mapping with Teacher and Student Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borders, Kareen; Mendez, Bryan; Thaller, Michelle; Gorjian, Varoujan; Borders, Kyla; Pitman, Peter; Pereira, Vincent; Sepulveda, Babs; Stark, Ron; Knisely, Cindy; Dandrea, Amy; Winglee, Robert; Plecki, Marge; Goebel, Jeri; Condit, Matt; Kelly, Susan

    The Spitzer Space Telescope and the recently launched WISE (Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer) observe the sky in infrared light. Among the objects WISE will study are asteroids, the coolest and dimmest stars, and the most luminous galaxies. Secondary students can do authentic research using infrared data. For example, students will use WISE data to mea-sure physical properties of asteroids. In order to prepare students and teachers at this level with a high level of rigor and scientific understanding, the WISE and the Spitzer Space Tele-scope Education programs provided an immersive teacher professional development workshop in infrared astronomy.The lessons learned from the Spitzer and WISE teacher and student pro-grams can be applied to other programs engaging them in authentic research experiences using data from space-borne observatories such as Herschel and Planck. Recently, WISE Educator Ambassadors and NASA Explorer School teachers developed and led an infrared astronomy workshop at Arecibo Observatory in PuertoRico. As many common misconceptions involve scale and distance, teachers worked with Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance and age of objects in the Universe. Teachers built and used basic telescopes, learned about the history of telescopes, explored ground and satellite based telescopes, and explored and worked on models of WISE Telescope. An in-depth explanation of WISE and the Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. We taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. We will outline specific steps for sec-ondary astronomy professional development, detail student involvement in infrared telescope data analysis, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional secondary professional development and student involvement in infrared astronomy. Funding was

  3. Design and Status of the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): An Interferometer at the Edge of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.; Barclay, Richard B.; Barry, R. K.; Benford, D. J.; Calhoun, P. C.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gorman, E. T.; Jackson, M. L.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Maher, S. F.; Mentzell, J. E.; Mundy, L. G.; Rizzo, M. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infraredinterferometer designed to fly on a high altitude balloon. BETTII uses a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer tosimultaneously obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets; the long baseline permits subarcsecond angular resolution, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. Here, we present key aspects of the overall design of the mission and provide an overview of the current status of the project. We also discuss briefly the implications of this experiment for future space-based far-infrared interferometers.

  4. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and its Complementarity to ALMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, Dave

    2007-01-01

    We report results of a pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their chemical organization; (2) Characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) Learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. In each of these science domains, SPIRIT will yield information complementary to that obtainable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and all three observatories could operate contemporaneously. Here we shall emphasize the SPIRIT science goals (1) and (2) and the mission's complementarity with ALMA.

  5. James Webb Space Telescope Mid Infra-Red Instrument Pulse-Tube Cryocooler Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, D.; Flowers, T.; Liu, N.; Moore, K.; Tran, D.; Valenzuela, P.; Franklin, B.; Michaels, D.

    2013-01-01

    The latest generation of long life, space pulse-tube cryocoolers require electronics capable of controlling self-induced vibration down to a fraction of a newton and coldhead temperature with high accuracy down to a few kelvin. Other functions include engineering diagnostics, heater and valve control, telemetry and safety protection of the cryocooler subsystem against extreme environments and operational anomalies. The electronics are designed to survive the thermal, vibration, shock and radiation environment of launch and orbit, while providing a design life in excess of 10 years on-orbit. A number of our current generation high reliability radiation-hardened electronics units are in various stages of integration on several space flight payloads. This paper describes the features and performance of our latest flight electronics designed for the pulse-tube cryocooler that is the pre-cooler for a closed cycle Joule-Thomson cooler providing 6K cooling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI). The electronics is capable of highly accurate temperature control over the temperature range from 4K to 15K. Self-induced vibration is controlled to low levels on all harmonics up to the 16th. A unique active power filter controls peak-to-peak reflected ripple current on the primary power bus to a very low level. The 9 kg unit is capable of delivering 360W continuous power to NGAS's 3-stage pulse-tube High-Capacity Cryocooler (HCC).

  6. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  7. Columbia University Participation in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Guest Obs. Program: Evolution of Near-Infrared Lines from the Formation of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the mass loss history of a sample of seven mass losing Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is done by observing their circumstellar dust shells which contain a record of the most recent mass loss history. The further away from the star we are able to detect this increasingly fainter dust emission the further back we can look into the mass loss history.

  8. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems

  9. Quasi-optical analysis of a far-infrared spatio-spectral space interferometer concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, C.; O'Sullivan, C.; Murphy, J. A.; Donohoe, A.; Savini, G.; Lightfoot, J.; Juanola-Parramon, R.

    2016-07-01

    FISICA (Far-Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment) was a three year study of a far-infrared spatio-spectral double-Fourier interferometer concept. One of the aims of the FISICA study was to set-out a baseline optical design for such a system, and to use a model of the system to simulate realistic telescope beams for use with an end-to-end instrument simulator. This paper describes a two-telescope (and hub) baseline optical design that fulfils the requirements of the FISICA science case, while minimising the optical mass of the system. A number of different modelling techniques were required for the analysis: fast approximate simulation tools such as ray tracing and Gaussian beam methods were employed for initial analysis, with GRASP physical optics used for higher accuracy in the final analysis. Results are shown for the predicted far-field patterns of the telescope primary mirrors under illumination by smooth walled rectangular feed horns. Far-field patterns for both on-axis and off-axis detectors are presented and discussed.

  10. Predicting Future Space-Based Slitless Spectroscopic Surveys Using the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, James W.; Teplitz, H.; Malkan, M.; Atek, H.; Ross, N.; Siana, B.; Henry, A.; McCarthy, P.; Bunker, A.; Scarlata, C.

    2012-01-01

    Future space telescopes are likely to make extensive use of slitless grism spectroscopy in the near-IR over large areas of sky. Both ESA's recently selected Euclid mission and the WFIRST mission being studied by NASA plan slitless spectroscopic surveys to obtain redshifts over thousands of square degrees. The HST WFC3 camera has two near-infrared grisms, G102 and G141, covering 0.8-1.6 microns, making it perfect the perfect laboratory for predicting what these future missions will find. We present results from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program, which has been taking deep WFC3 observations using both grisms at random locations across the sky in parallel with primary COS observations. The WISP survey presently consists of more than 150 fields, covering 700 square arcminutes, reaching fluxes of 5 x 10-17 ergs/s/cm2. We will present completeness corrected number counts, luminosity functions, and predicted counts for the proposed future missions. We will also discuss the issue of line identification of the emission lines, particularly H-alpha and [OIII]5007 which often have similar fluxes and equivalent widths.

  11. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROSCOPY OF BROWN DWARFS DISCOVERED WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Adam C.; Cushing, Michael C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-10

    We present a sample of brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for which we have obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared grism spectroscopy. The sample (22 in total) was observed with the G141 grism covering 1.10–1.70 μm, while 15 were also observed with the G102 grism, which covers 0.90–1.10 μm. The additional wavelength coverage provided by the G102 grism allows us to (1) search for spectroscopic features predicted to emerge at low effective temperatures (e.g.,ammonia bands) and (2) construct a smooth spectral sequence across the T/Y boundary. We find no evidence of absorption due to ammonia in the G102 spectra. Six of these brown dwarfs are new discoveries, three of which are found to have spectral types of T8 or T9. The remaining three, WISE J082507.35+280548.5 (Y0.5), WISE J120604.38+840110.6 (Y0), and WISE J235402.77+024015.0 (Y1), are the 19th, 20th, and 21st spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to date. We also present HST grism spectroscopy and reevaluate the spectral types of five brown dwarfs for which spectral types have been determined previously using other instruments.

  12. O(N) model in Euclidean de Sitter space: beyond the leading infrared approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacir, Diana López; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.; Trombetta, Leonardo G.

    2016-09-01

    We consider an O( N) scalar field model with quartic interaction in d-dimensional Euclidean de Sitter space. In order to avoid the problems of the standard perturbative calculations for light and massless fields, we generalize to the O( N) theory a systematic method introduced previously for a single field, which treats the zero modes exactly and the nonzero modes perturbatively. We compute the two-point functions taking into account not only the leading infrared contribution, coming from the self-interaction of the zero modes, but also corrections due to the interaction of the ultraviolet modes. For the model defined in the corresponding Lorentzian de Sitter spacetime, we obtain the two-point functions by analytical continuation. We point out that a partial resummation of the leading secular terms (which necessarily involves nonzero modes) is required to obtain a decay at large distances for massless fields. We implement this resummation along with a systematic double expansion in an effective coupling constant √{λ } and in 1 /N . We explicitly perform the calculation up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in √{λ } and up to next-to-leading order in 1 /N . The results reduce to those known in the leading infrared approximation. We also show that they coincide with the ones obtained directly in Lorentzian de Sitter spacetime in the large N limit, provided the same renormalization scheme is used.

  13. Study of advanced InSb arrays for SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Alan; Feitt, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Santa Barbara Research Center has completed a study leading to the development of advanced Indium Antimonide detector arrays for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Focal Plane Array Detector (FPAD) Subsystem of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Band 1. The overall goal of the study was to perform design tradeoff studies, analysis and research to develop a Direct Readout Integrated Circuit to be hybridized to an advanced, high performance InSb detector array that would satisfy the technical requirements for Band 1 as specified in the IRAC Instrument Requirements Document (IRD), IRAC-202. The overall goal of the study was divided into both a near-term goal and a far-term goal. The near-term goal identifies current technology available that approaches, and in some cases meets the program technological goals as specified in IRAC-202. The far-term goal identifies technology development required to completely achieve SIRTF program goals. Analyses of potential detector materials indicates that InSb presently meets all Band 1 requirements and is considered to be the baseline approach due to technical maturity. The major issue with regard to photovoltaic detectors such as InSb and HgCdTe is to achieve a reduction in detector capacitance.

  14. Small moving infrared space target tracking algorithm based on probabilistic data association filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzhou; Chen, Jing; Gu, Yuanshan; Tang, Lan; Dai, Zhen; Fu, Hongxia; Li, Ruzhang; Liu, Changju; Jin, Gang

    2014-03-01

    Numerous false alarms for low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) would seriously debase the performance for infrared low observable (LO) space target tracking. Due to the motion (i.e. azimuth, elevation and their derivative velocity), amplitude and size of infrared target are almost invariable and highly correlative, a multi-feature association approach based on probabilistic data association (PDA) is presented to track target in this paper. Firstly, the motion, amplitude and size of target are modeled as stationary random signal afforded Gaussian distribution. The probability of motion, amplitude and size of measurement originated as the target of interest is then estimated by Gaussian distribution, and that of false alarm is distributed uniformly. Subsequently, the combined probability of motion, amplitude and size is derived by PDA, and their weight coefficients are estimated adaptively according to their fluctuations. Finally, the relevant parameters including combination measurement are predicted and updated. Some experiments are included and the results show that the performance of target tracking by the proposed approach is significantly enhanced.

  15. Infrared Sensor System for Mobile-Robot Positioning in Intelligent Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Gorostiza, Ernesto Martín; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Meca, Franciso Javier Meca; Monzú, David Salido; Zapata, Felipe Espinosa; Puerto, Luis Pallarés

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to position a Mobile Robot in an Intelligent Space, and this paper presents a sensorial system for measuring differential phase-shifts in a sinusoidally modulated infrared signal transmitted from the robot. Differential distances were obtained from these phase-shifts, and the position of the robot was estimated by hyperbolic trilateration. Due to the extremely severe trade-off between SNR, angle (coverage) and real-time response, a very accurate design and device selection was required to achieve good precision with wide coverage and acceptable robot speed. An I/Q demodulator was used to measure phases with one-stage synchronous demodulation to DC. A complete set of results from real measurements, both for distance and position estimations, is provided to demonstrate the validity of the system proposed, comparing it with other similar indoor positioning systems. PMID:22163907

  16. Pointing and control system design study for the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Aubrun, J. N.; Sridhar, B.; Cochran, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The design and performance of pointing and control systems for two space infrared telescope facility vehicles were examined. The need for active compensation of image jitter using the secondary mirror or other optical elements was determined. In addition, a control system to allow the telescope to perform small angle slews, and to accomplish large angle slews at the rate of 15 deg per minute was designed. Both the 98 deg and the 28 deg inclination orbits were examined, and spacecraft designs were developed for each. The results indicate that active optical compensation of line-of-sight errors is not necessary if the system is allowed to settle for roughly ten seconds after a slew maneuver. The results are contingent on the assumption of rigid body dynamics, and a single structural mode between spacecraft and telescope. Helium slosh for a half full 4000 liter tank was analyzed, and did not represent a major control problem.

  17. Free-space-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for infrared optical communications.

    PubMed

    Bellei, Francesco; Cartwright, Alyssa P; McCaughan, Adam N; Dane, Andrew E; Najafi, Faraz; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-02-22

    This paper describes the construction of a cryostat and an optical system with a free-space coupling efficiency of 56.5% ± 3.4% to a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) for infrared quantum communication and spectrum analysis. A 1K pot decreases the base temperature to T = 1.7 K from the 2.9 K reached by the cold head cooled by a pulse-tube cryocooler. The minimum spot size coupled to the detector chip was 6.6 ± 0.11 µm starting from a fiber source at wavelength, λ = 1.55 µm. We demonstrated photon counting on a detector with an 8 × 7.3 µm2 area. We measured a dark count rate of 95 ± 3.35 kcps and a system detection efficiency of 1.64% ± 0.13%. We explain the key steps that are required to improve further the coupling efficiency.

  18. The James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam): Making Models, Building Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. W., Jr.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Higgins, M. L.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2011-09-01

    Since 2003, the Near Infrared Camear (NIRCam) science team for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has conducted "Train the Trainer" workshops for adult leaders of the Girl Scout of the USA (GSUSA), engaging them in the process of scientific inquiry and equipping them to host astronomy-related activities at the troop level. Training includes topics in basic astronomy (night sky, phases of the Moon, the scale of the Solar System and beyond, stars, galaxies, telescopes, etc.) as well as JWST-specific research areas in extra-solar planetary systems and cosmology, to pave the way for girls and women to understand the first images from JWST. Participants become part of our world-wide network of 160 trainers teaching young women essential STEM-related concepts using astronomy, the night sky environment, applied math, engineering, and critical thinking.

  19. The control unit of the near infrared spectrograph of the Euclid space mission: detailed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Gómez-Sáenz-de-Tejada, Jaime; Pérez-Lizán, David; Díaz-García, José Javier; Tubío-Araujo, Óscar; Raichs, Cayetano; Catalán, Jordi; Rebolo-López, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph and Photometer (NISP) is one of the instruments on board the ESA EUCLID mission. The Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena and Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias are responsible of the Instrument Control Unit of the NISP (NI-ICU) in the Euclid Consortium. The NI-ICU hardware is developed by CRISA (Airbus Defence and Space), and its main functions are: communication with the S/C and the Data Processing Unit, control of the Filter and Grism Wheels, control of the Calibration Unit and thermal control of the instrument. This paper presents the NI-ICU status of definition and design at the end of the detailed design phase.

  20. Configuration trade-offs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pue, A. J.; Strohbehn, K.; Hunt, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual pointing control system designs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are examined in terms of fine guidance pointing and large-angle slewing accuracies. In particular, basic trade-offs between body pointing only and body pointing plus image motion compensation (IMC) are considered using a steady-state linear covariance analysis to compute rms pointing errors. It is shown that body pointing can provide good performance during nominal fine pointing but limits the telescope capability to rapidly slew and acquire targets. Overall, body pointing plus IMC would offer superior performance but must be judged against the difficulties posed by the attitude sensor noise and the higher cost and complexity of IMC. It is recommended that improved sensor designs be pursued while slewing performance be enhanced by a combination of an appropriate command profile and control compensation.

  1. Near-infrared detection of WD 0806-661 B with the Hubble space telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L.; Morley, C. V.; Burgasser, A. J.; Bochanski, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    WD 0806-661 B is one of the coldest known brown dwarfs (T {sub eff} = 300-345 K) based on previous mid-infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope. In addition, it is a benchmark for testing theoretical models of brown dwarfs because its age and distance are well constrained via its primary star (2 ± 0.5 Gyr, 19.2 ± 0.6 pc). We present the first near-infrared detection of this object, which has been achieved through F110W imaging (∼Y + J) with the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure a Vega magnitude of m {sub 110} = 25.70 ± 0.08, which implies J ∼ 25.0. When combined with the Spitzer photometry, our estimate of J helps to better define the empirical sequence of the coldest brown dwarfs in M {sub 4.5} versus J – [4.5]. The positions of WD 0806-661 B and other Y dwarfs in that diagram are best matched by the cloudy models of Burrows et al. and the cloudless models of Saumon et al., both of which employ chemical equilibrium. The calculations by Morley et al. for 50% cloud coverage differ only modestly from the data. Spectroscopy would enable a more stringent test of the models, but based on our F110W measurement, such observations are currently possible only with Hubble, and would require at least ∼10 orbits to reach a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼5.

  2. Advanced fire observation by the Intelligent Infrared Sensor prototype FOCUS on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, D.; Haschberger, P.; Tank, V.; Lanzl, F.; Zhukov, B.; Jahn, H.; Briess, K.; Lorenz, E.; Roeser, H.-P.; Ginati, A.; Tobehn, C.; Schulte in den Bäumen, J.; Christmann, U.

    1999-01-01

    Current and planned operational space-borne Earth observation systems provide spatially, radiometrically or temporally crude data for the detection and monitoring of high temperature phenomena on the surface of our planet. High Temperature Events (HTE) very often cause environmental disasters. Such HTE are forest and savannah fires, fires of open coal mines, volcanic activities and others (e.g. fires of oil wells, pipelines etc.). A simultaneous co-registration of a combination of infrared (IR) and visible (VIS) channels is the key for a reliable autonomous on-board detection of High Temperature Events (HTE) on Earth surface, such as vegetation fires and volcano eruptions. This is the main feature of the FOCUS experiment. Furthermore there are ecology-oriented objectives of the FOCUS experiment mainly related to spectrometric/imaging remote inspection and parameter extraction of selected HTEs, and to the assessment of some ecological consequences of HTEs, such as aerosol and gas emission. Based on own experimental work and supported by Co-Investigators from Italy, Greece, France, Spain, Russia and Germany, DLR proposed in 1997 to use the International Space Station (ISS) in its early utilization phase as a platform and test-bed for an Intelligent Infrared Sensor prototype FOCUS of a future Environmental Disaster Recognition Satellite System. FOCUS is considered by ESA as an important mission combining a number of proven technologies and observation techniques to provide the scientific and operational user community with key data for the classification and monitoring of forest fires. FOCUS was selected as one of five European ``Groupings'' to be flown as an externally mounted payload during the early utilisation phase of the ISS. The FOCUS Phase A Study will be performed by OHB-System, DLR and Zeiss from September 1998 until May 1999.

  3. The infrared spectrum of comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crovisier, J.; Leech, K.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Brooke, T. Y.; Hanner, M. S.; Altieri, B.; Keller, H. U.; Lellouch, E.

    1997-01-01

    The infrared spectroscopic observations of the comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), in April and September-October 1996, are summarized. High resolution spectra were obtained with the long and short wavelength spectrometers of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The results showed that the dust in this comet contains crystalline silicates. The dust of Hale-Bopp is rather similar to that observed in the circumstellar disks of Vega-type stars.

  4. Cast Glance Near Infrared Imaging Observations of the Space Shuttle During Hypersonic Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tack, Steve; Tomek, Deborah M.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Verstynen, Harry A.; Shea, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution calibrated infrared imagery of the Space Shuttle was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric entries of the STS-119, STS-125 and STS128 missions and has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. This data collect was initiated by NASA s Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) team and incorporated the use of air- and land-based optical assets to image the Shuttle during atmospheric re-entry. The HYTHIRM objective is to develop and implement a set of mission planning tools designed to establish confidence in the ability of an existing optical asset to reliably acquire, track and return global quantitative surface temperatures of the Shuttle during entry. On Space Shuttle Discovery s STS-119 mission, NASA flew a specially modified thermal protection system tile and instrumentation package to monitor heating effects from boundary layer transition during re-entry. On STS-119, the windward airflow on the port wing was deliberately disrupted by a four-inch wide and quarter-inch tall protuberance built into the modified tile. In coordination with this flight experiment, a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft was flown 28 nautical miles below Discovery and remotely monitored surface temperature of the Orbiter at Mach 8.4 using a long-range infrared optical package referred to as Cast Glance. Approximately two months later, the same Navy Cast Glance aircraft successfully monitored the surface temperatures of the Orbiter Atlantis traveling at approximately Mach 14.3 during its return from the successful Hubble repair mission. In contrast to Discovery, Atlantis was not part of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) flight experiment, thus the vehicle was not configured with a protuberance on the port wing. In September 2009, Cast Glance was again successful in capturing infrared imagery and monitoring the surface temperatures on Discovery s next

  5. Space Studies Board Annual Report 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The following summaries of major reports are presented: (1) 'Scientific Opportunities in the Human Exploration of Space;' (2) 'A Space Physics Paradox;' (3) 'An Integrated Strategy for the Planetary Sciences;' and (4) 'ONR (Office of Naval Research) Research Opportunities in Upper Atmospheric Sciences.' Short reports on the following topics are also presented: life and microgravity sciences and the Space Station Program, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for infrared astronomy, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Cassini Saturn Probe, and the utilization of the Space Station.

  6. Sofia Observatory Performance and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Miller, Walter; Dunham, Edward; McLean, Ian; Wolf, Jurgen; Becklin, Eric; Bida, Tom; Brewster, Rick; Casey, Sean; Collins, Peter; Jakob, Holger; Killebrew, Jana; Lampater, Ulrich; Mandushev, Georgi; Marcum, Pamela; Meyer, Allan; Pfueller, Enrico; Reinacher, Andreas; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Savage, Maureen; Teufel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities have been viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and will be used to address the development activity that is planned for 2012, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. A series of 8 SOFIA Characterization And Integration (SCAI) flights have been conducted from June to December 2011. The HIPO science instrument in conjunction with the DSI Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) have been used to evaluate pointing stability, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an Active Mass Damper system installed on Telescope Assembly. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have been performed using the HIPO+FLITECAM Science Instrument configuration (FLIPO). A number of additional tests and measurements have targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements including, but not limited to, pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. SCAI activities included in-flight partial Science Instrument commissioning prior to the use of the instruments as measuring engines. This paper reports on the data collected during the SCAI flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.

  7. Infrared Heater Used in Qualification Testing of International Space Station Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Two heat rejection radiator systems for the International Space Station (ISS) have undergone thermal vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the Space Power Facility (SPF), the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world. The heat rejection system radiator was tested first; it removes heat from the ISS crew living quarters. The second system tested was the photovoltaic radiator (PVR), which rejects heat from the ISS photovoltaic arrays and the electrical power-conditioning equipment. The testing included thermal cycling, hot- and cold-soaked deployments, thermal gradient deployments, verification of the onboard heater controls, and for the PVR, thermal performance tests with ammonia flow. Both radiator systems are orbital replacement units for ease of replacement on the ISS. One key to the success of these tests was the performance of the infrared heater system. It was used in conjunction with a gaseous-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud in the SPF vacuum chamber to achieve the required thermal vacuum conditions for the qualification tests. The heater, which was designed specifically for these tests, was highly successful and easily met the test requirements. This report discusses the heating requirements, the heater design features, the design approach, and the mathematical basis of the design.

  8. Leak Location and Classification in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle by Infrared Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Lansing, Mathew

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is composed of cooling tubes brazed to the inside of a conical structural jacket. Because of the geometry there are regions that can't be inspected for leaks using the bubble solution and low-pressure method. The temperature change due escaping gas is detectable on the surface of the nozzle under the correct conditions. The methods and results presented in this summary address the thermographic identification of leaks in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles. A highly sensitive digital infrared camera is used to record the minute temperature change associated with a leak source, such as a crack or pinhole, hidden within the nozzle wall by observing the inner "hot wall" surface as the nozzle is pressurized. These images are enhanced by digitally subtracting a thermal reference image taken before pressurization, greatly diminishing background noise. The method provides a nonintrusive way of localizing the tube that is leaking and the exact leak source position to within a very small axial distance. Many of the factors that influence the inspectability of the nozzle are addressed; including pressure rate, peak pressure, gas type, ambient temperature and surface preparation.

  9. European agreement on James Webb Space Telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) signed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Artist's impression of the JWST hi-res Size hi-res: 1601 kb Credits: ESA Artist's impression of the JWST An artist's impression of the selected design for the JWST spacecraft. Northrop Grumman and Ball Aerospace are the prime contractors for JWST. Artist's impression of the JWST Credits: ESA Artist's impression of the JWST An artist's impression of the selected design for the JWST spacecraft. Northrop Grumman and Ball Aerospace are the prime contractors for JWST. Observing the first light, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will help to solve outstanding questions about our place in the evolving Universe. MIRI, the Mid-Infrared Instrument, is one of the four instruments on board the JWST, the mission scheduled to follow on the heritage of Hubble in 2011. MIRI will be built in cooperation between Europe and the United States (NASA), both equally contributing to its funding. MIRI’s optics, core of the instrument, will be provided by a consortium of European institutes. According to this formal agreement, ESA will manage and co-ordinate the whole development of the European part of MIRI and act as the sole interface with NASA, which is leading the JWST project. This marks a difference with respect to the previous ESA scientific missions. In the past the funding and the development of the scientific instruments was agreed by the participating ESA Member States on the basis of purely informal arrangements with ESA. In this case, the Member States involved in MIRI have agreed on formally guaranteeing the required level of funding on the basis of a multi-lateral international agreement, which still keeps scientists in key roles. Over the past years, missions have become more complex and demanding, and more costly within an ever tighter budget. They also require a more and more specific expertise which is spread throughout the vast European scientific community. As a result, a new management procedure for co-ordination of payload development has become a necessity to

  10. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  11. Long-term Observations of Jovian Mid-Infrared Aurora, Hydrocarbon Abundances, and Temperature: Ground-based and Space-based Comparison and Preparation for Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Schmuelling, F.

    2015-12-01

    With Juno's approach to Jupiter in 2016 nearing, we report on long term measurements of Jupiter's thermal infrared aurora covering spectral and altitude regions that will complement Juno observational capabilities. Previously acquired spectral data from ground-based observatories as well as by Voyager IRIS and Cassini CIRS during Jupiter flybys will be investigated using current methods and capabilities. The thermal (mid-) IR aurora from Jupiter's polar regions, hydrocarbon abundances, and thermal structure retrieved from the ground and from space-based investigations will be compared and used to illustrate the different capabilities and complementarity of the measurement platforms. We report on the reexamination and re-analysis of hydrocarbon emission spectra from Jupiter obtained using ground-based ultra-high spectral resolution infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) from Cassini CIRS during its flyby of Jupiter in 2000-2001 and Voyager IRIS data obtained during flybys in 1979. Measurements with IRHS have been made over 30 years, primarily of ethane near 12 micrometer wavelength. These measurements yield fully resolved individual spectral lines whose shape provides unique information on variability of temperature and abundance. CIRS and IRIS data at coarser spectral resolution provide extended spatial distributions covering a broad spectral region, including abundances and auroral response of hydrocarbon constituents in the 8-13 micrometer spectral region (ethane, methane, ethylene, and acetylene). Analysis shows detailed spatial variability of the primary hydrocarbons in northern latitudes. Temporal changes of the ethane line emission over three solar cycles and comparison of retrievals from ethane data taken contemporaneously during the Cassini flyby by both techniques will be compared and results discussed. From these analyses, the expectation is that the thermal IR auroral emission may be low during the Juno tour at

  12. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  13. Report on the decade of un/esa workshops on basic space science: the international perspective from small astronomical telescopes to the world space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.; Wamsteker, W.

    The UN/ESA Workshops on Basic Space Science is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and regional and international cooperation in this field on a world wide basis, particularly in developing nations. The first four workshops in this series (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, and Egypt 1994) addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia, respectively. One major recommendation that emanated from the first four workshops was that small astronomical facilities should be established in developing nations for research and education programmes at the university level and that such facilities should be networked. Subsequently, material for teaching and observational programmes for small optical telescopes were developed or recommended and astronomical telescope facilities have been inaugurated at UN/ESA Workshops on Basic Space Science in Sri Lanka (1995), Honduras (1997), and Jordan (1999). Elements of the Workshops, focusing on teaching, observing programmes, and the Japanese donation programme for small astronomical telescopes are briefly summarized in the first part of this paper. A report on the recent UN/ESA Workshop on Basic Space Science, held at CONAE of Argentina in 2002, and a full report on achievements of the UN/ESA Workshops on Basic Space Science for the period of time from 1991 to 2002 is contained in the second part of this paper. Since 1991, similar reports, issued for each of the UN/ESA Workshops on Basic Space Science, have been brought to the attention of UN Member States on an annual basis with the objective to gain more support for the world wide development of astronomy. WWW: http://www.seas.columbia.edu/~ah297/un-esa/

  14. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  15. ESO's Two Observatories Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    astronomical technology and is one of the premier facilities in the world for optical and near-infrared observations. In addition to the state-of-the-art Very Large Telescope and the four Auxiliary Telescopes of 1.8-m diameter which can move to relocate in up to 30 different locations feeding the interferometer, Paranal will also be home to the 2.6-m VLT Survey telescope (VST) and the 4.2-m VISTA IR survey telescope. Both Paranal and La Silla have a proven record of their unique ability to address most current issues in observational astronomy. In 2004 alone, each observatory provided data for the publication of about 350 peer-reviewed journal articles, more than any other ground-based observatory. With the present merging of these top-ranking astronomical observatories, fostering synergies and harmonizing the many diverse activities, ESO and the entire community of European astronomers will profit even more from these highly efficient research facilities. Images of ESO's observatories and telescopes are available in the ESO gallery.

  16. Measuring High-Precision Astrometry with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope currently offers the greatest potential for high-precision astrometry of faint mid-IR sources across arcminute-scale fields, which would be especially valuable for measuring parallaxes of cold brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and proper motions of obscured members of nearby star-forming regions. To more fully realize IRAC's astrometric capabilities, we have sought to minimize the largest sources of uncertainty in astrometry with its 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. By comparing different routines that estimate stellar positions, we have found that Point Response Function (PRF) fitting with the Spitzer Science Center's Astronomical Point Source Extractor produces both the smallest systematic errors from varying intra-pixel sensitivity and the greatest precision in measurements of positions. In addition, self-calibration has been used to derive new 7th and 8th order distortion corrections for the 3.6 and 4.5 μm arrays of IRAC, respectively. These corrections are suitable for data throughout the mission of Spitzer when a time-dependent scale factor is applied to the corrections. To illustrate the astrometric accuracy that can be achieved by combining PRF fitting with our new distortion corrections, we have applied them to archival data for a nearby star-forming region, arriving at total astrometric errors of ∼20 and 70 mas at signal to noise ratios of 100 and 10, respectively. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  17. Megalithic observatory Kokino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenev, Gj.

    2006-05-01

    In 2001, on the footpath of a mountain peak, near the village of Kokino, archeologist Jovica Stankovski discovered an archeological site from The Bronze Age. The site occupies a large area and is scaled in two levels. Several stone seats (thrones) are dominant in this site and they are pointing towards the east horizon. The high concentration of the movable archeological material found on the upper platform probably indicates its use in a function containing still unknown cult activities. Due to precise measurements and a detailed archaeoastronomical analysis of the site performed in the past three years by Gjore Cenev, physicist from the Planetarium in Skopje, it was shown that the site has characteristics of a sacred site, but also of a Megalithic Observatory. The markers found in this observatory point on the summer and winter solstices and spring and autumn equinoxes. It can be seen that on both sides of the solstice markers, that there are markers for establishing Moon's positions. The markers are crafted in such a way that for example on days when special rites were performed (harvest rites for example) the Sun filled a narrow space of the marker and special ray lighted the man sitting on only one of the thrones, which of course had a special meaning. According to the positions of the markers that are used for Sun marking, especially on the solstice days, it was calculated that this observatory dates from 1800 B.C.

  18. Haystack Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Radio astronomy programs comprise three very-long-baseline interferometer projects, ten spectral line investigations, one continuum mapping in the 0.8 cm region, and one monitoring of variable sources. A low-noise mixer was used in mapping observations of 3C273 at 31 GHz and in detecting of a new methyl alcohol line at 36,169 MHz in Sgr B2. The new Mark 2 VLBI recording terminal was used in galactic H2O source observations using Haystack and the Crimean Observatory, USSR. One feature in W29 appears to have a diameter of 0.3 millisec of arc and a brightness temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 15th power K. Geodetic baseline measurements via VLBI between Green Bank and Haystack are mutually consistent within a few meters. Radar investigations of Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Moon have continued. The favorable opposition of Mars and improvements in the radar permit measurements on a number of topographic features with unprecedented accuracy, including scarps and crater walls. The floor of Mare Serenitatis slopes upward towards the northeast and is also the location of a strong gravitational anomaly.

  19. Slitless spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera (JWST NIRCam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Thomas P.; Chu, Laurie; Egami, Eiichi; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Leisenring, Jarron; Rieke, Marcia; Robberto, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Stansberry, John

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared camera (JWST NIRCam) has two 2.02 x 2.02 fields of view that are capable of either imaging or spectroscopic observations. Either of two R ~ 1500 grisms with orthogonal dispersion directions can be used for slitless spectroscopy over λ = 2.4 - 5.0 μm in each module, and shorter wavelength observations of the same fields can be obtained simultaneously. We present the latest predicted grism sensitivities, saturation limits, resolving power, and wavelength coverage values based on component measurements, instrument tests, and end-to-end modeling. Short wavelength (0.6 - 2.3 μm) imaging observations of the 2.4 - 5.0 μm spectroscopic field can be performed in one of several different filter bands, either in-focus or defocused via weak lenses internal to NIRCam. Alternatively, the possibility of 1.0 - 2.0 μm spectroscopy (simultaneously with 2.4 - 5.0 μm) using dispersed Hartmann sensors (DHSs) is being explored. The grisms, weak lenses, and DHS elements were included in NIRCam primarily for wavefront sensing purposes, but all have significant science applications. Operational considerations including subarray sizes, and data volume limits are also discussed. Finally, we describe spectral simulation tools and illustrate potential scientific uses of the grisms by presenting simulated observations of deep extragalactic fields, galactic dark clouds, and transiting exoplanets.

  20. A System Trade Study of Remote Infrared Imaging for Space Shuttle Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Ross, Martin N.; Baize, Rosemary; Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Krasa, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    A trade study reviewing the primary operational parameters concerning the deployment of imaging assets in support of the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) project was undertaken. The objective was to determine key variables and constraints for obtaining thermal images of the Space Shuttle orbiter during reentry. The trade study investigated the performance characteristics and operating environment of optical instrumentation that may be deployed during a HYTHIRM data collection mission, and specified contributions to the Point Spread Function. It also investigated the constraints that have to be considered in order to optimize deployment through the use of mission planning tools. These tools simulate the radiance modeling of the vehicle as well as the expected spatial resolution based on the Orbiter trajectory and placement of land based or airborne optical sensors for given Mach numbers. Lastly, this report focused on the tools and methodology that have to be in place for real-time mission planning in order to handle the myriad of variables such as trajectory ground track, weather, and instrumentation availability that may only be known in the hours prior to landing.

  1. Mechanical cooler system for the next-generation infrared space telescope SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Keisuke; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Sato, Yoichi; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Yamawaki, Toshihiko; Mizutani, Tadahito; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Okabayashi, Akinobu; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) is a pre-project of JAXA in collaboration with ESA to be launched in the 2020s. The SPICA mission is to be launched into a halo orbit around the second Lagrangian point in the Sun-Earth system, which allows us to use effective radiant cooling in combination with a mechanical cooling system in order to cool a 2.5m-class large IR telescope below 8K. Recently, a new system design in particular thermal structure of the payload module has been studied by considering the technical feasibility of a cryogenic cooled telescope within current constraints of the mission in the CDF (Concurrent Design Facility) study of ESA/ESTEC. Then, the thermal design of the mechanical cooler system, for which the Japanese side is responsible, has been examined based on the CDF study and the feasible solution giving a proper margin has been obtained. As a baseline, 4K / 1K-class Joule-Thomson coolers are used to cool the telescope and thermal interface for Focal Plane Instruments (FPIs). Additionally, two sets of double stirling coolers (2STs) are used to cool the Telescope shield. In this design, nominal operation of FPIs can be kept when one mechanical cooler is in failure.

  2. A compact time-resolved system for near infrared spectroscopy based on wavelength space multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Rebecca; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    We designed and developed a compact dual-wavelength and dual-channel time-resolved system for near-infrared spectroscopy studies of muscle and brain. The system employs pulsed diode lasers as sources, compact photomultipliers, and time-correlated single photon counting boards for detection. To exploit the full temporal and dynamic range of the acquisition technique, we implemented an approach based on wavelength space multiplexing: laser pulses at the two wavelengths are alternatively injected into the two channels by means of an optical 2×2 switch. In each detection line (i.e., in each temporal window), the distribution of photon time-of-flights at one wavelength is acquired. The proposed approach increases the signal-to-noise ratio and avoids wavelength cross-talk with respect to the typical approach based on time multiplexing. The instrument was characterized on tissue phantoms to assess its properties in terms of linearity, stability, noise, and reproducibility. Finally, it was successfully tested in preliminary in vivo measurements on muscle during standard cuff occlusion and on the brain during a motor cortex response due to hand movements.

  3. A Spitzer Space Telescope Far-Infrared Spectral Atlas of Compact Sources in the Magellanic Clouds. I. The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Shiao, Bernie; Boyer, Martha L.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Marengo, Massimo; Indebetouw, Remy; Sloan, G. C.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-01

    the other hand, some of the compact H II regions display pronounced [O III] λ88 μm emission. The efficiency of photoelectric heating in the interfaces of ionized gas and molecular clouds is estimated at 0.1%-0.3%. We confirm earlier indications of a low nitrogen content in the LMC. Evidence for solid state emission features is found in both young and evolved objects, but the carriers of these features remain elusive; some of the YSOs are found to contain crystalline water ice. The spectra constitute a valuable resource for the planning and interpretation of observations with the Herschel Space Observatory and the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy.

  4. A SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE FAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL ATLAS OF COMPACT SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS. I. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Shiao, Bernie; Boyer, Martha L.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Marengo, Massimo; Indebetouw, Remy; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-01-15

    sun} of ISM dust was swept up. On the other hand, some of the compact H II regions display pronounced [O III] {lambda}88 {mu}m emission. The efficiency of photoelectric heating in the interfaces of ionized gas and molecular clouds is estimated at 0.1%-0.3%. We confirm earlier indications of a low nitrogen content in the LMC. Evidence for solid state emission features is found in both young and evolved objects, but the carriers of these features remain elusive; some of the YSOs are found to contain crystalline water ice. The spectra constitute a valuable resource for the planning and interpretation of observations with the Herschel Space Observatory and the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy.

  5. Study of wind retrieval from space-borne infrared coherent lidar in cloudy atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Okamoto, Kozo; Ochiai, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Future spaceborne tropospheric wind missions using infrared coherent lidar are currently being studied in Japan and in the United States [1,2]. The line-of-sight wind velocity is retrieved from the Doppler shift frequency of the signal returned by aerosol particles. However a large percentage (70-80%) of the measured single-shot intensity profiles are expected to be contaminated by clouds [3]. A large number of cloud contaminated profiles (>40%) will be characterized by a cloud-top signal intensity stronger than the aerosol signal by a factor of one order of magnitude, and by a strong attenuation of the signal backscattered from below the clouds. Profiles including more than one cloud layer are also expected. This work is a simulation study dealing with the impacts of clouds on wind retrieval. We focus on the three following points: 1) definition of an algorithm for optimizing the wind retrieval from the cloud-top signal, 2) assessment of the clouds impact on the measurement performance and, 3) definition of a method for averaging the measurements before the retrieval. The retrieval simulations are conducted considering the instrumental characteristics selected for the Japanese study: wavelength at 2 µm, PRF of 30 Hz, pulse power of 0.125 mJ and platform altitude between 200-400 km. Liquid and ice clouds are considered. The analysis uses data from atmospheric models and statistics of cloud effects derived from CALIPSO measurements such as in [3]. A special focus is put on the average method of the measurements before retrieval. Good retrievals in the mid-upper troposphere implie the average of measured single-range power spectra over large horizontal (100 km) and vertical (1 km) ranges. Large differences of signal intensities due to the presence of clouds and the clouds non-uniform distribution have to be taken into account when averaging the data to optimize the measurement performances. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T

  6. Sensitivity analysis of a space-based multi-band infrared imager for GEO belt debris study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Krezan, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Thousands of space objects in the Earth orbital-region known as the GEO belt are categorized as debris. Relatively little is known about the thousands of space debris objects. Remote sensing techniques offer the only viable opportunity to learn more about these objects. In this paper an analysis is performed for observations using a hypothetical space-based multi-band infrared instrument to measure characteristics of GEO belt space debris. The purpose of this study is to understand the limitations of such an instrument and sensing modality for studying GEO belt space debris. Although certain aspects of this study are analytical, the results are anchored with results from the NASA-WISE experiments.

  7. Enhanced Spectral Analysis of SEP Reservoir Events by OMNIWeb Multi-Source Browse Services of the Space Physics Data Facility and the Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; McGuire, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The NASA Space Physics Data Facility and Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) have jointly upgraded the highly used OMNIWeb services for heliospheric solar wind data to also include energetic electron, proton, and heavier ion data in a variety of graphical browse formats. The underlying OMNI and VEPO data now span just over a half century from 1963 to the present. The new services include overlay of differential flux spectra from multiple instruments and spacecraft, scatter plots of fluxes from two user-selected energy channels, distribution function histograms of selected parameters, and spectrograms of flux vs. energy and time. Users can also overlay directional flux spectra from different angular channels. Data from most current and some past (Helios 1&2, Pioneer 10&11) heliospheric spacecraft and instruments are wholly or partially covered by these evolving new services. The traditional OMNI service of correlating magnetic field and plasma data from L1 to 1 AU solar wind sources is also being extended for other spacecraft, e.g. Voyager 1 and 2, to correlations with energetic particle channels. The user capability is, for example, demonstrated to rapidly scan through particle flux spectra from consecutive time periods for so-called “reservoir” events, in which solar energetic particle flux spectra converge in shape and amplitude from multiple spacecraft sources within the inner heliosphere. Such events are important for understanding spectral evolution of global heliospheric events and for intercalibration of flux data from multiple instruments of the same and different spacecraft. These services are accessible at http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/. SPDF and VEPO are separately accessible at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/ and http://vepo.gsfc.nasa.gov/.In the future we will propose to extend OMNIWeb particle flux data coverage to the plasma and suprathermal energy range.

  8. Terrestrial monitoring of a radio telescope reference point using comprehensive uncertainty budgeting. Investigations during CONT14 at the Onsala Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösler, Michael; Haas, Rüdiger; Eschelbach, Cornelia

    2016-05-01

    During the 15-day-long global very long baseline interferometry campaign CONT14, a terrestrial monitoring campaign was carried out at the Onsala Space Observatory. The goal of these efforts was to monitor the reference point of the Onsala 20 m radio telescope during normal telescope operations. Parts of the local site network as well as a number of reflectors that were mounted on the 20 m radio telescope were observed in an automated and continual way using the in-house-developed software package HEIMDALL. The analysis of the observed data was performed using a new concept for a coordinate-based network adjustment to allow the full adjustment process in a true Cartesian global reference frame. The Akaike Information Criterion was used to select the preferable functional model for the network adjustment. The comprehensive stochastic model of this network adjustment process considers over 25 parameters, and, to describe the persistence of the observations performed during the monitoring with a very high measurement frequency, includes also time-dependent covariances. In total 15 individual solutions for the radio telescope reference point were derived, based on monitoring observations during the normal operation of the radio telescope. Since the radio telescope was moving continually, the influence of timing errors was studied and considered in the adjustment process. Finally, recursive filter techniques were introduced to combine the 15 individual solutions. Accuracies at the sub-millimeter level could be achieved for the radio telescope reference point. Thus, the presented monitoring concept fulfills the requirement proposed by the global geodetic observing system.

  9. Mission Planning for the CHANDRA X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, Larry D.; Stone, Russell, L.; Evans, Steven W.

    1999-01-01

    The CHANDRA x-ray observatory started life as the Advanced X-ray Facility (AXAF) but was renamed Chandra in December of 1998 at the of a nationwide contest by NASA to name the new observatory. The honors the Nobel Prize winning astrophysicist S. Chandrasekar who astrophysics at the University of Chicago for more than 50 years, following graduate studies at Cambridge University in England. The observatory has been under construction for a decade under the management of the Observatory observatory, Projects office at the Marshall Space Flight Center; the same office that oversaw the construction of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. This observatory is a member of NASA's great observatory series of missions of which Hubble and Compton are members. This paper describes the mission planning that was conducted at MSFC to design the orbit and launch window that would permit the new observatory to function properly.

  10. Application of a Near Infrared Imaging System for Thermographic Imaging of the Space Shuttle during Hypersonic Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Gibson, David M.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Mercer, C. David; Shea, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery was obtained of the Space Shuttle s reentry during STS-119, STS-125, and STS-128 missions. The infrared imagery was collected using a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft using a long-range infrared optical package referred to as Cast Glance. The slant ranges between the Space Shuttle and Cast Glance were approximately 26-41 nautical miles at point of closest approach. The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) project was a NASA Langley led endeavor sponsored by the NASA Engineering Safety Center, the Space Shuttle Program Office and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to demonstrate a quantitative thermal imaging capability. HYTHIRM required several mission tools to acquire the imagery. These tools include pre-mission acquisition simulations of the Shuttle trajectory in relationship to the Cast Glance aircraft flight path, radiance modeling to predict the infrared response of the Shuttle, and post mission analysis tools to process the infrared imagery to quantitative temperature maps. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Shuttle s hypersonic reentry provides valuable flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is considered critical for the development of turbulence models supporting NASA s next-generation spacecraft. This paper will provide the motivation and details behind the use of an upgraded NIR imaging system used onboard a Navy Cast Glance aircraft and describe the characterizations and procedures performed to obtain quantitative temperature maps. A brief description and assessment will be provided of the previously used analog NIR camera along with image examples from Shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and solar tower test. These thermal

  11. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  12. Global Infrared Observations of Roughness Induced Transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Wood, William A.; Berry, Scott A.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution infrared observations made from a mobile ground based optical system captured the laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition process as it occurred during Space Shuttle Endeavour's return to earth following its final mission in 2011. The STS-134 imagery was part of a larger effort to demonstrate an emerging and reliable non-intrusive global thermal measurement capability and to complement a series of boundary layer transition flight experiments that were flown on the Shuttle. The STS-134 observations are believed to be the first time that the development and movement of a hypersonic boundary layer transition front has been witnessed in flight over the entire vehicle surface and in particular, at unprecedented spatial resolution. Additionally, benchmark surface temperature maps of the Orbiter lower surface collected over multiple flights and spanning a Mach range of 18 to 6 are now available and represent an opportunity for collaborative comparison with computational techniques focused on hypersonic transition and turbulence modeling. The synergy of the global temperature maps with the companion in-situ thermocouple measurements serve as an example of the effective leveraging of resources to achieve a common goal of advancing our understanding of the complex nature of high Mach number transition. It is shown that quantitative imaging can open the door to a multitude of national and international opportunities for partnership associated with flight-testing and subsequent validation of numerical simulation techniques. The quantitative imaging applications highlighted in this paper offer unique and complementary flight measurement alternatives and suggest collaborative instrumentation opportunities to advance the state of the art in transition prediction and maximize the return on investment in terms of developmental flight tests for future vehicle designs.

  13. Micro-spec: an Integrated Direct-detection Spectrometer for Far-infrared Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chung; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared and submillimeter portions of the electromagnetic spectrum provide a unique view of the astrophysical processes present in the early universe. Our ability to fully explore this rich spectral region has been limited, however, by the size and cost of the cryogenic spectrometers required to carry out such measurements.Micro-Spec (µ-Spec) is a high-sensitivity, direct-detection spectrometer concept working in the 450-1000 (micrometers) wavelength range which will enable a wide range of flight missions that would otherwise be challenging due tothe large size of current instruments with the required spectral resolution and sensitivity. The spectrometer design utilizes two internal antenna arrays, one for transmitting and one for receiving, superconducting microstrip transmission lines for power division and phase delay, and an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) to achieve these goals. The instrument will be integrated on a approximately 10 sq cm silicon chip and can therefore become an important capability under the low background conditions accessible via space and high-altitude borne platforms. In this paper, an optical design methodology for micro-Spec is presented, with particular attention given to its two-dimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the maximization of the instrument resolving power and minimization of the RMS phase error on the instrument focal plane. This two-step optimization can generate geometrical configurations given specific requirements on spectrometer size, operating spectral range and performance.Two point designs with resolving power of 260 and 520 and an RMS phase error less than approximately 0.004 radians were developed for initial demonstration and will be the basis of future instruments with resolving power up to about 1200.

  14. Temporal Evolution of SL-9 Impact Sites on Jupiter and Global Maps of Jupiter from Multi-Observatory Visible and Infrared Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.

    1996-01-01

    site location measurements. HST images were also acquired and used to calibrate the results and to improve the sample. The resources available enabled an in-depth study only of impact site A, however, many more images have since become available through the global network observations through Lowell Observatory.

  15. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  16. The Curators of the University of Missouri Modeling the Infrared Emission of C_60 in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    Fullerenes are cage-like molecules of pure carbon, such as C_60, C_70, C_76, and C_84. C_60, also known as buckminsterfullerene, is the most stable fullerene and has a soccer- ball like structure. The presence of fullerenes in space has been suggested and observationally explored since their first synthesis in the laboratory in 1985 by Harry Kroto and his colleagues which earned them the 1996 Nobel prize in chemistry. C_60 (as well as C_70) has recently been detected in reflection nebulae, post-AGB stars, protoplanetary nebulae, planetary nebulae, Herbig Ae/Be stars, and young stellar objects through their characteristic infrared emission bands. The formation of C_60 in interstellar and circumstellar environments is not firmly established. Experimental studies have shown that C_60 can be made by gas-phase condensation (e.g. through vaporization of graphite) in a hydrogen-poor environment. In view of the simultaneous detection of C_60 and PAHs in hydrogen-rich interstellar and circumstellar regions, it has also been suggested that C_60 could be generated by the decomposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon, or the destruction of PAHs, both induced by shocks and/or UV photoprocessing. The phase (gas or solid) and excitation mechanism of C_60 in interstellar and circumstellar conditions are also hotly debated in the literature. One model suggests that C_60 is attached to dust and emits in solid-phase at the equilibrium temperature of the dust. Another model suggests that C_60 is stochastically excited by UV photons and emits in the gas-phase. We prefer the latter model as in interstellar and circumstellar conditions the energy content of a C_60 molecule is often smaller than the energy of a single starlight photon and C_60 is expected to undergo stochastical heating. We propose a two-year project to model the vibrational excitation of C_60 and calculate its infrared emission spectra in a wide variety of regions (e.g. reflection nebulae excited by stars of a range of

  17. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  18. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets coronagraphic operations: lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Ygouf, Marie; Choquet, Elodie; Hines, Dean C.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Golimowski, David A.; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; van der Marel, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraphic instrument (CGI) currently proposed for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) mission will be the first example of a space-based coronagraph optimized for extremely high contrasts that are required for the direct imaging of exoplanets reflecting the light of their host star. While the design of this instrument is still in progress, this early stage of development is a particularly beneficial time to consider the operation of such an instrument. We review current or planned operations on the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope with a focus on which operational aspects will have relevance to the planned WFIRST-AFTA CGI. We identify five key aspects of operations that will require attention: (1) detector health and evolution, (2) wavefront control, (3) observing strategies/postprocessing, (4) astrometric precision/target acquisition, and (5) polarimetry. We make suggestions on a path forward for each of these items.

  19. Portable coastal observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frye, Daniel; Butman, Bradford; Johnson, Mark; von der Heydt, Keith; Lerner, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Ocean observational science is in the midst of a paradigm shift from an expeditionary science centered on short research cruises and deployments of internally recording instruments to a sustained observational science where the ocean is monitored on a regular basis, much the way the atmosphere is monitored. While satellite remote sensing is one key way of meeting the challenge of real-time monitoring of large ocean regions, new technologies are required for in situ observations to measure conditions below the ocean surface and to measure ocean characteristics not observable from space. One method of making sustained observations in the coastal ocean is to install a fiber optic cable from shore to the area of interest. This approach has the advantage of providing power to offshore instruments and essentially unlimited bandwidth for data. The LEO-15 observatory offshore of New Jersey (yon Alt et al., 1997) and the planned Katama observatory offshore of Martha's Vineyard (Edson et al., 2000) use this approach. These sites, along with other cabled sites, will play an important role in coastal ocean science in the next decade. Cabled observatories, however, have two drawbacks that limit the number of sites that are likely to be installed. First, the cable and the cable installation are expensive and the shore station needed at the cable terminus is often in an environmentally sensitive area where competing interests must be resolved. Second, cabled sites are inherently limited geographically to sites within reach of the cable, so it is difficult to cover large areas of the coastal ocean.

  20. Planetary research at Lowell Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific goals include a better determination of the basic physical characteristics of cometary nuclei, a more complete understanding of the complex processes in the comae, a survey of abundances and gas/dust ratios in a large number of comets, and measurement of primordial (12)C/(13)C and (14)N/(15)N ratios. The program also includes the observation of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses to derive dimensions. Reduction and analysis of extensive narrowband photometry of Comet Halley from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Perth Observatory, Lowell Observatory, and Mauna Kea Observatory were completed. It was shown that the 7.4-day periodicity in the activity of Comet Halley was present from late February through at least early June 1986, but there is no conclusive evidence of periodic variability in the preperihelion data. Greatly improved NH scalelengths and lifetimes were derived from the Halley data which lead to the conclusion that the abundance of NH in comets is much higher than previously believed. Simultaneous optical and thermal infrared observations were obtained of Comet P/Temple 2 using the MKO 2.2 m telescope and the NASA IRTF. Preliminary analysis of these observations shows that the comet's nucleus is highly elongated, very dark, and quite red.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-line Galaxies from Infrared Grism Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughn, Amber N.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kümmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; Mutchler, Max; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Young, Erick T.; Xu, Chun

    2011-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 μm from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 μm grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the Hα, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 <~ z <~ 1.4, 1.2 <~ z <~ 2.2, and 2.0 <~ z <~ 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 μm R ~= 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 μm R ~= 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m AB(F098M) ~= 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Δz ~= 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m AB(F098M)= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z >~ 2.

  2. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF COMET 73P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 3 USING THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kelley, Michael S.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Kimes, Robin L.; Harker, David E. E-mail: bwhitney@wisc.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu E-mail: epolomsk@uwec.edu E-mail: Ray.W.Russell@aero.org E-mail: dharker@ucsd.edu

    2011-09-15

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to observe the 5-37 {mu}m thermal emission of comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW3), components B and C. We obtained low spectral resolution (R {approx} 100) data over the entire wavelength interval, along with images at 16 and 22 {mu}m. These observations provided an unprecedented opportunity to study nearly pristine material from the surface and what was until recently the interior of an ecliptic comet-the cometary surface having experienced only two prior perihelion passages, and including material that was totally fresh. The spectra were modeled using a variety of mineral types including both amorphous and crystalline components. We find that the degree of silicate crystallinity, {approx}35%, is somewhat lower than most other comets with strong emission features, while its abundance of amorphous carbon is higher. Both suggest that SW3 is among the most chemically primitive solar system objects yet studied in detail, and that it formed earlier or farther from the Sun than the bulk of the comets studied so far. The similar dust compositions of the two fragments suggest that these are not mineralogically heterogeneous, but rather uniform throughout their volumes. The best-fit particle size distribution for SW3B has a form dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, close to that expected for dust in collisional equilibrium, while that for SW3C has dn/da {approx} a{sup -4.0}, as seen mostly in active comets with strong directed jets, such as C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp. The total mass of dust in the comae plus nearby tail, extrapolated from the field of view of the IRS peak-up image arrays, is (3-5) x 10{sup 8} kg for B and (7-9) x 10{sup 8} kg for C. Atomic abundances derived from the spectral models indicate a depletion of O compared to solar photospheric values, despite the inclusion of water ice and gas in the models. Atomic C may be solar or slightly sub-solar, but its abundance is complicated by the potential

  3. The James Webb Space Telescope Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. It is a cryogenic infrared space observatory with a 25 m2 aperture telescope that will extend humanities’ high angular resolution view of the universe into the infrared spectrum to reveal early epochs of the universe that the Hubble cannot see. The Webb’s science instrument payload includes four cryogenic near-infrared sensors that provide imagery, coronagraphy, and spectroscopy over the near- and mid-infrared spectrum. The JWST is being developed by NASA, in partnership with the European and Canadian Space Agencies, as a general user facility with science observations to be proposed by the international astronomical community in a manner similar to the Hubble. Construction, integration and verification testing is underway in all areas of the program. The JWST is on schedule for launch during 2018.

  4. Space-borne remote sensing of atmospheric methane using near-infrared spectra: Current status and future perspectives. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenberg, C.; Aben, I.; Bergamaschi, P. M.; Butz, A.; Houweling, S.

    2010-12-01

    We will discuss the current status of methane remote sensing from space using absorption spectroscopy in the near-infrared spectral region. Special focus is on results from the SCIAMACHY instrument onboard ENVISAT and the recently launched Japanese GOSAT satellite. The talk provides an overview on how satellite retrievals work, how they can be used to infer emissions on a global scale and what their advantages and disadvantages are. Especially in winter, most current retrievals at arctic latitudes are complicated due to high solar zenith angles as well as snow/ice cover, all causing very low signal levels in the near infrared. Thus we will focus on results at mid-latitudes and tropical regions but also discuss the potential of current and future missions with respect to high latitude emissions.

  5. Interferometry from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Space-based interferometric observatories will be challenging projects, equal at least to that of building the Great Observatories (the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Gamma Ray Observatory), if not the Pyramids of Eygpt - but they represent the next logical step in examining our Universe at substantially higher angular resolution. Increasing our resolving power by factors of 100 or more (as is needed to make meaningful improvements in this observational arena) over existing facilities such as HST and SST requires mirror diameters (100's to 1000's of meters) much larger than can be supported by single or segmented mirrors - and thus the design and construction of sparse aperture, inteferometric arrays such as those described herein will be required. But just imagine the rewards of being able to see, for the first time, the surfaces of other stars, the location and type of extrasolar planets and even pictures of those same planets, the inner workings of Active Galactic Nuclei, the close-in details of supernovae explosions, black hole event horizons, and the infrared universe at the same resolution of the UV-optical Hubble Deep Fields. As a slight variation on the "Star Trek: Enterprise" theme song might say, it'll be a "long road, getting from here to there", but it will one well-worth taking.

  6. The Boulder magnetic observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.; Pedrie, Kolby L.; Blum, Cletus C.

    2015-08-14

    The Boulder magnetic observatory has, since 1963, been operated by the Geomagnetism Program of the U.S. Geological Survey in accordance with Bureau and national priorities. Data from the observatory are used for a wide variety of scientific purposes, both pure and applied. The observatory also supports developmental projects within the Geomagnetism Program and collaborative projects with allied geophysical agencies.

  7. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  8. The Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return full-disk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at nine EIUV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can 'observe the database' to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  9. Community Plan for Far-Infared/Submillimeter Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The consensus of attendees at the Second Workshop on New Concepts for Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Space Astronomy is that the Single Aperture Far-IR telescope (SAFIR), a cooled spaceborne observatory, is important for the future of far-infrared astronomy. This paper describes the specifications and capabilities of SAFIR, possible designs for SAFIR, and suggests a development strategy for the technology necessary for the telescope.

  10. Infrared Astronomy with Arrays: The Next Generation; Sunset Village, Los Angeles, CA, Oct. 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Ian S.

    1994-01-01

    Conference papers on infrared array techniques and methods for infrared astronomy are presented. Topics covered include the following: infrared telescopes; infrared spectrometers; spaceborne astronomy; astronomical observatories; infrared cameras; imaging techniques; sky surveys; infrared photography; infrared photometry; infrared spectroscopy; equipment specifications; data processing and analysis; control systems; cryogenic equipment; adaptive optics; image resolution; infrared detector materials; and focal plane arrays.

  11. Cirrus Parameter Retrieval by Combined Analysis of Spectral Thermal Infrared and Lidar Sensing from Aircraft and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Duda, David; Eloranta, Edward

    2000-01-01

    The distribution, radiative and microphysical parameters of cirrus clouds are an important factor for cloud effects on the global radiation balance and climate. Multispectral thermal infrared observation are the most significant method used to remote sense cirrus parameter from current and planned passive satellite observations. Passive sensing alone has the limitation that both the cloud radiative temperature, or height, and the spectral emissivity must be derived in the analysis. Factors such as multiple cloud laying, which is very common, are known to introduce ambiguities in results. The addition of lidar cloud height structure measurements significantly improves retrievals. Such active/passive observations have been applied from the NASA ER-2 high altitude remote sensing aircraft since 1983. Applications include the study of the effective effective particle size of cirrus and application toward remote sensing of the ice/water content of cirrus clouds in addition to radiative parameters. Limitations, accuracy and examples of retrievals are presented. In 1997 a space shuttle hitch hiker experiment was flown which included a new technology Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer and a laser altimeter for direct cloud height measurements. A 30 orbit data set to test global application of combined spectral infrared and laser height measurements were obtained. Initial results for cirrus analysis from the shuttle experiment will also be presented.

  12. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.

  13. The Pulkovo Observatory on the Centuries' Borderline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalakin, Viktor K.

    The present paper deals with the development of astrophysical research at the Pulkovo Observatory (now: the Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences) at adjacent time periods separated by the threshold between the 19th and the 20th centuries. The Pulkovo Observatory had been inaugurated in 1839. Its traditional field of research work was astrometry. The confirmation of light absorption phenomenon in interstellar space by Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve marked the turn of the Observatory's research programs toward astrophysics. New tendencies in the development of contemporaneous astronomy in Russia were pointed out by Otto Struve in his paper “About the Place of Astrophysics in Astronomy” presented in 1866 to the Saint-Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wide-scale astrophysical studies were performed at Pulkovo Observatory around 1900 during the directorships of Theodore Bredikhin, Oscar Backlund and Aristarchos Belopolsky.

  14. Photometric Recalibration of the Near-Infrared Camera and MultiObject Spectrometer on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Alex; de Jong, R.; Koekemoer, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since 1997 the Near-Infrared Camera and MultiObject Spectrograph (NICMOS) has been a unique science instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with diverse abilities. During this time it has accumulated a sizable database of calibration data. There is currently a major effort underway to update the calibration of the NICMOS instrument utilizing this wealth of data. Our poster will detail the preliminary effects and products of the photometric calibration improvements. Current improvements include updated darkfile and flatfield calibration files, enhanced error analysis of the photometry, and updated temperature-dependent photometric zero-points. The products of this recalibration effort will be available to the HST astronomical community in the spring of 2009. HST is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  15. Optimum thermal infrared bands for mapping general rock type and temperature from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Q. A.; Nuesch, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine quantitatively the number and locations of spectral bands required to perform general rock-type discrimination from spaceborne imaging sensors using only thermal infrared measurements. Beginning with laboratory spectra collected under idealized conditions from relatively well characterized, homogeneous samples, a radiative transfer model was employed to transform ground exitance values into the corresponding spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere. Taking sensor noise into account analysis of these data revealed that three 1 micrometer wide spectral bands would permit independent estimators of rock-type and sample temperature from a satellite infrared multispectral scanner. This study, indicates that the location of three spectral bands at 8.1-9.1 micrometers, 9.5-10.5 micrometers and 11.0-12.0 micrometers, and the employment of appropriate preprocessing to minimize atmospheric effects makes it possible to predict general rock-type and temperature for a variety of atmospheric states and temperatures.

  16. Infrared remote sensing of cometary parent volatiles from the ground, air, and space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Disanti, Michael A.; Hoban, Susan; Reuter, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    A balanced view of the present generation of infrared instruments for cometary compositional studies is presented. Ground-based instruments are compared with airborne and spaceborne capabilities. An attempt to give examples of the unique science achievable with each is made, and particular emphasis is on the unique aspects of a dedicated Cometary Composition Telescope in earth orbit for investigating the chemical and structural heterogeneity of the cometary nucleus.

  17. Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Spectrograph: Observing Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Beck, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We give examples of how this and other use cases are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  18. A study on ultra-precision machining technique for Al6061-T6 to fabricate space infrared optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Geun-man; Lee, Gil-jae; Hyun, Sang-won; Sung, Ha-yeong; Chung, Euisik; Kim, Geon-hee

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, analysis of variance on designed experiments with full factorial design was applied to determine the optimized machining parameters for ultra-precision fabrication of the secondary aspheric mirror, which is one of the key elements of the space cryogenic infrared optics. A single point diamond turning machine (SPDTM, Nanotech 4μpL Moore) was adopted to fabricate the material, AL6061-T6, and the three machining parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were selected. With several randomly assigned experimental conditions, surface roughness of each condition was measured by a non-contact optical profiler (NT2000; Vecco). As a result of analysis using Minitab, the optimum cutting condition was determined as following; cutting speed: 122 m/min, feed rate: 3 mm/min and depth of cut: 1 μm. Finally, a 120 mm diameter aspheric secondary mirror was attached to a particularly designed jig by using mixture of paraffin and wax and successfully fabricated under the optimum machining parameters. The profile of machined surface was measured by a high-accuracy 3-D profilometer(UA3P; Panasonic) and we obtained the geometrical errors of 30.6 nm(RMS) and 262.4 nm(PV), which satisfy the requirements of the space cryogenic infrared optics.

  19. Space astronomy to the year 2000 - A preview of the possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendhal, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Following an overview of the role of space observations in contemporary astrophysics, the next generation of space-based observatories (the Space Telescope, the Gamma Ray Observatory and the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility) is described. Possible new directions which may be pursued in the 1990s are also discussed. These include the development of large flux collectors for use in astronomy in the ultraviolet, optical, infrared and millimeter wave portions of the spectrum and the development of space-based interferometers to carry out a variety of astrophysically important measurements. Many of these longer term programs will require substantial advances in optics, structures, and control technology.

  20. The Wyoming Infrared Observatory telescope software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillar, Earl J.; Dumbrill, Daniel; Grasdalen, G. L.; Howell, R. R.

    1993-06-01

    We describe the University of Wyoming telescope control and data- acquisition software system. The software was designed to be maintainable, portable, and inexpensive. Moreover, the software was designed to allow rapid communication between the hardware, the data- acquisition processes, and the tracking processes, while leaving each distinct. We show how the new real-time features embodied in the POSIX.4 standard and implemented in the Unix compatible LynxOS operating system allow us to perform all of our tasks on a single 80486 machine with a standard Unix-like environment, with outstanding real-time performance. We discuss our telescope pointing model, which allows us to point with a root-mean-square error of less than 5 arcsec over the sky with the 2.3-m telescope. For more detailed investigation and use, we will make the software available through anonymous FTP.

  1. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  2. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  3. The James Webb Space Telescope: Capabilities for Exoplanet Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments covering the wavelength range of 0.6 micron to 28 micron. JWST's primary science goal is to detect and characterize the first galaxies. It will also study the assembly of galaxies, stellar and planetary system formation, and the formation and evolution of planetary systems. We will review the design of JWST, and discuss the current status of the project, with emphasis on recent progress in the construction of the observatory. We also review the capabilities of the observatory for observations of exosolar planets and debris disks by means of coronagraphic imaging, and high contrast imaging and spectroscopy. This discussion will focus on the optical and thermal performance of the observatory, and will include the current predictions for the performance of the observatory, with special reference to the demands of exoplanet science observations.

  4. Global geodetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Claude; Pearlman, Mike; Sarti, Pierguido

    2015-01-01

    Global geodetic observatories (GGO) play an increasingly important role both for scientific and societal applications, in particular for the maintenance and evolution of the reference frame and those applications that rely on the reference frame for their viability. The International Association of Geodesy (IAG), through the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), is fully involved in coordinating the development of these systems and ensuring their quality, perenniality and accessibility. This paper reviews the current role, basic concepts, and some of the critical issues associated with the GGOs, and advocates for their expansion to enhance co-location with other observing techniques (gravity, meteorology, etc). The historical perspective starts with the MERIT campaign, followed by the creation of international services (IERS, IGS, ILRS, IVS, IDS, etc). It provides a basic definition of observing systems and observatories and the build up of the international networks and the role of co-locations in geodesy and geosciences and multi-technique processing and data products. This paper gives special attention to the critical topic of local surveys and tie vectors among co-located systems in sites; the agreement of space geodetic solutions and the tie vectors now place one of the most significant limitations on the quality of integrated data products, most notably the ITRF. This topic focuses on survey techniques, extrapolation to instrument reference points, computation techniques, systematic biases, and alignment of the individual technique reference frames into ITRF. The paper also discusses the design, layout and implementation of network infrastructure, including the role of GGOS and the benefit that would be achieved with better standardization and international governance.

  5. ISS images for Observatory protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    Light pollution is the main factor of degradation of the astronomical quality of the sky along the history. Astronomical observatories have been monitoring how the brightness of the sky varies using photometric measures of the night sky brightness mainly at zenith. Since the sky brightness depends in other factors such as sky glow, aerosols, solar activity and the presence of celestial objects, the continuous increase of light pollution in these enclaves is difficult to trace except when it is too late.Using models of light dispersion on the atmosphere one can determine which light pollution sources are increasing the sky brightness at the observatories. The input satellite data has been provided by DMSP/OLS and SNPP/VIIRS. Unfortunately their panchromatic bands (color blinded) are not useful to detect in which extension the increase is due to the dramatic change produced by the irruption of LED technology in outdoor lighting. The only instrument in the space that is able to distinguish between the various lighting technologies are the DSLR cameras used by the astronauts onboard the ISS.Current status for some astronomical observatories that have been imaged from the ISS is presented. We are planning to send an official request to NASA with a plan to get images for the most important astronomical observatories. We ask support for this proposal by the astronomical community and especially by the US-based researchers.

  6. Using Virtual Observatories for Heliophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Robert S.; Baker, Daniel N.; Roberts, D. Aaron; King, Todd

    2009-11-01

    Scientific satellites, balloons, ground-based instruments, and other observational platforms are producing rich streams of data about the Earth and space. Ensuring widespread access to such data has led to the development of a new type of observatory: the virtual observatory. Existing only in cyberspace, virtual observatories are Web-based interfaces that point users to online data repositories. More important, they allow users not only to access and view multiple sources of information at the same time but also to cross-compare data to build new insights.

  7. Optical effect of the contamination of infrared windows by the outgassing of materials in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberman, E.

    1975-01-01

    The products and kinetics of outgassing from S13G paint were studied by using infrared absorption measurements of the material outgassed (using an evaporation cell and vacuum chamber). Two separate long-term experimental depositions from heated samples of the S13G paint were made. Before each experiment, the vacuum chamber and sample holder were carefully cleaned and outgassed to ensure that subsequent deposits on the colled-window were due only to the products evaporated from the sample. Results of experiments are listed and discussed.

  8. The control unit of the near infrared spectrograph of the EUCLID space mission: preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Díaz-García, José Javier; Tubío-Araujo, Óscar Manuel; Gómez-Sáenz, Jaime; Peña-Godino, Antonio; Velasco-Fernández, Tirso; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián.; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Rebolo-López, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph and Photometer (NISP) is one of the instruments on board the ESA EUCLID mission. The Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena and Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias are responsible of the Instrument Control Unit of the NISP (NI-ICU) in the Euclid Consortium. The NI-ICU main functions are: communication with the S/C and the Data Processing Unit, control of the Filter and Grism Wheels, control of the Calibration Unit and thermal control of the instrument. This paper presents the NI-ICU status of definition and design at the end of the preliminary design phase.

  9. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1986-01-01

    IRAC focal plane detector technology was developed and studies of alternate focal plane configurations were supported. While any of the alternate focal planes under consideration would have a major impact on the Infrared Array Camera, it was possible to proceed with detector development and optical analysis research based on the proposed design since, to a large degree, the studies undertaken are generic to any SIRTF imaging instrument. Development of the proposed instrument was also important in a situation in which none of the alternate configurations has received the approval of the Science Working Group.

  10. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

  11. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  12. The York College observatory outreach program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, T.; Spergel, M.

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory Outreach Program is to im- prove minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens: the York Col- lege Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy?s popular appeal to at- tract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for high schools and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and collaborations with other institutions.

  13. Kepler's Supernova Studied Through the Combined Abilities of NASA's Great Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Four hundred years ago, sky watchers, including the famous astronomer Johannes Kepler, best known as the discoverer of the laws of planetary motion, were startled by the sudden appearance of a new star in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of the nearby planets. Modern astronomers, using NASA's three orbiting Great Observatories, are unraveling the mysteries of the expanding remains of Kepler's supernova, the last such object seen to explode in our Milky Way galaxy. When a new star appeared Oct. 9, 1604, observers could use only their eyes to study it. The telescope would not be invented for another four years. A team of modern astronomers has the combined abilities of NASA's Great Observatories, the Spritzer Space Telescope (SST), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), to analyze the remains in infrared radiation, visible light, and X-rays. Visible-light images from Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The astronomers used the SST to probe for material that radiates in infrared light, which shows heated microscopic dust particles that have been swept up by the supernova shock wave. The CXO data show regions of very hot gas. The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust, 14 light-years wide and expanding at 4 million mph. There have been six known supernovas in our Milky Way over the past 1,000 years. Kepler's is the only one in which astronomers do not know what type of star exploded. By combining information from all three Great Observatories, astronomers may find the clues they need. Project management for both the HST and CXO programs is the responsibility of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  14. Towards Background-Limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a Cryogenic Far-Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyhrie, A.; Glenn, J.; Wheeler, J.; Day, P.; Eom, B. H.; Leduc, H.; Skrutskie, M.

    2016-08-01

    Arrays of tens of thousands of sensitive far-infrared detectors coupled to a cryogenic 4-6 m class orbital telescope are needed to trace the assembly of galaxies over cosmic time. The sensitivity of a 4 Kelvin telescope observing in the far-infrared (30-300 \\upmu m) would be limited by zodiacal light and Galactic interstellar dust emission, and require broadband detector noise equivalent powers (NEPs) in the range of 3× 10^{-19} W/√{Hz}. We are fabricating and testing 96 element arrays of lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) designed to reach NEPs near this level in a low-background laboratory environment. The LEKIDs are fabricated with aluminum: the low normal-state resistivity of Al permits the use of very thin wire-grid absorber lines (150 nm) for efficient absorption of radiation, while the small volumes enable high sensitivities because quasiparticle densities are high. Such narrow absorption lines present a fabrication challenge, but we deposit TiN atop the Al to increase the robustness of the detectors and achieve a 95 % yield. We present the design of these Al/TiN bilayer LEKIDs and preliminary sensitivity measurements at 350 \\upmu m optically loaded by cold blackbody radiation.

  15. Astronomy from Space: The Hubble, Herschel and James Webb Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Space-based astronomy is going through a renaissance, with three Great Observatories currently flying: Hubble in the visible and ultraviolet, Spitzer in the infrared and Chandra in X-rays. The future looks equally bright. The final servicing mission to Hubble will take place in February 2009 and promises to make the observatory more capable than ever with two new cameras, and refurbishment that will allow it to last at least five years. The upcoming launch of the Herschel Space Telescope will open the far-infrared to explore the cool and dusty Universe. Finally, we look forward to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2013, which wil provide a successor to both Hubble and Spitzer. In this talk, the author discusses some of the highlights of scientific discovery in the last 10 years and reveals the promise to the next 10 years.

  16. Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) accommodations requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results of an accommodations analysis for the Advanced Solar Observatory on Space Station Freedom are reported. Concepts for the High Resolution Telescope Cluster, Pinhole/Occulter Facility, and High Energy Cluster were developed which can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom. It is shown that workable accommodations concepts are possible. Areas of emphasis for the next stage of engineering development are identified.

  17. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Rideout, C.; Vanlew, K.

    1998-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction is nearly completed and first light is planned for fall 1998. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. That telescope has been in use for the past four years by up to 50 schools per month. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have applied for an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  18. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-05-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the building and dome has been completed, and first light is planned for spring 1999. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have received an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  19. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  20. The infrared camera onboard JEM-EUSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EUSO) on board the International Space Station (ISS) is the first space-based mission worldwide in the field of Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). For UHECR experiments, the atmosphere is not only the showering calorimeter for the primary cosmic rays, it is an essential part of the readout system, as well. Moreover, the atmosphere must be calibrated and has to be considered as input for the analysis of the fluorescence signals. Therefore, the JEM-EUSO Space Observatory is implementing an Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS) that will include an IR-Camera and a LIDAR. The AMS Infrared Camera is an infrared, wide FoV, imaging system designed to provide the cloud coverage along the JEM-EUSO track and the cloud top height to properly achieve the UHECR reconstruction in cloudy conditions. In this paper, an updated preliminary design status, the results from the calibration tests of the first prototype, the simulation of the instrument, and preliminary cloud top height retrieval algorithms are presented.