Science.gov

Sample records for infrastructure committee including

  1. 78 FR 72718 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration announce a meeting of the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC) of... page ``Public Admission to the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA...

  2. 75 FR 55616 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Tuesday, September 28, 2010, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Local...

  3. 75 FR 57079 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ..., Building 3, Ballroom, NASA Research Park, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms... attending the NASA Advisory Council Information Technology Infrastructure Committee meeting in the...

  4. 77 FR 38092 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    .... ADDRESSES: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Building 28, Room E210, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In...

  5. 76 FR 18800 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... picture identification such as a driver's license to enter the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and must... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In...

  6. 78 FR 42553 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting...) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. DATES: Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; and Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES:...

  7. Strategy to Reduce Districts Sewer Overflows Will Include Green Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (PHILADELPHIA- May 20, 2015) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the District of Columbia (District) and DC Water today announced an agreement to modify a 2005 federal consent decree (CD) allowing DC Water to incorporate green infrastructure

  8. 77 FR 6825 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m., local time. Meet- Me-Number: 1-866 818-0788, Participant--9453583. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E. Street SW.,...

  9. Congressional Testimony: Statement of Melissa Heist Before the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure U.S. House of Representatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Statement of Melissa Heist Assistant Inspector General for Audit Office of Inspector General U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Before the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure U.S. House of Representatives

  10. Standing Committee on Defense Materials, Manufacturing, and Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-06

    media, electro -chemical power storage systems or shape morphing structures. He has published 393 papers, co-authored a book on cellular materials...advanced sensors group. He began his research career at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (Harwell) where he worked on the origins of acoustic ...positions include electro -optic R&D laboratories, chip R&D and manufacturing, corporate strategic planning, a commercial chip company, and a major

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (42nd). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1254 to 1295

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  12. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (37th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1003 to 1031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  13. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (34th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 892 to 921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  14. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (40th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1158-1209

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  15. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (35th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 922 to 950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  16. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (41st). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1210 to 1253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  17. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (38th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 1059 to 1110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  18. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (36th). administrative report including Technical Report nos. 951 to 1002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  19. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (29th) : administrative report including Technical Report nos. 752 to 773

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1948-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  20. The Information Infrastructure: Reaching Society's Goals. A Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force Committee on Applications and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

    Intended for public comment and discussion, this document is the second volume of papers in which the Information Infrastructure Task Force has attempted to articulate in clear terms, with sufficient detail, how improvements in the National Information Infrastructure (NII) can help meet other social goals. These are not plans to be enacted, but…

  1. Congressional Testimony: Testimony of Nikki L. Tinsley Before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and the Environment Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure United States House of Representati

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Testimony of Nikki L. Tinsley Inspector General U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and the Environment Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure United States House of Representatives

  2. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (1st). [Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1 to 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1916-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  3. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  4. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  5. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  6. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  7. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (18th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 401 to 440

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  8. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (33rd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 863 to 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  9. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (9Th).Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 159 to 185

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  10. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (10th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 186 to 209

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1925-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (16th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 337 to 364

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  12. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (17th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 365 to 400

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  13. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (8th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 133 to 158

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  14. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (15th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 309 to 336

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  15. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (32nd).administative report including Technical Report nos. 834 to 862

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  16. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (28th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 727 to 751

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  17. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (21st).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 508 to 541

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  18. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (26th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 681 to 703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  19. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (23rd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 577 to 611

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  20. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (24th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 612 to 644

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  1. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (14th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 283 to 308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  2. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (25th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 645 to 680

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  3. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (13th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 257 to 282

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  4. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (11th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 210 to 232

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  5. Annual report for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (12th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 233 to 256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the president, congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  6. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (7th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 111 to 132

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, and expenditures.

  7. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (19th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 441 to 474

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  8. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (22nd).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 542 to 576

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  9. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (30th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 774 to 803

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of Committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  10. Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (27Th).Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 704 to 726

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1942-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  11. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (20th).administrative report including Technical Report nos. 475 to 507

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.

  12. Advanced Digital Video and the National Information Infrastructure. Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force, Committee on Applications and Technology, Technology Policy Working Group. Draft for Public Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, DC.

    The National Information Infrastructure (NII) vision encompasses an infrastructure providing seamless, interactive, user driven access to the widest range of information. Video will play a key role in distribution of educational information, government data, manufacturing information, and access to health care data and services. The Technology…

  13. NCAA Enforcement Procedures Including the Role of the Committee on Infractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington, Frank J.

    1984-01-01

    The task of the Infractions Committee and the NCAA enforcement staff is to deal with inappropriate conduct in intercollegiate athletic programs by member institutions, their staffs, their student athletes, and other institutional representatives. The work of the Committee and the NCAA enforcement process is described. (Author/MLW)

  14. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (5th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 51 to 82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  15. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (4th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 24 to 50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  16. A case for integrity: gains from including more than animal welfare in animal ethics committee deliberations.

    PubMed

    Röcklinsberg, H; Gamborg, C; Gjerris, M

    2014-01-01

    From January 2013, a new EU Directive 63/2010/EU requires that research using animals must undergo a harm-benefit analysis, which takes ethical considerations into account (Art. 38 (2) d) - a so-called 'project authorization' (Art. 36). A competent authority in each member state has to ensure that no project is carried out without such a project validation process, but often delegates the actual assessment to an animal ethics committee (AEC) or its equivalent. The core task of the AEC is to formulate a justifiable balance between the animals' suffering caused by research and the potential human benefit. AECs traditionally focus on animal welfare issues, but according to the new directive other public concerns must also be taken into account. Taking the new EU Directive as a point of departure, the central aim of this paper is to discuss the evaluation process in relation to animal welfare and animal ethics through the concept of animal integrity. A further aim is to elaborate on possible improvements to project evaluation by considering animal integrity. We argue that concepts like animal integrity are often left out of project authorization processes within AECs, because animal ethics is often interpreted narrowly to include only certain aspects of animal welfare. Firstly, we describe the task of an AEC and discuss what has typically been regarded as ethically relevant in the assessment process. Secondly, we categorize four notions of integrity found in the literature to show the complexity of the concept and furthermore to indicate its strengths. Thirdly, we discuss how certain interpretations of integrity can be included in AEC assessments to encapsulate wider ethical concerns and, perhaps even increase the democratic legitimacy of AECs.

  17. Putting the Information Infrastructure to Work. Report of the Information Infrastructure Task Force Committee on Applications and Technology. NIST Special Publication 857.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

    An interconnection of computer networks, telecommunications services, and applications, the National Information Infrastructure (NII) can open up new vistas and profoundly change much of American life. This report explores some of the opportunities and obstacles to the use of the NII by people and organizations. The goal is to express how…

  18. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Conference Chairs NameOrganization Gwyn Williams Jefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility Programme Committee NameOrganization Alastair MacDowellAdvanced Light Source Tom ToellnerAdvanced Photon Source Amitava D RoyCenter for Advanced Microstructures and Devices Tom EllisCanadian Light Source Roberta SantarosaLaboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron Jerry (Jerome) HastingsLinac Coherent Light Source Steven HulbertNational Synchrotron Light Source Thomas A RabedeauStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Mark BissenSynchrotron Radiation Center Gwyn WilliamsJefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility

  19. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural water supply project? 404.10 Section 404.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY...

  20. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural water supply project? 404.10 Section 404.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY...

  1. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (6th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 83 to 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, House of Representatives bill 14061, a copy of the bill introduced to the House of Representatives to regulate air navigation, and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  2. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  3. Analyses of extreme precipitation and runoff events including uncertainties and reliability in design and management of urban water infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailegeorgis, Teklu T.; Alfredsen, Knut

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for assessment of uncertainties and hence effects on reliability of design and management of stormwater pipes due to the prevalence of urban floods trigged by modification of land cover and high precipitation intensities respectively due to increasing urbanization and changing climate. Observed annual maximum series (AMS) of extreme precipitation intensities of 17 durations (1-min to 1440-min) and runoff records of 27 years from a 21.255 ha (23% impervious, 35% built-up and 41% open areas) Risvollan catchment in Trondheim City were used. Using a balanced bootstrap resampling (BBRS) with frequency analysis, we quantified considerable uncertainty in precipitation and runoff quantiles due to the sampling variability of systematic observations (e.g., -43% to +49% relative differences from the quantile estimates for the original sample). These differences are higher than suggested increase in design rainfall and floods by many countries for climate change adjustment. The uncertainties in IDF curves and derived design storm hyetographs are found to have large effects on the reliability of sizing of stormwater pipes. The study also indicated low validity of the assumptions on extreme precipitation and runoff relationships in the return period-based method for the partially paved urban catchment: (i) maximum of only 46% of the AMS of extreme precipitation and runoff events occurred concurrently and (ii) T-year return period extreme precipitation events do not necessarily result in T-year flood events. These indicate that there are effects of snowmelt seasonality, and probably catchment moisture states and interactions between the flows in subsurface media and pipes. The results substantiate the need for better understanding of relationships between precipitation and runoff extremes and urban runoff generation process, and importance of uncertainty assessment and application of reliability-based methods for design and management of water infrastructure.

  4. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1930, Alberto Sirlin studied at the University of Buenos Aires from 1948-52, where he carried out research work in classical nonlinear physics, under the guidance of Richard Gans, and in 1953 received the degree of doctor in Physical-Mathematical Sciences. In 1953 he held a fellowship at the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he did research work and attended some graduate courses, including a memorable and highly influential one taught by Richard Feynman. He spent the academic year 1954-55 at UCLA, where he initiated his work on electroweak physics in collaboration with Robert Finkelstein and Ralph Behrends. His next move was to Cornell University in 1955, earning his PhD there in 1958 for research in electroweak physics in collaboration with Toichiro Kinoshita. Sirlin spent 1957-59 as a research associate at Columbia University, becoming an Assistant Professor of Physics at New York University in 1959, an Associate Professor in 1961, and a full Professor in 1968. It is a remarkable coincidence that one of his fellow post-docs, Steven Weinberg, was to become one of the founders of the Standard Model, which in turn has provided the natural setting for Sirlin's work. During his formative years, he was extremely fortunate to receive guidance and advice from an extraordinary group of distinguished scientists, including R Gans, R P Feynman, R J Finkelstein, H A Bethe and E E Salpeter. He also enjoyed close and fruitful long-term collaborations with a number of brilliant theorists, including R E Behrends, T Kinoshita, T D Lee, M A B Beg, W J Marciano, P Langacker, G Degrassi, P Gambino and B A Kniehl, and has had fourteen excellent, interesting, and highly enterprising graduate students, who have remained close friends. Sirlin's main research interests have been in precision electroweak physics, other topics in weak interaction theory, the search for higher symmetries of the strong interactions

  5. 41 CFR 102-3.75 - What information must be included in the charter of an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Established, Renewed, Reestablished, and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What information must...

  6. 41 CFR 102-3.75 - What information must be included in the charter of an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Established, Renewed, Reestablished, and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What information must...

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.75 - What information must be included in the charter of an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Established, Renewed, Reestablished, and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What information must...

  8. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d) Buildings necessary... may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL...

  9. How Data Mining Threatens Student Privacy. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-76 and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-61, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session (June 25, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US House of Representatives, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first joint hearing of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. The subcommittees met to examine data collection…

  10. Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (2nd) together with the message of the President of the United States transmitting the report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1916. administrative report including technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1917-01-01

    Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations and a compilation of technical reports produced.

  11. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    Government Accountability Office, Critical Infrastructure Protection: Challenges for Selected Agencies and Industry Sectors. Repot to the Committee on...the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a dialogue between... government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s critical infrastructures by

  12. The National Information Infrastructure: Requirements for Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational IRM Quarterly, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Includes 19 access, education and training, and technical requirements that must be addressed in the development of the national information infrastructure. The requirements were prepared by national education, training, and trade associations participating in the National Coordinating Committee on Technology in Education and Training (NCC-TET). A…

  13. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  14. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's Education Development Committee (EDC) White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India – Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar; Kalra, Om Prakash; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Sundarakumar, Sundarajan

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM) has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI) has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers’ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India) has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE's Education Development Committee (EDC) was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE) to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM. PMID:25114431

  15. 77 FR 52053 - Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... established to advise the Federal Geographic Data Committee on management of Federal geospatial programs, the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure, and the implementation of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-16. Topics to be addressed at the meeting include: Leadership Dialogue...

  16. Libraries and Their Role in the Information Infrastructure. Hearing on Examining the Role of Libraries in Developing America's New Information Infrastructure, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The purpose of this congressional hearing was to determine how libraries fit into the emerging national information infrastructure (NII). Testimony and prepared statements include those from Howard F. McGinn, Director, Emporia Public Library, Emporia, Kansas; James H. Billington, Librarian of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.,…

  17. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  18. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-10

    Government Accountability Office, Critical Infrastructure Protection: Challenges for Selected Agencies and Industry Sectors. Repot to the Committee on...set up groups within the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a...dialogue between government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s critical

  19. Green Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large paved surfaces keep rain from infiltrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Alternatively, Green infrastructure uses natural processes to reduce and treat stormwater in place by soaking up and storing water. These systems provide many environmental, social, an...

  20. Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1342 to 1392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with act of Congress, approved March 3, 1915, as amended (U.S.C., title 50, .sw 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the Committee submits its Forty-fourth Annual Report for the fiscal year 1958. This is the Committee's final report to the Congress. The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) provides in section 301 that the NACA "shall cease to exist" and "all functions, powers, duties, and obligations, and all real and personal property, personnel (other than members of the Committee), funds, and records of the NACA shall be transferred to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The aforesaid act provides that "this section shall take effect 90 days after the date of the enactment of this act, or on any earlier date on which the Administrator shall determining and announce by proclamation published in the Federal Register, that the Administration has been organized and is prepared to discharge the duties and exercise the power conferred upon it by this act." The Administrator, Hon. T. Keith Glennan has advised the Committee of his intention to issue such proclamation, effective October 1,1958.

  1. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  2. 1978 Age Discrimination Act Amendments. Explanation of 1978 Age Discrimination Act Amendments. Report of Committee on Conference, Including Text of H.R. 5383. Text of Age Discrimination Act, as Amended. Report of House Labor Committee. Report of Senate Human Resources Committee. Union Labor Report No. 1596, Special Supplement, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This booklet explains and reproduces the text of the 1978 amendments to the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA). It also gives the actual committee on conference report as well as reports of the House labor committee and the Senate human resources committee. In its introductory explanation, the booklet discusses the most publicized…

  3. EULAR recommendations for the management of knee osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutic Trials (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, A; Arden, N; Dougados, M; Doherty, M; Bannwarth, B; Bijlsma, J; Cluzeau, F; Cooper, C; Dieppe, P; Gunther, K; Hauselmann, H; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Kaklamanis, P; Leeb, B; Lequesne, M; Lohmander, S; Mazieres, B; Mola, E; Pavelka, K; Serni, U; Swoboda, B; Verbruggen, A; Weseloh, G; Zimmermann-Gorska, I

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease encountered throughout Europe. A task force for the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Trials met in 1998 to determine the methodological and logistical approach required for the development of evidence based guidelines for treatment of knee OA. The guidelines were restricted to cover all currently available treatments for knee OA diagnosed either clinically and/or radiographically affecting any compartment of the knee.
METHODS—The first stage was the selection of treatment modalities to be considered. The second stage comprised a search of the electronic databases Medline and Embase using a combination of subject headings and keywords. All European language publications in the form of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, controlled trials, and observational studies were included. During stage three all the relevant studies were quality scored. The summary statistics for validated outcome measures, when available, were recorded and, where practical, the numbers needed to treat and the effect size for each treatment were calculated. In the fourth stage key clinical propositions were determined by expert consensus employing a Delphi approach. The final stage ranked these propositions according to the available evidence. A second set of propositions relating to a future research agenda was determined by expert consensus using a Delphi approach.
RESULTS—Over 2400 English language publications and 400 non-English language publications were identified. Seven hundred and forty four studies presented outcome data of the effects of specific treatments on knee OA. Quantitative analysis of treatment effect was possible in only 61 studies. Recommendations for the management of knee OA based on currently available data and expert opinion are presented. Proposals for a future research agenda are highlighted.
CONCLUSIONS—These are the first clinical guidelines on knee

  4. 78 FR 24749 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment AGENCY: Government Accountability... Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee to make recommendations on the implementation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure to the...

  5. Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 1003 to 1958

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    In accordance with the act of Congress, approved March 3,1915 (U.S. C. title 50, sec. 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics the Committee submits its thirty-seventh annual report for the fiscal year 1951. The United States is engaged in expanding military aviation to levels never before reached except in the midst of a major war. In Korea, our military aircraft are engaged in combat with airplanes of an unfriendly nation evidently able to build military aircraft of increasing capabilities. In this environment, the NACA is responsible for conducting an adequate program of scientific research to open the way for the design of aircraft and missile of superior performance. Since World War II the pace of technical development has increased. Until then, improvement in aircraft performance as a result of the application of scientific research proceeded at what. now seems to be a relatively slow and orderly rate. Modest increases in speed, climb, range, or altitude were set as reasonable goals. Compressibility effects at high speeds were just beginning to be encountered and indicated a formidable barrier near the velocity of sound. This barrier has been found by research and experiment to be lees formidable than supposed, and we now see the possibility of radical gains in airplane performance that are of great military significance. Such gains are ak attainable by a potential enemy. The increased complexity of modern high performance

  6. The future of infrastructure security :

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

    2013-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included in infrastructure problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions of secure and resilient infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

  7. ITER Cryoplant Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, E.; Monneret, E.; Voigt, T.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Simon, M.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak requires an average 75 kW of refrigeration power at 4.5 K and 600 kW of refrigeration Power at 80 K to maintain the nominal operation condition of the ITER thermal shields, superconducting magnets and cryopumps. This is produced by the ITER Cryoplant, a complex cluster of refrigeration systems including in particular three identical Liquid Helium Plants and two identical Liquid Nitrogen Plants. Beyond the equipment directly part of the Cryoplant, colossal infrastructures are required. These infrastructures account for a large part of the Cryoplants lay-out, budget and engineering efforts. It is ITER Organization responsibility to ensure that all infrastructures are adequately sized and designed to interface with the Cryoplant. This proceeding presents the overall architecture of the cryoplant. It provides order of magnitude related to the cryoplant building and utilities: electricity, cooling water, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC).

  8. Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1111 to 1157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    This is the fiftieth year since Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk N. C., made their powered flight. That airplane was a fragile and unsteady machine of no immediate utility. It flew for only a minute but it disclosed the solution of the age-old problem of human flight. The Wrights were the first in the history of man to fly. There was no one to teach them. They had to discover principles and to learn the art by cautious and methodical experimenting. From their own research they obtained the practical information needed to design their successful flying machine. The Wrights received no effective aid from the theoretical studies of flight made by the mathematicians of the nineteenth century. The science of aerodynamics was developed in response to the practical demands of aeronautics in the years to follow. In 1908, the Wrights demonstrated at Fort Myer, Va., a vastly improved flyer, the first military airplane. It carried a passenger and flew for more than an hour. Following this public demonstration, the development of the airplane was taken up vigorously. At first France and Germany took the lead, then Great Britain, but the United States lagged behind in the furthering of this greatest American development of the century. With war clouds in view in 1915, the Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to undertake the scientific study of the problems of fight with a view to their practical solution. President Wilson appointed the members of the first Committee, consisting of the heads of the military and civil agencies of the Government concerned with aeronautics and experts from private life.

  9. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens' quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  10. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens’ quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion. PMID:26615823

  11. 78 FR 38736 - Committee Management; Renewals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Biological Infrastructure, 10743 Proposal Review Panel for Earth Sciences, 1569 Proposal Review Panel for... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee Management; Renewals The National Science Foundation (NSF) management officials...

  12. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Barron, E. J.; Fine, R. A.; Bellingham, J. G.; Boss, E.; Boyle, E. A.; Edwards, M.; Johnson, K. S.; Kelley, D. S.; Kite-Powell, H.; Ramberg, S. E.; Rudnick, D. L.; Schofield, O.; Tamburri, M.; Wiebe, P. H.; Wright, D. J.; Committee on an Ocean Infrastructure StrategyU. S. Ocean Research in 2030

    2011-12-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, an expert committee was convened by the National Research Council to identify major research questions anticipated to be at the forefront of ocean science in 2030, define categories of infrastructure that should be included in planning, provide advice on criteria and processes that could be used to set priorities, and recommend ways to maximize the value of investments in ocean infrastructure. The committee identified 32 future ocean research questions in four themes: enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant now and are likely to take decades to solve. U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations and autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. A coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments will be needed and should be based upon known priorities and reviewed every 5-10 years. After assessing trends in ocean infrastructure and technology development, the committee recommended implementing a comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan in order to retain access to the sea; continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. They also recommended that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit. Particular consideration should be given to

  13. Rapid Arctic Changes due to Infrastructure and Climate (RATIC) in the Russian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Kofinas, G.; Raynolds, M. K.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.; Ambrosius, K.; Matyshak, G. V.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Kumpula, T.; Forbes, B. C.; Khukmotov, A.; Leibman, M. O.; Khitun, O.; Lemay, M.; Allard, M.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Bell, T.; Forbes, D. L.; Vincent, W. F.; Kuznetsova, E.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Fondahl, G.; Petrov, A.; Roy, L. P.; Schweitzer, P.; Buchhorn, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Rapid Arctic Transitions due to Infrastructure and Climate (RATIC) initiative is a forum developed by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) Terrestrial, Cryosphere, and Social & Human working groups for developing and sharing new ideas and methods to facilitate the best practices for assessing, responding to, and adaptively managing the cumulative effects of Arctic infrastructure and climate change. An IASC white paper summarizes the activities of two RATIC workshops at the Arctic Change 2014 Conference in Ottawa, Canada and the 2015 Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III) meeting in Toyama, Japan (Walker & Pierce, ed. 2015). Here we present an overview of the recommendations from several key papers and posters presented at these conferences with a focus on oil and gas infrastructure in the Russian north and comparison with oil development infrastructure in Alaska. These analyses include: (1) the effects of gas- and oilfield activities on the landscapes and the Nenets indigenous reindeer herders of the Yamal Peninsula, Russia; (2) a study of urban infrastructure in the vicinity of Norilsk, Russia, (3) an analysis of the effects of pipeline-related soil warming on trace-gas fluxes in the vicinity of Nadym, Russia, (4) two Canadian initiatives that address multiple aspects of Arctic infrastructure called Arctic Development and Adaptation to Permafrost in Transition (ADAPT) and the ArcticNet Integrated Regional Impact Studies (IRIS), and (5) the effects of oilfield infrastructure on landscapes and permafrost in the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska.

  14. 78 FR 40487 - National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Resilience Working Group. We request that comments be limited to the issues listed in the meeting agenda and... on the security and resilience of the Nation's critical infrastructure sectors and their information... resilience as directed by the President. At this meeting, the committee will receive and discuss...

  15. [Bioethics committees].

    PubMed

    Lanzilota, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    The present paper exposes a brief historical route showing the context of the Ethics Committee developing. The moral conflicts in clinical care that doctors had to face with the introduction of the new technologies, the creation of the first clinical committees in USA and the abuses in the biomedical investigations, determined the establishment of ethical guidelines and settled institutional review committees for its control. First Bioethics Committees in Argentina were established by adopting the US Ethic Committees model. The proliferation of hospital ethics committees was related to local regulations requirements. Current regulations. Bioethics Committees in Buenos Aires City, through the data of a survey.

  16. Animal Care Use Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Margaret D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the structure, activities, responsibilities, and practices of animal care and use committees established to review classroom activities and student research using animals. Provides six hypothetical situations with suggested solutions to test a committee's decision-making ability. Includes a proposed activity form for teachers. (MDH)

  17. 78 FR 64941 - Government-Wide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC); Public Advisory Committee Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Government-Wide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC); Public Advisory Committee Meetings AGENCY..., Designated Federal Officer (DFO), Government-wide Travel ] Advisory Committee (GTAC), Office of Government... recommendations to existing travel policies, processes and procedures, including the per diem methodology...

  18. Examining the effectiveness of health and safety committees and representatives: a review.

    PubMed

    Milgate, Nadine; Innes, Ev; O'Loughlin, Kate

    2002-01-01

    The establishment of a health and safety committee in the workplace and/or the appointment of an elected health and safety representative is believed to foster employee participation and consultation in the workplace. Despite an emphasis within the Australian occupational health and safety legislation towards employee participation in relation to health and safety issues, there is little known about the effectiveness of the strategies used to involve workers in health and safety matters in the workplace. There is anecdotal evidence published in relation to the implementation of health and safety committees and their effectiveness in the Australian workplace. Few opinions however are substantiated by empirical evidence. Significantly more research has been conducted on the role of health and safety representatives in Australia. This paper presents the findings of a review of the literature and identifies the factors that are considered to impact on the effectiveness of workplace health and safety committees and representatives. Several factors are described as being fundamental to the effective performance of committees and representatives. These factors include management commitment, communication, training and information, union involvement, the infrastructure of an organisation, committee processes and the involvement of professional experts. It is concluded that the effectiveness of health and safety committees in Australia is unexplored and it is unknown if these committees achieve the purpose for which they were established. Recommendations are made for future research to be conducted to test the current anecdotal evidence and assumptions associated with the operation and effectiveness of health and safety committees.

  19. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations

  20. S. 2195. The National Public Telecommunications Infrastructure Act of 1994. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Communications of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Subcommittee on Communications.

    This hearing focused on S. 2195, the National Public Telecommunications Infrastructure Act of 1994, which would guarantee that noncommercial and public interest groups would have a place reserved on the information superhighway for the provision of free educational, informational, cultural, civic, or charitable services to the public. It was noted…

  1. Infrastructure dynamics: A selected bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Bencosme, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The term infrastructure is used to denote the set of life support and public service systems which is necessary for the development of growth of human settlements. Included are some basic references in the field of dynamic simulation, as well as a number of relevant applications in the area of infrastructure planning. The intent is to enable the student or researcher to quickly identify such applications to the extent necessary for initiating further work in the field.

  2. 33 CFR 103.310 - Responsibilities of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Maritime Security (AMS) Committee. 103.310 Section 103.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Security (AMS) Committee § 103.310 Responsibilities of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee. (a) The AMS Committee shall: (1) Identify critical port infrastructure and operations; (2) Identify...

  3. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Technical report: prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Overturf, G D

    2000-08-01

    Pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections peaks in children younger than 2 years, reaching rates of 228/100,000 in children 6 to 12 months old. Children with functional or anatomic asplenia (including sickle cell disease [SCD]) and children with human immunodeficiency virus infection have pneumococcal infection rates 20- to 100-fold higher than those of healthy children during the first 5 years of life. Others at high risk of pneumococcal infections include children with congenital immunodeficiency; chronic cardiopulmonary disease; children receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy; children with immunosuppressive neoplastic diseases; children with chronic renal insufficiency, including nephrotic syndrome; children with diabetes; and children with cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Children of Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) or African American descent also have higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. Outbreaks of pneumococcal infection have occurred with increased frequency in children attending out-of-home care. Among these children, nasopharyngeal colonization rates of 60% have been observed, along with pneumococci resistant to multiple antibiotics. The administration of antibiotics to children involved in outbreaks of pneumococcal disease has had an inconsistent effect on nasopharyngeal carriage. In contrast, continuous penicillin prophylaxis in children younger than 5 years with SCD has been successful in reducing rates of pneumococcal disease by 84%. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have been recommended since 1985 for children older than 2 years who are at high risk of invasive disease, but these vaccines were not recommended for younger children and infants because of poor antibody response before 2 years of age. In contrast, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevnar) induce proposed protective antibody responses (>.15

  4. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  5. EULAR evidence based recommendations for gout. Part II: Management. Report of a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee For International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Doherty, M; Bardin, T; Pascual, E; Barskova, V; Conaghan, P; Gerster, J; Jacobs, J; Leeb, B; Lioté, F; McCarthy, G; Netter, P; Nuki, G; Perez‐Ruiz, F; Pignone, A; Pimentão, J; Punzi, L; Roddy, E; Uhlig, T; Zimmermann‐Gòrska, I

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of gout. Methods The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 19 rheumatologists and one evidence based medicine expert representing 13 European countries. Key propositions on management were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. Research evidence was searched systematically for each proposition. Where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk, odds ratio, and incremental cost‐effectiveness ratio were calculated. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the level of evidence. The strength of recommendation (SOR) was assessed using the EULAR visual analogue and ordinal scales. Results 12 key propositions were generated after three Delphi rounds. Propositions included both non‐pharmacological and pharmacological treatments and addressed symptomatic control of acute gout, urate lowering therapy (ULT), and prophylaxis of acute attacks. The importance of patient education, modification of adverse lifestyle (weight loss if obese; reduced alcohol consumption; low animal purine diet) and treatment of associated comorbidity and risk factors were emphasised. Recommended drugs for acute attacks were oral non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral colchicine (ES = 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.25 to 1.50)), or joint aspiration and injection of corticosteroid. ULT is indicated in patients with recurrent acute attacks, arthropathy, tophi, or radiographic changes of gout. Allopurinol was confirmed as effective long term ULT (ES = 1.39 (0.78 to 2.01)). If allopurinol toxicity occurs, options include other xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol desensitisation, or a uricosuric. The uricosuric benzbromarone is more effective than allopurinol (ES = 1.50 (0.76 to 2.24)) and can be used in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency but may be hepatotoxic. When gout is associated with the use of diuretics, the

  6. EULAR evidence based recommendations for the management of hip osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Doherty, M; Arden, N; Bannwarth, B; Bijlsma, J; Gunther, K; Hauselmann, H; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Jordan, K; Kaklamanis, P; Leeb, B; Lequesne, M; Lohmander, S; Mazieres, B; Martin-Mola, E; Pavelka, K; Pendleton, A; Punzi, L; Swoboda, B; Varatojo, R; Verbruggen, G; Zimmermann-Gorska, I; Dougados, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 18 rheumatologists, 4 orthopaedic surgeons, and 1 epidemiologist, representing 14 European countries. Each participant contributed up to 10 propositions describing key clinical aspects of hip OA management. Ten final recommendations were agreed using a Delphi consensus approach. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and HTA reports were searched systematically to obtain research evidence for each proposition. Where possible, outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. Effect size, rate ratio, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the evidence hierarchy. The strength of recommendation was assessed using the traditional A–D grading scale and a visual analogue scale. Results: Ten key treatment propositions were generated through three Delphi rounds. They included 21 interventions, such as paracetamol, NSAIDs, symptomatic slow acting disease modifying drugs, opioids, intra-articular steroids, non-pharmacological treatment, total hip replacement, osteotomy, and two general propositions. 461 studies were identified from the literature search for the proposed interventions of efficacy, side effects, and cost effectiveness. Research evidence supported 15 interventions in the treatment of hip OA. Evidence specific for the hip was strikingly lacking. Strength of recommendation varied according to category of research evidence and expert opinion. Conclusion: Ten key recommendations for the treatment of hip OA were developed based on research evidence and expert consensus. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of these recommendations were evaluated and the strength of recommendation was scored. PMID:15471891

  7. EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis: report of a task force of the European Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Combe, B; Landewe, R; Lukas, C; Bolosiu, H D; Breedveld, F; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Ferraccioli, G; Hazes, J M W; Klareskog, L; Machold, K; Martin‐Mola, E; Nielsen, H; Silman, A; Smolen, J; Yazici, H

    2007-01-01

    Objective To formulate EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis. Methods In accordance with EULAR's “standardised operating procedures”, the task force pursued an evidence based approach and an approach based on expert opinion. A steering group comprised of 14 rheumatologists representing 10 European countries. The group defined the focus of the process, the target population, and formulated an operational definition of “management”. Each participant was invited to propose issues of interest regarding the management of early arthritis or early rheumatoid arthritis. Fifteen issues for further research were selected by use of a modified Delphi technique. A systematic literature search was carried out. Evidence was categorised according to usual guidelines. A set of draft recommendations was proposed on the basis of the research questions and the results of the literature search.. The strength of the recommendations was based on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Results 15 research questions, covering the entire spectrum of “management of early arthritis”, were formulated for further research; and 284 studies were identified and evaluated. Twelve recommendations for the management of early arthritis were selected and presented with short sentences. The selected statements included recognition of arthritis, referral, diagnosis, prognosis, classification, and treatment of early arthritis (information, education, non‐pharmacological interventions, pharmacological treatments, and monitoring of the disease process). On the basis of expert opinion, 11 items were identified as being important for future research. Conclusions 12 key recommendations for the management of early arthritis or early rheumatoid arthritis were developed, based on evidence in the literature and expert consensus. PMID:16396980

  8. EULAR evidence based recommendations for the management of hand osteoarthritis: Report of a Task Force of the EULAR Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Doherty, M; Leeb, B F; Alekseeva, L; Arden, N K; Bijlsma, J W; Dinçer, F; Dziedzic, K; Häuselmann, H J; Herrero‐Beaumont, G; Kaklamanis, P; Lohmander, S; Maheu, E; Martín‐Mola, E; Pavelka, K; Punzi, L; Reiter, S; Sautner, J; Smolen, J; Verbruggen, G; Zimmermann‐Górska, I

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Methods The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 16 rheumatologists, one physiatrist, one orthopaedic surgeon, two allied health professionals, and one evidence based medicine expert, representing 15 different European countries. Each participant contributed up to 10 propositions describing key clinical points for management of hand OA. Final recommendations were agreed using a Delphi consensus approach. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Science Citation Index, AMED, Cochrane Library, HTA, and NICE reports was used to identify the best available research evidence to support each proposition. Where possible, the effect size and number needed to treat were calculated for efficacy. Relative risk or odds ratio was estimated for safety, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio was used for cost effectiveness. The strength of recommendation was provided according to research evidence, clinical expertise, and perceived patient preference. Results Eleven key propositions involving 17 treatment modalities were generated through three Delphi rounds. Treatment topics included general considerations (for example, clinical features, risk factors, comorbidities), non‐pharmacological (for example, education plus exercise, local heat, and splint), pharmacological (for example, paracetamol, NSAIDs, NSAIDs plus gastroprotective agents, COX‐2 inhibitors, systemic slow acting disease modifying drugs, intra‐articular corticosteroids), and surgery. Of 17 treatment modalities, only six were supported by research evidence (education plus exercise, NSAIDs, COX‐2 inhibitors, topical NSAIDs, topical capsaicin, and chondroitin sulphate). Others were supported either by evidence extrapolated from studies of OA affecting other joint sites or by expert opinion. Strength of recommendation varied according to level of evidence, benefits and harms/costs of

  9. EULAR evidence based recommendations for gout. Part I: Diagnosis. Report of a task force of the standing committee for international clinical studies including therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Doherty, M; Pascual, E; Bardin, T; Barskova, V; Conaghan, P; Gerster, J; Jacobs, J; Leeb, B; Lioté, F; McCarthy, G; Netter, P; Nuki, G; Perez‐Ruiz, F; Pignone, A; Pimentão, J; Punzi, L; Roddy, E; Uhlig, T; Zimmermann‐Gòrska, I

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence based recommendations for the diagnosis of gout. Methods The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 19 rheumatologists and one evidence based medicine expert, representing 13 European countries. Ten key propositions regarding diagnosis were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. Research evidence was searched systematically for each proposition. Wherever possible the sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio (LR), and incremental cost‐effectiveness ratio were calculated for diagnostic tests. Relative risk and odds ratios were estimated for risk factors and co‐morbidities associated with gout. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the evidence hierarchy. The strength of recommendation (SOR) was assessed using the EULAR visual analogue and ordinal scales. Results 10 key propositions were generated though three Delphi rounds including diagnostic topics in clinical manifestations, urate crystal identification, biochemical tests, radiographs, and risk factors/co‐morbidities. Urate crystal identification varies according to symptoms and observer skill but is very likely to be positive in symptomatic gout (LR = 567 (95% confidence interval (CI), 35.5 to 9053)). Classic podagra and presence of tophi have the highest clinical diagnostic value for gout (LR = 30.64 (95% CI, 20.51 to 45.77), and LR = 39.95 (21.06 to 75.79), respectively). Hyperuricaemia is a major risk factor for gout and may be a useful diagnostic marker when defined by the normal range of the local population (LR = 9.74 (7.45 to 12.72)), although some gouty patients may have normal serum uric acid concentrations at the time of investigation. Radiographs have little role in diagnosis, though in late or severe gout radiographic changes of asymmetrical swelling (LR = 4.13 (2.97 to 5.74)) and subcortical cysts without erosion (LR = 6.39 (3.00 to 13.57)) may be useful to differentiate chronic gout from other joint

  10. Committee Meeting of Assembly Education Committee "To Receive Testimony from the Commissioner of Education, Mary Lee Fitzgerald, Department Staff, and Others Concerning the Department's Skills Testing Program, Including the Early Warning Test and High School Proficiency Test, Pursuant to Assembly Resolution No. 113."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Office of Legislative Services, Trenton. Assembly Education Committee.

    The Assembly Education Committee of the New Jersey Office of Legislative Services held a hearing pursuant to Assembly Resolution 113, a proposal directing the Committee to investigate the skills testing program developed and administered to New Jersey children by the State Department of Education. The Committee was interested in the eighth-grade…

  11. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  12. Water Supply Infrastructure System Surety

    SciTech Connect

    EKMAN,MARK E.; ISBELL,DARYL

    2000-01-06

    The executive branch of the United States government has acknowledged and identified threats to the water supply infrastructure of the United States. These threats include contamination of the water supply, aging infrastructure components, and malicious attack. Government recognition of the importance of providing safe, secure, and reliable water supplies has a historical precedence in the water works of the ancient Romans, who recognized the same basic threats to their water supply infrastructure the United States acknowledges today. System surety is the philosophy of ''designing for threats, planning for failure, and managing for success'' in system design and implementation. System surety is an alternative to traditional compliance-based approaches to safety, security, and reliability. Four types of surety are recognized: reactive surety; proactive surety, preventative surety; and fundamental, inherent surety. The five steps of the system surety approach can be used to establish the type of surety needed for the water infrastructure and the methods used to realize a sure water infrastructure. The benefit to the water industry of using the system surety approach to infrastructure design and assessment is a proactive approach to safety, security, and reliability for water transmission, treatment, distribution, and wastewater collection and treatment.

  13. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    SciTech Connect

    Gutteridge, John

    2002-09-30

    This PowerPoint presentation was given at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee meeting held in Crystal City, VA, 30 Sept - 1 Oct 2002. The talk addresses activities in the area of Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) meant to counter declines in the nuclear workforce and prepare for the future in the nuclear industry. Three INIE programs are described: The Western Nuclear Science Alliance, the Big-10 Consortium, and Southwest Consortium.

  14. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit is a toolkit of 5 EPA green infrastructure models and tools, along with communication materials, that can be used as a teaching tool and a quick reference resource when making GI implementation decisions.

  15. Aging Water Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is part of EPA’s larger effort called the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative. The SI initiative brings together drinking water and wastewater utility managers; trade associations; local watershed protection organ...

  16. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  17. Sustainable Water Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Resources for state and local environmental and public health officials, and water, infrastructure and utility professionals to learn about sustainable water infrastructure, sustainable water and energy practices, and their role.

  18. Climate Action Benefits: Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides background on the relationship between infrastructure and climate change and describes what the CIRA Infrastructure analyses cover. It provides links to the subsectors Bridges, Roads, Urban Drainage, and Coastal Property.

  19. Infrastructure for microsystem production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeren, Henne; Sanchez, Stefan; Elders, Job; Heideman, Rene G.

    1999-03-01

    Manufacturing of micro-systems differs from IC manufacturing because the market requires a diversity of products and lower volumes per product. In addition, a diversity of micro-technologies has been developed, including non-IC compatible processes and potentially IC compatible processes. An infrastructure for the production of micro- system devices is lacking. On one side the technology for MST is available at the universities and small university related companies. On the other side there are several small and medium enterprises and bigger companies wanting to implement MST devices in their products, but unwilling to be dependent on universities. Philips Electronics in the Netherlands and Twente MicroProducts realized this problem and have started a project to fill this gap. At this moment the basic of the infrastructure is available: OnStream BV, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, opened its waferfab and assembly facilities for the production of MST devices. Twente MicroProducts will take care of the design of the products and of the small-scale production. Integration of quality systems for maintenance, yield, statistical process control and production in a Manufacturing Execution System offers direct access for all people involved to all the relevant information. It also ensures quality of the products made. The available capabilities of the infrastructure in the current status are compared to the market needs. In this article, a description of a seamless Micro-System Engineering Foundry is given. A seamless organization is capable of helping the customer from design to production. Several examples are given.

  20. New Assistance for Low-Income Areas and Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in federal policy affecting rural development in economically distressed areas in 2001 include new markets initiatives, establishment of the (Mississippi River) Delta Regional Authority, and increased infrastructure funding. Infrastructure priorities include highway construction, airport improvements, public works grants, rural…

  1. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  2. The Articulation Committee Companion: A Resource for BC's Articulation Committees. 2007 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2007

    2007-01-01

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) has designed "The Articulation Committee Companion" to serve as both an introductory resource for new articulation committee members and as an ongoing reference for committees. The "Companion" includes a brief overview of the province's articulation committees and…

  3. The Articulation Committee Companion: 2011 Edition--A Resource for BC's Articulation Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Orum, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Articulation Committee Companion is designed to serve as both an introductory resource for new articulation committee members and as an ongoing reference for committees. The Companion includes a brief overview of the province's articulation committees and their essential role in the post-secondary system. In addition, the Companion outlines…

  4. New AGU mineral physics committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A new Committee on Mineral Physics consisting of Orson Anderson (chairman), Peter Bell, Raymond Jeanloz, Robert Lieberman, Murli Manghnani, Alexandra Navrotsky, Tom Shankland, Joseph E. Smith, and Donald Weidner has been approved by the AGU Executive Committee.The increasing number of research groups in an area that combines the study of mineral properties and solid state sciences (materials research) created the impetus for this new committee. At AGU meetings, mineral physics studies have been included in recent years in sessions of Volcanology, Petrology, and Geochemistry and sessions of Tectonophysics. A portion of the charter for the new committee includes arranging special sessions for mineral physics that would bridge the two sections.

  5. Tools for 21st Century infrastructure protection

    SciTech Connect

    Trost, S.R.

    1997-07-01

    The President`s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCEP) was formed under Executive Order 13010 to recommend a national strategy for protecting and assuring critical infrastructures. Eight critical infrastructure elements have been identified. This paper provides an overview of tools necessary to conduct in depth analysis and characterization of threats, vulnerabilities, and interdependencies of critical infrastructure subsystems, and their interaction with each other. Particular emphasis is placed on research requirements necessary to develop the next generation of tools. In addition to tools, a number of system level research suggestions are made including developing a system architecture, data flow models, national level resources, and a national test bed.

  6. Development of a lunar infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of building an infrastructure on the moon is discussed, assuming that earth-to-moon and moon-to-earth transport will be available. The sequence of events which would occur in the process of building an infrastructure is examined. The human needs which must be met on a lunar base are discussed, including minimal life support, quality of life, and growth stages. The technology available to meet these needs is reviewed and further research in fields related to a lunar base, such as the study of the moon's polar regions and the limits of lunar agriculture, is recommended.

  7. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean's role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)'s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation's attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a

  8. Green Infrastructure Models and Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to modify and refine existing models and develop new tools to support decision making for the complete green infrastructure (GI) project lifecycle, including the planning and implementation of stormwater control in urban and agricultural settings,...

  9. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced

  10. Development of a Water Infrastructure Knowledge Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a methodology for developing a national database, as applied to water infrastructure systems, which includes both drinking water and wastewater. The database is branded as "WATERiD" and can be accessed at www.waterid.org. Water infrastructure in the U.S. is ag...

  11. 12 CFR 1273.9 - Audit Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... internal audit activities, including the selection, evaluation, compensation and, where appropriate, replacement of the internal auditor. The internal auditor shall report directly to the Audit Committee and... Committee shall ensure that senior management has established and is maintaining an adequate...

  12. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers

  13. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  14. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes"…

  15. How a policy requiring all highways infrastructure projects to consider climate change was born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, T. Q.; Sobie, S. R.; Nyland, D.; Wolf, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium has provided projected climate change scenarios including for use in several adaptation case studies by the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. Subsequent to these individual case studies throughout the Province, a sub-committee consisting of engineers, adaptation experts, and climate scientists was formed to provide input on forming a Province-wide requirement for all design projects to consider climate change. The work of this committee has recently culminated in the release of Technical Circular T06-15 (http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/driving-and-transportation/transportation-infrastructure/engineering-standards-and-guidelines/technical-circulars/2015/t06-15.pdf). A collaboration with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia has resulted in the development of Professional Practice Guidelines. These guidelines are meant to assist engineers without special climate adaptation training to make appropriate use of climate information in accordance with the Technical Circular. An overview of the process that led to this concrete policy decision will be presented. Lessons learned include pitfalls to avoid as well as what worked well. In particular, successful aspects of the process include active involvement of climate scientists in regional climate adaptation case studies, an emphasis on cross-discipline (engineer-climate scientist) communication, and consultation with professionals who would be affected by the policy.

  16. Infrastructure for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEwen, Howard A.; Lillie, Charles F.

    2016-10-01

    It is generally recognized (e.g., in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration response to recent congressional appropriations) that future space observatories must be serviceable, even if they are orbiting in deep space (e.g., around the Sun-Earth libration point, SEL2). On the basis of this legislation, we believe that budgetary considerations throughout the foreseeable future will require that large, long-lived astrophysics missions must be designed as evolvable semipermanent observatories that will be serviced using an operational, in-space infrastructure. We believe that the development of this infrastructure will include the design and development of a small to mid-sized servicing vehicle (MiniServ) as a key element of an affordable infrastructure for in-space assembly and servicing of future space vehicles. This can be accomplished by the adaptation of technology developed over the past half-century into a vehicle approximately the size of the ascent stage of the Apollo Lunar Module to provide some of the servicing capabilities that will be needed by very large telescopes located in deep space in the near future (2020s and 2030s). We specifically address the need for a detailed study of these servicing requirements and the current proposals for using presently available technologies to provide the appropriate infrastructure.

  17. Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997. Report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, on H.R. 1385 Together with Additional and Dissenting Views [Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office], 105th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This document contains the text of the Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997, as amended by committee, including the titles that cover the following: general provisions; employment and training programs for disadvantaged youth; federally administered programs; adult education programs; miscellaneous provisions; the State Human…

  18. [Attributes of forest infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-kai; Jin, Ying-shan

    2007-06-01

    This paper discussed the origin and evolution of the conception of ecological infrastructure, the understanding of international communities about the functions of forest, the important roles of forest in China' s economic development and ecological security, and the situations and challenges to the ongoing forestry ecological restoration programs. It was suggested that forest should be defined as an essential infrastructure for national economic and social development in a modern society. The critical functions of forest infrastructure played in the transition of forestry ecological development were emphasized. Based on the synthesis of forest ecosystem features, it was considered that the attributes of forest infrastructure are distinctive, due to the fact that it is constructed by living biological material and diversified in ownership. The forestry ecological restoration program should not only follow the basic principles of infrastructural construction, but also take the special characteristics of forests into consideration in studying the managerial system of the programs. Some suggestions for the ongoing programs were put forward: 1) developing a modern concept of ecosystem where man and nature in harmony is the core, 2) formulating long-term stable investments for forestry ecological restoration programs, 3) implementing forestry ecological restoration programs based on infrastructure construction principles, and 4) managing forests according to the principles of infrastructural construction management.

  19. 7 CFR 610.22 - State Technical Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false State Technical Committee membership. 610.22 Section... Committees § 610.22 State Technical Committee membership. (a) State Technical Committees will include... served by USDA, membership will include, to the extent practicable, individuals with demonstrated...

  20. 7 CFR 610.22 - State Technical Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State Technical Committee membership. 610.22 Section... Committees § 610.22 State Technical Committee membership. (a) State Technical Committees will include... served by USDA, membership will include, to the extent practicable, individuals with demonstrated...

  1. Modeling and Managing Risk in Billing Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Fabrizio; Telmon, Claudio; Sgandurra, Daniele

    This paper discusses risk modeling and risk management in information and communications technology (ICT) systems for which the attack impact distribution is heavy tailed (e.g., power law distribution) and the average risk is unbounded. Systems with these properties include billing infrastructures used to charge customers for services they access. Attacks against billing infrastructures can be classified as peripheral attacks and backbone attacks. The goal of a peripheral attack is to tamper with user bills; a backbone attack seeks to seize control of the billing infrastructure. The probability distribution of the overall impact of an attack on a billing infrastructure also has a heavy-tailed curve. This implies that the probability of a massive impact cannot be ignored and that the average impact may be unbounded - thus, even the most expensive countermeasures would be cost effective. Consequently, the only strategy for managing risk is to increase the resilience of the infrastructure by employing redundant components.

  2. 76 FR 48117 - Committee on Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ...Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the Committee on Rulemaking of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States. The committee will meet to discuss a recommendation, concerning agency innovations in e-Rulemaking, for consideration by the full Conference. Complete details regarding the committee meeting, a related research report, how to attend (including......

  3. 76 FR 58237 - Committee on Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ...Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the Committee on Rulemaking of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States. The committee will meet to discuss a recommendation concerning agency innovations in e-Rulemaking for consideration by the full Conference. Complete details regarding the committee meeting, a related research report, how to attend (including......

  4. 11 CFR 9032.1 - Authorized committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized committee. 9032.1 Section 9032.1 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY... authorized committee includes the candidate's principal campaign committee designated in accordance with...

  5. Report of the Technical Committee for Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This committee report identifies the skills and knowledge required by employees in the marketing occupational area. It also provides performance objectives from which competencies and instructional objectives may be developed. Introductory materials include a list of committee members, statement of the marketing committee, information on marketing…

  6. Flexible Computational Science Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Ben; Moss, Nicholas; Charest, Marc Robert Joseph

    2016-04-06

    FleCSI is a compile-time configurable framework designed to support multi-physics application development. As such, FleCSI attempts to provide a very general set of infrastructure design patterns that can be specialized and extended to suit the needs of a broad variety of solver and data requirements. Current support includes multi-dimensional mesh topology, mesh geometry, and mesh adjacency information, n-dimensional hashed-tree data structures, graph partitioning interfaces, and dependency closures. FleCSI also introduces a functional programming model with control, execution, and data abstractions that are consistent with both MPI and state-of-the-art task-based runtimes such as Legion and Charm++. The FleCSI abstraction layer provides the developer with insulation from the underlying runtime, while allowing support for multiple runtime systems, including conventional models like asynchronous MPI. The intent is to give developers a concrete set of user-friendly programming tools that can be used now, while allowing flexibility in choosing runtime implementations and optimizations that can be applied to architectures and runtimes that arise in the future. The control and execution models in FleCSI also provide formal nomenclature for describing poorly understood concepts like kernels and tasks.

  7. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners.

  8. Green infrastructure monitoring in Camden, NJ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) installed green infrastructure Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) at multiple locations around the city of Camden, NJ. The SCMs include raised downspout planter boxes, rain gardens, and cisterns. The cisterns capture water ...

  9. Powering the Network: The Forgotten Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learn, Larry L., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses systems that power the telecommunications infrastructure. Highlights include power for central telephone company offices; private branch exchange systems; power interruptions and power irregularities; uninterruptible power systems; problems in the systems; and photovoltaic systems. (LRW)

  10. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  11. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green infrastructure, such as rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns, and constructed wetlands, is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amount of stormwater runoff that flows into wastewater treatment plants or into waterbodies...

  12. Clarkesville Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The report outlines the 2012 technical assistance for Clarkesville, GA to develop a Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategy, which provides the basic building blocks for a green infrastructure plan:

  13. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  14. Building safeguards infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S; Mcclelland - Kerr, John

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

  15. Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

    2003-02-24

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired

  16. 78 FR 6399 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Convention, including: Intersessional Correspondence Group (ISCG) work --E-business possibilities for the...-Chairman for 2013 --Any other business --Consideration of the report of the Committee on its...

  17. Climate Indicators for Energy and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbanks, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Two of the key categories of climate indicators are energy and infrastructure. For energy supply and use, many indicators are available for energy supply and consumption; and some indicators are available to assess implications of climate change, such as changes over time in heating and cooling days. Indicators of adaptation and adaptive capacity are more elusive. For infrastructure, which includes more than a dozen different sectors, general indicators are not available, beyond counts of major disasters and such valuable contributions as the ASCE "report cards." In this case, research is needed, for example to develop credible metrics for assessing the resilience of built infrastructures to climate change and other stresses.

  18. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, C.; Mason, N. J.; Davies, G. R.; Marty, B.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the third TNA: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities. The modular infrastructure represents a major commitment of analytical instrumentation by three institutes and together forms a state-of-the-art analytical facility of unprecedented breadth. These centres perform research in the fields of geochemistry and cosmochemistry, studying fluids and rocks in order to better understand the keys cof the universe. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilities: Ion Probe facilities at CRPG and OU The Cameca 1270 Ion microprobe is a CNRS-INSU national facility. About a third of the useful analytical time of the ion probe (about 3 months each year) is allocated to the national community. French scientists have to submit their projects to a national committee for selection. The selected projects are allocated time in the following 6 months twice a year. About 15 to 20 projects are run each year. There are only two such instruments in Europe, with cosmochemistry only performed at CRPG. Different analyses can be performed on a routine basis, such as U-Pb dating on Zircon, Monazite or Pechblende, Li, B, C, O, Si isotopic ratios determination on different matrix, 26Al, 60Fe extinct radioactivity ages, light and trace elements contents . The NanoSIMS 50L - producing element or isotope maps with a spatial resolution down to ≈50nm. This is one of the cornerstone facilities of UKCAN, with 75% of available instrument time funded and

  19. A Scalable Tools Communication Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Buntinas, Darius; Bosilca, George; Graham, Richard L; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Watson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    The Scalable Tools Communication Infrastructure (STCI) is an open source collaborative effort intended to provide high-performance, scalable, resilient, and portable communications and process control services for a wide variety of user and system tools. STCI is aimed specifically at tools for ultrascale computing and uses a component architecture to simplify tailoring the infrastructure to a wide range of scenarios. This paper describes STCI's design philosophy, the various components that will be used to provide an STCI implementation for a range of ultrascale platforms, and a range of tool types. These include tools supporting parallel run-time environments, such as MPI, parallel application correctness tools and performance analysis tools, as well as system monitoring and management tools.

  20. COOPEUS - connecting research infrastructures in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop-Jakobsen, Ketil; Waldmann, Christoph; Huber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    , the first steps were taken to implement the GCI as a platform for documenting the capabilities of the COOPEUS research infrastructures. COOPEUS recognizes the potential for the GCI to become an important platform promoting cross-disciplinary approaches in the studies of multifaceted environmental challenges. Recommendations from the workshop participants also revealed that in order to attract research infrastructures to use the GCI, the registration process must be simplified and accelerated. However, also the data policies of the individual research infrastructure, or lack thereof, can prevent the use of the GCI or other portals, due to unclarities regarding data management authority and data ownership. COOPEUS shall continue to promote cross-disciplinary data exchange in the environmental field and will in the future expand to also include other geographical areas.

  1. 77 FR 7133 - Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness Solicitation of Nominations for Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... International Trade Administration Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness Solicitation of..., Including Ports, To Apply for Membership on the Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness. SUMMARY... or entities, including ports, to serve as members of the Advisory Committee on Supply...

  2. The Articulation Committee Companion: 2009 Edition. A Resource for BC's Articulation Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Orum, Jennifer, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) has designed The Articulation Committee Companion to serve as both an introductory resource for new members and as an ongoing reference for committees. The Companion includes a brief overview of the province's articulation committees and their essential role in the post-secondary…

  3. 75 FR 25212 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC) AGENCY: Under... that the Defense Audit Advisory Committee will meet on May 17, 2010. Subject to the availability of... include financial reporting processes, systems of internal controls, audit processes, and processes...

  4. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunju; Pandit, Arka; Crittenden, John; Xu, Ming; Perrings, Charles; Wang, Dali; Li, Ke; French, Steve

    2010-10-01

    and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  5. Critical Infrastructure Protection Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Franks, Trent [R-AZ-8

    2013-10-30

    12/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Fuzzy architecture assessment for critical infrastructure resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, George

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an approach for the selection of alternative architectures in a connected infrastructure system to increase resilience of the overall infrastructure system. The paper begins with a description of resilience and critical infrastructure, then summarizes existing approaches to resilience, and presents a fuzzy-rule based method of selecting among alternative infrastructure architectures. This methodology includes considerations which are most important when deciding on an approach to resilience. The paper concludes with a proposed approach which builds on existing resilience architecting methods by integrating key system aspects using fuzzy memberships and fuzzy rule sets. This novel approach aids the systems architect in considering resilience for the evaluation of architectures for adoption into the final system architecture.

  7. Toolkit of Available EPA Green Infrastructure Modeling ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This webinar will present a toolkit consisting of five EPA green infrastructure models and tools, along with communication material. This toolkit can be used as a teaching and quick reference resource for use by planners and developers when making green infrastructure implementation decisions. It can also be used for low impact development design competitions. Models and tools included: Green Infrastructure Wizard (GIWiz), Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST), Visualizing Ecosystem Land Management Assessments (VELMA) Model, Storm Water Management Model (SWMM), and the National Stormwater Calculator (SWC). This webinar will present a toolkit consisting of five EPA green infrastructure models and tools, along with communication material. This toolkit can be used as a teaching and quick reference resource for use by planners and developers when making green infrastructure implementation decisions. It can also be used for low impact development design competitions. Models and tools included: Green Infrastructure Wizard (GIWiz), Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST), Visualizing Ecosystem Land Management Assessments (VELMA) Model, Storm Water Management Model (SWMM), and the National Stormwater Calculator (SWC).

  8. Kwajalein Infrastructure Prioritization Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    GROUNDS-MAINTENANCE-SERVICE- CONTRACT-GUIDE-US-Army-Center>. David, Leonard. “ SpaceX Private Rocket Shifts to Island Launch.” 12 Aug. 2005. TechMedia...Network. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.space.com/1422- spacex -private-rocket-shifts-island-launch.html>. Kwajalein Infrastructure Prioritization

  9. An Infrastructure Roadmap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furgeson, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a master infrastructure plan for electrical and mechanical systems can help determine annual maintenance budgets, form annual capital-improvement budgets, take a snapshot of existing conditions, and lead to better energy management. Discusses important elements in such plans. (EV)

  10. Infrastructure Survey 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the Group of Eight (Go8) released a first report on the state of its buildings and infrastructure, based on a survey undertaken in 2007. A further survey was undertaken in 2009, updating some information about the assessed quality, value and condition of buildings and use of space. It also collated data related to aspects of the estate not…

  11. An Infrastructure Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  12. Creating an Oversight Infrastructure for Electronic Health Record-Related Patient Safety Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Classen, David C.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential quality and safety benefits. However, reports of EHR-related safety hazards are now emerging. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology (HIT) recently sponsored an Institute of Medicine committee to evaluate how HIT use affects patient safety. In this paper, we propose the creation of a national EHR oversight program to provide dedicated surveillance of EHR-related safety hazards and to promote learning from identified errors, close calls, and adverse events. The program calls for data gathering, investigation/analysis and regulatory components. The first two functions will depend on institution-level EHR safety committees that will investigate all known EHR-related adverse events and near-misses and report them nationally using standardized methods. These committees should also perform routine safety self-assessments to proactively identify new risks. Nationally, we propose the long-term creation of a centralized, non-partisan board with an appropriate legal and regulatory infrastructure to ensure the safety of EHRs. We discuss the rationale of the proposed oversight program and its potential organizational components and functions. These include mechanisms for robust data collection and analyses of all safety concerns using multiple methods that extend beyond reporting; multidisciplinary investigation of selected high-risk safety events; and enhanced coordination with other national agencies in order to facilitate broad dissemination of hazards information. Implementation of this proposed infrastructure can facilitate identification of EHR-related adverse events and errors and potentially create a safer and more effective EHR-based health care delivery system. PMID:22080284

  13. 75 FR 29762 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meetings. This notice announces forthcoming subcommittee... health information technology infrastructure that permits the electronic exchange and use of...

  14. Toolkit of Available EPA Green Infrastructure Modeling ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a software application designed tofacilitate integrated water resources management across wet and dry climate regions. It allows waterresources managers and planners to screen a wide range of practices across their watershed or jurisdictionfor cost-effectiveness and environmental and economic sustainability. WMOST allows users to select up to 15stormwater management practices, including traditional grey infrastructure, green infrastructure, and otherlow impact development practices. Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Conventional stormwater infrastructure, or gray infrastructure, is largely designed to move stormwater away from urban areas through pipes and conduit. Runoff from these surfaces can overwhelm sewer systems and end up contaminating local waterways. When stormwater runs off impervious streets, parking lots, sidewalks, and rooftops, it carries pollutants such as motor oil, lawn chemicals, sediments, and pet waste to streams, rivers, and lakes. Runoff flows can also cause erosion and flooding that can damage property, infrastructure, and wildlife habitat. In addition to runoff problems, impervious surfaces also prevent water from penetrating the soil and recharging groundwater supplies. Green infrastructure (e.g., rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns) is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amou

  15. Research infrastructure support to address ecosystem dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Wouter

    2014-05-01

    Predicting the evolution of ecosystems to climate change or human pressures is a challenge. Even understanding past or current processes is complicated as a result of the many interactions and feedbacks that occur within and between components of the system. This talk will present an example of current research on changes in landscape evolution, hydrology, soil biogeochemical processes, zoological food webs, and plant community succession, and how these affect feedbacks to components of the systems, including the climate system. Multiple observations, experiments, and simulations provide a wealth of data, but not necessarily understanding. Model development on the coupled processes on different spatial and temporal scales is sensitive for variations in data and of parameter change. Fast high performance computing may help to visualize the effect of these changes and the potential stability (and reliability) of the models. This may than allow for iteration between data production and models towards stable models reducing uncertainty and improving the prediction of change. The role of research infrastructures becomes crucial is overcoming barriers for such research. Environmental infrastructures are covering physical site facilities, dedicated instrumentation and e-infrastructure. The LifeWatch infrastructure for biodiversity and ecosystem research will provide services for data integration, analysis and modeling. But it has to cooperate intensively with the other kinds of infrastructures in order to support the iteration between data production and model computation. The cooperation in the ENVRI project (Common operations of environmental research infrastructures) is one of the initiatives to foster such multidisciplinary research.

  16. Decision Analysis Using Value-Focused Thinking for Infrastructure Prioritization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    single dimension value functions for the other measures are shown in Appendix B. Label Operations and Training Mobilitiy Maintenance and...310-320 (June 1991). Novick, David. “Life-Cycle Considerations in Urban Infrastructure Engineering,” Journal of Management in Engineering, Vol. 6...Improved Condition Assessment,” Proceedings of the Conference Sponsored by the Facilities 99 Management Committee of the Urban Transportation

  17. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Research infrastructures (RIs) are platforms integrating facilities, resources and services used by the research communities to conduct research and foster innovation. RIs include scientific equipment, e.g., sensor platforms, satellites or other instruments, but also scientific data, sample repositories or archives. E-infrastructures on the other hand provide the technological substratum and middleware to interlink distributed RI components with computing systems and communication networks. The resulting platforms provide the foundation for the design and implementation of RIs and play an increasing role in the advancement and exploitation of knowledge and technology. RIs are regarded as essential to achieve and maintain excellence in research and innovation crucial for the European Research Area (ERA). The implementation of RIs has to be considered as a long-term, complex development process often over a period of 10 or more years. The ongoing construction of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) provides a good example for the general complexity of infrastructure development processes especially in system-of-systems environments. A set of directives issued by the European Commission provided a framework of guidelines for the implementation processes addressing the relevant content and the encoding of data as well as the standards for service interfaces and the integration of these services into networks. Additionally, a time schedule for the overall construction process has been specified. As a result this process advances with a strong participation of member states and responsible organisations. Today, SDIs provide the operational basis for new digital business processes in both national and local authorities. Currently, the development of integrated RIs in Earth and Environmental Sciences is characterised by the following properties: • A high number of parallel activities on European and national levels with numerous institutes and organisations participating

  18. Executive committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    ChairVice Chair Toshiyuki AzumaRoberto Rivarola Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics LabUniversidad Nacional de Rosario and Advanced Science InstituteInstituto de Fisica Rosario RIKEN, JapanRosario, Argentina SecretaryMembers Dominique VernhetJoachim Burgdörfer, Austria Institut des NanoSciences de Paris Birgit Lohmann, Australia Université Pierre et Marie Curie Hossein Sadeghpour, USA Paris, FranceThomas Stöhlker, Germany Past ChairJim McCann, UK Barry DunningGuoqing Xiao, China Physics & AstronomyXiaohong Cai, China Rice University, HoustonXinwen Ma, China Texas, USAYongtao Zhao, China TreasurerFernando Martin, Spain Henrik CederquistLuis Mendez, Spain Alba Nova University CenterAnatoli Kheifets, Australia Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden Details of the general committee are available in the PDF

  19. Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    Scientific Committee Silvia Arrese-Igor Irigoyen (CFM, CSIC - UPV/EHU, Donostia), Javier Campo (ICMA-CSIC, Zaragoza), Carlos Frontera (ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona), Victoria García Sakai (ISIS, Chilton), Cristina Gómez-Polo (UPNa, Pamplona), Miguel Ángel González (ILL, Grenoble), Pedro Gorría (Universidad Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez Echevarría (EHU/UPV, Bilbao), J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (UPNa, Pamplona), Vicente Recarte (UPNa, Pamplona), Jesús Ruíz Hervías (UPM, Madrid), Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos (UPNa, Pamplona), Antonio Urbina (UPC, Cartagena) Organizing Committee J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (Co-Chair), Vicente Recarte ( Co-Chair), Cristina Gómez-Polo, Silvia Larumbe Abuin, Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos Editors of the Proceedings J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal, Vicente Recarte Plenary speakers Charles Simon (Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France), Miguel Angel Alario Franco (Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain), Dieter Richter (Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Jülich, Germany), James Yeck (European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden) Invited speakers Manu Barandiarán (BCMaterials & EHU/UPV), Arantxa Arbe (MFC, CSIC- UPV/EHU), José Luis Martínez (Consorcio ESS-Bilbao), Marta Castellote, IETcc-CSIC), Josep Lluis Tamarit (UPC), Diego Alba-Venero (ISIS), Elizabeth Castillo (CIC Energigune), Josu M. Igartua (EHU/UPV), Antonio Dos Santos (UPM), Alex Masalles (Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya), José Abad (UPCT), Claudia Mondelli (ILL), Oscar Fabelo (ILL), Aurora Nogales (IEM-CSIC), Jesús Rodríguez (UC), Gerardo

  20. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  1. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  2. Securing energy assets and infrastructure 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-15

    This report describes in detail the energy industry's challenges and solutions for protecting critical assets including oil and gas infrastructure, transmission grids, power plants, storage, pipelines, and all aspects of strategic industry assets. It includes a special section on cyber-terrorism and protecting control systems. Contents: Section I - Introduction; U.S Energy Trends; Vulnerabilities; Protection Measures. Section II - Sector-wise Vulnerabilities Assessments and Security Measures: Coal, Oil and Petroleum, Natural Gas, Electric Power, Cybersecurity and Control Systems, Key Recommendations; Section III - Critical Infrastructure Protection Efforts: Government Initiatives, Agencies, and Checklists.

  3. Multi Infrastructure Control and Optimization Toolkit, Resilient Design Module (MICOT-RDT), version 2.X

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Russell; Nagarajan, Harsha; Yamangil, Emre; Coffrin, Carleton

    2016-06-24

    MICOT is a tool for optimizing and controlling infrastructure systems. In includes modules for optimizing the operations of an infrastructure structure (for example optimal dispatch), designing infrastructure systems, restoring infrastructures systems, resiliency, preparing for natural disasters, interdicting networks, state estimation, sensor placement, and simulation of infrastructure systems. It implements algorithms developed at LANL that have been published in the academic community. This is a release of the of resilient design module of the MICOT.

  4. Operational models of infrastructure resilience.

    PubMed

    Alderson, David L; Brown, Gerald G; Carlyle, W Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We propose a definition of infrastructure resilience that is tied to the operation (or function) of an infrastructure as a system of interacting components and that can be objectively evaluated using quantitative models. Specifically, for any particular system, we use quantitative models of system operation to represent the decisions of an infrastructure operator who guides the behavior of the system as a whole, even in the presence of disruptions. Modeling infrastructure operation in this way makes it possible to systematically evaluate the consequences associated with the loss of infrastructure components, and leads to a precise notion of "operational resilience" that facilitates model verification, validation, and reproducible results. Using a simple example of a notional infrastructure, we demonstrate how to use these models for (1) assessing the operational resilience of an infrastructure system, (2) identifying critical vulnerabilities that threaten its continued function, and (3) advising policymakers on investments to improve resilience.

  5. 75 FR 21629 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... committee of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). The meeting... adoption of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure that permits the electronic...

  6. 75 FR 8953 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... committee of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). The meeting... and adoption of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure that permits the...

  7. 76 FR 70455 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee... framework for the development and adoption of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure...

  8. 76 FR 50734 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee... framework for the development and adoption of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure...

  9. American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines for Infant Bioethics Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Examples are given of points hospitals must consider when adopting and implementing infant bioethics committees, including committee functions (educational, policy development, and consultative), structure, membership, jurisdiction, recordkeeping, and legal issues. (MSE)

  10. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  11. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  12. The INSC Security Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Le but était de démontrer une infrastructure de réseau qui soutient la sécurité, l’interopérabilité, la maintenance, et la mobilité . La sécurité a...l’interopérabilité, la maintenance, et la mobilité . La sécurité a été fournie à la couche réseau en utilisant le protocole d’IPsec. Aucune sécurité

  13. Infrastructure: A technology battlefield in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, H.

    1997-12-31

    A major part of technological advancement has involved the development of complex infrastructure systems, including electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks; oil and gas pipeline systems; highway and rail networks; and telecommunication networks. Dependence on these infrastructure systems renders them attractive targets for conflict in the twenty-first century. Hostile governments, domestic and international terrorists, criminals, and mentally distressed individuals will inevitably find some part of the infrastructure an easy target for theft, for making political statements, for disruption of strategic activities, or for making a nuisance. The current situation regarding the vulnerability of the infrastructure can be summarized in three major points: (1) our dependence on technology has made our infrastructure more important and vital to our everyday lives, this in turn, makes us much more vulnerable to disruption in any infrastructure system; (2) technologies available for attacking infrastructure systems have changed substantially and have become much easier to obtain and use, easy accessibility to information on how to disrupt or destroy various infrastructure components means that almost anyone can be involved in this destructive process; (3) technologies for defending infrastructure systems and preventing damage have not kept pace with the capability for destroying such systems. A brief review of these points will illustrate the significance of infrastructure and the growing dangers to its various elements.

  14. Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-05-01

    Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

  15. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  16. Settlement characteristics of major infrastructures in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, X.; Yan, X. X.; Wang, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    Critical infrastructures in Shanghai have undergone uneven settlement since their operation, which plays an important role in affecting the security of Shanghai. This paper, taking rail transportation as example, investigates settlement characteristics and influencing factors of this linear engineering, based on long-term settlement monitoring data. Results show that rail settlement is related to geological conditions, regional ground subsidence, surrounding construction activities and structural differences in the rail systems. In order to effectively decrease the impact of regional ground subsidence, a monitoring and early-warning mechanism for critical infrastructure is established by the administrative department and engineering operators, including monitoring network construction, settlement monitoring, information sharing, settlement warning, and so on.

  17. Challenges in scaling up biofuels infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Richard, Tom L

    2010-08-13

    Rapid growth in demand for lignocellulosic bioenergy will require major changes in supply chain infrastructure. Even with densification and preprocessing, transport volumes by mid-century are likely to exceed the combined capacity of current agricultural and energy supply chains, including grain, petroleum, and coal. Efficient supply chains can be achieved through decentralized conversion processes that facilitate local sourcing, satellite preprocessing and densification for long-distance transport, and business models that reward biomass growers both nearby and afar. Integrated systems that are cost-effective and energy-efficient will require new ways of thinking about agriculture, energy infrastructure, and rural economic development. Implementing these integrated systems will require innovation and investment in novel technologies, efficient value chains, and socioeconomic and policy frameworks; all are needed to support an expanded biofuels infrastructure that can meet the challenges of scale.

  18. Correcting Systemic Deficiencies in Our Scientific Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Scientific method is inherently self-correcting. When different hypotheses are proposed, their study would result in the rejection of the invalid ones. If the study of a competing hypothesis is prevented because of the faith in an unverified one, scientific progress is stalled. This has happened in the study of low dose radiation. Though radiation hormesis was hypothesized to reduce cancers in 1980, it could not be studied in humans because of the faith in the unverified linear no-threshold model hypothesis, likely resulting in over 15 million preventable cancer deaths worldwide during the past two decades, since evidence has accumulated supporting the validity of the phenomenon of radiation hormesis. Since our society has been guided by scientific advisory committees that ostensibly follow the scientific method, the long duration of such large casualties is indicative of systemic deficiencies in the infrastructure that has evolved in our society for the application of science. Some of these deficiencies have been identified in a few elements of the scientific infrastructure, and remedial steps suggested. Identifying and correcting such deficiencies may prevent similar tolls in the future. PMID:24910580

  19. The National Information Infrastructure: Agenda for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Microcomputers for Information Management, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the National Information Infrastructure and the role of the government. Topics include private sector investment; universal service; technological innovation; user orientation; information security and network reliability; management of the radio frequency spectrum; intellectual property rights; coordination with other levels of…

  20. ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Macduff, M; Egan, D

    2004-12-01

    We present a description of the data flow from measurement to long-term archive. We also discuss data communications infrastructure. The data handling processes presented include collection, transfer, ingest, quality control, creation of Value-Added Products (VAP), and data archiving.

  1. The ICT Infrastructure: A Driver of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Richard N.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the influence of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure changes on higher education. Addresses issues such as ICT hardware, networks, and leadership and skills; budgets; policy (including access to information, information privacy, information security, and ownership of faculty course materials); changes in…

  2. SUPPORT FOR USEPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss recommended and new resources for the USEPA's Pathogen Equivalency Committee including: 1) Committee's creation in 1985 and its purpose 2) Drexel University Professor Chuck Haas' 2001 report (Assessment of the PEC Process) and its findings 3) NAS/NR...

  3. 78 FR 30328 - Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... NSDI Strategic Plan Geospatial Platform OMB Circular A-16 Portfolio Management Landsat Advisory Group... established to advise the Federal Geographic Data Committee on management of Federal geospatial programs, the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), and the implementation of Office of...

  4. 47 CFR 10.330 - Provider infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interactions with mobile devices. (c) Reference Points D & E. Reference Point D is the interface between a CMS Provider gateway and its infrastructure. Reference Point E is the interface between a provider's infrastructure and mobile devices including air interfaces. Reference Points D and E protocols are defined...

  5. 47 CFR 10.330 - Provider infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... interactions with mobile devices. (c) Reference Points D & E. Reference Point D is the interface between a CMS Provider gateway and its infrastructure. Reference Point E is the interface between a provider's infrastructure and mobile devices including air interfaces. Reference Points D and E protocols are defined...

  6. 47 CFR 10.330 - Provider infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interactions with mobile devices. (c) Reference Points D & E. Reference Point D is the interface between a CMS Provider gateway and its infrastructure. Reference Point E is the interface between a provider's infrastructure and mobile devices including air interfaces. Reference Points D and E protocols are defined...

  7. 47 CFR 10.330 - Provider infrastructure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... interactions with mobile devices. (c) Reference Points D & E. Reference Point D is the interface between a CMS Provider gateway and its infrastructure. Reference Point E is the interface between a provider's infrastructure and mobile devices including air interfaces. Reference Points D and E protocols are defined...

  8. A Comparison of Techniques for Optimal Infrastructure Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    failures can have large impacts on critical infrastructure (e.g., telecommunication networks, power networks, transportation networks and distribution...serious impacts on the humans and the economy of a country. Critical civil infrastructures include telecommunication networks, power net- works...use interdependent power de- livery and telecommunication systems as an example to show the capability of their model for the development of design

  9. Utilities building NGV infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Gas utilities across the US are aggressively pursuing the natural gas vehicle market by putting in place the infrastructure needed to ensure the growth of the important market. The first annual P and GJ NGV Marketing Survey has revealed many utilities plant to build and continue building NGV fueling facilities. The NGV industry in the US is confronting a classic chicken-or-egg quandary. Fleet operators and individual drivers are naturally unwilling to commit to a natural gas vehicle fuel until sufficient fueling facilities are in place, yet service station operators are reluctant to add NGV refueling capacity until enough CNG vehicles are on the road to create demand. The future of the NGV market is bright, but continued research and product improvements by suppliers as well as LDCs is needed if the potential is to be fulfilled. Advances in refueling facilities must continue if the market is to develop.

  10. Remembering History: The Work of the Information Services Sub-Committee of the Joint Information Systems Committee in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to record the work of the committee and its interaction with the much better known Electronic Libraries (eLib) Programme. It also examines the principles that underlay the development of content acquisition and supporting infrastructure in UK university libraries in the 1990s. Design/methodology/approach: A historical…

  11. Hydrogeology of the Old Faithful area, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and its relevance to natural resources and infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Foley, Duncan; Fournier, Robert O.; Heasler, Henry P.; Hinckley, Bern; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Susong, David D.

    2014-01-01

    There are many documented examples at YNP and elsewhere where human infrastructure and natural thermal features have negatively affected each other. Unless action is taken, human conflicts with the Old Faithful hydrothermal system are likely to increase over the coming years. This is partly because of the increase in park visitation over the past decades, but also because the interval between eruptions of Old Faithful has increased, lengthening the time spent (and services needed) for each visitor at Old Faithful. To avoid an increase in visitor impacts, the National Park Service should consider 2 alternate strategies to accommodate people, vehicles, and services in the Upper Geyser Basin, such as shuttle services from staging (parking and dining) areas with little or no recent hydrothermal activity. We further suggest that YNP consider a zone system to guide maintenance and development of infrastructure in the immediate Old Faithful area. A “red” zone includes hydrothermally active land where new development is discouraged and existing infrastructure is modified with great care. An outer “green” zone represents areas where cooler temperatures and less hydrothermal flow are thought to exist, and where development and maintenance could proceed as occurs elsewhere in the park. An intermediate “yellow” zone would require preliminary assessment of subsurface temperatures and gas concentrations to assess suitability for infrastructure development. The panel recommends that YNP management follow the lead of the National Park System Advisory Board Science Committee (2012) by applying the “precautionary principle” when making decisions regarding the interaction of hydrothermal phenomena and park infrastructure in the Old Faithful area and other thermal areas within YNP.

  12. 78 FR 77773 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ...-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW) to be held at the IMO Headquarters, United Kingdom, February 17-21, 2014. The agenda items to be considered include: --Decisions of other IMO bodies... Conference resolutions 6 and 7 --Development of guidelines for wing-in-ground craft --Role of the...

  13. 77 FR 52105 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ...; --Reports of sub-committees; --Work of other bodies; --Status of conventions; --Harmful anti-fouling systems... include: --Harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water; --Recycling of ships; --Air pollution and energy efficiency; --Reduction of GHG emissions from ships; --Consideration and adoption of amendments to...

  14. ARM Standards Policy Committee Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A; Jensen, M; Koontz, A; McFarlane, S; McCoy, R; Monroe, J; Palanisamy, G; Perez, R; Sivaraman, C

    2012-09-19

    Data and metadata standards promote the consistent recording of information and are necessary to ensure the stability and high quality of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility data products for scientific users. Standards also enable automated routines to be developed to examine data, which leads to more efficient operations and assessment of data quality. Although ARM Infrastructure agrees on the utility of data and metadata standards, there is significant confusion over the existing standards and the process for allowing the release of new data products with exceptions to the standards. The ARM Standards Policy Committee was initiated in March 2012 to develop a set of policies and best practices for ARM data and metadata standards.

  15. 78 FR 38725 - Great Lakes Pilotage Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Great Lakes Pilotage Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Great Lakes Pilotage Advisory... Guard on matters relating to Great Lakes pilotage, including review of proposed Great Lakes...

  16. 75 FR 68022 - Air Traffic Procedures Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Doc No: 2010-27832] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic... Administration Air Traffic Procedures Advisory Committee (ATPAC). The duties of this advisory committee include..., Executive Director, Air Traffic Procedures Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 2010-27832 Filed 11-3-10; 8:45...

  17. 22 CFR 214.36 - Records of advisory committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records of advisory committees. 214.36 Section 214.36 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Operation... Committee Management Officer. (b) Such records are to include the reports, transcripts, minutes,...

  18. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  19. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  20. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  1. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  2. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  3. Congressional Testimony: Statement of Wade T. Najjum Before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Committee on Transportation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Statement of Wade T. Najjum Assistant Inspector General for Program Evaluation Office of Inspector General U.S. EPA Before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure U.S. House of Representatives

  4. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  5. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassovski, Misha

    2013-04-01

    The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems. Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides data management support for the SPRUCE experiment including data infrastructure design, development, long-term storage and dissemination. This presentation is going to show how the whole data infrastructure was designed, discuss major problems that are common for remote observational systems and unique for this particular implementation. It will demonstrate the dataflow starting from the sensors and ending at the archiving/distribution points, discuss types of hardware and software used, and examine considerations that were used to choose them.

  6. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  7. Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

    2000-03-20

    The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

  8. Education, Infrastructure and America's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley-Braun, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, D-Ill., a recognized advocate for federal funding of educational facilities, describes the strategy of placing school infrastructure in the same category as commercial and transportation infrastructure. Three researchers in the facilities field present empirical evidence that facility conditions directly affect…

  9. The 1990 direct support infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The airport and cargo terminal were individually analyzed in depth as the principal direct infrastructure components having cross impacts with aircraft carrying cargo. Containerization was also addressed in depth as an infrastructure component since it categorically is linked with and cross impacted by the aircraft, the cargo terminal, the surface transport system, the shipper and consignee, and the actual cargo being moved.

  10. Multi-Scale Infrastructure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) multi-scale infrastructure assessment project supports both water resource adaptation to climate change and the rehabilitation of the nation’s aging water infrastructure by providing tools, scientific data and information to progra...

  11. Research ethics committees in Japan: A perspective from thirty years of experience at Tokushima University.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Hiroaki; Katashima, Rumi; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    The first Japanese ethics committee for biomedical research involving human subjects was established at Tokushima University in 1982. Although this committee was not formed as a response to national directives, the government eventually developed ethical guidelines, such as the Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Studies that were established in 2003. The practical impact of such guidelines was a rapid increase in the number of protocols seeking ethics committee approval and, accordingly, an increase in the workload of ethics committees. This review describes the activity of the ethics committee at Tokushima University during the last thirty years and discusses the infrastructure that best supports the activities of this committee. In addition, we address the issues that ethics committees now face and discuss future directions. J. Med. Invest. 62: 114-118, August, 2015.

  12. Progress and Challenges in Developing Reference Data Layers for Human Population Distribution and Built Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Yetman, G.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between environmental and human systems, and in particular supporting the applications of Earth science data and knowledge in place-based decision making, requires systematic assessment of the distribution and dynamics of human population and the built human infrastructure in conjunction with environmental variability and change. The NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) operated by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University has had a long track record in developing reference data layers for human population and settlements and is expanding its efforts on topics such as intercity roads, reservoirs and dams, and energy infrastructure. SEDAC has set as a strategic priority the acquisition, development, and dissemination of data resources derived from remote sensing and socioeconomic data on urban land use change, including temporally and spatially disaggregated data on urban change and rates of change, the built infrastructure, and critical facilities. We report here on a range of past and ongoing activities, including the Global Human Settlements Layer effort led by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), the Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM) project, the Global Roads Open Access Data Working Group (gROADS) of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), and recent work with ImageCat, Inc. to improve estimates of the exposure and fragility of buildings, road and rail infrastructure, and other facilities with respect to selected natural hazards. New efforts such as the proposed Global Human Settlement indicators initiative of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) could help fill critical gaps and link potential reference data layers with user needs. We highlight key sectors and themes that require further attention, and the many significant challenges that remain in developing comprehensive, high quality

  13. MOEMS industrial infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeren, Henne; Paschalidou, Lia

    2004-08-01

    Forecasters and analysts predict the market size for microsystems and microtechnologies to be in the order of 68 billion by the year 2005 (NEXUS Market Study 2002). In essence, the market potential is likely to double in size from its 38 billion status in 2002. According to InStat/MDR the market for MOEMS (Micro Optical Electro Mechanical Systems) in optical communication will be over $1.8 billion in 2006 and WTC states that the market for non telecom MOEMS will be even larger. Underpinning this staggering growth will be an infrastructure of design houses, foundries, package/assembly providers and equipment suppliers to cater for the demand in design, prototyping, and (mass-) production. This infrastructure is needed to provide an efficient route to commercialisation. Foundries, which provide the infrastructure to prototype, fabricate and mass-produce the designs emanating from the design houses and other companies. The reason for the customers to rely on foundries can be diverse: ranging from pure economical reasons (investments, cost-price) to technical (availability of required technology). The desire to have a second source of supply can also be a reason for outsourcing. Foundries aim to achieve economies of scale by combining several customer orders into volume production. Volumes are necessary, not only to achieve the required competitive cost prices, but also to attain the necessary technical competence level. Some products that serve very large markets can reach such high production volumes that they are able to sustain dedicated factories. In such cases, captive supply is possible, although outsourcing is still an option, as can be seen in the magnetic head markets, where captive and non-captive suppliers operate alongside each other. The most striking examples are: inkjet heads (>435 million heads per year) and magnetic heads (>1.5 billion heads per year). Also pressure sensor and accelerometer producers can afford their own facilities to produce the

  14. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  15. EULAR Recommendations 2003: an evidence based approach to the management of knee osteoarthritis: Report of a Task Force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutic Trials (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, K; Arden, N; Doherty, M; Bannwarth, B; Bijlsma, J; Dieppe, P; Gunther, K; Hauselmann, H; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Kaklamanis, P; Lohmander, S; Leeb, B; Lequesne, M; Mazieres, B; Martin-Mola, E; Pavelka, K; Pendleton, A; Punzi, L; Serni, U; Swoboda, B; Verbruggen, G; Zimmerman-Gorska, I; Dougados, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To update the EULAR recommendations for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) by an evidence based medicine and expert opinion approach. Methods: The literature search and guidelines were restricted to treatments for knee OA pertaining to clinical and/or radiological OA of any compartment of the knee. Papers for combined treatment of knee and other types of OA were excluded. Medline and Embase were searched using a combination of subject headings and key words. Searches for those treatments previously investigated were conducted for January 1999 to February 2002 and for those treatments not previously investigated for 1966 to February 2002. The level of evidence found for each treatment was documented. Quality scores were determined for each paper, an effect size comparing the treatment with placebo was calculated, where possible, and a toxicity profile was determined for each treatment modality. Results: 497 new publications were identified by the search. Of these, 103 were intervention trials and included in the overall analysis, and 33 treatment modalities were identified. Previously identified publications which were not exclusively knee OA in the initial analysis were rejected. In total, 545 publications were included. Based on the results of the literature search and expert opinion, 10 recommendations for the treatment of knee OA were devised using a five stage Delphi technique. Based on expert opinion, a further set of 10 items was identified by a five stage Delphi technique as important for future research. Conclusion: The updated recommendations support some of the previous propositions published in 2000 but also include modified statements and new propositions. Although a large number of treatment options for knee OA exist, the evidence based format of the EULAR Recommendations continues to identify key clinical questions that currently are unanswered. PMID:14644851

  16. The EPOS e-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Bailo, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is integrating geoscientific information concerning earth movements in Europe. We are approaching the end of the PP (Preparatory Project) phase and in October 2014 expect to continue with the full project within ESFRI (European Strategic Framework for Research Infrastructures). The key aspects of EPOS concern providing services to allow homogeneous access by end-users over heterogeneous data, software, facilities, equipment and services. The e-infrastructure of EPOS is the heart of the project since it integrates the work on organisational, legal, economic and scientific aspects. Following the creation of an inventory of relevant organisations, persons, facilities, equipment, services, datasets and software (RIDE) the scale of integration required became apparent. The EPOS e-infrastructure architecture has been developed systematically based on recorded primary (user) requirements and secondary (interoperation with other systems) requirements through Strawman, Woodman and Ironman phases with the specification - and developed confirmatory prototypes - becoming more precise and progressively moving from paper to implemented system. The EPOS architecture is based on global core services (Integrated Core Services - ICS) which access thematic nodes (domain-specific European-wide collections, called thematic Core Services - TCS), national nodes and specific institutional nodes. The key aspect is the metadata catalog. In one dimension this is described in 3 levels: (1) discovery metadata using well-known and commonly used standards such as DC (Dublin Core) to enable users (via an intelligent user interface) to search for objects within the EPOS environment relevant to their needs; (2) contextual metadata providing the context of the object described in the catalog to enable a user or the system to determine the relevance of the discovered object(s) to their requirement - the context includes projects, funding, organisations

  17. NASA science committee appointments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has made three new appointments to the NASA Advisory Council's (NAC' Science Committee, NASA announced on 22 September. Edward David, president of EED, Inc., and science advisor to the President from 1970 to 1973, will serve as the committee-s chair. Also appointed to the committee were Owen Garriott, a retired scientist astronaut, and Alan Stern, executive director of the Space Science and Engineering Division of the Southwest Research Institute (San Antonio, Tex.). David, Garriott, and Stern-who are among nine new members of the full advisory committee that were announced on 22 September-will replace three members of the Science Committee who resigned in August: Science Committee Chair Charles Kennel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography), Wesley Huntress (Carnegie Institution of Washington), and Eugene Levy (Rice University). The NAC's next public meeting will be held on 12 October at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

  18. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture—in the form of a primer—of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  19. The development of a cislunar space infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, C. A.; Johnson, A. S.; Mcglinchey, J. M.; Ryan, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of this Advanced Mission Design Program is to define the general characteristics and phased evolution of a near-Earth space infrastructure. The envisioned foundation includes a permanently manned, self-sustaining base on the lunar surface, a space station at the Libration Point between earth and the moon (L1), and a transportation system that anchors these elements to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) station. The implementation of this conceptual design was carried out with the idea that the infrastructure is an important step in a larger plan to expand man's capabilities in space science and technology. Such expansion depends on low cost, reliable, and frequent access to space for those who wish to use the multiple benefits of this environment. The presence of a cislunar space infrastructure would greatly facilitate the staging of future planetary missions, as well as the full exploration of the lunar potential for science and industry. The rationale for, and a proposed detailed scenario in support of, the cislunar space infrastructure are discussed.

  20. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-18

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being.

  1. Assessing the risk posed by natural hazards to infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsvig, Unni; Kristensen, Krister; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn

    2015-04-01

    The modern society is increasingly dependent on infrastructures to maintain its function, and disruption in one of the infrastructure systems may have severe consequences. The Norwegian municipalities have, according to legislation, a duty to carry out a risk and vulnerability analysis and plan and prepare for emergencies in a short- and long term perspective. Vulnerability analysis of the infrastructures and their interdependencies is an important part of this analysis. This paper proposes a model for assessing the risk posed by natural hazards to infrastructures. The model prescribes a three level analysis with increasing level of detail, moving from qualitative to quantitative analysis. This paper focuses on the second level, which consists of a semi-quantitative analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to perform a screening of the scenarios of natural hazards threatening the infrastructures identified in the level 1 analysis and investigate the need for further analyses, i.e. level 3 quantitative analyses. The proposed level 2 analysis considers the frequency of the natural hazard, different aspects of vulnerability including the physical vulnerability of the infrastructure itself and the societal dependency on the infrastructure. An indicator-based approach is applied, ranking the indicators on a relative scale. The proposed indicators characterize the robustness of the infrastructure, the importance of the infrastructure as well as interdependencies between society and infrastructure affecting the potential for cascading effects. Each indicator is ranked on a 1-5 scale based on pre-defined ranking criteria. The aggregated risk estimate is a combination of the semi-quantitative vulnerability indicators, as well as quantitative estimates of the frequency of the natural hazard and the number of users of the infrastructure. Case studies for two Norwegian municipalities are presented, where risk to primary road, water supply and power network threatened by storm

  2. Carbon emissions of infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel B; Liu, Gang; Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Steinhoff, Franciska S; Brattebø, Helge

    2013-10-15

    Identifying strategies for reconciling human development and climate change mitigation requires an adequate understanding of how infrastructures contribute to well-being and greenhouse gas emissions. While direct emissions from infrastructure use are well-known, information about indirect emissions from their construction is highly fragmented. Here, we estimated the carbon footprint of the existing global infrastructure stock in 2008, assuming current technologies, to be 122 (-20/+15) Gt CO2. The average per-capita carbon footprint of infrastructures in industrialized countries (53 (± 6) t CO2) was approximately 5 times larger that that of developing countries (10 (± 1) t CO2). A globalization of Western infrastructure stocks using current technologies would cause approximately 350 Gt CO2 from materials production, which corresponds to about 35-60% of the remaining carbon budget available until 2050 if the average temperature increase is to be limited to 2 °C, and could thus compromise the 2 °C target. A promising but poorly explored mitigation option is to build new settlements using less emissions-intensive materials, for example by urban design; however, this strategy is constrained by a lack of bottom-up data on material stocks in infrastructures. Infrastructure development must be considered in post-Kyoto climate change agreements if developing countries are to participate on a fair basis.

  3. Implementation of green infrastructure concept in Citarum Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryati, Sri; Humaira, An Nisaa'Siti

    2017-03-01

    Green infrastructure has several benefits compared to grey infrastructure in term of environmental services and sustainability, such as reducing energy consumption, improving air quality, providing carbon sequestration, and increasing property values. Nevertheless in practice, the implementation of the concept in Indonesia is still limited. Implementation of the certain concept has to be guided in planning document. In this paper, green infrastructure concept in the current spatial plan and other planning documents is assessed. The purpose of this research is to figure out how far the green infrastructure concept is integrated into planning system, based on the analysis of planning documents in Citarum Watershed and expert interviews with local stakeholders. Content analysis method is used to analyze the documents and result of interview. The result shows that green infrastructure concept has not been accommodated in spatial plan or other planning documents widely. There are some challenges in implementing the concept including reward and punishment system (incentive and disincentive), coordination, and lack of human resources.

  4. CIMS: A FRAMEWORK FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INTERDEPENDENCY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

    2006-12-01

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into the behavior of individual infrastructure networks, a far less understood area is that of the interrelationships among multiple infrastructure networks including the potential cascading effects that may result due to these interdependencies. This paper first describes infrastructure interdependencies as well as presenting a formalization of interdependency types. Next the paper describes a modeling and simulation framework called CIMS© and the work that is being conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model and simulate infrastructure interdependencies and the complex behaviors that can result.

  5. Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MISAC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the work of the committee, lists its membership, and provides the addresses of (English) suppliers of microbiological equipment and (British) sources of microbial cultures, including bacteria, fungi, and freshwater plankton. (AL)

  6. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... committee shall include the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the independent public accountant... public accountant the basis for the reports issued under this part. (1) Each insured depository... members who are large customers of the subsidiary institution. (c) Independent public...

  7. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jon A Bakken et al.

    2003-02-06

    Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

  8. An agent-based microsimulation of critical infrastructure systems

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON,DIANNE C.; STAMBER,KEVIN L.

    2000-03-29

    US infrastructures provide essential services that support the economic prosperity and quality of life. Today, the latest threat to these infrastructures is the increasing complexity and interconnectedness of the system. On balance, added connectivity will improve economic efficiency; however, increased coupling could also result in situations where a disturbance in an isolated infrastructure unexpectedly cascades across diverse infrastructures. An understanding of the behavior of complex systems can be critical to understanding and predicting infrastructure responses to unexpected perturbation. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an agent-based model of critical US infrastructures using time-dependent Monte Carlo methods and a genetic algorithm learning classifier system to control decision making. The model is currently under development and contains agents that represent the several areas within the interconnected infrastructures, including electric power and fuel supply. Previous work shows that agent-based simulations models have the potential to improve the accuracy of complex system forecasting and to provide new insights into the factors that are the primary drivers of emergent behaviors in interdependent systems. Simulation results can be examined both computationally and analytically, offering new ways of theorizing about the impact of perturbations to an infrastructure network.

  9. Meeting Hanford's Infrastructure Requirements - 12505

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Karen

    2012-07-01

    Hanford, by all accounts, is an enormous and complex project, with thousands of disparate, but co-mingled activities in motion on any given day. The primary target of the mission at Hanford is cleanup of the 586 square-mile site, but there is the equally vital mission of site services and infrastructure. Without functions like the well-maintained site roads, electricity, water, and emergency management services, not a single cleanup project could be undertaken. As the cleanup projects evolve - with new work-scope emerging, while existing projects are completed - there becomes a very real need to keep projects integrated and working to the same 'blueprint'. And the Hanford blueprint extends for years and includes myriad variables that come with meeting the challenges and complexities associated with Hanford cleanup. Because of an innovative and unique contracting strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) found a way to keep the cleanup projects un-encumbered from the side task of having to self-provide their individual essential site services, thus allowing the cleanup contractors to concentrate their efforts on their primary mission of cleaning up the site. These infrastructure and support services also need to be provided efficiently and cost effectively - done primarily through 'right-sizing' efforts. The real innovation came when DOE had the foresight to include a second provision in this contract which specifically asked for a specialized role of site integrator and innovator, with a special emphasis placed on providing substantial cost savings for the government. The need for a true site integrator function was necessitated by the ever-increasing complexity of projects at Hanford and the progression of cleanup at others. At present, there are two main DOE offices overseeing the cleanup work and six primary contractors performing that work. Each of these contractors works to separate schedules and cleanup milestones, and the nature of the cleanup differs, but

  10. 78 FR 21349 - Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... of the Secretary Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Federal Advisory... Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing will take place. DATES: Thursday, May 9, 2013... progress in developing computerized tests for military enlistment. Agenda: The agenda includes an...

  11. EPA Survey Shows $271 Billion Needed for Nations Wastewater Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a survey showing that $271 billion is needed to maintain and improve the nation's wastewater infrastructure, including the pipes that carry wastewater to treatment plants, th

  12. Green Infrastructure Research at EPA's Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation outline includes: (1) Green infrastructure research objectives (2) Introduction to ongoing research projects - Aspects of design, construction, and maintenence that affect function - Real-world applications of GI research

  13. First year update on green infrastructure monitoring in Camden, NJ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) installed green infrastructure Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) at multiple locations around the city of Camden, NJ. The SCMs include raised downspout planter boxes, rain gardens, and cisterns. The cisterns capture water ...

  14. Water Infrastructure Adaptation in New Urban Design: Possibilities and Constraints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural constraints, including climate change and dynamic socioeconomic development, can significantly impact the way we plan, design, and operate water infrastructure, thus its sustainability to deliver reliable quality water supplies and comply with environmental regulations. ...

  15. Conceptual Green Infrastructure Design for Washington Street, City of Sanford

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Summary of the Sanford Mill Yard Complex presents an opportunity to include green infrastructure practices in a land redevelopment initiative with relative ease while providing multiple benefits to the surrounding community.

  16. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    clinical trial designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry and Clinical Oral Investigations. Additionally, an extended abstract will be published in the International Dental Journal, giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community.

  17. 11 CFR 100.5 - Political committee (2 U.S.C. 431 (4), (5), (6)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... delegate at 11 CFR 110.14(b)(1).) (6) Leadership PAC. Leadership PAC means a political committee that is... that leadership PAC does not include a political committee of a political party. (7) Lobbyist/Registrant PAC. See 11 CFR 104.22(a)(3). (f) A political committee is either an authorized committee or...

  18. 11 CFR 100.5 - Political committee (2 U.S.C. 431 (4), (5), (6)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... delegate at 11 CFR 110.14(b)(1).) (6) Leadership PAC. Leadership PAC means a political committee that is... that leadership PAC does not include a political committee of a political party. (7) Lobbyist/Registrant PAC. See 11 CFR 104.22(a)(3). (f) A political committee is either an authorized committee or...

  19. 11 CFR 100.5 - Political committee (2 U.S.C. 431 (4), (5), (6)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... delegate at 11 CFR 110.14(b)(1).) (6) Leadership PAC. Leadership PAC means a political committee that is... that leadership PAC does not include a political committee of a political party. (7) Lobbyist/Registrant PAC. See 11 CFR 104.22(a)(3). (f) A political committee is either an authorized committee or...

  20. 11 CFR 100.5 - Political committee (2 U.S.C. 431 (4), (5), (6)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... delegate at 11 CFR 110.14(b)(1).) (6) Leadership PAC. Leadership PAC means a political committee that is... that leadership PAC does not include a political committee of a political party. (7) Lobbyist/Registrant PAC. See 11 CFR 104.22(a)(3). (f) A political committee is either an authorized committee or...

  1. European Marine Infrastructures: perspectives for Marine and Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Beranzoli, L.; Egerton, P.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Los, W.

    2009-04-01

    The European Commission (EC) is supporting a variety of Research Infrastructures in many different scientific fields: Social Sciences and Humanities, Environmental Sciences, Energy, Biological and Medical Sciences, Physical Sciences and Engineering and e-Infrastructures. All these infrastructures are included in the new report of the "European Roadmap for Research Infrastructures" published in late 2008 by ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/). In particular, some research infrastructures for the Environmental Sciences specifically addressed to the marine environment are presented: • EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory). The development of this underwater network is being supported by several other EC initiatives, ESONET-NoE (European Seas Network), coordinated by IFREMER (http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/). • ERICON AURORA BOREALIS (European Research Icebreaker Consortium, http://www.eri-aurora-borealis.eu/). • EURO-ARGO (Global Ocean Observing Infrastructure, http://www.euro-argo.eu/). • LIFEWATCH (E-science and technology infrastructure for biodiversity data and observatories, http://www.lifewatch.eu/). In particular through its scientific marine networks: EUR-OCEANS (European Network of Excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis, http://www.eur-oceans.eu/); MARBEF-NoE (MARine Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning, http://www.marbef.org/ and Marine Genomics (http://www.marine-genomics-europe.org/). Possible profitable links with new research infrastructures recently included in the roadmap, such as EPOS (European Plate Observing System) and SIAEOS (Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System) are also pointed out. The marine EC infrastructures presented constitute the fundamental tools to support the Earth Sciences, both terrestrial and marine.

  2. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  3. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  4. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  5. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  6. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  7. Technology Policy: Information Infrastructure [Information Superhighways and High Performance Computing]. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Technology, Environment and Aviation of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (March 23 and 25, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    This document contains transcriptions of testimony and prepared statements on national technology policy with a focus on President Clinton and Vice President Gore's initiatives to support the development of a national information infrastructure. On the first day of the hearing testimony was received from Edward H. Salmon, Chairman, New Jersey…

  8. The Uses of the National Information Infrastructure in Providing Services to Small Industry, State and Local Governments, and Education in Rural Areas. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session (Billings, Montana).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    The Senate Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space held a hearing in Billings, Montana, on rural America's access to the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and uses of NII in the provision of rural education and services. An Assistant Secretary of Commerce discussed the development of the Internet, problems in rural access to the…

  9. ACRF data collection and processing infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Macduff, M. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Pacific Northwest National Lab.

    2005-01-01

    integrated data flow. The network and computing infrastructure is able to centrally process the data from all sites on an hourly basis and make daily updates available for general users. This is accomplished through satellite networking, specialized data movement processes, and a tight configuration management process. We present a description of the data flow from measurement to long-term archive. We also discuss data communications infrastructure. The data handling processes presented include collection, transfer, ingest, quality control, creation of Value-Added Products (VAP), and data archiving.

  10. Decline in Radiation Hardened Microcircuit Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of radiation hardened microcircuit infrastructure will be discussed: 1) The availability and performance of radiation hardened microcircuits, and, and 2) The access to radiation test facilities primarily for proton single event effects (SEE) testing. Other areas not discussed, but are a concern include: The challenge for maintaining radiation effects tool access for assurance purposes, and, the access to radiation test facilities primarily for heavy ion single event effects (SEE) testing. Status and implications will be discussed for each area.

  11. Space Transportation Infrastructure Supported By Propellant Depots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    A space transportation infrastructure is described that utilizes propellant depot servicing platforms to support all foreseeable missions in the Earth-Moon vicinity and deep space out to Mars. The infrastructure utilizes current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) systems such as the Delta IV Heavy, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, for all crew, cargo, and propellant launches to orbit. Propellant launches are made to Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Depot and an Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 (L1) Depot to support a new reusable in-space transportation vehicles. The LEO Depot supports missions to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) for satellite servicing and to L1 for L1 Depot missions. The L1 Depot supports Lunar, Earth-Sun L2 (ESL2), Asteroid and Mars Missions. New vehicle design concepts are presented that can be launched on current 5 meter diameter ELV systems. These new reusable vehicle concepts include a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for crew transportation between the LEO Depot, L1 Depot and missions beyond L1; a new reusable lunar lander for crew transportation between the L1 Depot and the lunar surface; and Mars orbital Depot are based on International Space Station (ISS) heritage hardware. Data provided includes the number of launches required for each mission utilizing current ELV systems (Delta IV Heavy or equivalent) and the approximate vehicle masses and propellant requirements. Also included is a discussion on affordability with ideas on technologies that could reduce the number of launches required and thoughts on how this infrastructure include competitive bidding for ELV flights and propellant services, developments of new reusable in-space vehicles and development of a multiuse infrastructure that can support many government and commercial missions simultaneously.

  12. The Master Clock Building at USNO Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    40th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting THE MASTER CLOCK BUILDING AT USNO INFRASTRUCTURE Warren F. Walls U.S. Naval...Observatory, Time Service Department 3450 Massachusetts Ave., NW; Washington, DC 20392, USA E-mail: Warren.Walls@Navy.mil Abstract The U.S...estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the

  13. Putting the Critical Back in Critical Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    anonymous online survey to capture the perceptions and views of critical infrastructure professionals across the nation. The survey included an evaluation...on the perceptions and views of the business process, program maturity and implementation, as well as the current state of outcomes. This thesis...foundational nature of this work. A formative program evaluation was conducted through an anonymous online survey to capture the perceptions and views of

  14. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    how green infrastructure practices and the many associated benefits can be effective not only in wetter climates, but also for those communities in arid and semi-arid regions around the nation that have different precipitation patterns

  15. Incorporating Green Infrastructure into TMDLs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The fact sheet provides examples of how some states describe green infrastructure and low impact development activities in their TMDL implementation sections to address stormwater-source impaired waters.

  16. Open Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    OPEN COMPONENT PORTABILITY INFRASTRUCTURE (OPENCPI) MERCURY FEDERAL SYSTEMS, INC. MARCH 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...NUMBER OC 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER PI 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Mercury Federal Systems, Inc. 1901 South Bell Street, Suite...Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI) ,” AFRL-RI-RS-TR- 2009-257, Mercury Federal Systems, Inc., Arlington, VA, Nov 2009. 2. Kulp, J., “OpenCPI

  17. EEW Implementation into Critical Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfikar, Can; Pinar, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In FP7 MARsite project WP9, the integration algorithm of existing strong motion networks with the critical infrastructures strong motion networks have been studied. In Istanbul, the existing Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning (IEEW) strong motion network consists of 15 stations including 10 on land and 5 ocean bottom stations. The system provides continuous online data and earthquake early warning alert depending on the exceedance of the threshold levels in ground motion acceleration in certain number of station within the certain time interval. The data transmission is provided through the fiber optic cable and satellite line alternatively. The early warning alert is transmitted to the critical infrastructures of Istanbul Natural Gas distribution line and Marmaray Tube Tunnel line in order to activate the local strong motion networks for the automatic shut-off mechanism. Istanbul Natural Gas distribution line has 1.800km steel and 15.200km polyethylene in total 18.000km gas pipeline in Istanbul. There are in total 750 district regulators in the city where the gas pressure is reduced from 20bar to 4bar and from there the gas is transmitted with polyethylene lines to service boxes. Currently, Istanbul Natural Gas Distribution Company (IGDAS) has its own strong motion network with 110 strong motion stations installed at the 110 of 750 district regulators. Once the IGDAS strong motion network is activated by the IEEW network, depending on the exceedance of the ground motion parameters threshold levels the gas flow is stopped at the district regulators. Other than the Earthquake Early Warning operation in IGDAS strong motion network, having the calculated ground motion parameters in the network provides damage maps for the buildings and natural gas pipeline network. The Marmaray Tube Tunnel connects the Europe and Asian sides of Istanbul City by a rail line. The tunnel is 1.4km length and consists of 13segments. There is strong motion monitoring network in the tunnel

  18. Infrastructure for distributed enterprise simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.M.; Yoshimura, A.S.; Goldsby, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional discrete-event simulations employ an inherently sequential algorithm and are run on a single computer. However, the demands of many real-world problems exceed the capabilities of sequential simulation systems. Often the capacity of a computer`s primary memory limits the size of the models that can be handled, and in some cases parallel execution on multiple processors could significantly reduce the simulation time. This paper describes the development of an Infrastructure for Distributed Enterprise Simulation (IDES) - a large-scale portable parallel simulation framework developed to support Sandia National Laboratories` mission in stockpile stewardship. IDES is based on the Breathing-Time-Buckets synchronization protocol, and maps a message-based model of distributed computing onto an object-oriented programming model. IDES is portable across heterogeneous computing architectures, including single-processor systems, networks of workstations and multi-processor computers with shared or distributed memory. The system provides a simple and sufficient application programming interface that can be used by scientists to quickly model large-scale, complex enterprise systems. In the background and without involving the user, IDES is capable of making dynamic use of idle processing power available throughout the enterprise network. 16 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Extreme Light Infrastructure: nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, N. V.; Habs, D.; Negoita, F.; Ursescu, D.

    2011-06-01

    The spectacular progress of electron and heavy-ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high-power laser has opened the way for new methods of investigations in nuclear physics and related fields. On the other hand, upshifting the photon energies of a high repetition TW-class laser through inverse Compton scattering on electron bunches classically accelerated, a high-flux narrow bandwidth gamma beam can be produced. With such a gamma beam in the 1-20 MeV energy range and a two-arms 10-PW class laser system, the pillar of "Extreme Light Infrastructure" to be built in Bucharest will focus on nuclear phenomena and their practical applications. Nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental QED aspects as well as applications in material and life sciences, radioactive waste management and homeland security will be studied using the high-power laser, the gamma beam or combining the two. The article includes a general description of ELI-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility, an overview of the Physics Case and some details on the few, most representative proposed experiments.

  20. 76 FR 64960 - Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... INFORMATION: The role and functions of the Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC... for the FRPCC meeting includes: (1) Introductions, (2) Radiological and Emergency Preparedness...

  1. 77 FR 1697 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... painful conditions including osteoarthritis, chronic lower back pain, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, post... injury, and cancer pain. The committee will be asked to determine whether reports of joint...

  2. 75 FR 64390 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... --Formal safety assessment --Piracy and armed robbery against ships --General cargo ship...

  3. 78 FR 29201 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... new measures Formal safety assessment Piracy and armed robbery against ships Implementation...

  4. 77 FR 57638 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... new measures; Formal safety assessment; Piracy and armed robbery against ships; Implementation...

  5. 78 FR 48217 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an open meeting at 9:30 a... Secretary, Shipping Coordinating Committee, Department of State. [FR Doc. 2013-19083 Filed 8-6-13; 8:45...

  6. Assessing Terrorist Motivations for Attacking Critical "Chemical" Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, G; Bale, J; Moran, K

    2004-12-14

    Certain types of infrastructure--critical infrastructure (CI)--play vital roles in underpinning our economy, security, and way of life. One particular type of CI--that relating to chemicals--constitutes both an important element of our nation's infrastructure and a particularly attractive set of potential targets. This is primarily because of the large quantities of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) it employs in various operations and because of the essential economic functions it serves. This study attempts to minimize some of the ambiguities that presently impede chemical infrastructure threat assessments by providing new insight into the key motivational factors that affect terrorist organizations propensity to attack chemical facilities. Prepared as a companion piece to the Center for Nonproliferation Studies August 2004 study--''Assessing Terrorist Motivations for Attacking Critical Infrastructure''--it investigates three overarching research questions: (1) why do terrorists choose to attack chemical-related infrastructure over other targets; (2) what specific factors influence their target selection decisions concerning chemical facilities; and (3) which, if any, types of groups are most inclined to attack chemical infrastructure targets? The study involved a multi-pronged research design, which made use of four discrete investigative techniques to answer the above questions as comprehensively as possible. These include: (1) a review of terrorism and threat assessment literature to glean expert consensus regarding terrorist interest in targeting chemical facilities; (2) the preparation of case studies to help identify internal group factors and contextual influences that have played a significant role in leading some terrorist groups to attack chemical facilities; (3) an examination of data from the Critical Infrastructure Terrorist Incident Catalog (CrITIC) to further illuminate the nature of terrorist attacks against chemical facilities to date; and (4

  7. External Community Review Committee:

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maureen A.; Kaufman, Nancy J.; Dearlove, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Major gaps exist between what we know and what we do in clinical practice and community health programs and narrowing this gap will require substantive partnerships between academic researchers and the communities they serve. Objectives: We describe a research pilot award program that makes a unique commitment to community engagement through the addition of an External Community Review Committee to the typical research review process that gives external stakeholders decision-making power over research funding. Methods: Whereas engaging community reviewers in discussion and rating of research proposals is not novel, the ICTR ECRC review process is distinct in that it is subsequent to peer review and uses different criteria and methodology. This method of engagement allows for the community review panel to re-rank scientifically meritorious proposals—such that proposals funded do not necessarily follow the rank order from scientific peer review. The approach taken by UW ICTR differs from those discussed in the literature that present a model of community-academic co-review. Results: This article provides guidance for others interested in this model of community engagement and reviews insights gained during the evolution of this strategy; including how we addressed conflict, how the committee was able to change the pilot award program over time, and individual roles that were crucial to the success of this approach. Conclusions: The advantages of this approach include success through traditional academic metrics while achieving an innovative shared-power mechanism for community engagement which we believe is critical for narrowing the gap between knowledge and practice. PMID:24056512

  8. Committee Reports, May 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The Division's Executive Committee conducted several items of business at the New Orleans meeting. Elsewhere in this issue [see p 1032] is a listing of the candidates for Division offices for Fall 2008 election, approved by the Committee and later affirmed at the Division business meeting. Among items of specific interest to Division members is a plan to have the Journal of Chemical Education send an announcement to members when each issues goes online, and the Committee approved this use of the Division email list. It also approved plans presented by Amina El-Ashmawy and the BCCE committee to proceed with a bid from Pennsylvania State University for the 2012 BCCE.

  9. Publication committee meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Publications Committee has oversight responsibility for the entire AGU publications program. It is supported in this activity by the Journals Board, the Books Board, and the Translations Board. The 1982-1984 committee is chaired by Thomas Graedel. Serving with him are David Atlas, Grant Gross, Jurate Landwehr, Peter Molnar, George Reid, and Rob Van der Voo.At its November 3-4 meeting the new committee spent much of its time acquainting its elf with the scope of the program, the current problems, and the potential opportunities. In addition to setting the background against which the work of the next two years would take place, the committee

  10. Risk assessment of mountain infrastructure destabilization in the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvillard, Pierre-Allain; Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2015-04-01

    In the current context of imbalance of geosystems in connection with the rising air temperature for several decades, high mountain environments are especially affected by the shrinkage of glaciers and the permafrost degradation which can trigger slope movements in the rock slopes (rockfall, rock avalanches) or in superficial deposits (slides, rock glacier rupture, thermokarst). These processes generate a risk of direct destabilization for high mountain infrastructure (huts, cable-cars...) in addition to indirect risks for people and infrastructure located on the path of moving rock masses. We here focus on the direct risk of infrastructure destabilization due to permafrost degradation and/or glacier shrinkage in the French Alps. To help preventing these risks, an inventory of all the infrastructure was carried out with a GIS using different data layers among which the Alpine Permafrost Index Map and inventories of the French Alps glaciers in 2006-2009, 1967-1971 and at the end of the Little Ice Age. 1769 infrastructures have been identified in areas likely characterized by permafrost and/or possibly affected by glacier shrinkage. An index of risk of destabilization has been built to identify and to rank infrastructure at risk. This theoretical risk index includes a characterization of hazards and a diagnosis of the vulnerability. The value of hazard is dependent on passive factors (topography, lithology, geomorphological context...) and on so-considered active factors (thermal state of the permafrost, and changing constraints on slopes related to glacier shrinkage). The diagnosis of vulnerability has meanwhile been established by combining the level of potential damage to the exposed elements with their operational and financial values. The combination of hazard and vulnerability determines a degree of risk of infrastructure destabilization (from low to very high). Field work and several inventories of infrastructure damages were used to validate it. The

  11. Facilities and Infrastructure FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    The Facilities and Infrastructure Program includes EERE’s capital investments, operations and maintenance, and site-wide support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). It is the nation’s only national laboratory with a primary mission dedicated to the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) of energy efficiency, renewable energy and related technologies. EERE is NREL’s steward, primary client and sponsor of NREL’s designation as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center. The Facilities and Infrastructure (F&I) budget maintains NREL’s research and support infrastructure, ensures availability for EERE’s use, and provides a safe and secure workplace for employees.

  12. Framework for Vulnerability Assessment of Coastal Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, P. S.; Moritz, H. R.; White, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal infrastructure can be highly vulnerable to changing climate, including increasing sea levels and altered frequency and intensity of coastal storms. Existing coastal infrastructure may be of a sufficient age that it is already experiencing noticeable impacts from global sea level rise, and require a variety of potential preparedness and resilience measures to adapt to changing climate. Methods to determine vulnerability to changing sea level and support planning of potential future adaptation measures are needed for application to projects having multiple purposes (e.g., navigation, coastal risk reduction). Here we describe a potential framework for assessing projects with several components typical of existing coastal infrastructure spanning a range of engineering disciplines (e.g., hydrology, geotechnical, structural, electrical, and mechanical). The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Climate Preparedness and Resilience Register (CPRR) framework is currently under development. It takes a tiered approach as described in earlier USACE guidance (Engineer Technical Letter 1100-2-1) using the three scenarios prescribed by Engineer Regulation ER 1100-2-8162. Level 1 is a qualitative assessment defining the major sea level change-related impacts and ranks them in order of soonest occurrence. Level 2 is a quantitative evaluation that analyzes current and future performance of individual project components, including electrical, mechanical and structural components and functions using the sea level change scenarios prescribed by ER 1100-2-8162. Level 3 proposes adaptation measures per ETL 1100-2-1 and evaluates changes in sea level change-related impacts.

  13. Design and optimization of photovoltaics recycling infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ki; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2010-11-15

    With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States.

  14. Design and Optimization of Photovoltaics Recycling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

    2010-10-01

    With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States.

  15. Green Infrastructure, Groundwater and the Sustainable City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    The management of water is among the most important attributes of urbanization. Provision of sufficient quantities and quality of freshwater, treatment and disposal of wastewater and flood protection are critical for urban sustainability. Over the last century, two major shifts in water management paradigms have occurred, the first to improve public health with the provision of infrastructure for centralized sanitary effluent collection and treatment, and the rapid drainage and routing of stormwater. A current shift in paradigm is now occurring in response to the unintended consequences of sanitary and stormwater management, which have degraded downstream water bodies and shifted flood hazard downstream. Current infrastructure is being designed and implemented to retain, rather than rapidly drain, stormwater, with a focus on infiltration based methods. In urban areas, this amounts to a shift in hydrologic behavior to depression focused recharge. While stormwater is defined as surface flow resulting from developed areas, an integrated hydrologic systems approach to urban water management requires treatment of the full critical zone. In urban areas this extends from the top of the vegetation and building canopy, to a subsurface depth including natural soils, fill, saprolite and bedrock. In addition to matric and network flow in fracture systems, an urban "karst" includes multiple generations of current and past infrastructure, which has developed extensive subsurface pipe networks for supply and drainage, enhancing surface/groundwater flows and exchange. In this presentation, Band will discuss the need to focus on the urban critical zone, and the development and adaptation of new modeling and analytical approaches to understand and plan green infrastructure based on surface/groundwater/ecosystem interactions, and implications for the restoration and new design of cities.

  16. 77 FR 20690 - Northeast Corridor Safety Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... will include: Positive Train Control update presentations from NEC railroads, Transportation Security Administration NEC security initiatives, aging electric traction infrastructure, the Americans with...

  17. Human research ethics committees in technical universities.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the world shows that, where not specifically mandated by law, most technical universities do not employ ethics committees to review human studies. As the domains of basic and applied sciences expand, ethics committees are increasingly needed to guide and oversee all such research regardless of legal requirements. We offer as examples, from our experience as an ethics committee in a major European technical university, ways in which such a committee provides needed services and can help ensure more ethical studies involving humans outside the standard medical context. We provide some arguments for creating such committees, and in our supplemental article, we provide specific examples of cases and concerns that may confront technical, engineering, and design research, as well as outline the general framework we have used in creating our committee.

  18. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  19. Towards an Infrastructure for MLS Distributed Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Distributed computing owes its success to the development of infrastructure, middleware, and standards (e.g., CORBA) by the computing industry. This...Government must protect national security information against unauthorized information flow. To support MLS distributed computing , a MLS infrastructure...protection of classified information and use both the emerging distributed computing and commercial security infrastructures. The resulting infrastructure

  20. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  1. Infrastructure Commons in Economic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischmann, Brett M.

    This chapter briefly summarizes a theory (developed in substantial detail elsewhere)1 that explains why there are strong economic arguments for managing and sustaining infrastructure resources in an openly accessible manner. This theory facilitates a better understanding of two related issues: how society benefits from infrastructure resources and how decisions about how to manage or govern infrastructure resources affect a wide variety of public and private interests. The key insights from this analysis are that infrastructure resources generate value as inputs into a wide range of productive processes and that the outputs from these processes are often public goods and nonmarket goods that generate positive externalities that benefit society as a whole. Managing such resources in an openly accessible manner may be socially desirable from an economic perspective because doing so facilitates these downstream productive activities. For example, managing the Internet infrastructure in an openly accessible manner facilitates active citizen involvement in the production and sharing of many different public and nonmarket goods. Over the last decade, this has led to increased opportunities for a wide range of citizens to engage in entrepreneurship, political discourse, social network formation, and community building, among many other activities. The chapter applies these insights to the network neutrality debate and suggests how the debate might be reframed to better account for the wide range of private and public interests at stake.

  2. What Do Experienced Water Managers Think of Water Resources of Our Nation and Its Management Infrastructure?

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Faisal; Arnold, Jeffrey; Beighley, Ed; Brown, Casey; Burian, Steve; Chen, Ji; Mitra, Anindita; Niyogi, Dev; Pielke, Roger; Tidwell, Vincent; Wegner, Dave

    2015-01-01

    This article represents the second report by an ASCE Task CommitteeInfrastructure Impacts of Landscape-driven Weather Change” under the ASCE Watershed Management Technical Committee and the ASCE Hydroclimate Technical Committee. Herein, the ‘infrastructure impacts” are referred to as infrastructure-sensitive changes in weather and climate patterns (extremes and non-extremes) that are modulated, among other factors, by changes in landscape, land use and land cover change. In this first report, the article argued for explicitly considering the well-established feedbacks triggered by infrastructure systems to the land-atmosphere system via landscape change. In this report by the ASCE Task Committee (TC), we present the results of this ASCE TC’s survey of a cross section of experienced water managers using a set of carefully crafted questions. These questions covered water resources management, infrastructure resiliency and recommendations for inclusion in education and curriculum. We describe here the specifics of the survey and the results obtained in the form of statistical averages on the ‘perception’ of these managers. Finally, we discuss what these ‘perception’ averages may indicate to the ASCE TC and community as a whole for stewardship of the civil engineering profession. The survey and the responses gathered are not exhaustive nor do they represent the ASCE-endorsed viewpoint. However, the survey provides a critical first step to developing the framework of a research and education plan for ASCE. Given the Water Resources Reform and Development Act passed in 2014, we must now take into account the perceived concerns of the water management community. PMID:26544045

  3. What Do Experienced Water Managers Think of Water Resources of Our Nation and Its Management Infrastructure?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Faisal; Arnold, Jeffrey; Beighley, Ed; Brown, Casey; Burian, Steve; Chen, Ji; Mitra, Anindita; Niyogi, Dev; Pielke, Roger; Tidwell, Vincent; Wegner, Dave

    2015-01-01

    This article represents the second report by an ASCE Task Committee "Infrastructure Impacts of Landscape-driven Weather Change" under the ASCE Watershed Management Technical Committee and the ASCE Hydroclimate Technical Committee. Herein, the 'infrastructure impacts" are referred to as infrastructure-sensitive changes in weather and climate patterns (extremes and non-extremes) that are modulated, among other factors, by changes in landscape, land use and land cover change. In this first report, the article argued for explicitly considering the well-established feedbacks triggered by infrastructure systems to the land-atmosphere system via landscape change. In this report by the ASCE Task Committee (TC), we present the results of this ASCE TC's survey of a cross section of experienced water managers using a set of carefully crafted questions. These questions covered water resources management, infrastructure resiliency and recommendations for inclusion in education and curriculum. We describe here the specifics of the survey and the results obtained in the form of statistical averages on the 'perception' of these managers. Finally, we discuss what these 'perception' averages may indicate to the ASCE TC and community as a whole for stewardship of the civil engineering profession. The survey and the responses gathered are not exhaustive nor do they represent the ASCE-endorsed viewpoint. However, the survey provides a critical first step to developing the framework of a research and education plan for ASCE. Given the Water Resources Reform and Development Act passed in 2014, we must now take into account the perceived concerns of the water management community.

  4. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  5. Assessing Terrorist Motivations for Attacking Critical Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, G; Abhayaratne, P; Bale, J; Bhattacharjee, A; Blair, C; Hansell, L; Jayne, A; Kosal, M; Lucas, S; Moran, K; Seroki, L; Vadlamudi, S

    2006-12-04

    organization will attack critical infrastructure. In other words, this research investigates: (1) why terrorists choose to attack critical infrastructure rather than other targets; (2) how groups make such decisions; (3) what, if any, types of groups are most inclined to attack critical infrastructure targets; and (4) which types of critical infrastructure terrorists prefer to attack and why. In an effort to address the above questions as comprehensively as possible, the project team employed four discrete investigative approaches in its research design. These include: (1) a review of existing terrorism and threat assessment literature to glean expert consensus regarding terrorist target selection, as well as to identify theoretical approaches that might be valuable to analysts and decision-makers who are seeking to understand such terrorist group decision-making processes; (2) the preparation of several concise case studies to help identify internal group factors and contextual influences that have played significant roles in leading some terrorist groups to attack critical infrastructure; (3) the creation of a new database--the Critical Infrastructure Terrorist Incident Catalog (CrITC)--to capture a large sample of empirical CI attack data that might be used to illuminate the nature of such attacks to date; and (4) the development of a new analytical framework--the Determinants Effecting Critical Infrastructure Decisions (DECIDe) Framework--designed to make the factors and dynamics identified by the study more ''usable'' in any future efforts to assess terrorist intentions to target critical infrastructure. Although each is addressed separately in the following chapters, none of the four aspects of this study were developed in isolation. Rather, all the constituent elements of the project informed--and were informed by--the others. For example, the review of the available literature on terrorist target selection made possible the identification of several target selection

  6. Network and computing infrastructure for scientific applications in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvatadze, R.; Modebadze, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Status of network and computing infrastructure and available services for research and education community of Georgia are presented. Research and Educational Networking Association - GRENA provides the following network services: Internet connectivity, network services, cyber security, technical support, etc. Computing resources used by the research teams are located at GRENA and at major state universities. GE-01-GRENA site is included in European Grid infrastructure. Paper also contains information about programs of Learning Center and research and development projects in which GRENA is participating.

  7. E15 and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.; Yanowitz, J.

    2015-05-27

    This report explores the compatibility of refueling station equipment with E15--a 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline blend intended for use in conventional gasoline light duty vehicles model year 2001 or newer. The report includes background information on E15, a literature review seeking to identify issues during the nationwide deployment of E10, a diagram of all station equipment and supporting data.

  8. 78 FR 40144 - Governmentwide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC); Upcoming Public Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Governmentwide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC); Upcoming Public Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Governmentwide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC) (the Committee), is a Federal Advisory Committee established in..., Designated Federal Officer (DFO), Governmentwide Travel Advisory Committee (GTAC), Office of...

  9. Permafrost Hazards and Linear Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanilovskaya, Julia; Sergeev, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    The international experience of linear infrastructure planning, construction and exploitation in permafrost zone is being directly tied to the permafrost hazard assessment. That procedure should also consider the factors of climate impact and infrastructure protection. The current global climate change hotspots are currently polar and mountain areas. Temperature rise, precipitation and land ice conditions change, early springs occur more often. The big linear infrastructure objects cross the territories with different permafrost conditions which are sensitive to the changes in air temperature, hydrology, and snow accumulation which are connected to climatic dynamics. One of the most extensive linear structures built on permafrost worldwide are Trans Alaskan Pipeline (USA), Alaska Highway (Canada), Qinghai-Xizang Railway (China) and Eastern Siberia - Pacific Ocean Oil Pipeline (Russia). Those are currently being influenced by the regional climate change and permafrost impact which may act differently from place to place. Thermokarst is deemed to be the most dangerous process for linear engineering structures. Its formation and development depend on the linear structure type: road or pipeline, elevated or buried one. Zonal climate and geocryological conditions are also of the determining importance here. All the projects are of the different age and some of them were implemented under different climatic conditions. The effects of permafrost thawing have been recorded every year since then. The exploration and transportation companies from different countries maintain the linear infrastructure from permafrost degradation in different ways. The highways in Alaska are in a good condition due to governmental expenses on annual reconstructions. The Chara-China Railroad in Russia is under non-standard condition due to intensive permafrost response. Standards for engineering and construction should be reviewed and updated to account for permafrost hazards caused by the

  10. 77 FR 12086 - Committee Management Renewals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Committee Management Renewals The NSF management officials having responsibility for three advisory... Committee Management Secretariat, General Services Administration. Committees: Advisory Committee for.... Dated: February 22, 2012. Susanne Bolton, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 7555-01-P...

  11. 75 FR 9616 - Committee Management Renewals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Committee Management Renewals The NSF management officials having responsibility for three advisory... Committee Management Secretariat, General Services Administration. Committees: Advisory Committee for...-7488. Susanne Bolton, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 7555-01-P...

  12. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  13. 78 FR 57571 - Negotiated Rulemaking Committee, Negotiator Nominations and Schedule of Committee Meetings-Title...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Meetings--Title IV Federal Student Aid Programs, Violence Against Women Act AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary... Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). The committee will include representatives...

  14. International Needs for Infrastructure Nde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovics, John; Boller, Christian; Cawley, Peter; Spencer, Billie F.; Wang, Ming L.; Washer, Glenn

    2009-03-01

    The Aging of Infrastructure is a world wide problem of increasing importance, with the specifics varying from region to region depending on the age and nature of critical structures. It is clear that the NDE and SHM tools being developed by the QNDE community can play an important role in addressing the Aging Infrastructure problem, and the special evening session is designed to provide perspective to the developers of that technology through an overview of the international needs. A panel of speakers with experience with the unique situations in different regions of the world will first make a series of short presentations. This will be followed by a general discussion period.

  15. FOREWORD: Structural Health Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhishen; Fujino, Yozo

    2005-06-01

    This special issue collects together 19 papers that were originally presented at the First International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure (SHMII-1'2003), held in Tokyo, Japan, on 13-15 November 2003. This conference was organized by the Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE) with partial financial support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology, Japan. Many related organizations supported the conference. A total of 16 keynote papers including six state-of-the-art reports from different counties, six invited papers and 154 contributed papers were presented at the conference. The conference was attended by a diverse group of about 300 people from a variety of disciplines in academia, industry and government from all over the world. Structural health monitoring (SHM) and intelligent materials, structures and systems have been the subject of intense research and development in the last two decades and, in recent years, an increasing range of applications in infrastructure have been discovered both for existing structures and for new constructions. SHMII-1'2003 addressed progress in the development of building, transportation, marine, underground and energy-generating structures, and other civilian infrastructures that are periodically, continuously and/or actively monitored where there is a need to optimize their performance. In order to focus the current needs on SHM and intelligent technologies, the conference theme was set as 'Structures/Infrastructures Sustainability'. We are pleased to have the privilege to edit this special issue on SHM and intelligent infrastructure based on SHMII-1'2003. We invited some of the presenters to submit a revised/extended version of their paper that was included in the SHMII-1'2003 proceedings for possible publication in the special issue. Each paper included in this special issue was edited with the same

  16. National information infrastructure applications

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.; George, J.; Greenfield, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a telemedical application in which medical records are electronically searched and digital signatures of real CT scan data are indexed and used to characterize a range of diseases and are used to compare on-line medical data with archived clinical data rapidly. This system includes multimedia data management, interactive collaboration, data compression and transmission, remote data storage and retrieval, and automated data analysis integrated in a distributed application between Los Alamos and the National Jewish Hospital.

  17. The Audit Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, John S.

    1996-01-01

    In many colleges and universities the responsibility of the governing board's audit committee is to arrange and oversee regular audits of financial activities, comply with donor restrictions on gifts, adhere to laws and regulations, and conform to established board policies. Membership of three to five is usually sufficient, and while the…

  18. The Compensation Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tranquada, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This booklet describes some of the practices of committees charged with setting the compensation of the college or university president or chancellor. Whether the institution is private or public, the president's income will become public information, and apart from any public relations implications, it simply makes good sense for the compensation…

  19. 76 FR 22395 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications... ``Open Internet Advisory Committee'' (hereinafter ``the Committee''), is being established. FOR FURTHER... Internet rules (available at...

  20. Appendix G - GPRA06 hydrogen, fuel cells, and infrastructure technologies (HFCIT) program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The target markets for the Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) program include transportation (cars and light trucks) and stationary (particularly residential and commercial) applications.

  1. A European perspective--the European clinical research infrastructures network.

    PubMed

    Demotes-Mainard, J; Kubiak, C

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating research outcomes requires multinational cooperation in clinical research for optimization of treatment strategies and comparative effectiveness research, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) is a distributed ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific potential. Servicing multinational trials started during its preparatory phase, and ECRIN will now apply for an ERIC (European Research Infrastructures Consortium) status by 2011. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this achievement will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of the research and education capacity, tackling the major societal challenges starting with the area of healthy ageing, and removing barriers to bring ideas to the market.

  2. China national space remote sensing infrastructure and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Space Infrastructure is a space system that provides communication, navigation and remote sensing service for broad users. China National Space Remote Sensing Infrastructure includes remote sensing satellites, ground system and related systems. According to the principle of multiple-function on one satellite, multiple satellites in one constellation and collaboration between constellations, series of land observation, ocean observation and atmosphere observation satellites have been suggested to have high, middle and low resolution and fly on different orbits and with different means of payloads to achieve a high ability for global synthetically observation. With such an infrastructure, we can carry out the research on climate change, geophysics global surveying and mapping, water resources management, safety and emergency management, and so on. I This paper gives a detailed introduction about the planning of this infrastructure and its application in different area, especially the international cooperation potential in the so called One Belt and One Road space information corridor.

  3. A resolution establishing a Select Committee of the Senate to make a full and thorough investigation of the unauthorized disclosures of apparently classified information concerning the National Security Agency intelligence-collection programs, operations, and activities, including programs affecting Americans, to make findings based upon the investigation, and to make recommendations based on the investigation and findings.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McCain, John [R-AZ

    2014-02-04

    02/04/2014 Referred to the Committee on Rules and Administration. (text of measure as introduced: CR S765-767) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. ATLAS Metadata Infrastructure Evolution for Run 2 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemmeren, P.; Cranshaw, J.; Malon, D.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS developed and employed for Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider a sophisticated infrastructure for metadata handling in event processing jobs. This infrastructure profits from a rich feature set provided by the ATLAS execution control framework, including standardized interfaces and invocation mechanisms for tools and services, segregation of transient data stores with concomitant object lifetime management, and mechanisms for handling occurrences asynchronous to the control framework's state machine transitions. This metadata infrastructure is evolving and being extended for Run 2 to allow its use and reuse in downstream physics analyses, analyses that may or may not utilize the ATLAS control framework. At the same time, multiprocessing versions of the control framework and the requirements of future multithreaded frameworks are leading to redesign of components that use an incident-handling approach to asynchrony. The increased use of scatter-gather architectures, both local and distributed, requires further enhancement of metadata infrastructure in order to ensure semantic coherence and robust bookkeeping. This paper describes the evolution of ATLAS metadata infrastructure for Run 2 and beyond, including the transition to dual-use tools—tools that can operate inside or outside the ATLAS control framework—and the implications thereof. It further examines how the design of this infrastructure is changing to accommodate the requirements of future frameworks and emerging event processing architectures.

  5. EPA's Ongoing Green Infrastructure Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Infrastructure is a concept originating in the United States in the mid-1990's that highlights the importance of the natural environment in decisions about land use planning. In particular there is an emphasis on the “life support” functions provided by the natural environm...

  6. Managing Mission-Critical Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2012-01-01

    In the library context, they depend on sophisticated business applications specifically designed to support their work. This infrastructure consists of such components as integrated library systems, their associated online catalogs or discovery services, and self-check equipment, as well as a Web site and the various online tools and services…

  7. Impact of Declining Rural Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Fiona Haslem

    A study investigated the impact of declining rural community infrastructure on social, environmental, and economic well-being in Western Australia's central wheatbelt. Questionnaires were completed by 398 residents of the central wheatbelt, on-farm interviews were conducted with 68 respondents, and 4 focus groups were held in area towns.…

  8. Internet 2 Distributed Storage Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Distributed Storage Infrastructure (DSI) project, a cooperative effort of the University of Tennessee and University of North Carolina, is an example of the Internet 2 (I2) efforts to enable remote collaboration among the research and educational communities. It extends the domain of a distributed high-speed computing environment to enable…

  9. 2009 Infrastructure Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass program‘s Infrastructure platform review meeting, held on February 19, 2009, at the Marriott Residence Inn, National Harbor, Maryland.

  10. The RASD Outstanding Reference Sources Committee: Retrospect and Prospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Janet; Masters, Deborah C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the Reference and Adult Services Division's Outstanding Reference Sources Committee procedures for preparation of the 1979 listing, discusses expansion to include nonbook sources, and provides a retrospective list of nonbook sources selected by the 1979-80 committee. Nonbook sources include microforms and databases. Six references are…

  11. Clinical ethics committee.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, J. G.; Lilford, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    An informal clinical ethics committee was set up to advise on ethical problems in prenatal diagnosis in Leeds. It was used twice in six months but was not called on again in the subsequent year, and we describe this experience. In North America similar committees are often used to advise on clinical moral dilemmas, and we review the published evidence from there and discuss some of the advantages and problems. Our committee's advice may have altered clinicians' actions considerably, but perhaps doctors in Britain are not yet ready to surrender this aspect of clinical autonomy. PMID:7549638

  12. Public affairs committee actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Public Affairs Committee will create an ad hoc committee to consider possible AGU position statements concerning the effects of nuclear war.The action was taken at the May 31, 1983, meeting of the Committee at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore. Present were Carroll Ann Hodges, Chairman, and members Thomas J. Ahrens, David Cauffman, Jared Cohon, Stamatios Krimigis, Robert Murphy, Raymond Roble, and George Shaw. Also attending were the current Congressional Fellow Arthur Weissman and SPR—Cosmic Rays Section Secretary Miriam Forman.

  13. Intelligent systems technology infrastructure for integrated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred during the last decade in intelligent systems technologies (a.k.a. knowledge-based systems, KBS) including research, feasibility demonstrations, and technology implementations in operational environments. Evaluation and simulation data obtained to date in real-time operational environments suggest that cost-effective utilization of intelligent systems technologies can be realized for Automated Rendezvous and Capture applications. The successful implementation of these technologies involve a complex system infrastructure integrating the requirements of transportation, vehicle checkout and health management, and communication systems without compromise to systems reliability and performance. The resources that must be invoked to accomplish these tasks include remote ground operations and control, built-in system fault management and control, and intelligent robotics. To ensure long-term evolution and integration of new validated technologies over the lifetime of the vehicle, system interfaces must also be addressed and integrated into the overall system interface requirements. An approach for defining and evaluating the system infrastructures including the testbed currently being used to support the on-going evaluations for the evolutionary Space Station Freedom Data Management System is presented and discussed. Intelligent system technologies discussed include artificial intelligence (real-time replanning and scheduling), high performance computational elements (parallel processors, photonic processors, and neural networks), real-time fault management and control, and system software development tools for rapid prototyping capabilities.

  14. A Scalable Database Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2001-12-01

    The rapidly increasing volume and complexity of MG&G data, and the growing demand from funding agencies and the user community that it be easily accessible, demand that we improve our approach to data management in order to reach a broader user-base and operate more efficient and effectively. We have chosen an approach based on industry-standard relational database management systems (RDBMS) that use community-wide data specifications, where there is a clear and well-documented external interface that allows use of general purpose as well as customized clients. Rapid prototypes assembled with this approach show significant advantages over the traditional, custom-built data management systems that often use "in-house" legacy file formats, data specifications, and access tools. We have developed an effective database prototype based a public domain RDBMS (PostgreSQL) and metadata standard (FGDC), and used it as a template for several ongoing MG&G database management projects - including ADGRAV (Antarctic Digital Gravity Synthesis), MARGINS, the Community Review system of the Digital Library for Earth Science Education, multibeam swath bathymetry metadata, and the R/V Maurice Ewing onboard acquisition system. By using standard formats and specifications, and working from a common prototype, we are able to reuse code and deploy rapidly. Rather than spend time on low-level details such as storage and indexing (which are built into the RDBMS), we can focus on high-level details such as documentation and quality control. In addition, because many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) and public domain data browsers and visualization tools have built-in RDBMS support, we can focus on backend development and leave the choice of a frontend client(s) up to the end user. While our prototype is running under an open source RDBMS on a single processor host, the choice of standard components allows this implementation to scale to commercial RDBMS products and multiprocessor servers as

  15. 78 FR 26100 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of the Renewal of an... Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society (hereinafter ``the Committee''). The Committee provides advice and... of, civil society worldwide. Functions of the Committee include, but are not limited to:...

  16. 76 FR 22160 - Advisory Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Committee on the Secretary of State's Strategic Dialogue With Civil Society; Notice of the Establishment of... of State's Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society (hereinafter ``the Committee''). The Committee will... engagement with, and protection of, civil society worldwide. Functions of the Committee include, but are...

  17. 75 FR 881 - Meeting of Advisory Committee on International Communications and Information Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... including future generation communications technology issues, international market access, Internet... of Advisory Committee on International Communications and Information Policy The Department of State's Advisory Committee on International Communications and Information Policy (ACICIP) will hold...

  18. 78 FR 6342 - U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Office of the Secretary U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Advisory Committee AGENCY... status in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). The Committee includes... effort designed to increase transparency, strengthen the accountability of natural resource...

  19. The Evolving Genetics of Green Infrastructure Implementation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestero, T. P.; Watts, A. W.; Houle, J. J.; Puls, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization radically alters hydrology, with impacts from very local to regional scales. Green Infrastructure techniques use natural processes to restore hydrologic function, and provide multiple companion benefits such as energy savings, increased green space, improved ecosystems, etc. Although science can clearly demonstrate the benefits and cost saving associated with Green Infrastructure (see for example Forging The Link http://www.unh.edu/unhsc/forgingthelink ), many community decision makers continue to be reluctant to incorporate these more effective methods into standard planning practices. In spite of the wealth of evidence, communities are very slow to codify and adopt the practices, commonly waiting for regulatory or legal directives to force them down the path. Barriers to implementation include misconceptions of performance, reliability and cost, often fed by a local ';expert' who is trusted member of the community. For Green Infrastructure to be effective, implementation must become a standard practice, rather than an innovation; the methods and concepts must be integrated into planning DNA. Fundamentally, successful green infrastructure implementation comes down to changing behavior, perceptions, and priorities, and fostering trust in the science. We will present: data on the cost and effectiveness of using Green Infrastructure to restore damaged urban hydrology, incorporating methods into urban planning tools, and an ongoing science collaborative project engaging stakeholders directly in the development and optimization of Green Infrastructure tools.

  20. Critical Infrastructure Protection II, The International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    The information infrastructure -- comprising computers, embedded devices, networks and software systems -- is vital to day-to-day operations in every sector: information and telecommunications, banking and finance, energy, chemicals and hazardous materials, agriculture, food, water, public health, emergency services, transportation, postal and shipping, government and defense. Global business and industry, governments, indeed society itself, cannot function effectively if major components of the critical information infrastructure are degraded, disabled or destroyed. Critical Infrastructure Protection II describes original research results and innovative applications in the interdisciplinary field of critical infrastructure protection. Also, it highlights the importance of weaving science, technology and policy in crafting sophisticated, yet practical, solutions that will help secure information, computer and network assets in the various critical infrastructure sectors. Areas of coverage include: - Themes and Issues - Infrastructure Security - Control Systems Security - Security Strategies - Infrastructure Interdependencies - Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation This book is the second volume in the annual series produced by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 11.10 on Critical Infrastructure Protection, an international community of scientists, engineers, practitioners and policy makers dedicated to advancing research, development and implementation efforts focused on infrastructure protection. The book contains a selection of twenty edited papers from the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.10 International Conference on Critical Infrastructure Protection held at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, USA in the spring of 2008.

  1. 76 FR 17934 - Infrastructure Protection Data Call

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Infrastructure Protection Data Call AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS...: Infrastructure Protection Data Call. OMB Number: 1670-NEW. Frequency: On occasion. Affected Public:...

  2. Periodicals Committee Report--Summary of Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshon, Arnold

    This report summarizes the decisions of the Virginia Commonwealth University Joint Committee to Study Library Periodical Services that were scheduled for implementation for the fall 1987 semester. Approved decisions are outlined for the areas of: (1) photocopiers, including photocopy services and Vendacard; (2) bound volumes, including loan…

  3. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Berscheid, Alan P.

    2012-07-30

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  4. 7 CFR 945.11 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Committee. Committee means the administrative committee, called the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Potato...

  5. 7 CFR 945.11 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Committee. Committee means the administrative committee, called the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Potato...

  6. 7 CFR 945.11 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Committee. Committee means the administrative committee, called the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Potato...

  7. 7 CFR 945.11 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Committee. Committee means the administrative committee, called the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Potato...

  8. 7 CFR 983.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.8 Committee. Committee means the Administrative Committee for...

  9. 7 CFR 983.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.8 Committee. Committee means the Administrative Committee for...

  10. 7 CFR 983.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.8 Committee. Committee means the Administrative Committee for...

  11. 7 CFR 966.15 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.15 Committee. Committee means the Florida Tomato Committee,...

  12. 7 CFR 920.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 920.8 Committee. Committee means the Kiwifruit Administrative Committee established pursuant to §...

  13. 7 CFR 920.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 920.8 Committee. Committee means the Kiwifruit Administrative Committee established pursuant to §...

  14. 7 CFR 920.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 920.8 Committee. Committee means the Kiwifruit Administrative Committee established pursuant to §...

  15. 7 CFR 920.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 920.8 Committee. Committee means the Kiwifruit Administrative Committee established pursuant to §...

  16. 7 CFR 920.8 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 920.8 Committee. Committee means the Kiwifruit Administrative Committee established pursuant to §...

  17. Infrastructure of electronic information management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twitchell, G.D.

    2004-01-01

    The information technology infrastructure of an organization, whether it is a private, non-profit, federal, or academic institution, is key to delivering timely and high-quality products and services to its customers and stakeholders. With the evolution of the Internet and the World Wide Web, resources that were once "centralized" in nature are now distributed across the organization in various locations and often remote regions of the country. This presents tremendous challenges to the information technology managers, users, and CEOs of large world-wide corporations who wish to exchange information or get access to resources in today's global marketplace. Several tools and technologies have been developed over recent years that play critical roles in ensuring that the proper information infrastructure exists within the organization to facilitate this global information marketplace Such tools and technologies as JAVA, Proxy Servers, Virtual Private Networks (VPN), multi-platform database management solutions, high-speed telecommunication technologies (ATM, ISDN, etc.), mass storage devices, and firewall technologies most often determine the organization's success through effective and efficient information infrastructure practices. This session will address several of these technologies and provide options related to those that may exist and can be readily applied within Eastern Europe. ?? 2004 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

  18. Decontamination of Drinking Water Infrastructure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical Brief This study examines the effectiveness of decontaminating corroded iron and cement-mortar coupons that have been contaminated with spores of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii (B. globigii), which is often used as a surrogate for pathogenic B. anthracis (anthrax) in disinfection studies. Bacillus spores are persistent on common drinking water material surfaces like corroded iron, requiring physical or chemical methods to decontaminate the infrastructure. In the United States, free chlorine and monochloramine are the primary chemical disinfectants used by the drinking water industry to inactivate microorganisms. Flushing is also a common, easily implemented practice in drinking water distribution systems, although large volumes of contaminated water needing treatment could be generated. Identifying readily available alternative disinfectant formulations for infrastructure decontamination could give water utilities options for responding to specific types of contamination events. In addition to presenting data on flushing alone, which demonstrated the persistence of spores on water infrastructure in the absence of high levels of disinfectants, data on acidified nitrite, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone, peracetic acid, and followed by flushing are provided.

  19. Working towards a European Geological Data Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Krogt, Rob; Hughes, Richard; Pedersen, Mikael; Serrano, Jean-Jacques; Lee, Kathryn A.; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, François

    2013-04-01

    The increasing importance of geological information for policy, regulation and business needs at European and international level has been recognized by the European Parliament and the European Commission, who have called for the development of a common European geological knowledge base. The societal relevance of geoscience data/information is clear from many current issues such as shale gas exploration (including environmental impacts), the availability of critical mineral resources in a global economy, management and security with regard to geohazards (seismic, droughts, floods, ground stability), quality of (ground-)water and soil and societal responses to the impacts of climate change. The EGDI-Scope project responds to this, aiming to prepare an implementation plan for a pan-European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), under the umbrella of the FP7 e- Infrastructures program. It is envisaged that the EGDI will build on geological datasets and models currently held by the European Geological Surveys at national and regional levels, and will also provide a platform for datasets generated by the large number of relevant past, ongoing and future European projects which have geological components. With European policy makers and decision makers from (international) industry as the main target groups (followed by research communities and the general public) stakeholder involvement is imperative to the successful realization and continuity of the EGDI. With these ambitions in mind, the presentation will focus on the following issues, also based on the first results and experiences of the EGDI-Scope project that started mid-2012: • The organization of stakeholder input and commitment connected to relevant 'use cases' within different thematic domains; a number of stakeholder representatives is currently involved, but the project is open to more extensive participation; • A large number of European projects relevant for data delivery to EGDI has been reviewed

  20. RIDE: the Research Infrastructure Database for EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailo, Daniele; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Jeffery, Keith G.; Clemenceau, Alice; Hoffmann, Thomas L.

    2013-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is a European initiative which aims to promote and make possible innovative approaches for a better understanding of the physical processes laying behind natural events and geo-science phenomena (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unrest episodes and tsunamis etc.) by integrating existing national and trans-national Research Infrastructures (RIs). Such integration will increase access and use of the multidisciplinary data recorded by solid Earth monitoring networks, acquired in laboratory experiments and/or produced by computational simulations. Here we present the Research Infrastructures Database for EPOS (RIDE), a database containing technical information about the different RIs declared by EPOS partners and EPOS associate partners, which will eventually compose the EPOS distributed Research Infrastructure. The main goals of RIDE are (i) to allow the EPOS RI to be organized, with interactive access and information mining available to a broad community of users and stakeholders, (ii) to have a first set of information to be stored in the EPOS catalogue, which will be used as a basis for the development of EPOS Core Services, (iii) to enable EPOS partners to revise and update the current RI information, (iv) to show the contents of the EPOS integration plan to all stakeholders, (v) to facilitate the dissemination of existing data infrastructures to different communities and to promote a discussion within the community to implement the present data infrastructures. RIDE - whose driving technology is Apache CouchDB - contains at the current status detailed information on more than 200 Research Infrastructures. It enables any user to visualize RIs and sensors on a map, to carry out statistics on the stored data and to browse through the details of any RI. Based on the content of RIDE it is now possible to estimate the potential size of the new EPOS distributed RI: EPOS is going to integrate more than 7000 sensors (seismic

  1. Spatial Data Web Services Pricing Model Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozmus, L.; Erkek, B.; Colak, S.; Cankurt, I.; Bakıcı, S.

    2013-08-01

    The General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (TKGM) which is the leader in the field of cartography largely continues its missions which are; to keep and update land registry and cadastre system of the country under the responsibility of the treasure, to perform transactions related to real estate and to establish Turkish national spatial information system. TKGM a public agency has completed many projects. Such as; Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations (TUSAGA-Aktif), Geo-Metadata Portal (HBB), Orthophoto-Base Map Production and web services, Completion of Initial Cadastre, Cadastral Renovation Project (TKMP), Land Registry and Cadastre Information System (TAKBIS), Turkish National Spatial Data Infrastructure Project (TNSDI), Ottoman Land Registry Archive Information System (TARBIS). TKGM provides updated map and map information to not only public institutions but also to related society in the name of social responsibility principals. Turkish National Spatial Data Infrastructure activities have been started by the motivation of Circular No. 2003/48 which was declared by Turkish Prime Ministry in 2003 within the context of e-Transformation of Turkey Short-term Action Plan. Action No. 47 in the mentioned action plan implies that "A Feasibility Study shall be made in order to establish the Turkish National Spatial Data Infrastructure" whose responsibility has been given to General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre. Feasibility report of NSDI has been completed in 10th of December 2010. After decision of Steering Committee, feasibility report has been send to Development Bank (old name State Planning Organization) for further evaluation. There are two main arrangements with related this project (feasibility report).First; Now there is only one Ministry which is Ministry of Environment and Urbanism responsible for establishment, operating and all national level activities of NSDI. And Second arrangement is related to institutional Level. The

  2. Infrastructure opportunities in South America: Energy sector. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The report, conducted by CG/LA, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report was assembled for the South American Infrastructure Conference held in New Orleans. It contains a regional overview of infrastructure activities in ten countries represented at the conference. Also covered are project listings in five sectors, including Energy, Transportation, Environment, Telecommunications, and Industry. The study covers TDA case studies as well as project financeability. The ten countries covered in the report include the following: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. This volume focuses on the Energy Sector in South America.

  3. Space Agency Workshop Considers Effect of Climate Change on Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Brown, Molly

    2009-10-01

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation: NASA Mission and Infrastructure; Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 28-30 July 2009; With centers located throughout the country, NASA could experience a range of climate change hazards. Depending on the region, these hazards are likely to include more extreme and frequent high temperatures, more frequent and intense precipitation events, changing water availability, and sea level rise. These changing climate hazards could undermine key NASA missions by damaging operations and critical infrastructure assets. The specific effects of climate change may include shifting availability, reliability, and cost of water and energy; and changes in safety and operations related to more extreme events (e.g., floods, fire).

  4. 77 FR 57085 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide recommendations to the Commission...

  5. 76 FR 64348 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide recommendations to the Commission...

  6. 78 FR 21354 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide recommendations to the Commission...

  7. 77 FR 6113 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC's) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide recommendations to the Commission...

  8. Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, Kevin; Menart, James; Gilbert, Robert

    2012-08-31

    The Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative represents a collaborative effort by the University of Dayton, Wright State University and Sinclair Community College. This effort above all aimed to establish energy related programs at each of the universities while also providing outreach to the local, state-wide, and national communities. At the University of Dayton, the grant has aimed at: solidfying a newly created Master's program in Renewable and Clean Energy; helping to establish and staff a regional sustainability organization for SW Ohio. As well, as the prime grantee, the University of Dayton was responsible for insuring curricular sharing between WSU and the University of Dayton. Finally, the grant, through its support of graduate students, and through cooperation with the largest utilities in SW Ohio enabled a region-wide evaluation of over 10,000 commercial building buildings in order to identify the priority buildings in the region for energy reduction. In each, the grant has achieved success. The main focus of Wright State was to continue the development of graduate education in renewable and clean energy. Wright State has done this in a number of ways. First and foremost this was done by continuing the development of the new Renewable and Clean Energy Master's Degree program at Wright State . Development tasks included: continuing development of courses for the Renewable and Clean Energy Master's Degree, increasing the student enrollment, and increasing renewable and clean energy research work. The grant has enabled development and/or improvement of 7 courses. Collectively, the University of Dayton and WSU offer perhaps the most comprehensive list of courses in the renewable and clean energy area in the country. Because of this development, enrollment at WSU has increased from 4 students to 23. Secondly, the grant has helped to support student research aimed in the renewable and clean energy program. The grant helped to solidify new research

  9. Impact of a faculty orientation and development committee.

    PubMed

    Law, Anandi V; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murray, Wallace I; Hess, Karl; Pham, David Q; Min, David I; Le, Jennifer

    2012-02-10

    This paper describes the faculty enrichment activities and outcomes of a faculty orientation and development committee at a college of pharmacy. The committee used a continuous quality improvement (CQI) framework that included needs assessment, planning and implementation of programs and workshops, assessment of activities, and evaluation of feedback to improve future programming. Some of the programs established by the committee include a 3-month orientation process for new hires and development workshops on a broad range of topics including scholarship (eg, research methods), teaching (eg, test-item writing), and general development (mentorship). Evidence of the committee's success is reflected by high levels of faculty attendance at workshops, positive feedback on workshop evaluations, and overall high levels of satisfaction with activities. The committee has served as a role model for improving faculty orientation and retention.

  10. Impact of a Faculty Orientation and Development Committee

    PubMed Central

    Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murray, Wallace I.; Hess, Karl; Pham, David Q.; Min, David I.; Le, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the faculty enrichment activities and outcomes of a faculty orientation and development committee at a college of pharmacy. The committee used a continuous quality improvement (CQI) framework that included needs assessment, planning and implementation of programs and workshops, assessment of activities, and evaluation of feedback to improve future programming. Some of the programs established by the committee include a 3-month orientation process for new hires and development workshops on a broad range of topics including scholarship (eg, research methods), teaching (eg, test-item writing), and general development (mentorship). Evidence of the committee's success is reflected by high levels of faculty attendance at workshops, positive feedback on workshop evaluations, and overall high levels of satisfaction with activities. The committee has served as a role model for improving faculty orientation and retention. PMID:22412202

  11. 75 FR 42690 - Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... International Trade Administration Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: International... sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of a meeting of the Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory Committee... nuclear goods and services in accordance with applicable United States regulations, including advice...

  12. 75 FR 37783 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include discussions of the following: Friday,...

  13. 77 FR 47360 - Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... process the Committee will use to review and recommend fiscal year 2012 project proposals. DATES: The... 2011 project status and discussion of process the Committee will use to review and recommend fiscal... agenda will include time for people to make oral statements of three minutes or less. Individuals...

  14. 75 FR 45090 - El Dorado County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Forest Service El Dorado County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The El Dorado County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Placerville... the meeting includes: Discussions and possible decisions on an El Dorado County RAC mission...

  15. 78 FR 40098 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet on July 18 and... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those...

  16. 75 FR 51852 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces an open meeting of the NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee. The purpose of the meeting is to assess NASA and Roscosmos continuing plans to support a six-person crew aboard the International Space Station, including transportation,......

  17. Annual Report: Doctoral Program Committee, Academic Year 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievrouw, Leah A.; Leazer, Greg; Lynch, Beverly; Abler, Susan; Mediavilla, Cynthia

    This document summarizes the activities of the University of California, Los Angeles's (UCLA's) Department of Library and Information Science (DLIS) Doctoral Program Committee, 1996-97. These activities are organized into two main areas: Operations and Students. Doctoral Program Committee (DPC) operations outlined include: preparing major policy…

  18. 78 FR 59425 - Minority Depository Institutions Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Minority Depository Institutions Advisory Committee Meeting... meeting of the Minority Depository Institutions Advisory Committee (MDIAC). DATES: A public meeting of the...., Washington, DC 20219. Agenda items include a discussion of the status of the minority depository...

  19. The Special Educator and the Hospital Ethics Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; And Others

    With the advent of Public Law 99-457, special educators may be expected to observe and/or serve on Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs) in order to better assist families who have seriously ill and handicapped infants and children. Issues considered by such committees include alternative viewpoints on infant euthanasia and their right to life, the…

  20. A Language for Life (Report of the Bullock Committee).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackray, Derek, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    The articles collected in this special issue of "Reading"offer a response to and elaboration of the report of the Bullock Committee on reading. An editorial introduction describes the focus and implications of the report and outlines the committee's main recommendations. Included in the discussion are the following articles:…

  1. 75 FR 17744 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee... technology infrastructure that permits the electronic exchange and use of health information as is consistent..., Office of Programs and Coordination, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information...

  2. 75 FR 18551 - Advisory Committee for Polar Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... to 3 p.m. Place: National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Room II-555. Type of Meeting...-range planning. Agenda: Staff presentations and discussion on opportunities and challenges for polar research, education and infrastructure; discussion of Committee of Visitors meetings;...

  3. An Infrastructure to Advance the Scholarly Work of Staff Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Parkosewich, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional role of the acute care staff nurse is changing. The new norm establishes an expectation that staff nurses base their practice on best evidence. When evidence is lacking, nurses are charged with using the research process to generate and disseminate new knowledge. This article describes the critical forces behind the transformation of this role and the organizational mission, culture, and capacity required to support practice that is based on science. The vital role of senior nursing leaders, the nurse researcher, and the nursing research committee within the context of a collaborative governance structure is highlighted. Several well-known, evidence-based practice models are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of the infrastructure created by Yale-New Haven Hospital to advance the scholarly work of the nursing staff. PMID:23482435

  4. 7 CFR 948.16 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.16 Committee. Committee means any of the area committees established pursuant to § 948.50 or the Colorado Potato Committee established pursuant to § 948.51....

  5. 7 CFR 948.16 - Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.16 Committee. Committee means any of the area committees established pursuant to § 948.50 or the Colorado Potato Committee established pursuant to § 948.51....

  6. 76 FR 75874 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold..., attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any...

  7. 76 FR 8715 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold...: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any written...

  8. 76 FR 41196 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will meet in Thermopolis, Wyoming...: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, Shoshone National Forest Supervisor's...

  9. 76 FR 3081 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a conference call on.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator,...

  10. 76 FR 22672 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will meet in Thermopolis, Wyoming... CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, Shoshone National Forest...

  11. 76 FR 56454 - Consumer Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  12. 75 FR 33305 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  13. 75 FR 9898 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the ] Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  14. 75 FR 41863 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  15. 75 FR 63830 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  16. 75 FR 4819 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding...

  17. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. This document removes the Veterinary Advisory Committee from the Agency's list of...

  18. 77 FR 21619 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will... implementation of new measures; Role of the human element; Formal safety assessment; Piracy and armed...

  19. 78 FR 17467 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... seafarers in the event of a maritime accident. --Piracy. --Collation and preservation of evidence...

  20. 77 FR 12353 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... Convention, 2006; Fair treatment of seafarers in the event of a maritime accident; Piracy; Matters...

  1. 76 FR 12787 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... piracy; --Matters arising from the 105th regular session of the IMO Council; --Technical...

  2. 75 FR 63888 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... regarding piracy --Matters arising from the 25th extraordinary and the 104th regular sessions of the...

  3. 77 FR 12641 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an open meeting at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in Room 5-0624 of the United States Coast Guard Headquarters Building, 2100...

  4. Follow through Amendments of 1983. Mr. Perkins, from the Committee on Education and Labor, Submitted the Following Report together with Supplemental Views (To Accompany H. R. 2148), (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). House of Representatives, 98th Congress, 1st Session, Report No. 98-160.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    The Committee on Education and Labor strongly recommends the adoption of H. R. 2148, a bill that, with two major additions, would basically reenact Project Follow Through for an additional year as it is currently authorized under the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. The two additions would provide for review and evaluation of what has been…

  5. PRACE - The European HPC Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelmeyer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The mission of PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe) is to enable high impact scientific discovery and engineering research and development across all disciplines to enhance European competitiveness for the benefit of society. PRACE seeks to realize this mission by offering world class computing and data management resources and services through a peer review process. This talk gives a general overview about PRACE and the PRACE research infrastructure (RI). PRACE is established as an international not-for-profit association and the PRACE RI is a pan-European supercomputing infrastructure which offers access to computing and data management resources at partner sites distributed throughout Europe. Besides a short summary about the organization, history, and activities of PRACE, it is explained how scientists and researchers from academia and industry from around the world can access PRACE systems and which education and training activities are offered by PRACE. The overview also contains a selection of PRACE contributions to societal challenges and ongoing activities. Examples of the latter are beside others petascaling, application benchmark suite, best practice guides for efficient use of key architectures, application enabling / scaling, new programming models, and industrial applications. The Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) is an international non-profit association with its seat in Brussels. The PRACE Research Infrastructure provides a persistent world-class high performance computing service for scientists and researchers from academia and industry in Europe. The computer systems and their operations accessible through PRACE are provided by 4 PRACE members (BSC representing Spain, CINECA representing Italy, GCS representing Germany and GENCI representing France). The Implementation Phase of PRACE receives funding from the EU's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreements RI-261557, RI-283493 and RI

  6. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  7. The MED-SUV Multidisciplinary Interoperability Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; D'Auria, Luca; Reitano, Danilo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Roncella, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In accordance with the international Supersite initiative concept, the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to enable long-term monitoring experiment in two relevant geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: Mt. Vesuvio/Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. This objective requires the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases and novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters. Moreover, MED-SUV is also a direct contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as one the volcano Supersites recognized by the Group on Earth Observation (GEO). To achieve its goal, MED-SUV set up an advanced e-infrastructure allowing the discovery of and access to heterogeneous data for multidisciplinary applications, and the integration with external systems like GEOSS. The MED-SUV overall infrastructure is conceived as a three layer architecture with the lower layer (Data level) including the identified relevant data sources, the mid-tier (Supersite level) including components for mediation and harmonization , and the upper tier (Global level) composed of the systems that MED-SUV must serve, such as GEOSS and possibly other global/community systems. The Data level is mostly composed of existing data sources, such as space agencies satellite data archives, the UNAVCO system, the INGV-Rome data service. They share data according to different specifications for metadata, data and service interfaces, and cannot be changed. Thus, the only relevant MED-SUV activity at this level was the creation of a MED-SUV local repository based on Web Accessible Folder (WAF) technology, deployed in the INGV site in Catania, and hosting in-situ data and products collected and generated during the project. The Supersite level is at the core of the MED-SUV architecture, since it must mediate between the disparate data sources in the layer below, and provide a harmonized view to

  8. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel, A

    2008-05-30

    In this document we describe work done under the SciDAC-1 Project National Computerational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory. The objective of this project was to construct the computational infrastructure needed to study quantim chromodynamics (QCD). Nearly all high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States working on the numerical study of QCD are involved in the project, as are Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A list of the serior participants is given in Appendix A.2. The project includes the development of community software for the effective use of the terascale computers, and the research and development of commodity clusters optimized for the study of QCD. The software developed as part of this effort is pubicly available, and is being widely used by physicists in the United States and abroad. The prototype clusters built with SciDAC-1 fund have been used to test the software, and are available to lattice guage theorists in the United States on a peer reviewed basis.

  9. Infrastructure for deployment of power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary effort in characterizing the types of stationary lunar power systems which may be considered for emplacement on the lunar surface from the proposed initial 100-kW unit in 2003 to later units ranging in power from 25 to 825 kW is presented. Associated with these power systems are their related infrastructure hardware including: (1) electrical cable, wiring, switchgear, and converters; (2) deployable radiator panels; (3) deployable photovoltaic (PV) panels; (4) heat transfer fluid piping and connection joints; (5) power system instrumentation and control equipment; and (6) interface hardware between lunar surface construction/maintenance equipment and power system. This report: (1) presents estimates of the mass and volumes associated with these power systems and their related infrastructure hardware; (2) provides task breakdown description for emplacing this equipment; (3) gives estimated heat, forces, torques, and alignment tolerances for equipment assembly; and (4) provides other important equipment/machinery requirements where applicable. Packaging options for this equipment will be discussed along with necessary site preparation requirements. Design and analysis issues associated with the final emplacement of this power system hardware are also described.

  10. Infrastructure development for human cell therapy translation.

    PubMed

    Dietz, A B; Padley, D J; Gastineau, D A

    2007-09-01

    The common conception of a drug is that of a chemical with defined medicinal effect. However, cells used as drugs remain critical to patient care. Cell therapy's origins began with the realization that complex tissues such as blood can retain function when transplanted to the patient. More complex transplantation followed, culminating with the understanding that transplantation of some tissues such as bone marrow may act medicinally. Administration of cells with an intended therapeutic effect is a hallmark of cellular therapy. While cells have been used as drugs for decades, testing a specific therapeutic effect of cells has begun clinical testing relatively recently. Lessons learned during the establishment of blood banking (including the importance of quality control, process control, sterility, and product tracking) are key components in the assurance of the safety and potency of cell therapy preparations. As more academic medical centers and private companies move toward exploiting the full potential of cells as drugs, needs arise for the development of the infrastructure necessary to support these investigations. Careful consideration of the design of the structure used to manufacture is important in terms of the significant capital outlay involved and the facility's role in achieving regulatory compliance. This development perspective describes the regulatory environment surrounding the infrastructure support for cell therapy and practical aspects for design consideration with particular focus on those activities associated with early clinical trials.

  11. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about the mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.

  12. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; ...

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about themore » mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.« less

  13. Can Sensors Solve the Deterioration Problems of Public Infrastructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Chitoshi

    2014-11-01

    Various deteriorations are detected in public infrastructures, such as bridges, viaducts, piers and tunnels and caused fatal accidents in some cases. The possibility of the applications of health monitoring by using sensors is the issues of this lecture. The inspection and diagnosis are essential in the maintenance works which include appropriate rehabilitations and replacements. The introduction of monitoring system may improve accuracy and efficiency of inspection and diagnosis. This seems to be innovation of maintenance, old structures may change smart structures by the installation of nerve network and brain, specifically. Cost- benefit viewpoint is also important point, because of public infrastructures. The modes of deterioration are fatigue, corrosion, and delayed fracture in steel, and carbonization and alkali aggregate reaction in concrete. These are like adult disease in human bodies. The developments of Infrastructures in Japan were concentrated in the 1960th and 1970th. These ages are approaching 50 and deterioration due to aging has been progress gradually. The attacks of earthquakes are also a major issue. Actually, these infrastructures have been supporting economic and social activities in Japan and the deterioration of public infrastructure has become social problems. How to secure the same level of safety and security for all public infrastructures is the challenge we face now. The targets of monitoring are external disturbances such as traffic loads, earthquakes, winds, temperature, responses against external disturbances, and the changes of performances. In the monitoring of infrastructures, 3W1H(WHAT, WHERE, WHEN and HOW) are essential, that is what kind of data are necessary, where sensors place, when data are collected, and how to collect and process data. The required performances of sensors are accuracy, stability for long time. In the case of long term monitoring, the durability of systems needs more than five years, because the interval

  14. Interagency Ocean Observing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rome, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Decades of focused investment in ocean observing and prediction have produced many examples of substantive societal and economic benefit resulting from improved knowledge of ocean and coastal waters and their behavior. Many complex and difficult questions about the ocean remain, including many that have implications for the lives and livelihoods of millions of Americans. The United States has embarked on a series of efforts to develop an ocean observing system capable of addressing broad societal needs. This system is known as the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (U.S. IOOS). The activities and members of the U.S. IOOS community are broad and complex. There are 18 Federal agencies involved in the U.S. IOOS program, as well as 11 U.S. IOOS Regional Associations that encompass efforts focused in U.S. coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and U.S. territories and their waters in the Pacific and the Caribbean. In addition, there are many Federal and academic scientists representing the U.S. Government in various United Nations-sponsored groups that plan and oversee global ocean observation programs. This diverse community is managed largely through cooperation rather than clear directive or budgetary authority, which has contributed to both the strong growth, and the integration weaknesses, of the U.S. IOOS program. The Interagency Ocean Observation Committee (IOOC) is a dynamic group of federal leaders required by Congress to implement procedural, technical, and scientific requirements to ensure full execution of U.S. IOOS. A major focus for the next decade of the IOOC is to help guide comprehensive processes that more fully integrate the requirements, technologies, data/product development and dissemination, testing and modeling efforts across the regional, national, and global sectors of the U.S. IOOS program. This poster/presentation will increase awareness of IOOC efforts to coordinate physical, chemical, and biological observations -- a complementary objective

  15. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulton, William R.; Meieran, Eugene S.; Tummala, Rao R.

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found that, after four decades of development in electronics and manufacturing technologies, Japanese electronics companies are leaders in the development, support, and management of complex, low-cost packaging and assembly technologies used in the production of a broad range of consumer electronics products. The electronics industry's suppliers provide basic materials and equipment required for electronic packaging applications. Panelists concluded that some Japanese firms could be leading U.S. competitors by as much as a decade in these areas. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure is an integral part of its microelectronics industry's success.

  16. Open Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2009-257 Final Technical Report November 2009 OPEN COMPONENT PORTABILITY INFRASTRUCTURE (OPENCPI) Mercury ...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Mercury Federal Systems, Inc. 1901 South Bell Street, Suite 402 Arlington, VA 22202-4511 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...APPLICATIONS  30  6.0  REFERENCES  31  7.0  LIST OF ABBRVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS  32  APPENDIX A: ADDITIONAL REFERENCES  34  APPENDIX B:  MERCURY  CPI ITAR

  17. [Hospital clinical ethics committees].

    PubMed

    Gómez Velásquez, Luis; Gómez Espinosa, Luis Néstor

    2007-01-01

    The scientific and technological advances have been surprising, more in the two last decades, but they don't go united with to the ethical values of the medical professional practice, it has been totally escaped, specially when the biological subsistence, the maintenance of the life through apparatuses and the mechanisms that prolong the existence are who undergoes an alteration that until recently time was mortal shortly lapse. It is common listening that exist a crisis in the medical profession, but what really is it of human values, which as soon and taken into nowadays, actually professional account, which gives rise to a dehumanization towards the life, the health, the disease, the suffering and the death. The ideal of the doctor to give to service to the man in its life and health, as well to be conscious that the last biological process that must fulfill is the death, and when it appears, does not have considered as a actually professional failure. It has protect to the patient as the extreme cruelty therapeutic, that it has right a worthy death. It's taking to the birth of the hospital ethics committees, they have like function to analyze, to advise and to think about the ethical dilemmas that appear actually clinical or in the biomedical investigation. In 1982 in the UEA only 1% of its hospitals had a ethics committees; by 1988, it was 67% and the 100% in 2000. In Mexico the process of the formation by these committees begins, only in the Military Central Hospital, to count the ethics committee on 1983, also the Hospital no. 14 of the IMSS in Guadalajara, it works with regularity from 1995, with internal teaching of bioethic. The Secretariat of Health has asked the formation of the bioethical committees in each hospital, and order the it was be coordinated by the National Committee of Bioética. The integration of these committees is indispensable that their members have the knowledge necessary of bioética. The Mexican Society of Ortopedia, conscious of

  18. Geomagnetism-Paleomagnetism Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subir K.

    I n response to strong member concerns about the future of geomagnetism, Neil D. Opdyke, President of the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section, has appointed an ad hoc Committee for the Future of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism consisting of Subir K. Banerjee (chair; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), Joseph Cain (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colo.) and Rob Van der Voo (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor). The committee seeks, from the membership at large, perceptions of future directions of research, help in identifying a few expanding research areas that show a promise of delivering significant results in the next 5 to 10 years, and guidance in generating a strategy to bring these about.

  19. Committees and supporting organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    Advisory Committee:Organizing Committee: Marcello Baldo (Catania)Takaharu Otsuka (Tokyo), co-chair George Bertsch (Seattle)Michael Urban (Orsay), co-chair Jean-Paul Blaizot (Saclay)Taiichi Yamada (Yokohama) Michel Girod (Bruyères-le-Châtel)Nguyen van Giai (Orsay) Hisashi Horiuchi (Osaka)Shinichiro Fujii (Tokyo) Umberto Lombardo (Catania)Jérôme Margueron (Orsay) Gerd Röpke (Rostock)Kouichi Hagino (Sendai) Hiroyuki Sagawa (Aizu)Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo (Kyoto) Piet Van Isacker (Caen) Enrico Vigezzi (Milano) IPN logo    EFES logo    CNRS logo    ihp logo

  20. Space Transportation Infrastructure Supported By Propellant Depots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    A space transportation infrastructure is described that utilizes propellant depots to support all foreseeable missions in the Earth-Moon vicinity and deep space out to Mars. The infrastructure utilizes current expendable launch vehicles such as the Delta IV Heavy, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, for all crew, cargo, and propellant launches to orbit. Propellant launches are made to a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Depot and an Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 (L1) Depot to support new reusable in-space transportation vehicles. The LEO Depot supports missions to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) for satellite servicing, and to L1 for L1 Depot missions. The L1 Depot supports Lunar, Earth-Sun L2 (ESL2), Asteroid, and Mars missions. A Mars Orbital Depot is also described to support ongoing Mars missions. New concepts for vehicle designs are presented that can be launched on current 5-meter diameter expendable launch vehicles. These new reusable vehicle concepts include a LEO Depot, L1 Depot, and Mars Orbital Depot based on International Space Station (ISS) heritage hardware. The high-energy depots at L1 and Mars orbit are compatible with, but do not require, electric propulsion tug use for propellant and/or cargo delivery. New reusable in-space crew transportation vehicles include a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for crew transportation between the LEO Depot and the L1 Depot, a new reusable Lunar Lander for crew transportation between the L1 Depot and the lunar surface, and a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) to support crew missions from the L1 Depot to ESL2, Asteroid, and Mars destinations. A 6 meter diameter Mars lander concept is presented that can be launched without a fairing based on the Delta IV heavy Payload Planners Guide, which indicates feasibility of a 6.5 meter fairing. This lander would evolve to re-usable operations when propellant production is established on Mars. Figure 1 provides a summary of the possible missions this infrastructure can support. Summary mission profiles are presented

  1. Federal Advisory Committees at EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FACA committees are created to obtain advice on a wide range of environmental issues. Every committee meeting, no matter what the subject matter or where it is held, is dedicated to open government and citizen participation.

  2. Interagency Suspension and Debarment Committee

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Interagency Suspension and Debarment Committee (ISDC) was created, as an Office of Management and Budget (OMB) committee, by Executive Order 12549 for the purpose of monitoring the implementation of the Order.

  3. CCCT - Patient Advocate Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Patient Advocate Steering Committee (PASC) works to ensure advocates involved with the Scientific Steering Committees (SSCs) are completely integrated in the development, implementation, and monitoring of clinical trials within those groups.

  4. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  5. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  6. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  7. 76 FR 55867 - National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry..., 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection (NACMPI) will..., including floppy disks or CD-ROMs: Send to National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection,...

  8. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include...

  9. 11 CFR 100.5 - Political committee (2 U.S.C. 431 (4), (5), (6)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pursuant to 11 CFR 101.1 and 102.1. (2) Single candidate committee. Single candidate committee means a... of persons, including any parent, subsidiary, branch, division, department, or local unit thereof... regional association. (3) Affiliated committees sharing a single contribution limitation under paragraph...

  10. 78 FR 33841 - Federal Open Market Committee; Domestic Policy Directive of April 30-May 1, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... No: 2013-13271] FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Federal Open Market Committee; Domestic Policy Directive of... Open Market Committee at its meeting held on April 30-May 1, 2013.\\1\\ \\1\\ Copies of the Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee at its meeting held on April 30-May 1, 2013, which includes the...

  11. Rolling Deck to Repository I: Designing a Database Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Miller, S. P.; Chandler, C. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; O'Hara, S. H.

    2008-12-01

    The NSF-supported academic research fleet collectively produces a large and diverse volume of scientific data, which are increasingly being shared across disciplines and contributed to regional and global syntheses. As both Internet connectivity and storage technology improve, it becomes practical for ships to routinely deliver data and documentation for a standard suite of underway instruments to a central shoreside repository. Routine delivery will facilitate data discovery and integration, quality assessment, cruise planning, compliance with funding agency and clearance requirements, and long-term data preservation. We are working collaboratively with ship operators and data managers to develop a prototype "data discovery system" for NSF-supported research vessels. Our goal is to establish infrastructure for a central shoreside repository, and to develop and test procedures for the routine delivery of standard data products and documentation to the repository. Related efforts are underway to identify tools and criteria for quality control of standard data products, and to develop standard interfaces and procedures for maintaining an underway event log. Development of a shoreside repository infrastructure will include: 1. Deployment and testing of a central catalog that holds cruise summaries and vessel profiles. A cruise summary will capture the essential details of a research expedition (operating institution, ports/dates, personnel, data inventory, etc.), as well as related documentation such as event logs and technical reports. A vessel profile will capture the essential details of a ship's installed instruments (manufacturer, model, serial number, reference location, etc.), with version control as the profile changes through time. The catalog's relational database schema will be based on the UNOLS Data Best Practices Committee's recommendations, and published as a formal XML specification. 2. Deployment and testing of a central repository that holds

  12. Protection of large alpine infrastructures against natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Scheikl, Manfred; Hergarten, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Large infrastructures in alpine domains are threatened by a variety of natural hazards like debris flows, rock falls and snow avalanches. Especially linear infrastructure including roads, railway lines, pipe lines and power lines passes through the entire mountain range and the impact of natural hazards can be expected along a distance over hundreds of kilometers. New infrastructure projects like storage power plants or ski resorts including access roads are often located in remote alpine domains without any historical record of hazardous events. Mitigation strategies against natural hazards require a detailed analysis on the exposure of the infrastructure to natural hazards. Following conventional concepts extensive mapping and documentation of surface processes over hundreds to several thousand km² of steep alpine domain is essential but can be hardly performed. We present a case study from the Austrian Alps to demonstrate the ability of a multi-level concept to describe the impact of natural hazards on infrastructure by an iterative process. This includes new state of the art numerical models, modern field work and GIS-analysis with an increasing level of refinement at each stage. A set of new numerical models for rock falls, debris flows and snow avalanches was designed to operate with information from field in different qualities and spatial resolutions. Our analysis starts with simple and fast cellular automata for rockfalls and debrisflows to show the exposure of the infrastructure to natural hazards in huge domains and detects "high risk areas" that are investigated in more detail in field in the next refinement level. Finally, sophisticated 2D- depth averaged fluid dynamic models for all kinds of rapid mass movements are applied to support the development of protection structures.

  13. The Audit Committee. Board Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, John S.

    2004-01-01

    The Effective Committees set of booklets comprises publications on the following committees: investment, buildings and grounds, academic affairs, student affairs, finance, development, trustees, audit, compensation, and executive. It is part of the AGB Board Basics Series. This report describes the primary role of an audit committee. The primary…

  14. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  15. Rebuilding a Research Ethics Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John S. G.; Marchesi, August

    2013-01-01

    The principal ethics committee in Australia's Capital, Canberra, underwent a major revision in the last three years based on changes debated in the literature. Committee or Board structure varies widely; regulations determining minimum size and membership differ between countries. Issues such as the effectiveness of committee management,…

  16. Identifying, understanding, and analyzing critical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, S. M.; Peerenboom, J. P.; Kelly, T. K.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2001-12-01

    The notion that our nation's critical infrastructures are highly interconnected and mutually dependent in complex ways, both physically and through a host of information and communications technologies (so-called 'cyberbased systems'), is more than an abstract, theoretical concept. As shown by the 1998 failure of the Galaxy 4 telecommunications satellite, the prolonged power crisis in California, and many other recent infrastructure disruptions, what happens to one infrastructure can directly and indirectly affect other infrastructures, impact large geographic regions and send ripples throughout the national a global economy. This article presents a conceptual framework for addressing infrastructure interdependencies that could serve as the basis for further understanding and scholarship in this important area. We use this framework to explore the challenges and complexities of interdependency. We set the stage for this discussion by explicitly defining the terms infrastructure, infrastructure dependencies, and infrastructure interdependencies and introducing the fundamental concept of infrastructures as complex adaptive systems. We then focus on the interrelated factors and system conditions that collectively define the six dimensions. Finally, we discuss some of the research challenges involved in developing, applying, and validating modeling and simulation methodologies and tools for infrastructure interdependency analysis.

  17. Good practices on cost - effective road infrastructure safety investments.

    PubMed

    Yannis, George; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Evgenikos, Petros; Dragomanovits, Anastasios

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the findings of a research project aiming to quantify and subsequently classify several infrastructure-related road safety measures, based on the international experience attained through extensive and selected literature review and additionally on a full consultation process including questionnaire surveys addressed to experts and relevant workshops. Initially, a review of selected research reports was carried out and an exhaustive list of road safety infrastructure investments covering all types of infrastructure was compiled. Individual investments were classified according to the infrastructure investment area and the type of investment and were thereafter analysed on the basis of key safety components. These investments were subsequently ranked in relation to their safety effects and implementation costs and on the basis of this ranking, a set of five most promising investments was selected for an in-depth analysis. The results suggest that the overall cost effectiveness of a road safety infrastructure investment is not always in direct correlation with the safety effect and is recommended that cost-benefit ratios and safety effects are always examined in conjunction with each other in order to identify the optimum solution for a specific road safety problem in specific conditions and with specific objectives.

  18. Engineering Infrastructures: Problems of Safety and Security in the Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhutov, Nikolay A.; Reznikov, Dmitry O.; Petrov, Vitaly P.

    Modern society cannot exist without stable and reliable engineering infrastructures (EI), whose operation is vital for any national economy. These infrastructures include energy, transportation, water and gas supply systems, telecommunication and cyber systems, etc. Their performance is commensurate with storing and processing huge amounts of information, energy and hazardous substances. Ageing infrastructures are deteriorating — with operating conditions declining from normal to emergency and catastrophic. The complexity of engineering infrastructures and their interdependence with other technical systems makes them vulnerable to emergency situations triggered by natural and manmade catastrophes or terrorist attacks.

  19. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  20. Report of Computer Selection Study Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botten, LeRoy H.

    A computer selection committee was charged with studying the computer needs of Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan. Major results of the investigation included the findings that campus academic and administrative needs would best be served by one onsite system which could support versatile and concurrent time-sharing, batch processing,…

  1. 11 CFR 9002.1 - Authorized committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized committee. 9002.1 Section 9002.1 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION... behalf of such candidate. The term “authorized committee” includes the candidate's principal...

  2. Module utilization committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.; Praver, G.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules on a national basis and to act as a broker for requests for these modules originating outside of the National Photovoltaics Program.

  3. Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan

    2010-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

  4. Space-based communications infrastructure for developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Keith; Barnes, Carl; Price, K. M.

    1995-08-01

    This study examines the potential use of satellites to augment the telecommunications infrastructure of developing countries with advanced satellites. The study investigated the potential market for using satellites in developing countries, the role of satellites in national information infrastructures (NII), the technical feasibility of augmenting NIIs with satellites, and a nation's financial conditions necessary for procuring satellite systems. In addition, the study examined several technical areas including onboard processing, intersatellite links, frequency of operation, multibeam and active antennas, and advanced satellite technologies. The marketing portion of this study focused on three case studies: China, Brazil, and Mexico. These cases represent countries in various stages of telecommunication infrastructure development. The study concludes by defining the needs of developing countries for satellites, and recommends steps that both industry and NASA can take to improve the competitiveness of U.S. satellite manufacturing.

  5. Space-Based Information Infrastructure Architecture for Broadband Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Inukai, Tom; Razdan, Rajendev; Lazeav, Yvonne M.

    1996-01-01

    This study addressed four tasks: (1) identify satellite-addressable information infrastructure markets; (2) perform network analysis for space-based information infrastructure; (3) develop conceptual architectures; and (4) economic assessment of architectures. The report concludes that satellites will have a major role in the national and global information infrastructure, requiring seamless integration between terrestrial and satellite networks. The proposed LEO, MEO, and GEO satellite systems have satellite characteristics that vary widely. They include delay, delay variations, poorer link quality and beam/satellite handover. The barriers against seamless interoperability between satellite and terrestrial networks are discussed. These barriers are the lack of compatible parameters, standards and protocols, which are presently being evaluated and reduced.

  6. 15 CFR 292.4 - Information infrastructure projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... electronic commerce. Specific industry sectors to be addressed or subcategories of information infrastructure projects include, but are not limited to, pilot demonstration of electronic data interchange in a supplier chain, implementation of an electronic information service for field engineers at MEP extension...

  7. 15 CFR 292.4 - Information infrastructure projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... electronic commerce. Specific industry sectors to be addressed or subcategories of information infrastructure projects include, but are not limited to, pilot demonstration of electronic data interchange in a supplier chain, implementation of an electronic information service for field engineers at MEP extension...

  8. 15 CFR 292.4 - Information infrastructure projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... electronic commerce. Specific industry sectors to be addressed or subcategories of information infrastructure projects include, but are not limited to, pilot demonstration of electronic data interchange in a supplier chain, implementation of an electronic information service for field engineers at MEP extension...

  9. 15 CFR 292.4 - Information infrastructure projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... electronic commerce. Specific industry sectors to be addressed or subcategories of information infrastructure projects include, but are not limited to, pilot demonstration of electronic data interchange in a supplier chain, implementation of an electronic information service for field engineers at MEP extension...

  10. 78 FR 57644 - Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... resiliency. Off-topic questions or comments will not be permitted or discussed. Please note that the public... security and resilience. The September 25, 2013, meeting will include topic- specific discussions focused on partnership efforts to enhance critical infrastructure resilience. Topics such as the...

  11. The Construction of Infrastructure for Library's Digital Document Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Changxing, Ying; Zuzao, Lin

    This paper discusses the construction of the infrastructure for libraries' digital document telecommunications. The first section describes the topologies of the library LAN (Local Area Network) cabling system, including the main characteristics of the LAN and three classical topologies typically used with LANs, i.e., the bus, star, and ring…

  12. Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    1 ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research FINAL REPORT 15 AUG 2003... Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson

  13. Method or Madness: Federal Oversight Structures for Critical Infrastructure Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    51 x THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS As with most things ...daughters, Amber and Lauren, who always say just the right things to keep this all in perspective. Bike rides and soccer games helped to provide just...critical to the functioning of American society. These infrastructures include things often taken for granted: food and water supplies, banking

  14. A Distributed Infrastructure for Ensemble Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epicoco, I.; Mirto, M.; Mocavero, S.; Aloisio, G.

    2012-04-01

    Users as well as developers of Earth System Models (ESMs) rely on an infrastructure, consisting of high-end computing, data storage and network resources to perform complex and demanding simulations. In the past, mainly local resources and infrastructures were used. However, the increasing requirements on computing capability and capacity as well as on data storage facilities often exceed the possibilities of a single center. Moreover, an ensemble simulation, consisting of many individual runs, requires intensive computational power and produces huge amount of data to be post-processed and archived. The processing phase is often integrated in a complex workflow including also pre and post-processing steps that are performed on different machines, potentially at different sites, and often by different scientists. In Europe, there is the need to deploy and to develop technologies in order to provide climate scientists with virtual proximity to distributed computing resources and data. The distributed infrastructure should take advantage from the distributed climate centers belonging to the ENES community and it will leverage the external services offered within the European HPC ecosystem, e.g. today by DEISA2 and in the near future by PRACE. This work describes the deployment of a grid prototype used for verifying if complex workflows, defined within the ESM climate community, can take advantage from the use of a distributed environment through the adoption of Grid technologies. This will concern running ensembles of multi-member (and eventually multi-model) experiments. The activities carried out in this task also aim at looking for making the interaction with and configuration of Grid environments straightforward and thus at improving the uptake of Grid technology on a larger scale. The ESM Grid Environment prototype allows exploiting the GRB grid service, developed at the University of Salento, and the basic services offered by the Globus Toolkit middleware or

  15. Design of the National Bioforensics Library Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T; Critchlow, T; Hazlett, S; Samatova, N; Chandramohan, P; Krishnamurthy, R

    2004-02-02

    This design document is the first concrete step in developing a national resource for Bioforensics, the ''Bioforensics Information Encyclopedia''. This resource will contain a semantically consistent representation of all the information relevant to the nation's bio-defense efforts. The availability of such a resource will provide analysts and scientists with efficient, timely access to the information needed to accomplish such tasks as locating relevant experts, determining an optimal order of appropriate forensic tests, and comparing the ''signature'' of the current attack to previous ones. Much of the information required for this repository is scattered across multiple institutions in differing formats and is either currently being generated or is proposed as part of new research efforts. Without effective integration and curation, the data is of limited availability and use. This resource would be utilized by several government agencies to prepare for, investigate, analyze, and respond to bio-terrorist events. In particular, NBACC requires a highly advanced knowledge base of this nature to perform its unique role for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Under our current execution plan, an implementation of the design provided in this document will be demonstrated in a limited functionality prototype that can be deployed at NBACC-West (LLNL). This prototype will provide analysts with access to semantically consistent data from multiple data sources through a single, web-based interface. This interface will support a limited number of queries against an underlying data warehouse. The prototype data warehouse will include information from at least three of the scientific domains relevant to Bioforensics (e.g. genomics, pathogen signature, disease symptoms, chemical/toxicity). While the purpose of this document is to provide a design for the entire infrastructure, we identify those aspects of the infrastructure that will not be included in the initial

  16. Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnis, M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Bloxham, J.; Hager, B. H.; Spiegelman, M.; Willett, S.; Wysession, M. E.; Aivazis, M.

    2004-12-01

    Solid earth geophysicists have a long tradition of writing scientific software to address a wide range of problems. In particular, computer simulations came into wide use in geophysics during the decade after the plate tectonic revolution. Solution schemes and numerical algorithms that developed in other areas of science, most notably engineering, fluid mechanics, and physics, were adapted with considerable success to geophysics. This software has largely been the product of individual efforts and although this approach has proven successful, its strength for solving problems of interest is now starting to show its limitations as we try to share codes and algorithms or when we want to recombine codes in novel ways to produce new science. With funding from the NSF, the US community has embarked on a Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) that will develop, support, and disseminate community-accessible software for the greater geodynamics community from model developers to end-users. The software is being developed for problems involving mantle and core dynamics, crustal and earthquake dynamics, magma migration, seismology, and other related topics. With a high level of community participation, CIG is leveraging state-of-the-art scientific computing into a suite of open-source tools and codes. The infrastructure that we are now starting to develop will consist of: (a) a coordinated effort to develop reusable, well-documented and open-source geodynamics software; (b) the basic building blocks - an infrastructure layer - of software by which state-of-the-art modeling codes can be quickly assembled; (c) extension of existing software frameworks to interlink multiple codes and data through a superstructure layer; (d) strategic partnerships with the larger world of computational science and geoinformatics; and (e) specialized training and workshops for both the geodynamics and broader Earth science communities. The CIG initiative has already started to

  17. Grid infrastructures for developing mammography CAD systems.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pollan, Raul; Franco, Jose M; Sevilla, Jorge; Guevara-Lopez, Miguel A; de Posada, Naimy Gonzalez; Loureiro, Joanna; Ramos, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a set of technologies developed to exploit Grid infrastructures for breast cancer CAD, that include (1) federated repositories of mammography images and clinical data over Grid storage, (2) a workstation for mammography image analysis and diagnosis and (3) a framework for data analysis and training machine learning classifiers over Grid computing power specially tuned for medical image based data. An experimental mammography digital repository of approximately 300 mammograms from the MIAS database was created and classifiers were built achieving a 0.85 average area under the ROC curve in a dataset of 100 selected mammograms with representative pathological lesions and normal cases. Similar results were achieved with classifiers built for the UCI Breast Cancer Wisconsin dataset (699 features vectors). Now these technologies are being validated in a real medical environment at the Faculty of Medicine in Porto University after a process of integrating the tools within the clinicians workflows and IT systems.

  18. Autonomous rendezvous and capture development infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of the technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking, key infrastructure capabilities must be used for effective and economical development. This need involves facility capabilities, both equipment and personnel, to devise, develop, qualify, and integrate ARD elements and subsystems into flight programs. One effective way of reducing technical risks in developing ARD technology is the use of the Low Earth Orbit test facility. Using a reusable free-flying testbed carried in the Shuttle, as a technology demonstration test flight, can be structured to include a variety of sensors, control schemes, and operational approaches. This testbed and flight demonstration concept will be used to illustrate how technologies and facilities at MSFC can be used to develop and prove an ARD system.

  19. Autonomous rendezvous and capture development infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.; Roe, Fred; Coker, Cindy; Nelson, Pam; Johnson, B.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of the technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking, key infrastructure capabilities must be used for effective and economical development. This involves facility capabilities, both equipment and personnel, to devise, develop, qualify, and integrate ARD elements and subsystems into flight programs. One effective way of reducing technical risks in developing ARD technology is the use of the ultimate test facility, using a Shuttle-based reusable free-flying testbed to perform a Technology Demonstration Test Flight which can be structured to include a variety of additional sensors, control schemes, and operational approaches. This conceptual testbed and flight demonstration will be used to illustrate how technologies and facilities at MSFC can be used to develop and prove an ARD system.

  20. Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Frederic; Verner, Duane; Brannegan, David; Buehring, William; Dickinson, David; Guziel, Karen; Haffenden, Rebecca; Phillips, Julia; Peerenboom, James

    2015-06-01

    The report begins by defining dependencies and interdependencies and exploring basic concepts of dependencies in order to facilitate a common understanding and consistent analytical approaches. Key concepts covered include; Characteristics of dependencies: upstream dependencies, internal dependencies, and downstream dependencies; Classes of dependencies: physical, cyber, geographic, and logical; and Dimensions of dependencies: operating environment, coupling and response behavior, type of failure, infrastructure characteristics, and state of operations From there, the report proposes a multi-phase roadmap to support dependency and interdependency assessment activities nationwide, identifying a range of data inputs, analysis activities, and potential products for each phase, as well as key steps needed to progress from one phase to the next. The report concludes by outlining a comprehensive, iterative, and scalable framework for analyzing dependencies and interdependencies that stakeholders can integrate into existing risk and resilience assessment efforts.

  1. Building a North American Spatial Data Infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.J.; Nebert, D.D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the state of spatial data infrastructures within North America in late 1997. After providing some background underlying the philosophy and development of the SDI concept, the authors discuss effects of technology, institutions, and standardization that confront the cohesive implementation of a common infrastructure today. The paper concludes with a comparative framework and specific examples of elements and initiatives defining respective spatial data infrastructure initiatives in the United States and Canada.

  2. Transforming Our Cities: High-Performance Green Infrastructure (WERF Report INFR1R11)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that the highly distributed real-time control (DRTC) technologies for green infrastructure being developed by the research team can play a critical role in transforming our nation’s urban infrastructure. These technologies include a...

  3. Michigan's Infrastructure: Priorities for the Future. Capital Investment Needs 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Infrastructure Coalition, Lansing.

    The Michigan Infrastructure Coalition was formed to review needs and make judgments concerning priorities for future infrastructure investments in Michigan. This report describes the coalition's findings and is intended to serve as the guidelines for state elected officials. Contents include: (1) an introduction (specifying priority areas); (2)…

  4. Emergent Risks In Critical Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dynes, Scott

    Firms cannot function successfully without managing a host of internal and external organizational and process interdependencies. Part of this involves business continuity planning, which directly aects how resilient arm and its business sector are in the face of disruptions. This paper presents the results of eld studies related to information risk management practices in the health care and retail sectors. The studies explore information risk management coordinating signals within and across rms in these sectors as well as the potential eects of cyber disruptions on the rms as stand-alone entities and as part of a critical infrastructure. The health care case study investigates the impact of the Zotob worm on the ability to deliver medical care and treatment. The retail study examines the resilience of certain elements of the food supply chain to cyber disruptions.

  5. The Moral Dimensions of Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Epting, Shane

    2016-04-01

    Moral issues in urban planning involving technology, residents, marginalized groups, ecosystems, and future generations are complex cases, requiring solutions that go beyond the limits of contemporary moral theory. Aside from typical planning problems, there is incongruence between moral theory and some of the subjects that require moral assessment, such as urban infrastructure. Despite this incongruence, there is not a need to develop another moral theory. Instead, a supplemental measure that is compatible with existing moral positions will suffice. My primary goal in this paper is to explain the need for this supplemental measure, describe what one looks like, and show how it works with existing moral systems. The secondary goal is to show that creating a supplemental measure that provides congruency between moral systems that are designed to assess human action and non-human subjects advances the study of moral theory.

  6. Enhancing Sustainable Communities With Green Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This publication aims to help local governments, water utilities, nonprofit organizations, neighborhood groups, and other stakeholders integrate green infrastructure strategies into plans that can transform their communities.

  7. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power.

  8. Using teams and committees effectively.

    PubMed

    Spilker, B

    1998-09-01

    In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals.

  9. 66 FR 7487 - Meeting of the Local Government Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2001-01-23

    ... to resolve issues regarding how the two groups work together--intra-committee management issues. The... previous meeting and continue to work on their recommendations under development, including Total...

  10. Total Coliform Rule Distribution System Advisory Committee (TCRDSAC) Document

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provide information about the TCRDSAC, including its charter, processes and recommendations. The Agency used the Advisory Committee recommendations to develop proposed and final rules that revised the Total Coliform Rule.

  11. Enhanced INL Power Grid Test Bed Infrastructure – Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Carol Ann; West, Grayson Shawn; McBride, Scott Alan

    2014-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory, owns, operates, and maintains transmission and distribution power grid infrastructure to support the INL multi program mission. Sections of this power infrastructure, known as the INL Power Grid Test Bed, have been and are being used by government and industry to develop, demonstrate, and validate technologies for the modern grid, including smart grid, on a full scale utility test bed. INL’s power grid includes 61 miles of 140 MW, 138 kV rated electrical power transmission supplying seven main substations, each feeding a separate facility complex (or ‘city’) within the INL’s 890 square mile Site. This power grid is fed by three commercial utilities into the INL’s main control substation, but is operated independently from the commercial utility through its primary substation and command and control center. Within the INL complex, one of the seven complexes, the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC), has been designated as the INL complex for supporting critical infrastructure research and testing. This complex includes its own substation and 13.8kV distribution network, all configurable and controlled by the INL research and development programs. Through investment partnership with the DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE), INL is enhancing its existing distribution infrastructure to expand the types of testing that can be conducted and increase flexibility for testing configurations. The enhancement of the INL Power Grid Test Bed will enable development and full scale testing of smart-grid-related technologies and smart devices including testing interoperability, operational performance, reliability, and resiliency contribution at multiple distribution voltage classes, specifically 15kV, 25kV, and 35kV. The expected time frame for completion of the Phase I portion of the enhancement would be 4th quarter fiscal year (FY) 2015.

  12. Software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Mouček, Roman; Ježek, Petr; Vařeka, Lukáš; Řondík, Tomáš; Brůha, Petr; Papež, Václav; Mautner, Pavel; Novotný, Jiří; Prokop, Tomáš; Štěbeták, Jan

    2014-01-01

    As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly. This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research. After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software. PMID:24639646

  13. Committees and sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  14. PREFACE: Conference Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov - Chairman, Kiril Blagoev - Vice-Chairman, Margarita Grozeva - Scientific secretary, Kostadinka Gesheva, Anna Szekeres, Hassan Chamati, Diana Nesheva, Peter Rafailov, Yordan Marinov, Emilia Dimova, Tatyana Ivanova, Radostina Kamburova, Ekaterina Iordanova, Julia Genova, Alexander Donkov, Emilia Vlaikova SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov, Bulgaria; Nikola Sabotinov, Bulgaria; Kiril Blagoev, Bulgaria; Nicholay Tonchev, Bulgaria; Hassan Chamati, Bulgaria; Marin Gospodinov, Bulgaria; Peter Rafailov, Bulgaria; Emil Vlakhov, Bulgaria; Kostadinka Gesheva, Bulgaria; Anna Szekeres, Bulgaria; Diana Nesheva, Bulgaria; Albena Paskaleva, Bulgaria; Tatyana Ivanova, Bulgaria; Alexander Dreischuh, Bulgaria; Evgenia Valcheva, Bulgaria; Miglena Nikolaeva-Dimitrova, Bulgaria; Sanka Gateva, Bulgaria; Frank Hamelmann, Germany; Nicola Scaramuzza, Italy; G.M.W. Kroesen, Netherlands; Jan van Dijk Netherlands; Andrzej Szewczyk, Poland; Henryk Szymczak, Poland; Krzistof Rogacki, Poland; Ion Mihailescu, Romania; Claes-Goran Granqvist, Sweden; Mikael Jonsson, Sweden; Andrew Livingston, UK; Ludmila Peeva, UK

  15. CTSA Consortium Consensus Scientific Review Committee (SRC) Working Group Report on the SRC Processes

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.; Califf, Robert M.; Carter, Robert; Cooper, Dan M.; Davis, Jonathan; Ford, Daniel E.; Galassetti, Pietro; Guay‐Woodford, Lisa; Huggins, Gordon S.; Kasper, Amanda; Kieburtz, Karl; Kirby, Aaron; Klein, Andreas K.; Kline, Joel; O’ Neill, Robert T.; Rape, Marie; Reichgott, Douglas J.; Rojevsky, Svetlana; Rosenthal, Gary E.; Rubinstein, Eric P.; Shepherd, Amy; Stacy, Mark; Terrin, Norma; Wallace, Mark; Welch, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human research projects must have a scientifically valid study design, analytic plan, and be operationally feasible in order to be successfully completed and thus to have translational impact. To ensure this, institutions that conduct clinical research should have a scientific review process prior to submission to the Institutional Review Committee (IRB). This paper reports the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium Scientific Review Committee (SRC) Consensus Working Group's proposed framework for a SRC process. Recommendations are provided for institutional support and roles of CTSAs, multisite research, criteria for selection of protocols that should be reviewed, roles of committee members, application process, and committee process. Additionally, to support the SCR process effectively, and to ensure efficiency, the Working Group recommends information technology infrastructures and evaluation metrics to determine outcomes are provided. PMID:26184433

  16. Volcanic hazard impacts to critical infrastructure: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; Wilson, T. M.; Deligne, N. I.; Cole, J. W.

    2014-10-01

    Effective natural hazard risk assessment requires the characterisation of both hazards and vulnerabilities of exposed elements. Volcanic hazard assessment is at an advanced state and is a considerable focus of volcanic scientific inquiry, whereas comprehensive vulnerability assessment is lacking. Cataloguing and analysing volcanic impacts provide insight on likely societal and physical vulnerabilities during future eruptions. This paper reviews documented disruption and physical damage of critical infrastructure elements resulting from four volcanic hazards (tephra fall, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows and lahars) of eruptions in the last 100 years. We define critical infrastructure as including energy sector infrastructure, water supply and wastewater networks, transportation routes, communications, and critical components. Common trends of impacts and vulnerabilities are summarised, which can be used to assess and reduce volcanic risk for future eruptions. In general, tephra falls cause disruption to these infrastructure sectors, reducing their functionality, whilst flow hazards (pyroclastic density currents, lava flows and lahars) are more destructive causing considerable permanent damage. Volcanic risk assessment should include quantification of vulnerabilities and we challenge the volcanology community to address this through the implementation of a standardised vulnerability assessment methodology and the development and use of fragility functions, as has been successfully implemented in other natural hazard fields.

  17. Interoperability and security in wireless body area network infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Warren, Steve; Lebak, Jeffrey; Yao, Jianchu; Creekmore, Jonathan; Milenkovic, Aleksandar; Jovanov, Emil

    2005-01-01

    Wireless body area networks (WBANs) and their supporting information infrastructures offer unprecedented opportunities to monitor state of health without constraining the activities of a wearer. These mobile point-of-care systems are now realizable due to the convergence of technologies such as low-power wireless communication standards, plug-and-play device buses, off-the-shelf development kits for low-power microcontrollers, handheld computers, electronic medical records, and the Internet. To increase acceptance of personal monitoring technology while lowering equipment cost, advances must be made in interoperability (at both the system and device levels) and security. This paper presents an overview of WBAN infrastructure work in these areas currently underway in the Medical Component Design Laboratory at Kansas State University (KSU) and at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). KSU efforts include the development of wearable health status monitoring systems that utilize ISO/IEEE 11073, Bluetooth, Health Level 7, and OpenEMed. WBAN efforts at UAH include the development of wearable activity and health monitors that incorporate ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor platforms with hardware-level encryption and the TinyOS development environment. WBAN infrastructures are complex, requiring many functional support elements. To realize these infrastructures through collaborative efforts, organizations such as KSU and UAH must define and utilize standard interfaces, nomenclature, and security approaches.

  18. 77 FR 13131 - Advisory Committees; Filing of Closed Meeting Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Research Allergenic Products Advisory Committee Blood Products Advisory Committee Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee Center for...

  19. A modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures in multi-hazard environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Dean A.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Prince, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Currently, much of protection planning is conducted separately for each infrastructure and hazard. Limited funding requires a balance of expenditures between terrorism and natural hazards based on potential impacts. This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project that created a modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures focused on multiple hazards, including terrorism. To develop this framework, three modeling elements were integrated: natural hazards, terrorism, and interdependent infrastructures. For natural hazards, a methodology was created for specifying events consistent with regional hazards. For terrorism, we modeled the terrorists actions based on assumptions regarding their knowledge, goals, and target identification strategy. For infrastructures, we focused on predicting post-event performance due to specific terrorist attacks and natural hazard events, tempered by appropriate infrastructure investments. We demonstrate the utility of this framework with various examples, including protection of electric power, roadway, and hospital networks.

  20. Approaches for assessment of vulnerability of critical infrastructures to weather-related hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsvig, Unni; Uzielli, Marco; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Critical infrastructures are essential components for the modern society to maintain its function, and malfunctioning of one of the critical infrastructure systems may have far-reaching consequences. Climate changes may lead to increase in frequency and intensity of weather-related hazards, creating challenges for the infrastructures. This paper outlines approaches to assess vulnerability posed by weather-related hazards to infrastructures. The approaches assess factors that affect the probability of a malfunctioning of the infrastructure should a weather-related threat occur, as well factors that affect the societal consequences of the infrastructure malfunctioning. Even if vulnerability factors are normally very infrastructure specific and hazard dependent, generic factors could be defined and analyzed. For the vulnerability and resilience of the infrastructure, such factors include e.g. robustness, buffer capacity, protection, quality, age, adaptability and transparency. For the vulnerability of the society in relation to the infrastructure, such factors include e.g. redundancy, substitutes and cascading effects. A semi-quantitative, indicator-based approach is proposed, providing schemes for ranking of the most important vulnerability indicators relevant for weather-related hazards on a relative scale. The application of the indicators in a semi-quantitative risk assessment is also demonstrated. In addition, a quantitative vulnerability model is proposed in terms of vulnerability (representing degree of loss) as a function of intensity, which is adaptable to different types of degree of loss (e.g. fraction of infrastructure users that lose their service, fraction of repair costs to full reconstruction costs). The vulnerability model can be calibrated with empirical data using deterministic calibration or a variety of probabilistic calibration approaches to account for the uncertainties within the model. The research leading to these results has received funding

  1. The National Information Infrastructure: Agenda for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC. Information Infrastructure Task Force.

    The National Information Infrastructure (NII) is planned as a web of communications networks, computers, databases, and consumer electronics that will put vast amounts of information at the users' fingertips. Private sector firms are beginning to develop this infrastructure, but essential roles remain for the Federal Government. The National…

  2. USEPA ORD Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes research that is being conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) Research Program, which will help U.S. water infrastructure to be more effectively and sustainably managed. The AWI research program see...

  3. 78 FR 11737 - Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Cybersecurity #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 33 / Tuesday... of February 12, 2013 Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity By the authority vested in me as... improved cybersecurity. The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow and represents one...

  4. The Other Infrastructure: Distance Education's Digital Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettcher, Judith V.; Kumar, M. S. Vijay

    2000-01-01

    Suggests a new infrastructure--the digital plant--for supporting flexible Web campus environments. Describes four categories which make up the infrastructure: personal communication tools and applications; network of networks for the Web campus; dedicated servers and software applications; software applications and services from external…

  5. Cyber Security and Critical Energy Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Onyeji, Ijeoma; Bazilian, Morgan; Bronk, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Both the number and security implications of sophisticated cyber attacks on companies providing critical energy infrastructures are increasing. As power networks and, to a certain extent, oil and gas infrastructure both upstream and downstream, are becoming increasingly integrated with information communication technology systems, they are growing more susceptible to cyber attacks.

  6. 31 CFR 800.208 - Critical infrastructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Critical infrastructure. 800.208 Section 800.208 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE..., AND TAKEOVERS BY FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.208 Critical infrastructure. The term...

  7. Critical Infrastructure Rebuild Prioritization using Simulation Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    the water and allowing the water to flow to the turbine. ( SEDA Renewable Energy Web site) 24 2.4.3 Oil infrastructure In the Wikipedia...Critical Infrastructure Protection Workshop, Frankfurt Germany, September 2003 SEDA Renewable Energy & Cogeneration, “Hydro Power,” September 2006

  8. 78 FR 65675 - National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... comments after the presentation of the report from the Regional Resilience Working Group, and after the... security and resilience of the Nation's critical infrastructure sectors. The NIAC will meet to discuss issues relevant to the critical infrastructure security and resilience as directed by the President....

  9. Institutional Support Infrastructure for Online Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Ray

    2001-01-01

    Asserting that providing infrastructure to support online classes is analogous to building a new physical campus adjacent to the pre-existing one, describes the support requirements of online faculty, information technology networks, students, and administrators. Says that if these infrastructure considerations are not addressed near the beginning…

  10. 77 FR 19300 - National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... SECURITY National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 1310 N. Courthouse Road, Suite 300, Virginia Room, Arlington, VA 22201. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The NIAC will...

  11. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-15

    set up groups within the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a...dialogue between government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s critical...16 Policy Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Government — Sector Coordination

  12. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-15

    Directive set up groups within the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a...dialogue between government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s...16 Policy Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Government — Sector

  13. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-02

    set up groups within the federal government to develop and implement plans that would protect government -operated infrastructures and called for a...dialogue between government and the private sector to develop a National Infrastructure Assurance Plan that would protect all of the nation’s critical...Policy Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Government — Sector Coordination

  14. Upgrading Technology Infrastructure in California's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Niu; Murphy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As California schools move into online testing and online learning, an adequate technology infrastructure is no longer an option, but a necessity. To fully benefit from digital learning, schools will require a comprehensive technology infrastructure that can support a range of administrative and instructional tools. An earlier PPIC report found…

  15. South Africa's School Infrastructure Performance Indicator System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibberd, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    While some South African schools have excellent infrastructure, others lack basic services such as water and sanitation. This article describes the school infrastructure performance indicator system (SIPIS) in South Africa. The project offers an approach that can address both the urgent provision of basic services as well as support the…

  16. 76 FR 58330 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... sixteenth Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Radio Communications... Communications Commission Headquarters Building, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554. Two...

  17. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-26

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  18. 78 FR 39289 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission... enhance diversity in the telecommunications and related industries. In particular, the Committee...

  19. 77 FR 12306 - Notice of Committee Meetings, President's Committee for People With Intellectual Disabilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Committee for People With Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID) AGENCY: President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Committee Meetings. DATES: Friday, April 6, 2012, from 1... Taylor Roach, Senior Advisor, President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities,...

  20. 76 FR 41274 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... also advises the Under Secretary on policies, management processes, and organizational constructs as... SECURITY Committee Name: Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal advisory committee charter renewal. SUMMARY: The Secretary...