Science.gov

Sample records for inherited antithrombin deficiency

  1. Molecular basis of inherited antithrombin deficiency in Portuguese families: identification of genetic alterations and screening for additional thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    David, Dezsö; Ribeiro, Sofia; Ferrão, Lénia; Gago, Teresa; Crespo, Francisco

    2004-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), the most important coagulation serine proteases inhibitor, plays an important role in maintaining the hemostatic balance. Inherited AT deficiency, mainly characterized by predisposition to recurrent venous thromboembolism, is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this study, we analyzed the underlying genetic alterations in 12 unrelated Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency. At the same time, the modulating effect of the FV Leiden mutation, PT 20210A, PAI-1 4G, and MTHFR 677T allelic variants, on the thrombotic risk of AT deficient patients was also evaluated. Three novel frameshift alterations, a 4-bp deletion in exon 4 and two 1-bp insertions in exon 6, were identified in six unrelated type I AT deficient families. A novel missense mutation in exon 3a, which changes the highly conserved F147 residue, and a novel splice site mutation in the invariant acceptor AG dinucleotide of intron 2 were also identified in unrelated type I AT deficient families. In addition to these, two previously reported missense mutations changing the AT reactive site bond (R393-S394) and leading to type II-RS deficiency, and a previously reported cryptic splice site mutation (IVS4-14G-->A), were also identified. In these families, increased thrombotic risk associated with co-inheritance of the FV Leiden mutation and of the PAI-1 4G variant was also observed. In conclusion, we present the first data regarding the underlying genetic alterations in Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency, and confirm that the FV Leiden mutation and probably the PAI-1 4G variant represent additional thrombotic risk factors in these families.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  3. Issues in the Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kenneth A; Nguyen-Cao, Tam M; Spears, Jeffrey B

    2016-09-01

    To review insights gained in the past several years about hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency and to outline approaches to the management of patients with AT deficiency in the acute and chronic settings. An extensive literature search of Scopus (January 2008-April 2016) was performed for the terms congenital antithrombin deficiency, inherited antithrombin deficiency, or hereditary antithrombin deficiency Additional references were identified by reviewing literature citations. All relevant English-language case reports, reviews, clinical studies, meeting abstracts, and book chapters assessing hereditary AT deficiency were included. AT deficiency significantly increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The risk of VTE is particularly high during pregnancy, the postpartum period, and following major surgery. Effective clinical management includes determination of the appropriate type and duration of antithrombotic therapy (ie, AT replacement for acute situations) while minimizing the risk of bleeding. For persons newly diagnosed with AT deficiency, age, lifestyle, concurrent medical conditions, family history, and personal treatment preferences can be used to individualize patient management. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with hormonal therapy, pregnancy, surgical procedures, and immobility, which further increase the risk of VTE in patients with AT deficiency. AT deficiency poses the highest risk for VTE among the hereditary thrombophilias, often requiring long-term anticoagulation. Undertaking an evaluation for hereditary thrombophilia is controversial; however, a diagnosis of VTE in association with AT deficiency can have management implications. An important treatment option for patients with this disorder in high-risk situations is AT concentrate. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. [Antithrombin resistance: a new mechanism of inherited thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito; Takagi, Akira; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a multifactorial disease resulting from complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors. To date, numerous genetic defects have been found in families with hereditary thrombophilia, but there may still be many undiscovered causative gene mutations. We investigated a possible causative gene defect in a large Japanese family with inherited thrombophilia, and found a novel missense mutation in the prothrombin gene (p.Arg596Leu) resulting in a variant prothrombin (prothrombin Yukuhashi). The mutant prothrombin had moderately lower activity than wild type prothrombin in clotting assays, but formation of the thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex was substantially impaired resulting in prolonged thrombin activity. A thrombin generation assay revealed that the peak activity of the mutant prothrombin was fairly low, but its inactivation was extremely slow in reconstituted plasma. The Leu596 substitution caused a gain-of-function mutation in the prothrombin gene, resulting in resistance to antithrombin and susceptibility to thrombosis. We also showed the effects of the prothrombin Yukuhashi mutation on the thrombomodulin-protein C anticoagulation system, recent development of a laboratory test detecting antithrombin resistance in plasma, and another antithrombin resistant mutation found in other thrombophilia families.

  5. Antithrombin alfa in hereditary antithrombin deficient patients: A phase 3 study of prophylactic intravenous administration in high risk situations.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas; Tait, R Campbell; Shaffer, Don W; Baudo, Francesco; Boneu, Bernard; Dempfle, Carl Erik; Horellou, Marie Helene; Klamroth, Robert; Lazarchick, John; Mumford, Andrew D; Schulman, Sam; Shiach, Caroline; Bonfiglio, Laura J; Frieling, Johan T M; Conard, Jacqueline; von Depka, Mario

    2008-03-01

    During surgery and childbirth, patients with hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency are at high risk for thrombosis, and heparin prophylaxis may not be sufficiently efficacious. In these patients, exogenous AT may be used in association with heparin. A recombinant human AT (generic name: antithrombin alfa) has been developed. This multi-center study assessed the efficacy and safety of prophylactic intravenous administration of antithrombin alfa to hereditary AT deficient patients in high risk situations, including elective surgery, childbirth, or cesarean section. Antithrombin alfa was administered prior to and during the high risk period for restoration and maintenance of AT activity at 100% of normal. Heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and/or vitamin K antagonists were used according to standard of care. The primary efficacy endpoint was the incidence of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from baseline up to day 30 post dosing as assessed by independent central review of duplex ultrasonograms and/or venograms. Safety was assessed based on adverse events (AEs) and laboratory evaluations. Five surgical and nine obstetrical hereditary AT deficiency patients received antithrombin alfa for a mean period of seven days. No clinically overt DVT occurred. Central review of ultrasonograms identified signs of acute DVT in two out of 13 evaluable patients. No antithrombin alfa-related AEs were reported. No patient developed anti-antithrombin alfa antibodies. In conclusion, this study suggests that antithrombin alfa is a safe and effective alternative to human plasma-derived AT for treating hereditary AT deficiency patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  6. Antithrombin deficiency in three Japanese families: one novel and two reported point mutations in the antithrombin gene.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Keiko; Morishita, Eriko; Karato, Megumi; Kadono, Tadaaki; Sekiya, Akiko; Goto, Yukie; Sato, Tomomi; Nomoto, Haruka; Omi, Wataru; Tsuzura, Sachie; Imai, Hidenori; Asakura, Hidesaku; Ohtake, Shigeki; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-08-01

    Inherited antithrombin (AT) deficiency is associated with a predisposition to familial venous thromboembolic disease. We analyzed the AT gene in three unrelated patients with an AT deficiency who developed thrombosis. We analyzed the SERPINC1 gene in three patients. Additionally, we expressed the three mutants in the COS-1 cells and compared their secretion rates and levels of AT activity with those of the wild-type (WT). We identified three distinct heterozygous mutations of c.2534C>T: p.56Arginine → Cysteine (R56C), c.13398C>A: p.459Alanine → Aspartic acid (A459D) and c.2703C>G: p.112 Proline → Arginine (P112R). In the in vitro expression experiments, the AT antigen levels in the conditioned media (CM) of the R56C mutant were nearly equal to those of WT. In contrast, the AT antigen levels in the CM of the A459D and P112R mutants were significantly decreased. The AT activity of R56C was decreased in association with a shorter incubation time in a FXa inhibition assay and a thrombin inhibition-based activity test. However, the AT activity of R56C was comparable to that of WT when the incubation time was increased. We concluded that the R56C mutant is responsible for type II HBS deficiency. We considered that the A459D and P112R mutants can be classified as belonging to the type I AT deficiency. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Prevention, management and extent of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rogenhofer, Nina; Bohlmann, Michael K; Beuter-Winkler, Petra; Würfel, Wolfgang; Rank, Andreas; Thaler, Christian J; Toth, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is a rare hereditary thrombophilia with a mean prevalence of 0.02 % in the general population, associated with a more than ten-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Within this multicenter retrospective clinical analysis, female patients with inherited AT deficiency were evaluated concerning the type of inheritance and extent of AT deficiency, medical treatment during pregnancy and postpartally, VTE risk as well as maternal and neonatal outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with SPPS for Windows (19.0). A total of 18 pregnancies in 7 patients were evaluated, including 11 healthy newborns ≥37th gestational weeks (gw), one small for gestational age premature infant (25th gw), two late-pregnancy losses (21st and 28th gw) and four early miscarriages. Despite low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) administration, three VTE occurred during pregnancy and one postpartally. Several adverse pregnancy outcomes occurred including fetal and neonatal death, as well as severe maternal neurologic disorders occurred. Patients with substitution of AT during pregnancy in addition to LMWH showed the best maternal and neonatal outcome. Close monitoring with appropriate anticoagulant treatment including surveillance of AT levels might help to optimize maternal and fetal outcome in patients with hereditary AT deficiency.

  8. Complete antithrombin deficiency in mice results in embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakayama, Yukiko; Takagi, Akira; Suzuki, Misao; Takeda, Naoki; Ito, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Koji; Matsushita, Tadashi; Kusugami, Kazuo; Muramatsu, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko

    2000-01-01

    Antithrombin is a plasma protease inhibitor that inhibits thrombin and contributes to the maintenance of blood fluidity. Using targeted gene disruption, we investigated the role of antithrombin in embryogenesis. Mating mice heterozygous for antithrombin gene (ATIII) disruption, ATIII+/–, yielded the expected Mendelian distribution of genotypes until 14.5 gestational days (gd). However, approximately 70% of the ATIII–/– embryos at 15.5 gd and 100% at 16.5 gd had died and showed extensive subcutaneous hemorrhage. Histological examination of those embryos revealed extensive fibrin(ogen) deposition in the myocardium and liver, but not in the brain or lung. Furthermore, no apparent fibrin(ogen) deposition was detected in the extensive hemorrhagic region, suggesting that fibrinogen might be decreased due to consumptive coagulopathy and/or liver dysfunction. These findings suggest that antithrombin is essential for embryonic survival and that it plays an important role in regulation of blood coagulation in the myocardium and liver. PMID:11018075

  9. Alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels are high in adult patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, A; Chantarangkul, V; De Stefano, V; Mannucci, P

    2000-04-15

    Antithrombin is responsible for about 80% of the progressive inhibitory activity of thrombin in human plasma. The role of other protease inhibitors known to inhibit thrombin is not completely clarified. However, their contribution may become relevant when antithrombin is low. We elected to investigate adult patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency to assess the concentration of other naturally occurring thrombin inhibitors such as alpha(2)-macroglobulin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, heparin cofactor II, and C(1)-inhibitor. The study included 59 patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency with and without a previous history of thrombosis, together with an equal number of control subjects matched for age and sex. Statistically significant differences (patients vs. controls) were observed only for alpha(2)-macroglobulin (i.e., 120 vs. 102%, p<0.01). Further analysis of antithrombin-deficient carriers with and without a past history of thrombosis showed that alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels were higher than the 90th percentile of control distribution more often in asymptomatic than symptomatic men (odds ratio=0.04; confidence interval=0.003-0.60), but not in women (odds ratio=2.14; confidence interval=0.35-13.1). In conclusion, results from this cross sectional study showed that alpha(2)-macroglobulin levels were high in patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency. Furthermore, the high levels were found more often in asymptomatic than symptomatic men. Whether this increase provides protection against thrombosis should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  10. Antithrombin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency. (For more about excessive clotting (such as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and antithrombin deficiency, see the " ... affected person may bleed and/or clot. DVT (deep vein thrombosis – a blood clot usually in a ...

  11. Hypoglycosylation is a common finding in antithrombin deficiency in the absence of a SERPINC1 gene defect.

    PubMed

    de la Morena-Barrio, M E; Martínez-Martínez, I; de Cos, C; Wypasek, E; Roldán, V; Undas, A; van Scherpenzeel, M; Lefeber, D J; Toderici, M; Sevivas, T; España, F; Jaeken, J; Corral, J; Vicente, V

    2016-08-01

    Essentials We investigated the molecular base of antithrombin deficiency in cases without SERPINC1 defects. 27% of cases presented hypoglycosylation, transient in 62% and not restricted to antithrombin. Variations in genes involved in N-glycosylation underline this phenotype. These results support a new form of thrombophilia. Click here to listen to Dr Huntington's perspective on thrombin inhibition by the serpins Background Since the discovery of antithrombin deficiency, 50 years ago, few new thrombophilic defects have been identified, all with weaker risk of thrombosis than antithrombin deficiency. Objective To identify new thrombophilic mechanisms. Patients/methods We studied 30 patients with antithrombin deficiency but no defects in the gene encoding this key anticoagulant (SERPINC1). Results A high proportion of these patients (8/30: 27%) had increased hypoglycosylated forms of antithrombin. All N-glycoproteins tested in these patients (α1-antitrypsin, FXI and transferrin) had electrophoretic, HPLC and Q-TOF patterns indistinguishable from those of the congenital disorders of glycosylation (rare recessive multisystem disorders). However, all except one had no mental disability. Moreover, intermittent antithrombin deficiency and hypoglycosylation was recorded in five out of these eight patients, all associated with moderate alcohol intake. Genetic analysis, including whole exome sequencing, revealed mutations in different genes involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. Conclusions Our study provides substantial and novel mechanistic insights into two disease processes, with potential implications for diagnosis and clinical care. An aberrant N-glycosylation causing a recessive or transient antithrombin deficiency is a new form of thrombophilia. Our data suggest that congenital disorders of glycosylation are probably underestimated, especially in cases with thrombosis as the main or only clinical manifestation. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and

  12. Familial antithrombin III deficiency in a Malay patient with massive thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wan Ab Rahman, W S; Abdullah, W Z; Hassan, M N; Hussin, A; Zulkafli, Z; Haron, J

    2017-08-01

    Patients with low antithrombin III (AT III) has increased risk for arteriovenous thromboembolic (TE) disease. We report a 28-year-old Malay lady who presented with spontaneous right calf pain and swelling of one week duration. She was on oral contraceptive pills and had a history of travelling for a long distance prior to the presentation. Her brother who was diagnosed with AT III deficiency had arterial thrombosis at a young age. She was diagnosed as having right popliteal vein thrombosis by ultrasound and treated with subcutaneous fondaparinux. While on treatment, she developed massive bilateral pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombophilia study showed reduced AT III activity (38μl/dl) and normal results for protein C, protein S, activated protein C resistance and lupus anticoagulant assays. This patient has heterozygous AT III deficiency added with significant acquired factors responsible for the TE events. Those with AT III deficiency may have resistance to heparin therapy and require higher doses of heparin.

  13. Management of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency and Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lydia; Lim, Wendy; Crowther, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hereditary antithrombin deficiency is a thrombogenic disorder associated with a 50–90% lifetime risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is increased during pregnancy and the puerperium in these patients. We present a case of a woman with antithrombin (AT) deficiency who presented with a VTE despite therapeutic low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Though the pregnancy was deemed unviable, further maternal complications were mitigated through the combined use of therapeutic anticoagulation and plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate infusions to normalize her functional antithrombin levels. Methods. A review of the literature was conducted for studies on prophylaxis and management of VTE in pregnant patients with hereditary AT deficiency. The search involved a number of electronic databases, using combinations of keywords as described in the text. Only English language studies between 1946 and 2015 were included. Conclusion. Antithrombin concentrate is indicated in pregnant women with hereditary AT deficiency who develop VTE despite being on therapeutic dose anticoagulation. Expert opinion suggests AT concentrate should be used concomitantly with therapeutic dose anticoagulation. However, further high-quality studies on the dose and duration of treatment in the postpartum period are required. Use of AT concentrate for prophylaxis is controversial and should be based on individual VTE risk stratification. PMID:28168066

  14. Deficiencies of Proteins C, S and Antithrombin and Activated Protein C Resistance–Their Involvement in the Occurrence of Arterial Thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    Deficiencies of natural anticoagulants protein C, protein S, antithrombin and activated protein C resistance are components of inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia was defined as a genetically determined tendency towards venous thromboembolism which characteristically occurs in young age (before 40 to 45 years) without apparent causes and tend to recur. In the recent years, there has been a lot of debate about the implication of these defects in arterial thromboses (peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction). The screening for thrombophilia is recommended for young patients with spontaneous thromboses, arterial infarctions, family history of thromboses, personal history of recurrent abortions, with thrombosis of venous dural sinuses or strokes or myocardial infarctions, in patients with venous thrombosis at unusual sites, because the diagnosis of such a disease leads to a treatment that is lifesaving [1,2]. PMID:21254740

  15. Acquired deficiency and urinary excretion of antithrombin III in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Paule, P; Toohey, J; Hung, E; Alikhani, S; Darwish, R; Pahl, M V

    1984-09-01

    The published data concerning changes of antithrombin III (ATIII) in nephrotic syndrome (NS) are contradictory. While increased ATIII activity has been reported by some investigators, decreased concentration has been shown by others and normal values by yet another group of authors. We determined plasma and urine concentrations of ATIII in a group of 20 patients with NS using an immunologic assay. In addition, plasma ATIII activity was determined. The results were compared with those obtained in a group of normal volunteers. Plasma concentration and activity of ATIII were both greatly reduced in the patients with NS. In addition, substantial quantities of ATIII were recovered in the urine of all tested patients. The present study, therefore, substantiates the low plasma concentrations of ATIII and its urinary losses in NS. In addition, a parallel reduction in plasma ATIII activity is demonstrated providing functional evidence of acquired ATIII deficiency in this condition.

  16. Inherited factor V deficient neonate with galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan; Sharifi-Hoseini, Mohamad Reza; Shahroudian, Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Reporting a case of inherited factor V deficiency and galactosemia. A neonate was admitted with hematoma, jaundice, splenomegaly, diarrhea, anemia, abdominal ascites and bilateral cataracts that diagnosis of galactosaemia and factor V deficiency was established. Coinheritance of both coagulation disorder and metabolic disorder is very rare episode that was identified in a neonate. Our case indicates that in mild bleeding episodes of neonates that imitate of coagulation disorders should be considered promptly by pediatricians. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency. PMID:27708219

  18. A small deletion in SERPINC1 causes type I antithrombin deficiency by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Zhou; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Yu; Liu, Jianren

    2016-11-22

    Antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder, and identification of mutation AT variants would improve our understanding of the anticoagulant function of this serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a Chinese family with deep vein thrombosis, and identified a new small deletion that eliminates four amino acids (INEL) from exon 4 of SERPINC1 gene. This causes type I AT deficiency by enhancing the intracellular retention of this protein. AT retention leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which further inhibits AT release. In addition, ER stress activates ER-associated degradation, which promotes AT degradation. Suppression of ER stress enhanced the secretion of AT, while inhibition of ER-associated degradation suppressed AT release. Thus, our study identified a new mutation (INEL deletion) causing type I AT deficiency, and uncovered a novel mechanism for AT retention through enhanced ER stress, which may provide an innovative approach for treating AT deficiency.

  19. Transient desialylation in combination with a novel antithrombin deficiency causing a severe and recurrent thrombosis despite anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Nuria; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Miñano, Antonia; López-Gálvez, Raquel; Toderici, Mara; Padilla, José; García-Avello, Ángel; Lozano, María Luisa; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    An in-depth focused study of specific cases of patients with recurrent thrombosis may help to identify novel circumstances, genetic and acquired factors contributing to the development of this disorder. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed and sequential analysis of samples from a patient suffering from early and recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis. We performed thrombophilic tests, biochemical, functional, genetic and glycomic analysis of antithrombin and other plasma proteins. The patient carried a new type I antithrombin mutation (p.Ile218del), whose structural relevance was verified in a recombinant model. Experiments with N-glycosidase F and neuraminidase suggested a nearly full desialylation of plasma proteins, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of transferrin glycoforms. However, partial desialylation and normal patterns were detected in samples collected at other time-points. Desialylation was noticeable after arterial events and was associated with low antithrombin activity, reduced platelet count and glomerular filtration rate. This is the first description of a global and transient desialylation of plasma proteins associated with thrombosis. The decrease in the strong electronegative charge of terminal glycans may modulate hemostatic protein-protein interactions, which in combination with a strong prothrombotic situation, such as antithrombin deficiency, could increase the risk of thrombosis. PMID:28303970

  20. Transient desialylation in combination with a novel antithrombin deficiency causing a severe and recurrent thrombosis despite anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Nuria; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Miñano, Antonia; López-Gálvez, Raquel; Toderici, Mara; Padilla, José; García-Avello, Ángel; Lozano, María Luisa; Lefeber, Dirk J; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente

    2017-03-17

    An in-depth focused study of specific cases of patients with recurrent thrombosis may help to identify novel circumstances, genetic and acquired factors contributing to the development of this disorder. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed and sequential analysis of samples from a patient suffering from early and recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis. We performed thrombophilic tests, biochemical, functional, genetic and glycomic analysis of antithrombin and other plasma proteins. The patient carried a new type I antithrombin mutation (p.Ile218del), whose structural relevance was verified in a recombinant model. Experiments with N-glycosidase F and neuraminidase suggested a nearly full desialylation of plasma proteins, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of transferrin glycoforms. However, partial desialylation and normal patterns were detected in samples collected at other time-points. Desialylation was noticeable after arterial events and was associated with low antithrombin activity, reduced platelet count and glomerular filtration rate. This is the first description of a global and transient desialylation of plasma proteins associated with thrombosis. The decrease in the strong electronegative charge of terminal glycans may modulate hemostatic protein-protein interactions, which in combination with a strong prothrombotic situation, such as antithrombin deficiency, could increase the risk of thrombosis.

  1. Isolated pregnancy-induced anti-thrombin deficiency in a woman with twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Kosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    A woman with twin pregnancy had a gradual decline in anti-thrombin (AT) activity from 72% at gestational week (GW) 29(-3/7) , to 53% at GW31(-2/7) , and to 41% at GW32(-2/7) , at which time hypertension (148/90 mmHg) and proteinuria (protein-to-creatinine ratio [P/Cr], 0.79 mg/mg) developed in the presence of normal platelet count (159 × 10(9) /L) and serum aspartate aminotransferase/lactate dehydrogenase (22/164 IU/L). AT product was given three times to maintain AT activity >50% and blood pressure was maintained below 155/95 mmHg with no treatment, but generalized edema with a weekly weight gain of 4.9 kg and increased proteinuria (to P/Cr, 7.6 mg/mg) required cesarean section at GW33(-3/7) . This case highlights the occurrence of pregnancy-induced AT deficiency alone in the absence of any other abnormality, including hypertension, proteinuria, or thrombocytopenia. Measurement of AT activity was considered helpful for determination of the appropriate time for delivery in this patient.

  2. Case Report of Severe Antithrombin Deficiency During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Therapeutic Plasma Exchange for Double Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brittney; Mazzeffi, Michael A; Sanchez, Pablo G; Pham, Si M; Kon, Zachary; Tanaka, Kenichi A

    2017-01-01

    Acquired antithrombin (AT) deficiency is not uncommon in cardiothoracic surgery because of heparin exposure and dilutional or consumptive losses. We report a case of acquired AT deficiency and resultant multiple deep vein thrombosis in a patient with pulmonary fibrosis on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation who underwent double lung transplantation with intraoperative therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) as a part of an immunomodulation regimen for allosensitization. Preoperative heparin anticoagulation resulted in AT deficiency, which was further exacerbated by TPE using albumin. The recovery of AT activity after TPE with plasma was incomplete, and postoperative deficiencies of AT and other anticoagulants might have contributed to deep vein thromboses. The limitation of thromboelastometry in detecting AT deficiency was evident.

  3. Deep Dermatophytosis and Inherited CARD9 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Quentin B.; Liu, Luyan; Cypowyj, Sophie; Prando, Carolina; Migaud, Mélanie; Taibi, Lynda; Ammar-Khodja, Aomar; Stambouli, Omar Boudghene; Guellil, Boumediene; Jacobs, Frederique; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Schepers, Kinda; del Marmol, Véronique; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Larif, Molka; Bachelez, Hervé; Michel, Laurence; Lefranc, Gérard; Hay, Rod; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Fraitag, Sylvie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Boudia, Merad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep dermatophytosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection caused by dermatophytes. It is characterized by extensive dermal and subcutaneous tissue invasion and by frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and, occasionally, the central nervous system. The condition is different from common superficial dermatophyte infection and has been reported in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Patients are mostly from North African, consanguineous, multiplex families, which strongly suggests a mendelian genetic cause. METHODS We studied the clinical features of deep dermatophytosis in 17 patients with no known immunodeficiency from eight unrelated Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan families. Because CARD9 (caspase recruitment domain–containing protein 9) deficiency has been reported in an Iranian family with invasive fungal infections, we also sequenced CARD9 in the patients. RESULTS Four patients died, at 28, 29, 37, and 39 years of age, with clinically active deep dermatophytosis. No other severe infections, fungal or otherwise, were reported in the surviving patients, who ranged in age from 37 to 75 years. The 15 Algerian and Tunisian patients, from seven unrelated families, had a homozygous Q289X CARD9 allele, due to a founder effect. The 2 Moroccan siblings were homozygous for the R101C CARD9 allele. Both alleles are rare deleterious variants. The familial segregation of these alleles was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance and complete clinical penetrance. CONCLUSIONS All the patients with deep dermatophytosis had autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency. Deep dermatophytosis appears to be an important clinical manifestation of CARD9 deficiency. (Funded by Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and others.) PMID:24131138

  4. Deep dermatophytosis and inherited CARD9 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lanternier, Fanny; Pathan, Saad; Vincent, Quentin B; Liu, Luyan; Cypowyj, Sophie; Prando, Carolina; Migaud, Mélanie; Taibi, Lynda; Ammar-Khodja, Aomar; Stambouli, Omar Boudghene; Guellil, Boumediene; Jacobs, Frederique; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Schepers, Kinda; Del Marmol, Véronique; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Larif, Molka; Bachelez, Hervé; Michel, Laurence; Lefranc, Gérard; Hay, Rod; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Fraitag, Sylvie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Boudia, Merad; Abel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Grimbacher, Bodo; Puel, Anne

    2013-10-31

    Deep dermatophytosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection caused by dermatophytes. It is characterized by extensive dermal and subcutaneous tissue invasion and by frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and, occasionally, the central nervous system. The condition is different from common superficial dermatophyte infection and has been reported in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Patients are mostly from North African, consanguineous, multiplex families, which strongly suggests a mendelian genetic cause. We studied the clinical features of deep dermatophytosis in 17 patients with no known immunodeficiency from eight unrelated Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan families. Because CARD9 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9) deficiency has been reported in an Iranian family with invasive fungal infections, we also sequenced CARD9 in the patients. Four patients died, at 28, 29, 37, and 39 years of age, with clinically active deep dermatophytosis. No other severe infections, fungal or otherwise, were reported in the surviving patients, who ranged in age from 37 to 75 years. The 15 Algerian and Tunisian patients, from seven unrelated families, had a homozygous Q289X CARD9 allele, due to a founder effect. The 2 Moroccan siblings were homozygous for the R101C CARD9 allele. Both alleles are rare deleterious variants. The familial segregation of these alleles was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance and complete clinical penetrance. All the patients with deep dermatophytosis had autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency. Deep dermatophytosis appears to be an important clinical manifestation of CARD9 deficiency. (Funded by Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and others.).

  5. Recessive inheritance of the adult type of intestinal lactase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lisker, R; Gonzalez, B; Daltabuit, M

    1975-01-01

    In order to investigate the genetic control of the adult type of intestinal lactase deficiency, 61 families with 177 children over 6 years of age were investigated. The results strongly suggest that this deficiency is inherited as a simple Mendelian recessive trait. PMID:1163538

  6. Inherited IL-12p40 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Samarina, Arina; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Cobat, Aurelie; Picard, Capucine; AlSum, Zobaida; Al-Jumaah, Suliman; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Frayha, Husn; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Adimi, Parisa; Feinberg, Jacqueline; de Suremain, Maylis; Jannière, Lucile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Mansouri, Nahal; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Bloorsaz, Mohamad Reza; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Elloumi-Zghal, Houda; Chemli, Jalel; Bouguila, Jihene; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Alaki, Emadia; AlFawaz, Tariq S.; Al Idrissi, Eman; ElGhazali, Gehad; Pollard, Andrew J.; Murugasu, Belinda; Wah Lee, Bee; Halwani, Rabih; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed; Al Shehri, Mohammed A.; Al-Zahrani, Mofareh; Bin-Hussain, Ibrahim; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Parvaneh, Nima; Abel, Laurent; Mansouri, Davood; Barbouche, Ridha; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive interleukin (IL)-12 p40 (IL-12p40) deficiency is a rare genetic etiology of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). We report the genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds originating from 5 countries (India, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia). There are only 9 different mutant alleles of the IL12B gene: 2 small insertions, 3 small deletions, 2 splice site mutations, and 1 large deletion, each causing a frameshift and leading to a premature stop codon, and 1 nonsense mutation. Four of these 9 variants are recurrent, affecting 25 of the 30 reported kindreds, due to founder effects in specific countries. All patients are homozygous and display complete IL-12p40 deficiency. As a result, the patients lack detectable IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 and have low levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The clinical features are characterized by childhood onset of bacille Calmette-Guérin (attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain) (BCG) and Salmonella infections, with recurrences of salmonellosis (36.4%) more common than recurrences of mycobacterial disease (25%). BCG vaccination led to BCG disease in 40 of the 41 patients vaccinated (97.5%). Multiple mycobacterial infections were rare, observed in only 3 patients, whereas the association of salmonellosis and mycobacteriosis was observed in 9 patients. A few other infections were diagnosed, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 3), nocardiosis (n = 2), and klebsiellosis (n = 1). IL-12p40 deficiency has a high but incomplete clinical penetrance, with 33.3% of genetically affected relatives of index cases showing no symptoms. However, the prognosis is poor, with mortality rates of up to 28.6%. Overall, the clinical phenotype of IL-12p40 deficiency closely resembles that of interleukin 12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) deficiency. In conclusion, IL-12p40 deficiency is more common than initially thought and should be considered worldwide in patients

  7. Purified radiolabeled antithrombin III metabolism in three families with hereditary AT III deficiency: application of a three-compartment model

    SciTech Connect

    Knot, E.A.; de Jong, E.; ten Cate, J.W.; Iburg, A.H.; Henny, C.P.; Bruin, T.; Stibbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human radioiodinated antithrombin III (125I-AT III) was used to study its metabolism in six members from three different families with a known hereditary AT III deficiency. Six healthy volunteers served as a control group. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) showed the purified AT III to be homogeneous. Amino acid analysis of the protein revealed a composition identical to a highly purified internal standard. The specific activity was 5.6 U/mg. Analysis of plasma radioactivity data was performed, using a three-compartment model. Neither plasma disappearance half-times nor fractional catabolic rate constants differed significantly between patients and control subjects. The mean absolute catabolic rate in the patient group was significantly lower than that of the control group at 2.57 +/- 0.44 and 4.46 +/- 0.80 mg/kg/day, respectively. In addition, the mean patient alpha 1-phase, flux ratio (k1,2 and k2,1) of the second compartment alpha 2-phase and influx (k3,1) of the third compartment were significantly reduced as compared with control values. It has been tentatively concluded that the observed reduction in the second compartment may be caused by a decrease in endothelial cell surface binding.

  8. Hemiconvulsion, hemiplegia, epilepsy syndrome and inherited protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mondal, R K; Chakravorty, D; Das, S

    2006-02-01

    A nine-year-old Nepalese girl developed hemiconvulsion, hemiplegia, epilepsy syndrome (HHE syndrome) after an episode of right-sided focal status epilepticus following acute gastroenteritis. She had left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infracts due to inherited protein S deficiency.

  9. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Nanda, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL. Review ...

  10. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  11. [Inherited colour vision deficiencies--from Dalton to molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Dragana; Cvetković, Dobrosav

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, great advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis of colour vision defects, as well as of the patterns of genetic variation in individuals with normal colour vision. Molecular genetic analyses have explained the diversity of types and degrees of severity in colour vision anomalies, their frequencies, pronounced individual variations in test results, etc. New techniques have even enabled the determination of John Dalton's real colour vision defect, 150 years after his death. Inherited colour vision deficiencies most often result from the mutations of genes that encode cone opsins. Cone opsin genes are linked to chromosomes 7 (the S or "blue" gene) and X (the L or "red" gene and the M or "green" gene). The L and M genes are located on the q arm of the X chromosome in a head-to-tail array, composed of 2 to 6 (typically 3) genes--a single L is followed by one or more M genes. Only the first two genes of the array are expressed and contribute to the colour vision phenotype. The high degree of homology (96%) between the L and M genes predisposes them to unequal recombination, leading to gene deletion or the formation of hybrid genes (comprising portions of both the L and M genes), explaining the majority of the common red-green colour vision deficiencies. The severity of any deficiency is influenced by the difference in spectral sensitivity between the opsins encoded by the first two genes of the array. A rare defect, S monochromacy, is caused either by the deletion of the regulatory region of the array or by mutations that inactivate the L and M genes. Most recent research concerns the molecular basis of complete achromatopsia, a rare disorder that involves the complete loss of all cone function. This is not caused by mutations in opsin genes, but in other genes that encode cone-specific proteins, e.g. channel proteins and transducin.

  12. Heterogeneity of the molecular lesions in inherited phosphofructokinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Vora, S; Davidson, M; Seaman, C; Miranda, A F; Noble, N A; Tanaka, K R; Frenkel, E P; Dimauro, S

    1983-01-01

    Human phosphofructokinase (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11) exists in tetrameric isozymic forms. Muscle and liver contain the homotetramers M4 and L4, whereas erythrocytes contain five isozymes composed of M (muscle) and L (liver) subunits, i.e., M4, M3L, M2L2, ML3, and L4. Inherited defects of erythrocyte PFK are usually partial and are described in association with heterogeneous clinical syndromes. To define the molecular basis and pathogenesis of this enzymopathy, we investigated four unrelated individuals manifesting myopathy and hemolysis (glycogenosis type VII), isolated hemolysis, or no symptoms at all. The three symptomatic patients showed high-normal hemoglobin levels, despite hemolysis and early-onset hyperuricemia. They showed total lack of muscle-type PFK and suffered from exertional myopathy of varying severity. In the erythrocytes, a metabolic crossover was evident at the PFK step: the levels of hexose monophosphates were elevated and those of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) were depressed, causing strikingly increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity. In all cases, the residual erythrocyte PFK consisted exclusively of L4 isozyme, indicating homozygosity for the deficiency of the catalytically active M subunit. However, presence of immunoreactive M subunit was shown in cultured fibroblasts by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-M antibody. The fourth individual was completely asymptomatic, had normal erythrocyte metabolism, and had no evidence of hemolysis. His residual erythrocyte PFK showed a striking decrease of the L4, ML3, and M2L2 isozymes, secondary to a mutant unstable L subunit. Identical alterations of erythrocyte PFK were found in his asymptomatic son, indicating heterozygosity for the mutant unstable L subunit in this kindred. These studies show that, except for the varying severity of the myopathic symptoms, glycogenosis type VII has highly uniform clinical and biochemical features and results from homozygosity for mutant inactive M subunit

  13. Genetics Home Reference: inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Encyclopedia: Serum TBG Level Health Topic: Newborn Screening Health Topic: Thyroid Diseases Educational Resources (1 link) MalaCards: inherited thyroxine-binding ...

  14. Antithrombin and heparin.

    PubMed

    Carrell, R; Skinner, R; Warden, M; Whisstock, J

    1995-08-01

    Antithrombin, the main inhibitor of thrombosis in blood, is bound and activated by the heparin-like side-chains that line the small vasculature. We now have good depictions of the heparin-binding site on antithrombin, and of the way in which mutations at this site cause thrombotic disease. The interaction of heparin with antithrombin is, however, a kinetic one, with binding being followed by formation of a complex with thrombin and then release from the heparin. Our understanding of the processes involved is currently based on crystallographic models but, for a mobile mechanism, these merely provide snapshots - what is needed is a movie.

  15. Multiple carboxylase deficiency: inherited and acquired disorders of biotin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, E R; Suormala, T

    1997-01-01

    Acquired biotin deficiency and the two known congenital disorders of biotin metabolism, biotinidase and holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) deficiency, all lead to deficiency of the 4 biotin-dependent carboxylases, i.e. to multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD). The underlying mechanism in HCS-deficiency, discovered in 1981, is decreased affinity of HCS for biotin impairing the formation of holocarboxylases at physiological biotin levels. In biotinidase deficiency, discovered in 1983, MCD results from progressive development of biotin-deficiency due to inability to liberate and recycle biotin which is lost in urine as biocytin. MCD leads to typical organic aciduria and severe life-threatening illness. Main symptoms and signs are feeding difficulties, neurologic abnormalities (hypotonia, impaired consciousness, seizures, ataxia) and cutaneous changes (rash, alopecia). However, the clinical presentation and age of onset are extremely variable, and organic aciduria may initially be absent in biotinidase deficiency. Therefore, the definitive diagnosis requires enzyme studies. MCD can be detected in lymphocytes obtained before treatment and biotinidase deficiency is confirmed or excluded by a colorimetric enzyme assay in plasma. Newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency has resulted in the detection of patients with partial deficiency (10-30% of mean normal activity) in addition to patients with profound deficiency (0-10%). Severe illness has been observed mainly in patients with O-activity or a Km-mutation, detection of which requires detailed investigation. HCS-deficiency has to be confirmed by enzyme assay in cultured cells. Both congenital disorders respond clinically and biochemically to oral biotin therapy. Whereas 10 mg/day or less is sufficient to treat profound biotinidase deficiency, the optimal biotin dose for patients with HCS-deficiency must be assessed individually. The prognosis of both disorders is good if biotin therapy is introduced early and continued

  16. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  17. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphological abnormality of Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pengon, Jutharat; Svasti, Saovaros; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Vattanaviboon, Phantip

    2017-06-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and thalassemia are genetically independent hemolytic disorders. Co-inheritance of both disorders may affect red blood cell pathology to a greater extent than normally seen in either disorder alone. This study determines the prevalence and evaluates hematological changes of G-6-PD deficiency and thalassemia co-inheritance. G-6-PD deficiency was screened from 200 male thalassemia blood samples using a fluorescent spot test. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphology were evaluated among G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance, G-6-PD deficiency alone, thalassemia alone, and normal individuals. G-6-PD deficiency was detected together with hemoglobin (Hb) E heterozygote, Hb E homozygote, β-thalassemia trait, and β-thalassemia/Hb E, α-thalassemia-2 trait, and Hb H disease. Hb level, hematocrit, mean cell volume, and mean cell Hb of G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with asymptomatic thalassemia carriers show significantly lower mean values compared to carriers with only the same thalassemia genotypes. Higher mean red blood cell distribution width was observed in G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with Hb E heterozygote, as with numbers of hemighost cells in G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance compared to those with either disorder. Apart from Hb level, hematological parameters of co-inheritance disorders were not different from individuals with a single thalassemia disease. G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia in males was present in 10% of the participants, resulting in worsening of red blood cell pathology compared with inheritance of thalassemia alone. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inherited deficiency of the second component of complement. Rheumatic disease associations.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, D; Raum, D; Gibson, D; Stillman, J S; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The prevalence of homozygous and heterozygous deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was determined in patients with rheumatic disease including 137 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 274 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and 134 with rheumatoid arthritis. 1 C2 homozygous deficient and 19 possible heterozygous deficient individuals were identified by using both immunochemical and functional assays to determine C2 levels. Of the 20, 8 had SLE (5.9%), 10 had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (3.7%), and 2 had rheumatoid arthritis (1.4%), the homozygous deficient individual having SLE. The prevalence of C2 deficiency in the SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients was significantly increased (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.02, respectively) when compared with controls, 6 (1.2%) of 509 blood donors having C2 levels consistent with heterozygous deficiency. 15 of the 20 C2 deficient patients were HLA typed and found to have antigens A10(Aw25), B18, or both. The patients with C2 deficiency and SLE had earlier age of onset of disease and less antinuclear antibody when compared with the C2 normal SLE patients. 11 families of the propositi were studied and found to have one or more C2 heterozygous deficient individuals. The family members had an equal distribution of rheumatic disease and antinuclear antibody in the C2 deficient and C2 normal groups. C2 deficient individuals were found to have significantly lower levels of properdin Factor B (242 mug/ml+/-54) when compared with the non-C2 deficient family members (282 mug/ml+/-73). These data support the concept that inherited deficiency of C2 is significantly associated with both SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:965492

  19. Superoxide production is inversely related to complex I activity in inherited complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verkaart, Sjoerd; Koopman, Werner J H; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E; Nijtmans, Leo G J; van den Heuvel, Lambertus W P J; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M

    2007-03-01

    Deficiency of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex I (CI) is the most common cause of disorders of the oxidative phosphorylation system in humans. Using life cell imaging and blue-native electrophoresis we quantitatively compared superoxide production and CI amount and activity in cultured skin fibroblasts of 7 healthy control subjects and 21 children with inherited isolated CI deficiency. Thirteen children had a disease causing mutation in one of the nuclear-encoded CI subunits, whereas in the remainder the genetic cause of the disease is not yet established. Superoxide production was significantly increased in all but two of the patient cell lines. An inverse relationship with the amount and residual activity of CI was observed. In agreement with this finding, rotenone, a potent inhibitor of CI activity, dose-dependently increased superoxide production in healthy control cells. Also in this case an inverse relationship with the residual activity of CI was observed. In sharp contrast, however, rotenone did not decrease the amount of CI. The data presented show that superoxide production is increased in inherited CI deficiency and that this increase is primarily a consequence of the reduction in cellular CI activity and not of a further leakage of electrons from mutationally malformed complexes.

  20. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  1. Antithrombin activities in childhood malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, R A; Jiménez, E; Ingram, G I; Mora, L A; Atmetlla, F; Carrillo, J M; Vargas, W

    1979-01-01

    Antithrombin activities in 30 severely malnourished children and 40 normal children were estimated in clotting tests by thrombin neutralisation as anti-Xa and by a heparin antithrombin assay; and by immunodiffusion as alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin. The patients' mean alpha 2-globulin was severely depressed, and there were less marked depletions in mean values for thrombin neutralisation, anti-Xa, and in the heparin antithrombin assay (which showed the flat curve thought to reflect a thrombotic tendency). The alpha 1-antitrypsin values were normal. The findings support the concept of antithrombin as the summation of alpha 2-globulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin (with alpha 2-macroglobulin); and the low values may be related to the high incidence of thrombosis reported in childhood malnutrition, although it was not seen in these patients. PMID:118190

  2. Genotype and phenotype relationships in 10 Pakistani unrelated patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Borhany, M; Boijout, H; Pellequer, J-L; Shamsi, T; Moulis, G; Aguilar-Martinez, P; Schved, J-F; Giansily-Blaizot, M

    2013-11-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the commonest rare bleeding disorders. It is characterized by a wide molecular and clinical heterogeneity and an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Factor VII-deficient patients are still scarcely explored in Pakistan although rare bleeding disorders became quite common as a result of traditional consanguineous marriages. The aim of the study was to give a first insight of F7 gene mutations in Pakistani population. Ten unrelated FVII-deficient patients living in Pakistan were investigated (median FVII:C = 2%; range = 2-37%). A clinical questionnaire was filled out for each patient and direct sequencing was performed on the coding regions, intron/exon boundaries and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the F7 gene. Nine different mutations (eight missense mutations and one located within the F7 promoter) were identified on the F7 gene. Five of them were novel (p.Cys82Tyr, p.Cys322Ser, p.Leu357Phe, p.Thr410Ala, c-57C>T, the last being predicted to alter the binding site of transcription factor HNF-4). Half of the patients had single mutations in Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges. The p.Cys82Arg mutation was the most frequent in our series. Six of seven patients with FVII:C levels below 10% were homozygous in connection with the high percentage of consanguinity in our series. In addition, we graded the 10 patients according to three previously published classifications for rare bleeding disorders. The use of the bleeding score proposed by Tosetto and co-workers in 2006 appears to well qualify the bleeding tendency in our series. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Antithrombin Activity of Erythrocyte Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Levin, G Ya; Sukhareva, E G

    2017-04-01

    Coagulation and optical (based on chromogenic substrate) methods were employed to examine antithrombin activity of erythrocytes and erythrocyte-derived microvesicles isolated days 7, 14, 21, and 28 on erythrocyte storage. The erythrocyte-derived microvesicles decelerated fibrin clot formation from fibrinogen in the presence of exogenous thrombin both with and without heparin. Microvesicles reduced optical density of chromogenic substrate. These data suggest that erythrocyte-derived microvesicles display a prominent antithrombin activity, which significantly increases during erythrocyte storage.

  4. Inherited complex I deficiency is associated with faster protein diffusion in the matrix of moving mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Hink, Mark A; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Wijers, Mietske; Fransen, Jack; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondria continuously change shape, position, and matrix configuration for optimal metabolite exchange. It is well established that changes in mitochondrial metabolism influence mitochondrial shape and matrix configuration. We demonstrated previously that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I (CI or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) by rotenone accelerated matrix protein diffusion and decreased the fraction and velocity of moving mitochondria. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between inherited CI deficiency, mitochondrial shape, mobility, and matrix protein diffusion. To this end, we analyzed fibroblasts of two children that represented opposite extremes in a cohort of 16 patients, with respect to their residual CI activity and mitochondrial shape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) revealed no relationship between residual CI activity, mitochondrial shape, the fraction of moving mitochondria, their velocity, and the rate of matrix-targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (mitoEYFP) diffusion. However, mitochondrial velocity and matrix protein diffusion in moving mitochondria were two to three times higher in patient cells than in control cells. Nocodazole inhibited mitochondrial movement without altering matrix EYFP diffusion, suggesting that both activities are mutually independent. Unexpectedly, electron microscopy analysis revealed no differences in mitochondrial ultrastructure between control and patient cells. It is discussed that the matrix of a moving mitochondrion in the CI-deficient state becomes less dense, allowing faster metabolite diffusion, and that fibroblasts of CI-deficient patients become more glycolytic, allowing a higher mitochondrial velocity.

  5. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in 2 unrelated patients with invasive Exophiala infection.

    PubMed

    Lanternier, Fanny; Barbati, Elisa; Meinzer, Ulrich; Liu, Luyan; Pedergnana, Vincent; Migaud, Mélanie; Héritier, Sébastien; Chomton, Maryline; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Galeotti, Caroline; Romana, Serge; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Angoulvant, Adela; Bidault, Valeska; Canioni, Danielle; Lachenaud, Julie; Mansouri, Davood; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Adimi, Parvaneh; Mansouri, Nahal; Jamshidi, Mahin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Abel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne

    2015-04-15

    Exophiala species are mostly responsible for skin infections. Invasive Exophiala dermatitidis disease is a rare and frequently fatal infection, with 42 cases reported. About half of these cases had no known risk factors. Similarly, invasive Exophiala spinifera disease is extremely rare, with only 3 cases reported, all in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency has recently been reported in otherwise healthy patients with severe fungal diseases caused by Candida species, dermatophytes, or Phialophora verrucosa. We investigated an 8-year-old girl from a nonconsanguineous Angolan kindred, who was born in France and developed disseminated E. dermatitidis disease and a 26 year-old woman from an Iranian consaguineous kindred, who was living in Iran and developed disseminated E. spinifera disease. Both patients were otherwise healthy. We sequenced CARD9 and found both patients to be homozygous for loss-of-function mutations (R18W and E323del). The first patient had segmental uniparental disomy of chromosome 9, carrying 2 copies of the maternal CARD9 mutated allele. These are the first 2 patients with inherited CARD9 deficiency and invasive Exophiala disease to be described. CARD9 deficiency should thus be considered in patients with unexplained invasive Exophiala species disease, even in the absence of other infections. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Inherited CARD9 Deficiency in 2 Unrelated Patients With Invasive Exophiala Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Barbati, Elisa; Meinzer, Ulrich; Liu, Luyan; Pedergnana, Vincent; Migaud, Mélanie; Héritier, Sébastien; Chomton, Maryline; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Galeotti, Caroline; Romana, Serge; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Angoulvant, Adela; Bidault, Valeska; Canioni, Danielle; Lachenaud, Julie; Mansouri, Davood; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Adimi, Parvaneh; Mansouri, Nahal; Jamshidi, Mahin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Abel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Exophiala species are mostly responsible for skin infections. Invasive Exophiala dermatitidis disease is a rare and frequently fatal infection, with 42 cases reported. About half of these cases had no known risk factors. Similarly, invasive Exophiala spinifera disease is extremely rare, with only 3 cases reported, all in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency has recently been reported in otherwise healthy patients with severe fungal diseases caused by Candida species, dermatophytes, or Phialophora verrucosa. Methods. We investigated an 8-year-old girl from a nonconsanguineous Angolan kindred, who was born in France and developed disseminated E. dermatitidis disease and a 26 year-old woman from an Iranian consaguineous kindred, who was living in Iran and developed disseminated E. spinifera disease. Both patients were otherwise healthy. Results. We sequenced CARD9 and found both patients to be homozygous for loss-of-function mutations (R18W and E323del). The first patient had segmental uniparental disomy of chromosome 9, carrying 2 copies of the maternal CARD9 mutated allele. Conclusions. These are the first 2 patients with inherited CARD9 deficiency and invasive Exophiala disease to be described. CARD9 deficiency should thus be considered in patients with unexplained invasive Exophiala species disease, even in the absence of other infections. PMID:25057046

  7. Inherited ADAMTS13 deficiency (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome): a short review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Almudena; Lourés, Esther; Rodríguez-Trillo, Ángela; Costa-Pinto, Joana; García-Rivero, Aránzazu; Batlle-López, Ana; Batlle, Javier; López-Fernández, María Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome, is associated with an inherited deficiency of ADAMTS13, a von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease. It is a rare, life-threatening disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, neurological symptoms, renal dysfunction, and fever resulting from formation of platelet thrombi within the microvasculature. Patients have initial episodes mainly during infancy or early childhood, and are conventionally treated with fresh frozen plasma. However, a more appropriate approach based on recombinant ADAMTS13 is slated to begin shortly. Mutations throughout the ADAMTS13 have been identified in congenital TTP patients. The prevalence of this entity is probably underestimated because it is often not suspected, the clinical course is usually heterogeneous and most of the symptoms are common to other diseases. The present review summarizes our current knowledge about Upshaw-Schulman syndrome.

  8. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-09-28

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. Here, we describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral, diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses that we tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes-granulocyte, in particular-reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity.

  9. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  10. Assembly defects induce oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Leman, Géraldine; Gueguen, Naïg; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Kane, Mariame Selma; Wettervald, Céline; Chupin, Stéphanie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Barth, Magalie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Verny, Christophe; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (CI) deficiency is the most common respiratory chain defect representing more than 30% of mitochondrial diseases. CI is an L-shaped multi-subunit complex with a peripheral arm protruding into the mitochondrial matrix and a membrane arm. CI sequentially assembled into main assembly intermediates: the P (pumping), Q (Quinone) and N (NADH dehydrogenase) modules. In this study, we analyzed 11 fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with inherited CI deficiency resulting from mutations in the nuclear or mitochondrial DNA and impacting these different modules. In patient cells carrying a mutation located in the matrix arm of CI, blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed a significant reduction of fully assembled CI enzyme and an accumulation of intermediates of the N module. In these cell lines with an assembly defect, NADH dehydrogenase activity was partly functional, even though CI was not fully assembled. We further demonstrated that this functional N module was responsible for ROS production through the reduced flavin mononucleotide. Due to the assembly defect, the FMN site was not re-oxidized leading to a significant oxidative stress in cell lines with an assembly defect. These findings not only highlight the relationship between CI assembly and oxidative stress, but also show the suitability of BN-PAGE analysis in evaluating the consequences of CI dysfunction. Moreover, these data suggest that the use of antioxidants may be particularly relevant for patients displaying a CI assembly defect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Analysis of the gene mutation in an inherited FVII deficiency patient].

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Manli; Wang, Zhengguan; Liu, Ping; Duan, Jinyan; Wang, Chengbin; Lu, Yanping

    2015-05-12

    The identify the gene defect of an inherited FVII deficiency patient. The promoter, all the exons and exon-intron boundaries and 3' UTR of F7 gene of the proband were analyzed by direct sequencing. The defected mutations were confirmed by sequencing the complementary strand. The mutations would be screened in the related database and 150 healthy donors to identify the SNP. By splice site prediction, we analyzed the pathogenesis of defected mutations. Genetic analysis revealed G to A transition at 15975 in the intron 6 of F7 gene (IVS6-1G>A) and A to G transition at 16813 in the intron 7 of F7 gene (IVS7+7 A>G). According to the fruitfly, the acceptor site could not be recognized when a G to A substitution took place. The closest candidate splice site was located 132 bp downstream. The distance was probably too far to allow the use of the cryptic splice site and resulted in the skipping of exon6. A to G transition at 16813 in the intron 7 of F7 gene could not change the splice site, but modify a different molecular interaction that is important for the splice process. The heterozygous mutation of IVS6-1G>A combined with polymorphism of IVS7+7 A>G in F7 gene relates to the FVII deficiency.

  12. Inherited thrombophilia: memorandum from a joint WHO/International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    Inherited thrombophilias are common disorders with a worldwide distribution, including antithrombin, protein C, and protein S deficiencies as well as resistance to activated protein C. Increased understanding of these disorders suggests that thrombophilia can arise from interaction between defective genes and environmental factors. WHO and the international Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) discussed the problems of inherited thrombophilia at a joint meeting held in Geneva on 6-8 November 1995. The present article reports on the various possibilities for controlling the disorder and makes a series of recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and research into the condition. PMID:9277004

  13. Inherited human IRAK-1 deficiency selectively impairs TLR signaling in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Alessandro; Zhou, Hao; Bougarn, Salim; Boughorbel, Sabri; Israel, Laura; Meloni, Ilaria; Chrabieh, Maya; Ling, Yun; Itan, Yuval; Renieri, Alessandra; Mazzucchelli, Iolanda; Basso, Sabrina; Pavone, Piero; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ciccone, Roberto; Cerbo, Rosa Maria; Stronati, Mauro; Picard, Capucine; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Marr, Nico; Li, Xiaoxia; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Most members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) families transduce signals via a canonical pathway involving the MyD88 adapter and the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) complex. This complex contains four molecules, including at least two (IRAK-1 and IRAK-4) active kinases. In mice and humans, deficiencies of IRAK-4 or MyD88 abolish most TLR (except for TLR3 and some TLR4) and IL-1R signaling in both leukocytes and fibroblasts. TLR and IL-1R responses are weak but not abolished in mice lacking IRAK-1, whereas the role of IRAK-1 in humans remains unclear. We describe here a boy with X-linked MECP2 deficiency-related syndrome due to a large de novo Xq28 chromosomal deletion encompassing both MECP2 and IRAK1. Like many boys with MECP2 null mutations, this child died very early, at the age of 7 mo. Unlike most IRAK-4– or MyD88-deficient patients, he did not suffer from invasive bacterial diseases during his short life. The IRAK-1 protein was completely absent from the patient’s fibroblasts, which responded very poorly to all TLR2/6 (PAM2CSK4, LTA, FSL-1), TLR1/2 (PAM3CSK4), and TLR4 (LPS, MPLA) agonists tested but had almost unimpaired responses to IL-1β. By contrast, the patient’s peripheral blood mononuclear cells responded normally to all TLR1/2, TLR2/6, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR8 (R848) agonists tested, and to IL-1β. The death of this child precluded long-term evaluations of the clinical consequences of inherited IRAK-1 deficiency. However, these findings suggest that human IRAK-1 is essential downstream from TLRs but not IL-1Rs in fibroblasts, whereas it plays a redundant role downstream from both TLRs and IL-1Rs in leukocytes. PMID:28069966

  14. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  15. Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency: consequences of an inherited mutation at mRNA, protein and metabolic levels

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Judit; Orosz, Ferenc; Puskás, László G.; Hackler, Jr, László; Horányi, Margit; Polgár, László; Hollán, Susan; Ovádi, Judit

    2005-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a unique glycolytic enzymopathy coupled with neurodegeneration. Two Hungarian compound heterozygote brothers inherited the same TPI mutations (F240L and E145Stop), but only the younger one suffers from neurodegeneration. In the present study, we determined the kinetic parameters of key glycolytic enzymes including the mutant TPI for rational modelling of erythrocyte glycolysis. We found that a low TPI activity in the mutant cells (lower than predicted from the protein level and specific activity of the purified recombinant enzyme) is coupled with an increase in the activities of glycolytic kinases. The modelling rendered it possible to establish the steady-state flux of the glycolysis and metabolite concentrations, which was not possible experimentally due to the inactivation of the mutant TPI and other enzymes during the pre-steady state. Our results showed that the flux was 2.5-fold higher and the concentration of DHAP (dihydroxyacetone phosphate) and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate increased 40- and 5-fold respectively in the erythrocytes of the patient compared with the control. Although the rapid equilibration of triosephosphates is not achieved, the energy state of the cells is not ‘sick’ due to the activation of key regulatory enzymes. In lymphocytes of the two brothers, the TPI activity was also lower (20%) than that of controls; however, the remaining activity was high enough to maintain the rapid equilibration of triosephosphates; consequently, no accumulation of DHAP occurs, as judged by our experimental and computational data. Interestingly, we found significant differences in the mRNA levels of the brothers for TPI and some other, apparently unrelated, proteins. One of them is the prolyl oligopeptidase, the activity decrease of which has been reported in well-characterized neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the peptidase activity of the affected brother was reduced by 30% compared with that of his

  16. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have an inherited metabolic disease, this is the one to have".

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry

    2012-06-01

    Biotinidase recycles the vitamin biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited neurocutaneous disorder. The symptoms of the disorder can be successfully treated or prevented by administering pharmacological doses of biotin. The biotinidase gene (BTD) has been cloned and sequenced; its genomic organization has been determined and more than 150 mutations have been identified. The disorder meets the major criteria for newborn screening and is being universally adopted in the United States and in many countries around the world. Newborn screening will limit our understanding about the natural history of the disorder. Regardless, the disorder is an ideal example of an inherited metabolic disorder that if untreated can result in major disabilities, but if identified early can be readily treated by the oral administration of a vitamin.

  17. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  19. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in otherwise healthy children and adults with Candida species-induced meningoencephalitis, colitis, or both.

    PubMed

    Lanternier, Fanny; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Barbati, Elisa; Chaussade, Hélène; Koumar, Yatrika; Levy, Romain; Denis, Blandine; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Sophie; Loop, Michèle; Peeters, Julie; de Selys, Ariel; Vanclaire, Jean; Vermylen, Christiane; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Chatzis, Olga; Liu, Luyan; Migaud, Mélanie; Pedergnana, Vincent; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Netea, Mihai G; De Bruycker, Jean J; Bernard, Louis; Reynes, Jacques; Amazrine, Noureddine; Abel, Laurent; Van der Linden, Dimitri; Harrison, Tom; Picard, Capucine; Lortholary, Olivier; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Invasive infections of the central nervous system (CNS) or digestive tract caused by commensal fungi of the genus Candida are rare and life-threatening. The known risk factors include acquired and inherited immunodeficiencies, with patients often displaying a history of multiple infections. Cases of meningoencephalitis, colitis, or both caused by Candida species remain unexplained. We studied 5 previously healthy children and adults with unexplained invasive disease of the CNS, digestive tract, or both caused by Candida species. The patients were aged 39, 7, 17, 37, and 26 years at the time of infection and were unrelated, but each was born to consanguineous parents of Turkish (2 patients), Iranian, Moroccan, or Pakistani origin. Meningoencephalitis was reported in 3 patients, meningoencephalitis associated with colitis was reported in a fourth patient, and the fifth patient had colitis only. Inherited caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) deficiency was recently reported in otherwise healthy patients with other forms of severe disease caused by Candida, Trichophyton, Phialophora, and Exophiala species, including meningoencephalitis but not colitis caused by Candida and Exophiala species. Therefore we sequenced CARD9 in the 5 patients. All patients were found to be homozygous for rare and deleterious mutant CARD9 alleles: R70W and Q289* for the 3 patients with Candida albicans-induced meningoencephalitis, R35Q for the patient with meningoencephalitis and colitis caused by Candida glabrata, and Q295* for the patient with Candida albicans-induced colitis. Regardless of their levels of mutant CARD9 protein, the patients' monocyte-derived dendritic cells responded poorly to CARD9-dependent fungal agonists (curdlan, heat-killed C albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Exophiala dermatitidis). Invasive infections of the CNS or digestive tract caused by Candida species in previously healthy children and even adults might be caused by inherited CARD9

  20. Inherited IL-17RC deficiency in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yun; Cypowyj, Sophie; Aytekin, Caner; Galicchio, Miguel; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Nepesov, Serdar; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Belkadi, Aziz; Levy, Romain; Migaud, Mélanie; Boisson, Bertrand; Bolze, Alexandre; Itan, Yuval; Goudin, Nicolas; Cottineau, Julien; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nail, oral, and genital mucosae with Candida species, mainly C. albicans. Autosomal-recessive (AR) IL-17RA and ACT1 deficiencies and autosomal-dominant IL-17F deficiency, each reported in a single kindred, underlie CMC in otherwise healthy patients. We report three patients from unrelated kindreds, aged 8, 12, and 37 yr with isolated CMC, who display AR IL-17RC deficiency. The patients are homozygous for different nonsense alleles that prevent the expression of IL-17RC on the cell surface. The defect is complete, abolishing cellular responses to IL-17A and IL-17F homo- and heterodimers. However, in contrast to what is observed for the IL-17RA– and ACT1-deficient patients tested, the response to IL-17E (IL-25) is maintained in these IL-17RC–deficient patients. These experiments of nature indicate that human IL-17RC is essential for mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans but is otherwise largely redundant. PMID:25918342

  1. Inherited IL-17RC deficiency in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yun; Cypowyj, Sophie; Aytekin, Caner; Galicchio, Miguel; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Nepesov, Serdar; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Belkadi, Aziz; Levy, Romain; Migaud, Mélanie; Boisson, Bertrand; Bolze, Alexandre; Itan, Yuval; Goudin, Nicolas; Cottineau, Julien; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-05-04

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nail, oral, and genital mucosae with Candida species, mainly C. albicans. Autosomal-recessive (AR) IL-17RA and ACT1 deficiencies and autosomal-dominant IL-17F deficiency, each reported in a single kindred, underlie CMC in otherwise healthy patients. We report three patients from unrelated kindreds, aged 8, 12, and 37 yr with isolated CMC, who display AR IL-17RC deficiency. The patients are homozygous for different nonsense alleles that prevent the expression of IL-17RC on the cell surface. The defect is complete, abolishing cellular responses to IL-17A and IL-17F homo- and heterodimers. However, in contrast to what is observed for the IL-17RA- and ACT1-deficient patients tested, the response to IL-17E (IL-25) is maintained in these IL-17RC-deficient patients. These experiments of nature indicate that human IL-17RC is essential for mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans but is otherwise largely redundant. © 2015 Ling et al.

  2. Dominant and recessive inheritance of morbid obesity associated with melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Keogh, Julia M.; Aminian, Shiva; Jebb, Susan A.; Butler, Gary; Cheetham, Tim; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Over 20 severely obese subjects in 11 independent kindreds have been reported to have pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), making this the most common known monogenic cause of human obesity. To date, the detailed clinical phenotype of this dominantly inherited disorder has not been defined, and no homozygous subjects have been described. We determined the nucleotide sequence of the entire coding region of the MC4R gene in 243 subjects with severe, early-onset obesity. A novel two–base pair GT insertion in codon 279 was found in two unrelated subjects, and four novel missense mutations, N62S, R165Q, V253I, C271Y, and one mutation (T112M) reported previously were found in five subjects. N62S was found in homozygous form in five children with severe obesity from a consanguineous pedigree. All four heterozygous carriers were nonobese. Several features of the phenotype, e.g. hyperphagia, tendency toward tall stature, hyperinsulinemia, and preserved reproductive function, closely resemble those reported previously in Mc4r knock-out mice. In addition, a marked increase in bone mineral density was seen in all affected subjects. In transient transfection assays, the N62S mutant receptor showed a responsiveness to αMSH that was intermediate between the wild-type receptor and mutant receptors carrying nonsense and missense mutations associated with dominantly inherited obesity. Thus MC4R mutations result in a syndrome of hyperphagic obesity in humans that can present with either dominant or recessive patterns of inheritance. PMID:10903343

  3. Dominant and recessive inheritance of morbid obesity associated with melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S; Yeo, G S; Keogh, J M; Aminian, S; Jebb, S A; Butler, G; Cheetham, T; O'Rahilly, S

    2000-07-01

    Over 20 severely obese subjects in 11 independent kindreds have been reported to have pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), making this the most common known monogenic cause of human obesity. To date, the detailed clinical phenotype of this dominantly inherited disorder has not been defined, and no homozygous subjects have been described. We determined the nucleotide sequence of the entire coding region of the MC4R gene in 243 subjects with severe, early-onset obesity. A novel two-base pair GT insertion in codon 279 was found in two unrelated subjects, and four novel missense mutations, N62S, R165Q, V253I, C271Y, and one mutation (T112M) reported previously were found in five subjects. N62S was found in homozygous form in five children with severe obesity from a consanguineous pedigree. All four heterozygous carriers were nonobese. Several features of the phenotype, e.g. hyperphagia, tendency toward tall stature, hyperinsulinemia, and preserved reproductive function, closely resemble those reported previously in Mc4r knock-out mice. In addition, a marked increase in bone mineral density was seen in all affected subjects. In transient transfection assays, the N62S mutant receptor showed a responsiveness to alphaMSH that was intermediate between the wild-type receptor and mutant receptors carrying nonsense and missense mutations associated with dominantly inherited obesity. Thus MC4R mutations result in a syndrome of hyperphagic obesity in humans that can present with either dominant or recessive patterns of inheritance.

  4. Inherited Glutathione Reductase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria—A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahlfs, Stefan; Schirmer, R. Heiner; van Zwieten, Rob; Roos, Dirk; Arese, Paolo; Becker, Katja

    2009-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBCs), the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase (GR) regenerates reduced glutathione, which is essential for antioxidant defense. GR utilizes NADPH produced in the pentose phosphate shunt by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Thus, conditions affecting host G6PD or GR induce increased sensitivity to oxidants. Hereditary G6PD deficiency is frequent in malaria endemic areas and provides protection against severe malaria. Furthermore, GR deficiency resulting from insufficient saturation of the enzyme with its prosthetic group FAD is common. Based on these naturally occurring phenomena, GR of malaria parasites and their host cells represent attractive antimalarial drug targets. Recently we were given the opportunity to examine invasion, growth, and drug sensitivity of three P. falciparum strains (3D7, K1, and Palo Alto) in the RBCs from three homozygous individuals with total GR deficiency resulting from mutations in the apoprotein. Invasion or growth in the GR-deficient RBCs was not impaired for any of the parasite strains tested. Drug sensitivity to chloroquine, artemisinin, and methylene blue was comparable to parasites grown in GR-sufficient RBCs and sensitivity towards paraquat and sodium nitroprusside was only slightly enhanced. In contrast, membrane deposition of hemichromes as well as the opsonizing complement C3b fragments and phagocytosis were strongly increased in ring-infected RBCs of the GR-deficient individuals compared to ring-infected normal RBCs. Also, in one of the individuals, membrane-bound autologous IgGs were significantly enhanced. Thus, based on our in vitro data, GR deficiency and drug-induced GR inhibition may protect from malaria by inducing enhanced ring stage phagocytosis rather than by impairing parasite growth directly. PMID:19806191

  5. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  6. PROS1 genotype phenotype relationships in a large cohort of adults with suspicion of inherited quantitative protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Plu-Bureau, Genevieve; Horellou, Marie Hélène; Rauch, Antoine; Suchon, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Inherited protein S deficiency (PSD) is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, data are conflicting concerning risk of VTE associated with decreased free PS level (FPS) and information on PROS1 genotype-phenotype relationship is sparse. In a retrospective cohort of 579 patients with inherited type I/III deficiency suspicion, PROS1 genotyping was performed and the effect of genotype on FPS and on VTE risk was investigated. We found 116 (including 65 novel) detrimental mutations (DM) in 222 (type I/III in 194, type II in 28), PS Heerlen in 74, possibly non DM in 38 and no mutation in 245 subjects. Among DMs, type I/IIIDMs only were found in subjects with FPS< 30 %. Prevalence of type I/III DM decreased with increasing FPS level. Risk of VT associated with FPS level and genotype was studied in the 467 subjects with personal or family history of thrombosis. Only type I/IIIDM carriers presented with an increased risk of VTE [1.41 (95 %CI (1.05-1.89)] compared to subjects with no mutation. Among the group of type I/IIIDM heterozygotes and subjects with no mutation, the optimal FPS cut-off point for identifying subjects at increased VTE risk was searched for. We found that only subjects with FPS< 30 % and type I/IIIDM presented with an increased risk [1.48 (95 %CI 1.08-2.04)]. Our findings confirm the value of a cut-off FPS level for identifying subjects at increased VTE risk far below the lower limit of the normal range and suggest a place for PROS1 genotyping in PSD diagnosis strategy.

  7. X-linked dominant inheritance of partial phosphorylase kinase deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Varsányi, M; Vrbica, A; Heilmeyer, L M

    1980-04-01

    A new mouse strain, the V strain, with a partial deficiency of phosphorylase kinase has been established. The deficiency is caused by an X-linked dominant gene (PhKc). Muscle extracts of homozygous and heterozygous females and hemizygous males have about 25% of the activity found in extracts of normal (C3H/HeHan) mice. This dominant phosphorylase kinase deficiency of the new V strain is different from that of the I-strain mice with the X-linked recessive deficiency of skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase. The muscle extracts of V-strain and normal mice contain the same phosphorylase phosphatase activity of about 1 U/mg. Heart and liver extracts from V mice contained about 50% and 66%, respectively, of the phosphorylase kinase activity compared to that found in the same organs from the normal mice. The glycogen content of the skeletal muscle of the V strain was normal, i.e., 0.9 mg/g. Phosphorylase kinase was purified from the skeletal muscle of the V strain by (a) hydrophobic chromatography on methylamine Sepharose, (b) ammonium sulfate precipitation, and (c) gel filtration of Sepharose 4B. The enzyme has a similar structure to the normal murine and rabbit skeletal muscle enzyme, except that the proportion of the subunits differs. The molar ratio of the subunits of the V strain mice is (alpha + alpha'):beta:gamma=0.54:1:1.169, in comparison with that of the rabbit (alpha + alpha'):beta:gamma=1.1:1.0:1.0 and that of normal murine enzyme 0.9:1.0:0.7.

  8. Immune deficiency in mouse models for inherited peripheral neuropathies leads to improved myelin maintenance.

    PubMed

    Schmid, C D; Stienekemeier, M; Oehen, S; Bootz, F; Zielasek, J; Gold, R; Toyka, K V; Schachner, M; Martini, R

    2000-01-15

    The adhesive cell surface molecule P(0) is the most abundant glycoprotein in peripheral nerve myelin and fulfills pivotal functions during myelin formation and maintenance. Mutations in the corresponding gene cause hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In mice heterozygously deficient in P(0) (P(0)(+/-) mice), an established animal model for a subtype of hereditary neuropathies, T-lymphocytes are present in the demyelinating nerves. To monitor the possible involvement of the immune system in myelin pathology, we cross-bred P(0)(+/-) mice with null mutants for the recombination activating gene 1 (RAG-1) or with mice deficient in the T-cell receptor alpha-subunit. We found that in P(0)(+/-) mice myelin degeneration and impairment of nerve conduction properties is less severe when the immune system is deficient. Moreover, isolated T-lymphocytes from P(0)(+/-) mice show enhanced reactivity to myelin components of the peripheral nerve, such as P(0), P(2), and myelin basic protein. We hypothesize that autoreactive immune cells can significantly foster the demyelinating phenotype of mice with a primarily genetically based peripheral neuropathy.

  9. Inherited DOCK2 Deficiency in Patients with Early-Onset Invasive Infections.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Kerry; Domínguez Conde, Cecilia; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Parolini, Silvia; Audry, Magali; Chou, Janet; Haapaniemi, Emma; Keles, Sevgi; Bilic, Ivan; Okada, Satoshi; Massaad, Michel J; Rounioja, Samuli; Alwahadneh, Adel M; Serwas, Nina K; Capuder, Kelly; Çiftçi, Ergin; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Pedergnana, Vincent; Boisson, Bertrand; Haskoloğlu, Şule; Ensari, Arzu; Schuster, Michael; Moretta, Alessandro; Itan, Yuval; Patrizi, Ornella; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Saarela, Janna; Knip, Mikael; Petrovski, Slavé; Goldstein, David B; Parrott, Roberta E; Savas, Berna; Schambach, Axel; Tabellini, Giovanna; Bock, Christoph; Chatila, Talal A; Comeau, Anne Marie; Geha, Raif S; Abel, Laurent; Buckley, Rebecca H; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Al-Herz, Waleed; Helminen, Merja; Doğu, Figen; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Boztuğ, Kaan; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2015-06-18

    Background Combined immunodeficiencies are marked by inborn errors of T-cell immunity in which the T cells that are present are quantitatively or functionally deficient. Impaired humoral immunity is also common. Patients have severe infections, autoimmunity, or both. The specific molecular, cellular, and clinical features of many types of combined immunodeficiencies remain unknown. Methods We performed genetic and cellular immunologic studies involving five unrelated children with early-onset invasive bacterial and viral infections, lymphopenia, and defective T-cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Two patients died early in childhood; after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, the other three had normalization of T-cell function and clinical improvement. Results We identified biallelic mutations in the dedicator of cytokinesis 2 gene (DOCK2) in these five patients. RAC1 activation was impaired in the T cells. Chemokine-induced migration and actin polymerization were defective in the T cells, B cells, and NK cells. NK-cell degranulation was also affected. Interferon-α and interferon-λ production by peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was diminished after viral infection. Moreover, in DOCK2-deficient fibroblasts, viral replication was increased and virus-induced cell death was enhanced; these conditions were normalized by treatment with interferon alfa-2b or after expression of wild-type DOCK2. Conclusions Autosomal recessive DOCK2 deficiency is a new mendelian disorder with pleiotropic defects of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. Children with clinical features of combined immunodeficiencies, especially with early-onset, invasive infections, may have this condition. (Supported by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  10. Clinical Features of Candidiasis in Patients With Inherited Interleukin 12 Receptor β1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background. Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)–deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12–dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23–dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Results. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Conclusions. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients. PMID:24186907

  11. Inherited human OX40 deficiency underlying classic Kaposi sarcoma of childhood.

    PubMed

    Byun, Minji; Ma, Cindy S; Akçay, Arzu; Pedergnana, Vincent; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Myoung, Jinjong; Avery, Danielle T; Liu, Yifang; Abhyankar, Avinash; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Schmidt, Monika; Lim, Hye Kyung; Cassar, Olivier; Migaud, Melanie; Rozenberg, Flore; Canpolat, Nur; Aydogan, Gönül; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Cesarman, Ethel; Olivier, Martin; Gros, Philippe; Abel, Laurent; Croft, Michael; Tangye, Stuart G; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-08-26

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8; also called KSHV)-induced endothelial tumor, develops only in a small fraction of individuals infected with HHV-8. We hypothesized that inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 might underlie the exceedingly rare development of classic KS in childhood. We report here autosomal recessive OX40 deficiency in an otherwise healthy adult with childhood-onset classic KS. OX40 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on activated T cells. Its ligand, OX40L, is expressed on various cell types, including endothelial cells. We found OX40L was abundantly expressed in KS lesions. The mutant OX40 protein was poorly expressed on the cell surface and failed to bind OX40L, resulting in complete functional OX40 deficiency. The patient had a low proportion of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the peripheral blood, consistent with impaired CD4(+) T cell responses to recall antigens in vitro. The proportion of effector memory CD8(+) T cells was less diminished. The proportion of circulating memory B cells was low, but the antibody response in vivo was intact, including the response to a vaccine boost. Together, these findings suggest that human OX40 is necessary for robust CD4(+) T cell memory and confers apparently selective protective immunity against HHV-8 infection in endothelial cells.

  12. Inherited human OX40 deficiency underlying classic Kaposi sarcoma of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cindy S.; Akçay, Arzu; Pedergnana, Vincent; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Myoung, Jinjong; Avery, Danielle T.; Liu, Yifang; Abhyankar, Avinash; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Schmidt, Monika; Lim, Hye Kyung; Cassar, Olivier; Migaud, Melanie; Rozenberg, Flore; Canpolat, Nur; Aydoğan, Gönül; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Cesarman, Ethel; Olivier, Martin; Gros, Philippe; Abel, Laurent; Croft, Michael; Tangye, Stuart G.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8; also called KSHV)–induced endothelial tumor, develops only in a small fraction of individuals infected with HHV-8. We hypothesized that inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 might underlie the exceedingly rare development of classic KS in childhood. We report here autosomal recessive OX40 deficiency in an otherwise healthy adult with childhood-onset classic KS. OX40 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on activated T cells. Its ligand, OX40L, is expressed on various cell types, including endothelial cells. We found OX40L was abundantly expressed in KS lesions. The mutant OX40 protein was poorly expressed on the cell surface and failed to bind OX40L, resulting in complete functional OX40 deficiency. The patient had a low proportion of effector memory CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood, consistent with impaired CD4+ T cell responses to recall antigens in vitro. The proportion of effector memory CD8+ T cells was less diminished. The proportion of circulating memory B cells was low, but the antibody response in vivo was intact, including the response to a vaccine boost. Together, these findings suggest that human OX40 is necessary for robust CD4+ T cell memory and confers apparently selective protective immunity against HHV-8 infection in endothelial cells. PMID:23897980

  13. A new case of high-molecular-weight kininogen inherited deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, J J; Horellou, M H; Gozin, D; Conard, J; Muller, J Y; Clark, M; Soulier, J P; Samama, M

    1986-08-01

    A preoperative hemostasis study discovered a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time in a 23-year-old Portuguese Caucasian woman without personal or past family history of hemorrhage or thrombosis. This was corrected by pooled plasma that excluded circulating anticoagulant. Activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged whatever the activator, particularly ellagic acid, and was not corrected by prolonged kaolin incubation. Levels of factors VIII and XII were normal; factor XI and prekallikrein levels were either moderately low or normal according to activators and defective reagents used. High-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK) level assessed by coagulation and immunological method was virtually nil. Fibrinolysis activity was normal before and after venous occlusion. The programmed operation was performed without any particular preparation and no complication arose. Family investigation found heterozygous HMWK deficiency in the proposita's father and three of her siblings.

  14. Inherited Thrombophilia in Pediatric Venous Thromboembolic Disease: Why and Who to Test

    PubMed Central

    van Ommen, C. Heleen; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in childhood is a multifactorial disease. Risk factors include acquired clinical risk factors such as a central venous catheter and underlying disease and inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia is defined as a genetically determined tendency to develop venous thromboembolism. In contrast to adults, acquired clinical risk factors play a larger role than inherited thrombophilia in the development of thrombotic disease in children. The contributing role of inherited thrombophilia is not clear in many pediatric thrombotic events, especially catheter-related thrombosis. Furthermore, identification of inherited thrombophilia will not often influence acute management of the thrombotic event as well as the duration of anticoagulation. In some patients, however, detection of inherited thrombophilia may lead to identification of other family members who can be counseled for their thrombotic risk. This article discusses the potential arguments for testing of inherited thrombophilia, including factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin mutation, and deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, or protein S and suggests some patient groups in childhood, which may be tested. PMID:28352625

  15. Inherited Thrombophilia in Pediatric Venous Thromboembolic Disease: Why and Who to Test.

    PubMed

    van Ommen, C Heleen; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in childhood is a multifactorial disease. Risk factors include acquired clinical risk factors such as a central venous catheter and underlying disease and inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia is defined as a genetically determined tendency to develop venous thromboembolism. In contrast to adults, acquired clinical risk factors play a larger role than inherited thrombophilia in the development of thrombotic disease in children. The contributing role of inherited thrombophilia is not clear in many pediatric thrombotic events, especially catheter-related thrombosis. Furthermore, identification of inherited thrombophilia will not often influence acute management of the thrombotic event as well as the duration of anticoagulation. In some patients, however, detection of inherited thrombophilia may lead to identification of other family members who can be counseled for their thrombotic risk. This article discusses the potential arguments for testing of inherited thrombophilia, including factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin mutation, and deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, or protein S and suggests some patient groups in childhood, which may be tested.

  16. T-cell lines from 2 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency showed the restoration of ADA activity resulted from the reversion of an inherited mutation.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Yamaguchi, K; Kawamura, N; Kikuta, H; Taniuchi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Terada, K; Ikeda, H; Hershfield, M S; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    Inherited deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in one of the autosomal recessive forms of severe combined immunodeficiency. This report discusses 2 patients with ADA deficiency from different families, in whom a possible reverse mutation had occurred. The novel mutations were identified in the ADA gene from the patients, and both their parents were revealed to be carriers. Unexpectedly, established patient T-cell lines, not B-cell lines, showed half-normal levels of ADA enzyme activity. Reevaluation of the mutations in these T-cell lines indicated that one of the inherited ADA gene mutations was reverted in both patients. At least one of the patients seemed to possess the revertant cells in vivo; however, the mutant cells might have overcome the revertant after receiving ADA enzyme replacement therapy. These findings may have significant implications regarding the prospects for stem cell gene therapy for ADA deficiency.

  17. Recurrent rhinovirus infections in a child with inherited MDA5 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Zhang, Yu; Drutman, Scott B; Abbott, Jordan K; Munir, Shirin; Bade, Sangeeta; Murdock, Heardley M; Santos, Celia P; Brock, Linda G; Masutani, Evan; Fordjour, Emmanuel Y; McElwee, Joshua J; Hughes, Jason D; Nichols, Dave P; Belkadi, Aziz; Oler, Andrew J; Happel, Corinne S; Matthews, Helen F; Abel, Laurent; Collins, Peter L; Subbarao, Kanta; Gelfand, Erwin W; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Su, Helen C

    2017-07-03

    MDA5 is a cytosolic sensor of double-stranded RNA (ds)RNA including viral byproducts and intermediates. We studied a child with life-threatening, recurrent respiratory tract infections, caused by viruses including human rhinovirus (HRV), influenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We identified in her a homozygous missense mutation in IFIH1 that encodes MDA5. Mutant MDA5 was expressed but did not recognize the synthetic MDA5 agonist/(ds)RNA mimic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid. When overexpressed, mutant MDA5 failed to drive luciferase activity from the IFNB1 promoter or promoters containing ISRE or NF-κB sequence motifs. In respiratory epithelial cells or fibroblasts, wild-type but not knockdown of MDA5 restricted HRV infection while increasing IFN-stimulated gene expression and IFN-β/λ. However, wild-type MDA5 did not restrict influenza virus or RSV replication. Moreover, nasal epithelial cells from the patient, or fibroblasts gene-edited to express mutant MDA5, showed increased replication of HRV but not influenza or RSV. Thus, human MDA5 deficiency is a novel inborn error of innate and/or intrinsic immunity that causes impaired (ds)RNA sensing, reduced IFN induction, and susceptibility to the common cold virus. This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Foreign copyrights may apply.

  18. Does urinary peptide content differ between COPD patients with and without inherited alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Carleo, Alfonso; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Czajkowska-Malinowska, Małgorzata; Rozy, Adriana; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with normal (PiMM) or deficient (PiZZ) genetic variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is important not only for understanding the pathobiology of disease progression but also for improving personalized therapies. This pilot study aimed to investigate whether urinary peptides reflect the A1AT-related phenotypes of COPD. Urine samples from 19 clinically stable COPD cases (7 PiMM and 12 PiZZ A1AT) were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We identified 66 peptides (corresponding to 36 unique proteins) that differed between PiZZ and PiMM COPD. Among these, peptides from the collagen family were the most abundant and divergent. A logistic regression model based on COL1A1 or COL5A3 peptides enabled differentiation between PiMM and PiZZ groups, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.71% for COL1A1 and a sensitivity of 91.67% and specificity of 85.71% for COL5A3. Furthermore, patients with PiZZ presented low levels of urinary peptides involved in lipoproteins/lipids and retinoic acid metabolism, such as apolipoprotein A-I and C4, retinol-binding protein 4 and prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase. However, peptides of MDS1 and EVII complex locus, gelsolin and hemoglobin alpha were found in the urine of COPD cases with PiZZ, but not with PiMM. These capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry-based results provide the first evidence that urinary peptide content differs between PiMM and PiZZ patients with COPD. PMID:28331304

  19. Inherited and acquired thrombophilia: pregnancy outcome and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; Cavaliere, A F; Straface, G; Di Gianantonio, E; Caruso, A

    2006-08-01

    Maternal thrombophilias increases the risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome. An extensive literature review highlights the role of inherited and acquired thrombophilic disorders in spontaneous abortion, both early and late, recurrent or isolate, in intrauterine growth retardation, in placenta abruption, in pre-eclampsia and in venous thromboembolism. We have particularly focused attention on the following factors: antithrombin III (ATIII), proteins C (PC) and S (PS) deficiencies, genetic mutations particularly factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin gene G20210A (PTM) and the thermolabile variant of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR) gene, lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and anticardiolipin antibodies, VIIIc factor, hyperhomocysteinemia and acquired activated protein C resistance. Appropriate treatment can improve pregnancy outcome without teratogenic effects.

  20. Characterisation of a large complex intragenic re-arrangement in the FVII gene (F7) avoiding misdiagnosis in inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Thorel, Delphine; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Behar, Catherine; Romey, Marie-Catherine; Mugneret, Francine; Schved, Jean-François; Claustres, Mireille

    2007-08-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder mostly caused by point mutations. Large genomic re-arrangements at F7 locus could account for a fraction of mutant alleles that remain unidentified after DNA sequencing, because they escape conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. We report the first systematic screening of F7 for large re-arrangements, by semi-quantitative multiplex PCR of fluorescent fragments targeting the 9 exons and the promoter region. A well-characterised cohort of 43 unrelated patients either apparently homozygous for a F7 point mutation or carrying at least one unidentified F7 mutant allele participated in this study. Two large F7 re-arrangements were identified in two FVII-deficient pedigrees, including a discontinuous deletion involving two distinct portions of F7 whose proximal and distal end junctions were characterised. A simple and efficient method for the routine detection of gross alterations of F7, which accounted for 2.3% of mutant alleles in our sample, is now available in inherited FVII deficiency. This test should complement conventional PCR-based techniques not only in unsolved cases, but also where inheritance pattern analysis is not achievable.

  1. Proposed heparin binding site in antithrombin based on arginine 47. A new variant Rouen-II, 47 Arg to Ser.

    PubMed Central

    Borg, J Y; Owen, M C; Soria, C; Soria, J; Caen, J; Carrell, R W

    1988-01-01

    Antithrombin Rouen-II, a new inherited variant of antithrombin-III, was found in two members of a family with no definite history of thrombosis. The subjects had normal antigenic concentrations of antithrombin and normal progressive inhibitory activity. However, the variant had defective heparin and heparan sulfate cofactor activities, and was not activated by a synthetic pentasaccharide representing the minimum heparin sequence. The abnormal antithrombin was isolated using heparin-Sepharose chromatography, and on electrophoresis at pH 8.6 migrated more anodally than normal. Two-dimensional peptide mapping of tryptic and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digests was performed and the abnormal peptide was located by tryptophan staining. Amino acid sequence studies demonstrated a substitution of arginine at residue 47 by a serine. Evidence strongly suggests that arginine 47 is a prime heparin binding site in antithrombin and that it forms part of a proposed positively charged linear site (to which heparin binds) that stretches across the surface of the molecule from the A to the D helix. PMID:3350974

  2. Induction of an inhibitor antibody to factor XI in a patient with severe inherited factor XI deficiency by Rh immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Michal; Zivelin, Ariella; Teitel, Jerome; Seligsohn, Uri

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we report an inhibitor antibody to factor XI (FXI) in a woman with severe inherited FXI deficiency, induced by FXI present in an Rh immune globulin preparation. The patient is homozygous for the Glu117Stop mutation, associated with a FXI level of less than 1 U/dL. Unlike all previously described patients with severe FXI deficiency and an inhibitor, the patient had never been exposed to blood products. Following 3 injections of Rh immune globulin during pregnancy, she developed an inhibitor to FXI (8 Bethesda units) that was shown to bind specifically to FXI and inhibit factor IX cleavage by purified FXIa. The administered Rh immune globulin and 2 other similar products were shown to contain FXI. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for immunization of severely FXI-deficient patients by FXI present in Rh immune globulin preparations.

  3. Evidence for a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III-thrombin complex formation in humans.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Lefèbvre, P

    1990-03-01

    In the presence of increased levels of fibrinopeptide A, decreased antithrombin III biological activity, and thrombin-antithrombin III complex levels are seen in diabetic patients. Induced-hyperglycaemia in diabetic and normal subjects decreased antithrombin III activity and thrombin-antithrombin III levels, and increased fibrinopeptide A plasma levels, while antithrombin III concentration did not change; heparin was shown to reduced these phenomena. In diabetic patients, euglycaemia induced by insulin infusion restored antithrombin III activity, thrombin-antithrombin III complex and fibrinopeptide A concentrations; heparin administration had the same effects. These data stress the role of a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III activity in precipitating thrombin hyperactivity in diabetes mellitus.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antithrombin III assay. 864.7060 Section 864.7060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7060 Antithrombin III...

  8. [Plasma antithrombin III activity in patients with pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Vertun, B; Filipecki, S; Szczepański, M; Wawrzyńska, L; Rózycka, J

    A decreased plasma antithrombin III activity has been noted in 12 out of 20 patients. In 2 patients it was most probably congenital defect, whereas in the remaining 10 patients--acquired. The observed disorders in the activity of antithrombin III with particular reference to anticoagulant therapy have been discussed.

  9. Lack of Association between Recurrent Pregnancy Loss and Inherited Thrombophilia in a Group of Colombian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Henry; Castañeda, Serguei A.; Cardona Maya, Wálter; Alvarez, Leonor; Gómez, Joaquín; Gómez, Jorge; Torres, José; Tobón, Luis; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cadavid, Ángela P.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown an association between recurrent pregnancy loss and inherited thrombophilia in Caucasian populations, but there is insufficient knowledge concerning triethnic populations such as the Colombian. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether inherited thrombophilia is associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. Methods. We conducted a case-control study of 93 patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (cases) and 206 healthy multiparous women (controls) in a Colombian subpopulation. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers of the inherited thrombophilias factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Activated protein C resistance and plasma levels of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S were also measured. Results. The frequency of thrombophilia-associated SNPs, activated protein C resistance, and anticoagulant protein deficiencies, was low overall, except for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T SNP. The differences between patients and controls had no statistical significance. Conclusion. Our study confirms the low prevalence of inherited thrombophilias in non-Caucasian populations and it is unlikely that the tested thrombophilias play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent pregnancy loss in this Colombian population. PMID:22577540

  10. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of the F11 gene in 14 Turkish patients with factor XI deficiency: identification of novel and recurrent mutations and their inheritance within families.

    PubMed

    Colakoglu, Seyma; Bayhan, Turan; Tavil, Betül; Keskin, Ebru Yılmaz; Cakir, Volkan; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla; Aytaç, Selin; Berber, Ergul

    2016-10-04

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is an autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the F11 gene which cause decreased FXI levels or impaired FXI function. An increasing number of mutations has been reported in the FXI mutation database, most of which affect the serine protease domain of the protein. FXI is a heterogeneous disorder associated with a variable bleeding tendency and a variety of causative F11 gene mutations. The molecular basis of FXI deficiency in 14 patients from ten unrelated families in Turkey was analysed to establish genotype-phenotype correlations and inheritance of the mutations in the patients' families. Fourteen index cases with a diagnosis of FXI deficiency and family members of these patients were enrolled into the study. The patients' F11 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct DNA sequencing analysis. The findings were analysed statistically using bivariate correlations, Pearson's correlation coefficient and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Direct DNA sequencing analysis of the F11 genes revealed that all of the 14 patients had a F11 gene mutation. Eight different mutations were identified in the apple 1, apple 2 or serine protease domains, except one which was a splice site mutation. Six of the mutations were recurrent. Two of the mutations were novel missense mutations, p.Val522Gly and p.Cys581Arg, within the catalytic domain. The p.Trp519Stop mutation was observed in two families whereas all the other mutations were specific to a single family. Identification of mutations confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of FXI deficiency. Most of the patients with mutations did not have any bleeding complications, whereas some had severe bleeding symptoms. Genetic screening for F11 gene mutations is important to decrease the mortality and morbidity rate associated with FXI deficiency, which can be life-threatening if bleeding occurs in tissues with high fibrinolytic activity.

  12. Inherited surfactant deficiency due to uniparental disomy of rare mutations in the surfactant protein-B and ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 genes

    PubMed Central

    Hamvas, Aaron; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Wegner, Daniel J.; DePass, Kelcey; Christodoulou, John; Bennetts, Bruce; McQuade, Leon R.; Gray, Peter H.; Deterding, Robin R.; Carroll, Travis R.; Kammesheidt, Anja; Kasch, Laura M.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cole, F. Sessions

    2009-01-01

    Objective To characterize inheritance of homozygous, rare, recessive loss-of-function mutations in the surfactant protein-B (SFTPB) or ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 (ABCA3) genes in newborns with lethal respiratory failure. Study design We resequenced parents whose infants were homozygous for mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. For infants with only one heterozygous parent, we performed microsatellite analysis for chromosomes 2 (SFTPB) and 16 (ABCA3). Results We identified one infant homozygous for the c.1549C>GAA mutation (121ins2) in SFTPB for whom only the mother was heterozygous and 3 infants homozygous for mutations in ABCA3 (p.K914R, p.P147L, and c.806_7insGCT) for whom only the fathers were heterozygous. For the SP-B deficient infant, microsatellite markers confirmed maternal heterodisomy with segmental isodisomy. Microsatellite analysis confirmed paternal isodisomy for the three ABCA3 deficient infants. Two ABCA3 deficient infants underwent lung transplantation at 3 and 5 months of age, respectively, and two infants died. None exhibited any non-pulmonary phenotype. Conclusions Uniparental disomy should be suspected in infants with rare homozygous mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. Confirmation of parental carrier status is important to provide recurrence risk and to monitor expression of other phenotypes that may emerge through reduction to homozygosity of recessive alleles. PMID:19647838

  13. Mycobacterium simiae infection in two unrelated patients with different forms of inherited IFN-γR2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Megged, Orli; Stepensky, Polina; Casimir, Pierre; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Averbuch, Diana; Assous, Marc Victor; Abuzaitoun, Omar; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Pedergnana, Vincent; Deswarte, Caroline; Migaud, Mélanie; Rose-John, Stefan; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Belkadi, Aziz; Conti, Francesca; Abel, Laurent; Vogt, Guillaume; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by predisposition to infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as environmental mycobacteria and BCG vaccines. We describe here two children with IFN-γR2 deficiency, from unrelated, consanguineous kindreds of Arab and Israeli descent. The first patient was a boy who died at the age of 4.5 years, from recurrent, disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium simiae. His IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and complete. The second patient was a girl with multiple disseminated mycobacterial infections, including infection with M. simiae. She died at the age of five years, a short time after the transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells from an unrelated donor. Her IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and partial. Autosomal recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency is life-threatening, even in its partial form, and genetic diagnosis and familial counseling are therefore particularly important for this condition. These two cases are the first of IFN-γR2 deficiency associated with M simiae infection to be described. PMID:25135595

  14. Using a minigene approach to characterize a novel splice site mutation in human F7 gene causing inherited factor VII deficiency in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Wang, X; Ding, Q; Fu, Q; Dai, J; Lu, Y; Xi, X; Wang, H

    2009-11-01

    Factor VII deficiency which transmitted as an autosomal recessive disorder is a rare haemorrhagic condition. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic defect and determine its functional consequences in a Chinese pedigree with FVII deficiency. The proband was diagnosed as inherited coagulation FVII deficiency by reduced plasma levels of FVII activity (4.4%) and antigen (38.5%). All nine exons and their flanking sequence of F7 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the proband and the PCR products were directly sequenced. The compound heterozygous mutations of F7 (NM_000131.3) c.572-1G>A and F7 (NM_000131.3) c.1165T>G; p.Cys389Gly were identified in the proband's F7 gene. To investigate the splicing patterns associated with F7 c.572-1G>A, ectopic transcripts in leucocytes of the proband were analyzed. F7 minigenes, spanning from intron 4 to intron 7 and carrying either an A or a G at position -1 of intron 5, were constructed and transiently transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, followed by RT-PCR analysis. The aberrant transcripts from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele were not detected by ectopic transcription study. Sequencing of the RT-PCR products from the mutant transfectant demonstrated the production of an erroneously spliced mRNA with exon 6 skipping, whereas a normal splicing occurred in the wide type transfectant. The aberrant mRNA produced from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele is responsible for the factor VII deficiency in this pedigree.

  15. Inherited IL-12p40 deficiency: genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds.

    PubMed

    Prando, Carolina; Samarina, Arina; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Cobat, Aurelie; Picard, Capucine; AlSum, Zobaida; Al-Jumaah, Suliman; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Frayha, Husn; Alangari, Abdullah; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Mobaireek, Khalid F; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Adimi, Parisa; Feinberg, Jacqueline; de Suremain, Maylis; Jannière, Lucile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Mansouri, Nahal; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S; Bloorsaz, Mohamad Reza; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Elloumi-Zghal, Houda; Chemli, Jalel; Bouguila, Jihene; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Alaki, Emadia; AlFawaz, Tariq S; Al Idrissi, Eman; ElGhazali, Gehad; Pollard, Andrew J; Murugasu, Belinda; Wah Lee, Bee; Halwani, Rabih; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed; Al Shehri, Mohammed A; Al-Zahrani, Mofareh; Bin-Hussain, Ibrahim; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Parvaneh, Nima; Abel, Laurent; Mansouri, Davood; Barbouche, Ridha; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-03-01

    Autosomal recessive interleukin (IL)-12 p40 (IL-12p40) deficiency is a rare genetic etiology of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). We report the genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds originating from 5 countries (India, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia). There are only 9 different mutant alleles of the IL12B gene: 2 small insertions, 3 small deletions, 2 splice site mutations, and 1 large deletion, each causing a frameshift and leading to a premature stop codon, and 1 nonsense mutation. Four of these 9 variants are recurrent, affecting 25 of the 30 reported kindreds, due to founder effects in specific countries. All patients are homozygous and display complete IL-12p40 deficiency. As a result, the patients lack detectable IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 and have low levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The clinical features are characterized by childhood onset of bacille Calmette-Guérin (attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain) (BCG) and Salmonella infections, with recurrences of salmonellosis (36.4%) more common than recurrences of mycobacterial disease (25%). BCG vaccination led to BCG disease in 40 of the 41 patients vaccinated (97.5%). Multiple mycobacterial infections were rare, observed in only 3 patients, whereas the association of salmonellosis and mycobacteriosis was observed in 9 patients. A few other infections were diagnosed, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 3), nocardiosis (n = 2), and klebsiellosis (n = 1). IL-12p40 deficiency has a high but incomplete clinical penetrance, with 33.3% of genetically affected relatives of index cases showing no symptoms. However, the prognosis is poor, with mortality rates of up to 28.6%. Overall, the clinical phenotype of IL-12p40 deficiency closely resembles that of interleukin 12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) deficiency. In conclusion, IL-12p40 deficiency is more common than initially thought and should be considered worldwide in patients with MSMD

  16. Deficient Sumoylation of Yeast 2-Micron Plasmid Proteins Rep1 and Rep2 Associated with Their Loss from the Plasmid-Partitioning Locus and Impaired Plasmid Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Jordan B.; McQuaid, Mary E.; Dobson, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The 2-micron plasmid of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes copy-number amplification and partitioning systems that enable the plasmid to persist despite conferring no advantage to its host. Plasmid partitioning requires interaction of the plasmid Rep1 and Rep2 proteins with each other and with the plasmid-partitioning locus STB. Here we demonstrate that Rep1 stability is reduced in the absence of Rep2, and that both Rep proteins are sumoylated. Lysine-to-arginine substitutions in Rep1 and Rep2 that inhibited their sumoylation perturbed plasmid inheritance without affecting Rep protein stability or two-hybrid interaction between Rep1 and Rep2. One-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Rep1 was required for efficient retention of Rep2 at STB and that sumoylation-deficient mutants of Rep1 and Rep2 were impaired for association with STB. The normal co-localization of both Rep proteins with the punctate nuclear plasmid foci was also lost when Rep1 was sumoylation-deficient. The correlation of Rep protein sumoylation status with plasmid-partitioning locus association suggests a theme common to eukaryotic chromosome segregation proteins, sumoylated forms of which are found enriched at centromeres, and between the yeast 2-micron plasmid and viral episomes that depend on sumoylation of their maintenance proteins for persistence in their hosts. PMID:23555963

  17. Genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with bacterial and fungal infections due to inherited IL-17RA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Romain; Okada, Satoshi; Béziat, Vivien; Moriya, Kunihiko; Liu, Caini; Chai, Louis Yi Ann; Migaud, Mélanie; Hauck, Fabian; Al Ali, Amein; Cyrus, Cyril; Vatte, Chittibabu; Patiroglu, Turkan; Unal, Ekrem; Ferneiny, Marie; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Nepesov, Serdar; Oleastro, Matias; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Asano, Takaki; Ohara, Osamu; Yun, Ling; Della Mina, Erika; Bronnimann, Didier; Itan, Yuval; Gothe, Florian; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Tahuil, Natalia; Aytekin, Caner; Salhi, Aicha; Al Muhsen, Saleh; Kobayashi, Masao; Toubiana, Julie; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Celmeli, Fatih; Klein, Christoph; AlKhater, Suzan A; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-12-20

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is defined as recurrent or persistent infection of the skin, nails, and/or mucosae with commensal Candida species. The first genetic etiology of isolated CMC-autosomal recessive (AR) IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) deficiency-was reported in 2011, in a single patient. We report here 21 patients with complete AR IL-17RA deficiency, including this first patient. Each patient is homozygous for 1 of 12 different IL-17RA alleles, 8 of which create a premature stop codon upstream from the transmembrane domain and have been predicted and/or shown to prevent expression of the receptor on the surface of circulating leukocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Three other mutant alleles create a premature stop codon downstream from the transmembrane domain, one of which encodes a surface-expressed receptor. Finally, the only known missense allele (p.D387N) also encodes a surface-expressed receptor. All of the alleles tested abolish cellular responses to IL-17A and -17F homodimers and heterodimers in fibroblasts and to IL-17E/IL-25 in leukocytes. The patients are currently aged from 2 to 35 y and originate from 12 unrelated kindreds. All had their first CMC episode by 6 mo of age. Fourteen patients presented various forms of staphylococcal skin disease. Eight were also prone to various bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Human IL-17RA is, thus, essential for mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and Staphylococcus, but otherwise largely redundant. A diagnosis of AR IL-17RA deficiency should be considered in children or adults with CMC, cutaneous staphylococcal disease, or both, even if IL-17RA is detected on the cell surface.

  18. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  19. Genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with bacterial and fungal infections due to inherited IL-17RA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, Romain; Okada, Satoshi; Béziat, Vivien; Moriya, Kunihiko; Liu, Caini; Chai, Louis Yi Ann; Migaud, Mélanie; Hauck, Fabian; Al Ali, Amein; Cyrus, Cyril; Vatte, Chittibabu; Patiroglu, Turkan; Unal, Ekrem; Ferneiny, Marie; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Nepesov, Serdar; Oleastro, Matias; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Asano, Takaki; Ohara, Osamu; Yun, Ling; Della Mina, Erika; Bronnimann, Didier; Itan, Yuval; Gothe, Florian; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Tahuil, Natalia; Aytekin, Caner; Salhi, Aicha; Al Muhsen, Saleh; Kobayashi, Masao; Toubiana, Julie; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Celmeli, Fatih; Klein, Christoph; AlKhater, Suzan A.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is defined as recurrent or persistent infection of the skin, nails, and/or mucosae with commensal Candida species. The first genetic etiology of isolated CMC—autosomal recessive (AR) IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) deficiency—was reported in 2011, in a single patient. We report here 21 patients with complete AR IL-17RA deficiency, including this first patient. Each patient is homozygous for 1 of 12 different IL-17RA alleles, 8 of which create a premature stop codon upstream from the transmembrane domain and have been predicted and/or shown to prevent expression of the receptor on the surface of circulating leukocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Three other mutant alleles create a premature stop codon downstream from the transmembrane domain, one of which encodes a surface-expressed receptor. Finally, the only known missense allele (p.D387N) also encodes a surface-expressed receptor. All of the alleles tested abolish cellular responses to IL-17A and -17F homodimers and heterodimers in fibroblasts and to IL-17E/IL-25 in leukocytes. The patients are currently aged from 2 to 35 y and originate from 12 unrelated kindreds. All had their first CMC episode by 6 mo of age. Fourteen patients presented various forms of staphylococcal skin disease. Eight were also prone to various bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Human IL-17RA is, thus, essential for mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and Staphylococcus, but otherwise largely redundant. A diagnosis of AR IL-17RA deficiency should be considered in children or adults with CMC, cutaneous staphylococcal disease, or both, even if IL-17RA is detected on the cell surface. PMID:27930337

  20. A phenocopy of CAII deficiency: a novel genetic explanation for inherited infantile osteopetrosis with distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, K; Kandemir, N; Topaloglu, R; Kornak, U; Bakkaloglu, A; Yordam, N; Ozen, S; Mocan, H; Shah, G; Sly, W; Karet, F

    2003-01-01

    We report the molecular genetic investigation of two consanguineous kindreds where osteopetrosis and distal RTA (dRTA) were both manifest. One kindred harbours a novel homozygous frameshift alteration in CA2. In the other, CAII levels were normal despite a similar clinical picture, and we excluded defects in CA2. In this kindred, two separate recessive disorders are penetrant, each affecting a different, tissue specific subunit of the vacuolar proton pump (H+-ATPase), providing a highly unusual, novel genetic explanation for the coexistence of osteopetrosis and dRTA. The osteopetrosis is the result of a homozygous deletion in TCIRG1, which encodes an osteoclast specific isoform of subunit a of the H+-ATPase, while the dRTA is associated with a homozygous mutation in ATP6V1B1, encoding the kidney specific B1 subunit of H+-ATPase. This kindred is exceptional firstly because the coinheritance of two rare recessive disorders has created a phenocopy of CAII deficiency, and secondly because these disorders affect two different subunits of the H+-ATPase that have opposite effects on bone density, but which have only recently been determined to possess tissue specific isoforms. PMID:12566520

  1. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M.; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. Objective This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Methods Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. Results We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. Conclusion INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. PMID:25312759

  3. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  5. Early Changes in the Antithrombin and Thrombin-Antithrombin Complex in Patients With Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Negreva, Mariya; Georgiev, Svetoslav; Prodanova, Krasimira; Nikolova, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on coagulation changes in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) are scarce. The aim of this study was to examine plasma antithrombin (AT) levels and activity as well as thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels in the early hours of the clinical manifestation of PAF. Methods Fifty-one patients (26 men and 25 women; mean age 59.84 ± 1.60 years) were consecutively selected with PAF duration < 24 hours, and 52 controls (26 men and 26 women; mean age 59.50 ± 1.46 years) matched the patients in terms of gender, age and comorbidities. Plasma levels and activity of AT and levels of the covalent TAT complex were studied once in each study participant. Results AT plasma levels in PAF patients were statistically significantly lower compared to controls (164.69 ± 10.51 vs. 276.21 ± 8.29 μg/mL, P < 0.001). Plasma activity of the anticoagulant was also significantly lower in PAF (71.33±4.87 vs. 110.72±3.09%, P < 0.001). TAT complex concentration in plasma was higher in the patient group (5.32 ± 0.23 vs. 3.20 ± 0.14 μg/L, P < 0.001). Conclusion We can say that PAF is associated with significantly reduced AT levels and activity and increased levels of TAT complex during the first 24 hours after its manifestation. These changes indicate a reduced activity of AT anticoagulant system, which is a probable prerequisite for the established enhanced coagulation (high TAT complex levels). PMID:28197274

  6. Characterization of the conformational alterations, reduced anticoagulant activity, and enhanced antiangiogenic activity of prelatent antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2008-05-23

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996-12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071-36081), since the (1)H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  7. A Pilot Study of Antithrombin Replacement Prior to Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Robert A; Woods, Katherine J; Murkowski, Kathleen; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Hoffman, George; Mitchell, Michael E; Punzalan, Rowena C; Scott, J Paul; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S

    2016-01-01

    Neonates have low levels of antithrombin. Inadequate anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) due to low antithrombin activity may result in a poor preservation of the coagulation system during bypass. We hypothesize that antithrombin replacement to neonates prior to CPB will preserve the hemostatic system and result in less postoperative bleeding. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot study of antithrombin replacement to neonates prior to CPB was conducted. Preoperative antithrombin levels determined the dose of recombinant antithrombin or placebo to be given. Antithrombin levels were measured following the dosing of the antithrombin/placebo, after initiation of bypass, near the completion of bypass, and upon intensive care unit admission. Eight subjects were enrolled. No subject had safety concerns. Mediastinal exploration occurred in two antithrombin subjects and one placebo subject. Antithrombin activity levels were significantly higher in the treated group following drug administration; levels continued to be higher than preoperatively but not different from the placebo group at all other time points. Total heparin administration was less in the antithrombin group; measurements of blood loss were similar in both groups. A single dose of recombinant antithrombin did not maintain 100% activity levels throughout the entire operation. Although no safety concerns were identified in this pilot study, a larger trial is necessary to determine clinical efficacy.

  8. The effect of plasma antithrombin concentration on thrombin generation and fibrin gel structure.

    PubMed

    Elgue, G; Sanchez, J; Fatah, K; Olsson, P; Blombäck, B

    1994-07-15

    Congenital deficiency of antithrombin (AT) is associated with thrombotic events and AT consumption occurs in some severe disorders and after treatment with heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variations in the level of plasma AT modify thrombin generation and the fibrin formation process after the intrinsic coagulation mechanism is triggered. Normal plasma was depleted of AT by immunoadsorption on CNBr-Sepharose coupled with the anti-AT-IgG fraction of antiserum. The AT-depleted plasma was reconstituted with AT (between 0.3 and 1.5 AT units per ml). Thrombin generation was measured as the development of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT). The lag phase preceding fibrin formation depended on the concentration of AT. The short lag phase was seen in completely AT-depleted plasma and the long in plasma with 1.5 AT units per ml. TAT generation, determined in parallel consecutive samples, showed that the rate at which thrombin was generated was inverse to the AT concentration in plasma. The network structure of hydrated fibrin gels in the clotted plasma was studied by measuring the wavelength dependence of gel turbidity. The mass/length ratio value, -i.e. the thickness of fiber strands and porosity of the gel increased with increasing AT concentrations. It is concluded that plasma AT regulates the rate of prothrombin-thrombin conversion, the clotting time and the consequently network structure of the fibrin gel.

  9. 21 CFR 864.7060 - Antithrombin III assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... level of antithrombin III (a substance which acts with the anticoagulant heparin to prevent coagulation). This determination is used to monitor the administration of heparin in the treatment of thrombosis. The...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... links) Children Living With Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Biotinidase Deficiency (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Biotinidase Deficiency Illinois ... Group Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 ...

  11. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase deficiency results in mTOR activation, failed translocation of lipin 1α to the nucleus and hypersensitivity to glucose: Implications for the inherited glycolytic disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jorge F; Krawczyk, Sarah A; Gostilovitch, Lubov; Corkey, Barbara E; Zoeller, Raphael A

    2011-11-01

    Inherited glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is the second most frequent glycolytic erythroenzymopathy in humans. Patients present with non-spherocytic anemia of variable severity and with neuromuscular dysfunction. We previously described Chinese hamster (CHO) cell lines with mutations in GPI and loss of GPI activity. This resulted in a temperature sensitivity and severe reduction in the synthesis of glycerolipids due to a reduction in phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP). In the current article we attempt to describe the nature of this pleiotropic effect. We cloned and sequenced the CHO lipin 1 cDNA, a gene that codes for PAP activity. Overexpression of lipin 1 in the GPI-deficient cell line, GroD1 resulted in increased PAP activity, however it failed to restore glycerolipid biosynthesis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a failure of GPI-deficient cells to localize lipin 1α to the nucleus. We also found that glucose-6-phosphate levels in GroD1 cells were 10-fold over normal. Lowering glucose levels in the growth medium partially restored glycerolipid biosynthesis and nuclear localization of lipin 1α. Western blot analysis of the elements within the mTOR pathway, which influences lipin 1 activity, was consistent with an abnormal activation of this system. Combined, these data suggest that GPI deficiency results in an accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate, and possibly other glucose-derived metabolites, leading to activation of mTOR and sequestration of lipin 1 to the cytosol, preventing its proper functioning. These results shed light on the mechanism underlying the pathologies associated with inherited GPI deficiency and the variability in the severity of the symptoms observed in these patients.

  13. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  14. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-06-08

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule.

  15. Insight into residues critical for antithrombin function from analysis of an expanded database of sequences that includes frog, turtle, and ostrich antithrombins.

    PubMed

    Backovic, Marija; Gettins, Peter G W

    2002-01-01

    Complete sequences were determined for frog, turtle, and ostrich antithrombins. Protein sequence comparisons with the other 10 known antithrombin sequences and with sequences of other serpins have provided striking evidence for the conservation of the heparin activation mechanism and new insight into those residues important for heparin binding, for heparin activation, and for reactive center loop function, as well as an indication of which glycosylation sites might be needed for function. Importantly, an understanding of, as yet, poorly understood antithrombin-protein interactions will be greatly aided by this expanded database and comparative analysis.

  16. The measurement of propionyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase activity in hair roots: its use in the diagnosis of inherited biotin-dependent enzyme deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Raetz, H

    1983-05-09

    Two mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzymes, propionyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase, are measurable in hair roots. A third biotin-dependent enzyme, beta-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, was barely detectable in hair roots. The diagnosis of isolated propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency was confirmed in hair roots of a known affected patient. This method should be a rapid and accurate method for the diagnoses of the various carboxylase deficiencies, particularly isolated pyruvate carboxylase deficiency in individuals with lactic acidosis, as well as for the assessment of biotin responsiveness in these patients.

  17. The usefulness of antithrombin activity monitoring during antithrombin supplementation in patients with sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Gando, Satoshi; Thachil, Jecko

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have repeatedly reported the effectiveness of antithrombin (AT) supplementation for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). In this study, we intended to elucidate the usefulness of monitoring antithrombin activity during antithrombin supplementation. Data of 926 patients with sepsis-associated DIC who had been undergone AT substitution were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients had received 1500IU/day of AT concentrate for three consecutive days. The patients' demographic characteristics, including the age, body weight, baseline DIC score and baseline AT activity, and treatment-related markers such as the change in DIC score and the change in the AT activity with treatment were analyzed in relation to the 28-day mortality. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association of the patients' age, baseline AT activity, Δ AT activity, baseline DIC score and Δ DIC score to the patients' outcomes. The cutoff values of the AT activities for death calculated by the ROC curve analysis were 41.3% for the baseline AT activity, 72.9% for the post-treatment AT activity and 37.0% for Δ AT activity. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) showed discriminative powers for the baseline AT activity, post-treatment AT activity and Δ AT activity of 0.58, 0.69 and 0.66, respectively. Monitoring of the AT activity is useful to predict the patients' outcome. Furthermore, the measurement of baseline AT activity may help in determining the appropriate dose for AT supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  19. Deficiency of Adenosine Deaminase 2 (DADA2), an Inherited Cause of Polyarteritis Nodosa and a Mimic of Other Systemic Rheumatologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Hasan; Kelly, Susan J; Ganson, Nancy J; Hershfield, Michael S

    2017-10-05

    A new autoinflammatory disease, deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2), caused by mutations in the CECR1 gene, was first reported in 2014. This review aims to update progress in defining, treating, and understanding this multi-faceted disorder. DADA2 was first described in patients with systemic inflammation, mild immune deficiency, and vasculopathy manifested as recurrent stroke or polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). More than 125 patients have now been reported, and the phenotype has expanded to include children and adults presenting primarily with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), or with antibody deficiency. Age of onset and clinical severity vary widely, even among related patients, and are not clearly related to CECR1 genotype. Inflammatory features often respond to anti-TNF agents, but marrow failure and severe immune deficiency may require hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. ADA2 is expressed and secreted by monocytes and macrophages, but its biological function and the pathogenesis of DADA2 are uncertain and will remain an important area of research. Pre-clinical investigation of ADA2 replacement therapy and CECR1-directed gene therapy are warranted, but complicated by the absence of a suitable animal model.

  20. [Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin III complex(TAT) and thrombophilia parameters in orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena cava filters].

    PubMed

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Toth, E

    1993-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) and thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TAT) levels were compared in 31 orally anticoagulated patients with inferior vena caval filters and a control group of 31 orally anticoagulated patients without caval filters and the incidence of markers of thrombophilia (deficiency of antithrombin-III, protein C, protein S and factor XII, presence of lupus anticoagulants) was determined. 8 of 31 patients (26%) from the group of caval filter carriers showed markers of thrombophilia (3 protein S deficiencies, 1 protein C deficiency, 2 factor XII deficiencies and 2 patients with lupus anticoagulants). In all orally anticoagulated patients a significant interdependence (p < 0.05) between F1 + 2- and TAT-levels and intensity (INR) of the oral anticoagulation could be observed. Comparison of F1 + 2- and TAT-levels of caval filter carriers and controls revealed no significant difference which leads to the conclusion that inferior vena caval filters do not induce detectable systemic activation of prothrombin under adequate oral anticoagulation therapy.

  1. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  2. Anti-HSV activity of serpin antithrombin III

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Prichard, Mark N.; Lynn, Ralf Geiben

    2014-01-01

    Natural serine protease inhibitors (serpins) elicit sensing of a microbial cell intruder and activate an intrinsic cellular immune response in HIV and HCV infected cells. Here, we demonstrate in vitro inhibition of HSV with serpin antithrombin III (ATIII) early during infection pointing towards inhibition of an entry event. We also found reduction of mortality from 90% to 40% in an abrasion mice model demonstrating a strong reduction of infection in vivo. Our data also indicated that this treatment might be suitable for drug-resistant viruses since high inhibition of an acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strain was found. Thus, an ATIII tropical treatment might be used for immunocompromised patients where prolonged treatment leads to drug resistant HSV-1 strains. Understanding how ATIII regulates HSV-1 infections may reveal new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25215309

  3. Anti-HSV activity of serpin antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Quenelle, Debra C; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Prichard, Mark N; Lynn, Ralf Geiben

    2014-04-01

    Natural serine protease inhibitors (serpins) elicit sensing of a microbial cell intruder and activate an intrinsic cellular immune response in HIV and HCV infected cells. Here, we demonstrate in vitro inhibition of HSV with serpin antithrombin III (ATIII) early during infection pointing towards inhibition of an entry event. We also found reduction of mortality from 90% to 40% in an abrasion mice model demonstrating a strong reduction of infection in vivo. Our data also indicated that this treatment might be suitable for drug-resistant viruses since high inhibition of an acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strain was found. Thus, an ATIII tropical treatment might be used for immunocompromised patients where prolonged treatment leads to drug resistant HSV-1 strains. Understanding how ATIII regulates HSV-1 infections may reveal new avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  4. INHERITED CARDIOMYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies, diseases of the heart muscle, are major causes of morbidity and mortality. A significant percentage of patients with cardiomyopathies have genetic-based, inheritable disease and, over the past two decades the genetic causes of these disorders have been increasingly discovered. The genes causing these disorders when they are mutated appear to encode proteins that frame a “final common pathway” for that specific disorder but the specifics of the phenotype, including age of onset, severity, and outcome is variable for reasons not yet understood. The “final common pathways” for the classified forms of cardiomyopathy include the sarcomere in the primarily diastolic dysfunction disorders hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), the linkage of the sarcomere and sarcolemma in the systolic dysfunction disorder dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and the desmosome in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AVC). Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is an overlap disorder and appears that any of these “final common pathways” can be involved depending on the specific form of LVNC. The genetics and mechanisms responsible for these clinical phenotypes will be described. PMID:25186923

  5. Factor XI replacement for inherited factor XI deficiency in routine clinical practice: results of the HEMOLEVEN prospective 3-year postmarketing study.

    PubMed

    Bauduer, F; de Raucourt, E; Boyer-Neumann, C; Trossaert, M; Beurrier, P; Faradji, A; Peynet, J; Borg, J-Y; Chamouni, P; Chatelanaz, C; Henriet, C; Bridey, F; Goudemand, J

    2015-07-01

    Factor XI (FXI)-deficient patients may develop excessive bleeding after trauma or surgery. Replacement therapy should be considered in high-risk situations, especially when FXI levels are below 20 IU dL(-1) . HEMOLEVEN is a human plasma-derived factor XI concentrate available in France since 1992, but there are few data regarding its use by physicians. This prospective study assessed the use, efficacy and safety of HEMOLEVEN in common clinical practice. HEMOLEVEN was evaluated in FXI-deficient patients in 13 French centres in a 3-year postmarketing study. Forty-four patients (30 females, 14 males) received 67 treatments. The median age was 37 years (8 months-91 years). Basal FXI levels were <1 to 51 IU dL(-1) (median: 5.5); 29 patients were severely FXI-deficient (<20 IU dL(-1) ). FXI was administered prophylactically before 43 surgical procedures, 10 invasive procedures, 8 vaginal deliveries, or as curative treatment for six bleeds. The efficacy was assessed as excellent/good in 63, moderate in two and undetermined in two treatments. Seven patients experienced seven adverse effects, including two rated as serious: one sudden massive pulmonary embolism with fatal outcome and one case of inhibitor to FXI. HEMOLEVEN is effective for bleeding prevention in FXI deficiency. However, considering the benefit/risk ratio observed in relation to dosage in this study; firstly, it should be used sparingly due to its potential prothrombotic effect; secondly, new prescription procedures should be defined to adapt the dosage, especially in patients with intrinsic and/or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Clinical and genetic findings in patients with biotinidase deficiency detected through newborn screening or selective screening for hearing loss or inherited metabolic disease].

    PubMed

    Couce, María Luz; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; García Silva, María Teresa; García Cazorla, Angels; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Castiñeiras, Daisy; Pineda, Merçè; Navarrete, Rosa; Campistol, Jaume; Fraga, José María; Pérez, Belén; Ugarte, Magdalena

    2011-10-22

    To evaluate clinical, biochemical and genetic findings of two series of patients with biotinidase deficiency. Fifteen cases detected through newborn screening and six through selective screening for hearing loss or metabolic disease. No patient detected by neonatal screening had symptoms and only one case with partial biotinidase activity developed myoclonic seizures that resolved with biotin. More common mutations found among this group were p.D444H and the double mutation [p.D444H;p.A171T]. However, neurological and hearing manifestations predominated among the six symptomatic cases and mutations p.L32fs, p.G34fs, p.T401I, p.D444H, p.T532M and the novel one p.L466fs were identified. Patients with profound biotinidase deficiency and/or clinical signs were treated with pharmacological doses of biotin (10-30mg daily). Biotinidase deficiency must be included in the newborn screening programmes in order to begin early treatment even in partial forms. Different mutations found in both series of patients suggest that routine genetic procedure of the BTD gene by direct sequencing might be useful to assign patients to the partial or profound form of the disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  8. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis disseminated disease in a patient with inherited deficiency in the beta1 subunit of the interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23 receptor.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Vasconcelos, Dewton de; Grumach, Anete S; Yamaguti, Augusto; Andrade, Maria Elisa B; Fieschi, Claire; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2005-08-15

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular dimorphic fungus that causes paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the most important deep mycosis in Latin America. Only a small percentage of individuals infected by P. brasiliensis develop clinical PCM, possibly in part because of genetically determined interindividual variability of host immunity. However, no primary immunodeficiency has ever been associated with PCM. We describe the first patient, to our knowledge, with PCM and a well-defined primary immunodeficiency in the beta 1 subunit of the interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23 receptor, a disorder previously shown to be specifically associated with impaired interferon (IFN)-gamma production, mycobacteriosis, and salmonellosis. Our patient had a childhood history of bacille Calmette-Guérin disease and nontyphoid salmonellosis and, at the age of 20 years, presented to our clinic with a disseminated (acute) form of PCM. He responded well to antifungal treatment and is now doing well at 24 years of age. This unique observation supports previous studies of PCM suggesting that IL-12, IL-23, and IFN-gamma play an important role in protective immunity to P. brasiliensis. Tuberculosis and PCM are thus not only related clinically and pathologically, but also by their immunological pathogenesis. Our study further expands the spectrum of clinical manifestations of inherited defects of the IL-12/IL-23-IFN-gamma axis. Patients with unexplained deep fungal infections, such as PCM, should be tested for defects in the IL-12/IL-23-IFN- gamma axis.

  9. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts.

  10. Association of protein S p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with plasma protein S levels in normal individuals and patients with inherited protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaman, G; Biguzzi, E; Razzari, C; Tosetto, A; Fontana, G; Asti, D; Brancaccio, V; Castori, D; Lane, D A; Faioni, E M

    2007-01-01

    A dimorphism in PROS1 gene (c.A2,001G, p.Pro667Pro) has been associated with significantly reduced levels of both free and total protein S in carriers of the GG genotype. It is not known how the GG genotype could influence PS levels in normals, whether it could influence the levels of protein S in carriers of mutations in PROS1 gene and whether this genotype acts as an isolated or additive risk factor for venous thrombosis. With this as background, we evaluated the association of p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with free and total protein S centrally measured in a panel of 119 normal controls, 222 individuals with low protein S and 137 individuals with normal PS levels belonging to 76 families with protein S deficiency enrolled in the ProSIT study. Transient expression of recombinant wild type protein S and p.Pro667Pro protein S was performed to evaluate the role of the A to G transition at position 2001 in vitro. The p.Pro667Pro polymorphism was also expressed together with a p.Glu67Ala variant to assess a possible influence on protein S levels in protein S deficient subjects. Free and total protein S levels were significantly lower in normal women. In normal women only was the GG genotype associated with significantly lower free protein S levels in comparison to AA and AG genotypes (P=0.032). No significant influence of GG genotype was observed in patients, either with known mutations or with low protein S levels. These data were confirmed by in vitro transient expression, showing no difference in secretion levels of the p.Pro667Pro variant (even in association with the p.Glu67Ala mutation), compared to the wild type protein S. The genotype in itself was neither a significant risk factor for venous thrombosis nor a risk modifier in patients with known mutations.

  11. Production of recombinant human antithrombin by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kuwae, Shinobu; Ohyama, Masao; Ohya, Tomoshi; Ohi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with the production of recombinant human antithrombin (rAT) by the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. In preliminary methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation, the rAT concentration reached 324 mg/l at 192 h of cultivation, but the specific heparin cofactor (HC) activity of rAT in the culture supernatant was 10% of that of plasma-derived antithrombin (pAT). To improve the specific HC activity of rAT, effort was first focused on the optimization of culture pH and media composition, resulting in protection of rAT against pH-dependent instability and proteolytic degradation. However, even in the optimized methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation, the specific HC activity of rAT in the culture supernatant was still 20% that of pAT. To investigate the unknown mechanisms involved in the decreased specific HC activity of rAT, the culture supernatant of mock-transfected cells was prepared by methanol-limited fed-batch fermentation. When pAT was added to this supernatant, a rapid decrease in HC activity was observed; the residual HC activity was 26% after 24 h of incubation at 25 degrees C. The loss of pAT activity was prevented by addition of a formaldehyde scavenger, amino urea, to the supernatant. In addition, alcohol oxidase activity was observed in the supernatant, resulting in the accumulation of formaldehyde in the culture broth. These results suggest that the formaldehyde produced by methanol oxidation in the culture broth of P. pastoris might decrease the HC activity of rAT during fermentation. Replacing the methanol with glycerol as the carbon source improved the specific HC activity of rAT from 20% to above 40% of that of pAT. In the glycerol-limited fed-batch fermentation, rAT is expressed at 100 mg/l under the control of the truncated mutated AOX2 promoter.

  12. Antithrombin III in animal models of sepsis and organ failure.

    PubMed

    Dickneite, G

    1998-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT III) is the physiological inhibitor of thrombin and other serine proteases of the clotting cascade. In the development of sepsis, septic shock and organ failure, the plasma levels of AT III decrease considerably, suggesting the concept of a substitution therapy with the inhibitor. A decrease of AT III plasma levels might also be associated with other pathological disorders like trauma, burns, pancreatitis or preclampsia. Activation of coagulation and consumption of AT III is the consequence of a generalized inflammation called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). The clotting cascade is also frequently activated after organ transplantation, especially if organs are grafted between different species (xenotransplantation). During the past years AT III has been investigated in numerous corresponding disease models in different animal species which will be reviewed here. The bulk of evidence suggests, that AT III substitution reduces morbidity and mortality in the diseased animals. While gaining more experience with AT III, the concept of substitution therapy to maximal baseline plasma levels (100%) appears to become insufficient. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies now suggests to adjust the AT III plasma levels to about 200%, i.e., doubling the normal value. During the last few years several authors proposed that AT III might not only be an anti-thrombotic agent, but to have in addition an anti-inflammatory effect.

  13. Thromboembolic disease due to thermolabile conformational changes of antithrombin Rouen-VI (187 Asn-->Asp)

    PubMed

    Bruce, D; Perry, D J; Borg, J Y; Carrell, R W; Wardell, M R

    1994-12-01

    A new variant of antithrombin (Rouen-VI, 187 Asn-->Asp) with increased heparin affinity was shown to have normal inhibitory activity which decreased slowly at 4 degrees C and rapidly at 41 degrees C. On electrophoresis the freshly isolated variant had an anodal shift relative to native antithrombin due to the mutation. A further anodal transition occurred after either prolonged storage at 4 degrees C or incubation at 41 degrees C due to the formation of a new inactive uncleaved component with properties characteristic of L-form (latent) antithrombin. At the same time, polymerization also occurred with a predominance of di-, tri-, and tetra-mers. These findings fit with the observed mutation of the conserved asparagine (187) in the F-helix destabilizing the underlying A-sheet of the molecule. Evidence of A-sheet perturbation is provided by the increased rate of peptide insertion into the A-sheet and by the decreased vulnerability of the reactive loop to proteolysis. The spontaneous formation of both L-antithrombin and polymers is consistent with our crystal structure of intact antithrombin where L-form and active antithrombin are linked together as dimers. The nature of this linkage favors a mechanism of polymerization whereby the opening of the A-sheet, to give incorporation of the reactive center loop, is accompanied by the bonding of the loop of one molecule to the C-sheet of the next. The accelerated lability of antithrombin Rouen-VI at 41 versus 37 degrees C provides an explanation for the clinical observation that episodes of thrombosis were preceded by unrelated pyrexias.

  14. Postoperative costs associated with outcomes after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation: role of antithrombin levels.

    PubMed

    Muedra, Vicente; Llau, Juan V; Llagunes, José; Paniagua, Pilar; Veiras, Sonia; Fernández-López, Antonio R; Diago, Carmen; Hidalgo, Francisco; Gil, Jesús; Valiño, Cristina; Moret, Enric; Gómez, Laura; Pajares, Azucena; de Prada, Blanca

    2013-04-01

    To study the impact on postoperative costs of a patient's antithrombin levels associated with outcomes after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. An analytic decision model was designed to estimate costs and clinical outcomes after cardiac surgery in a typical patient with low antithrombin levels (<63.7%) compared with a patient with normal antithrombin levels (≥63.7%). The data used in the model were obtained from a literature review and subsequently validated by a panel of experts in cardiothoracic anesthesiology. Multi-institutional (14 Spanish hospitals). Consultant anesthesiologists. A sensitivity analysis of extreme scenarios was carried out to assess the impact of the major variables in the model results. The average cost per patient was €18,772 for a typical patient with low antithrombin levels and €13,881 for a typical patient with normal antithrombin levels. The difference in cost was due mainly to the longer hospital stay of a patient with low antithrombin levels compared with a patient with normal levels (13 v 10 days, respectively, representing a €4,596 higher cost) rather than to costs related to the management of postoperative complications (€215, mostly owing to transfusions). Sensitivity analysis showed a high variability range of approximately ±55% of the base case cost between the minimum and maximum scenarios, with the hospital stay contributing more significantly to the variation. Based on this analytic decision model, there could be a marked increase in the postoperative costs of patients with low antithrombin activity levels at the end of cardiac surgery, mainly ascribed to a longer hospitalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions lysosomal acid lipase deficiency lysosomal acid lipase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  18. Polyguluronate sulfate, polymannuronate sulfate, and their oligosaccharides have antithrombin III- and heparin cofactor II-independent anticoagulant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuan; Lan, Ying; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Hao, Cui; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death. However, the complications can be treated with heparin and heparinoids, such as heparin pentasaccharide Fondaparinux, dermatan sulfate, and PSS made from alginate extracted from brown seaweeds by chemical sulfation. Alginate is composed of a linear backbone of polymannuronate (PM), polyguluronate (PG), and alternate residues of mannuronic acid and guluronic acid. It is unknown if heparin and sulfated PG (PGS)/PM (PMS) have the same or different anticoagulant molecular targets. In the current study, the anticoagulant activities of PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides were directly compared to that of heparin, Fondaparinux, and dermatan sulfate by the activated partial thrombinplastin time (aPTT) assay using normal, antithrombin III (ATIII)-deficient, heparin co-factor II (HCII)-deficient, and ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasmas. Our results showed that PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides had better anticoagulant activity than that of Fondaparinux in all four human plasmas tested. As expected, heparin was the best anticoagulant in normal plasma. Moreover, PGS, PGS6, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than dermatan sulfate in HCII-deficient plasma. Most strikingly, PGS, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than that of heparin in ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasma. The results revealed for the first time that sulfated alginate had ATIII- and HCII-independent anticoagulant activities. Therefore, developing PGS and PMS-based anticoagulants might require to discover their major molecular targets and to develop target-specific anticoagulant assays.

  19. Hydration structure of antithrombin conformers and water transfer during reactive loop insertion.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; McGee, M P

    1998-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor antithrombin undergoes extensive conformational changes during functional interaction with its target proteases. Changes include insertion of the reactive loop region into a beta-sheet structure in the protein core. We explore the possibility that these changes are linked to water transfer. Volumes of water transferred during inhibition of coagulation factor Xa are compared to water-permeable volumes in the x-ray structure of two different antithrombin conformers. In one conformer, the reactive loop is largely exposed to solvent, and in the other, the loop is inserted. Hydration fingerprints of antithrombin (that is, water-permeable pockets) are analyzed to determine their location, volume, and size of access pores, using alpha shape-based methods from computational geometry. Water transfer during reactions is calculated from changes in rate with osmotic pressure. Hydration fingerprints prove markedly different in the two conformers. There is an excess of 61-76 water molecules in loop-exposed as compared to loop-inserted conformers. Quantitatively, rate increases with osmotic pressure are consistent with the transfer of 73 +/- 7 water molecules. This study demonstrates that conformational changes of antithrombin, including loop insertion, are linked to water transfer from antithrombin to bulk solution. It also illustrates the combined use of osmotic stress and analytical geometry as a new and effective tool for structure/function studies. PMID:9675160

  20. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  1. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  2. Testing for inherited thrombophilia and consequences for antithrombotic prophylaxis in patients with venous thromboembolism and their relatives. A review of the Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Valerio; Rossi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The clinical penetrance of venous thromboembolism (VTE) susceptibility genes is variable, being lower in heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A (mild thrombophilia), and higher in the rare carriers of deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C or S, and those with multiple or homozygous abnormalities (high-risk thrombophilia). The absolute risk of VTE is low, and the utility of laboratory investigation for inherited thrombophilia in patients with VTE and their asymptomatic relatives has been largely debated, leading to the production of several Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups. The risk for VTE largely depends on the family history of VTE. Therefore, indiscriminate search for carriers is of no utility, and targeted screening is potentially more fruitful. In patients with VTE inherited thrombophilia is not scored as a determinant of recurrence, playing a minor role in the decision of prolonging anticoagulation; indeed, a few guidelines consider testing worthwhile to identify carriers of high-risk thrombophilia, particularly those with a family history of VTE. The identification of the asymptomatic carrier relatives of the probands with VTE and thrombophilia could reduce cases of provoked VTE, offering them primary antithrombotic prophylaxis during risk situations. In most guidelines, this is considered justified only for relatives of probands with a deficiency of natural anticoagulants or multiple abnormalities. Counselling the asymptomatic female relatives of individuals with VTE and/or thrombophilia before pregnancy or the prescription of hormonal treatments should be administered with consideration of the risk driven by the type of thrombophilia and the family history of VTE.

  3. Clinical Severity of PGK1 Deficiency Due To a Novel p.E120K Substitution Is Exacerbated by Co-inheritance of a Subclinical Translocation t(3;14)(q26.33;q12), Disrupting NUBPL Gene.

    PubMed

    David, Dezső; Almeida, Lígia S; Maggi, Maristella; Araújo, Carlos; Imreh, Stefan; Valentini, Giovanna; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of cytogenetically similar, apparently balanced familial chromosome translocations not always exhibit the putative translocation-associated disease phenotype. Additional genetic defects, such as genomic imbalance at breakpoint regions or elsewhere in the genome, have been reported as the most plausible explanation.By means of comprehensive molecular and functional analyses, additional to careful dissection of the t(3;14)(q26.33;q12) breakpoints, we unveil a novel X-linked PGK1 mutation and examine the contribution of these to the extremely severe clinical phenotype characterized by hemolytic anemia and neuromyopathy.The 3q26.33 breakpoint is 40 kb from the 5' region of tetratricopeptide repeat domain 14 gene (TTC14), whereas the 14q12 breakpoint is within IVS6 of nucleotide-binding protein-like gene (NUBPL) that encodes a mitochondrial complex I assembly factor. Disruption of NUBPL in translocation carriers leads to a decrease in the corresponding mRNA accompanied by a decrease in protein level. Exclusion of pathogenic genomic imbalance and reassessment of familial clinical history indicate the existence of an additional causal genetic defect. Consequently, by WES a novel mutation, c.358G>A, p.E120K, in the X-linked phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) was identified that segregates with the phenotype. Specific activity, kinetic properties, and thermal stability of this enzyme variant were severely affected. The novel PGK1 mutation is the primary genetic alteration underlying the reported phenotype as the translocation per se only results in a subclinical phenotype. Nevertheless, its co-inheritance presumably exacerbates PGK1-deficient phenotype, most likely due to a synergistic interaction of the affected genes both involved in cell energy supply.

  4. Mitochondrial inheritance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Basse, Christoph W

    2010-12-01

    Faithful inheritance of mitochondria is essential for growth and development. Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria is a common phenomenon in sexual eukaryotes and has been reported for numerous fungal species. Uniparental inheritance is a genetically regulated process, aimed to gain a homoplasmic state within cells, and this is often associated with selective elimination of one parental mitochondria population. This review will focus on recent developments in our understanding of common and specified regulatory circuits of selective mitochondrial inheritance during sexual development. It further refers to the influence of mitochondrial fusion on generation of recombinant mitochondrial DNA molecules. The latter aspect appears rather exciting in the context of intron homing and could bring a new twist to the debate on the significance of uniparental inheritance. The emergence of genome-wide studies offers new perspectives to address potential relationships between uniparental inheritance, vegetative inheritance and last but not least cellular scavenging systems to dispose of disintegrated organelles.

  5. Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Genetics & Inheritance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prepare Your Application Draft Specific Aims Outline Your Experiments Know Your Audience Write Your Research Plan Plan ... Applications Requesting Prior Clinical Trial Planning Application Vertebrate Animals Research Animals Involvement Codes Select Agents NIAID Select ...

  6. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Inherited Emphysema)

    MedlinePlus

    ... general term used to describe diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. In emphysema there is damage to the walls of the ... alveoli) in the lungs. The earliest symptom of emphysema is shortness of breath during activity. Later the ...

  7. Oral contraceptives, antithrombin- III activity, and postoperative deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, S; Stamatakis, J D; Thomas, D P; Kakkar, V V

    1976-03-06

    Deep-vein thrombosis (D.V.T.) was detected by the fibrinogen-uptake test in six out of a total of thirty-one young women undergoing emergency abdominal surgery who gave a history of recent oral contraceptive intake. In contrast, no D.V.T. developed in nineteen similar patients who were not on oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). Plasma-antithrombin-III activity was significantly lower preoperatively in patients taking oral contraceptives; postoperative D.V.T. subsequently developed in three out of five patients with preoperative antithrombin-III activity below 50%. In seventy-eight dental patients undergoing molar extraction, antithrombin-III activity was measured before, during, and after operation. Activity fell in all patients during operation, but the fall was significantly greater in women taking oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). The intra-operative fall in antithrombin-III activity was prevented by a small preoperative dose of subcutaneous heparin.

  8. Technology evaluation: transgenic antithrombin III (rhAT-III), Genzyme Transgenics.

    PubMed

    Yeung, P K

    2000-06-01

    AT-III LLC, a joint venture between Genzyme Transgenics (GTC) and Genzyme General, is developing transgenic recombinant human antithrombin III (rhAT-III) as a potential treatment for sepsis and other disorders involving thrombosis. It is in phase III clinical trials in the US and Europe as an anticoagulant in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery such as cardiopulmonary bypass.

  9. Synthesis and characterisation of magnetised Dacron-heparin composite employed for antithrombin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Mercês, Aurenice Arruda Dutra das; Silva, Ricardo de Souza; Silva, Karciano José Santos; Maciel, Jackeline da Costa; Oliveira, Givanildo Bezerra; Buitrago, Davian Martinez; de Aguiar, José Albino Oliveira; de Carvalho-Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2016-12-01

    Human antithrombin is a blood derivative widely used in the treatment of coagulation dysfunction. Affinity chromatography using heparin (HEP) derivatives is usually used for antithrombin purification. In this study, an affinity procedure based on a magnetic Dacron-HEP composite is proposed. Dacron was firstly converted to Dacron-hydrazide and magnetised by co-precipitation with of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) (mDAC). HEP was activated by carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide and covalently linked to mDAC (mDAC-HEP). EDX and infrared spectra analyses confirmed each synthesis step of mDAC-HEP. This composite exhibited superparamagnetism behaviour. Human plasma was incubated with mDAC-HEP (fresh and stored over a long period) and washed with phosphate buffer containing increasing concentrations of NaCl. Human plasma antithrombin activity was reduced by approximately 20% in the presence of the 1.0M NaCl fraction, and this eluate was able to prolong coagulation time (aPTT) using both preparations. Electrophoresis of the eluates revealed bands corresponding to the expected size of antithrombin (58kDa). The mDAC-HEP particles are reusable. This method presents the following advantages: easy, low-cost synthesis of the composite, magnet-based affinity purification steps, and reusability.

  10. Epigenetic inheritance: Uncontested?

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Reinberg, Danny

    2011-01-01

    “Epigenetics” is currently defined as “the inheritance of variation (-genetics) above and beyond (epi-) changes in the DNA sequence”. Despite the fact that histones are believed to carry important epigenetic information, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the inheritance of histone-based epigenetic information, including histone modifications and histone variants. Here we review recent progress and discuss potential models for the mitotic inheritance of histone modifications-based epigenetic information. PMID:21321606

  11. Polymorphisms in factor V and antithrombin III gene in recurrent pregnancy loss: a case-control study in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Bhakuni, Teena; Ranjan, Ravi; Kumar, Ravi; Kishor, Kamal; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman; Saxena, Renu

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) can be caused due to diverse factors with thrombophilia being one of them. The association of various thrombophilic risk factors with RPL is inconsistent in different studies and the frequency of these risk factors in Indian population is obscure. Five hundred and eighty patients with either recurrent early miscarriage or a history of at least one late miscarriage were screened for deficiency of protein C (PC), protein S (PS), antithrombin III (AT), APC resistance and prothrombin 20210G > A mutation. APC resistance positive patients were typed for the factor V Leiden, factor V Hong Kong/Cambridge mutations, and HR2 haplotype. PstI and rs2227589 AT mutations were detected by direct sequencing. APC resistance (13.4 %) was detected to be most common in Indian RPL patients followed by PS (10.6 %), PC (9.8 %) and AT deficiency (4.31 %.). FV Leiden was shown to be associated with APC resistance while HR2 haplotype was not associated with APC resistance (p values: 0.0001 and 0.327 respectively) and the increased risk of RPL. PstI and rs2227589 polymorphisms were similar in patients and controls and not associated with AT deficiency in RPL. Our study emphasizes the presence of other contributory factors towards APC resistance rather than FV Leiden alone. This is the first Indian study where HR2 haplotype and rs2227589 are observed to be present in RPL population. Although not significant, occurrence of rs2227589 and FV HR2 in homozygous condition necessitates the study of these polymorphisms in a larger sample size.

  12. The Impact of Inherited Thrombophilia Types and Low Molecular Weight Heparin Treatment on Pregnancy Complications in Women with Previous Adverse Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Aracic, Nada; Roje, Damir; Jakus, Ivana Alujevic; Bakotin, Marinela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the distribution of births and spontaneous abortions, first-trimester abortion (FTA) and mid-trimester abortion (MTA), in untreated (n=128) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treated pregnancies (n=50) of the same women with inherited thrombophilias and adverse pregnancy outcome (APO) in previous pregnancies. We particularly investigated the impact of LMWH on reducing the pregnancy complications in two thrombophilia types, "Conventional" and "Novel". Materials and Methods 50 women with inherited thrombophilia (26 Conventional and 24 Novel) and APO in previous pregnancies were included in the study. Conventional group included factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PT) mutations and antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), and protein C (PC) deficiency, while the Novel group included methylentetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism. APO was defined as one of the following: preterm birth (PTB), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), placental abruption (PA) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Results There was no difference in distribution of births and spontaneous abortions between Conventional and Novel thrombophilia in untreated pregnancies (χ2=2.7; p=0.100) and LMWH treated pregnancies (χ2=0.442; p=0.506). In untreaed pregnancies thrombophilia type did not have any impact on the frequency of FTA and MTA (χ2=0.14; p=0.711). In birth-ended pregnancies LMWH treatement reduced the incidence of IUFD (p=0.011) in Conventional and FGR, IUFD, and PTB in Novel thrombophilia group. Conclusion The equal impact of two thrombophilia types on the pregnancy outcomes and a more favorable effect of LMWH therapy on pregnancy complications in Novel thrombophilia group point the need for Novel thrombophilias screening and the future studies on this issue should be recommended. PMID:27401656

  13. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  16. Antithrombotic and thrombolytic effects of antithrombin: comparison with either heparin or defibrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Miwa, Atsuko; Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi

    1993-05-01

    Anti-thrombotic and thrombolytic effects of anti-thrombin agent (Argatroban;Arg 0.5 mg/kg) was evaluated by angioscopy and compared with heparin (250 U/kg). Occlusive thrombus was produced in canine iliac artery by balloon injury. At another side, balloon denudation was attempted at 20 minutes after the administration of the agent. One hour thrombus was control. Angioscopic percent luminal obstruction with thrombus reduced by Arg (from 69 to 32%, P < 0.0001), but not by heparin (from 53% to 59%). Both agents had antithrombotic effects and prevented thrombus formation. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) prolonged to 190% with argatroban and 1253% with heparin (P < 0.0001). Thus, antithrombin agent has both preventive effect of thrombosis and thrombolytic effect without marked prolongation of the APTT.

  17. Treatment of accidental perianal injection of topical thrombin with intravenous antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Paidy, Samata R; McLeod, Whitney; Fox, Alexandra; Nfonsam, Valentine N

    2017-04-01

    While topical thrombin application can markedly improve surgical hemostasis, rapid absorption of thrombin can result in pulmonary embolism and death. We report a case of accidental interstitial infiltration of topical thrombin after hemorrhoidectomy that was treated with administration of human antithrombin and heparin anticoagulation. Except for a marked decrease in antithrombin activity from super normal to normal values, the patient exhibited no laboratory or clinical signs of pulmonary embolism, thrombin mediated consumptive loss of procoagulants, or regional thrombosis. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery without sign of thrombotic morbidity. While it is hoped that such a medical misadventure should not occur, our case may serve as a reference to guide anticoagulant therapy if such a clinical scenario arises.

  18. Non-enzymatic glycation reduces heparin cofactor II anti-thrombin activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Milani, M R; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Lefebvre, P

    1990-04-01

    The effects of non-enzymatic glycation on heparin cofactor II activity, at glucose concentrations which might be expected in physiological or diabetic conditions have been evaluated in this study. Radiolabelled glucose incorporation was associated with a loss of heparin cofactor anti-thrombin activity. The heparin cofactor heparin and dermatan sulfate-dependent inhibition of thrombin was significantly reduced, showing a remarkable decrease of the maximum second order rate constant. This study shows that heparin cofactor can be glycated at glucose concentrations found in the blood, and that this phenomenon produces a loss of heparin cofactor-antithrombin activity. These data suggest, furthermore, a possible link between heparin cofactor glycation and the pathogenesis of thrombosis in diabetes mellitus.

  19. Mechanism of poly(acrylic acid) acceleration of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin: implications for the design of novel heparin mimics.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Cheang, Kai I; Desai, Umesh R

    2005-08-11

    The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive approximately 2500-fold acceleration in the reaction rate and is also a key reason for the clinical usage of heparin. Our recent study of the antithrombin-activating properties of a carboxylic acid-based polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), demonstrated a surprisingly high acceleration in thrombin inhibition (Monien, B. H.; Desai, U. R. J. Med. Chem. 2005, 48, 1269). To better understand this interesting phenomenon, we have studied the mechanism of PAA-dependent acceleration in antithrombin inhibition of thrombin. Competitive binding studies with low-affinity heparin and a heparin tetrasaccharide suggest that PAA binds antithrombin in both the pentasaccharide- and the extended heparin-binding sites, and these results are corroborated by molecular modeling. The salt-dependence of the K(D) of the PAA-antithrombin interaction shows the formation of five ionic interactions. In contrast, the contribution of nonionic forces is miniscule, resulting in an interaction that is significantly weaker than that observed for heparins. A bell-shaped profile of the observed rate constant for antithrombin inhibition of thrombin as a function of PAA concentration was observed, suggesting that inhibition proceeds through the "bridging" mechanism. The knowledge gained in this mechanistic study highlights important rules for the rational design of orally available heparin mimics.

  20. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  1. Domain structure of antithrombin III. Tentative localization of the heparin binding region using /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gettins, P.; Wooten, E.W.

    1987-07-14

    The denaturation of human and bovine antithrombin III by guanidine hydrochloride has been followed by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The same unfolding transition seen previously from circular dichroism studies at low denaturant concentration was detected here by discontinuous changes in the chemical shifts of the C(2) protons of two of the five histidines in human antithrombin III and of three of the six histidines in bovine antithrombin III. These two histidines in human antithrombin III are assigned to residue 1 and, more tentatively, to residue 65. Two of the three histidines similarly affected in the bovine protein appear to be homologous to residues in the human protein. This supports the proposal of similar structures for the two proteins. In the presence of heparin, the discontinuous titration behavior of these histidine resonances is shifted to higher denaturant concentration, reflecting the stabilization of the easily unfolded first domain of the protein by bound heparin. From the tentative assignment of one of these resonances to histidine-1, it is proposed that the heparin binding site of antithrombin III is located in the N-terminal region and that this region forms a separate domain from the rest of the protein. The pattern of disulfide linkages is such that this domain may well extend from residue 1 to at least residue 128. Thermal denaturation also leads to major perturbation of these two histidine resonances in human antithrombin III, though stable intermediates in the unfolding were not detected.

  2. Targeting of Antithrombin in Hemophilia A or B with RNAi Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pasi, K John; Rangarajan, Savita; Georgiev, Pencho; Mant, Tim; Creagh, Michael D; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Bevan, David; Austin, Steve; Hay, Charles R; Hegemann, Inga; Kazmi, Rashid; Chowdary, Pratima; Gercheva-Kyuchukova, Liana; Mamonov, Vasily; Timofeeva, Margarita; Soh, Chang-Heok; Garg, Pushkal; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Akinc, Akin; Sørensen, Benny; Ragni, Margaret V

    2017-08-31

    Current hemophilia treatment involves frequent intravenous infusions of clotting factors, which is associated with variable hemostatic protection, a high treatment burden, and a risk of the development of inhibitory alloantibodies. Fitusiran, an investigational RNA interference (RNAi) therapy that targets antithrombin (encoded by SERPINC1), is in development to address these and other limitations. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, we enrolled 4 healthy volunteers and 25 participants with moderate or severe hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. Healthy volunteers received a single subcutaneous injection of fitusiran (at a dose of 0.03 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo. The participants with hemophilia received three injections of fitusiran administered either once weekly (at a dose of 0.015, 0.045, or 0.075 mg per kilogram) or once monthly (at a dose of 0.225, 0.45, 0.9, or 1.8 mg per kilogram or a fixed dose of 80 mg). The study objectives were to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and safety of fitusiran. No thromboembolic events were observed during the study. The most common adverse events were mild injection-site reactions. Plasma levels of fitusiran increased in a dose-dependent manner and showed no accumulation with repeated administration. The monthly regimen induced a dose-dependent mean maximum antithrombin reduction of 70 to 89% from baseline. A reduction in the antithrombin level of more than 75% from baseline resulted in median peak thrombin values at the lower end of the range observed in healthy participants. Once-monthly subcutaneous administration of fitusiran resulted in dose-dependent lowering of the antithrombin level and increased thrombin generation in participants with hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. (Funded by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02035605 .).

  3. Children's Understanding of Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Elizabeth Engel; Wood-Robinson, Colin

    1985-01-01

    Investigated common belief patterns secondary school students (N=84) have about inheritance, noting the most prevalent misconceptions about genetics which occur at different age levels. Implications based on findings and suggestions for teaching lower secondary courses are included. (ML)

  4. [Inherited aplastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Esteves, A C; Freitas, O; Almeida, T; Rosado, L

    2010-08-01

    The inherited aplastic anaemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone marrow failure, frequent association with one or more somatic anomalies and increased risk of cancer. They are rare disorders, usually diagnosed at paediatric age, and have significant premature mortality. The authors report 11 cases of inherited aplastic anaemias, 8 of Fanconi's anaemia and 3 of Dyskeratosis congenita. These cases were diagnosed in the last 14 years in the Dona Estefânia Hospital.

  5. Inherited platelet disorders and oral health.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marie-Cécile; Kemoun, Philippe; Cousty, Sarah; Sie, Pierre; Payrastre, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    Platelets play a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Accumulation of platelets at the site of vascular injury is the first step in the formation of hemostatic plugs, which play a pivotal role in preventing blood loss after injury. Platelet adhesion at sites of injury results in spreading, secretion, recruitment of additional platelets, and formation of platelet aggregates. Inherited platelet disorders are rare causes of bleeding syndromes, ranging from mild bruising to severe hemorrhage. The defects can reflect deficiency or dysfunction of platelet surface glycoproteins, granule contents, cytoskeletal proteins, platelet pro-coagulant function, and signaling pathways. For instance, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and Glanzmann thrombasthenia are attributed to deficiencies of glycoprotein Ib/IX/V and GPIIb/IIIa, respectively, and are rare but severe platelet disorders. Inherited defects that impair platelet secretion and/or signal transduction are among the most common forms of mild platelet disorders and include gray platelet syndrome, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and Chediak-Higashi syndrome. When necessary, desmopressin, antifibrinolytic agents, and transfusion of platelets remain the most common treatment of inherited platelet disorders. Alternative therapies such as recombinant activated factor VII are also available for a limited number of situations. In this review, we will discuss the management of patients with inherited platelet disorders in various clinical situations related to dental cares, including surgical intervention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

  7. Inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in genes expressed in Schwann cells and the axons they ensheathe cause the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). More than 40 different genes have been shown to cause inherited neuropathies; chromosomal localizations of many other distinct inherited neuropathies have been mapped, and new genetic causes for inherited neuropathies continue to be discovered. How to keep track of all of these disorders, when to pursue genetic testing, and what tests to order for specific patients are difficult challenges for any neurologist. This review addresses these issues and provides illustrative cases to help in dealing with them. CMT serves as a living system to identify molecules necessary for normal peripheral nervous system (PNS) function. Understanding how these various molecules interact will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in general as well as other neurodegenerative disorders involving the PNS.

  8. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  9. Inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Mario A; Shy, Michael E

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurologic or multisystem syndrome. Because of the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. This article reviews the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineates major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes, and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  11. [Changes in antithrombin III, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complex following implantation of a coronary Palmaz-Schatz stent].

    PubMed

    Dittel, M; Haushofer, A; Spiel, R; Halbmayer, W M; Prachar, H; Fischer, M; Mlczoch, J

    1995-01-01

    To detect changes in the clotting parameters antithrombin III (AT III), prothrombin-fragment 1 + 2 (F 1 + 2) and thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TAT) after implantation of Palmaz Schatz stents, coagulation was monitored at standardized time points in 35 patients for 10 days. All patients were anticoagulated using a combination of heparin, phenprocoumon, and acetyl salicylic acid. Heparin therapy was guided by APTT levels (normal range 25-35 s), which were still within the therapeutic range (median 49.6 s (25%/75% percentiles 41.6/54.4) on day 10. Simultaneous oral anticoagulation was found to be effective on day 8 on average (INR median 2.24 (1.93/2.50)). The AT III activity dropped significantly (p < 0.0001) after a heparin loading dose of 15,000 IU during stenting. As the heparin dose was reduced on the following days, AT III levels increased significantly (p < 0.0001) during the observation time. There was a highly significant (p < 0.001) negative correlation between AT III and heparin levels. On days 4 and 5 F 1 + 2 values were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) higher than on the day of stenting (median 1.07 (0.90/1.31) 1.13 nmol/l and 1.06 (0.85/1.23) nmol/l vs. 0.97 (0.69/1.15) nmol/l) and dropped during anticoagulation. F 1 + 2 levels showed a significant negative correlation (p < 0.0005) with APTT values. TAT values showed no significant changes during the observation period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Antithrombin III/SerpinC1 insufficiency exacerbates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Guangyuan; Lu, Zeyuan; Geurts, Aron M; Usa, Kristie; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombin III, encoded by SerpinC1, is a major anti-coagulation molecule in vivo and has anti-inflammatory effects. We found that patients with low antithrombin III activities presented a higher risk of developing acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. To study this further, we generated SerpinC1 heterozygous knockout rats and followed the development of acute kidney injury in a model of modest renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Renal injury, assessed by serum creatinine and renal tubular injury scores after 24 h of reperfusion, was significantly exacerbated in SerpinC1+/− rats compared to wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, renal oxidative stress, tubular apoptosis, and macrophage infiltration following this injury were significantly aggravated in SerpinC1+/− rats. However, significant thrombosis was not found in the kidneys of any group of rats. Antithrombin III is reported to stimulate the production of prostaglandin I2, a known regulator of renal cortical blood flow, in addition to having anti-inflammatory effects and to protect against renal failure. Prostaglandin F1α, an assayable metabolite of prostaglandin I2, was increased in the kidneys of the wild-type rats at 3 h after reperfusion. The increase of prostaglandin F1α was significantly blunted in SerpinC1+/− rats, which preceded increased tubular injury and oxidative stress. Thus, our study found a novel role of SerpinC1 insufficiency in increasing the severity of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26108065

  13. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. [Comparative measurement of antithrombin III by latex agglutination and radial immunodiffusion in patients with peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Miagkova, M A; Aleshkin, A V; Abramenko, T V; Savitskaia, Iu A; Aleshkin, V A

    1997-01-01

    A highly sensitive and rapid method, based on latex agglutination, has been developed for measuring antithrombin III (AT III) in the blood serum of patients and donors. The sensitivity of analysis is 0.6 microgram/ml, time 2 to 3 min. The method is simple, requires no sophisticated equipment, and may be used under field conditions. The results are assessed visually. Immunochemical reagents have been synthesized for the method: latex conjugates and specific antibodies to AT III. The method was tried in patients with peritonitis. An additional criterion for diagnosing the respiratory distress syndrome of adults in this patient population has been developed.

  15. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  16. [Prophylaxis of consumption coagulopathy in shock. Dependence of the effect of heparin on the activity of antithrombin III (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H; Blauhut, B; Necek, S; Kramar, H; Vinazzer, H

    1980-11-01

    In 16 patients admitted in shock, heparin prophylaxis for DIC was carried out. The effect of heparin was monitored by a series of coagulation tests. A distinct relation was found between the effect of heparin on the aPTT and on the thrombin clotting time and the activity of antithrombin III. Even a comparatively slight diminution of this activity resulted in a considerable decrease of the heparin effect on coagulation. Since this effect is of primary importance for the efficacy of prophylaxis of DIC, regular assays of antithrombin III are proposed in shock patients receiving heparin.

  17. Founder effect is responsible for the p.Leu131Phe heparin-binding-site antithrombin mutation common in Hungary: phenotype analysis in a large cohort.

    PubMed

    Gindele, R; Oláh, Z; Ilonczai, P; Speker, M; Udvari, Á; Selmeczi, A; Pfliegler, G; Marján, E; Kovács, B; Boda, Z; Muszbek, L; Bereczky, Z

    2016-04-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a key regulator of the coagulation. In type II deficiency, the heparin-binding-site defect (type II HBS) is considered to be relatively low thrombosis risk. Our aims were to search for SERPINC1 mutation(s) and to describe the clinical and laboratory phenotype of a large number of AT Budapest3 (ATBp3, p.Leu131Phe) carriers and confirm the presence of a founder effect. AT-deficient patients were recruited and carriers of ATBp3, n = 102 (63 families) were selected. To investigate the founder effect, eight intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 5'-length dimorphism, and five microsatellite markers were detected. Clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed. In AT deficiency, 16 different causative mutations were found, and the great majority of patients were of type II HBS subtype. Most of them (n = 102/118, 86.5%) carried the ATBp3 mutation. The ATBp3 mutant allele was associated with one single haplotype, while different haplotypes were detected in the case of normal allele. The anti-factor Xa-based AT activity assay that we used could detect all ATBp3 patients with high sensitivity in our cohort. ATBp3 homozygosity (n = 26) was associated with thrombosis at a young age and conferred a high thrombotic risk. Half of the heterozygotes (n = 41/76, 53.9%) also had venous and/or arterial thrombosis, and pregnancy complications were also recorded. In Hungary, the founder mutation, ATBp3, is the most common AT deficiency. Our study is the first in which the clinical characterization of ATBp3 mutation was executed in a large population. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Lipedema: an inherited condition.

    PubMed

    Child, Anne H; Gordon, Kristiana D; Sharpe, Pip; Brice, Glen; Ostergaard, Pia; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S

    2010-04-01

    Lipedema is a condition characterized by swelling and enlargement of the lower limbs due to abnormal deposition of subcutaneous fat. Lipedema is an under-recognized condition, often misdiagnosed as lymphedema or dismissed as simple obesity. We present a series of pedigrees and propose that lipedema is a genetic condition with either X-linked dominant inheritance or more likely, autosomal dominant inheritance with sex limitation. Lipedema appears to be a condition almost exclusively affecting females, presumably estrogen-requiring as it usually manifests at puberty. Lipedema is an entity distinct from obesity, but may be wrongly diagnosed as primary obesity, due to clinical overlap. The phenotype suggests a condition distinct from obesity and associated with pain, tenderness, and easy bruising in affected areas. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Heparin chain-length dependence of factor Xa inhibition by antithrombin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Alireza R

    2007-01-01

    Heparin anticoagulants function by enhancing the inhibition of coagulation proteases by the serpin antithrombin (AT). A direct evaluation of the specific anti-factor Xa (fXa) activity of therapeutic heparins in the physiologically relevant plasma-based clotting assays has not been feasible since thrombin, the final protease of the cascade, is the primary target for inhibition by AT in the presence of heparin. To circumvent this problem, we developed an assay in which the native AT in plasma was replaced with an AT mutant which exhibits identical affinity for heparin and near normal reactivity for fXa, but does not react with thrombin and other coagulation proteases in either the absence or presence of heparin. This assay was used to distinguish the anti-fXa activity of different molecular weight heparins from their anti-thrombin activity in clotting assays which were initiated by the triggers of either the extrinsic or intrinsic coagulation pathway. The results suggest that the acceleration of fXa inhibition by AT exhibits a marked heparin chain-length dependence, with fondaparinux (a pentasaccharide) having the lowest and unfractionated heparin having the highest effect. Interestingly, comparative studies revealed that the fondaparinux-catalyzed acceleration of thrombin inhibition by AT also contributes to the prolongation of the clotting time, possibly suggesting that the anticoagulant function of the therapeutic pentasaccharide is mediated though the inhibition of both fXa and thrombin.

  20. Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane with a covalent antithrombin-heparin complex to prevent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jennifer M; Berry, Leslie R; Chan, Anthony K C; Brash, John L

    2014-01-01

    To prevent coagulation in contact with blood, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was modified with an antithrombin-heparin (ATH) covalent complex using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a linker/spacer. Using NHS chemistry, ATH was attached covalently to the distal chain end of the immobilized PEG linker. Surfaces were characterized by contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; attachment was confirmed by decrease in contact angles and an increase in nitrogen content as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Protein interactions in plasma were investigated using radiolabeled proteins added to plasma as tracers, and by immunoblotting of eluted proteins. Modification of PDMS with PEG alone was effective in reducing non-specific protein adsorption; attachment of ATH at the distal end of the PEG chains did not significantly affect protein resistance. It was shown that surfaces modified with ATH bound antithrombin selectively from plasma through the pentasaccharide sequence on the heparin moiety of ATH, indicating the ability of the ATH-modified surfaces to inhibit coagulation. Using thromboelastography, the effect of ATH modification on plasma coagulation was evaluated directly. It was found that initiation of coagulation was delayed and the time to clot was prolonged on PDMS modified with ATH/PEG compared to controls. For comparison, surfaces modified in a similar way with heparin were prepared and investigated using the same methods. The data suggest that the ATH-modified surfaces have superior anticoagulant properties compared to those modified with heparin.

  1. Mitochondrial inheritance and disease.

    PubMed

    Fine, P E

    1978-09-23

    Spontaneously occurring variants of the D.N.A. content of mitochondria may be responsible for human disease. Among the prime candidates for such a mitochondrial aetiology are certain drug-induced blood dyscrasias, particularly that due to chloramphenicol. Because mitochondria are generally inherited from the female parent, such disorders should be clustered among matroclinally related individuals. The clinical manifestations of such diseases are a function of the manner in which mitochondria are allocated to somatic cells and tissues during development.

  2. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are critical environmental exposures that influence health and can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and abnormal physiology. Advances in 2015 included analyses of the effects of endocrine disruptors on human disease, further examples of endocrine disruptors promoting transgenerational behavioural effects, insights into effects of endocrine disruptors on epigenetic programming of primordial germ cells and the finding that endocrine disruptors can transgenerationally promote genetic mutations. PMID:26585656

  3. Inherited hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Augusto; Newell, Pippa; Hoshida, Yujin

    2010-10-01

    Inherited liver disorders that cause chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis can lead to the development of liver cancer. Because of the rarity and diversity of some of these syndromes, the relative risk of developing HCC in these patients and the age at which tumours typically arise cannot be accurately estimated. Among patients with hereditary hemachromatosis (HH), the annual incidence of HCC is 4% once cirrhosis has been established. Fibrosis and portal hypertension associated with HH can be partially reversed with therapeutic phlebotomy, but it is unclear whether this treatment alters the incidence of HCC in these patients. Importantly, it seems likely that coincidence of these genetic disorders with known HCC risk factors such as alcoholism and viral hepatitis would amplify their oncogenic potential. For this reason, patients with known genetic disorders of the liver should be repeatedly counselled to avoid environmental and toxic injury to the liver. Treatment of HCC in patients with inherited liver disease mirrors that of HCC associated with other etiologies. Unfortunately, there are case series which suggest these patients with inherited liver disease and HCC tend to present at more advanced stages and are therefore not eligible for curative therapies, causing overall decreased survival relative to patients with HCC of viral or other etiologies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inherited disorders of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-08-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as a physiological response to blood vessel injury and bleeding, which entails a co-ordinated process involving the blood vessel, platelets, and blood clotting proteins (i.e. coagulation factors). Hemostasis can be divided into primary and secondary components. The former rapidly initiates after endothelial damage and is characterized by vascular contraction, platelet adhesion, and formation of a soft aggregate plug. The latter is initiated following the release of tissue factor and involves a complex sequence of events known as the blood coagulation cascade, encompassing serial steps where each coagulation factor activates another in a chain reaction that culminates in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Patients carrying abnormalities of the coagulation cascade (i.e. deficiencies of coagulation factors) have an increased bleeding tendency, where the clinical severity is mostly dependent upon the type and the plasma level of the factor affected. These disorders also impose a heavy medical and economic burden on individual patients and society in general. The aim of this article is to provide a general overview on the pathophysiology, clinics, diagnostics, and therapy of inherited disorders of coagulation factors.

  5. An unusual antithrombin-binding heparin octasaccharide with an additional 3-O-sulfated glucosamine in the active pentasaccharide sequence.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Marco; Elli, Stefano; Mourier, Pierre; Rudd, Timothy R; Gaudesi, Davide; Casu, Benito; Boudier, Christian; Torri, Giangiacomo; Viskov, Christian

    2013-01-15

    The 3-O-sulfation of N-sulfated glucosamine is the last event in the biosynthesis of heparin/heparan sulfate, giving rise to the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide sequence AGA*IA, which is largely associated with the antithrombotic activity of these molecules. The aim of the present study was the structural and biochemical characterization of a previously unreported AGA*IA*-containing octasaccharide isolated from the very-low-molecular-mass heparin semuloparin, in which both glucosamine residues of the pentasaccharide moiety located at the non-reducing end bear 3-O-sulfate groups. Two-dimensional and STD (saturation transfer difference) NMR experiments clearly confirmed its structure and identified its ligand epitope binding to antithrombin. The molecular conformation of the octasaccharide-antithrombin complex has been determined by NMR experiments and docking/energy minimization. The presence of the second 3-O-sulfated glucosamine in the octasaccharide induced more than one order of magnitude increase in affinity to antithrombin compared to the pentasaccharide AGA*IA.

  6. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  7. Comparison of antithrombin activity of the polysulphate chitosan derivatives in in vivo and in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Drozd, N N; Sher, A I; Makarov, V A; Galbraikh, L S; Vikhoreva, G A; Gorbachiova, I N

    2001-06-01

    In order to choose the proper method for evaluating the antithrombin activity in samples of chitosan polysulphate (CP) with different polymerization degrees and sulphation degrees, we estimated the ability of direct anticoagulants to depress the coagulability of recalcified sheep blood using the third international heparin standard (A1 - in vitro system) and determined such activity on pharmacodynamic curve (A2 - in vivo system). The curve admits the kinetics of CP elimination to be nonlinear in case of intravenous injection to rabbits, as it is observed in heparin: Ct = C(o)exp(-K(e)lt), where Ct is the CP concentration at the time moment t; C(o) is the CP concentration at the injection moment; Kel is the elimination constant. Besides, it is assumed that there is a linear approximation of the anticoagulant effect on the dose, which finally makes it possible to calculate the specific activity A2: T = KTCt+T(in), where T is the time of clot formation at different time intervals after CP injection; T(in) is the time of clot formation prior to CP injection. T value was assessed in two tests: blood coagulation time (BCT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). No correlation was observed between A1 and A2. At the same time, the values of Kel and the period of semi-elimination, with the use of the biospecific cetylpyridinium chloride electrophores for the quantitative determination of CP in rabbit's blood taken at different time intervals after injection, showed a close correlation (r = .94, P < .05) between the same parameters, obtained with the help of the rectilinear pharmacodynamic plot in BCT test. Thus, experimentally, it was proven that the assumption of the CP nonlinear elimination and the CP effect-dose dependence was true, which is necessary for A2 calculation. Relatively low molecular weights (MW 61-82 kDa, polymerization degree 188-252 ) and high sulphation patterns (sulphur amounts 15.6-16.9%, sulphation degree 1.58-1.86) were slowly cleared and

  8. Inheritance and testicular cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P. W.; Harland, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Statistical analysis of published data on the age of onset of germ cell tumours of the testis and of the prevalence of bilateral disease in familial and general cases suggest the following: 1. Patients with bilateral disease carry the same genetic predisposition as familial cases. 2. Males with the hereditary predisposition develop none, unilateral or bilateral tumours in the proportions 55%, 38% and 7% respectively. 3. One-third of all testis cancer patients are genetically predisposed to the disease. 4. The 2.2% risk to brothers of cases as reported elsewhere can be accounted for by the homozygous (recessive) inheritance of a single predisposing gene. PMID:7841065

  9. Hepatitic inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, May; Crawford, James M

    2006-01-01

    Primary metabolic disorders are a disparate group of diseases that may or may not be accompanied by hepatic manifestations. Those with liver involvement may show a range of histopathologic changes. Proper histologic diagnosis requires correlation with clinical and laboratory data, including evaluation for mutations either via serum protein electrophoresis or through formal genetic analysis. This article is a review of the three most common inherited metabolic disorders which may present with a hepatitic pattern. In alpha1-antitrypsin disorder, there is a broad range of clinical presentations, age at presentation, and histological features ranging from "neonatal hepatitis" to a chronic progressive hepatitis in later childhood and adulthood. Hence, this disorder must be in the differential diagnosis of liver disease of the very young, and in older children and adults, with or without coexistent overt pulmonary symptoms. In Wilson disease, presentation tends to be in older childhood or the adult, with a progressive chronic hepatitis. Cystic fibrosis may feature a characteristic obstructive biliary syndrome, coexisting with the many extrahepatic manifestations of this debilitating disease. Lastly, the progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) syndromes are given as examples of inherited metabolic conditions in which relentlessly progressive cholestatic liver disease eventuates over years in end-stage cholestatic liver disease with cirrhosis. Distinguishing features include absence of elevated serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) in PFIC-1 and PFIC-2, and elevated GGT in PFIC-3. However, molecular studies are required for a confident diagnosis of the rare PFIC syndromes.

  10. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results.

  11. Interaction of a trypsin-like enzyme of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 with antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Curtis, M A; Slaney, J M; Carman, R J; Pemberton, P A

    1993-04-01

    We have previously observed that trypsin-like activity in Porphyromonas gingivalis culture supernatants is inhibitable by the plasma arg-serpin antithrombin III (ATIII). This report demonstrates that a partially purified P. gingivalis trypsin-like enzyme (M(r) 47,000) is inhibited by ATIII with an association rate constant (k(ass)) of 5.65 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 but does not form SDS-stable complexes. Heparin enhances the k(ass) and stabilizes the complexes but in either case such inhibition is temporary and results in ATIII inactivation by reactive centre proteolysis between R393-S394. In the absence of heparin this is accompanied by N-terminal cleavage between K39-I40.

  12. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia.

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance in a mitochondrially mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Egger, J; Wilson, J

    1983-07-21

    Mendelian inheritance involves the transmission to successive generations of DNA contained in genes in the nucleus, but DNA is also contained in mitochondria, where it is believed to be responsible for the encoding of certain mitochondrial enzymes. Since nearly all mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted, one might expect a nonmendelian pattern of inheritance in mitochondrial cytopathy, a syndrome in which there are abnormalities in mitochondrial structure and deficiencies in a variety of mitochondrial enzymes. We studied the pedigrees of 6 affected families whose members we had examined personally and of 24 families described in the literature. In 27 families, exclusively maternal transmission occurred; in 3 there was also paternal transmission in one generation. Altogether, 51 mothers but only 3 fathers had transmitted the condition. These results are consistent with mitochondrial transmission of mitochondrial cytopathy; the inheritance and enzyme defects of mitochondrial cytopathy can be considered in the light of recent evidence that subunits of respiratory-enzyme complexes are encoded solely by mitochondrial DNA. The occasional paternal transmission may be explained if certain enzyme subunits that are encoded by nuclear DNA are affected.

  14. Changes in Plasma Levels of Natural Anticoagulants in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: High Prognostic Value of Antithrombin and Protein C in Patients with Underlying Sepsis or Severe Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Qute; Hong, Ki Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysfunctional natural anticoagulant systems enhance intravascular fibrin for mation in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and plasma levels of natural anti coagulants can be used in the diagnosis and prognosis of DIC. Herein, the diagnostic value of 4 natural anticoagulants was assessed, and the prognostic value of antithrombin and protein C were validated in a large population. Methods Part 1 study included 126 patients with clinically suspected DIC and estimated plasma levels of 4 candidate anticoagulant proteins: antithrombin, protein C, protein S, and protein Z. Part 2 comprised 1,846 patients, in whom plasma antithrombin and protein C levels were compared with other well-known DIC markers according to the underlying dis eases. The 28-day mortality rate was used to assess prognostic outcome. Results Antithrombin and protein C showed higher areas under the ROC curve than pro tein S and protein Z. In part 2 of the study, antithrombin and protein C levels significantly correlated with DIC score, suggesting that these factors are good indicators of DIC severity. Antithrombin and protein C showed significant prognostic power in Kaplan-Meier analyses. In patients with sepsis/severe infection, antithrombin and protein C showed higher hazard ratios than D-dimer. Platelet count showed the highest hazard ratio in patients with hemato logic malignancy. In patients with liver disease, the hazard ratio for antithrombin levels was significantly high. Conclusions Decreased plasma anticoagulant levels reflect florid consumption of the phys iologic defense system against DIC-induced hypercoagulation. Plasma antithrombin and protein C levels are powerful prognostic markers of DIC, especially in patients with sepsis/severe infection. PMID:24624342

  15. Advances in the treatment of inherited coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A

    2013-09-01

    Inherited coagulation disorders constitute a broad spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies that include X-linked factor (F)VIII or FIX deficiency that causes haemophilia, and autosomal recessive disorders producing heterogeneous deficiencies in fibrinogen (FI), prothrombin (FII), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV+FVIII. Significant advances in treatments for patients with congenital haemophilia A (FVIII deficiency) and B (FIX deficiency) over the last two decades have resulted from improvements in the production, availability and patient access to factor replacement products. Translation of advances in biotechnology, namely recombinant protein technology, targeted protein modifications to improve function and potentially reduce immunogenicity, and advanced formulations to optimize bioavailability and sustain activity offer promisingly new treatments for haemophilia as well as recessively inherited bleeding disorders in patients who otherwise have few therapeutic options. Though a theoretical risk remains for blood-borne viral infections with pooled plasma-derived products, this concern has diminished with breakthroughs in purification and viral inactivation methods. Development of inhibitory antibodies is still the most daunting problem for patients with inherited bleeding disorders, complicating treatment approaches to control and prevent bleeding, and posing risks for allergic and anaphylactic reactions in susceptible patients. The objectives of this review are to (i) highlight emerging advances in hemostatic therapies that are bioengineered to improve pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability, sustain functional activity, and possibly eliminate immunogenicity of recombinant factor proteins; and (ii) present an overview of key clinical trials of novel factor products currently in the development pipeline.

  16. Dominantly-inherited lop ears.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander K C; Kong, Albert Y F; Robson, W Lane M; McLeod, D Ross

    2007-10-01

    We describe a four-generation Chinese family that included five members who had an isolated bilateral lop ear anomaly. The presentation suggested a dominant mode of inheritance. The absence of male-to-male transmission does not exclude an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance. Since the phenotypic anomaly of the male proband was no more severe than the affected female members, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is most likely. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  17. Safety and Proof-of-Concept Study of Oral QLT091001 in Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Inherited Deficiencies of Retinal Pigment Epithelial 65 Protein (RPE65) or Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Fishman, Gerald A.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Bittner, Ava; Bowles, Kristen; Fletcher, Emily C.; Collison, Frederick T.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Degli Eposti, Simona; Michaelides, Michel; Saperstein, David A.; Schuchard, Ronald A.; Barnes, Claire; Zein, Wadih; Zobor, Ditta; Birch, David G.; Mendola, Janine D.; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in inherited retinal degenerations remains an unmet medical need. In mice exhibiting a genetically engineered block of the visual cycle, vision was recently successfully restored by oral administration of 9-cis-retinyl acetate (QLT091001). Safety and visual outcomes of a once-daily oral dose of 40 mg/m2/day QLT091001 for 7 consecutive days was investigated in an international, multi-center, open-label, proof-of-concept study in 18 patients with RPE65- or LRAT-related retinitis pigmentosa. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed a ≥20% increase and 4 of 18 (22%) showed a ≥40% increase in functional retinal area determined from Goldmann visual fields; 12 (67%) and 5 (28%) of 18 patients showed a ≥5 and ≥10 ETDRS letter score increase of visual acuity, respectively, in one or both eyes at two or more visits within 2 months of treatment. In two patients who underwent fMRI, a significant positive response was measured to stimuli of medium contrast, moving, pattern targets in both left and right hemispheres of the occipital cortex. There were no serious adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were transient and the most common included headache, photophobia, nausea, vomiting, and minor biochemical abnormalities. Measuring the outer segment length of the photoreceptor layer with high-definition optical coherence tomography was highly predictive of treatment responses with responders having a significantly larger baseline outer segment thickness (11.7 ± 4.8 μm, mean ± 95% CI) than non-responders (3.5 ± 1.2 μm). This structure-function relationship suggests that treatment with QLT091001 is more likely to be efficacious if there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014052 PMID:26656277

  18. Safety and Proof-of-Concept Study of Oral QLT091001 in Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Inherited Deficiencies of Retinal Pigment Epithelial 65 Protein (RPE65) or Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT).

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Moore, Anthony T; Koenekoop, Robert K; Wen, Yuquan; Fishman, Gerald A; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Bittner, Ava; Bowles, Kristen; Fletcher, Emily C; Collison, Frederick T; Dagnelie, Gislin; Degli Eposti, Simona; Michaelides, Michel; Saperstein, David A; Schuchard, Ronald A; Barnes, Claire; Zein, Wadih; Zobor, Ditta; Birch, David G; Mendola, Janine D; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in inherited retinal degenerations remains an unmet medical need. In mice exhibiting a genetically engineered block of the visual cycle, vision was recently successfully restored by oral administration of 9-cis-retinyl acetate (QLT091001). Safety and visual outcomes of a once-daily oral dose of 40 mg/m2/day QLT091001 for 7 consecutive days was investigated in an international, multi-center, open-label, proof-of-concept study in 18 patients with RPE65- or LRAT-related retinitis pigmentosa. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed a ≥20% increase and 4 of 18 (22%) showed a ≥40% increase in functional retinal area determined from Goldmann visual fields; 12 (67%) and 5 (28%) of 18 patients showed a ≥5 and ≥10 ETDRS letter score increase of visual acuity, respectively, in one or both eyes at two or more visits within 2 months of treatment. In two patients who underwent fMRI, a significant positive response was measured to stimuli of medium contrast, moving, pattern targets in both left and right hemispheres of the occipital cortex. There were no serious adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were transient and the most common included headache, photophobia, nausea, vomiting, and minor biochemical abnormalities. Measuring the outer segment length of the photoreceptor layer with high-definition optical coherence tomography was highly predictive of treatment responses with responders having a significantly larger baseline outer segment thickness (11.7 ± 4.8 μm, mean ± 95% CI) than non-responders (3.5 ± 1.2 μm). This structure-function relationship suggests that treatment with QLT091001 is more likely to be efficacious if there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014052.

  19. Mitochondrial inheritance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondria are the site of oxidative phosphorylation, play a key role in cellular energy metabolism, and are critical for cell survival and proliferation. The propagation of mitochondria during cell division depends on replication and partitioning of mitochondrial DNA, cytoskeleton-dependent mitochondrial transport, intracellular positioning of the organelle, and activities coordinating these processes. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a valuable model organism to study the mechanisms that drive segregation of the mitochondrial genome and determine mitochondrial partitioning and behavior in an asymmetrically dividing cell. Here, I review past and recent advances that identified key components and cellular pathways contributing to mitochondrial inheritance in yeast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  20. Inherited disorders of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John A

    2005-11-01

    Desmosomes are highly organized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical integrity to tissues by anchoring intermediate filaments to sites of strong adhesion. These cell-cell adhesion junctions are found in skin, heart, lymph nodes and meninges. Over the last 8 years, several naturally occurring human gene mutations in structural components of desmosomes have been reported. These comprise autosomal dominant or recessive mutations in plakophilin 1, plakophilin 2, desmoplakin, plakoglobin, desmoglein 1, desmoglein 4 and corneodesmosin. These discoveries have often highlighted novel or unusual phenotypes, including abnormal skin fragility and differentiation, and developmental anomalies of various ectodermal appendages, especially hair. Some desmosomal gene mutations may also result in cardiac disease, notably cardiomyopathy. This article describes the spectrum of clinical features that may be found in the inherited disorders of desmosomes and highlights the key functions of several of the desmosomal proteins in tissue adhesion and cell biology.

  1. Inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Griffiths, P G; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F

    2009-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies and they result in significant visual morbidity among young adults. Both disorders are the result of mitochondrial dysfunction: LHON from primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations affecting the respiratory chain complexes; and the majority of DOA families have mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for an inner mitochondrial membrane protein critical for mtDNA maintenance and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional genetic and environmental factors modulate the penetrance of LHON, and the same is likely to be the case for DOA which has a markedly variable clinical phenotype. The selective vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a key pathological feature and understanding the fundamental mechanisms that underlie RGC loss in these disorders is a prerequisite for the development of effective therapeutic strategies which are currently limited. PMID:19001017

  2. Effect of Human Growth Hormone Treatment for 1 to 7 Years on Growth of 100 Children, with Growth Hormone Deficiency, Low Birthweight, Inherited Smallness, Turner's Syndrome, and Other Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. M.; Whitehouse, R. H.; Hughes, P. C. R.; Vince, F. P.

    1971-01-01

    (1) Human growth hormone (HGH) has been given for one whole year or longer to 100 patients, aged 1·5 to 19 years, participating in the Medical Research Council Clinical Trial of HGH. Each patient was measured 3-monthly for a control year before treatment, and the majority for a control year after the first treatment year. All measurements were made by one anthropometrist. Radiographic measurements of widths of bone, muscle, and fat in calf and upper arm were made. Methods and standards for assessing the significance of a given height acceleration are presented. (2) The characteristics at diagnosis are given of 35 patients with isolated GH deficiency or hyposomatotrophism (HS), 18 with craniopharyngiomas and other CNS lesions, 3 with multiple trophic hormone deficiency, 18 with low birthweight short stature, 4 with hereditary smallness and/or delay in growth, 4 with psychosocial short stature, 1 with high resting HGH and low somatomedin, 6 with Turner's syndrome, and 11 with other diagnoses. (3) 29 of the 35 HS patients were boys and 13 had an abnormally small penis and ill-developed scrotum. Only 2 were sibs. Parents averaged 40th centile for height. 4 children developed growth-suppressing antibodies, and had to cease treatment. The mean standard deviation score (SDS) for height at diagnosis was -4·7, range -2·6 to -7·3. Bone age SDS averaged -3·2, range -0·8 to -5·7. Skinfold SDS averaged +0·91. Limb muscle width SDS averaged about -3·0. GH peak in insulin hypoglycaemia averaged 4·7 ± 0·7 μU/ml, range 1 to 13. (4) A category of partial growth hormone deficiency is defined as patients with GH peaks of 7-20 μU/ml inclusive and height velocity SDS in the year before treatment between -1 and -2. Total HS patients have GH peaks of 1 to 6 μU/ml inclusive and height velocity SDS of < -2. Partial HS patients are accelerated by HGH and should be treated; but their average acceleration is below that of total HS patients. (5) There was a highly significant

  3. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  4. Multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Soong, B W; Casamassima, A C; Fink, J K; Constantopoulos, G; Horwitz, A L

    1988-08-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. The clinical manifestations represent the summation of two diseases: late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis. We present a 9-year-old girl with a phenotype similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis: short stature, microcephaly, and mild facial dysmorphism, along with dysphagia, retinal degeneration, developmental arrest, and ataxia. We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the cultured skin fibroblasts.

  5. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) encompasses a number of disorders characterized by recurrent blister formation as the result of structural fragility within the skin and selected other tissues. All types and subtypes of EB are rare; the overall incidence and prevalence of the disease within the United States is approximately 19 per one million live births and 8 per one million population, respectively. Clinical manifestations range widely, from localized blistering of the hands and feet to generalized blistering of the skin and oral cavity, and injury to many internal organs. Each EB subtype is known to arise from mutations within the genes encoding for several different proteins, each of which is intimately involved in the maintenance of keratinocyte structural stability or adhesion of the keratinocyte to the underlying dermis. EB is best diagnosed and subclassified by the collective findings obtained via detailed personal and family history, in concert with the results of immunofluorescence antigenic mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and in some cases, by DNA analysis. Optimal patient management requires a multidisciplinary approach, and revolves around the protection of susceptible tissues against trauma, use of sophisticated wound care dressings, aggressive nutritional support, and early medical or surgical interventions to correct whenever possible the extracutaneous complications. Prognosis varies considerably and is based on both EB subtype and the overall health of the patient. PMID:20507631

  6. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antithrombin nanoparticles inhibit stent thrombosis in ex vivo static and flow models.

    PubMed

    Palekar, Rohun U; Vemuri, Chandu; Marsh, Jon N; Arif, Batool; Wickline, Samuel A

    2016-11-01

    antithrombin perfluorocarbon NPs exert marked focal antithrombin activity to prevent intravascular stent thrombosis and occlusion. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  9. Mitochondrial inheritance in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Coenen, A; Croft, J H; Slakhorst, M; Debets, F; Hoekstra, R

    1996-04-01

    Mitochondrial chloramphenicol and oligomycin resistance mutations were used to investigate mitochondrial inheritance in A. nidulans. Mitochondrial RFLPs could not be used to distinguish between paternal and maternal mitochondria because none were detected in the 54 isolates investigated. Several thousand ascospores from each of 111 hybrid cleistothecia from 21 different crosses between 7 heterokaryon incompatible isolates were tested for biparental inheritance. All mitochondrial inheritance was strictly uniparental. Not one instance of paternal inheritance of mitochondria was observed. The implications of our results for the theory that uniparental inheritance evolved to avoid cytoplasmic conflict are discussed. Possible explanations for the maintenance of strict uniparental inheritance of mitochondria in an inbreeding homothallic organism are suggested. The chloramphenicol resistance marker was inherited preferentially to the oligomycin resistance marker probably due to the inhibited energy production of mitochondria with the oligomycin resistance mutation. The maternal parent was determined for 93 hybrid cleistothecia from 17 crosses between 7 different strains. Contrary to previous reports A. nidulans strains functioned as both maternal and paternal parent in most crosses.

  10. Inherited secondary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: concentrating on humans.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, D; Bichet, D G

    2013-04-15

    The study of human physiology is paramount to understanding disease and developing rational and targeted treatments. Conversely, the study of human disease can teach us a lot about physiology. Investigations into primary inherited nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) have contributed enormously to our understanding of the mechanisms of urinary concentration and identified the vasopressin receptor AVPR2, as well as the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2), as key players in water reabsorption in the collecting duct. Yet, there are also secondary forms of NDI, for instance as a complication of lithium treatment. The focus of this review is secondary NDI associated with inherited human diseases, such as Bartter syndrome or apparent mineralocorticoid excess. Currently, the underlying pathophysiology of this inherited secondary NDI is unclear, but there appears to be true AQP2 deficiency. To better understand the underlying mechanism(s), collaboration between clinical and experimental physiologists is essential to further investigate these observations in appropriate experimental models.

  11. Intravenous nitroglycerin-induced heparin resistance: a qualitative antithrombin III abnormality.

    PubMed

    Becker, R C; Corrao, J M; Bovill, E G; Gore, J M; Baker, S P; Miller, M L; Lucas, F V; Alpert, J A

    1990-06-01

    An ability of intravenous nitroglycerin to interfere with the anticoagulant properties of intravenous heparin would have profound clinical implications. To investigation nitroglycerin-heparin interactions, the following pilot study was performed. Patients (N = 18) admitted to the coronary care unit with a diagnosis of either acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina were divided into four treatment groups: (1) intravenous nitroglycerin and intravenous heparin; (2) intravenous nitroglycerin alone; (3) intravenous heparin alone; or (4) neither intravenous nitroglycerin nor intravenous heparin. Serial determinations of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), serum heparin concentration, antithrombin III (ATIII) antigen (ATA), and ATIII activity (ATC) were obtained over a 72-hour period. Overall, patients receiving intravenous nitroglycerin did not differ significantly from other patients in APTT, heparin dose, heparin concentration, ATA, ATC, or ATA/ATC ratio (ATR). However, patients receiving intravenous nitroglycerin at a rate exceeding 350 micrograms per minute had a lower APTT (p less than 0.05), lower ATC (p = 0.02), higher ATR (p = 0.004), and a larger heparin dose requirement than patients receiving lower infusion rates. ATR correlated directly (r = 0.91; p less than 0.05) and ATC inversely (r = -0.78; p less than 0.05) with the intravenous nitroglycerin dose. Serum heparin concentration did not correlate with the intravenous nitroglycerin dose. Intravenous nitroglycerin-induced heparin resistance occurs at a critical nitroglycerin dose. A nitroglycerin-induced qualitative ATIII abnormality may be the underlying mechanism.

  12. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  13. Amide-HILIC LC/MS for the characterization of Antithrombin III heparin binders

    PubMed Central

    Naimy, Hicham; Leymarie, Nancy; Bowman, Michael J.; Costello, Catherine E.; Zaia, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a sulfated glycosaminoglycan attached to a core protein on the cell surface. Protein binding to cell surface Heparan sulfate (HS) is a key regulatory event for many cellular processes. The concept whereby protein binding to HS is not random but requires a limited number of sulfation patterns is becoming clear. Here we describe a hydrophobic trapping assay to screen a library of heparin hexasaccharides for binders to Antithrombin III (ATIII). Out of five initial hexasaccharide compositions present in the library (1:2:3:6:1), (1:2:3:7:1), (1:2:3:7:0), (1:2:3:8:0), (1:2:3:9:0) only two are shown to be able to bind ATIII, namely (1:2:3:8:0) and (1:2:3:9:0). The use of an amide hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) LC/MS permitted reproducible quantitative analysis of the composition of the initial library as well as that of the binding fraction. This type of LC/MS has never been applied to heparinoids. The specificity of the hexasaccharides binding ATIII was confirmed by assaying their ability to enhance ATIII mediated inhibition of Factor Xa in vitro. PMID:18260648

  14. A capillary zone electrophoresis method to detect conformers and dimers of antithrombin in therapeutic preparations.

    PubMed

    Marie, Anne-Lise; Tran, Nguyet Thuy; Saller, François; Abdou, Youmna Mohamed; Zeau, Pascal; Plantier, Jean-Luc; Urbain, Rémi; Borgel, Delphine; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-07-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a human plasma glycoprotein that possesses anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the native (active) form of AT is unstable and undergoes conformational changes, leading to latent, cleaved, and heterodimeric forms. The presence of these alternative forms mostly inactive can highly impact the quality and therapeutic activity of pharmaceutical AT preparations. We developed a capillary zone electrophoresis method, based on a neutral polyethylene oxide-coated capillary and a buffer close to physiological conditions, enabling the separation of more than eight forms of AT. Several peaks were identified as native, latent, and heterodimeric forms. The CZE method was reproducible with intraday relative standard deviations less than 0.5 and 2% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. The method was applied to the comparison of AT preparations produced by five competitive pharmaceutical companies, and statistical tests were performed. Important differences in the proportion of each form were highlighted. In particular, one AT preparation was shown to contain a high quantity of heterodimer, and two preparations contained high quantities of latent form. In addition, one AT preparation exhibited additional forms, not yet identified. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development of a recombinant antithrombin variant as a potent antidote to fondaparinux and other heparin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Elsa P; Fazavana, Judicael; Picard, Veronique; Borgel, Delphine

    2011-02-10

    Heparin derivative-based therapy has evolved from unfractionated heparin (UFH) to low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) and now fondaparinux, a synthetic pentasaccharide. Contrary to UFH or LMWHs, fondaparinux is not neutralized by protamine sulfate, and no antidote is available to counteract bleeding disorders associated with overdosing. To make the use of fondaparinux safer, we developed an antithrombin (AT) variant as a potent antidote to heparin derivatives. This variant (AT-N135Q-Pro394) combines 2 mutations: substitution of Asn135 by a Gln to remove a glycosylation site and increase affinity for heparins, and the insertion of a Pro between Arg393 and Ser394 to abolish its anticoagulant activity. As expected, AT-N135Q-Pro394 anticoagulant activity was almost abolished, and it exhibited a 3-fold increase in fondaparinux affinity. AT-N135Q-Pro394 was shown to reverse fondaparinux overdosing in vitro in a dose-dependent manner through a competitive process with plasma AT for fondaparinux binding. This antidote effect was also observed in vivo: administration of AT-N135Q-Pro394 in 2.5-fold molar excess versus plasma AT neutralized 86% of the anti-Xa activity within 5 minutes in mice treated with fondaparinux. These results clearly demonstrate that AT-N135Q-Pro394 can reverse the anticoagulant activity of fondaparinux and thus could be used as an antidote for this drug.

  16. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  17. Oxidized antithrombin is a dual inhibitor of coagulation and angiogenesis: Importance of low heparin affinity.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Asim; Khan, Mohammad Sazzad; Swaminathan, Akila; Naseem, Asma; Chatterjee, Suvro; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous proteins that promote vascular endothelial cell based inhibition of angiogenesis are an attractive option for antitumor therapy. Inactive cleaved and latent conformations of antithrombin (AT) are antiangiogenic, but not its native form which is an inhibitor of proteases involved in blood coagulation. Unlike native, the cleaved and latent conformations are reactive center loop inserted conformations which binds heparin with very low affinity. We use a sulfoxy modified AT to assess the role of reactive center loop insertion and heparin affinity in antiangiogenic function. Chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) shows that antiangiogenic activity of latent and oxidized AT are better than thalidomide, a potent antiangiogenic drug. Wound healing experiments suggest that latent and oxidized conformations can influence endothelial cell migration. Latent and cleaved conformations of AT shows an increase in α-helical content in the presence of unfractionated heparin, but not the oxidized AT. Unlike the loop inserted polymer, cleaved and latent conformations, oxidized AT has factor Xa inhibitory activity indicating that loop insertion is not necessary for antiangiogenic role. The results of our study establish that active conformation of AT can become antiangiogenic while maintaining its anticoagulant activity possibly through chelation of low affinity heparin in the vicinity of endothelial cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense.

  19. A Comprehensive Docking and MM/GBSA Rescoring Study of Ligand Recognition upon Binding Antithrombin

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Perez-Sanchez, Horacio; C. Lightstone, Felice

    2017-04-06

    A high-throughput virtual screening pipeline has been extended from single energetically minimized structure Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) rescoring to ensemble-average MM/GBSA rescoring. The correlation coefficient (R2) of calculated and experimental binding free energies for a series of antithrombin ligands has been improved from 0.36 to 0.69 when switching from the single-structure MM/GBSA rescoring to ensemble-average one. The electrostatic interactions in both solute and solvent are identified to play an important role in determining the binding free energy after the decomposition of the calculated binding free energy. Furthermore, the increasing negative charge of the compounds provides a more favorablemore » electrostatic energy change but creates a higher penalty for the solvation free energy. Such a penalty is compensated by the electrostatic energy change, which results in a better binding affinity. A highly hydrophobic ligand is determined by the docking program to be a non-specific binder. Finally, these results have demonstrated that it is very important to keep a few top poses for rescoring, if the binding is non-specific or the binding mode is not well determined by the docking calculation.« less

  20. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-29

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties.

  1. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  2. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L

    2014-11-25

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

  3. Internet resources cataloguing inherited disorders in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Crook, Alice; Sargan, David R

    2011-08-01

    Up-to-date annotated catalogues of known inherited disorders in dogs are freely available on the Internet, providing vital information to existing and prospective dog owners, dog breeders, veterinarians, geneticists and others interested in the occurrence and control of inherited disorders. These resources are the Canine Inherited Disorders Database (CIDD), Inherited Diseases in Dogs (IDID) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) the latter associated with Listing of Inherited Disorders in Animals (LIDA). The history and features of these resources are summarised.

  4. Inherited partial duplication of chromosome No. 15

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Atsuko; Towner, Joseph W.; Ebbin, Allan J.; Kahlstrom, Emily J.; Wilson, Miriam G.

    1974-01-01

    A boy with unusual facial appearance and mental retardation was found to have duplication for the distal half of the long arm of chromosome No. 15 and possibly deficiency for the distal end of the long arm of No. 21. The chromosome abnormality was inherited from his mother, who had a translocation involving chromosomes Nos. 15 and 21. Giemsa-banding localized the break point in chromosome No. 15 just distal to the intense band at the midportion of the long arm. The break point in chromosome No. 21 appeared to be at the distal end of the long arm. The difficulty encountered in cytogenetic analysis of the propositus with conventional staining, the importance of chromosome analysis of the parents, and the application of differential staining techniques are also presented. Images PMID:4139262

  5. Inherited renal tubular defects with hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, J; Modi, K D; Kumar, P Jagdish; Jha, Ratan

    2009-03-01

    Bartter's and Gitelman's syndrome are two ends of a spectrum of inherited renal tubular disorders that present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis of varying severity. Clinical features and associated calcium and magnesium ion abnormalities are used to diagnose these cases after excluding other commoner causes. We report on two cases, the first being a young boy, born of pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios, who had classical dysmorphic features, polyuria, hypokalemia and hypercalciuria and was diagnosed as having Bartter's syndrome. The second patient is a lady who had recurrent tetany as the only manifestation of Gitelman's syndrome, which is an unusual presentation. Potassium replacement with supplementation of other deficient ions led to satisfactory clinical and biochemical response.

  6. [Inherited tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hassan; Hayek, Donia; Nasr, Dhekra; Daudon, Michel; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a tubulopathy characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap secondary to abnormalities of renal acidification. RTA can be classified into four main subtypes: distal RTA, proximal RTA, combined proximal and distal RTA, and hyperkalemic RTA. Distal RTA (type 1) is caused by the defect of H(+) secretion in the distal tubules and is characterized by the inability to acidify the urine below pH 5.5 during systemic acidemia. Proximal RTA (type 2) is caused by an impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and characterized by a decreased renal bicarbonate threshold. Combined proximal and distal RTA (type 3) secondary to a reduction in tubular reclamation of bicarbonate and an inability to acidify the urine in the face of severe acidemia. Hyperkalemic RTA (type 4) may occur as a result of aldosterone deficiency or tubular insensitivity to aldosterone. Clinicians should be alert to the presence of RTA in patients with an unexplained normal anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, recurrent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The mainstay of treatment of RTA remains alkali replacement.

  7. Inactivation of Factor VIIa by Antithrombin In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo: Role of Tissue Factor and Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Kothari, Hema; Mackman, Nigel; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that antithrombin (AT) could act as a significant physiologic regulator of FVIIa. However, in vitro studies showed that AT could inhibit FVIIa effectively only when it was bound to tissue factor (TF). Circulating blood is known to contain only traces of TF, at best. FVIIa also binds endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), but the role of EPCR on FVIIa inactivation by AT is unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the role of TF and EPCR in inactivation of FVIIa by AT in vivo. Low human TF mice (low TF, ∼1% expression of the mouse TF level) and high human TF mice (HTF, ∼100% of the mouse TF level) were injected with human rFVIIa (120 µg kg−1 body weight) via the tail vein. At varying time intervals following rFVIIa administration, blood was collected to measure FVIIa-AT complex and rFVIIa antigen levels in the plasma. Despite the large difference in TF expression in the mice, HTF mice generated only 40–50% more of FVIIa-AT complex as compared to low TF mice. Increasing the concentration of TF in vivo in HTF mice by LPS injection increased the levels of FVIIa-AT complexes by about 25%. No significant differences were found in FVIIa-AT levels among wild-type, EPCR-deficient, and EPCR-overexpressing mice. The levels of FVIIa-AT complex formed in vitro and ex vivo were much lower than that was found in vivo. In summary, our results suggest that traces of TF that may be present in circulating blood or extravascular TF that is transiently exposed during normal vessel damage contributes to inactivation of FVIIa by AT in circulation. However, TF’s role in AT inactivation of FVIIa appears to be minor and other factor(s) present in plasma, on blood cells or vascular endothelium may play a predominant role in this process. PMID:25102166

  8. Early prediction of postoperative liver dysfunction and clinical outcome using antithrombin III-activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, David; Offensperger, Florian; Klinglmueller, Florian; Haegele, Stefanie; Oehlberger, Lukas; Gruenberger, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine; Starlinger, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Antithrombin III (ATIII) has been reported to be associated with liver pathologies and was shown to predict outcome in patients undergoing liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. We now aimed to assess whether perioperative ATIII-activity could predict postoperative outcome in patients without underlying liver disease, as well as in a routine clinical setting of patients undergoing hepatic resection. Methods ATIII-activity was evaluated preoperatively and on the first (POD1) and fifth day after liver resection in a retrospective evaluation cohort of 228 colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis (mCRC). We further aimed to prospectively validate our results in a set of 177 consecutive patients undergoing hepatic resection. Results Patients developing postoperative liver dysfunction (LD) had a more pronounced postoperative decrease in ATIII-activity (P<0.001). ATIII-activity on POD1 significantly predicted postoperative LD (P<0.001, AUC = 84.4%) and remained independent upon multivariable analysis. A cut-off value of 61.5% ATIII-activity was determined using ROC analysis. This cut-off was vital to identify high-risk patients for postoperative LD, morbidity, severe morbidity and mortality (P<0.001, respectively) with a highly accurate negative predictive value of 97%, which could be confirmed for LD (P<0.001) and mortality (P = 0.014) in our independent validation cohort. Further, mCRC patients below our cut-off suffered from a significantly decreased overall survival (OS) at 1 and 3 years after surgery (P = 0.011, P = 0.025). Conclusions The routine laboratory parameter ATIII-activity on POD1 independently predicted postoperative LD and was associated with clinical outcome. Patients with a postoperative ATIII-activity <61.5% might benefit from close monitoring and timely initiation of supportive therapy. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01700231 PMID:28406940

  9. Polymorphisms in antithrombin and in tissue factor pathway inhibitor genes are associated with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M; Bertinato, Juliano Felix; Tosin Bueno, Carolina; Cordeiro da Silva, Kelma; Burlacchini de Carvalho, Mário Henrique; Pulcineli Vieira Francisco, Rossana; Zugaib, Marcelo; Cerda, Alvaro; Morelli, Vânia Maris

    2012-10-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is a multifactorial condition. The effect of antithrombin (SERPINC1), protein C (PROC), thrombomodulin (THBD) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the risk of RPL is thus far unknown. Our objective was to determine the association of SNPs in the above mentioned genes with RPL. We included 117 non-pregnant women with three or more consecutive losses prior to 20 weeks of pregnancy without a previous history of carrying a fetus to viability, and 264 healthy fertile non-pregnant women who had at least two term deliveries and no known pregnancy losses. The PROC (rs1799809 and rs1799808), SERPINC1 (rs2227589), THBD (rs1042579) and TFPI (rs10931292, rs8176592 and rs10153820) SNPs were analysed by Real Time PCR. Genotype frequencies for PROC 2418A>G, PROC 2405C>T, THBD 1418C>T, TFPI (T-33C and TFPI C-399T) SNPs were similar in cases and controls. The carriers of SERPINC1 786A allele (GA + AA genotypes) had an increased risk for RPL (odds ratio [OR]: 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p= 0.034) while women carrying the TFPI -287C allele (TC + CC genotypes) had a protection effect on having RPL (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.26-0.83, p= 0.009). The TCC haplotype for TFPI T-33C/ TFPI T-287C/ TFPI C-399T SNPs was less frequent in cases (5.7%) than in controls (11.6%) (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.23-0.90, p= 0.025). In conclusion, our data indicate that SERPINC1 786G>A variant increases the risk for RPL, while TFPI T-287C variant is protective; however, further studies are required to confirm our findings.

  10. Inhibition of antithrombin and bovine serum albumin native state aggregation by heparin.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Zheng, Bingqian; Dubin, Paul L

    2014-01-14

    Protein native state aggregation, a major problem in pharmaceutical and biological processes, has been addressed pharmacologically by the addition of protein-binding excipients. Heparin (Hp), a highly sulfated polysaccharide, interacts with numerous proteins with moderate to high affinity, but reports about its effect on protein aggregation are contradictory. We studied the pH dependence of the aggregation of antithrombin (AT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the presence and absence of heparin. High-precision turbidimetry showed strong aggregation for both AT and BSA in I = 10 mM NaCl, conditions at which electrostatically driven Hp binding and aggregation both occur, with more obvious aggregation of heparin-free AT appearing as larger aggregate size. Aggregation of AT was dramatically inhibited at Hp: protein 6:1 (mole ratio); however, the effect at 0.5:1 Hp:protein was greater for BSA. Frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis showed a much larger equilibrium association constant Kobs between Hp and AT, in accord with the onset of Hp binding at a higher pH; both effects are explained by the higher charge density of the positive domain for AT as revealed by modeling with DelPhi. The corresponding modeling images showed that these domains persist at high salt only for AT, consistent with the 160-fold drop in Kobs at 100 mM salt for BSA-Hp binding. The smaller inhibition effect for AT arises from the tendency of its uncomplexed monomer to form larger aggregates more rapidly, but the stronger binding of Hp to AT does not facilitate Hp-induced aggregate dissolution which occurs more readily for BSA. This can be attributed to the higher density of AT aggregates evidenced by higher fractal dimensions. Differences between inhibition and reversal by Hp arise because the former may depend on the stage at which Hp enters the aggregation process and the latter on aggregate size and morphology.

  11. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  12. Biotinidase deficiency: a novel vitamin recycling defect.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Grier, R E; Secor McVoy, J R; Heard, G S

    1985-01-01

    The recent finding that biotinidase deficiency is the primary biochemical defect in late-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency was stimulated new interest in the inherited disorders of biotin-dependent carboxylases. The clinical and biochemical features of biotinidase deficiency are discussed. We also speculate about two exciting areas currently being investigated: the localization of action biotinidase, and the possible role of the enzyme as a binding or carrier protein for biotin.

  13. The role of hyperglycaemia-induced alterations of antithrombin III and factor X activation in the thrombin hyperactivity of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Dello Russo, P; Lefebvre, P; Giugliano, D

    1990-05-01

    Factor X concentration and factor X activation, antithrombin III anti-Xa activity and plasma concentration, and fibrinopeptide A were measured in 20 diabetic patients and 20 normal subjects. Although factor X activation (81.3 +/- 2.2 vs 97.3 +/- 2.1%, p less than 0.01; mean +/- SE) and antithrombin III activity (76.5 +/- 2.2 vs 96.3 +/- 1.8%, p less than 0.01) were reduced in the diabetic patients, fibrinopeptide A concentration was increased (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng ml-1, p less than 0.01). The ratio of factor X activation to antithrombin III anti-factor Xa activity was increased in the diabetic patients (1.10 +/- 0.01 vs 1.01 +/- 0.02, p less than 0.01). Induced hyperglycaemia was able to mimic all these abnormalities, without changing factor X or antithrombin III concentration. The results suggest that in vivo hyperglycaemia produces a decrease of factor X activation, but at the same time increases fibrinopeptide A formation due to a greater decrease of antithrombin III anti-Xa activity.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    ... assembly enzyme myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Description Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder that primarily ...

  15. Kin selection under blending inheritance.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andy

    2011-09-07

    Why did Darwin fail to develop his insights on kin selection into a proper theory of social adaptation? One suggestion has been that his inadequate understanding of heredity kept the problem out of focus. Here, I determine whether it is possible to develop a quantitative theory of kin selection upon the assumption of blending inheritance. I find that, whilst Hamilton's rule of kin selection can be readily derived under the assumption of blending inheritance, this mechanism complicates the computation of relatedness coefficients, and can even cause them to fluctuate over generations. Nevertheless, I show that the ultimate criterion for selection to favour any social trait - i.e. a time-average of Hamilton's rule - remains the same as under particulate inheritance. By eliminating the gene from the theory of kin selection, I clarify the role that it plays in the theory of social adaptation.

  16. Imitation as an inheritance system

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    What is the evolutionary significance of the various mechanisms of imitation, emulation and social learning found in humans and other animals? This paper presents an advance in the theoretical resources for addressing that question, in the light of which standard approaches from the cultural evolution literature should be refocused. The central question is whether humans have an imitation-based inheritance system—a mechanism that has the evolutionary function of transmitting behavioural phenotypes reliably down the generations. To have the evolutionary power of an inheritance system, an imitiation-based mechanism must meet a range of demanding requirements. The paper goes on to review the evidence for and against the hypothesis that there is indeed an imitation-based inheritance system in humans. PMID:19620113

  17. PGD for inherited cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, Anver; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Polling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Rechitsky, Svetlana

    2012-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been applied for more than 200 different inherited conditions, with expanding application to common disorders with genetic predisposition. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. This paper presents the first, as far as is known, cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A total of 18 PGD cycles were performed, resulting in transfer in 15 of them, which yielded nine unaffected pregnancies and the births of seven disease- or disease predisposition-free children. The data open the prospect of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, allowing couples carrying cardiac disease predisposing genes to reproduce without much fear of having offspring with these genes, which are at risk for premature or sudden death. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is currently an established clinical procedure in assisted reproduction and genetic practices. Its application has been expanding beyond traditional indications of prenatal diagnosis and currently includes common disorders with genetic predisposition, such as inherited forms of cancer. This applies also to the diseases with no current prospect of treatment, which may manifest despite presymptomatic diagnosis and follow up, when PGD may provide the only relief for the at-risk couples to reproduce. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. We present here our first cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A

  18. Obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Chi, Claudia; Lee, Christine A; England, Adrian; Hingorani, Jaishree; Paintsil, James; Kadir, Rezan A

    2009-06-01

    A retrospective review was carried out on the methods of obstetric analgesia/anesthesia used in 80 pregnancies amongst 63 women with inherited bleeding disorders (19 factor XI deficiency, 16 carriers of haemophilia, 15 von Willebrand disease, seven platelet function disorders, four factor VII deficiency, one factor VII and XI deficiency and one factor X deficiency). In 72 pregnancies, the woman was seen antenatally in a multidisciplinary clinic to discuss and plan pain relief options. Regional block was performed for 41 pregnancies. The mothers were known to have a bleeding disorder in 35 of these pregnancies. Prophylactic cover was given in 10 pregnancies prior to the insertion of regional block but not required in the remaining 25 pregnancies because the coagulation defects had spontaneously normalised at term. There were six reported adverse effects from regional block similar to that found in the general population: inadequate anesthesia/analgesia (2), bloody tap (2), hypotension and a possible dural puncture which was treated conservatively. There were no reports of long-term complications. The findings show that it is possible to offer women with inherited bleeding disorders the option of regional block provided their coagulation defects have normalised, either spontaneously during pregnancy or following adequate haemostatic cover.

  19. A nuclear Argonaute promotes multigenerational epigenetic inheritance and germline immortality.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Bethany A; Burkhart, Kirk B; Gu, Sam Guoping; Spracklin, George; Kershner, Aaron; Fritz, Heidi; Kimble, Judith; Fire, Andrew; Kennedy, Scott

    2012-09-20

    Epigenetic information is frequently erased near the start of each new generation. In some cases, however, epigenetic information can be transmitted from parent to progeny (multigenerational epigenetic inheritance). A particularly notable example of this type of epigenetic inheritance is double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing in Caenorhabditis elegans. This RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) can be inherited for more than five generations. To understand this process, here we conduct a genetic screen for nematodes defective in transmitting RNAi silencing signals to future generations. This screen identified the heritable RNAi defective 1 (hrde-1) gene. hrde-1 encodes an Argonaute protein that associates with small interfering RNAs in the germ cells of progeny of animals exposed to double-stranded RNA. In the nuclei of these germ cells, HRDE-1 engages the nuclear RNAi defective pathway to direct the trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 (H3K9me3) at RNAi-targeted genomic loci and promote RNAi inheritance. Under normal growth conditions, HRDE-1 associates with endogenously expressed short interfering RNAs, which direct nuclear gene silencing in germ cells. In hrde-1- or nuclear RNAi-deficient animals, germline silencing is lost over generational time. Concurrently, these animals exhibit steadily worsening defects in gamete formation and function that ultimately lead to sterility. These results establish that the Argonaute protein HRDE-1 directs gene-silencing events in germ-cell nuclei that drive multigenerational RNAi inheritance and promote immortality of the germ-cell lineage. We propose that C. elegans use the RNAi inheritance machinery to transmit epigenetic information, accrued by past generations, into future generations to regulate important biological processes.

  20. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment.

  1. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in plants.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Marie-Theres; Aufsatz, Werner; Jonak, Claudia; Luschnig, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Interest in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance has intensified with the boosting of knowledge on epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression during development and in response to internal and external signals such as biotic and abiotic stresses. Starting with an historical background of scantily documented anecdotes and their consequences, we recapitulate the information gathered during the last 60 years on naturally occurring and induced epialleles and paramutations in plants. We present the major players of epigenetic regulation and their importance in controlling stress responses. The effect of diverse stressors on the epigenetic status and its transgenerational inheritance is summarized from a mechanistic viewpoint. The consequences of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance are presented, focusing on the knowledge about its stability, and in relation to genetically fixed mutations, recombination, and genomic rearrangement. We conclude with an outlook on the importance of transgenerational inheritance for adaptation to changing environments and for practical applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epigenetic control of cellular and developmental processes in plants".

  2. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  3. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in plants☆

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Marie-Theres; Aufsatz, Werner; Jonak, Claudia; Luschnig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interest in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance has intensified with the boosting of knowledge on epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression during development and in response to internal and external signals such as biotic and abiotic stresses. Starting with an historical background of scantily documented anecdotes and their consequences, we recapitulate the information gathered during the last 60 years on naturally occurring and induced epialleles and paramutations in plants. We present the major players of epigenetic regulation and their importance in controlling stress responses. The effect of diverse stressors on the epigenetic status and its transgenerational inheritance is summarized from a mechanistic viewpoint. The consequences of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance are presented, focusing on the knowledge about its stability, and in relation to genetically fixed mutations, recombination, and genomic rearrangement. We conclude with an outlook on the importance of transgenerational inheritance for adaptation to changing environments and for practical applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Epigenetic control of cellular and developmental processes in plants”. PMID:21515434

  4. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  5. Congenital prothrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Stefano; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2009-06-01

    Prothrombin deficiency is among the rarest inherited coagulation disorders, with a prevalence of approximately 1:2,000,000. Two main phenotypes can be distinguished: (1) hypoprothrombinemia (type I deficiency), characterized by concomitantly low levels of activity and antigen; and (2) dysprothrombinemia (type II deficiency), characterized by the normal or near-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. In some cases, hypoprothrombinemia associated with dysprothrombinemia was also described in compound heterozygous defects. No living patient with undetectable plasma prothrombin has been reported to date. Prothrombin is encoded by a gene of approximately 21 kb located on chromosome 11 and containing 14 exons. Forty different mutations have been identified and characterized in prothrombin deficiency. Many of them surround the catalytic site, whereas another "hot spot" is localized in the recognition domain called anion binding exosite I, also called fibrinogen recognition site. Recently, mutations were identified also in the Na (+)-binding loop and in the light A-chain of thrombin. Most hypoprothrombinemia-associated mutations are missense, but there are also nonsense mutations leading to stop codons and one single nucleotide deletion. Finally, the main aspects of clinical manifestations and therapy of congenital prothrombin deficiency are presented and discussed.

  6. Inherited bleeding disorders: a 14-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Eid, Suhair S; Kamal, Nazmi R; Shubeilat, Taisir S; Wael, Abu-Ghoush Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Congenital bleeding disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that reflect abnormalities of blood vessels, coagulation proteins, and platelets. A 14-year retrospective study (1991-2005) was conducted for patients referred to the coagulation section of the Hematology Department (King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan), who had suffered from bleeding tendencies to assess the prevalence of bleeding disorders among Jordanians and to describe their clinical manifestations. Four hundred and three patients matched our criteria. All patients were screened with routine coagulation assays and a complete blood cell count; a factor assay was performed if indicated by the results of the screening assays. A total of 168 patients (41.6%) were diagnosed with a bleeding disorder caused by a factor deficiency, of which 17.1% were described as hemophilia A (n=69), 6.2% were described as vWD (n=25), and 4.2% were described as hemophilia B (n=17). A subset of the total patient population comprising 14.1% of the patients were diagnosed with a Rare Inherited Coagulation Deficiency (RICD), where 4.0% were FX deficient (n=16), 3.7% were FVII deficient (n=15), 3.7% were FV deficient (n=15), 2.5% were FXI deficient (n=10), and 0.2% were diagnosed with afibrinogenemia (n=1).

  7. Epigenetic inheritance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Keiko; Katakami, Hatsue; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ogawa, Emiko; Sano, Cecile M; Wada, Yuko; Sano, Hiroshi

    2007-08-01

    Epigenetics is defined as mechanisms that regulate gene expression without base sequence alteration. One molecular basis is considered to be DNA cytosine methylation, which reversibly modifies DNA or chromatin structures. Although its correlation with epigenetic inheritance over generations has been circumstantially shown, evidence at the gene level has been limited. The present study aims to find genes whose methylation status directly correlates with inheritance of phenotypic changes. DNA methylation in vivo was artificially reduced by treating rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) seeds with 5-azadeoxycytidine, and the progeny were cultivated in the field for > 10 years. Genomic regions with changed methylation status were screened by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphysm (MSAP) method, and cytosine methylation was directly scanned by the bisulfite mapping method. Pathogen infection with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, race PR2 was performed by the scissors-dip method on mature leaf blades. The majority of seedlings were lethal, but some survived to maturity. One line designated as Line-2 showed a clear marker phenotype of dwarfism, which was stably inherited by the progeny over nine generations. MSAP screening identified six fragments, among which two were further characterized by DNA blot hybridization and direct methylation mapping. One clone encoding a retrotransposon gag-pol polyprotein showed a complete erasure of 5-methylcytosines in Line-2, but neither translocation nor expression of this region was detectable. The other clone encoded an Xa21-like protein, Xa21G. In wild-type plants, all cytosines were methylated within the promoter region, whereas in Line-2, corresponding methylation was completely erased throughout generations. Expression of Xa21G was not detectable in wild type but was constitutive in Line-2. When infected with X. oryzae pv. oryzae, against which Xa21 confers resistance in a gene-for-gene manner, the progeny of Line-2 were

  8. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  9. Epigenetic Inheritance across the Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, Amy V.; Holeski, Liza M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of epigenomic variation at the landscape-level in plants may add important insight to studies of adaptive variation. A major goal of landscape genomic studies is to identify genomic regions contributing to adaptive variation across the landscape. Heritable variation in epigenetic marks, resulting in transgenerational plasticity, can influence fitness-related traits. Epigenetic marks are influenced by the genome, the environment, and their interaction, and can be inherited independently of the genome. Thus, epigenomic variation likely influences the heritability of many adaptive traits, but the extent of this influence remains largely unknown. Here, we summarize the relevance of epigenetic inheritance to ecological and evolutionary processes, and review the literature on landscape-level patterns of epigenetic variation. Landscape-level patterns of epigenomic variation in plants generally show greater levels of isolation by distance and isolation by environment then is found for the genome, but the causes of these patterns are not yet clear. Linkage between the environment and epigenomic variation has been clearly shown within a single generation, but demonstrating transgenerational inheritance requires more complex breeding and/or experimental designs. Transgenerational epigenetic variation may alter the interpretation of landscape genomic studies that rely upon phenotypic analyses, but should have less influence on landscape genomic approaches that rely upon outlier analyses or genome–environment associations. We suggest that multi-generation common garden experiments conducted across multiple environments will allow researchers to understand which parts of the epigenome are inherited, as well as to parse out the relative contribution of heritable epigenetic variation to the phenotype. PMID:27826318

  10. Rickets–vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal. PMID:22470851

  11. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  12. Inherited predisposition to multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Koura, Divya T.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the United States, after non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Family pedigree analyses of high-risk families, case-control studies and racial disparities in disease incidence all point to a potential inherited predisposition to MM. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified susceptibility loci in a number of cancers and such studies are currently underway in MM. To date, GWASs in MM have identified several potential regions of interest for further study on chromosomes 3p22, 7p15.3, 8q24 and 2p23.3. In addition, several targets of paraproteins (so called ‘paratargs’) in MM have been identified. Hyperphosphorylation of the paratarg protein, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, appears a common mechanism underlying the antigenicity of these proteins. One particular protein, hyperphosphorylated paratarg-7 (pP-7) is a common target in persons with myeloma and has also been identified in affected members of several high-risk MM families. It appears that the frequency of pP-7 as an antigenic target may be particularly high in African American patients with MM, which could be part of the explanation for observed racial disparities in the incidence of MM. In this review we focus on available data in the area of inherited predisposition to MM, and highlight future research directions. PMID:23926460

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  14. Clinical and biochemical characterization of the prothrombin Belgrade mutation in a large Serbian pedigree: new insights into the antithrombin resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miljic, P; Gvozdenov, M; Takagi, Y; Takagi, A; Pruner, I; Dragojevic, M; Tomic, B; Bodrozic, J; Kojima, T; Radojkovic, D; Djordjevic, V

    2017-01-11

    Essentials Prothrombin Belgrade mutation leads to antithrombin resistance. Clinical and biochemical phenotypes in a large family with this mutation were investigated. In carriers, we detected decreased factor II activity and increased endogenous thrombin potential. Prothrombin Belgrade mutation represents a strong prothrombotic risk factor.

  15. Ophthalmologic findings in biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Salbert, B A; Astruc, J; Wolf, B

    1993-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. We studied 78 symptomatic children and found that 51% had ophthalmologic abnormalities. These include infections (30%), optic neuropathies and visual disturbances (13%), motility disturbances (13%), retinal pigment changes (4%) and pupillary findings (1%). The most commonly reported findings are optic atrophy and keratoconjunctivities. Although the disorder can be effectively treated with biotin therapy, untreated children are at risk of developing permanent neuro-ophthalmic damage.

  16. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  17. [Preparation and antithrombogenicity of oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin complex coated-polyvinyl chloride tubing].

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Liu, Weiyong; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Hua; Cao, Ruijun; Yang, Jian

    2011-02-01

    Based on non-enzymatic protein glycated reaction, the sodium periodate-oxidated low molecular weight heparin-antithrombin covalent complex (SPLMWATH) was produced. By using polyethyleneimine-glutaraldehyde bonding technique, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubings were coated with SPLMWATH, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Spectrophotometry and dynamic clotting time experiment were used to determine the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH, graft density, coating leaching ratio and to evaluate the antithrombogenicity of different coating on the PVC tubings. The results showed that the synthetic ratio of SPLMWATH was approximately 55%, and compared with heparin coating and LMWH coating, the graft density of SPLMWATH coating on the PVC tubing was smaller, but its coating stability and antithrombogenicity were significantly better than that of heparin coating and LMWH coating on the PVC tubings.

  18. Sex hormone-binding globulin and antithrombin III activity in women with oral ultra-low-dose estradiol.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Sumika; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Kasai, Kana; Keyama, Kaoru; Yoshida, Kanako; Kato, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kuwahara, Akira; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-03-20

    Oral oestrogen increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and increases production of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in a dose-dependent manner. SHBG has been suggested to be involved in venous thromboembolism. We examined the effects of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on circulating levels of SHBG and coagulation parameters, and we compared the effects to those of transdermal oestradiol. Twenty women received oral oestradiol (500 μg) every day (oral ultra-low-dose group) and 20 women received a transdermal patch (50 μg) as a transdermal group. In addition, the women received dydrogesterone continuously (5 mg) except for women who underwent hysterectomy. Circulating SHBG, antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex and plasmin-α2 plasmin inhibitor complex were measured before and 3 months after the start of treatment. SHBG was significantly increased at 3 months in the oral ultra-low-dose group, but not in the transdermal group. However, percent changes in SHBG were not significantly different between the two groups. In both groups, ATIII was significantly decreased at 3 months. In conclusion, even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG level. However, the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. Impact statement Oral oestrogen replacement therapy increases production of SHBG which may be related to increase in VTE risk. However, the effect of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on SHBG has not been clarified. Even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG levels, but the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. VTE risk in women receiving oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol may be comparable to that in women receiving transdermal oestradiol.

  19. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  20. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Pon, L A

    2001-06-01

    During the past decade significant advances were made toward understanding the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A combination of genetics, cell-free assays and microscopy has led to the discovery of a great number of components. These fall into three major categories: cytoskeletal elements, mitochondrial membrane components and regulatory proteins. These proteins mediate activities, including movement of mitochondria from mother cells to buds, segregation of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, and equal distribution of the organelle between mother cells and buds during yeast cell division.

  1. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  2. Digenic inheritance in medical genetics.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2013-10-01

    Digenic inheritance (DI) is the simplest form of inheritance for genetically complex diseases. By contrast with the thousands of reports that mutations in single genes cause human diseases, there are only dozens of human disease phenotypes with evidence for DI in some pedigrees. The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has made it simpler to identify monogenic disease causes and could similarly simplify proving DI because one can simultaneously find mutations in two genes in the same sample. However, through 2012, I could find only one example of human DI in which HTS was used; in that example, HTS found only the second of the two genes. To explore the gap between expectation and reality, I tried to collect all examples of human DI with a narrow definition and characterise them according to the types of evidence collected, and whether there has been replication. Two strong trends are that knowledge of candidate genes and knowledge of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have been helpful in most published examples of human DI. By contrast, the positional method of genetic linkage analysis, has been mostly unsuccessful in identifying genes underlying human DI. Based on the empirical data, I suggest that combining HTS with growing networks of established PPIs may expedite future discoveries of human DI and strengthen the evidence for them.

  3. Factor VII deficiency in a mixed breed dog.

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, R; Scherer, J; Ross, M L; Gentry, P A

    1999-01-01

    Abnormal bleeding following routine orchectomy of a 5-month-old mixed breed was determined to be due to factor VII deficiency. Although pedigree information was unavailable, failure to respond to vitamin K therapy and the absence of a plasma coagulation inhibitor suggested that the factor VII deficiency was likely inherited rather than acquired. PMID:10416073

  4. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  5. Inherited neuropathies: clinical overview and update.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christopher J; Duan, Xiaohui; Shy, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  7. Inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy V.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are haematological disorders characterized by an overproduction of mature myeloid cells with a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukaemia. Clonal proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells is driven by somatically acquired mutations, most notably JAK2 V617F, but there are important features relating to pathogenesis and phenotypic diversity that cannot be explained by acquired mutations alone. In this review we consider what is currently known about the role that inherited factors play in the development and biology of both sporadic and familial forms of MPN. Although most MPN cases appear to be sporadic, familial predisposition has been recognized for many years in a subset of cases and epidemiological studies have indicated the presence of common susceptibility alleles. Currently the JAK2 46/1 haplotype (also referred to as ‘GGCC’) is the strongest known predisposition factor for sporadic MPNs carrying a JAK2 V617F mutation, explaining a large proportion of the heritability of this disorder. Less is known about what genetic variants predispose to MPNs that lack JAK2 V617F, but there have been recent reports of interesting associations in biologically plausible candidates, and more loci are set to emerge with the application of systematic genome-wide association methodologies. Several highly penetrant predisposition variants that affect erythropoietin signalling, thrombopoietin signalling or oxygen sensing have been characterized in families with nonclonal hereditary erythrocytosis or thrombocytosis, but much less is known about familial predisposition to true clonal MPN. The heterogeneous pattern of inheritance and presumed genetic heterogeneity in these families makes analysis difficult, but whole exome or genome sequencing should provide novel insights into these elusive disorders. PMID:23926457

  8. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  9. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  10. Primer in Genetics and Genomics, Article 4-Inheritance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Lisa B; Chiatti, Beth Desaretz

    2017-07-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, much has been uncovered about inheritance of various illnesses and disorders. There are two main types of inheritance: Mendelian and non-Mendelian. Mendelian inheritance includes autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and Y-linked inheritance. Non-Mendelian inheritance includes mitochondrial and multifactorial inheritance. Nurses must understand the types of inheritance in order to identify red flags that may indicate the possibility of a hereditary disorder in a patient or family.

  11. Pituitary deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes insipidus, arising from damage to or congenital abnormalities of the neurohypophysis, is the most common pituitary deficiency in animals. Hypopituitarism and isolated growth hormone or thyrotropin deficiency may result in growth abnormalities in puppies and kittens. In addition, treatment of associated hormone deficiencies, such as hypothyroidism and hypoadrenocorticism, in patients with panhypopituitarism is vital to restore adequate growth in dwarfed animals. Secondary hypoadrenocorticism is an uncommon clinical entity; however differentiation of primary versus secondary adrenal insufficiency is of utmost importance in determining optimal therapy. This article will focus on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of hormone deficiencies of the pituitary gland and neurohypophysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. [Influence of intravenous injection of fucoidan from brown seaweed Fucus evanescens by plasma rabbits anticoagulant activity and neutralisation by sulphate protamin of fucoidans antithrombin activity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lapikova, E S; Drozd, N N; Makarov, V A; Zviagintseva, T N; Shevchenko, N M; Kuznetsova, T A; Besednova, N N

    2012-01-01

    With fucoidan from Fucus evanescens dose increase from 1 to 5 mg/kg plasma coagulation time in test A(see symbol)TB increases. Sulphate protamin in final concentration 0.67-1.35 mkg/ml will neutralise antithrombin activity of fucoidans from brown seaweed Fucus evanescens and Laminaria cichorioides. The gravimetrichesky relation for the investigated samples makes an antidot/anticoagulant 1.

  13. Partial biotinidase deficiency: clinical and biochemical features.

    PubMed

    McVoy, J R; Levy, H L; Lawler, M; Schmidt, M A; Ebers, D D; Hart, P S; Pettit, D D; Blitzer, M G; Wolf, B

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal screening for profound biotinidase deficiency (less than 10% of the mean normal activity level) has identified a group of children with partial biotinidase deficiency (10% to 30% of mean normal activity). Because partial biotinidase deficiency may result in clinical consequences that may be prevented by treatment with biotin, we evaluated such individuals and their family members (1) to determine whether partial biotinidase deficiency is associated with symptoms and (2) to determine the inheritance pattern. We quantified serum biotinidase activity levels and obtained medical histories of probands, their parents and siblings, and additional family members. All children with partial deficiency were healthy at the time of diagnosis. One child, who was not initially treated with biotin, later developed hypotonia, hair loss, and skin rash, which resolved with biotin therapy. Four adults and three children with partial biotinidase deficiency were identified among family members of infants identified by neonatal screening. All these individuals were healthy, although one sibling had elevated urinary lactate excretion. A fifth adult with partial deficiency, found among clinically normal adult volunteers, later showed minor symptoms that resolved after biotin therapy. Like children with profound biotinidase deficiency, children with partial biotinidase deficiency are symptoms free at birth. However, the subsequent occurrence of symptoms of profound biotinidase deficiency in some persons with partial deficiency suggests that biotin therapy for this condition may be warranted.

  14. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  15. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  16. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except to...

  17. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except to...

  18. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except to...

  19. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except to...

  20. 25 CFR 213.13 - Inherited lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inherited lands. 213.13 Section 213.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.13 Inherited lands. Except to...

  1. Present and future of anticoagulant therapy using antithrombin and thrombomodulin for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation: a perspective from Japan.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    In sepsis, the coagulation system is often systemically activated in combination with the simultaneous impairment of fibrinolysis and anticoagulant systems. Since this hypercoagulable state often leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients, the appropriate management of DIC itself is a crucial part of treatment strategies for severe sepsis. In this context, the Japanese Association of Acute Medicine (JAAM) scoring system for DIC has been proposed as a valid test for diagnosing DIC; this system is also expected to aid in devising specifically tailored management strategies. Anticoagulant therapy is commonly given to septic patients with DIC as part of the standard care in Japan. More recently, antithrombin concentrate and recombinant thrombomodulin have become the two major anticoagulant agents of choice. In relation to the use of antithrombin, recent studies have indicated that the recovery of antithrombin activity to within the normal range (>70%) is necessary if supplementation therapy is to provide a favorable outcome. Recombinant thrombomodulin is slightly more controversial, with favorable results being greater among severe cases of DIC. In the present review, we summarize recent clinical advances in anticoagulant therapy for sepsis-associated DIC.

  2. The neurology of biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder in which the enzyme, biotinidase, is defective and the vitamin, biotin, is not recycled. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency, if not treated with biotin, usually exhibit neurological and cutaneous abnormalities. Biotin treatment can ameliorate or prevent symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency meets the major criteria for inclusion in newborn screening programs. With the advent of universal newborn screening for the disorder, the "window-of-opportunity" to characterize the consequences of the untreated disease is essentially gone. To understand the neurology of biotinidase deficiency, we must depend on what is already known about symptomatic individuals with the disorder. Therefore, in this review, the neurological findings of symptomatic individuals with profound biotinidase deficiency have been compiled to catalog the characteristic features of the disorder and the consequences of biotin treatment on these findings. In addition, based on the available evidence, I have speculated on the cause of neurological problems associated with the disorder. Future studies in biotinidase-deficient animals should allow us to demonstrate more definitively if these speculations are correct. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial movement and inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, Istvan R; Fehrenbacher, Kammy L; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A

    2005-07-18

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that perform fundamental cellular functions including aerobic energy mobilization, fatty acid oxidation, amino acid metabolism, heme biosynthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondria cannot be synthesized de novo. Therefore, the inheritance of this organelle is an essential part of the cell cycle; that is, daughter cells that do not inherit mitochondria will not survive. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a facultative aerobe that can tolerate mitochondrial mutations that would be lethal in other organisms. Therefore, yeast has been used extensively to study inheritance and segregation of mitochondria. As a result, much of what we know regarding mitochondrial inheritance has been uncovered using yeast as a model system. Here, we describe the latest developments in mitochondrial motility and inheritance.

  4. Recombinant human antithrombin III improves survival and attenuates inflammatory responses in baboons lethally challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Chang, A C; Jansen, P M; Lubbers, Y T; Pratt, B M; Whittaker, B G; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E; Friedman, B

    2000-02-15

    Plasma-derived antithrombin III (ATIII) prevents the lethal effects of Escherichia coli infusion in baboons, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant human ATIII (rhATIII) on the clinical course and the inflammatory cytokine and coagulation responses in baboons challenged with lethal dose of E coli. Animals in the treatment group (n = 5) received high doses of rhATIII starting 1 hour before an E coli challenge. Those in the control group were administered saline. Survival was significantly improved in the treatment group (P =.002). Both groups had similar hemodynamic responses to E coli challenge but different coagulation and inflammatory responses. The rhATIII group had an accelerated increase of thrombin-ATIII complexes and significantly less fibrinogen consumption compared to controls. In addition, the rhATIII group had much less severe thrombotic pathology on autopsy and virtually no fibrinolytic response to E coli challenge. Furthermore, the rhATIII group had a significantly attenuated inflammatory response as evidenced by marked reduction of the release of various cytokines. We conclude that the early administration of high doses of rhATIII improves the outcome in baboons lethally challenged with E coli, probably due to the combined anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects of this therapy. (Blood. 2000;95:1117-1123)

  5. Novel mutation (E113X) of antithrombin III gene (AT3) in a woman with gestational recurrent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Hoshi, N; Kato, E H; Ebina, Y; Kishida, T; Sagawa, T; Matsuno, K; Fujimoto, S

    2000-04-24

    A 35-year-old Japanese woman with a low level (42-54%) of blood antithrombin (AT) III, experienced two induced abortions due to deep venous thrombosis at 8 weeks of gestation (GW) and cerebral thrombosis at 10 GW. The present pregnancy was successfully managed with intravenous administration of AT III (6,000-8,000 U/wk). Analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for exons 3A and 4 of the AT III gene (AT3) using her DNA revealed extra expansion bands with altered migration. The DNA sequencing demonstrated novel mutations in exon 3A of AT3: a G to T substitution at nucleotide position 5333 in codon GAG for Glu 113, causing a stop codon (E113X), and an A to T substitution at position 5338 in codon AAA for Lys 114, forming Asn (K114N). These novel mutations, especially E113X, in AT3 may be related to recurrent thrombosis in the pregnancy. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of bioisosteric sulfonic-Acid analogues of the antithrombin-binding pentasaccharide domain of heparin.

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Mihály; Lázár, László; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Kövér, Katalin E; Timári, István; Kappelmayer, János; Lipták, András; Antus, Sándor; Borbás, Anikó

    2012-08-20

    Two pentasaccharide sulfonic acids that were related to the antithrombin-binding domain of heparin were prepared, in which two or three primary sulfate esters were replaced by sodium-sulfonatomethyl moieties. The sulfonic-acid groups were formed on a monosaccharide level and the obtained carbohydrate sulfonic-acid esters were found to be excellent donors and acceptors in the glycosylation reactions. Throughout the synthesis, the hydroxy groups to be methylated were masked in the form of acetates and the hydroxy groups to be sulfated were masked with benzyl groups. The disulfonic-acid analogue was prepared in a [2+3] block synthesis by using a trisaccharide disulfonic acid as an acceptor and a glucuronide disaccharide as a donor. For the synthesis of the pentasaccharide trisulfonic acid, a more-efficient approach, which involved elongation of the trisaccharide acceptor with a non-oxidized precursor of the glucuronic acid followed by post-glycosidation oxidation at the tetrasaccharide level and a subsequent [1+4] coupling reaction, was elaborated. In vitro evaluation of the anticoagulant activity of these new sulfonic-acid derivatives revealed that the disulfonate analogue inhibited the blood-coagulation-proteinase factor Xa with outstanding efficacy; however, the introduction of the third sulfonic-acid moiety resulted in a notable decrease in the anti-Xa activity. The difference in the biological activity of the disulfonic- and trisulfonic-acid counterparts could be explained by the different conformation of their L-iduronic-acid residues.

  7. Antithrombin reduces monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation in addition to blocking platelet activation during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rinder, Christine S; Rinder, Henry M; Smith, Michael J; Fitch, Jane C K; Tracey, Jayne B; Chandler, Wayne L; Rollins, Scott A; Smith, Brian R

    2006-07-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass develop a systemic inflammatory reaction. Antithrombin III (AT) has anticoagulant effects but also shows evidence of anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to examine whether exogenous AT could reduce white blood cell activation (CD11b up regulation or elastase release), in addition to inhibiting platelet (PLT) activation and fibrin generation, during simulated cardiopulmonary bypass (sCPB), undertaken in the absence of endothelium. sCPB was carried out with minimally heparinized (2 U/mL) human blood for 90 minutes in controls and with supplementation by low-dose (1 U/mL) and high-dose (5 U/mL) AT. High-dose AT blunted thrombin generation during sCPB (prothrombin fragment 1.2); both doses significantly inhibited thrombin activity (fibrinopeptide A). Complement activation (C3a and C5b-9) was unaffected by AT. High-dose AT inhibited PLT activation (P-selectin expression and P-selectin-dependent monocyte-PLT conjugate formation). AT supplementation at the higher dose significantly abrogated monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation and neutrophil elastase release. In addition to anticoagulant and anti-PLT effects, pharmacologic AT doses significantly blunted monocyte and neutrophil CD11b up regulation and neutrophil elastase release during sCPB, independent of endothelial effects. These data provide evidence for the direct anti-inflammatory activity of AT that has clinical relevance for CPB complications.

  8. Relationship between angiotensinogen, alpha 1-protease inhibitor elastase complex, antithrombin III and C-reactive protein in septic ARDS.

    PubMed

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kellermann, W; Kienapfel, G; Jochum, M

    1990-01-01

    The time-course of plasma angiotensinogen (Ao), elastase-alpha 1-protease inhibitor complex (EL alpha 1PI), antithrombin III (AT III) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been investigated of six patients suffering from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The total plasma Ao level (active and inactive Ao) varied in individuals but was increased up to five-fold. An increasing amount of inactive Ao is found. From the beginning of their stay in the intensive care unit up to five days half of the patients displayed a positive correlation between the plasma CRP and Ao level. The CRP and Ao values were either not or were negatively correlated with the AT III values. In contrast plasma Ao and AT III levels in all patients were positively correlated during a particular period in the subsequent phase of the disease, where there was no or a negative correlation with CRP. The two acute phase reactants CRP and EL alpha 1PI were only correlated in two patients at the beginning of the disease. The markedly increased plasma level at the beginning of the inflammatory disease indicates that Ao is an acute phase reactant, and this is supported by the parallel changes in plasma CRP and Ao levels during the early days of ARDS. The relationship between the plasma levels of Ao and AT III for more than fourteen days suggests similar regulation of these members of the serpin family after termination of the acute-phase.

  9. Blood macrophage colony-stimulating factor and thrombin-antithrombin III complex concentrations in pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Numaguchi, M; Ohkubo, N; Yaoi, Y

    1998-04-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a characteristic cytokine that plays an essential role in placenta maintenance, and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) is a hemostatic marker that is remarkably altered both in normal pregnancy and in preeclampsia. The present study was designed in order to show various levels of M-CSF and TAT in pregnancies. Peripheral blood was collected from 49 subjects, of whom 31 were normal pregnant women consisting of the four groups (namely 10th, 20th, 30th, and 38th weeks of gestation), 13 were preeclamptic pregnant women (37th week of gestation; mean blood pressure, 158/99 mm Hg), and 5 were nonpregnant controls. We compared blood M-CSF and TAT levels among them. Results showed that blood M-CSF and TAT levels increased significantly with gestational age. Furthermore, the ratio of increase in M-CSF was significantly lower than that in TAT in normal pregnant women compared with controls. In contrast, the ratio of increase in M-CSF was significantly higher than that in TAT in preeclamptic women compared with normal pregnant women. These results concerning the ratio of increase in M-CSF and TAT have not been reported. These findings show that M-CSF level increases significantly in preeclampsia even in its earlier stage, exhibiting a systolic blood pressure of less than 160 mm Hg.

  10. Factor VIIa-antithrombin complexes in patients with non-neoplastic portal vein thrombosis with and without cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, V; Spiezia, L; Senzolo, M; Rodriguez, K; Gavasso, S; Woodhams, B; Simioni, P

    2013-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is caused by local and systemic prothrombotic risk factors. In this case-control study, we evaluated the use of the Factor VIIa-antithrombin complex (FVIIa-AT) complex assay as a hypercoagulability marker in patients with PVT. Two different groups of cases were considered: (i) n = 12 noncirrhotic PVT patients, (ii) n = 33 cirrhotic patients with PVT. Controls were sex and age-matched healthy volunteers and cirrhotic subjects without PVT, respectively. Levels of the FVIIa-AT complex were significantly higher in noncirrhotic PVT subjects (132 ± 32 pM) than in healthy volunteers (108 ± 18 pM, P = 0.04). No significant difference in FVIIa-AT complexes was seen between cirrhotic patients with (64 ± 20 pM) or without (61 ± 24 pM) PVT. A linear correlation was seen between FVIIa-AT and FVIIa in noncirrhotic PVT subjects. In cirrhotic patients, FVIIa-AT complexes depended on both FVIIa and AT. These results confirm the utility of the FVIIa-AT assay in identifying the hypercoagulable state of noncirrhotic patients because of a previous thrombotic event. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [Study on antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives and effective components variation of Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility].

    PubMed

    Su, Shu-lan; Xue, Ping; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhou, Wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2015-08-01

    The changes of bioactive constituents were analyzed for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility and the antiplatelet and antithrombin activitives were evaluated in order to elucidate the scientific and reasonable of Puhuang-Wulingzhi compatibility. UPLC-QTOF-MA-Markerlynx, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis were used for data analysis and tracking changes of chemical composition during the decocting process. In vitro platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin time(TT) and prothrombin time (PT) were investigated for Puhuang-Wulingzhi before and after compatibility. The results showed that significant differences were found between the mixed decoction and codecoction of Wulingzhi and Puhuang. Five compounds changed obviously were identified as typhaneoside, naringenin, isorhamnetin-3-O-ruinoside, quercetin-3-O-neohesperidoside, kaempferol-3-O-neohesperidoside. The codecoction, comparing with the single decoction, was more significant in antiplatelet aggregation and could prolong thrombin time. In the same crude drug dose, the thrombin time (TT) elongation were greater. These data could provide references for elucidation of bioactive components for this herb pair.

  12. Paternity and inheritance of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, John

    1981-06-01

    One of the oldest conjectures in anthropology is that men transfer wealth to their sister's son when the biological paternity of their `own' children is in doubt1-12. Because maternity is certain, a man is necessarily related to his sister's son and his brother (see Fig. 1). It is argued here that relatedness to male heirs can be assured by passing wealth to sister's sons or down a line of brothers, whether the prevailing kinship system reckons those brothers matrilineally or patrilineally. It is also argued that when several transfers of wealth are considered, a man's likelihood of being cuckolded need not be unrealistically high13 for his successive matrilineal heirs to be more related to him than his successive patrilineal heirs (see Fig. 2). Cross-cultural data on sister's son/brother inheritance14 and frequency of extramarital sex for females15 support the hypothesis that men tend to transmit wealth to their sister's son and/or brother when the probability that their putative children are their genetic children is relatively low.

  13. Coalgebraic structure of genetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Li, Bai-Lian

    2004-09-01

    Although in the broadly defined genetic algebra, multiplication suggests a forward direction of from parents to progeny, when looking from the reverse direction, it also suggests to us a new algebraic structure-coalge- braic structure, which we call genetic coalgebras. It is not the dual coalgebraic structure and can be used in the construction of phylogenetic trees. Math- ematically, to construct phylogenetic trees means we need to solve equations x([n]) = a, or x([n]) = b. It is generally impossible to solve these equations inalgebras. However, we can solve them in coalgebras in the sense of tracing back for their ancestors. A thorough exploration of coalgebraic structure in genetics is apparently necessary. Here, we develop a theoretical framework of the coalgebraic structure of genetics. From biological viewpoint, we defined various fundamental concepts and examined their elementary properties that contain genetic significance. Mathematically, by genetic coalgebra, we mean any coalgebra that occurs in genetics. They are generally noncoassociative and without counit; and in the case of non-sex-linked inheritance, they are cocommutative. Each coalgebra with genetic realization has a baric property. We have also discussed the methods to construct new genetic coalgebras, including cocommutative duplication, the tensor product, linear combinations and the skew linear map, which allow us to describe complex genetic traits. We also put forward certain theorems that state the relationship between gametic coalgebra and gametic algebra. By Brower's theorem in topology, we prove the existence of equilibrium state for the in-evolution operator.

  14. Treatable inherited rare movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, H A; Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash P; Cardoso, Francisco; Da Prat, Gustavo; de Koning, Tom J; Espay, Alberto J; Fung, Victor; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Gershanik, Oscar; Jankovic, Joseph; Kaji, Ryuji; Kotschet, Katya; Marras, Connie; Miyasaki, Janis M; Morgante, Francesca; Munchau, Alexander; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Rodriguez Oroz, Maria C; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Schöls, Ludger; Stamelou, Maria; Tijssen, Marina; Uribe Roca, Claudia; de la Cerda, Andres; Gatto, Emilia M

    2017-09-01

    There are many rare movement disorders, and new ones are described every year. Because they are not well recognized, they often go undiagnosed for long periods of time. However, early diagnosis is becoming increasingly important. Rapid advances in our understanding of the biological mechanisms responsible for many rare disorders have enabled the development of specific treatments for some of them. Well-known historical examples include Wilson disease and dopa-responsive dystonia, for which specific and highly effective treatments have life-altering effects. In recent years, similarly specific and effective treatments have been developed for more than 30 rare inherited movement disorders. These treatments include specific medications, dietary changes, avoidance or management of certain triggers, enzyme replacement therapy, and others. This list of treatable rare movement disorders is likely to grow during the next few years because a number of additional promising treatments are actively being developed or evaluated in clinical trials. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Thrombosis in Inherited Fibrinogen Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Wolfgang; Poon, Man-Chiu; Iorio, Alfonso; Makris, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Although inherited fibrinogen disorders (IFD) are primarily considered to be bleeding disorders, they are associated with a higher thrombotic complication risk than defects in other clotting factors. Managing IFD patients with thrombosis is challenging as anticoagulant treatment may exacerbate the underlying bleeding risk which can be life-threatening. Due to the low prevalence of IFD, there is little information on pathophysiology or optimal treatment of thrombosis in these patients. We searched the literature for cases of thrombosis among IFD patients and identified a total of 128 patient reports. In approximately half of the cases, thromboses were spontaneous, while in the others trauma, surgery, and parturition contributed to the risk. The true mechanism(s) of thrombosis in IFD patients remain to be elucidated. A variety of anticoagulant treatments have been used in the treatment or prevention of thrombosis, sometimes with concurrent fibrinogen replacement therapy. There is no definite evidence that fibrinogen supplementation increases the risk of thrombosis, and it may potentially be effective in the treatment and prevention of both thrombosis and hemorrhage in IFD patients. PMID:28503122

  16. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth.

  17. Zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tuerk, Melanie J; Fazel, Nasim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in numerous biochemical pathways. Zinc deficiency affects many organ systems, including the integumentary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems. This article aims to discuss zinc metabolism and highlights a few of the diseases associated with zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency results in dysfunction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity and increases the susceptibility to infection. Supplementation of zinc has been shown to reduce the incidence of infection as well as cellular damage from increased oxidative stress. Zinc deficiency is also associated with acute and chronic liver disease. Zinc supplementation protects against toxin-induced liver damage and is used as a therapy for hepatic encephalopathy in patients refractory to standard treatment. Zinc deficiency has also been implicated in diarrheal disease, and supplementation has been effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of acute diarrhea. This article is not meant to review all of the disease states associated with zinc deficiency. Rather, it is an introduction to the influence of the many roles of zinc in the body, with an extensive discussion of the influence of zinc deficiency in selected diseases. Zinc supplementation may be beneficial as an adjunct to treatment of many disease states.

  18. Ketogenic diets in patients with inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, S; Höller, A; Pichler, K; Michel, M; Haberlandt, E; Karall, D

    2015-07-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) are diets that bring on a metabolic condition comparable to fasting, usually without catabolism. Since the mid-1990s such diets have been widely used in patients with seizures/epilepsies, mostly children. This review focuses on the use of KDs in patients with various inherited metabolic disorders (IMD). In glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) deficiency, KDs are deemed the therapy of choice and directly target the underlying metabolic disorder. Moreover, in other IMD, mainly of intermediary metabolism such as glycogen storage diseases and disorders of mitochondrial energy supply, KDs may ameliorate clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. KDs have also been used successfully to treat symptoms such as seizures/epilepsy in IMD, e.g. in urea cycle disorders and non-ketotic hyperglycinemia. As a note of caution, catabolism may cause the condition of patients with IMD to deteriorate and should thus be avoided during KDs. For this reason, careful monitoring (clinical, laboratory and apparatus-supported) is warranted. In some IMDs specific macronutrient supply is critical. Therefore, in cases of PDHc deficiency the carbohydrate intake tolerated without lactate increase and in urea cycle disorders the protein tolerance should be determined. Considering this, it is particularly important in patients with IMD that the use of KDs be individualized and well documented.

  19. Inherited abnormalities of skeletal development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K G; Piripi, S A; Dittmer, K E

    2008-09-01

    Inherited diseases of the skeleton are reported less often in sheep than in most other domestic animal species but are likely to occur more frequently than the veterinary literature would suggest. Although most are lethal or semi-lethal, the gene frequency for some of these diseases has reached surprisingly high levels in defined populations, presumably due either to the founder effect or the presence of a selective advantage of heterozygous individuals. This article reviews the clinical characteristics, pathology, mode of inheritance and molecular basis of skeletal diseases known to have a genetic aetiology in sheep. Inherited skeletal diseases of sheep are potential models for studying the treatment of similar diseases in humans.

  20. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly.

  1. Law & psychiatry: Murder, inheritance, and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, Azgad; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2011-07-01

    Should a murderer be allowed to inherit the victim's estate? The question dates from biblical times, but most jurisdictions today have statutes in place that bar inheritance by convicted murderers. However, a special problem arises when the killer has a severe mental illness and has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Should such people, who have not been convicted of a crime, be permitted to collect their inheritance? Jurisdictions vary in their responses, with the rules reflecting a mix of practical and moral considerations influenced by different perspectives about what determines the behavior of persons with mental illness.

  2. Inherited Disorders of Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gattineni, Jyothsna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate homeostasis have variable presentation and can cause significant morbidity. Understanding the mode of inheritance and pathophysiology of these conditions will help in the diagnosis and early institution of therapy. Recent Findings Identification of genetic mutations in human subjects and animal models has advanced our understanding of many inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate regulation. Identification of mutations of CaSR also has improved our understanding of hypocalcemic and hypercalcemic conditions. Mutations of Fgf23, Klotho and phosphate transporter genes have been identified as causes for disorders of phosphate metabolism. Summary Calcium and phosphate homeostasis is tightly regulated in a narrow range due to their vital role in many biological processes. Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate metabolism though uncommon can have severe morbidity. Genetic counseling of the affected families is an important part of the follow up of these patients. PMID:24553630

  3. Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gattineni, Jyothsna

    2014-04-01

    Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate homeostasis have variable presentation and can cause significant morbidity. An understanding of the mode of inheritance and pathophysiology of these conditions will help in the diagnosis and early institution of therapy. Identification of genetic mutations in humans and animal models has advanced our understanding of many inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate regulation. Identification of mutations of calcium-sensing receptor has improved our understanding of hypocalcemic and hypercalcemic conditions. Mutations of Fgf23, Klotho and phosphate transporter genes have been identified to cause disorders of phosphate metabolism. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis is tightly regulated in a narrow range due to their vital role in many biological processes. Inherited disorders of calcium and phosphate metabolism though uncommon can have severe morbidity. Genetic counseling of the affected families is an important part of the follow-up of these patients.

  4. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  5. Developmental origins of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Mark A.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors can induce epigenetic alterations in the germ cells that can potentially be transmitted transgenerationally. This non-genetic form of inheritance is termed epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and has been shown in a variety of species including plants, flies, worms, fish, rodents, pigs, and humans. This phenomenon operates during specific critical windows of exposure, linked to the developmental biology of the germ cells (sperm and eggs). Therefore, concepts of the developmental origins of transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation and subsequent disease risk need to include epigenetic processes affecting the developmental biology of the germ cell. These developmental impacts on epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, in contrast to multigenerational exposures, are the focus of this Perspective. PMID:27390622

  6. Developmental origins of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark A; Skinner, Michael K

    Environmental factors can induce epigenetic alterations in the germ cells that can potentially be transmitted transgenerationally. This non-genetic form of inheritance is termed epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and has been shown in a variety of species including plants, flies, worms, fish, rodents, pigs, and humans. This phenomenon operates during specific critical windows of exposure, linked to the developmental biology of the germ cells (sperm and eggs). Therefore, concepts of the developmental origins of transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation and subsequent disease risk need to include epigenetic processes affecting the developmental biology of the germ cell. These developmental impacts on epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, in contrast to multigenerational exposures, are the focus of this Perspective.

  7. Patterns of inheritance in familial ALS.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marcus; Bradley, Lloyd; de Belleroche, Jackie; Orrell, Richard W

    2005-05-10

    We investigated 185 families with ALS for evidence of anticipation and mitochondrial inheritance. Although initial analysis demonstrated significant anticipation of age at death between generations in patients with familial ALS, further analysis demonstrated features of regression to the mean, suggesting that the perceived differences are the result of bias. In addition, there was no evidence of an effect of preferential maternal inheritance, which would have supported transmission of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  8. Inheritance and Synchronization in Concurrent OOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briot, Jean-Pierre; Yonezawa, Akinori

    This paper discusses knowledge sharing (inheritance) mechanisms for Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) in the context of concurrent (distributed) languages. We review three different schemes: inheritance, delegation and copy. A fourth model, called recipe-query, is presented and all are compared and criticized. Techniques relying on the shared memory assumption are rejected. We point out the conflict between distributing knowledge among objects and the synchronization of concurrent objects.

  9. Inherited Metabolic Disorders: Aspects of Chronic Nutritional Management

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, SW; Barclay, LJ; Burrage, LC

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of newborn screening and the development of new therapies have led to an expanding population of patients with inherited metabolic disorders, and these patients are now entering adulthood. Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for many of these disorders and thus, trained metabolic dietitians are critical members of the multidisciplinary team required for management of such patients. The main goals of dietary therapy in inborn errors of metabolism are the maintenance of normal growth and development while limiting offending metabolites and providing deficient products. Typically, the offending metabolite is either significantly reduced or removed completely from the diet and then reintroduced in small quantities until blood levels are within the normal range. Such treatment is required in infancy, childhood and adulthood and requires careful monitoring of micronutrient and macronutrient intake throughout the lifespan. The goal of this review is to highlight the basic principles of chronic nutritional management of the inborn errors of protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism. PMID:26079521

  10. The Critical Role of Hinge Region Expulsion in the Induced-fit Heparin Binding Mechanism of Antithrombin

    PubMed Central

    Langdown, Jonathan; Belzar, Klara J.; Savory, Wendy J.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Huntington, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Antithrombin (AT) is the most important inhibitor of the coagulation proteases. Its activity is stimulated by glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, through allosteric and template mechanisms. AT utilises an induced-fit mechanism to bind with high affinity to a pentasaccharide sequence found in about one-third of heparin chains. The conformational changes behind this mechanism have been characterised by several crystal structures of AT in the absence and presence of the pentasaccharide. Pentasaccharide binding ultimately results in a conformational change that improves affinity by about 1000-fold. Crystal structures show several differences, including the expulsion of the hinge region of the reactive centre loop from β-sheet A, known to be critical for the allosteric activation of AT. Here we present data that reveals an energetically distinct intermediate on the path to full activation, where the majority of conformational changes have already occurred. A crystal structure of this intermediate shows that the hinge region is in a native like state, in spite of having the pentasaccharide bound in the normal fashion. We engineered a disulphide bond to lock the hinge in its native position to determine the energetic contributions of the initial and final conformational events. Approximately 60% of the free energy contribution of conformational change is provided by the final step of hinge region expulsion and subsequent closure of the main β-sheet A. A new analysis of the individual structural changes provides a plausible mechanism for propagation of conformational change from the heparin binding site to the remote hinge region in β-sheet A. PMID:19452598

  11. Antithrombin Administration During Intravenous Heparin Anticoagulation in the Intensive Care Unit: A Single-Center Matched Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jacob T; Schoeppler, Kelly E; Zanotti, Giorgio; Weiss, Gregory M; Mueller, Scott W; MacLaren, Robert; Fish, Douglas N; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-09-13

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is a frequently utilized indirect anticoagulant that induces therapeutic effect by enhancing antithrombin (AT)-mediated procoagulant enzyme inhibition. In suspected heparin resistance (HR) during cardiopulmonary bypass, AT activity may be decreased and AT supplementation helps restore UFH responsiveness. The benefit of AT supplementation in HR over longer durations of UFH therapy is unclear. The objective of this study was to describe and evaluate the use of AT III concentrate in the intensive care units (ICUs) at our institution for improving UFH therapy response over 72 hours. A total of 44 critically ill patients were included in the analysis-22 patients received at least 1 dose of AT and 22 patients received no AT. Thirty (68.2%) of the 44 patients were receiving mechanical circulatory support. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The average AT activity prior to AT supplementation was 57.9% in the treatment group, and the median cumulative dose of AT was 786.5 U (9.26 U/kg) per patient. There were no significant differences observed in proportion of time spent in therapeutic range (31.9% vs 35.2%, P = .65), time to therapeutic goal (16.5 vs 15.5 hours, P = .97), or patients who experienced a bleeding event (5 vs 5, P = .99) between groups. In conclusion, AT supplementation had minimal impact on anticoagulant response in this cohort of ICU patients with mild to moderate HR receiving a prolonged UFH infusion. Additional research is needed to define AT activity targets and to standardize AT supplementation practices in patients receiving prolonged heparin infusion.

  12. Missense mutations in the gene encoding prothrombin corresponding to Arg596 cause antithrombin resistance and thrombomodulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Tamura, Shogo; Takagi, Akira; Matsushita, Tadashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-11-30

    Antithrombin (AT) and thrombomodulin (TM) play important roles in the process of natural anticoagulation in vivo. Recently, we reported that the prothrombin Yukuhashi mutation (p.Arg596Leu) was associated with AT and TM resistance-related thrombophilia. To assess the AT and TM resistances associated with other missense mutations by single base substitution in the Arg596 codon, we generated recombinant variants (596Gln, 596Trp, 596Gly, and 596Pro) and investigated the effects on AT and TM anticoagulant functions. All variants except 596Pro were secreted in amounts comparable to that of the wild-type but exhibited variable procoagulant activities. After a 30-minute inactivation by AT, the relative residual activity of wild-type thrombin decreased to 15 ± 4.0 %, in contrast to values of all variants were maintained at above 80 %. The thrombin-AT complex formation, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was reduced with all tested variants in the presence and absence of heparin. In the presence of soluble TM (sTM), the relative fibrinogen clotting activity of wild-type thrombin decreased to 16 ± 0.12 %, whereas that of tested variants was 37 %-56 %. In a surface plasmon resonance assay, missense Arg596 mutations reduced thrombin-TM affinity to an extent similar to the reduction of fibrinogen clotting inhibition. In the presence of sTM or cultured endothelial-like cells, APC generation was enhanced differently by variant thrombins in a thrombin-TM affinity-dependent manner. These data indicate that prothrombin Arg596 missense mutations lead to AT and TM resistance in the variant thrombins and suggest that prothrombin Arg596 is important for AT- and TM-mediated anticoagulation.

  13. Interaction of antithrombin III with bovine aortic segments. Role of heparin in binding and enhanced anticoagulant activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.; Nawroth, P.; Marcum, J.; Handley, D.; Kisiel, W.; Rosenberg, R.; Stern, K.

    1985-01-01

    Bovine antithrombin III (AT III) interaction with the luminal surface of bovine aortic segments with a continuous layer of endothelium was examined. Incubation of /sup 125/I-AT III with vessel segments, previously washed free of endogenous AT III, demonstrated specific, time-dependent binding to the protease inhibitor to the endothelium. Half-maximal binding was observed at an added AT III concentration of 14 nM. Binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel wall was reversible (50% dissociated in 4 min), and addition of either heparin or Factor Xa accelerated displacement of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment. Dissociation of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment in the presence of factor Xa coincided with the formation of a Factor Xa-/sup 125/I-AT III complex. Inactivation of Factor IXa and Factor Xa by AT III was facilitated in the presence of vessel segments. Pretreatment of vessel segments with highly purified Flavobacterium heparinase precluded the vessel-dependent augmentation of AT III anticoagulant activity as well as specific binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel endothelium. In contrast, pretreatment of the vessel segments with chrondroitinases (ABC or AC) had no detectable effect on /sup 125/I-AT III binding or on AT III anticoagulant activity. AT III binding to vessel segments was competitively inhibited by increasing concentration of platelet factor 4. Binding of the protease inhibitor to vessel segments was inhibited by chemical modification of AT III lysyl or tryptophan residues. These AT III derivatives retained progressive inhibitory activity. These data suggest that heparin-like molecules are present on the aortic vessel wall and mediate binding of AT III to the vessel surface, as well as enhancing the anticoagulant activity of AT III at these sites.

  14. Stability with Inheritance in the Conditional Strategy.

    PubMed

    Gross; Repka

    1998-06-21

    The conditional strategy is a theoretical framework that explains the existence within populations of individuals that express alternative behavioral, physical or life history tactics (phenotypes). An example is fighters and sneakers in many animal mating systems. In the conditional strategy the alternative tactics are chosen by individuals based on their state, for example large or small bodied. Since state is often heritable, due for example to additive genetic variance, the alternative tactics may also have inheritance. As the tactics do not have equal fitnesses, it is generally believed that any such inheritance would prevent the evolutionary stability of the conditional strategy. However, in previous work we introduced an Inheritance Theorem and were able to prove that a conditional strategy with tactic inheritances can have a unique equilibrium proportion of the tactics. We now prove a second property of our Inheritance Theorem, namely the stability of the equilibrium. This means that if the tactics are perturbed from their equilibrium proportions, they will return across generations to their equilibrium proportions. An example is provided in mites. We have therefore established an Inheritance Theorem which includes both the existence of an equilibrium and its stability for alternative tactics in a conditional strategy.Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  15. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in a Patient with Undiagnosed Factor VII Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Hira; Rashid, Anila; Adil, Salman Naseem

    2017-09-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the rare inherited bleeding disorders. Thrombosis has been occasionally described in inherited FVII deficiency. Here, we report a young female with undiagnosed FVII deficiency who presented with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Oral contraceptive pill was found to be prothrombotic risk factor. The CVSToccurred in spite of the congenital FVII deficiency indicating that no definitive antithrombotic protection is assured by this defect. Low molecular weight heparin and anti-Xa assay were found to be safe choice of anticoagulation and monitoring, respectively, in this patient.

  16. Spectrum analysis of common inherited metabolic diseases in Chinese patients screened and diagnosed by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Lianshu; Han, Feng; Ye, Jun; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Gao, Xiaolan; Wang, Yu; Ji, Wenjun; Gu, Xuefan

    2015-03-01

    Information concerning inherited metabolic diseases in China is scarce. We investigated the prevalence and age distributions of amino acid, organic acid, and fatty acid oxidation disorders in Chinese patients. Blood levels of amino acids and acylcarnitines (tandem mass spectrometry) were measured in 18,303 patients with suspected inherited metabolic diseases. Diagnosis was based on clinical features, blood levels of amino acids or acylcarnitines, urinary organic acid levels (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), and (in some) gene mutation tests. Inherited metabolic diseases were confirmed in 1,135 patients (739 males, 396 females). Median age was 12 months (1 day to 59 years). There were 28 diseases: 12 amino acid disorders (580 patients, 51.1%), with hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) being the most common; nine organic acidemias (408 patients, 35.9%), with methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) as the most common; and seven fatty acid oxidation defects (147 patients, 13.0%), with multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) being the most common. Onset was mainly at 1-6 months for citrin deficiency, 0-6 months for MMA, and in newborns for ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD). HPA was common in patients aged 1-3 years, and MADD was common in patients >18 years. In China, HPA, citrin deficiency, MMA, and MADD are the most common inherited disorders, particularly in newborns/infants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A case with combined rare inborn metabolic disorders: congenital adrenal hyperplasia and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lim, Han Hyuk; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-09-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle disorder and demonstrates X-linked inheritance. In female OTC deficiency, phenotypes are variable according to X-inactivation patterns. These disorders develop separately, and their co-morbidity is extremely rare. We report one girl with CAH showing recurrent hyperammonemia and hepatitis after 2 years-of-age due to additional OTC deficiency.

  18. Cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) consists of a corrinoid structure with cobalt in the centre of the molecule. Neither humans nor animals are able to synthesize this vitamin. Foods of animal source are the only natural source of cobalamin in human diet. There are only two enzymatic reactions in mammalian cells that require cobalamin as cofactor. Methylcobolamin is a cofactor for methionine synthase. The enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Therefore, serum concentrations of homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) will increase in cobalamin deficiency. The cobalamin absorption from diet is a complex process that involves different proteins: haptocorrin, intrinsic factor and transcobalamin (TC). Cobalamin that is bound to TC is called holotranscobalamin (holoTC) which is the metabolically active vitamin B12 fraction. HoloTC consists 6 and 20% of total cobalamin whereas 80% of total serum cobalamin is bound to another binding protein, haptocorrin. Cobalamin deficiency is common worldwide. Cobalamin malabsorption is common in elderly subjects which might explain low vitamin status. Subjects who ingest low amount of cobalamin like vegetarians develop vitamin deficiency. No single parameter can be used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. Total serum cobalamin is neither sensitive nor it is specific for cobalamin deficiency. This might explain why many deficient subjects would be overlooked by utilizing total cobalamin as status marker. Concentration of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in serum is an earlier marker that becomes decreased before total serum cobalamin. Concentrations of MMA and tHcy increase in blood of cobalamin deficient subjects. Despite limitations of these markers in patients with renal dysfunction, concentrations of MMA and tHcy are useful functional markers of cobalamin status. The combined use of holoTC and MMA assays may better indicate cobalamin status than either of them. Because Cbl deficiency is a risk factor

  19. Molecular autopsy in victims of inherited arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a rare but devastating complication of a number of underlying cardiovascular diseases. While coronary artery disease and acute myocardial infarction are the most common causes of SCD in older populations, inherited cardiac disorders comprise a substantial proportion of SCD cases aged less than 40 years. Inherited cardiac disorders include primary inherited arrhythmogenic disorders such as familial long QT syndrome (LQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), and inherited cardiomyopathies, most commonly hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In up to 40% of young SCD victims (defined as 1-40 years old, excluding sudden unexplained death in infancy from 0 to 1 years, referred to as SIDS), no cause of death is identified at postmortem [so-called "autopsy negative" or "sudden arrhythmic death syndrome" (SADS)]. Management of families following a SCD includes the identification of the cause of death, based either on premorbid clinical details or the pathological findings at the postmortem. When no cause of death is identified, genetic testing of DNA extracted from postmortem tissue (the molecular autopsy) may identify a cause of death in up to 30% of SADS cases. Targeted clinical testing in a specialized multidisciplinary clinic in surviving family members combined with the results from genetic testing, provide the optimal setting for the identification of relatives who may be at risk of having the same inherited heart disease and are therefore also predisposed to an increased risk of SCD.

  20. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  1. Inheritance of idiopathic torsion dystonia among Jews.

    PubMed Central

    Zilber, N; Korczyn, A D; Kahana, E; Fried, K; Alter, M

    1984-01-01

    Idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) has long been considered to be genetically determined, but the pattern of inheritance has been unclear. It has been suggested that inheritance may differ in Jews and non-Jews. In the present study, data gathered in a nationwide survey of ITD in Israel were analysed. Between 1969 and 1980, 47 patients were collected, of whom 40 were of European origin. In these European Jews, the ITD frequency was about 1:23 000 live births, which was five-fold greater than in Jews of Afro-Asian origin. Assuming that all cases fit the same genetic model, an X linked or a simple autosomal recessive model of inheritance did not agree well with our data. An autosomal dominant model with low penetrance could have accounted for our observations and would yield an ITD gene frequency in European Jews of 3 to 4:100 000. In view of the increased ages of their fathers, the isolated cases may have included some new mutations. Multifactorial inheritance was also possible. However, it may be inappropriate to assume that all cases have the same genetic basis, or even that all are inherited. PMID:6694180

  2. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  3. Inheritance of Telomere Length in a Bird

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Thorsten; Robertson, Bruce C.; Will, Margaret; Eason, Daryl K.; Elliott, Graeme P.; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere dynamics are intensively studied in human ageing research and epidemiology, with many correlations reported between telomere length and age-related diseases, cancer and death. While telomere length is influenced by environmental factors there is also good evidence for a strong heritable component. In human, the mode of telomere length inheritance appears to be paternal and telomere length differs between sexes, with females having longer telomeres than males. Genetic factors, e.g. sex chromosomal inactivation, and non-genetic factors, e.g. antioxidant properties of oestrogen, have been suggested as possible explanations for these sex-specific telomere inheritance and telomere length differences. To test the influence of sex chromosomes on telomere length, we investigated inheritance and sex-specificity of telomere length in a bird species, the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), in which females are the heterogametic sex (ZW) and males are the homogametic (ZZ) sex. We found that, contrary to findings in humans, telomere length was maternally inherited and also longer in males. These results argue against an effect of sex hormones on telomere length and suggest that factors associated with heterogamy may play a role in telomere inheritance and sex-specific differences in telomere length. PMID:21364951

  4. Inheritance of telomere length in a bird.

    PubMed

    Horn, Thorsten; Robertson, Bruce C; Will, Margaret; Eason, Daryl K; Elliott, Graeme P; Gemmell, Neil J

    2011-02-22

    Telomere dynamics are intensively studied in human ageing research and epidemiology, with many correlations reported between telomere length and age-related diseases, cancer and death. While telomere length is influenced by environmental factors there is also good evidence for a strong heritable component. In human, the mode of telomere length inheritance appears to be paternal and telomere length differs between sexes, with females having longer telomeres than males. Genetic factors, e.g. sex chromosomal inactivation, and non-genetic factors, e.g. antioxidant properties of oestrogen, have been suggested as possible explanations for these sex-specific telomere inheritance and telomere length differences. To test the influence of sex chromosomes on telomere length, we investigated inheritance and sex-specificity of telomere length in a bird species, the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), in which females are the heterogametic sex (ZW) and males are the homogametic (ZZ) sex. We found that, contrary to findings in humans, telomere length was maternally inherited and also longer in males. These results argue against an effect of sex hormones on telomere length and suggest that factors associated with heterogamy may play a role in telomere inheritance and sex-specific differences in telomere length.

  5. Inheritance in tetraploid yeast revisited: segregation patterns and statistical power under different inheritance models.

    PubMed

    Stift, M; Reeve, R; van Tienderen, P H

    2010-07-01

    In their recent article, Albertin et al. (2009) suggest an autotetraploid origin of 10 tetraploid strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), supported by the frequent observation of double reduction meiospores. However, the presented inheritance results were puzzling and seemed to contradict the authors' interpretation that segregation ratios support a tetrasomic model of inheritance. Here, we provide an overview of the expected segregation ratios at the tetrad and meiospore level given scenarios of strict disomic and tetrasomic inheritance, for cases with and without recombination between locus and centromere. We also use a power analysis to derive adequate sample sizes to distinguish alternative models. Closer inspection of the Albertin et al. data reveals that strict disomy can be rejected in most cases. However, disomic inheritance with strong but imperfect preferential pairing could not be excluded with the sample sizes used. The possibility of tetrad analysis in tetraploid yeast offers a valuable opportunity to improve our understanding of meiosis and inheritance of tetraploids.

  6. Current and future therapies for inherited cholestatic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    van der Woerd, Wendy L; Houwen, Roderick HJ; van de Graaf, Stan FJ

    2017-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestasis (FIC) comprises a group of rare cholestatic liver diseases associated with canalicular transport defects resulting predominantly from mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4. Phenotypes range from benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), associated with recurrent cholestatic attacks, to progressive FIC (PFIC). Patients often suffer from severe pruritus and eventually progressive cholestasis results in liver failure. Currently, first-line treatment includes ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with ABCB4 deficiency (PFIC3) and partial biliary diversion in patients with ATP8B1 or ABCB11 deficiency (PFIC1 and PFIC2). When treatment fails, liver transplantation is needed which is associated with complications like rejection, post-transplant hepatic steatosis and recurrence of disease. Therefore, the need for more and better therapies for this group of chronic diseases remains. Here, we discuss new symptomatic treatment options like total biliary diversion, pharmacological diversion of bile acids and hepatocyte transplantation. Furthermore, we focus on emerging mutation-targeted therapeutic strategies, providing an outlook for future personalized treatment for inherited cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:28223721

  7. Inherited anaemias in the Greek community of Cape Town.

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, R P; Botha, M C; Beighton, P

    1979-01-01

    Cape Town has a Greek community of about 5000, of whom approximately 75% originate from the island of Lesbos. In a survey of inherited haematological conditions in this population, 250 unrelated volunteers were investigated. The prevalence of heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was found to be 6.4%, with a gene frequency of 0.033. G6PD deficiency was detected in 10 males and it can be estimated that the prevalence in the male members of this population is 6.7%, with a gene frequency of 0.067. Hereditary spherocytosis was found in three respondents and this represents a prevalence of 1.2%, with a gene frequency of 0.006. One subject was heterozygous for the sickle cell trait (HbS) and another volunteer had haemoglobin Lepore, which had already been diagnosed in Greece. Our findings with respect to beta-thalassaemia and G6PD deficiency are similar to those reported from regions in Greece where malaria is not highly endemic. PMID:469897

  8. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: an open discussion.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Corina; Turecki, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    Much controversy surrounds the idea of transgenerational epigenetics. Recent papers argue that epigenetic marks acquired through experience are passed to offspring, but as in much of the field of epigenetics, there is lack of precision in the definitions and perhaps too much eagerness to translate animal research to humans. Here, we review operational definitions of transgenerational inheritance and the processes of epigenetic programing during early development. Subsequently, based on this background, we critically examine some recent findings of studies investigating transgenerational inheritance. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms that may explain transgenerational inheritance, including transmission of an epigenetic blueprint, which may predispose offspring to specific epigenetic patterning. Taken together, we conclude that presently, the evidence suggesting that acquired epigenetic marks are passed to the subsequent generation remains limited.

  9. Pathology of inherited rickets in Corriedale sheep.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G; Blair, H T

    2009-01-01

    A skeletal disease with features of rickets and simple autosomal recessive inheritance has been discovered in Corriedale sheep in New Zealand. The clinical signs resemble rickets in other species and include decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Gross lesions include segmental thickening of physes, growth arrest lines, collapse of subchondral bone of the humeral head, thickened cortices and enthesophytes around distal limb joints. Microscopically, there is persistence of hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification, inappropriate and excessive osteoclastic resorption, microfractures and wide, unmineralized osteoid seams lining trabeculae and filling secondary osteons. This study confirms that this skeletal disease of Corriedale sheep is a newly discovered form of inherited rickets and suggests that the genetic defect may be different from inherited forms of rickets described to date in man and animals.

  10. Inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason D; Veinot, John P; Rutberg, Julie; Gollob, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) represents an inherited cardiomyopathy that manifests clinically with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and less commonly heart failure. The condition is characterized by replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty tissue. Extensive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium has been previously thought to be pathognomonic of ARVC; however, this report details two other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome, that were found to have significant fibrofatty myocardial replacement at pathologic examination. This report represents the first documentation of inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking ARVC and highlights the concept that other cardiac conditions can be associated with fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental stress and epigenetic transgenerational inheritance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K

    2014-09-05

    Previous studies have shown a wide variety of environmental toxicants and abnormal nutrition can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. More recently a number of studies have indicated environmental stress can also promote epigenetic alterations that are transmitted to subsequent generations to induce pathologies. A recent study by Yao and colleagues demonstrated gestational exposure to restraint stress and forced swimming promoted preterm birth risk and adverse newborn outcomes generationally. This ancestral stress promoted the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of abnormalities in the great-grand offspring of the exposed gestating female. Several studies now support the role of environmental stress in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Observations suggest ancestral environmental stress may be a component of disease etiology in the current population.

  12. Inheritance of apospory in bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Martínez, E J; Urbani, M H; Quarin, C L; Ortiz, J P

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies on the inheritance of aposporous apomixis in bahiagrass showed a wide range of segregation ratios in crosses involving sexual and aposporous apomictic plants. The F1 progenies were classified through a visual progeny test carried out on few F2 plants. The number of sexual F1s highly exceeded the apomictics leading to the conclusion that apomixis was controlled by a few recessive genes. The present study examines the inheritance of apospory in bahiagrass. A sexual plant was self-pollinated and crossed with an aposporous apomictic plant as pollen donor. Backcross and F2 progenies were obtained in several combinations. All self-pollinated sexual plants or sexual x sexual crosses produced progenies free of apospory. All crosses involving a sexual and an apomictic plant produced approximately three times more apospory-free plants than plants with apospory. Bahiagrass is of autotetraploid origin and hence is expected to display tetrasomic inheritance. The most widely accepted genetic model for inheritance of apospory in tropical grasses is a single dominant gene with tetrasomic inheritance. In the present experiments none of the apospory-free F1s segregated for the apospory trait indicating that it is most likely a dominant character. However, the observed results fit better a modified model: tetrasomic inheritance of a single dominant gene with pleiotropic effect and incomplete penetrance. The excess of apospory-free plants in the F1 progeny could be ascribed to some distortion in the segregation pattern due to a pleiotropic lethal effect of the dominant A allele with incomplete penetrance. Alternatively, partial lethality of factors linked to aposporous gene may account for segregation distortion against apospory.

  13. Proposed multigenic Composite Inheritance in major depression.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Katherine A; Waters, Robert F; Price, Catherine R

    2005-01-01

    Various rationale have been considered in the familial inheritance pattern of major depression ranging from simple one-gene Mendelian inheritance to pseudo-additive gene action. We instead predict broad genetic expressivity patterns in the progeny of parents where at least one parent has recurrent major depression. In keeping with this idea, we feel that recurrent major depression could involve an expression imbalance of "normal" genes either exclusively or along with allelic variation(s). The patterns of pathology are theoretically conceptualized as qualitative and quantitative, meaning that expressivity of the genetic pattern in these children may range from minimal to complete even among siblings. Thus, prediction of the particular genetic pattern expressed by a particular child might prove difficult. The complex inheritance pattern that we propose is referred to as Composite Inheritance. Composite Inheritance considers that both the up- and down-regulation of luxury genes and housekeeping genes are involved in this dichotomous qualitative inheritance pattern and also the wide quantitative expressivity. The luxury genes include such genes as those coding for the neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The housekeeping genes found to date include those that code for proteins involved in gene transcription, secondary signaling systems, fatty acid metabolism and transport, and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Other luxury and housekeeping genes no doubt remain to be discovered. Our current research utilizes an empirical approach involving advanced genomics and specialized pattern recognition mathematics in families having at least one parent with recurrent major depression. The goal of our research is to develop a pattern recognition system of genetic expressivity in major depression to which prevention and early intervention may be tailored.

  14. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  15. New patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Marianne; Vissing, John

    2003-10-17

    With the identification of a patient with mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of paternal origin, it has been unequivocally proven that not only does paternal mtDNA survive in the zygote, but it can also contribute substantially to the mtDNA pool of adult, human skeletal muscle. The questions are: how often does paternal mtDNA inheritance occur and what mechanisms are involved? In this paper, we will review current knowledge on the fate of sperm mitochondria after fertilization and discuss the impact paternal inheritance may have on our understanding of mitochondrial biology.

  16. Genetics beyond Mendel. Understanding nontraditional inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, J

    2000-09-01

    Many medical conditions that clearly have a strong genetic component are not transmitted in a straightforward dominant, recessive, or X-linked pattern. Recent progress in understanding other modes of inheritance, such as imprinting, trinucleotide repeat expansion, mitochondrial inheritance, and mosaicism, has allowed us to solve many of these hereditary puzzles. Such advances have led to improvements in diagnosis and genetic counseling for patients affected with these disorders and should be valuable in development of effective therapies for some of these disorders in the future.

  17. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  18. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: how important is it?

    PubMed

    Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kelly, William G; Kelly, Bill; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Pembrey, Marcus; Lindquist, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Much attention has been given to the idea of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, but fundamental questions remain regarding how much takes place and the impact that this might have on organisms. We asked five leading researchers in this area--working on a range of model organisms and in human disease--for their views on these topics. Their responses highlight the mixture of excitement and caution that surrounds transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and the wide gulf between species in terms of our knowledge of the mechanisms that may be involved.

  19. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Endocrine Dysfunctions in Patients with Inherited Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Erdöl, Şahin; Sağlam, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) can affect many organ systems, including the endocrine system. There are limited data regarding endocrine dysfunctions related to IMDs in adults, however, no data exist in pediatric patients with IMDs. The aim of this study was to investigate endocrine dysfunctions in patients with IMDs by assessing their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. Methods: Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical reports of patients with IMDs who were followed by the division of pediatric metabolism and nutrition between June 2011 and November 2013. Results: In total, 260 patients [139 males (53%) and 121 females (47%)] with an IMD diagnosis were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 5.94 (range; 0.08 to 49) years and 95.8% (249 of 260 patients) were in the pediatric age group. Growth status was evaluated in 258 patients and of them, 27 (10.5%) had growth failure, all cases of which were attributed to non-endocrine reasons. There was a significant correlation between growth failure and serum albumin levels below 3.5 g/dL (p=0.002). Only three of 260 (1.1%) patients had endocrine dysfunction. Of these, one with lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency and another with Kearns-Sayre syndrome had diabetes, and one with glycerol kinase deficiency had glucocorticoid deficiency. Conclusion: Endocrine dysfunction in patients with IMDs is relatively rare. For this reason, there is no need to conduct routine endocrine evaluations in most patients with IMDs unless a careful and detailed history and a physical examination point to an endocrine dysfunction. PMID:27086477

  1. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  2. Doubly uniparental inheritance: two mitochondrial genomes, one precious model for organelle DNA inheritance and evolution.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Marco; Ghiselli, Fabrizio

    2009-02-01

    Eukaryotes have exploited several mechanisms for organelle uniparental inheritance, so this feature arose and evolved independently many times in their history. Metazoans' mitochondria commonly experience strict maternal inheritance; that is, they are only transmitted by females. However, the most noteworthy exception comes from some bivalve mollusks, in which two mitochondrial lineages (together with their genomes) are inherited: one through females (F) and the other through males (M). M and F genomes show up to 30% sequence divergence. This inheritance mechanism is known as doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), because both sexes inherit uniparentally their mitochondria. Here, we review what we know about this unusual system, and we propose a model for evolution of DUI that might account for its origin as sex determination mechanism. Moreover, we propose DUI as a choice model to address many aspects that should be of interest to a wide range of biological subfields, such as mitochondrial inheritance, mtDNA evolution and recombination, genomic conflicts, evolution of sex, and developmental biology. Actually, as research proceeds, mitochondria appear to have acquired a central role in many fundamental processes of life, which are not only in their metabolic activity as cellular power plants, such as cell signaling, fertilization, development, differentiation, ageing, apoptosis, and sex determination. A function of mitochondria in the origin and maintenance of sex has been also proposed.

  3. Pathologic findings of multiple sulfatase deficiency reflect the pattern of enzyme deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, R J; Lowry, N J; Casey, R E

    1998-11-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is a rare metabolic storage disorder that manifests in childhood. It is probably an autosomal-recessive inherited condition, the gene for which has not yet been identified. Clinical features include mental deficiency and a dysmorphic appearance reminiscent of a mucopolysaccharidosis. Unlike most storage disorders, there are multiple deficient enzymes; all are sulfatases, hence the name of the disorder. Biochemical testing reveals accumulation of glycosaminoglycans, sulfatides, and gangliosides in the brain and other tissues of affected patients. In previous accounts of postmortem examinations, white matter histologic and biochemical pathologic findings similar to metachromatic leukodystrophy have been reported. Ganglioside accumulation, secondary to interference with degradative enzyme activity by the accumulating glycosaminoglycans also has been demonstrated. The authors report a case of multiple sulfatase deficiency with only mild deficiencies of the arylsulfatases but with severe deficiencies of iduronate sulfatase and heparan sulfamidase. Pathologic changes were more in keeping with a mucopolysaccharidosis, with minimal white matter changes and deposition of metachromatic material. The authors postulate that the mild leukodystrophic changes but striking features similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis are reflections of the pattern of enzyme deficiency. The pathology of multiple sulfatase deficiency therefore represents an overlap between a leukodystrophy and a mucopolysaccharidosis, with the relative contribution of each pattern apparently depending on the pattern of enzyme deficiency encountered in each patient.

  4. [Thyrotropic deficiency].

    PubMed

    Chanson, P

    1998-11-15

    Central hypothyroidism (thyrotropic deficiency) is due to a defect in TSH secretion by thyrotrophs (or alternatively to an altered bioactivity of TSH). Central hypothyroidism is rare and is often associated with other pituitary deficiencies as it is generally encountered in case of hypothalamo-pituitary tumoral process. Clinical symptoms are milder than those of primary thyroid failure. Diagnosis is based on free T4 measurement whose level is decreased while TSH concentration is normal or minimally increased, reflecting an alteration in the bioactivity of TSH. Replacement therapy is monitored by T4 level measurement: the objective is to obtain normal T4 levels. TSH concentration must not be taken into account for the adjustment of the thyroxine doses.

  5. Understanding Genetics and Inheritance in Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibuka-Sebitosi, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Conducted in urban and rural schools in two provinces of South Africa, the present study reports biology learners' understanding of concepts about genetics and inheritance. Participants were Grade 11 and 12 learners, aged 15-16 years. The tools included a written questionnaire, interviews, pre- and post-paper and pencil tests and focus group…

  6. Inherited resistance to Corynebacterium kutscheri in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, R G; Wallace, M E

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the factors responsible for inherited resistance to Corynebacterium kutscheri was undertaken. Various inbred mouse strains were examined; these included the Swiss Lynch and C57Bl/l mice, their F1 and F2 progeny, and the progeny of the F1 backcrossed to each parent strain. Two modes of inherited resistance are described. An examination suggested that resistance as measured by the mean lethal dose of C. kutscheri was under polygenic control and was inherited continuously. However, the efficiency with which C. kutscheri was eliminated by the mononuclear phagocyte cells of the liver over 3 days differed markedly among strains. A genetic analysis of this mononuclear phagocyte microbicidal efficiency (MPME) in Swiss Lynch and C57Bl/6 mice was undertaken. The trait, MPME, was present, but did not segregate, in the F1 progeny or in the progeny of the backcross to the resistant C57Bl/6 parent; this was clear evidence of dominance. Moreover, MPME segregated in a ratio of 1:1 in the progeny of the backcross to the sensitive Swiss Lynch parent and in a ratio of 3:1 in the F2 progeny. It was concluded that MPME was inherited discontinuously and was controlled by a single dominant autosomal gene (or closely linked group); the recessive allele was assigned the gene symbol ack. Linkage experiments showed there to be no association between the ack locus and any of the immune-response genes. PMID:971958

  7. The genetics of inherited macular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, M; Hunt, D; Moore, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge relating to the monogenic macular dystrophies, with discussion of currently mapped genes, chromosomal loci and genotype-phenotype relationships. Inherited systemic disorders with a macular dystrophy component will not be discussed. PMID:12960208

  8. Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease and Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks in an organism can be altered by environmental factors throughout life. Although changes in the epigenetic code can be positive, some are associated with severe diseases, in particular, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent evidence has indicated that certain epigenetic marks can be inherited, and reshape developmental and cellular features over generations. This review examines the challenging possibility that epigenetic changes induced by environmental factors can contribute to some of the inheritance of disease and disease risk. This concept has immense implications for the understanding of biological functions and disease etiology, and provides potential novel strategies for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of epigenetic inheritance relevant to human disease, such as the detrimental effects of traumatic stress or drug/toxic exposure on brain functions, are reviewed. Different possible routes of transmission of epigenetic information involving the germline or germline-independent transfer are discussed, and different mechanisms for the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic information like chromatin remodeling and small noncoding RNAs are considered. Future research directions and remaining major challenges in this field are also outlined. Finally, the adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance, and the cost and benefit of allowing acquired epigenetic marks to persist across generations is critically evaluated. PMID:22781843

  9. Genetic instability in inherited and sporadic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Popp, Henning D; Bohlander, Stefan K

    2010-12-01

    Genetic instability due to increased DNA damage and altered DNA repair is of central significance in the initiation and progression of inherited and sporadic human leukemias. Although very rare, some inherited DNA repair insufficiency syndromes (e.g., Fanconi anemia, Bloom's syndrome) have added substantially to our understanding of crucial mechanisms of leukemogenesis in recent years. Conversely, sporadic leukemias account for the main proportion of leukemias and here DNA damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role. Although the exact mechanisms of increased ROS production remain largely unknown and no single pathway has been detected thus far, some oncogenic proteins (e.g., the activated tyrosine kinases BCR-ABL1 and FLT3-ITD) seem to play a key role in driving genetic instability by increased ROS generation which influences the disease course (e.g., blast crisis in chronic myeloid leukemia or relapse in FLT3-ITD positive acute myeloid leukemia). Of course other mechanisms, which promote genetic instability in leukemia also exist. A newly emerging mechanism is the genome-wide alteration of epigenetic marks (e.g., hypomethylation of histone H3K79), which promotes chromosomal instability. Taken together genetic instability plays a critical role both in inherited and sporadic leukemias and emerges as a common theme in both inherited and sporadic leukemias. Beyond its theoretical impact, the analysis of genetic instability may lead the way to the development of innovative therapy strategies. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The inheritance of acquired epigenetic variations.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eva; Lamb, Marion J

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence that the functional history of a gene in one generation can influence its expression in the next. In somatic cells, changes in gene activity are frequently associated with changes in the pattern of methylation of the cytosines in DNA; these methylation patterns are stably inherited. Recent work suggests that information about patterns of methylation and other epigenetic states can also be transmitted from parents to offspring. This evidence is the basis of a model for the inheritance of acquired epigenetic variations. According to the model, an environmental stimulus can induce heritable chromatin modifications which are very specific and predictable, and might result in an adaptive response to the stimulus. This type of response probably has most significance for adaptive evolution in organisms such as fungi and plants, which lack distinct segregation of the soma and germ line. However, in all organisms, the accumulation of specific and random chromatin modifications in the germ line may be important in speciation, because these modifications could lead to reproductive isolation between populations. Heritable chromatin variations may also alter the frequency and distribution of classical mutations and meiotic recombination. Therefore, inherited epigenetic changes in the structure of chromatin can influence neo-Darwinian evolution as well as cause a type of "Lamarckian" inheritance.

  11. Difficulties in Learning Inheritance and Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Neomi; Beeri, Catriel; Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on difficulties related to the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism, expressed by a group of 22 in-service CS teachers with an experience with the procedural paradigm, as they coped with a course on OOP. Our findings are based on the analysis of tests, questionnaires that the teachers completed in the course, as well as on…

  12. Difficulties in Learning Inheritance and Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Neomi; Beeri, Catriel; Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on difficulties related to the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism, expressed by a group of 22 in-service CS teachers with an experience with the procedural paradigm, as they coped with a course on OOP. Our findings are based on the analysis of tests, questionnaires that the teachers completed in the course, as well as on…

  13. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  14. Inheritance of the accessory navicular bone.

    PubMed

    Kiter, E; Erduran, M; Günal, I

    2000-01-01

    The accessory navicular bone is one of the most symptomatic bones of the foot. Although it has been reported to be present in various members of the same family, there is a lack of knowledge about its inheritance in the literature. We examined three families and suggest that it has an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance.

  15. A Simple Analysis of an Inherited Trait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aagaard, Stanley; Keller, Elhannan

    1977-01-01

    Described is a classroom activity for analyzing an inherited human trait, the ability to tast phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). Formulas for analyzing gene frequency are given for classroom and neighborhood samples. Additional tables include statistics on the ability to taste PTC and other easily sampled human traits. (MA)

  16. Phylogenetics Exercise Using Inherited Human Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuimala, Jarno

    2006-01-01

    A bioinformatics laboratory exercise based on inherited human morphological traits is presented. It teaches how morphological characters can be used to study the evolutionary history of humans using parsimony. The exercise can easily be used in a pen-and-paper laboratory, but if computers are available, a more versatile analysis can be carried…

  17. Phylogenetics Exercise Using Inherited Human Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuimala, Jarno

    2006-01-01

    A bioinformatics laboratory exercise based on inherited human morphological traits is presented. It teaches how morphological characters can be used to study the evolutionary history of humans using parsimony. The exercise can easily be used in a pen-and-paper laboratory, but if computers are available, a more versatile analysis can be carried…

  18. Epigenetic inheritance of proteostasis and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheryl; Casanueva, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence shows that the genome is not as static as once thought and that gene expression can be reversibly modulated by the environment. In some cases, these changes can be transmitted to the next generation even if the environment has reverted. Such transgenerational epigenetic inheritance requires that information be stored in the germline in response to exogenous stressors. One of the most elusive questions in the field of epigenetic inheritance is the identity of such inherited factor(s). Answering this question would allow us to understand how the environment can shape human populations for multiple generations and may help to explain the rapid rise in obesity and neurodegenerative diseases in modern society. It will also provide clues on how we might be able to reprogramme the epigenome to prevent transmission of detrimental phenotypes and identify individuals who might be at increased risk of disease. In this article, we aim to review recent developments in this field, focusing on research conducted mostly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and mice, that link environmental modulators with the transgenerational inheritance of phenotypes that affect protein-folding homoeostasis and ageing. PMID:27744335

  19. Epigenetic inheritance and the missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Trerotola, Marco; Relli, Valeria; Simeone, Pasquale; Alberti, Saverio

    2015-07-28

    Genome-wide association studies of complex physiological traits and diseases consistently found that associated genetic factors, such as allelic polymorphisms or DNA mutations, only explained a minority of the expected heritable fraction. This discrepancy is known as "missing heritability", and its underlying factors and molecular mechanisms are not established. Epigenetic programs may account for a significant fraction of the "missing heritability." Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation and chromatin assembly states, reflect the high plasticity of the genome and contribute to stably alter gene expression without modifying genomic DNA sequences. Consistent components of complex traits, such as those linked to human stature/height, fertility, and food metabolism or to hereditary defects, have been shown to respond to environmental or nutritional condition and to be epigenetically inherited. The knowledge acquired from epigenetic genome reprogramming during development, stem cell differentiation/de-differentiation, and model organisms is today shedding light on the mechanisms of (a) mitotic inheritance of epigenetic traits from cell to cell, (b) meiotic epigenetic inheritance from generation to generation, and (c) true transgenerational inheritance. Such mechanisms have been shown to include incomplete erasure of DNA methylation, parental effects, transmission of distinct RNA types (mRNA, non-coding RNA, miRNA, siRNA, piRNA), and persistence of subsets of histone marks.

  20. Analysis of mutations causing biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pindolia, Kirit; Jordan, Megan; Wolf, Barry

    2010-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an inherited disorder in which the vitamin, biotin, is not recycled. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency can develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms if they are not treated with biotin. Biotinidase deficiency screening has been incorporated into essentially all newborn screening programs in the United States and in many countries. We now report 140 known mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) that cause biotinidase deficiency. All types of mutations have been found to cause biotinidase deficiency. Variants have been identified throughout the coding sequence. Essentially all the variants result in enzymatic activities with less than 10% of mean normal enzyme activity (profound biotinidase deficiency) with the exception of the c.1330G>C (p.D444H) mutation, which results in an enzyme having 50% of mean normal serum activity. The putative three-dimensional structure of biotinidase has been predicted by homology to that of nitrilases/amidases. The effect of the various missense mutations can be predicted to affect various important sites within the structure of the enzyme. This compilation of variants causing biotinidase deficiency will be useful to clinical laboratories that are performing mutation analysis for confirmational testing when the enzymatic results are equivocal for children identified through newborn screening. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Role of immune cells in animal models for inherited neuropathies: facts and visions.

    PubMed

    Mäurer, Mathias; Kobsar, Igor; Berghoff, Martin; Schmid, Christoph D; Carenini, Stefano; Martini, Rudolf

    2002-04-01

    Mice heterozygously deficient in the peripheral myelin adhesion molecule P0 (P0+/- mice) are models for some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies. In addition to the characteristic hallmarks of demyelination, elevated numbers of CD8-positive T-lymphocytes and F4/80-positive macrophages are striking features in the nerves of these mice. These immune cells increase in number with age and progress of demyelination, suggesting that they might be functionally related to myelin damage. In order to investigate the pathogenetic role of lymphocytes, the myelin mutants were cross-bred with recombination activating gene 1 (RAG-1)-deficient mice, which lack mature T- and B-lymphocytes. The immunodeficient myelin mutants showed a less severe myelin degeneration. The beneficial effect of lymphocyte-deficiency was reversible, since demyelination worsened in immunodeficient myelin-mutants when reconstituted with bone marrow from wild-type mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed macrophages in close apposition to myelin and demyelinated axons. We therefore cross-bred the P0+/- mice with spontaneous osteopetrotic (op) mutants deficient in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), hence displaying impaired macrophage activation. In the corresponding double mutants the numbers of macrophages were not elevated in the peripheral nerves, and the demyelinating phenotype was less severe than in the genuine P0+/- mice, demonstrating that macrophages are also functionally involved in the pathogenesis of genetically mediated demyelination. We also examined other models for inherited neuropathies for a possible involvement of immune cells. We chose mice deficient in the gap junction component connexin 32, a model for the X-linked form of CMT. Similar to P0-deficient mice, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were elevated and macrophages showed a close apposition to degenerating myelin. We conclude that the involvement of T-lymphocytes and macrophages is a common pathogenetic

  2. Modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, S. Tamir; Corbineau, Sebastien; Hannan, Nick; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Graeme; Huang-Doran, Isabel; Griffin, Julian; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Skepper, Jeremy; Semple, Robert; Weber, Anne; Lomas, David A.; Vallier, Ludovic

    2010-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for advancements in developmental biology, cell-based therapy, and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of human iPS cells for modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. Dermal fibroblasts from patients with various inherited metabolic diseases of the liver were used to generate a library of patient-specific human iPS cell lines. Each line was differentiated into hepatocytes using what we believe to be a novel 3-step differentiation protocol in chemically defined conditions. The resulting cells exhibited properties of mature hepatocytes, such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 metabolism. Moreover, cells generated from patients with 3 of the inherited metabolic conditions studied in further detail (α1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease type 1a) were found to recapitulate key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from which they were derived, such as aggregation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in the endoplasmic reticulum, deficient LDL receptor–mediated cholesterol uptake, and elevated lipid and glycogen accumulation. Therefore, we report a simple and effective platform for hepatocyte generation from patient-specific human iPS cells. These patient-derived hepatocytes demonstrate that it is possible to model diseases whose phenotypes are caused by pathological dysregulation of key processes within adult cells. PMID:20739751

  3. The inheritance of organelle genes and genomes: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2005-12-01

    Unlike nuclear genes and genomes, the inheritance of organelle genes and genomes does not follow Mendel's laws. In this mini-review, I summarize recent research progress on the patterns and mechanisms of the inheritance of organelle genes and genomes. While most sexual eukaryotes show uniparental inheritance of organelle genes and genomes in some progeny at least part of the time, increasing evidence indicates that strictly uniparental inheritance is rare and that organelle inheritance patterns are very diverse and complex. In contrast with the predominance of uniparental inheritance in multicellular organisms, organelle genes in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as protists, algae, and fungi, typically show a greater diversity of inheritance patterns, with sex-determining loci playing significant roles. The diverse patterns of inheritance are matched by the rich variety of potential mechanisms. Indeed, many factors, both deterministic and stochastic, can influence observed patterns of organelle inheritance. Interestingly, in multicellular organisms, progeny from interspecific crosses seem to exhibit more frequent paternal leakage and biparental organelle genome inheritance than those from intraspecific crosses. The recent observation of a sex-determining gene in the basidiomycete yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, which controls mitochondrial DNA inheritance, has opened up potentially exciting research opportunities for identifying specific molecular genetic pathways that control organelle inheritance, as well as for testing evolutionary hypotheses regarding the prevalence of uniparental inheritance of organelle genes and genomes.

  4. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Martos, Suzanne N; Tang, Wan-Yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

  5. Plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celkan, Tiraje

    2017-01-01

    Plasminogen plays an important role in fibrinolysis as well as wound healing, cell migration, tissue modeling and angiogenesis. Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that leads to the development of thick, wood-like pseudomembranes on mucosal surfaces, mostly seen in conjunctivas named as ''ligneous conjunctivitis''. Local conjunctival use of fresh frozen plazma (FFP) in combination with other eye medications such as cyclosporin and artificial tear drops may relieve the symptoms. Topical treatment with plasminogen eye drops is the most promising treatment that is not yet available in Turkey.

  6. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Refah; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tombul, Temel

    2012-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome (SS) is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  7. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus vectors are attractive for clinical use because (1) adeno-associated viruses do not cause human disease and (2) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of gene therapy with adeno-associated virus for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders are presented, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and x-linked myotubular myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed.

  8. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: Where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are attractive for clinical use because (i) AAVs do not cause human disease, and (ii) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of gene therapy with AAV for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, we present recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked Myotubular Myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed. PMID:25313664

  9. Rat heparan sulphates. A study of the antithrombin-binding properties of heparan sulphate chains from rat adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1990-01-01

    Adult male rats were given [35S]sulphate intraperitoneally. Heparan [35S]sulphate (HS) chains were recovered from adipose tissue, brain, carcase, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, skin and spleen by digestion with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride, digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase and DNAase and gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel. Purity was confirmed by agarose-gel electrophoresis and degradation with HNO2. Fractionation by gradient elution from antithrombin-agarose indicated that the proportion of HS with high binding affinity for antithrombin (HA-HS) ranged from 4.7% (kidneys) to 21.5% (brain). On a mass basis the major sources of HA-HS were carcase, skin and intestine. HA-HS from intestine was arbitrarily divided into subfractions I-VI, with anticoagulant activities ranging from 1 to 60 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor IIa) assay] and from 4 to 98 units/mg [by amidolytic anti-(Factor Xa) assay], indicating that the antithrombin-binding-site densities of HA-HS chains covered a wide range, as shown previously for rat HA-heparin chains [Horner, Kusche, Lindahl & Peterson (1988) Biochem. J. 251, 141-145]. HA-HS subfractions II, IV and VI were mixed with samples of HA-[3H]heparin chains and rechromatographed on antithrombin-agarose. Affinity for matrix-bound antithrombin did not correlate with anticoagulant activity, e.g. HA-HS subfraction IV [38 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg] was co-eluted with HA-heparin chains [127 anti-(Factor Xa) units/mg]. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2138457

  10. Novel approaches for diagnosing inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Bastida Bermejo, José María; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; González-Porras, José Ramón

    2017-01-20

    Inherited platelet disorders diagnosis is based on the clinical history and bleeding assessment tools. The laboratory functional assays as well as the molecular test to identify the pathogenic genetic variant are essential to confirm the accurate diagnosis of these disorders. Nowadays, the main challenges to developing a new diagnostic system are involved in reducing the samples' volume, and faster and more helpful analysis. Moreover, there are no widely available and standardised global tests. High throughput genetic testing such as next-generation sequencing has revolutionised DNA sequencing technologies as it allows the simultaneous and faster investigation of multiple genes at a manageable cost. This technology has improved the molecular characterisation of inherited platelet disorders and has been implemented in the research studies and the clinical routine practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Inheritance of Hair Constrictions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Stanley J.; Straile, William E.

    1972-01-01

    The frequencies of multi-constricted hairs in the pelage is the same (75%) in the caudal mid-dorsum of C57BL/10 and CBA inbred mice, but there are more single-constricted hairs in C57BL mice (9.41%) than in CBA mice (0.13%). This structural feature is used as a basis for genetic analysis of the hair coat.—The frequency of single-constricted hairs (4.41%) in F1 mice is intermediate between the frequencies observed in the CBA and C57BL parent strains. Data from the F2 crosses and backcrosses to the respective parent strains indicate that the presence of numerous single-constricted hairs in the pelage is an inherited characteristic. The mode of inheritance is controlled primarily by a semi-dominant autosomal gene (single-constriction; Hct), without the involvement of maternal factors. PMID:5034773

  12. Inheritance is where physiology meets evolution.

    PubMed

    Danchin, Etienne; Pocheville, Arnaud

    2014-06-01

    Physiology and evolutionary biology have developed as two separated disciplines, a separation that mirrored the hypothesis that the physiological and evolutionary processes could be decoupled. We argue that non-genetic inheritance shatters the frontier between physiology and evolution, and leads to the coupling of physiological and evolutionary processes to a point where there exists a continuum between accommodation by phenotypic plasticity and adaptation by natural selection. This approach is also profoundly affecting the definition of the concept of phenotypic plasticity, which should now be envisaged as a multi-scale concept. We further suggest that inclusive inheritance provides a quantitative way to help bridging infra-individual (i.e. physiology) with supra-individual (i.e. evolution) approaches, in a way that should help building the long sough inclusive evolutionary synthesis. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  13. Recessive inheritance of a relative fat pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Ramirez, M E; Kuida, H; Williams, R R

    1989-01-01

    We defined a relative-fat-pattern index (RFPI) as the ratio of subscapular skinfold thickness to the sum of subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses and computed RFPI for 774 adults (age greater than or equal to 25 years) in 59 pedigrees ascertained through cases of cardiovascular disease. Likelihood analysis of RFPI supported recessive inheritance of an allele with a frequency of 46%, which elevated mean RFPI from .412 to .533 when homozygous. The analysis apportioned the variance in RFPI as 42.3% due to the major locus, 9.5% due to polygenic inheritance, and 48.2% due to random environmental effects. Homozygotes for the recessive allele tended to have small suprailiac skinfold thicknesses rather than large subscapular skinfold thicknesses. Homozygotes were more frequent in younger than in older cases of obesity, coronary heart disease, essential hypertension, and diabetes mellitus; the increase was significant for all but diabetes. PMID:2589320

  14. Evolutionary inheritance of elemental stoichiometry in phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Quigg, Antonietta; Irwin, Andrew J.; Finkel, Zoe V.

    2011-01-01

    The elemental composition of phytoplankton is a fusion of the evolutionary history of the host and plastid, resulting in differences in genetic constraints and selection pressures associated with environmental conditions. The evolutionary inheritance hypothesis predicts similarities in elemental composition within related taxonomic lineages of phytoplankton. To test this hypothesis, we measured the elemental composition (C, N, P, S, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Cd and Mo) of 14 phytoplankton species and combined these with published data from 15 more species from both marine and freshwater environments grown under nutrient-replete conditions. The largest differences in the elemental profiles of the species distinguish between the prokaryotic Cyanophyta and primary endosymbiotic events that resulted in the green and red plastid lineages. Smaller differences in trace element stoichiometry within the red and green plastid lineages are consistent with changes in trace elemental stoichiometry owing to the processes associated with secondary endosymbioses and inheritance by descent with modification. PMID:20826483

  15. Evolutionary inheritance of elemental stoichiometry in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Quigg, Antonietta; Irwin, Andrew J; Finkel, Zoe V

    2011-02-22

    The elemental composition of phytoplankton is a fusion of the evolutionary history of the host and plastid, resulting in differences in genetic constraints and selection pressures associated with environmental conditions. The evolutionary inheritance hypothesis predicts similarities in elemental composition within related taxonomic lineages of phytoplankton. To test this hypothesis, we measured the elemental composition (C, N, P, S, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Cd and Mo) of 14 phytoplankton species and combined these with published data from 15 more species from both marine and freshwater environments grown under nutrient-replete conditions. The largest differences in the elemental profiles of the species distinguish between the prokaryotic Cyanophyta and primary endosymbiotic events that resulted in the green and red plastid lineages. Smaller differences in trace element stoichiometry within the red and green plastid lineages are consistent with changes in trace elemental stoichiometry owing to the processes associated with secondary endosymbioses and inheritance by descent with modification.

  16. Medical Problems in Obstetrics: Inherited Metabolic Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elaine

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of women with rare inherited disorders of metabolism are becoming pregnant. Although, in general, outcomes for women and their children are good, there are a number of issues that need to be considered. Currently, limited specific guidance on the management of these conditions in pregnancy is available. Prepregnancy counselling with information on inheritance, options for reproduction, teratogenicity risk, potential impact on maternal health and long-term health of children should be offered. With appropriate specialist management, the teratogenic risk of conditions such as maternal phenylketonuria (PKU) can be eliminated, and the risk of metabolic decompensation in disorders of energy metabolism or intoxication significantly reduced. Multidisciplinary management, and close liaison between obstetricians and other specialists, is required for those women in whom there is cardiac, renal, respiratory, joint or other organ involvement.

  17. Management of inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias in children.

    PubMed

    Guardamagna, Ornella; Cagliero, Paola; Abello, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    In order to prevent cardiovascular disease, the treatment of inherited dyslipidemias in childhood represents an emerging topic capturing scientists' consideration. A body of findings emerged in the last decade for diagnosis and therapy, and results were recently summarized to introduce new guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. It is well known and generally shared the need to detect affected children precociously, when the family history address to genetic dyslipidemia and when familial premature cardiovascular disease occurs. A spectrum of disorders involving lipoproteins could be recognized by specific biochemical and genetic markers. A defined diagnosis represents the starting point to establish a correct treatment and follow-up program. This review represents a literature synthesis of the main cornerstones and criticisms concerning the screening program and management of atherogenic inherited dyslipidemias in children and adolescents.

  18. Pregnancy in women with inherited metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of women with rare inherited disorders of metabolism are becoming pregnant. Whilst, in general, outcomes for women and their children are good, there are issues that need to be considered. Due to the rarity of many conditions, there is limited specific guidance available on best management. Prepregnancy counselling with information on inheritance, options for reproduction, teratogenicity risk, potential impact on maternal health and long-term health of children should be offered. With appropriate specialist management, the teratogenic risk of conditions such as maternal phenylketonuria (PKU) can be eliminated, and the risk of metabolic decompensation in other disorders of intoxication or energy metabolism significantly reduced. Newer therapies, such as enzyme replacement therapy, appear to be safe in pregnancy, but specific advice should be sought. Multidisciplinary management, and close liaison between obstetricians and other specialists is required for women in whom there is cardiac, renal, respiratory, joint or other organ involvement. PMID:27512458

  19. Inheritance is where physiology meets evolution

    PubMed Central

    Danchin, Étienne; Pocheville, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Physiology and evolutionary biology have developed as two separated disciplines, a separation that mirrored the hypothesis that the physiological and evolutionary processes could be decoupled. We argue that non-genetic inheritance shatters the frontier between physiology and evolution, and leads to the coupling of physiological and evolutionary processes to a point where there exists a continuum between accommodation by phenotypic plasticity and adaptation by natural selection. This approach is also profoundly affecting the definition of the concept of phenotypic plasticity, which should now be envisaged as a multi-scale concept. We further suggest that inclusive inheritance provides a quantitative way to help bridging infra-individual (i.e. physiology) with supra-individual (i.e. evolution) approaches, in a way that should help building the long sough inclusive evolutionary synthesis. PMID:24882815

  20. [Inheritance and innovation of traditional processing technology of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Zhong, Ling-Yun; Xue, Xiao; Liu, Rong-Hua; Gong, Qian-Feng

    2016-02-01

    To discuss the inheritance and innovation study of Chinese medicine processing technology from three aspects: inheritance, standardization and industrial innovation development, propose "three lacks" in inheritance, "six lacks of standardization, and one lack of unity" in standardization, and "three emphasizing and three despising aspects" in industrial innovation, and propose feasible solutions for the above mentioned problems, providing a good foundation for inheritance and innovation of Chinese medicine processing. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Guru - A tool for automatic restructuring of self inheritance hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, I.

    1995-12-31

    This paper introduces Guru, a prototype tool for restructuring inheritance hierarchies in Self, while preserving the behavior of objects. Guru reverse engineers from existing inheritance hierarchies. Unlike previous work, Guru handles resends, redefined methods and the restructuring of only part of a system. Furthermore, Guru handles dynamic and cyclical inheritance, which are more specific to Self. Guru removes duplicated methods, and can create inheritance hierarchies with no overridden methods. The results of two non-trivial tests are presented and assessed.

  2. GPI Mount Scopus--a variant of glucosephosphate isomerase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shalev, O; Shalev, R S; Forman, L; Beutler, E

    1993-10-01

    Glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an unusual cause of hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. The disease, inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder, is most often manifested by symptoms and signs of chronic hemolysis, ameliorated by splenectomy. We recently diagnosed GPI deficiency in a 23-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish man who displayed the typical clinical course of this disorder. The biophysical characteristics of the GPI variant are slow electrophoretic mobility, presence of only one of the two bands normally present, and extreme thermolability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of GPI deficiency in a patient of Jewish descent, and we propose to designate this enzyme variant "GPI Mount Scopus".

  3. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  4. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials.

  5. CZ: Multimethods and Multiple Inheritance Without Diamonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    renaming (e.g., Eiffel [31]) or by lin- earizing the class hierarchy [46, 45]. However, there is still no satisfactory solution to the dia- mond...the latter is the desirable semantics; it is supported in languages such as Scala, Eiffel , and C++ (the last through virtual inheritance) [38, 31, 21...certain. Previous Solutions. Languages that directly attempt to solve the object initialization problem include Eiffel [31], C++ [21], Scala [38] and

  6. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited retinal degenerative diseases is estimated at...for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa ). As new interventions become available for clinical evaluation, the creation of such a network will...dominant retinitis pigmentosa at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the Southwest

  7. Problem of technological inheritance in machine engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstein, Valery; Rakhimyanov, Kharis; Heifetz, Mikhail; Kleptzov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the importance of the research study with regard to the technological inheritance of the properties, which characterize the surface layer, at different stages of a part's life cycle. It looks back at the major achievements and gives the findings relating to the technological inheritance of the parameters of the surface layer strength and quality as well as to how they affect the performance properties of machine parts. It demonstrates that high rates of machine engineering development, occurrence of new materials and more complicated machine operation environment require a shorter period for design-to-manufacture facility by reducing experiments and increasing design work. That, in its turn, generates the necessity in more complex but also more accurate models of metal behavior under stressing. It is especially critical for strengthening treatment. Among them are the models developed within the mechanics of technological inheritance. It is assumed that at the stages of a part's life cycle deformation accumulates on a continuous basis and the plasticity reserve of the metal, which the surface layer is made of, depletes. The research study of technological inheritance and the discovery of physical patterns of the evolution and degradation of the structures in a thin surface layer, which occur during machining and operational stressing of parts made from existing and unique including nanopatterned metals, is a crucial scientific challenge. This leads to the acquisition of new knowledge in the plasticity of state-of-the-art metals in the conditions of complex non monotonous stressing and to the development of efficient integrated and combined methods of technological impact.

  8. Antithrombin III in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis during heparin treatment (subcutaneous and intravenous) and during and after treatment with oral coumarins.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G; Fagrell, B; Holmgren, K; Johnsson, H; Ljungberg, B; Wilhelmsson, S

    1984-05-15

    The antithrombin III (AT-III) concentration was studied in 98 patients with symptomatic acute deep-vein thrombosis. All patients were initially treated with heparin randomly by subcutaneous injections or by continuous infusions. Then the patients were treated with coumarins during one or six months. The AT-III concentration was estimated daily during heparin treatment and repeatedly during the first year. The mean AT-III concentration decreased progressively 25% during 5 days of heparin treatment regardless of whether heparin was given intravenously or subcutaneously. The mean AT-III concentration during coumarin treatment was higher than after coumarin treatment. Eleven patients developed recurrent thromboembolic episodes during the follow-up period. The mean AT-III concentration in these patients was not lower than in the patients without recurrences.

  9. Manufacturing process of anti-thrombin III concentrate: viral safety validation studies and effect of column re-use on viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morrica, Antonietta; Nardini, Claudia; Falbo, Anna; Bailey, Andrew C; Bucci, E

    2003-09-01

    A manufacturing process for the production of Anti-thrombin IIII concentrate is described, which is based primarily on Heparin Sepharose affinity chromatography. The process includes two sequential viral inactivation/removal procedures, applied to the fraction eluted from the column, the first by heating in aqueous solution at 60 degrees C for 10 h and the second by nanofiltration. Using viral validation on a scaled-down process both treatments proved to be effective steps; able to inactivate or remove more than 4 logs of virus, and their combined effect (>8 logs) assured the safety of the final product. Viral validation studies of the Heparin Sepharose chromatographic step demonstrated a consistency of the affinity of the resin for viruses over repeated use (16 runs), thus providing evidence of absence of cross-contamination from one batch to the next. It was concluded that the process of ATIII manufacturing provides a high level of confidence that the product will not transmit viruses.

  10. Arrhythmogenic inherited heart muscle diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure, leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device, or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the origin is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30% to 40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy, the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, 2 genes for X-linked familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and 4 genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In 1 form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators, and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. This review describes the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  11. Paternal inheritance in mealybugs (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Mendel, Zvi; Franco, José Carlos; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-10-01

    Mealybugs have a haplodiploid reproduction system, with paternal genome elimination (PGE); the males are diploid soon after fertilization, but during embryogenesis, the male paternal set of chromosomes becomes heterochromatic (HC) and therefore inactive. Previous studies have suggested that paternal genes can be passed on from mealybug males to their sons, but not necessarily by any son, to the next generation. We employed crosses between two mealybug species— Planococcus ficus (Signoret) and Planococcus citri (Risso)—and between two populations of P. ficus, which differ in their mode of pheromone attraction, in order to demonstrate paternal inheritance from males to F2 through F1 male hybrids. Two traits were monitored through three generations: mode of male pheromone attraction (pherotype) and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene segment (genotype). Our results demonstrate that paternal inheritance in mealybugs can occur from males to their F2 offspring, through F1 males (paternal line). F2 backcrossed hybrid males expressed paternal pherotypes and ITS2 genotypes although their mother originated through a maternal population. Further results revealed other, hitherto unknown, aspects of inheritance in mealybugs, such as that hybridization between the two species caused absence of paternal traits in F2 hybrid females produced by F1 hybrid females. Furthermore, hybridization between the two species raised the question of whether unattracted males have any role in the interactions between P. ficus and P. citri.

  12. Inheritance law in an aging society.

    PubMed

    Hill, G J

    1995-01-01

    An exploratory analysis of states' inheritance law changes between 1961 and 1990 was conducted in order to discern major trends and their implications for older families. Results suggested that states were modifying their laws in ways similar to suggestions of the law community's Uniform Probate Code, with about one third of the states adopting the Code itself. Consequently, inheritance law has become less traditional and paternalistic and more like "facilitative law," that is, flexible, accommodating, and supportive of family autonomy and decisionmaking authority. These changes and new laws that simplify procedures, protect the dependent and vulnerable, treat marital property more like community property, recognize variant family forms, and enable extrafamilial bequests, may serve to minimize family disruption, conserve resources, and allow families to tailor property divisions and procedures to particular needs and wishes. An impact study is proposed for disclosing the actual effects on inheritance law reforms. Also, while trends observed in this study were fairly evident, states' adoption of new laws was uneven and selective, inviting continuing trend analyses and further research into the reasons for interstate variation.

  13. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.; Miller, William B.

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  14. Genetic sequence analysis of inherited bleeding diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, Flora; Kunicki, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding the coagulation factor proteins were among the first human genes to be characterized over 25 years ago. Since then, significant progress has been made in the translational application of this information for the 2 commonest severe inherited bleeding disorders, hemophilia A and B. For these X-linked disorders, genetic characterization of the disease-causing mutations is now incorporated into the standard of care and genetic information is used for risk stratification of treatment complications. With electronic databases detailing >2100 unique mutations for hemophilia A and >1100 mutations for hemophilia B, these diseases are among the most extensively characterized inherited diseases in humans. Experience with the genetics of the rare bleeding disorders is, as expected, less well advanced. However, here again, electronic mutation databases have been developed and provide excellent guidance for the application of genetic analysis as a confirmatory approach to diagnosis. Most recently, progress has also been made in identifying the mutant loci in a variety of inherited platelet disorders, and these findings are beginning to be applied to the genetic diagnosis of these conditions. Investigation of patients with bleeding phenotypes without a diagnosis, using genome-wide strategies, may identify novel genes not previously recognized as playing a role in hemostasis. PMID:24124085

  15. Inherited drainage - paleochannels and preferential groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Richard; Dahlin, T.

    2010-06-01

    It is suggested that in a localized remnant of Kalahari sand at Dufuya, central Zimbabwe, groundwater flows in an integrated pattern inherited from the paleochannel network of the underlying gneiss. Contact springs occur at discrete localities along the Kalahari sand/gneiss boundary and are associated with spring sapping and land surface subsidence. Subsidence is presumed to be due to preferential solute removal by leaching and dissolution as a result of concentration of groundwater flow within the buried paleochannel network and the location of the springs is presumed to occur where the paleochannel network intersects the Kalahari sand/gneiss boundary. Over time the surficial Kalahari sand is preferentially removed along these buried drainage lines by spring sapping and headwards erosion, exposing the gneiss. Multi-electrode direct current resistivity profiling and radar have been used to map the sub-surface, revealing the topography of the basement and nature of the Kalahari cover. Coincidence of gneiss basement depressions with the spring sites, leached sands and subsidence zones suggests inheritance of the gneiss fluvial paleochannel network pattern by the present day groundwater flow. Washed sand and gravel intersected in shallow boreholes in these areas provides further evidentiary support for the concept of inherited drainage.

  16. Fractional populations in multiple gene inheritance.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2003-01-22

    With complete knowledge of the human genome sequence, one of the most interesting tasks remaining is to understand the functions of individual genes and how they communicate. Using the information about genes (locus, allele, mutation rate, fitness, etc.), we attempt to explain population demographic data. This population evolution study could complement and enhance biologists' understanding about genes. We present a general approach to study population genetics in complex situations. In the present approach, multiple allele inheritance, multiple loci inheritance, natural selection and mutations are allowed simultaneously in order to consider a more realistic situation. A simulation program is presented so that readers can readily carry out studies with their own parameters. It is shown that the multiplicity of the loci greatly affects the demographic results of fractional population ratios. Furthermore, the study indicates that some high infant mortality rates due to congenital anomalies can be attributed to multiple loci inheritance. The simulation program can be downloaded from http://won.hongik.ac.kr/~mhchung/index_files/yapop.htm. In order to run this program, one needs Visual Studio.NET platform, which can be downloaded from http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframework/downloads/default.asp.

  17. Cytoplasmic inheritance of organelles in brown algae.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Taizo; Nagasato, Chikako; Kimura, Kei

    2010-03-01

    Brown algae, together with diatoms and chrysophytes, are a member of the heterokonts. They have either a characteristic life cycle of diplohaplontic alternation of gametophytic and sporophytic generations that are isomorphic or heteromorphic, or a diplontic life cycle. Isogamy, anisogamy and oogamy have been recognized as the mode of sexual reproduction. Brown algae are the characteristic group having elaborated multicellular organization within the heterokonts. In this study, cytoplasmic inheritance of chloroplasts, mitochondria and centrioles was examined, with special focus on sexual reproduction and subsequent zygote development. In oogamy, chloroplasts and mitochondria are inherited maternally. In isogamy, chloroplasts in sporophyte cells are inherited biparentally (maternal or paternal); however, mitochondria (or mitochondrial DNA) derived from the female gamete only remained during zygote development after fertilization. Centrioles in zygotes are definitely derived from the male gamete, irrespective of the sexual reproduction pattern. Female centrioles in zygotes are selectively broken down within 1-2 h after fertilization. The remaining male centrioles play a crucial role as a part of the centrosome for microtubule organization, mitosis, determination of the cytokinetic plane and cytokinesis, as well as for maintaining multicellularity and regular morphogenesis in brown algae.

  18. Paternal inheritance in mealybugs (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Mendel, Zvi; Franco, José Carlos; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-10-01

    Mealybugs have a haplodiploid reproduction system, with paternal genome elimination (PGE); the males are diploid soon after fertilization, but during embryogenesis, the male paternal set of chromosomes becomes heterochromatic (HC) and therefore inactive. Previous studies have suggested that paternal genes can be passed on from mealybug males to their sons, but not necessarily by any son, to the next generation. We employed crosses between two mealybug species--Planococcus ficus (Signoret) and Planococcus citri (Risso)--and between two populations of P. ficus, which differ in their mode of pheromone attraction, in order to demonstrate paternal inheritance from males to F2 through F1 male hybrids. Two traits were monitored through three generations: mode of male pheromone attraction (pherotype) and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene segment (genotype). Our results demonstrate that paternal inheritance in mealybugs can occur from males to their F2 offspring, through F1 males (paternal line). F2 backcrossed hybrid males expressed paternal pherotypes and ITS2 genotypes although their mother originated through a maternal population. Further results revealed other, hitherto unknown, aspects of inheritance in mealybugs, such as that hybridization between the two species caused absence of paternal traits in F2 hybrid females produced by F1 hybrid females. Furthermore, hybridization between the two species raised the question of whether unattracted males have any role in the interactions between P. ficus and P. citri.

  19. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Inheritance of improvements. 91.9 Section 91.9 Indians..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in accordance...

  20. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inheritance of improvements. 91.9 Section 91.9 Indians..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in accordance...

  1. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inheritance of improvements. 91.9 Section 91.9 Indians..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in accordance...

  2. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inheritance of improvements. 91.9 Section 91.9 Indians..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of... of the county courts, State of Oklahoma, and shall be subject to inheritance or bequest in accordance...

  3. Solitary Mastocytoma of the Eyelid in an Adult Patient With Prolidase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shirley P; Hardy, Thomas G

    Prolidase deficiency and solitary mastocytoma of the eyelid are both exceedingly rare. Prolidase deficiency is an inherited connective tissue disorder that has systemic sequelae, such as intractable skin ulceration, poor wound healing, recurrent infections, and intellectual impairment. Cutaneous mastocytoma is an isolated, aberrant cutaneous aggregation of mast cells. A case of an adult with severe prolidase deficiency who developed cutaneous mastocytoma of the eyelid was presented. To the authors' knowledge, adult-onset solitary mastocytoma of the eyelid has never been reported previously.

  4. Inherited disorders of the IL-12-IFN-gamma axis in patients with disseminated BCG infection.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Davood; Adimi, Parisa; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Mansouri, Nahal; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Masjedi, Mohammad R; Adimi, Parvaneh; Tabarsi, Payam; Naderi, Mohammad; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Vogt, Guillaume; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Bustamante, Jacinta; Chapgier, Ariane; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Velayati, Ali A; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Disseminated BCG infection is a rare complication of vaccination that occurs in patients with impaired immunity. In recent years, a series of inherited disorders of the IL-12-IFN-gamma axis have been described that predispose affected individuals to disseminated disease caused by BCG, environmental Mycobacteria, and non-typhoidal Salmonella. The routine immunological work-up of these patients is normal and the diagnosis requires specific investigation of the IL-12-IFN-gamma circuit. We report here the first two such patients originating from and living in Iran. The first child is two years old and suffers from complete IFN-gamma receptor 2 deficiency and disseminated BCG infection. He is currently in clinical remission thanks to prolonged multiple antibiotic therapy. The other, a 28-year-old adult, suffers from IL-12p40 deficiency and presented with disseminated BCG infection followed by recurrent episodes of systemic salmonellosis. He is now doing well. A third patient of Iranian descent, living in North America, was reported elsewhere to suffer from IL-12Rbeta1 deficiency. These three patients thus indicate that various inherited defects of the IL-12-IFN-gamma circuit can be found in Iranian people. In conclusion we recommend to consider the disorders of the IL-12-IFN-gamma circuit in all patients with severe BCG infection, disseminated environmental mycobacterial disease, or systemic non-typhoidal salmonellosis, regardless of their ethnic origin and country of residence.

  5. Autoimmunity in Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Ahmadi, Moslem; Abolhassani, Hassan; Yazdani, Reza; Mohammadi, Hamed; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common inherited primary immunodeficiencies in humans, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, an inability to produce specific antibodies, and recurrent infections mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria. However, it has been shown that inflammatory disorders, granulomatous lesions, lymphoproliferative diseases, cancer, and autoimmunity are associated with the various types of PAD. Both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases could be attributed to B-cell defects in PAD patients. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common autoimmune disorders in this group of patients. The aim of this review is to describe the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity and to review the literature with respect to the reported autoimmune disorders in each type of PAD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Introducing high-throughput sequencing into mainstream of genetic diagnosis practice in inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Bastida, José M; Lozano, Marĺa L; Benito, Rocĺo; Janusz, Kamila; Palma-Barqueros, Verónica; Del Rey, Mónica; Hernández-Sánchez, Jesús M; Riesco, Susana; Bermejo, Nuria; González-García, Hermenegildo; Rodriguez-Alén, Agustín; Aguilar, Carlos; Sevivas, Teresa; López-Fernández, Marĺa F; Marneth, Anna E; van der Reijden, Bert A; Morgan, Neil V; Watson, Steve P; Vicente, Vicente; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Rivera, José; González-Porras, José R

    2017-10-05

    Inherited platelet disorders are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases, caused by inherited defects in platelet production and/or function. Their genetic diagnosis would benefit clinical care, prognosis and preventive treatments. Until recently, this has been performed by Sanger sequencing of a limited number of candidate genes. High-throughput sequencing is revolutionizing genetic diagnosis of diseases, including bleeding disorders. We have designed a novel high-throughput sequencing platform to investigate the unknown molecular pathology in a cohort of 82 patients with inherited platelet disorders. Thirty-four (41.5%) patients presented with a phenotype strongly indicative of a particular type of disorder. The remaining had disease with no specific manifestations. Overall, high-throughput sequencing test attained a molecular diagnosis in 70% of the patients. This sensitivity increased to 90% among patients suspected to have a defined platelet disorder. We found 58 different candidate variants in 29 genes, among which 70% were not previously described. Following consensus guidelines, we qualified 68% and 27% of the candidate variants as pathogenic and likely pathogenic, respectively. Apart from establishing definitive diagnosis of well-known inherited platelet disorders in most patients, in few others high-throughput sequencing provided molecular results suggestive of less recognized disorders, such as sitosterolemia, filamin and actinin deficiencies and abnormalities at the level of G-protein coupled receptors and effector enzymes. Noteworthy, high-throughput sequencing diagnosed novel patients with very rare molecular pathology in DIAPH1 (n=2) and RASGRP2 (n=3). Overall, our study reinforces the feasibility of introducing high-throughput sequencing technology into the mainstream of genetic diagnosis practice in inherited platelet disorders. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  8. Patterns of mitochondrial inheritance in the myxogastrid Didymium iridis.

    PubMed

    Silliker, Margaret E; Liles, Jeffery L; Monroe, Jason A

    2002-01-01

    Seven strains of the Central American A1 mating series of Didymium iridis were crossed in all possible combinations. Individual plasmodia were isolated and grown to a stage where total DNA could be isolated for DNA-DNA hybridization with cloned mitochondrial DNA probes to determine the pattern of mitochondrial inheritance. Random, biased, and dominant patterns of uniparental mitochondrial inheritance were observed, as well as rare cases of biparental inheritance, depending on the particular parental strains mated. The diverse patterns suggest that the factors controlling mitochondrial inheritance in D. iridis are complex. Differences between trials of the same matings suggest that non-genetic factors may also influence mitochondrial inheritance.

  9. Biparental chloroplast inheritance leads to rescue from cytonuclear incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Barnard-Kubow, Karen B; McCoy, Morgan A; Galloway, Laura F

    2017-02-01

    Although organelle inheritance is predominantly maternal across animals and plants, biparental chloroplast inheritance has arisen multiple times in the angiosperms. Biparental inheritance has the potential to impact the evolutionary dynamics of cytonuclear incompatibility, interactions between nuclear and organelle genomes that are proposed to be among the earliest types of genetic incompatibility to arise in speciation. We examine the interplay between biparental inheritance and cytonuclear incompatibility in Campanulastrum americanum, a plant species exhibiting both traits. We first determine patterns of chloroplast inheritance in genetically similar and divergent crosses, and then associate inheritance with hybrid survival across multiple generations. There is substantial biparental inheritance in C. americanum. The frequency of biparental inheritance is greater in divergent crosses and in the presence of cytonuclear incompatibility. Biparental inheritance helps to mitigate cytonuclear incompatibility, leading to increased fitness of F1 hybrids and recovery in the F2 generation. This study demonstrates the potential for biparental chloroplast inheritance to rescue cytonuclear compatibility, reducing cytonuclear incompatibility's contribution to reproductive isolation and potentially slowing speciation. The efficacy of rescue depended upon the strength of incompatibility, with a greater persistence of weak incompatibilities in later generations. These findings suggest that incompatible plastids may lead to selection for biparental inheritance.

  10. Transgenerational inheritance: Models and mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance.

    PubMed

    Miska, Eric A; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2016-10-07

    Heritability has traditionally been thought to be a characteristic feature of the genetic material of an organism-notably, its DNA. However, it is now clear that inheritance not based on DNA sequence exists in multiple organisms, with examples found in microbes, plants, and invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In mammals, the molecular mechanisms have been challenging to elucidate, in part due to difficulties in designing robust models and approaches. Here we review some of the evidence, concepts, and potential mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based transgenerational inheritance. We highlight model systems and discuss whether phenotypes are replicated or reconstructed over successive generations, as well as whether mechanisms operate at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we explore the short- and long-term implications of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance. Understanding the effects of non-DNA sequence-based mechanisms is key to a full appreciation of heritability in health and disease.

  11. [Antithrombin III dosage using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN, in several pathological situations].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, D M; Noguti, M A; Juliano, L

    1995-01-01

    Functional methods for ATIII determination are essential for the diagnosis of deficiencies of this important thrombin inhibitor. The aim of this work was standardize the method for ATIII level determination in plasma, in microplates. ATIII levels were measured, using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN, which is specific for thrombin, and which has been sinthesized at the Biophysical Department of the Escola Paulista de Medicina of the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Among 21 patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 20 had ATIII levels above 70% (113 +/- 22%). A 22 year-old female patient, who had recurrent DVT and a familiar DVT antecedent, had a congenital ATIII deficiency (56%). ATIII levels were normal in 6 patients with von Willebrand disease (109 +/- 28%), as expected. In 20 patients with severe hepatic failure, it has been found reduced ATIII levels (42 +/- 19%), since this inhibitor is produced by the liver. In 3 patients with sepsis and DIC, ATIII levels have also been reduced (45 +/- 5%) owing to consumption during blood coagulation activation. There was a significant correlation between ATIII levels and the prothrombin time, as well as the factor V levels, and both are good parameters to assess hepatic function and to monitor DIC. There was a significant correlation between ATIII levels measured using the chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-NAN and those measured using S-2238, produced by Kabi Laboratories. This method for ATIII determination in plasma is easy to perform and it can detect ATIII deficiency in patients with hepatic failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombophilia.

  12. Inheritance of acquired traits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since Lamarck proposed the idea of inheritance of acquired traits 200 years ago, much has been said for and against it, but the theory was finally declined after the 1930s. Despite of the negative opinions of the majority of geneticists, botanists and plant breeders have long recognized that altered properties during the growth were occasionally transmitted to the offspring. This was also the case with artificially altered properties such as dwarfism, flowering timing and plant stature, which were induced by a non-mutagenic chemical, 5-azacytidine and its derivatives. As these drugs are powerful inhibitors of DNA methylation in vivo, a close correlation between methylation and phenotypic expression was suggested. Subsequent studies showed that rice plants acquired disease resistance upon demethylation of the corresponding resistant gene, and that both resistant trait and hypomethylated status were inherited by the progeny up to nine generations. Whether or not the methylation pattern changes under natural condition was then questioned, and recent studies have indicated that it indeed naturally changes in response to environmental stresses. Whether or not the altered methylation pattern during the vegetative growth is heritable was also questioned, and studies on toadflax and rice affirmed the question, showing stable maintenance of hypermethylation in the former and hypomethylation in the latter for 250 and 10 years, respectively. The observation strongly suggested that acquired traits can be heritable as far as the acquired methylation pattern is stably transmitted. This concept is consistent with the Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired traits, which therefore should be carefully reevaluated to reestablish his impaired reputation. PMID:20118668

  13. Diagnosis and management of inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynne; Sharma, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Inherited heart conditions are the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in those under the age of 35 and the leading cause of non-traumatic death in young athletes. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease affecting 1 in 500 of the population. Some patients may exhibit severe left ventricular hypertrophy, others may show nothing more than an abnormal ECG. Left ventricular hypertrophy most commonly manifests in the second decade of life. Sudden death is rare and usually affects patients in the first three decades whereas older patients present with heart failure, atrial fibrillation and stroke. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a rare, autosomal dominant heart muscle disorder which affects between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 5,000 of the population. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterised by a dilated left ventricle with impaired function that cannot be explained by ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or valvular heart disease. At least 25% of cases of DCM are familial. DCM may be associated with multisystem conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Chemotherapy and certain other drugs, alcohol abuse and myocarditis may also lead to a dilated and poorly contracting left ventricle. In many cases the first manifestation of an inherited cardiomyopathy can be a sudden cardiac arrest. Other presentations include chest pain or breathlessness during exertion, palpitations and syncope. In many of the cardiomyopathies, the diagnosis can be made with a standard ECG and echocardiogram. However if the diagnosis is not certain or the cardiologist wishes to look at the heart structure in greater detail, a cardiac MRI may be performed.

  14. Genetic Counselling for Maternally Inherited Mitochondrial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Joanna; Finsterer, Josef; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this review was to provide an evidence-based approach to frequently asked questions relating to the risk of transmitting a maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder (MID). We do not address disorders linked with disturbed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, causing mtDNA depletion or multiple mtDNA deletions, as these are autosomally inherited. The review addresses questions regarding prognosis, recurrence risks and the strategies available to prevent disease transmission. The clinical and genetic complexity of maternally inherited MIDs represent a major challenge for patients, their relatives and health professionals. Since many of the genetic and pathophysiological aspects of MIDs remain unknown, counselling of affected patients and at-risk family members remains difficult. MtDNA mutations are maternally transmitted or, more rarely, they are sporadic, occurring de novo (~25%). Females carrying homoplasmic mtDNA mutations will transmit the mutant species to all of their offspring, who may or may not exhibit a similar phenotype depending on modifying, secondary factors. Females carrying heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations will transmit a variable amount of mutant mtDNA to their offspring, which can result in considerable phenotypic heterogeneity among siblings. The majority of mtDNA rearrangements, such as single large-scale deletions, are sporadic, but there is a small risk of recurrence (~4%) among the offspring of affected women. The range and suitability of reproductive choices for prospective mothers is a complex area of mitochondrial medicine that needs to be managed by experienced healthcare professionals as part of a multidisciplinary team. Genetic counselling is facilitated by the identification of the underlying causative genetic defect. To provide more precise genetic counselling, further research is needed to clarify the secondary factors that account for the variable penetrance and the often marked differential expressivity of pathogenic mt

  15. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion.

    PubMed

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C; Walter, Peter

    2015-03-03

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin-dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome.

  16. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R.; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C.; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin–dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:25730886

  17. The machinery of mitochondrial inheritance and behavior.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, M P

    1999-03-05

    The distribution of mitochondria to daughter cells during cell division is an essential feature of cell proliferation. Until recently, it was commonly believed that inheritance of mitochondria and other organelles was a passive process, a consequence of their random diffusion throughout the cytoplasm. A growing recognition of the reticular morphology of mitochondria in many living cells, the association of mitochondria with the cytoskeleton, and the coordinated movements of mitochondria during cellular division and differentiation has illuminated the necessity for a cellular machinery that mediates mitochondrial behavior. Characterization of the underlying molecular components of this machinery is providing insight into mechanisms regulating mitochondrial morphology and distribution.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  19. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: myths and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heard, Edith; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-03-27

    Since the human genome was sequenced, the term "epigenetics" is increasingly being associated with the hope that we are more than just the sum of our genes. Might what we eat, the air we breathe, or even the emotions we feel influence not only our genes but those of descendants? The environment can certainly influence gene expression and can lead to disease, but transgenerational consequences are another matter. Although the inheritance of epigenetic characters can certainly occur-particularly in plants-how much is due to the environment and the extent to which it happens in humans remain unclear.

  20. Transgenerational Epigenetic Inheritance: myths and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Edith; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the human genome was sequenced, the term “epigenetics” is increasingly being associated with the hope that we are more than just the sum of our genes. Might what we eat, the air we breathe, or even the emotions we feel, influence not only our genes but those of descendents? The environment can certainly influence gene expression, and can lead to disease, but trans-generational consequences are another matter. While the inheritance of epigenetic characters can certainly occur - particularly in plants – how much is due to the environment and the extent to which it happens in humans, remains unclear. PMID:24679529

  1. [Contribution to the inheritance of schizophrenic psychosis].

    PubMed

    Feyler, K P

    2000-05-01

    This case presentation involves a family study looking at the inheritance of schizophrenic psychosis. It refers to the increasing risk of disease in correlation to the closeness of the relationship. The study includes both affected parents, their three children and one grandchild, all of whom had multiple hospital admissions and received psychiatric treatment. The clinical features were typical of schizophrenia. The severity of illness increased within the later generation. This study indicates a high risk correlation in this family and is in keeping with other current field studies.

  2. The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chirnomas, S Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). The study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients and to identify the physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies, which include ribosome assembly and ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia pathway has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. In this article, the diseases that account for most IBMFS diagnoses are analyzed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inherited ion channel diseases: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Lieve, Krystien V V; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2015-10-01

    Ion channelopathies are diseases caused by dysfunctional ion channels that may lead to sudden death. These diseases can be either acquired or inherited. The main phenotypes observed in patients carrying these heritable arrhythmia syndromes are congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome. In the recent years, tremendous progress has been made in the recognition, mechanisms, and treatment of these diseases. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the main phenotypes, genetic underpinnings, risk stratification, and treatment options for these so-called cardiac ion channelopathies.

  4. Endocardial fibroelastosis: possible X linked inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, S; Child, A; Dyson, M

    1987-01-01

    We report a pedigree in which six males died of cardiac failure within the first eight months of life. These males were related through healthy females, as with X linked recessive inheritance. There was no consanguinity. None of the affected boys had an anatomical cardiac abnormality. In two affected brothers, histological evidence for endomyocardial fibroelastosis was documented, and in one of these electron microscopy demonstrated abnormalities of the mitochondria as found in mitochondrial cytopathy. A review of published reports revealed five similar X linked pedigrees, and in two of these mitochondrial abnormalities were found. We suggest that these families may show an X linked recessive cardiomyopathy with mitochondrial abnormalities. Images PMID:3585935

  5. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixuan; Wilson, Amanda; Xu, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly uniparental in most sexual eukaryotes. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial inheritance pattern of Cryptococcus gattii, a basidiomycetous yeast responsible for the recent and ongoing outbreak of cryptococcal infections in the US Pacific Northwest and British Columbia (especially Vancouver Island) in Canada. Using molecular markers, we analyzed the inheritance of mtDNA in 14 crosses between strains within and between divergent lineages in C. gattii. Consistent with results from recent studies, our analyses identified significant variations in mtDNA inheritance patterns among strains and crosses, ranging from strictly uniparental to biparental. For two of the crosses that showed uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in standard laboratory conditions, we further investigated the effects of the following environmental variables on mtDNA inheritance: UV exposure, temperature, and treatments with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and with the ubiquitination inhibitor ammonium chloride. Interestingly, one of these crosses showed no response to these environmental variables while the other exhibited diverse patterns ranging from complete uniparental inheritance of the MATa parent mtDNA, to biparental inheritance, and to a significant bias toward inheritance of the MATα parental mtDNA. Our results indicate that mtDNA inheritance in C. gattii differs from that in its closely related species Cryptococcus neoformans.

  6. Plastid inheritance in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Polans, N O; Corriveau, J L; Coleman, A W

    1990-12-01

    Cultivar variability for levels of plastid DNA (cpDNA) in the germ cell line of germinated pea pollen has suggested the possibility of biparental plastid transmission. In order to examine this possibility further, RFLP markers were used to follow the transmission of cpDNA from parents to their F1 offspring. Results from these inheritance studies clearly indicate the presence of only maternal plastid markers in the F1 progeny of each cross examined, irrespective of the pollen cpDNA levels of the paternal parent. The same result is obtained for F1 progeny produced from crosses using pollen characterized by comparatively high cpDNA content, even when offspring are sampled at early developmental stages. Thus, there appears to be little correspondence between pollen cytological data indicating potential paternal plastid transmission and data from molecular marker studies confirming that P. sativum generally follows a uniparental-maternal mode of plastid inheritance. Insufficient F1 progeny were examined to exclude instances of trace biparentalism.

  7. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  8. Identification and management of inherited cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F P

    1995-01-01

    Identification of inherited cancer-predisposing genes offers opportunities for cancer prevention. Inherited susceptibility genes have been identified, primarily through studies of unusual cancer cases and families but also through general population studies. Examples include the RB1 gene for retinoblastoma; the WT1 gene for Wilms' tumor; germline p53 mutations in families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome; the NF1 and NF2 genes for neuroblastomatosis, types 1 and 2; the VHL gene for renal cancer and other tumors associated with Von Hippel-Lindau disease; the APC gene for adenomatous polyposis coli; the BRCA1 gene for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer; and the mismatch repair genes for colon and other common cancers. For some cancers, identification of gene carriers might be beneficial for targeting screening and chemopreventive interventions. On the other hand, predisposition testing for cancer has the potential for harm from loss of insurability and employability, psychological distress, social stigmatization and other adverse effects. Research is needed to identify predisposition testing procedures that maximize benefits while minimizing harm to subjects. Chemoprevention trials in genetically susceptible populations offer the prospect of finding effective methods of reducing future cancer risk. PMID:8741802

  9. Modeling genetic inheritance of copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhen; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Glessner, Joseph; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bucan, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are being used as genetic markers or functional candidates in gene-mapping studies. However, unlike single nucleotide polymorphism or microsatellite genotyping techniques, most CNV detection methods are limited to detecting total copy numbers, rather than copy number in each of the two homologous chromosomes. To address this issue, we developed a statistical framework for intensity-based CNV detection platforms using family data. Our algorithm identifies CNVs for a family simultaneously, thus avoiding the generation of calls with Mendelian inconsistency while maintaining the ability to detect de novo CNVs. Applications to simulated data and real data indicate that our method significantly improves both call rates and accuracy of boundary inference, compared to existing approaches. We further illustrate the use of Mendelian inheritance to infer SNP allele compositions in each of the two homologous chromosomes in CNV regions using real data. Finally, we applied our method to a set of families genotyped using both the Illumina HumanHap550 and Affymetrix genome-wide 5.0 arrays to demonstrate its performance on both inherited and de novo CNVs. In conclusion, our method produces accurate CNV calls, gives probabilistic estimates of CNV transmission and builds a solid foundation for the development of linkage and association tests utilizing CNVs. PMID:18832372

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Inherited Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially-expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production, or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stresses in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases; Friedreich's ataxia (FA), LHON, MELAS, MERRF and Leigh Syndrome (LS) is discussed. Published reports for oxidative stress involvement in pathomechanism in these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest for oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was in Friedreich's ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for oxidative stress citation count frequency within each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is in Friedreich's ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich's diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26073122

  12. Atypical inheritance: new horizons for neurology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G N

    1994-11-01

    Rediscovery of Mendel's laws produced an enthusiastic new discipline at the turn of this century. The eugenics movement had many disciples in the United States, and it should be noted that the term "final solution" was first used by the National Association of Charities and Corrections in the 1920s. American advocates of eugenics accomplished mass sterilization of retarded individuals and the prohibition of Jewish immigration from Germany during World War II. It is interesting that the close of this century has produced a similar revolution in genetics. These newer genetic mechanisms expose the major fallacy of eugenics: traits may be genetic without showing obvious familial transmission. Sanctions against reproduction or immigration thus will have little effect on the gene pool. The clinical implications of atypical inheritance are enormous. Almost every medical disorder must be reinvestigated for evidence of subtle chromosome changes, for worsening in progressive generations, and for influence of parental origin. The classical Mendelian model taught that extreme and rare phenotypes shed light on more frequent ones, hence the definition of genes responsible for hypercholesterolemia, for Alzheimer disease, and for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Atypical inheritance mechanisms further enhance this approach, bringing all of neurology under the light of genetic technology. The lure for the practitioner, then, is not the hyperbole of molecular biology; it is the need for a seasoned hand so emphasized by Huntington's disease and the duty to protect the next century from disasters of the current one.

  13. The Mode of Inheritance of Scheuermann's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, A. M.; Zaidman, M. N.; Strokova, E. L.; Korel, A. V.; Kalashnikova, E. V.; Rusova, T. V.; Mikhailovsky, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The mode of Scheuermann's disease inheritance and its phenotypic traits in probands and their relatives were studied in 90 pedigrees (90 probands and 385 relatives). The disorder was identified as a genetically related pathology inherited by autosomal dominant type, controlled by a mutant major gene, as a kyphotic deformity without signs of vertebral bodies' anomaly and torsion. Morphological and biochemical studies showed disturbance in the structure of vertebral growth plate anterior aspects at the level of deformity, defects in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and change in proteoglycan spectrum in cells and matrix. Twelve candidate genes were studied in chondrocytes isolated from vertebral growth plates of patients with Scheuermann's disease. The study results included disorder in the IHH gene expression and preservation of the expression of PAX1, two aggrecan isoforms, link protein, types I and II collagen, lumican, versican, growth hormone and growth factor receptor genes, and proliferation gene. Preservation of the SOX9 gene (transcription gene) probably indicates posttranscriptional genetic disorders. The study is under way. PMID:24102061

  14. Epigenetic inheritance of cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray K; Gurdon, John B

    2008-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression pattern and provide a unique signature of a cell differentiation status. Without external stimuli or signalling events, this cell identity remains stable and unlikely to change over many cell divisions. The epigenetic signature of a particular cell fate therefore needs to be replicated faithfully in daughter cells; otherwise a cell lineage cannot be maintained. However, the mechanism of transmission of cellular memory from mother to daughter cells remains unclear. It has been suggested that the inheritance of an active or silent gene state involves different kinds of epigenetic mechanisms, e.g. DNA methylation, histone modifications, replacement of histone variants, Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins. Emerging evidence supports the role of histone variant H3.3 in maintaining an active gene status and in remodelling nucleosomal composition. Here we discuss some recent findings on the propagation of epigenetic memory and propose a model for the inheritance of an active gene state through the interaction of H3.3 with other epigenetic components.

  15. The mode of inheritance of Scheuermann's disease.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, A M; Zaidman, M N; Strokova, E L; Korel, A V; Kalashnikova, E V; Rusova, T V; Mikhailovsky, M V

    2013-01-01

    The mode of Scheuermann's disease inheritance and its phenotypic traits in probands and their relatives were studied in 90 pedigrees (90 probands and 385 relatives). The disorder was identified as a genetically related pathology inherited by autosomal dominant type, controlled by a mutant major gene, as a kyphotic deformity without signs of vertebral bodies' anomaly and torsion. Morphological and biochemical studies showed disturbance in the structure of vertebral growth plate anterior aspects at the level of deformity, defects in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and change in proteoglycan spectrum in cells and matrix. Twelve candidate genes were studied in chondrocytes isolated from vertebral growth plates of patients with Scheuermann's disease. The study results included disorder in the IHH gene expression and preservation of the expression of PAX1, two aggrecan isoforms, link protein, types I and II collagen, lumican, versican, growth hormone and growth factor receptor genes, and proliferation gene. Preservation of the SOX9 gene (transcription gene) probably indicates posttranscriptional genetic disorders. The study is under way.

  16. Isolation of Deficiencies in the Arabidopsis Genome by γ-Irradiation of Pollen

    PubMed Central

    Vizir, I. Y.; Anderson, M. L.; Wilson, Z. A.; Mulligan, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal deficiencies are a useful genetic tool in fine-scale genetic mapping and the integration of physical and visible marker genetic maps. Viable overlapping deficiencies may permit gene cloning by subtractive procedures and provide a means of analyzing the functional importance of different chromosomal regions. A method is described for isolation of deficiencies in the Arabidopsis genome which encompass specific loci and other extended chromosomal regions. The technique employs pollen mutagenized by γ-irradiation to pollinate marker lines homozygous for recessive mutations. Deficiencies at specific loci were detected by screening for marker phenotypes in the F(1). Screening for lethal mutations in the F(1)/F(2) confirmed specific deficiencies and revealed other deficiencies that did not overlap the marker loci. Further evidence for such mutations was provided by distorted F(2) segregation of the chromosomal markers linked to putative deficiencies. Maintainable (transmissible) and non-transmissible deficiencies were demonstrated by their pattern of inheritance in subsequent generations. PMID:7982565

  17. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and art].

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Collado-Vazquez, Susana

    2010-07-16

    Disability is a complex phenomenon, and the ways it has been conceived, explained and treated have varied notably throughout history. As the years go by, human beings have evolved and, at the same time, so have medicine and art. And therein lies the extraordinary value, from the ontological point of view, of many works of art, which would never have been produced without the intervention of disease and the practice of the medical art. The aim of this work is to address the study of some deficiencies, disabilities and neurological pathologies that have been represented in paintings at different times in history. This article begins with the study of pictures that deal with dwarves and other misnamed freaks of nature that have been represented by painters from Velazquez to Titian or Rubens. The study looks at paintings of cripples, pictures containing the mentally disabled, with examples by Bruegel the Elder or Munch, as well as certain neurological disorders that have been portrayed in paintings, such as Escaping criticism by Pere Borrell or Sad inheritance by Sorolla. Likewise, we also reflect on the trite concept of disease and artistic creativity. The artistic representation of deficiency and disability has evolved in parallel to the feelings of men and women in each period of history and, at the same time, their social evolution. Nowadays, this concept continues to advance and some artists no longer represent the sick person, but instead the illness itself.

  18. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  19. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency diagnosed in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Buyuktas, Deram; Aydin, Ahmet; Acbay, Ozer

    2011-12-01

    Urea cycle enzymes deficiencies are rare metabolic disorders. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common type. The syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme OTC which catalyses the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrulline. It shows X-linked inheritance and typically remains asymptomatic until late infancy or early childhood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the age of the patient and the duration of hyperammonemia. Female heterozygotes are more difficult to diagnose. They suffer from hyperammonemic periods which can be triggered by trauma, infections, surgery, childbirth, parenteral nutrition, and by the initiation of sodium valproate therapy. The prognosis of OTC deficiency is better for those with an onset after infancy, but morbidity from brain damage does not appear to be linked to the number of episodes of hyperammonemia that have occurred. However, early diagnosis and prompt initiation of ammonia-lowering treatment are essential for survival of these patients. This case presents a patient who was diagnosed with OTC deficiency following mental confusion during pregnancy.

  20. [Prevalence study of biotinidase deficiency in newborns].

    PubMed

    Pinto, A L; Raymond, K M; Bruck, I; Antoniuk, S A

    1998-04-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an inheritable disorder of biotin metabolism. This disorder fulfills major criteria for consideration for newborn screening: the affected children do no show clinical signs in the newborn period; the disease is highly disabling; treatment is effective in preventing neurological sequelae if undertaken promptly. Screening of 125,000 infants born in Paraná State was carried out to establish the prevalence of biotinidase deficiency. A simple colorimetric procedure was used to detect two infants with biotinidase deficiency (1:62,500), one of them with profound deficiency (1:125,000) and the other with partial deficiency (1:125,000) of the enzyme. There were no known false-negative test results and 0.12% were false-positive, defined by further blood samples which were negative upon repeated testing. Sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 99.88%. Repeat blood samples could not be obtained in 63 (30%) suspected cases. Newborn screening for biotinidase is useful in identifying affected children, is inexpensive and allows early intervention, which may prevent irreversible neurological damage.

  1. Inherited coagulation disorders in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Ardeshiri, R; Yarmohammadi, Hooman

    2002-11-01

    A comprehensive survey concerning the Shiraz Hemophilia Society and the associated haemophilia treatment centre was undertaken in April 2002 to collect data on demographics, signs and symptoms in the southern Iranian population with haemophilia and allied disorders. The total number of patients with coagulation disorders was 367. Haemophilia A (factor [F] VIII deficiency) was found in 271, 39 had haemophilia B (FIX deficiency) and 24 had von Willebrand disease. The rare coagulation disorders (n = 33) included 11 patients with FX deficiency; 10 with FVII; six with FXIII; two with afibrinogenaemia; two with FXI; one with combined FVIII and FV; and one with combined FVII, FVIII and FIX deficiency. The prevalence was 6.64 per 100,000 inhabitants. The most common symptoms were haemarthrosis, haematomas and epistaxis. None of the patients were human immunodeficiency virus positive but 47 (15%) were hepatitis C virus positive and two (0.7%) were hepatitis B positive, so that the rate of transfusion-transmitted infections was lower compared with other populations.

  2. Biochemical basis for dominant inheritance, variable penetrance and maternal effects in RBP4 congenital eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Christopher M.; Nelson, Christine; Tarlè, Susan A.; Pribila, Jonathan T.; Bardakjian, Tanya; Woods, Sean; Schneider, Adele; Glaser, Tom

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gestational vitamin A (retinol) deficiency poses a risk for ocular birth defects and blindness. We identified missense mutations in RBP4, encoding serum retinol binding protein (RBP), in three families with eye malformations of differing severity. The mutant phenotypes exhibit dominant inheritance but incomplete penetrance. Maternal inheritance significantly increases the probability of phenotypic expression. RBP normally delivers retinol from hepatic stores to peripheral tissues, including the placenta and fetal eye. The disease mutations greatly reduce retinol binding to RBP yet paradoxically increase RBP affinity for its cell surface receptor, STRA6. By occupying STRA6 nonproductively, the dominant-negative proteins are predicted to disrupt vitamin A delivery from wild-type proteins within the fetus but also, in the case of maternal transmission, at the placenta. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized mode of maternal inheritance, distinct from imprinting and oocyte-derived mRNA, and define a group of hereditary disorders plausibly modulated by dietary vitamin A levels. PMID:25910211

  3. Inherited Thrombophilia and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Parand, Alireza; Zolghadri, Jale; Nezam, Mozhgan; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is a common health problem. The polymorphisms G20210A of prothrombin gene (FII G 20210A), and G 1691A of factor V gene (Factor V Leiden, FVL) are the most extensively studied thrombophilic mutations in association to recurrent miscarriage. Objectives: To determine the frequency of FII G20210A and FVL polymorphisms as well as protein C and protein S deficiency in a series of patients with RPL compared with control group. Patients and Methods: The study group included 90 randomly selected patients with three or more consecutive miscarriages with the same partner in <20 weeks gestation in 2012. The control population consisted of 44 age-matched women with at least one live born children and no history of pregnancy loss. Functional activity of protein C and S, activated protein C resistance, FVL assay by polymerase chain reaction and prothrombin gene mutation were assessed. The polymorphism frequencies were recorded for each group and comparisons were made. Results: The mean functional activity of protein C and protein S were not significantly different between case and control groups (P >0.05). Frequency of protein C deficiency was also not significantly different between the case and control groups (P=0.906), but frequency of protein S deficiency was significantly higher in patients than controls (P=0.03). Genotype pattern of the patients and healthy individuals were not significantly different with regard to either FVL or Prothrombin G20210A (P > 0.05). Conclusions: We determined a significant higher frequency of protein S deficiency in patients with RPL compared with controls. But the frequency of protein C deficiency and the frequency of two common thrombophilic mutations (Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A), were not significantly different between patients with recurrent miscarriage and healthy women. PMID:24693393

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome in inherited neuropathies: A retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Francis B; Kirk, Callyn A; Marking, Devon; Reilly, Mary M; Scherer, Steven S; Shy, Michael E; Herrmann, David N

    2017-07-10

    This study evaluates carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptom severity, functional status, and outcome of CTS therapies in patients with inherited neuropathies. Validated questionnaires were used to compare symptom severity and functional status in patients with and without a diagnosis of CTS and a diagnosis of an inherited neuropathy. 309 patients with inherited neuropathies participated in this study. The CTS symptom severity score (SSS) was found to be the most useful tool in assessing CTS severity in patients with inherited neuropathy. Splint therapy and surgery were associated with significant improvement in carpal tunnel symptoms as measured through the SSS. This study provides insight into the assessment of CTS symptom severity and patient-reported outcomes to CTS therapy in individuals with inherited neuropathies. The SSS appears useful for evaluation of CTS symptoms and patient-reported outcomes following CTS interventions in individuals with inherited neuropathies. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Interaction of heparin with internally quenched fluorogenic peptides derived from heparin-binding consensus sequences, kallistatin and anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Daniel C; Nantes, Iseli L; de Souza, Eduardo S; Le Bonniec, Bernard; Ito, Amando S; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Oliveira, Vitor; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2002-09-01

    Internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) peptides bearing the fluorescence donor/acceptor pair o-aminobenzoic acid (Abz)/N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp) at N- and C-terminal ends were synthesized containing heparin-binding sites from the human serpins kallistatin and antithrombin, as well as consensus heparin-binding sequences (Cardin clusters). The dissociation constant (K(d)), as well as the stoichiometry for the heparin-peptide complexes, was determined directly by measuring the decrease in fluorescence of the peptide solution. Experimental procedures were as sensitive as those used to follow the fluorescence change of tryptophan in heparin-binding proteins. The conformation of the peptides and the heparin-peptide complexes were obtained from measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decay and CD spectra. Kallistatin (Arg(300)-Pro(319))-derived peptide (HC2) and one derived from antithrombin III helix D [(AT3D), corresponding to Ser(112)-Lys(139)], which are the heparin-binding sites in these serpins, showed significant affinity for 4500 Da heparin, for which K(d) values were 17 nM and 100 nM respectively. The CD spectra of the heparin-HC2 peptide complex did not show any significant alpha-helix content, different from the situation with peptide AT3D, for which complex-formation with heparin resulted in 24% alpha-helix content. The end-to-end distance distribution and the time-resolved fluorescence-decay measurements agree with the CD spectra and K(d) values. The synthetic alpha-methyl glycoside pentasaccharide AGA*IA(M) (where A represents N,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; G, beta-d-glucuronic acid; A*, N,3,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; I, 2-O-sulphated alpha-l-iduronic acid; and A(M), alpha-methyl glycoside of A) also binds to AT3D and other consensus heparin-binding sequences, although with lower affinity. The interaction of IQF peptides with 4500 Da heparin was displaced by protamine. In conclusion, IQF peptides containing Abz/EDDnp as the

  6. Interaction of heparin with internally quenched fluorogenic peptides derived from heparin-binding consensus sequences, kallistatin and anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Daniel C; Nantes, Iseli L; de Souza, Eduardo S; Le Bonniec, Bernard; Ito, Amando S; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Oliveira, Vitor; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) peptides bearing the fluorescence donor/acceptor pair o-aminobenzoic acid (Abz)/N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp) at N- and C-terminal ends were synthesized containing heparin-binding sites from the human serpins kallistatin and antithrombin, as well as consensus heparin-binding sequences (Cardin clusters). The dissociation constant (K(d)), as well as the stoichiometry for the heparin-peptide complexes, was determined directly by measuring the decrease in fluorescence of the peptide solution. Experimental procedures were as sensitive as those used to follow the fluorescence change of tryptophan in heparin-binding proteins. The conformation of the peptides and the heparin-peptide complexes were obtained from measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decay and CD spectra. Kallistatin (Arg(300)-Pro(319))-derived peptide (HC2) and one derived from antithrombin III helix D [(AT3D), corresponding to Ser(112)-Lys(139)], which are the heparin-binding sites in these serpins, showed significant affinity for 4500 Da heparin, for which K(d) values were 17 nM and 100 nM respectively. The CD spectra of the heparin-HC2 peptide complex did not show any significant alpha-helix content, different from the situation with peptide AT3D, for which complex-formation with heparin resulted in 24% alpha-helix content. The end-to-end distance distribution and the time-resolved fluorescence-decay measurements agree with the CD spectra and K(d) values. The synthetic alpha-methyl glycoside pentasaccharide AGA*IA(M) (where A represents N,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; G, beta-d-glucuronic acid; A*, N,3,6-O-sulphated alpha-d-glucosamine; I, 2-O-sulphated alpha-l-iduronic acid; and A(M), alpha-methyl glycoside of A) also binds to AT3D and other consensus heparin-binding sequences, although with lower affinity. The interaction of IQF peptides with 4500 Da heparin was displaced by protamine. In conclusion, IQF peptides containing Abz/EDDnp as the

  7. Rat heparins. A study of the relative sizes and antithrombin-binding characteristics of heparin proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products from rat adipose tissue, heart, lungs, peritoneal cavity and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1986-01-01

    35S-labelled heparins were recovered from adipose tissue, hearts, lungs, peritoneal cavities and skins of rats given H2(35)SO4. Their purification involved incubation with Pronase, precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride in 1.0 M-NaCl, gradient elution from DEAE-Sephacel and incubation with chondroitinase ABC. Each product was divided into proteoglycan and "depolymerization products' fractions by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-15m. Heparin chains were released from a portion of each proteoglycan fraction by beta-elimination with NaOH. Proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products were separated by gradient elution from a column of antithrombin-agarose into fractions with no affinity, low affinity and high affinity for antithrombin. The relative sizes of the products were determined by gel filtration on columns of Bio-Gel A-50m, A-15m, A-1.5m and A-0.5m. Skin was the major source of heparin and contained the largest proteoglycans and the lowest proportion of depolymerization products. Lungs contained the smallest proteoglycans, the smallest depolymerization products and the highest proportion of depolymerization products. The highest proportions of proteoglycans, chains and depolymerization products with high affinity for antithrombin were found in adipose tissue. The lowest proportions of each of these fractions were found in the peritoneal cavity. The data suggest that there was relatively little biosynthesis of sites with high affinity for antithrombin in peritoneal-cavity mast cells and that heparin catabolism was most active in lungs. Each source of heparin was unique with respect to both biosynthesis and subsequent breakdown of its proteoglycans. PMID:3827837

  8. Ichthyosis: the skin manifestation of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaño Suárez, E; Segurado Rodríguez, A; Guerra Tapia, A; Simón de las Heras, R; López-Ríos, F; Coll Rosell, M J

    1997-01-01

    Juvenile sulfatidosis (Austin type) or multiple sulfatase deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting the activity of many sulfatases: arylsulfatase A, several mucopolysaccharide sulfatases, and steroid sulfatase. Certain aspects of the clinical phenotype can be attributed mainly to a deficiency of one specific sulfatase. Most patients develop metachromatic leukodystrophy caused by arylsulfatase A deficiency, dysostosis multiplex by mucopolysaccharide sulfatase deficiency, and ichthyotic skin by steroid sulfatase deficiency. We describe a 7-year-old boy with developmental delay from 7 months of age, progressive spastic quadriparesis, and coarse facial features. By 27 months of age, an ichthyotic rash had developed on the limbs, trunk, and scalp. A skin biopsy specimen revealed hyperkeratosis with a normal granular layer. The diagnosis of multiple sulfatase deficiency was demonstrated by measuring sulfatase activities in fresh leukocytes: there were large deficiencies of arylsulfatase A and B plus reduced arylsulfatase C. The ichthyosis associated with multiple sulfatase deficiency has an autosomal recessive inheritance, is caused by steroid sulfatase deficiency, and the scaling is sometimes milder than in X-linked recessive ichthyosis. This could reflect the residual activity of steroid sulfatase in some cases.

  9. Widow inheritance and HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mabumba, E D; Mugyenyi, P; Batwala, V; Mulogo, E M; Mirembe, J; Khan, F A; Liljestrand, J

    2007-10-01

    Despite current efforts to combat HIV/AIDS through behavioural change, ingrained socio-cultural practices such as widow inheritance in south-western Uganda has not changed. Low education, unemployment, dowry, widows' socioeconomic demands and the inheritor's greed for the deceased's wealth, influence widow inheritance. Voluntary counselling and testing is needed for the widows and their inheritors; formal dowry should be removed from marriage and widow inheritance stripped of its sexual component.

  10. Mechanisms of Uniparental Mitochondrial DNA Inheritance in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rachana; Lin, Xiaorong

    2011-12-01

    In contrast to the nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome does not follow Mendelian laws of inheritance. The nuclear genome of meiotic progeny comes from the recombination of both parental genomes, whereas the meiotic progeny could inherit mitochondria from one, the other, or both parents. In fact, one fascinating phenomenon is that mitochondrial DNA in the majority of eukaryotes is inherited from only one particular parent. Typically, such unidirectional and uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA can be explained by the size of the gametes involved in mating, with the larger gamete contributing towards mitochondrial DNA inheritance. However, in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, bisexual mating involves the fusion of two isogamous cells of mating type (MAT) a and MATα, yet the mitochondrial DNA is inherited predominantly from the MATa parent. Although the exact mechanism underlying such uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in this fungus is still unclear, various hypotheses have been proposed. Elucidating the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in this clinically important and genetically amenable eukaryotic microbe will yield insights into general mechanisms that are likely conserved in higher eukaryotes. In this review, we highlight studies on Cryptococcus mitochondrial inheritance and point out some important questions that need to be addressed in the future.

  11. Does the Mode of Plastid Inheritance Influence Plastid Genome Architecture?

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Kate; Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Plastid genomes show an impressive array of sizes and compactnesses, but the forces responsible for this variation are unknown. It has been argued that species with small effective genetic population sizes are less efficient at purging excess DNA from their genomes than those with large effective population sizes. If true, one may expect the primary mode of plastid inheritance to influence plastid DNA (ptDNA) architecture. All else being equal, biparentally inherited ptDNAs should have a two-fold greater effective population size than those that are uniparentally inherited, and thus should also be more compact. Here, we explore the relationship between plastid inheritance pattern and ptDNA architecture, and consider the role of phylogeny in shaping our observations. Contrary to our expectations, we found no significant difference in plastid genome size or compactness between ptDNAs that are biparentally inherited relative to those that are uniparentally inherited. However, we also found that there was significant phylogenetic signal for the trait of mode of plastid inheritance. We also found that paternally inherited ptDNAs are significantly smaller (n = 19, p = 0.000001) than those that are maternally, uniparentally (when isogamous), or biparentally inherited. Potential explanations for this observation are discussed. PMID:23029453

  12. Mechanisms of non-genetic inheritance and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental 'intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms.

  13. Mechanisms of Non-Genetic Inheritance and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental ‘intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms. PMID:24889369

  14. Targeted metabolomic analysis of plasma samples for the diagnosis of inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Janečková, Hana; Hron, Karel; Wojtowicz, Petr; Hlídková, Eva; Barešová, Anna; Friedecký, David; Zídková, Lenka; Hornik, Petr; Behúlová, Darina; Procházková, Dagmar; Vinohradská, Hana; Pešková, Karolína; Bruheim, Per; Smolka, Vratislav; Sťastná, Sylvie; Adam, Tomáš

    2012-02-24

    Metabolomics has become an important tool in clinical research and diagnosis of human diseases. In this work we focused on the diagnosis of inherited metabolic disorders (IMDs) in plasma samples using a targeted metabolomic approach. The plasma samples were analyzed with the flow injection analysis method. All the experiments were performed on a QTRAP 5500 tandem mass spectrometer (AB SCIEX, U.S.A.) with electrospray ionization. The compounds were measured in a multiple reaction monitoring mode. We analyzed 50 control samples and 34 samples with defects in amino acid metabolism (phenylketonuria, maple syrup urine disease, tyrosinemia I, argininemia, homocystinuria, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase deficiency, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, nonketotic hyperglycinemia), organic acidurias (methylmalonic aciduria, propionic aciduria, glutaric aciduria I, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria, isovaleric aciduria), and mitochondrial defects (medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency). The controls were distinguished from the patient samples by principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. Approximately 80% of patients were clearly detected by absolute metabolite concentrations, the sum of variance for first two principle components was in the range of 44-55%. Other patient samples were assigned due to the characteristic ratio of metabolites (the sum of variance for first two principle components 77 and 83%). This study has revealed that targeted metabolomic tools with automated and unsupervised processing can be applied for the diagnosis of various IMDs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  16. Mitochondrial genome function and maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Allen, John F; de Paula, Wilson B M

    2013-10-01

    The persistence of mtDNA to encode a small subset of mitochondrial proteins reflects the selective advantage of co-location of key respiratory chain subunit genes with their gene products. The disadvantage of this co-location is exposure of mtDNA to mutagenic ROS (reactive oxygen species), which are by-products of aerobic respiration. The resulting 'vicious circle' of mitochondrial mutation has been proposed to underlie aging and its associated degenerative diseases. Recent evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that oocyte mitochondria escape the aging process by acting as quiescent genetic templates, transcriptionally and bioenergetically repressed. Transmission of unexpressed mtDNA in the female germline is considered as a reason for the existence of separate sexes, i.e. male and female. Maternal inheritance then circumvents incremental accumulation of age-related disease in each new generation.

  17. 77 FR 14700 - Streamlining Inherited Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...On December 5, 2011, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the Bureau) published in the Federal Register a notice and request for information requesting specific suggestions from the public for streamlining regulations it recently inherited from other Federal agencies (the Streamlining Notice) The Streamlining Notice provided for a two-stage comment process. Initial comments were due March 5, 2012. The Notice then allowed a 30-day period, closing on April 3, 2012, for submitting responses to the comments filed. Due to the likely number and complexity of the comments submitted in the first round and to allow parties more time to consider and craft their responses to those initial submissions, the Bureau has determined that an extension of the comment reply period until June 4, 2012, is appropriate. This action will allow interested persons more time to analyze the submitted comments and prepare their responses. However, the initial comment period is still closed as of March 5, 2012.

  18. New thinking, innateness and inherited representation.

    PubMed

    Shea, Nicholas

    2012-08-05

    The New Thinking contained in this volume rejects an Evolutionary Psychology that is committed to innate domain-specific psychological mechanisms: gene-based adaptations that are unlearnt, developmentally fixed and culturally universal. But the New Thinking does not simply deny the importance of innate psychological traits. The problem runs deeper: the concept of innateness is not suited to distinguishing between the New Thinking and Evolutionary Psychology. That points to a more serious problem with the concept of innateness as it is applied to human psychological phenotypes. This paper argues that the features of recent human evolution highlighted by the New Thinking imply that the concept of inherited representation, set out here, is a better tool for theorizing about human cognitive evolution.

  19. Molecular therapies for inherited epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises rare genetic disorders characterized by formation of blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membranes after minor mechanical trauma. The molecular basis and the pathomechanisms of the main EB types have been largely deciphered in the past decades. The burden of the disease is high and quality of life strongly affected. The treatment is still symptomatic aiming to support wound healing and resolve complications. Numerous experimental therapeutic approaches for EB have been explored in the last years, most of them dedicated to dystrophic EB. Although gene and cell therapies have been already applied in patients, molecular therapies including gene editing and repurposing of small molecules are currently very attractive. Recent data on the effect of small molecules, like aminoglycosides and angiotensin receptor blockers in preclinical models for dystrophic EB are encouraging. The efficacy in patients remains to be proven in clinical trials. Therapeutic efficacy, as well as unexpected outcomes must be carefully monitored.

  20. The Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chirnomas, S. Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the rarity of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), they represent diseases for which the molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated. Their study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted not only for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients but also because they lend clues to the normal physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and, in many cases, mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies that entail both ribosome assembly as well as ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway itself has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. The sections that follow present a more detailed analysis of the diseases that account for the majority of IBMFS diagnoses. PMID:24237972

  1. Genetic testing for inherited cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Behr, Elijah R

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 2 decades, investigators in the field of cardiac genetics have evolved a complex understanding of the pathophysiological basis of inherited cardiac diseases, which predispose individuals to sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we describe the current status of gene discovery and the associations between phenotype and genotype in the cardiac channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. The various indications for genetic testing and its utility in the clinic are assessed in relation to diagnosis, cascade testing, guiding management, and prognosis. Some common problems exist across all phenotypes: the variable penetrance and expressivity of genetic disease, and the difficulty of assessing the functional and clinical effects of novel mutations. These issues will be of particular importance as the next-generation sequencing technologies are used by genetics laboratories to provide results from large panels of genes. The accurate interpretation of these results will be the main challenge for the future.

  2. Therapeutic strategies for the inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    More than 30 genetic causes have been identified for the inherited neuropathies collectively referred to as Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Previous therapies for CMT were limited to traditional approaches such as rehabilitation medicine, ambulation aids, and pain management. Identification of the genes causing CMT has led to improved genetic counseling and assistance in family planning. Identification of these genes is beginning to delineate common molecular pathways in multiple forms of CMT that can be exploited in future molecular therapies. Scientifically based clinical trials for CMT are currently being implemented. Techniques of gene therapy are advancing to the point that they may become feasible options for patients with CMT and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Epigenetic Inheritance: Histone Bookmarks Across Generations

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Eric I.; Stafford, James M.; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Multiple circuitries ensure that cells respond correctly to the environmental cues within defined cellular programs. There is increasing evidence suggesting that cellular memory for these adaptive processes can be passed on through cell divisions and generations. However, the mechanisms by which this epigenetic information is transferred remain elusive largely because it requires that such memory survive through gross chromatin remodeling events during DNA replication, mitosis, meiosis and developmental reprogramming. Elucidating the processes by which epigenetic information survives and is transmitted is a central challenge in biology. Here we consider recent advances in understanding mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance with a focus on histone segregation at the replication fork and how an epigenetic memory may get passed through the paternal lineage. PMID:25242115

  4. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: More questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Daxinger, Lucia; Whitelaw, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are widely accepted as playing a critical role in the regulation of gene expression and thereby contributing to the determination of the phenotype of multicellular organisms. In general, these marks are cleared and re-established each generation, but there have been reports in a number of model organisms that at some loci in the genome this clearing is incomplete. This phenomenon is referred to as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. Moreover, recent evidence shows that the environment can stably influence the establishment of the epigenome. Together, these findings suggest that an environmental event in one generation could affect the phenotype in subsequent generations, and these somewhat Lamarckian ideas are stimulating interest from a broad spectrum of biologists, from ecologists to health workers. PMID:21041414

  5. Genetics of inherited cardiocutaneous syndromes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bardawil, Tara; Khalil, Samar; Bergqvist, Christina; Abbas, Ossama; Kibbi, Abdul Ghani; Bitar, Fadi; Nemer, Georges; Kurban, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    The life of a human being originates as a single cell which, under the influence of certain factors, divides sequentially into multiple cells that subsequently become committed to develop and differentiate into the different structures and organs. Alterations occurring early on in the development process may lead to fetal demise in utero. Conversely, abnormalities at later stages may result in structural and/or functional abnormalities of varying severities. The cardiovascular system and skin share certain developmental and structural factors; therefore, it is not surprising to find several inherited syndromes with both cardiac and skin manifestations. Here, we will review the overlapping pathways in the development of the skin and heart, as well as the resulting syndromes. We will also highlight several cutaneous clues that may help physicians screen and uncover cardiac anomalies that may be otherwise hidden and result in sudden cardiac death. PMID:27933191

  6. Three lay mental models of disease inheritance.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B J; Maguire, B T

    2000-01-01

    Genetics are coming to play an increasing role in biomedical understanding of common diseases. The implication of such findings is that at-risk individuals may be offered predictive genetic tests. How do individuals make decisions about predictive tests and what information do they need to make informed choices? Richards [Richards, M.P.M., 1993. The new genetics: some issues for social scientists. Sociology of Health and Illness 15, 567-586] has argued the first step in understanding and helping people to make these decisions is to investigate lay beliefs of genetics. This study examined mental models of inheritance in a sample of 72 lay people. Through analysis of open-ended questionnaires we found three mental models which loosely corresponded to three phases of historical development in the science of genetics. These we labelled the Constitutional, Mendelian and Molecular Models. Predictions for individuals holding each model are made for the comprehension of genetic information in a testing situation.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance.

    PubMed

    Wiltzius, Jed J W; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R; Apostol, Marcin I; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-09-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of beta-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct beta-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  8. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  9. The molecular basis of inherited afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, M

    2001-07-01

    This article reviews the substantial progress made in understanding the molecular basis of inherited afibrinogenaemia (or congenital afibrinogenaemia), an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by the complete absence of detectable fibrinogen. The identification in 1999 of the first genetic defect, recurrent homozygous deletions of approximately 11 kb of the fibrinogen alpha-chain (FGA) gene, revealed that the disease was caused by defective fibrinogen synthesis, and led to the subsequent analysis of the three fibrinogen genes in other affected individuals with the identification of numerous causative mutations. Combined analyses of more than thirty unrelated afibrinogenaemia families from various ethnic groups have shown that the majority of patients have truncating mutations in the FGA gene although intuitively all three fibrinogen genes might be equally implicated. These results will facilitate molecular diagnosis of the disorder, permit prenatal diagnosis for families who so desire, and pave the way for new therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy.

  10. Biotinidase deficiency and our champagne legacy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-09-10

    Biotinidase is the enzyme that is necessary for the recycling of the vitamin, biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder. If untreated, individuals with biotinidase deficiency usually develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms that can result in coma or death. Symptomatic individuals can be markedly improved by treating them with pharmacological doses of biotin; however, some clinical features may be irreversible. Fortunately, essentially all symptoms can be prevented if treatment is initiated at birth or before the symptoms develop. Because of this, the disorder is currently screened for in newborns in all states in the United States and in many countries around the world. This is the story of one laboratory's work in bringing basic science research from the discovery of the disorder to its translation into clinical medicine and its impact on the individuals with the disorder and their families.

  11. New frontiers of primary antibody deficiencies.

    PubMed

    van der Burg, Mirjam; van Zelm, Menno C; Driessen, Gertjan J A; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2012-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) form the largest group of inherited disorders of the immune system. They are characterized by a marked reduction or absence of serum immunoglobulins (Ig) due to disturbed B cell differentiation and by a poor response to vaccination. PAD can be divided into agammaglobulinemia, Ig class switch recombination deficiencies, and idiopathic hypogammaglobulinemia. Over the past 20 years, defects have been identified in 18 different genes, but in many PAD patients the underlying gene defects have not been found. Diagnosis of known PAD and discovery of new PAD is important for good patient care. In this review, we present the effects of genetic defects in the context of normal B cell differentiation, and we discuss how new technical developments can support understanding and discovering new genetic defects in PAD.

  12. Inherited Determinants of Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Ellen L.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; White, Kristin L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Cliby, William A.; Rider, David N.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Jones, Monica B.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Lancaster, Johnathan M.; Olson, Janet E.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Due to variation of outcome among cases, we sought to examine whether overall survival in ovarian cancer was associated with common inherited variants in 227 candidate genes from ovarian cancer-related pathways including angiogenesis, inflammation, detoxification, glycosylation, one-carbon transfer, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Experimental Design Blood samples were obtained from 325 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic from 1999 to 2006. During a median follow-up of 3.8 years (range, 0.1 – 8.6 years), 157 deaths were observed. Germline DNA was analyzed at 1,416 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For all patients, and for 203 with serous subtype, we assessed the overall significance of each gene and pathway, and estimated risk of death via hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results Variation within angiogenesis was most strongly associated with survival time overall (p=0.03) and among patients with serous cancer (p=0.05), particularly for EIF2B5 rs4912474 (all patients HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.89, p=0.004), VEGFC rs17697305 (serous subtype HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.34-3.92, p=0.003), and four SNPs in VHL. Variation within the inflammation pathway was borderline significant (all patients, p=0.09), and SNPs in CCR3, IL1B, IL18, CCL2, and ALOX5 which correlated with survival time are worthy of follow-up. Conclusion An extensive multiple-pathway assessment found evidence that inherited differences may play a role in outcome of ovarian cancer patients, particularly in genes within the angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. Our work supports efforts to target such mediators for therapeutic gain. PMID:20103664

  13. Mutational analysis of Mdm1p function in nuclear and mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Fisk, H A; Yaffe, M P

    1997-08-11

    Nuclear and mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on Mdm1p, an intermediate filament-like protein localized to numerous punctate structures distributed throughout the yeast cell cytoplasm. These structures disappear and organelle inheritance is disrupted when mdm1 mutant cells are incubated at the restrictive temperature. To characterize further the function of Mdm1p, new mutant mdm1 alleles that confer temperature-sensitive growth and defects in organelle inheritance but produce stable Mdm1p structures were isolated. Microscopic analysis of the new mdm1 mutants revealed three phenotypic classes: Class I mutants showed defects in both mitochondrial and nuclear transmission; Class II alleles displayed defective mitochondrial inheritance but had no effect on nuclear movement; and Class III mutants showed aberrant nuclear inheritance but normal mitochondrial distribution. Class I and II mutants also exhibited altered mitochondrial morphology, possessing primarily small, round mitochondria instead of the extended tubular structures found in wild-type cells. Mutant mdm1 alleles affecting nuclear transmission were of two types: Class Ia and IIIa mutants were deficient for nuclear movement into daughter buds, while Class Ib and IIIb mutants displayed a complete transfer of all nuclear DNA into buds. The mutations defining all three allelic classes mapped to two distinct domains within the Mdm1p protein. Genetic crosses of yeast strains containing different mdm1 alleles revealed complex genetic interactions including intragenic suppression, synthetic phenotypes, and intragenic complementation. These results support a model of Mdm1p function in which a network comprised of multimeric assemblies of the protein mediates two distinct cellular processes.

  14. Screening of Inherited Metabolic Disorders in Infants with Infantile Spasms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Rui; Chen, Sheng-Zhi; Sang, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Fan, Cong-Hai

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the incidence of inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) in infants with infantile spasms (IS), with an attempt to improve the early diagnosis and etiological and symptomatic treatment. Urine and blood samples were collected from 60 IS patients and analyzed for the quantification of amino acids, organic acids, and fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrum. Routine urine tests, hepatic function tests, blood biochemistry, brain imaging, as well as examinations of the brain stem auditory/visual evoked potentials were also examined. In addition to antiepileptic therapy, etiological and symptomatic treatments were also conducted in infants with confirmed IMD and the follow-up lasted for 6 months in these pediatric patients. Metabolic disorders were found in 28 (46.67 %) of 60 IS infants, among them 13 (21.67 %) were confirmed to be with IMD. Twelve of these 13 IS patients with definite IMD diagnoses (92.31 %) experienced varying degrees of delayed development of intelligence and motor function, 8 patients (61.54 %) had abnormal cranial CT or MRI findings, 11 patients (84.61 %) had abnormal brain stem evoked potentials, 4 patients (30.77 %) had abnormal hepatic functions, 3 patients (23.07 %) had abnormal blood biochemistry, 2 patients (15.38 %) had positive (+ to ++) results for routine urine ketones, and 2 patients (15.38 %) had skin lesions. After treatment in children who were diagnosed IMD, the well controlled epileptic seizures and the satisfactory developments in mental and motor were found in 4 cases of methylmalonic acidemia, 2 cases of classical phenylketonuria, and one case of biotin deficiency disease, glutaric acidemia type I, and 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria in each. IMD is a key biological cause in IS. Early screening for IMD is warranted in IS infants to facilitate the improvement for the prognosis and an early etiological treatment.

  15. Plasma-derived human antithrombin attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy but not inflammation in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats.

    PubMed

    Aslami, H; Haitsma, J J; Hofstra, J J; Florquin, S; Dos Santos, C; Streutker, C; Zhang, H; Levi, M; Slutsky, A S; Schultz, M J

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation exaggerates pneumonia-associated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. We hypothesized that the administration of plasma-derived human antithrombin (AT), one of the natural inhibitors of coagulation, prevents ventilator-induced pulmonary coagulopathy, inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. Forty-eight hours after induction of S. pneumoniae pneumonia rats were subjected to mechanical ventilation (tidal volume 12 mL kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure 0 cmH(2)O and inspired oxygen fraction 40%). Rats were randomized to systemic treatment with AT (250 IU administered intravenously (i.v.) before the start of mechanical ventilation) or placebo (saline). Non-ventilated, non-infected rats and non-ventilated rats with pneumonia served as controls. The primary endpoints were pulmonary coagulation and inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pneumonia was characterized by local activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis, resulting in increased levels of fibrin degradation products and fibrin deposition in the lung. Mechanical ventilation exaggerated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. Systemic administration of AT led to supra-normal BALF levels of AT and decreased ventilator-associated activation of coagulation. AT neither affected pulmonary inflammation nor bacterial outgrowth from the lungs or blood. Plasma-derived human AT attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy, but not inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a S. pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. In Vivo Anti-HIV Activity of the Heparin-Activated Serine Protease Inhibitor Antithrombin III Encapsulated in Lymph-Targeting Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Whitney, James B.; Luedemann, Corinne; Carville, Angela; Steen, Robert; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are anti-inflammatory mediators with multiple biologic functions. Several serpins have been reported to modulate HIV pathogenesis, or exhibit potent anti-HIV activity in vitro, but the efficacy of serpins as therapeutic agents for HIV in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we show that heparin-activated antithrombin III (hep-ATIII), a member of the serpin family, significantly inhibits lentiviral replication in a non-human primate model. We further demonstrate greater than one log10 reduction in plasma viremia in the nonhuman primate system by loading of hep-ATIII into anti-HLA-DR immunoliposomes, which target tissue reservoirs of viral replication. We also demonstrate the utility of hep-ATIIII as a potential salvage agent for HIV strains resistant to standard anti-retroviral treatment. Finally, we applied gene-expression arrays to analyze hep-ATIII-induced host cell interactomes and found that downstream of hep-ATIII, two independent gene networks were modulated by host factors prostaglandin synthetase-2, ERK1/2 and NFκB. Ultimately, understanding how serpins, such as hep-ATIII, regulate host responses during HIV infection may reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23133620

  17. The inheritance of groin hernia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Burcharth, J; Pommergaard, H C; Rosenberg, J

    2013-04-01

    Groin hernia has been proposed to be hereditary; however, a clear hereditary pattern has not been established yet. The purpose of this review was to analyze studies evaluating family history and inheritance patterns and to investigate the possible heredity of groin hernias. A literature search in the MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed with the following search terms: genetics, heredity, multifactorial inheritance, inheritance patterns, sibling relations, family relations, and abdominal hernia. Only English human clinical or register-based studies describing the inheritance of groin hernias, family history of groin hernias, or familial accumulation of groin hernias were included. Eleven studies evaluating 37,166 persons were included. The overall findings were that a family history of inguinal hernia was a significant risk factor for the development of a primary hernia. A family history of inguinal hernia showed a tendency toward increased hernia recurrence rate and significantly earlier recurrence. The included studies did not agree on the possible inheritance patterns differing between polygenic inheritance, autosomal dominant inheritance, and multifactorial inheritance. Furthermore, the studies did not agree on the degree of penetrance. The literature on the inheritance of groin hernias indicates that groin hernia is most likely an inherited disease; however, neither the extent of familial accumulation nor a clear inheritance pattern has yet been found. In order to establish whether groin hernias are accumulated in certain families and to what extent, large register studies based on hernia repair data or clinical examinations are needed. Groin hernia repair (inguinal and femoral hernia) is among the most commonly performed gastrointestinal surgical procedures [1]. Emergency groin hernia surgery is associated with increased mortality, increased patient-related morbidity, and increased hospital stay compared with elective groin hernia procedures [2, 3

  18. Cytoplasmic inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: comparison of first zygotic budsite to mitochondrial inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, K J

    1975-10-03

    Zygotic first budsite in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied in relation to defined mitochondrial inheritance systems: both petite and drug resistance. It was hypothesized that a highly asymmetric inheritance pattern would be correlated to a high frequency of first budsites on the petite or drug resistant end of the zygote (i.e., that portion of the zygote which was originally the drug resistant or petite haploid before zygote formation). The data collected did not support the hypothesis. For drug resistance, the budsite pattern is identical for a highly biased and a moderately biased inheritance pattern. In a grande by grande cross there is a high probability of the first bud appearing on the conjugation bridge, with lower but equal probabilities of the first bud appearing on one end or the other of the zygote. A grande by petite cross changes this pattern to a high probability of the first bud appearing on the grade end of the zygote, with a lesser probability of the first bud appearing on the conjugation bridge and virtually no budding of the petite end. This phenomenon is independent of degree of neutrality or suppressiveness of the petite strain used, however. The difference between a grande and a grande by petite pattern may be due to the relative functional ability of the mitochondria in each end of the zygote. Tests using antimitochondrial drugs suggest that selection of first budsite on a zygote is a complex phenomenon, not simply dependent upon mitochondrial phenotype. In conclusion, selection of the first zygotic budsite appears to be independent of mitochondrial inheritance patterns.

  19. Conversion of antithrombin from an inhibitor of thrombin to a substrate with reduced heparin affinity and enhanced conformational stability by binding of a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the P1 to P14 region of the putative reactive bond loop of the inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Björk, I; Ylinenjärvi, K; Olson, S T; Bock, P E

    1992-01-25

    A synthetic tetradecapeptide having the sequence of the region of the antithrombin chain amino-terminal to the reactive bond, i.e. comprising residues P1 to P14, was shown to form a tight equimolar complex with antithrombin. A similar complex has previously been demonstrated between alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and the analogous peptide of this inhibitor (Schulze, A. J., Baumann, U., Knof, S., Jaeger, E., Huber, R. and Laurell, C.-B. (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 194, 51-56). The antithrombin-peptide complex had a conformation similar to that of reactive bond-cleaved antithrombin and, like the cleaved inhibitor, also had a higher conformational stability and lower heparin affinity than intact antithrombin. These properties suggest that the peptide bound to intact antithrombin at the same site that the P1 to P14 segment of the inhibitor occupies in reactive-bond-cleaved antithrombin, i.e. was incorporated as a sixth strand in the middle of the major beta-sheet, the A sheet. The extent of complex formation was reduced in the presence of heparin with high affinity for antithrombin, which is consistent with heparin binding and peptide incorporation being linked. Antithrombin in the complex with the tetradecapeptide had lost its ability to inactivate thrombin, but the reactive bond of the inhibitor was cleaved as in a normal substrate. These observations suggest a model, analogous to that proposed for alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (Engh, R.A., Wright, H.T., and Huber, R. (1990) Protein Eng. 3, 469-477) for the structure of intact antithrombin, in which the A sheet contains only five strands and the P1 to P14 segment of the chain forms part of an exposed loop of the protein. The results further support a reaction model for serpins in which partial insertion of this loop into the A sheet is required for trapping of a proteinase in a stable complex, and complete insertion is responsible for the conformational change accompanying cleavage of the reactive bond of the inhibitor.

  20. Cytoplasmic inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: comparison of zygotic mitochondrial inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, K J; Johnson, R G

    1976-03-30

    Mitochondrial movements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) zygotes were monitored with phase-contrast microscopy and compared to known mitochondrial inheritance systems. The mitochondria of Sc were convincingly identified by integrated use of phase-contrast, cytochemical and electron microscopic observations. Mitochondria in Sc appear to move by saltatory jumps, which appear to be oriented towards movement of mitochondria into developing buds. Tracking of mitochondria of different genotypes was made possible by positive identification of each mitochondrial population before zygosis, and by the low degree of mixing (less than 10%) of mitochondrial populations before first bud septation. A grande by grande cross demonstrated equal numbers of mitochondria from each haploid moving into the first zygotic bud. A grande by neutral petite cross gave a 2:1 ratio of grande to petite mitochondria. However, a grande by suppressive petite cross gave equal numbers of grande and petite mitochondria. Using drug resistance systems, a comparison was made of highly biased (97%) and moderately biased (71%) chloramphenicol resistant inheritance patterns. In both cases, the ratios of drug resistant to sensitive mitochondria were 1:1. When numbers of mitochondria moving into an individual bud were compared to the phenotypic content of the clone of that bud, no model could be constructed which could predict the latter from the former. The data indicate (with the exception of the neutral petite by grande cross) that the numbers of each mitochondrial type "inserted" into the first zygotic bud are equal, regardless of the degree of asymmetry of inheritance of mitochondrial markers.

  1. Two unusual clinical and radiological presentations of biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mc Sweeney, N; Grunewald, S; Bhate, S; Ganesan, V; Chong, W K; Hemingway, C

    2010-11-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is due to a defect in recycling of biotin and is a treatable autosomal recessive inherited disorder. We describe two cases with unusual presenting symptoms and rarely described MRI findings. We propose that the diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency should be considered when there are symmetrical MRI changes in the medial thalamus, dorsal brainstem, medulla and spinal cord as in our two cases. As long as there isn't newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency in the UK; increased awareness of this disorder and recognition of biotinidase deficiency as a cause of bilateral symmetrical MRI patterns similar to our patients, would facilitate early diagnosis and prevent many of the devastating neurological sequelae associated with missing the condition. Copyright © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Technical standards and guidelines for the diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Tina M; Blitzer, Miriam G; Wolf, Barry

    2010-07-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of biotin recycling that is associated with neurologic and cutaneous consequences if untreated. Fortunately, the clinical features of the disorder can be ameliorated or prevented by administering pharmacological doses of the vitamin biotin. Newborn screening and confirmatory diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency encompasses both enzymatic and molecular testing approaches. These guidelines were developed to define and standardize laboratory procedures for enzymatic biotinidase testing, to delineate situations for which follow-up molecular testing is warranted, and to characterize variables that can influence test performance and interpretation of results.

  3. Hemolytic anemia in dogs and cats due to erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Harvey, John W

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies do not usually shorten life expectancy except for PK deficiency in dogs and the potential for PFK-deficient dogs to die during hemolytic crises. In addition, erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies are uncommon or rare, so they are generally not seriously considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia until common causes of anemia have been excluded. However, unique clinical and/or laboratory findings like sporadic hemoglobinuria in English Springer spaniels (PFK deficiency) may quickly point to the possibility of an inherited erythrocyte enzyme defect. The ability to diagnose deficient or carrier animals allows for the possibility of eliminating these undesirable traits in future breeding. Continued research is needed to document additional enzyme deficiencies that likely occur and to develop additional DNA-based assays that are especially important in the recognition of heterozygous or carrier animals that have no clinical signs.

  4. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  5. Multiple pathways influence mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Rebecca L; Okamoto, Koji; Shaw, Janet M

    2008-02-01

    Yeast mitochondria form a branched tubular network. Mitochondrial inheritance is tightly coupled with bud emergence, ensuring that daughter cells receive mitochondria from mother cells during division. Proteins reported to influence mitochondrial inheritance include the mitochondrial rho (Miro) GTPase Gem1p, Mmr1p, and Ypt11p. A synthetic genetic array (SGA) screen revealed interactions between gem1Delta and deletions of genes that affect mitochondrial function or inheritance, including mmr1Delta. Synthetic sickness of gem1Delta mmr1Delta double mutants correlated with defective mitochondrial inheritance by large buds. Additional studies demonstrated that GEM1, MMR1, and YPT11 each contribute to mitochondrial inheritance. Mitochondrial accumulation in buds caused by overexpression of either Mmr1p or Ypt11p did not depend on Gem1p, indicating these three proteins function independently. Physical linkage of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has led to speculation that distribution of these two organelles is coordinated. We show that yeast mitochondrial inheritance is not required for inheritance or spreading of cortical ER in the bud. Moreover, Ypt11p overexpression, but not Mmr1p overexpression, caused ER accumulation in the bud, revealing a potential role for Ypt11p in ER distribution. This study demonstrates that multiple pathways influence mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and that Miro GTPases have conserved roles in mitochondrial distribution.

  6. Social and Experiential Influences on the Development of Inheritance Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanne M.; Smith, Lesley A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored social and experiential differences in children's (aged 4 to 14 years) concepts of inheritance. The study utilized semi-structured interviews including four tasks that were designed to elicit judgements and explanations about different aspects of inheritance understanding. A variety of social and experiential factors were…

  7. Population thinking and natural selection in dual-inheritance theory.

    PubMed

    Houkes, Wybo

    2012-05-01

    A deflationary perspective on theories of cultural evolution, in particular dual-inheritance theory, has recently been proposed by Lewens. On this 'pop-culture' analysis, dual-inheritance theorists apply population thinking to cultural phenomena, without claiming that cultural items evolve by natural selection. This paper argues against this pop-culture analysis of dual-inheritance theory. First, it focuses on recent dual-inheritance models of specific patterns of cultural change. These models exemplify population thinking without a commitment to natural selection of cultural items. There are grounds, however, for doubting the added explanatory value of the models in their disciplinary context-and thus grounds for engaging in other potentially explanatory projects based on dual-inheritance theory. One such project is suggested by advocates of the theory. Some of the motivational narratives that they offer can be interpreted as setting up an adaptationist project with regard to cumulative change in cultural items. We develop this interpretation here. On it, dual-inheritance theory features two interrelated selection processes, one on the level of genetically inherited learning mechanisms, another on the level of the cultural items transmitted through these mechanisms. This interpretation identifies a need for further modelling efforts, but also offers scope for enhancing the explanatory power of dual-inheritance theory.

  8. Women's Inheritance Rights and Intergenerational Transmission of Resources in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deininger, Klaus; Goyal, Aparajita; Nagarajan, Hari

    2013-01-01

    We use inheritance patterns over three generations of individuals to assess the impact of changes in the Hindu Succession Act that grant daughters equal coparcenary birth rights in joint family property that were denied to daughters in the past. We show that the amendment significantly increased daughters' likelihood to inherit land, but that…

  9. Epigenetic Inheritance and the Intergenerational Transfer of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Currently, behavioral development is thought to result from the interplay among genetic inheritance, congenital characteristics, cultural contexts, and parental practices as they directly impact the individual. Evolutionary ecology points to another contributor, epigenetic inheritance, the transmission to offspring of parental phenotypic responses…

  10. Women's Inheritance Rights and Intergenerational Transmission of Resources in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deininger, Klaus; Goyal, Aparajita; Nagarajan, Hari

    2013-01-01

    We use inheritance patterns over three generations of individuals to assess the impact of changes in the Hindu Succession Act that grant daughters equal coparcenary birth rights in joint family property that were denied to daughters in the past. We show that the amendment significantly increased daughters' likelihood to inherit land, but that…

  11. Inheritance of Pigeonpea Sterility Mosaic Disease Resistance in Pigeonpea

    PubMed Central

    Daspute, Abhijit; Fakrudin, B.; Bhairappanavar, Shivarudrappa. B.; Kavil, S. P.; Narayana, Y. D.; Muniswamy; Kaumar, Anil; Krishnaraj, P. U.; Yerimani, Abid; Khadi, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted using PPSMV resistant (BSMR 736) and susceptible (ICP 8863) genotypes to develop a segregating population and understand the inheritance of PPSMV resistance. The observed segregation was comparable to 13 (susceptible): 3 (resistant). Hence, the inheritance was controlled by two genes, SV1 and SV2, with inhibitory gene interaction. PMID:25289002

  12. Epigenetic Inheritance and the Intergenerational Transfer of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Currently, behavioral development is thought to result from the interplay among genetic inheritance, congenital characteristics, cultural contexts, and parental practices as they directly impact the individual. Evolutionary ecology points to another contributor, epigenetic inheritance, the transmission to offspring of parental phenotypic responses…

  13. Occupational Inheritance in Service Academy Cadets and Midshipmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Brain; Doerries, Lee E.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational inheritance refers to the phenomenon where sons and daughters follow in the career paths of their parents. Historically this has been documented in the areas of engineering, medicine and education. This study investigated the phenomenon of occupational inheritance as it pertains to military service. Archival data provided by the…

  14. 25 CFR 91.9 - Inheritance of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inheritance of improvements. 91.9 Section 91.9 Indians..., OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.9 Inheritance of improvements. (a) Upon the death of the owner of improvements in a village reserve, such improvements shall, in probate matters, be subject to the jurisdiction...

  15. Long Oskar Controls Mitochondrial Inheritance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas Ryan; Herrmann, Beate; Sauerwald, Julia; Sanny, Justina; Grosch, Markus; Lehmann, Ruth

    2016-12-05

    Inherited mtDNA mutations cause severe human disease. In most species, mitochondria are inherited maternally through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Genes that specifically control the inheritance of mitochondria in the germline are unknown. Here, we show that the long isoform of the protein Oskar regulates the maternal inheritance of mitochondria in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that, during oogenesis, mitochondria accumulate at the oocyte posterior, concurrent with the bulk streaming and churning of the oocyte cytoplasm. Long Oskar traps and maintains mitochondria at the posterior at the site of primordial germ cell (PGC) formation through an actin-dependent mechanism. Mutating long oskar strongly reduces the number of mtDNA molecules inherited by PGCs. Therefore, Long Oskar ensures germline transmission of mitochondria to the next generation. These results provide molecular insight into how mitochondria are passed from mother to offspring, as well as how they are positioned and asymmetrically partitioned within polarized cells.

  16. Motors, anchors, and connectors: orchestrators of organelle inheritance.

    PubMed

    Knoblach, Barbara; Rachubinski, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Organelle inheritance is a process whereby organelles are actively distributed between dividing cells at cytokinesis. Much valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of organelle inheritance has come from the analysis of asymmetrically dividing cells, which transport a portion of their organelles to the bud while retaining another portion in the mother cell. Common principles apply to the inheritance of all organelles, although individual organelles use specific factors for their partitioning. Inheritance factors can be classified as motors, which are required for organelle transport; anchors, which immobilize organelles at distinct cell structures; or connectors, which mediate the attachment of organelles to motors and anchors. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in the field of organelle inheritance and highlight how motor, anchor, and connector molecules choreograph the segregation of a multicopy organelle, the peroxisome. We also discuss the role of organelle population control in the generation of cellular diversity.

  17. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:24567781

  18. Paternally biased cpDNA inheritance in Turnera ulmifolia (Turneraceae).

    PubMed

    Shore, J; Triassi, M

    1998-03-01

    We end-labeled Hin fI restriction digests of a PCR-amplified plastid encoded gene, the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, to investigate patterns of cpDNA inheritance in Turnera ulmifolia. A total of 70 progeny from crosses among plants taken from ten populations revealed varying patterns of inheritance. A majority of progeny inherited the paternal cpDNA (64%), while 19% exhibited maternal and 17% biparental inheritance. Eight variegated progeny showed biparental inheritance and were analyzed in greater detail. We extracted and analyzed the cpDNA content of light- vs. dark- green leaf sectors from these plants. The results showed that vegetative segregation of cpDNA had occurred for seven of the eight plants.

  19. Prominent Optic Disc Featured in Inherited Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Todorova, M G; Bojinova, R I; Valmaggia, C; Schorderet, D F

    2017-02-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between prominent optic disc (POD) and inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD). Patients and Methods A cross-sectional consecutive study was performed in 10 children and 11 adults of 7 non-related families. We performed clinical phenotyping, including a detailed examination, fundus autofluorescence, and colour fundus and OCT imaging. Genetic testing was subsequently performed for all family members presenting retinal pathology. Results In 4 members of a 3-generation family, hyperfluorescent deposits on the surface of POD were related to a p.(L224M) heterozygous mutation in BEST1. In the second family, one member presented deposits located on the surface on hyperaemic OD and a compound p.(R141H);(A195V) mutation in BEST1. In the third family, POD was observed in father and child with early onset cone-rod dystrophy and a novel autosomal recessive p.(W31*) homozygous mutation in ABCA4. In the fourth family, POD with "mulberry-like" deposits and attenuated vessels were observed in a 7-year old girl, with a mutation in USH1A, and with early onset rod-cone dystrophy, associated with hearing loss. In the fifth family, blurry OD with tortuous vessels was observed in 4 consanguineous female carriers and a hemizygous boy with a p.(R200H) mutation in the X-linked retinoschisis RS1. In the sixth family, a mother and her son were both affected with POD and attenuated peripapillary vessels, and presented with a p.(Y836C) heterozygous mutation in TOPORS, thus confirming autosomal dominant RP. In the seventh family, in 3 family members with POD, compound p.(L541P;A1038 V);(G1961E) mutations in ABCA4 confirmed the diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Conclusions A variety of OD findings are found in a genetically heterogeneous group of IRDs. In the presence of POD, an inherited progressive photoreceptor disease should be ruled out.

  20. Inherited Representations are Read in Development

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has identified a tightly constrained sense in which genes carry representational content. Representational properties of the genome are founded in the transmission of DNA over phylogenetic time and its role in natural selection. However, genetic representation is not just relevant to questions of selection and evolution. This article goes beyond existing treatments and argues for the heterodox view that information generated by a process of selection over phylogenetic time can be read in ontogenetic time, in the course of individual development. Recent results in evolutionary biology, drawn both from modelling work, and from experimental and observational data, support a role for genetic representation in explaining individual ontogeny: both genetic representations and environmental information are read by the mechanisms of development, in an individual, so as to lead to adaptive phenotypes. Furthermore, in some cases there appears to have been selection between individuals that rely to different degrees on the two sources of information. Thus, the theory of representation in inheritance systems like the genome is much more than just a coherent reconstruction of information talk in biology. Genetic representation is a property with considerable explanatory utility. 1 Introduction2 Inherited Representations3 Reading Genetic Representations   3.1 Do genes carry correlational information?4 Selection Between Genetic and Environmental Information   4.1 Modelling  4.2 Empirical applications  4.3 Maternal effects5 Genetic Representation and the Genome   5.1 Information capacity of organisms' genomes  5.2 Many amino acids, few nucleotides  5.3 A function of sex6 Explaining Further Aspects of Development   6.1 Canalization against environmental variation  6.2 An informational function for the nuclear membrane?7 Conclusion PMID:23526835