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Sample records for inherited demyelinating neuropathies

  1. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  2. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  3. Inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary disorders of the peripheral nerves constitute a group of frequently encountered neurological diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is genetically heterogeneous and characterized by demyelination with moderately to severely reduced nerve conduction velocities, absent muscle stretch reflexes and onion bulb formation. Genetic loci for CMT1 map to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), and another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1 B result from point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1 C is unknown. Mutations in the early growth response 2 gene (EGR2) are also associated with demyelinating neuropathy. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q, and 11q. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is characterized by normal or mildly reduced nerve conduction velocity with decreased amplitude and axonal loss without hypertrophic features. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1 p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the Po gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced

  4. Similarities between inherited demyelinating neuropathies and Wallerian degeneration: an old repair program may cause myelin and axon perturbation under nonlesion conditions.

    PubMed

    Martini, Rudolf; Klein, Dennis; Groh, Janos

    2013-09-01

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) and inherited demyelinating neuropathies of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) appear to represent completely distinct events. CMT1-like diseases are chronic disorders of peripheral nerves that are genetically caused and lead to secondary neurodegenerative events, resulting in usually non-treatable disabilities, whereas WD is an acute, usually transient, reaction on injuries, aiming to allow peripheral nerve regeneration. Despite these differences, there are some striking similarities regarding molecular characteristics of neural cells in the affected peripheral nerves. The most conspicuous similarities might comprise the inflammatory component in both situations, as identified in appropriate mouse models. However, although inflammation is a beneficial component in WD, leading to removal of regrowth-repellent myelin debris, inflammation in CMT1 mouse models causes damage of initially intact nerve fibers. We hypothesize that, in CMT1 models, molecular pathways are activated that are shared with an important repair program after peripheral nerve injury, but lead to neural perturbation when activated under nonlesion conditions, as is the case in CMT1. These novel insights into the pathogenesis of CMT1 might be instrumental for the development of new therapeutic options in humans.

  5. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  6. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  7. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  8. Clinicopathological and genetic study of early-onset demyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parman, Yesim; Battaloglu, Esra; Baris, Ibrahim; Bilir, Birdal; Poyraz, Mürüvvet; Bissar-Tadmouri, Nisrine; Williams, Anna; Ammar, Nadia; Nelis, Eva; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Najafov, Ayaz; Necefov, Ayaz; Deymeer, Feza; Serdaroglu, Piraye; Brophy, Peter J; Said, G

    2004-11-01

    Autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4), Dejerine-Sottas disease and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are variants of hereditary demyelinating neuropathy of infancy, a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To explore the spectrum of early-onset demyelinating neuropathies further, we studied the clinicopathological and genetic aspects of 20 patients born to unaffected parents. In 19 families out of 20, consanguinity between the parents or presence of an affected sib suggested autosomal recessive transmission. Screening of various genes known to be involved in CMT4 revealed six mutations of which five are novel. Four of these novel mutations occurred in the homozygous state and include: one in GDAP1, one in MTMR2, one in PRX and one in KIAA1985. One patient was heterozygous for a novel MTMR2 mutation and still another was homozygous for the founder mutation, R148X, in NDRG1. All patients tested negative for mutations in EGR2. Histopathological examination of nerve biopsy specimens showed a severe, chronic demyelinating neuropathy, with onion bulb formation, extensive demyelination of isolated fibres and axon loss. We did not discern a specific pattern of histopathology that could be correlated to mutations in a particular gene. PMID:15469949

  9. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  10. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations without Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The membrane properties (intracellular, extracellular, electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles), which can now be measured in healthy subjects and patients with demyelinating neuropathies, are investigated in simulated cases of focal reduction (70%) of the myelin sheath in one, two and three successive internodal segments along the length of human motor fibres. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively) are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibres. The results show that the intracellular potentials are with reduced amplitude and slowed conduction velocity in the vicinity of demyelinated segments, however the segmental conduction block is not achieved. The radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes slightly increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination. In contrast, the electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants and rheobases are normal. In the recovery cycles, the refractoriness, supernormality and less late subnormality are close to the normal, showing that the pathology is relatively minor. The obtained abnormalities in the potentials and excitability properties provide new information about the pathophysiology of the demyelinated human motor axons and can be observed in vivo in patients with acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669452

  11. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  12. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations with Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the membrane properties (potentials and axonal excitability indices) in the case of myelin wrap reduction (96%) in one, two and three consecutive internodes along the length of human motor nerve fibre. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively, with one, two and three demyelinated internodes are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibre. The progressively greater increase of focal loss of myelin lamellae blocks the invasion of the intracellular potentials into the demyelinated zones. For all investigated cases, the radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination, whereas the electrotonic potentials show a decrease in the slow part of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses. The time constants are shorter and the rheobases higher for the IFD2 and IFD3 cases than for the normal case. In the recovery cycles, the same cases have less refractoriness, greater supernormality and less late subnormality than the normal case. The simulated membrane abnormalities can be observed in vivo in patients with demyelinating forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The study provides new information about the pathophysiology of acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669456

  13. Axonal pathology precedes demyelination in a mouse model of X-linked demyelinating/type I Charcot-Marie Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vavlitou, Natalie; Sargiannidou, Irene; Markoullis, Kyriaki; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2010-09-01

    The X-linked demyelinating/type I Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT1X) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in GJB1, the gene that encodes the gap junction protein connexin32. Connexin32 is expressed by myelinating Schwann cells and forms gap junctions in noncompact myelin areas, but axonal involvement is more prominent in X-linked compared with other forms of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. To clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal pathology in CMT1X, we studied Gjb1-null mice at early stages (i.e. 2-4 months old) of the neuropathy, when there is minimal or no demyelination. The diameters of large myelinated axons were progressively reduced in Gjb1-null mice compared with those in wild-type littermates. Furthermore, neurofilaments were relatively more dephosphorylated and more densely packed starting at 2 months of age. Increased expression of β-amyloid precursor protein, a marker of axonal damage, was also detected in Gjb1-null nerves. Finally, fast axonal transport, assayed by sciatic nerve ligation experiments, was slower in distal axons of Gjb1-null versus wild-type animals with reduced accumulation of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins. These findings demonstrate that axonal abnormalities including impaired cytoskeletal organization and defects in axonal transport precede demyelination in this mouse model of CMT1X. PMID:20720503

  14. Genetic evaluation of inherited motor/sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2004-01-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), chromosome 16 (CMT1C) and chromosome 10 (CMT1D). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. In rare patients it may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. Mutations in the SIMPLE gene cause CMT1C, and CMT1D is the result of mutations in the early response 2 (ERG2 or Krox-20) gene. An X-linked form of CMT1 (CMT1X) maps to Xq13 and is associated with mutations in the connexin32 (Cx32) gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy that maps to chromosome 1p35-p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3q13-q22 (CMT2B), chromosome 7p14 (CMT2D), chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E), chromosome 1q22-q23 (CMT2F) or chromosome 3q13 (CMT2G). Two X-linked forms of CMT2 have been reported (CMT2XA and CMT2XB), but the genes remain unidentified. An area that has recently expanded is the identification of autosomal recessive forms of CMT type 1 and 2. Of the eight recessive forms of CMT1 that have been identified to date, only two have been fully characterized at the molecular level (CMT1 AR B 1 and CMT1 AR D). Point mutations were found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (MTM2) gene for CMT1 AR B1. CMT1 AR D is the result of point mutations in the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene, PO gene, EGR2 gene or the PRX gene (for the recessive form). It shares considerable clinical and

  15. Axonal Pathology Precedes Demyelination in a Mouse Model of X-Linked Demyelinating/ Type I Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT1X) Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vavlitou, Natalie; Sargiannidou, Irene; Markoullis, Kyriaki; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Scherer, Steven S.; Kleopa, Kleopas A.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in GJB1, the gene that encodes the gap junction protein connexin32 (Cx32). Cx32 is expressed by myelinating Schwann cells and forms gap junctions in non-compact myelin areas but axonal involvement is more prominent in X-linked compared to other forms of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. To clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal pathology in CMT1X, we studied Gjb1-null mice at early stages (i.e. 2- to 4-month-old) of the neuropathy, when there is minimal or no demyelination. The diameters of large myelinated axons were progressively reduced in Gjb1-null mice compared to those in wild type littermates. Furthermore, neurofilaments were relatively more dephosphorylated and more densely packed starting at 2 months of age. Increased expression of β-amyloid precursor protein, a marker of axonal damage, was also detected in Gjb1-null nerves. Finally, fast axonal transport, assayed by sciatic nerve ligation experiments, was slower in distal axons of Gjb1-null vs. wild type animals with reduced accumulation of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins. These findings demonstrate that axonal abnormalities including impaired cytoskeletal organization and defects in axonal transport precede demyelination in this mouse model of CMT1-X. PMID:20720503

  16. The range of chronic demyelinating neuropathy of infancy: a clinico-pathological and genetic study of 15 unrelated cases.

    PubMed

    Planté-Bordeneuve, V; Parman, Y; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Alj, Y; Deymeer, F; Serdaroglu, P; Eraksoy, M; Said, G

    2001-09-01

    The concept of Dejerine-Sottas disease, which corresponds to presumed recessive demyelinating neuropathies with onset in infancy, remains controversial. To learn more on the subject, we performed a clinico-pathological and molecular genetic study in 15 unrelated patients with the Dejerine-Sottas phenotype seen over a 16 year period. There were 12 females and 3 males, born to asymptomatic parents. Study of the PMP22, P0 and Egr2 genes was performed in all cases and 14 underwent a nerve biopsy. First manifestations of neuropathy occurred before 3 years of age in all patients. An inherited disorder was suspected in 10 patients, because of their family history and/or disclosure of a molecular genetic defect in 4 of them. One patient had a recessively transmitted homozygous point mutation (Arg157Trp) of the PMP22 gene. A heterozygous duplication of the 17p11.2-12 segment was detected in one offspring of a consanguineous marriage. One patient carried a "de novo" heterozygous Ser72Leu substitution in the PMP22. A heterozygous double mutation of the P0 gene including a "de novo" Val42 deletion and an Ala221Thr substitution, maternally inherited, were found in an apparently sporadic case. No mutation of the Egr2 gene was identified. A neuropathy with focally folded myelin sheaths (CMT4B) was diagnosed in the nerve biopsy specimens of two patients. In five patients, the clinico-pathological findings along with the absence of an identified mutation suggested the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy of infantile onset. Our findings illustrate the genetic heterogeneity of cases with identified mutations, the scarcity of cases with "demonstrated" recessive transmission and the likelihood of early acquired chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in several patients. PMID:11596785

  17. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  18. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  19. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  20. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes.

  1. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  2. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  3. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  4. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations.

  5. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  6. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  7. Office Immunotherapy in Chronic Inflammatoryh Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, Peter J.; Taylor, Bruce V.; Davies, Jenny L.; Mauermann, Michelle L.; Litchy, William J.; Klein, Christopher J.; Dyck, P. James B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. Objective and Methods Results and Conclusions NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-basedimmunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons). PMID:25976871

  8. [On the mechanisms and diagnosis of conduction disturbances due to demyelination with special reference to multifocal demyelinating neuropathy (Lewis-Sumner)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R; Kimura, J

    1991-12-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block can mimic motor neuron disease, but is potentially reversible. Its diagnosis rests upon electrophysiological demonstration of focal conduction block at multiple sites. Conduction block is the most important mechanism causing clinical symptoms in peripheral nerve demyelination. On the other hand, conduction slowing is not always associated with clinical symptoms. In 2 out of 9 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy, MRI showed focal swelling of the nerve at the site of conduction block. Both of them had elevated titers of anti-GM1 antibodies. In one, we biopsied a portion of the medial pectoral nerve, which was adjacent to the focal swelling, at surgical exploration. Pathological findings included very thin myelin associated with large diameter fibers and small onion bulb formation, suggesting that remyelinative process is abortive in this disease leading to persistent conduction block. Anti-GM1 antibodies bound to the denuded axoplasmic membrane may interfere with the process by masking the cell surface markers. The reason why the sensory fibers are spared is unclear, but it may be possible that GM1 in sensory axons have less affinity to the antibody than that in motor fibers. PMID:1817801

  9. Mechanisms of action of IVIg and therapeutic considerations in the treatment of acute and chronic demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-12-24

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is an immunomodulating agent that has multiple activities, including modulation of complement activation products, suppressing idiotypic antibody, saturating Fc receptors on macrophages, and suppressing various inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinases. Because all these factors are implicated to various degrees in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated demyelination of the PNS, administration of IVIg could be beneficial in treating neuropathies by suppressing the immune-mediated processes that are directed against myelin or axonal antigenic targets. This article outlines the actions of IVIg in CIDP and other autoimmune neuropathies based on data derived from in vivo and in vitro studies. The predominant mechanisms by which IVIg exerts its action on these neuropathies appear to be a combined effect on complement inactivation, neutralization of idiotypic antibodies, cytokine inhibition, and saturation of Fc receptors on endoneurial macrophages.

  10. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating l-alanine in place of l-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral l-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral l-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  11. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven S

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating L-alanine in place of L-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral L-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral L-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  12. Hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy (HMSN): possible X-linked dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L H; Kelly, T E; Schnatterly, P; Parker, D

    1985-04-01

    The inheritance of the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) is usually autosomal dominant. We studied a kinship with a pattern of X-linked dominant inheritance. The phenotype was similar to HMSN of the "intermediate" type. Men were more severely affected than women, and hypertrophic nerves were not found. Nerve conduction was very slow in men, but it was mildly slow or normal in women. No male-to-male transmission was found in six generations.

  13. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  14. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP.

  15. Molecular genetics and biology of inherited peripheral neuropathies: a fast-moving field.

    PubMed

    Nelis, E; Timmerman, V; De Jonghe, P; Van Broeckhoven, C; Rautenstrauss, B

    1999-09-01

    The recent progress of molecular genetics has considerably increased our knowledge about the underlying disease mechanism of inherited peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in three genes coding for the myelin proteins peripheral myelin protein 22, myelin protein zero and connexin 32 and in one gene coding for the transcription factor early growth response 2 element are associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and 2, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome and congenital hypomyelination. This review focuses on the correlation of the different human phenotypes associated with distinct mutations with those found in cellular and animal models. PMID:10541586

  16. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  17. Giant axonal neuropathy: a rare inherited neuropathy with simple clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Kamate, Mahesh; Ramakrishna, Shashikala; Kambali, Shweta; Mahadevan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of excess neurofilaments in the axons of peripheral and central nervous systems, which hampers signal transmission. It usually manifests in infancy and early childhood and is slowly progressive. Those affected with GAN have characteristic curly kinky hair, everted feet and a crouched gait, which suggest the diagnosis in most cases. We describe twin children who presented with difficulty in walking and an abnormal gait since they began walking; clinical clues such as hair changes led us to the final diagnosis. PMID:25216920

  18. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  19. Autosomal dominant inherited neuropathies with prominent sensory loss and mutilations: a review.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; De Jonghe, Peter; Verhoeven, Kristien; Timmerman, Vincent; Wagner, Klaus; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Nicholson, Garth A

    2003-03-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs) are rare disorders characterized by progressive distal sensory loss, predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Foot ulcers, severe skin and bone infections, arthropathy, and amputations are frequent and feared complications. Occasionally, patients complain of spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. Autonomic fibers can be affected to a variable degree. Patients with HSN can also have severe distal weakness, and some HSN variants have therefore been classified among the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSNs). Molecular genetic studies of autosomal dominant inherited neuropathies with prominent sensory loss and ulceromutilating features have assigned the genetic loci for HMSN type 2B (Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome type 2B) and HSN type 1 to chromosomes 3q13-22 and 9q22.1-22.3, respectively. However, some families with HSN have been excluded for linkage to these loci, suggesting further genetic heterogeneity. Recently, disease-causing mutations in the SPTLC1 gene have been identified in patients with HSN type 1. In this review, we discuss the hallmark features associated with the distinct genetic subtypes of autosomal dominant inherited HSN and provide genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:12633143

  20. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present.

  2. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  3. Oral curcumin mitigates the clinical and neuropathologic phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse: a potential therapy for inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Shiga, Kensuke; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; He, Feng; Shaw, Chad A; Yan, Jiong; Wensel, Theodore G; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  4. Caspr1/Paranodin/Neurexin IV is most likely not a common disease-causing gene for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Venken, K; Meuleman, J; Irobi, J; Ceuterick, C; Martini, R; De Jonghe, P; Timmerman, V

    2001-08-01

    Contactin associated protein 1 (Caspr1/Paranodin/Neurexin IV) is an axonal transmembrane molecule mainly localised at the paranodal junction. Since molecular alterations in septate-like junctions at the paranodes might have important consequences for the function of the nerve fiber, we considered that Caspr1 could be involved in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathies. In this study, we physically mapped the Caspr1 gene on chromosome 17q21.1 and determined its genomic structure. We performed a mutation analysis of the Caspr1 gene in a cohort of 64 unrelated patients afflicted with distinct inherited peripheral neuropathies. Since no disease causing mutations were found, we suggest that Caspr1 is probably not a common cause of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:11496158

  5. Rapidly progressive asymmetrical weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J resembles chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cottenie, Ellen; Menezes, Manoj P; Rossor, Alexander M; Morrow, Jasper M; Yousry, Tarek A; Dick, David J; Anderson, Janice R; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Blake, Julian C; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J (CMT4J), a rare form of demyelinating CMT, caused by recessive mutations in the phosphoinositide phosphatase FIG4 gene, is characterised by progressive proximal and distal weakness and evidence of chronic denervation in both proximal and distal muscles. We describe a patient with a previous diagnosis of CMT1 who presented with a two year history of rapidly progressive weakness in a single limb, resembling an acquired inflammatory neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies showed an asymmetrical demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block and temporal dispersion. FIG4 sequencing identified a compound heterozygous I41T/K278YfsX5 genotype. CMT4J secondary to FIG4 mutations should be added to the list of inherited neuropathies that need to be considered in suspected cases of inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, especially if there is a background history of a more slowly progressive neuropathy.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-11-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination. Images PMID:2214025

  8. Congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy (CCFDN) in 10 Czech gypsy children – frequent and underestimated cause of disability among Czech gypsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital Cataract Facial Dysmorphism and demyelinating Neuropathy (CCFDN, OMIM 604468) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder which was first described in Bulgarian Gypsies in 1999. It is caused by the homozygous founder mutation c.863 + 389C > T in the CTDP1 gene. The syndrome has been described exclusively in patients of Gypsy ancestry. The prevalence of this disorder in the Gypsy population in the Czech Republic and Central Europe is not known and is probably underestimated and under-diagnosed. Methods We clinically diagnosed and assessed 10 CCFDN children living in the Czech Republic. All patients are children of different ages, all of Gypsy origin born in the Czech Republic. Molecular genetic testing for the founder CTDP1 gene mutation was performed. Results All patients are homozygous for the c.863 + 389C > T mutation in the CTDP1 gene. All patients presented a bilateral congenital cataract and microphthalmos and had early cataract surgery. Correct diagnosis was not made until the age of two. All patients had variably delayed motor milestones. Gait is characteristically paleocerebellar in all the patients. Mental retardation was variable and usually mild. Conclusions Clinical diagnosis of CCFDN should be easy for an informed pediatrician or neurologist by the obligate signalling trias of congenital bilateral cataract, developmental delay and later demyelinating neuropathy. Our data indicate a probably high prevalence of CCFDN in the Czech Gypsy ethnic subpopulation. PMID:24690360

  9. Molecular basis of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F

    2001-05-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. Forms of CMT2 map to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3p (CMT2B), chromosome 7p (CMT2D), and to chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset, demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathologic features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosomes 8q, 10q, and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies

  10. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  11. Association of an inherited genetic variant with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Crews, Kristine R.; Lew, Glen; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie J.; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Wheeler, Heather E.; Wing, Claudia; Delaney, Shannon M.; Komatsu, Masaaki; Paugh, Steven W.; McCorkle, Joseph Robert; Lu, Xiaomin; Winick, Naomi J.; Carroll, William L.; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Pui, Ching-Hon; Dolan, M. Eileen; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    the St. Jude cohort and in 22.2% of patients (n=22 of 99) in the COG cohort. A SNP in the promoter region of the CEP72 gene, which encodes a centrosomal protein involved in microtubule formation, had a significant association with vincristine neuropathy (meta p =6.3 × 10−9). This SNP had a minor allele frequency of 37% (235/642), with 50 of 321 patients (16%, 95% CI 11.6%–19.5%) homozygous for the risk allele (TT at rs924607). Among patients with the high-risk CEP72 genotype (TT at rs924607), 28 of 50 patients (56%, 95% CI 41.2–70.0) developed at least one episode of grade 2–4 neuropathy, a higher rate than in patients with the CEP72 CC or CT genotype (58 of 271 patients; 21.4%, 95% CI 16.9–26.7); p=2.4×10−6. The severity (grade) of neuropathy was greater (2.4-fold by Poisson regression (p<0.0001), 2.7-fold based on mean grade of neuropathy (1.23 [95% CI 0.74 – 1.72] versus 0.45 [95% CI 0.3 – 0.6]; t test p=0.004)) in patients homozygous for the CEP72 risk allele (TT genotype), compared to patients with the CC or CT genotype. The CEP72 promoter SNP was shown to create a binding site for a transcriptional repressor causing lower mRNA expression, and reducing CEP72 expression in human neurons and leukemia cells increased their sensitivity to vincristine. Conclusions In this preliminary study of children with ALL, an inherited polymorphism in the promoter region of CEP72 was associated with increased risk and severity of vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy. If replicated in additional populations, this finding may provide a basis for safer dosing of this widely prescribed anticancer agent. PMID:25710658

  12. MRI shows increased sciatic nerve cross sectional area in inherited and inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Miranda, M A; Cowley, P; Morrow, J M; Davagnanam, I; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Reilly, M M; Yousry, T A; Thornton, J S

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve are described in a group of 10 patients with genetically confirmed Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and 10 healthy controls using MRI. One mid-thigh of each individual was imaged using a short tau inversion recovery sequence and the nerve appearance evaluated radiologically with respect to the signal intensity and visibility of the internal neural structure. The cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve of each individual was measured by defining irregular enclosing regions of interest on the MRI images. The sciatic nerve area was enlarged in both CMT1A (p<0.001) and CIDP (p=0.008) compared with controls and in CMT1A compared with CIDP (p<0.001). Median (interquartile range) areas were 67.6 (16.2) mm(2) for the CIDP group, 135.9 (46.5) mm(2) for the CMT1A group and 43.3 (19.9) mm(2) for the control group. The critical upper value for discriminating pathologically enlarged nerves from normal controls with p<0.05 was 64.4 mm(2). Quantification of sciatic nerve hypertrophy on MRI may be of assistance in cases where the diagnosis is still in doubt, providing an objective pathological marker complimenting other clinical investigations.

  13. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  14. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P.

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  16. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Franques, J; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J; Attarian, S

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a demyelinating chronic neuropathy of immune origin whose diagnosis is based upon clinical, biological and electrophysiological data; previously critical to the diagnosis the nerve biopsy is now restricted to the rare situations where accurate diagnosis cannot be reached using these data alone. CIDP are mainly idiopathic, but a few associated diseases must be sought for as they require specific attention. Such associated diseases must particularly be discussed when the manifestations are severe or resistant to immunomodulating or immunosuppressive agents. Indeed, idiopathic CIDP are usually responsive to these treatments. The effectiveness of these treatments is limited by the importance of the secondary axonal loss. The dependence or the resistance may sometimes justify the association of several immunomodulating treatments. A single randomized controlled trial support the use of cytotoxic drugs and none with rituximab.

  17. Peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Hanewinckel, R; Ikram, M A; Van Doorn, P A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are diseases of the peripheral nervous system that can be divided into mononeuropathies, multifocal neuropathies, and polyneuropathies. Symptoms usually include numbness and paresthesia. These symptoms are often accompanied by weakness and can be painful. Polyneuropathies can be divided into axonal and demyelinating forms, which is important for diagnostic reasons. Most peripheral neuropathies develop over months or years, but some are rapidly progressive. Some patients only suffer from mild, unilateral, slowly progressive tingling in the fingers due to median nerve compression in the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome), while other patients can be tetraplegic, with respiratory insufficiency within 1-2 days due to Guillain-Barré syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome, with a prevalence of 5% and incidence of 1-2 per 1000 person-years, is the most common mononeuropathy. Population-based data for chronic polyneuropathy are relatively scarce. Prevalence is estimated at 1% and increases to 7% in persons over 65 years of age. Incidence is approximately 1 per 1000 person-years. Immune-mediated polyneuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are rare diseases, with an annual incidence of approximately 1-2 and 0.2-0.5 per 100 000 persons respectively. Most peripheral neuropathies are more prevalent in older adults and in men, except for carpal tunnel syndrome, which is more common in women. Diabetes is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy and is associated with both mono- and polyneuropathies. Among the group of chronic polyneuropathies, in about 20-25% no direct cause can be found. These are slowly progressive axonal polyneuropathies. PMID:27637963

  18. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-01-01

    Background The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. Methods We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). Results 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Conclusions Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. Clinical trial registration ID number NCT01193075. PMID:25430934

  19. Electrodiagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic studies are an important component of the evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral nerve disorders. The pattern of findings and the features that are seen on the motor and sensory nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography can help to identify the type of neuropathy, define the underlying pathophysiology (axonal or demyelinating), and ultimately help to narrow the list of possible causes. This article reviews the electrodiagnostic approach to and interpretation of findings in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  1. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of history and examination for correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with hematemesis and a 6-month history of unsteady gait and falls due to tripping. Because of a history of alcohol abuse, the initial diagnosis was upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to alcoholic gastritis or gastric ulcer, with the neuropathy likely due to alcoholism or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. After further neurological examination and careful review of nerve conduction studies, however, an inherited neuropathy was suspected. Despite denial by the patient and her daughter of a family history of neuropathy, both had a pes cavus deformity with muscle atrophy and partial foot drop gait. Subsequent testing of the daughter revealed the same nerve conduction findings as the patient's. Genetic testing showed that both women had the myelin PMP22 repeat defect characteristic of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Endoscopy revealed that the patient had Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, which accounted for the hematemesis.

  2. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common autoimmune neuropathy. The diagnosis depends on the clinical presentation with a progressive or relapsing course over at least 2 months and electrophysiological evidence of primary demyelination. Whereas typical CIDP is quite easily recognizable because virtually no other neuropathies present with both distal and proximal motor and sensory deficit, atypical CIDP, focal and multifocal variants in particular, may represent a difficult diagnostic challenge. CIDP very likely is an underdiagnosed condition as suggested also by a positive correlation between prevalence rates and sensitivity of electrophysiological criteria. Since no 'gold standard' diagnostic marker exists, electrophysiological criteria have been optimized to be at the same time as sensitive and as specific as possible. Additional supportive laboratory features, such as increased spinal fluid protein, MRI abnormalities of nerve segments, and in selected cases nerve biopsy lead to the correct diagnosis in the large majority of the cases. Objective clinical improvement following immune therapy is also a useful parameter to confirm the diagnosis. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of CIDP remain poorly understood, but the available evidence for an inflammatory origin is quite convincing. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange (PE) have been proven to be effective treatments. IVIG usually leads to rapid improvement, which is useful in severely disabled patients. Repeat treatment over regular time intervals for many years is often necessary. The effect of steroids is slower and the side-effect profile may be problematic, but they may induce disease remission more frequently than IVIG. An important and as of yet uncompletely resolved issue is the evaluation of long-term outcome to determine whether the disease is still active and responsive to treatment.

  4. Infantile demyelinating neuropathy associated with a de novo point mutation on Ser72 in PMP22 and basal lamina onion bulbs in skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ceuterick-de Groote, C; De Jonghe, P; Timmerman, V; Van Goethem, G; Löfgren, A; Ceulemans, B; Van Broeckhoven, C; Martin, J J

    2001-01-01

    Codon 72 has been designated as a hot spot for distinct missense mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Ser72Leu substitution was associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) in four patients and with congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (CHN) in one patient. Our objective was to report one other DSS patient with Ser72Leu substitution in PMP22 and to concurrently illustrate how less invasive procedures such as skin biopsy could provide a rapid and reliable alternative to conventional sural nerve biopsy for the characterization of histophenotypic features. A skin biopsy was carried out in a 2 4/12-year-old girl with muscle atrophy, hypotonia and weakness, as well as generalized areflexia and absent sensory and motor nerve responses. Standard electron microscope techniques were used. PMP22 was screened by automated direct nucleotide sequencing analysis. Morphological examination revealed basal lamina onion bulbs surrounding a de- or hypomyelinated axon in all nerve bundles. Mutation analysis demonstrated a missense point mutation in codon 72 of the PMP22 gene leading to a Ser72Leu substitution. Further genotype-phenotype correlations will have to determine whether morphologically distinct phenotypes can be correlated with specific mutations. For this purpose, cutaneous nerve bundles could serve as an alternative tool to help identify and classify subtypes in this heterogeneous syndrome. PMID:11314784

  5. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  6. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  7. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  8. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Donofrio, Peter D

    2012-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immunomodulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP.

  10. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  11. Diabetic polyneuropathy. Axonal or demyelinating?

    PubMed

    Valls-Canals, J; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Pradas, J

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy is the most common subgroup of diabetic neuropathy, but its nature is controversial as it might be demyelinating and/or axonal. We have tried to determine whether diabetic polyneuropathy is electrophysiologically axonal, demyelinating, or both. We have studied the sural and peroneal nerves and the electromyographies of leg muscles in 50 healthy subjects (average age 67.2 years, range 45 to 84 years), in 50 diabetic patients (average age 66.34 years, range 44 to 82 years) showing no symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP1), and in 50 diabetic patients (average age 67.10 years, range 49 to 87 years) showing symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP2). The amplitude (AMP) of sural and peroneal nerves in healthy and DP1 subjects was similar. Conduction velocity (CV) of sural and peroneal nerves was slower in DP1 subjects than in healthy subjects. DP2 subjects showed AMP and CV values significantly lower than those in DP1 subjects, and signs of acute and chronic denervation/reinervation were found in the leg muscles. We believe that this result indicates that diabetic patients have two types of polyneuropathies: a demyelinating disease that could appear in diabetic patients with and without symptoms of polyneuropathy, and an axonal loss that is responsible for most of the symptoms.

  12. Diabetic neuropathy part 1: overview and symmetric phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in United States and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain, and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular, and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control.

  13. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Hilo, Wasseem; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Modi, Naftali; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute severe visual loss in both eyes, which usually manifests in young adulthood. The disease has maternal inheritance due to mitochondrial DNA mutation. The final diagnosis is genetic. There is still no proven treatment, but there is significant progress in developments on the genetics of the disease to reach gene therapy. In this article we review the latest literature relevant to this disease.

  14. Hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2004-05-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs) are a group of genetically determined peripheral neuropathies with prominent disturbance of the peripheral sensory neurons. They are characterized by sensory loss, insensitivity to pain, a variable degree of muscle weakness and wasting, as well as autonomic features. Frequent complications are foot ulcerations and infections that may lead to osteomyelitis, followed by necrosis and amputations. Consequently, the hereditary sensory neuropathies have also been termed ulceromutilating neuropathies. On the other hand, in the presence of additional motor weakness, they have been subclassified among the group of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders. Sporadic and familial cases with different modes of inheritance are known to affect both children and adults. The most prevalent forms of the autosomal dominantly inherited hereditary sensory neuropathies are HSN I and CMT 2b. HSN I is associated with mutations in the SPTLC1 gene, whereas mutations in the RAB7 gene have been identified in CMT 2b. However, at least one more hitherto unknown gene responsible for autosomal-dominant hereditary sensory neuropathies must exist. Autosomal-recessive hereditary sensory neuropathies types III and IV, and probably also type V, result from mutations in the IKBKAP and NTRK1 genes. Very recently, the gene in HSN II (HSN2) has been identified. A spontaneous autosomal-recessive mutation in the Cct4 gene has been reported in the Sprague-Dawley rat strain with early onset sensory neuropathy. Although no curative treatment is available so far, and current therapy is limited to symptom relief, these molecular genetic advances in knowledge about the hereditary sensory neuropathies can be translated into clinical practice by improving diagnosis and genetic counseling. They will also be the basis for functional studies in the future. PMID:15319794

  15. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  16. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression

  17. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  18. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  19. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  20. [Atypical neuropathies associated with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lozeron, P

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of neuropathy worldwide and, due to the epidemic progression of the affection, prevalence of diabetic neuropathies will increase in the near future. Beside the typical diabetic neuropathy pattern and the common entrapment neuropathies, several unusual clinical forms have been described with either a symmetrical or an asymmetrical pattern. Treatment-induced neuropathy is an acute sensory affection most commonly related to acute glycemic control. Pain is debilitating and associated with vegetative dysfunction. Prevention is important, as resolution is often incomplete. Several patterns or asymmetrical neuropathies of inflammatory and ischemic origin were described long ago in the lower limb. They are debilitating, most often painful and require steroid treatment. Other patterns affecting the thoracolumbar region or the upper limbs or involving a painless motor deficit must be identified as specific treatments are sometimes needed. An association between diabetes and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has not been demonstrated but diagnosis may be suggested due to the misleading low conduction velocities seen in classical diabetic neuropathy. Like any other patient, the diabetic patient may present a neuropathy unrelated to diabetes. To facilitate patient care, neurologists should be aware of such clinical entities. PMID:25459114

  1. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  2. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Altinkaya, Ayca; Topcular, Baris; Sakalli, Nazan Karagoz; Kuscu, Demet Yandim; Kirbas, Dursun

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. In this report, we detail the course of a 58-year-old male patient who had headache and double vision followed by progressive paresthesia and difficulty in walking. The patient had bilateral papilledema and mild leg weakness, absent ankle jerks and loss of sensation in distal parts of his lower and upper extremities. His electromyography (EMG) was concordant with CIDP and lumbar puncture revealed high opening pressure. The polyradiculoneuropathy as well as the papilledema and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure improved under steroids. The improvement in intracranial hypertension (IHT) and papilledema under steroid treatment suggests that the IHT in this patient might be associated with CIDP.

  4. Characteristics of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with concurrent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Wu, Xiaohua; Xie, Huijun; Han, Ying; Guan, Yangtai; Qin, Yong; Zheng, Huimin; Jiang, Jianming; Niu, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common type of inherited peripheral neuropathy and has a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. CMT with concurrent diabetes mellitus (DM) is rare. The purpose of this study is to explore the genetic, clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients with CMT and concurrent DM. Methods: We investigated gene mutations (the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene, myelin protein zero gene, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor gene, early growth response gene and the neurofilament light chain gene loci) of a relatively large and typical Chinese family with CMT1 and concurrent DM2. From the literature, we also retrieved all reported families and single cases with CMT and concurrent DM. We comprehensively analyzed the characteristics of total 33 patients with CMT and concurrent DM, and further compared these characteristics with those of patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Results: Patients with CMT and concurrent DM had some relatively independent characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms. So we designated that kind of characteristic demyelinating CMT which accompanies DM as Yu-Xie syndrome (YXS), a new specific clinical subtype of CMT. Conclusion: CMT is an etiologic factor of DM, even though the intrinsic association between CMT and DM still remains further exploration. PMID:25120817

  5. Peripheral neuropathy in the Twitcher mutant. A new experimental model of endoneurial edema.

    PubMed

    Powell, H C; Knobler, R L; Myers, R R

    1983-07-01

    The Twitcher mouse (Twi/Twi) is a recently identified mutant experimental model for human globoid leukodystrophy. Affected mice develop neurologic abnormalities with demyelination of white matter and peripheral nerve due to an inherited enzyme deficiency. The neuropathy has unusual pathologic features:severe interstitial edema and infiltration by eosinophils. To investigate its pathogenesis and to identify the mechanism of demyelination, we studied vascular permeability and measured endoneurial fluid pressure. Significantly increased endoneurial fluid pressure was detected in clinically affected animals (average, 6.4 cm H2O) versus controls (1.7 cm H2O), and these data are the first measurements of EFP to be reported in mice. Increased vascular permeability to horseradish peroxidase was visualized by electron microscopy with leakage of horseradish peroxidase between endothelial cells and flooding of the endoneurial interstitium. Numerous eosinophils were present in the interstitium, as well as some polymorphonuclear cells, occasional erythrocytes, and degranulating mast cells. Abnormalities of nerve fibers included swelling of Schwann cells with intracytoplasmic inclusions, demyelination, and remyelination. As well as being a model for globoid leukodystrophy, the Twitcher is the first spontaneously occurring experimental model for endoneurial edema and increased endoneurial fluid pressure.

  6. Screening for SH3TC2 gene mutations in a series of demyelinating recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4).

    PubMed

    Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Saveri, Paola; Magri, Stefania; Ciano, Claudia; Gandioli, Claudia; Morbin, Michela; Bella, Daniela D; Moroni, Isabella; Taroni, Franco; Pareyson, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C (CMT4C) is an autosomal recessive (AR) demyelinating neuropathy associated to SH3TC2 mutations, characterized by early onset, spine deformities, and cranial nerve involvement. We screened 43 CMT4 patients (36 index cases) with AR inheritance, demyelinating nerve conductions, and negative testing for PMP22 duplication, GJB1 and MPZ mutations, for SH3TC2 mutations. Twelve patients (11 index cases) had CMT4C as they carried homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in SH3TC2. We found six mutations: three nonsense (p.R1109*, p.R954*, p.Q892*), one splice site (c.805+2T>C), one synonymous variant (p.K93K) predicting altered splicing, and one frameshift (p.F491Lfs*32) mutation. The splice site and the frameshift mutations are novel. Mean onset age was 7 years (range: 1-14). Neuropathy was moderate-to-severe. Scoliosis was present in 11 patients (severe in 4), and cranial nerve deficits in 9 (hearing loss in 7). Scoliosis and cranial nerve involvement are frequent features of this CMT4 subtype, and their presence should prompt the clinician to look for SH3TC2 gene mutations. In our series of undiagnosed CMT4 patients, SH3TC2 mutation frequency is 30%, confirming that CMT4C may be the most common AR-CMT type.

  7. Toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2009-01-01

    Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  8. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  10. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  11. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  12. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  13. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  14. Molecular genetics of autosomal-dominant demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2006-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders and is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, with an estimated overall prevalence of 17-40/10,000. Although there has been major advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of CMT in recent years, the most useful classification is still a neurophysiological classification that divides CMT into type 1 (demyelinating; median motor conduction velocity < 38 m/s) and type 2 (axonal; median motor conduction velocity > 38 m/s). An intermediate type is also increasingly being described. Inheritance can be autosomal-dominant (AD), X-linked, or autosomal-recessive (AR). AD CMT1 is the most common type of CMT and was the first form of CMT in which a causative gene was described. This review provides an up-to-date overview of AD CMT1 concentrating on the molecular genetics as the clinical, neurophysiological, and pathological features have been covered elsewhere. Four genes (PMP22, MPZ, LITAF, and EGR2) have been described in the last 15 yr associated with AD CMTI and a further gene (NEFL), originally described as causing AD CMT2 can also cause AD CMT1 (by neurophysiological criteria). Studies have shown many of these genes, when mutated, can cause a wide range of CMT phenotypes from the relatively mild CMT1 to the more severe Dejerine-Sottas disease and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy, and even in some cases axonal CMT2. This review discusses what is known about these genes and in particular how they cause a peripheral neuropathy, when mutated. PMID:16775366

  15. Clinical trials in CIDP and chronic autoimmune demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-05-01

    The main chronic autoimmune neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) demyelinating neuropathy. On the basis of randomized controlled studies, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), and plasmapheresis provide short-term benefits in CIDP. MMN responds only to IVIg. Because in MMN and CIDP, IVIg infusions are required every 3-6 weeks to sustain benefits or long-term remissions, there is a need for "IVIg-sparing" agents. In CIDP, immunosuppressive drugs, such as azathioprine, cyclosporine, methotrexate, mycophenolate, and cyclophosphamide, are used, but controlled trials have not shown that they are effective. Controlled trials have also not shown benefit to any agents in anti-MAG neuropathy. However, clinicians use many immunosuppressive drugs in both settings, but all have potentially serious side effects and are only effective in some patients. Thus, there is a need for new therapies in the inflammatory and paraproteinemic neuropathies. New agents targeting T cells, B cells, and transmigration and transduction molecules are discussed as potential treatment options for new trials. The need for biomarkers that predict therapeutic responses or identify patients with active disease is emphasized, and the search for better scoring tools that capture meaningful changes after response to therapies is highlighted.

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Christoph; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Rakowicz, Maryla; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, Jose; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Pedersen, Karine; Depondt, Chantal; Rola, Rafal; Klockgether, Thomas; García, Antonio; Mutlu, Gurkan; Schöls, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are characterized by autosomal dominantly inherited progressive ataxia but are clinically heterogeneous due to variable involvement of non-cerebellar parts of the nervous system. Non-cerebellar symptoms contribute significantly to the burden of SCAs, may guide the clinician to the underlying genetic subtype, and might be useful markers to monitor disease. Peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in SCA, but subtype-specific features and subclinical manifestations have rarely been evaluated. We performed a multicenter nerve conduction study with 162 patients with genetically confirmed SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6. The study proved peripheral nerves to be involved in the neurodegenerative process in 82 % of SCA1, 63 % of SCA2, 55 % of SCA3, and 22 % of SCA6 patients. Most patients of all subtypes revealed affection of both sensory and motor fibers. Neuropathy was most frequently of mixed type with axonal and demyelinating characteristics in all SCA subtypes. However, nerve conduction velocities of SCA1 patients were slower compared to other genotypes. SCA6 patients revealed less axonal damage than patients with other subtypes. No influence of CAG repeat length or biometric determinants on peripheral neuropathy could be identified in SCA1, SCA3, and SCA6. In SCA2, earlier onset and more severe ataxia were associated with peripheral neuropathy. We proved peripheral neuropathy to be a frequent site of the neurodegenerative process in all common SCA subtypes. Since damage to peripheral nerves is readily assessable by electrophysiological means, nerve conduction studies should be performed in a longitudinal approach to assess these parameters as potential progression markers.

  17. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 1: OVERVIEW AND SYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in US and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Various types of neuropathies can be associated with diabetes mellitus.1 Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Pathologically axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control. Many medications are available for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:23642717

  18. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sinéad M; Laurá, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  19. Early onset (childhood) monogenic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) with onset in childhood are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission and, in selected cases, pathological findings. Especially relevant to pediatrics are the items "secondary" versus "primary" neuropathy, "syndromic versus nonsyndromic," and "period of life." Different combinations of these parameters frequently point toward specific monogenic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first concern in pediatrics. As a rule, metabolic diseases include additional, orienting symptoms or signs, and their biochemical diagnosis is based on logical algorithms. Primary, motor sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating autosomal dominant (AD) forms (CMT1). Other forms include demyelinating autosomal recessive (AR) forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Peripheral motor neuron disorders are dominated by AR SMN-linked spinal muscular atrophies. (Distal) hereditary motor neuropathies represent <10% of HN but exhibit large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Sensory/dysautonomic HN involves five classic subtypes, each one related to specific genes. However, genetic heterogeneity is larger than initially suspected. Syndromic HN distinguish "purely neurological syndromes", which are multisystemic, such as spinocerebellar atrophies +, spastic paraplegias +, etc. Peripheral neuropathy is possibly the presenting feature, including in childhood. Autosomal recessive forms, on average, start more frequently in childhood. "Multiorgan syndromes", on the other hand, are more specific to Pediatrics. AR forms, which are clearly degenerative, prompt the investigation of a large set of pleiotropic genes. Other syndromes expressed in the perinatal period are mainly developmental disorders, and can sometimes be related to specific transcription factors. Systematic

  20. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... CIDP is one cause of damage to nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy ...

  2. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing.

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP.

  4. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  5. PMP22 related congenital hypomyelination neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, G M; Simonati, A; Taioli, F; Cavallaro, T; Ferrarini, M; Rigatelli, F; Pini, A; Mostacciuolo, M L; Rizzuto, N

    2001-01-01

    The peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a tetraspan membrane protein which is localised in the compact myelin of the peripheral nerves. In fibroblasts, where it was originally identified as growth arrest related factor 3 (Gas3), PMP22 has been shown to modulate cell proliferation; in the peripheral nervous system its roles are still debated. The duplication of PMP22 is the most common cause of the demyelinating form of the autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT1A); rarer missense mutations of PMP22 also cause CMT1A or severe dehypomyelinating neuropathies of infancy grouped under the heading of Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Here, a sporadic patient affected with DSS is described; nerve biopsy disclosed a picture of hypomyelination/amyelination with basal laminae onion bulbs and no florid demyelination and it was consistent with congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (CHN); molecular analysis disclosed a novel point mutation of PMP22 that causes a non-conservative arginine for cysteine substitution at codon 109, in the third transmembrane domain. CHN is the rarest and severest form of DSS and it is thought to reflect dysmyelination rather than demyelination. The reported case suggests that missense point mutations may alter a putative role of PMP22 in modulating Schwann cell growth and differentiation. PMID:11118262

  6. A novel EGR2 mutation within a family with a mild demyelinating form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Kensuke; Noto, Yuichi; Mizuta, Ikuko; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Takashima, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2012-06-01

    Mutations of the early growth response 2 (EGR2) gene have been reported in a variety of severe demyelinating neuropathies such as autosomal recessive congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy, autosomal dominant child-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy, and autosomal dominant adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Here, we report on a heterozygous mutation in EGR2 (c.1160C>A), which results in threonine at position 387 being changed to asparagine, in a family with a mild demyelinating form of adult-onset CMT. Of note, both the proband and her asymptomatic son exhibited neither pes cavus nor champagne-bottle leg atrophy, suggesting that the heterozygous T387N mutation may result in a relatively mild phenotype of demyelinating CMT. PMID:22734907

  7. Severe demyelinating hypertrophic polyneuropathy caused by a de novo frameshift mutation within the intracellular domain of myelin protein zero (MPZ/P0).

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Dibaj, Payam; Pilgram, Sara; Kötting, Judith; Gerding, Wanda M; Neusch, C

    2009-06-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuropathies classically divided into demyelinating (CMT1) and axonal forms (CMT2). The most common demyelinating form is CMT1A with an underlying duplication in the gene coding for the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Less frequently, mutations in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ/P(0)) account for demyelinating CMT1B, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS), or congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN). Here, we report a patient with a severe, early-onset hypertrophic and dysmyelinating neuropathy. The patient exhibits a novel frameshift mutation with an insertion of a single T-nucleotide on position c.618_619 of the MPZ gene resulting in a premature stop M207fsX38. PMID:19344920

  8. Novel MPZ mutations and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Hugh J.; Santagata, Sandro; Shapiro, Frederic; Batish, Sat Dev; Couchon, Libby; Donnelly, Stephen; Kang, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    We report two new MPZ mutations causing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies; c.368_382delGCACGTTCACTTGTG (in-frame deletion of five amino acids) and c.392A>G, Asn131Ser. Each child had clinical and electrodiagnostic features consistent with an inherited neuropathy, confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The cases illustrate the clinically heterogeneity that exists even within early-onset forms of this disease. They also lend additional support to the emerging clinical and laboratory evidence that impaired intracellular protein trafficking may represent the cause of some congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies. PMID:20621479

  9. Periaxin mutations cause recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boerkoel, C F; Takashima, H; Stankiewicz, P; Garcia, C A; Leber, S M; Rhee-Morris, L; Lupski, J R

    2001-02-01

    The periaxin gene (PRX) encodes two PDZ-domain proteins, L- and S-periaxin, that are required for maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Prx(-/-) mice develop a severe demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, despite apparently normal initial formation of myelin sheaths. We hypothesized that mutations in PRX could cause human peripheral myelinopathies. In accordance with this, we identified three unrelated Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy patients with recessive PRX mutations-two with compound heterozygous nonsense and frameshift mutations, and one with a homozygous frameshift mutation. We mapped PRX to 19q13.13-13.2, a region recently associated with a severe autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy in a Lebanese family (Delague et al. 2000) and syntenic to the location of Prx on murine chromosome 7 (Gillespie et al. 1997). PMID:11133365

  10. Dejerine-Sottas disease and hereditary demyelinating polyneuropathy of infancy.

    PubMed

    Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gérard

    2002-11-01

    Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD) was originally described as a hypertrophic polyneuropathy characterized by onset in infancy or early childhood in patients born to unaffected parents. The clinical features included distal sensory changes with ataxia; pes cavus, at times with kyphoscoliosis; motor deficit and atrophy predominating in the distal lower limbs and progressing toward the proximal limbs following a length-dependent pattern; palpable nerve hypertrophy; and Argyll-Robertson pupils. The morphological hallmark was the extensive nerve and root hypertrophy associated with demyelination-remyelination of surviving, originally myelinated axons and profuse Schwann-cell proliferation forming onion bulbs. Wide variations in clinical manifestations of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies of early onset in children born to unaffected parents have now been reported, with only some of the characteristics required in the original study, and at least seven genes encoding the myelin proteins P0, PMP22, the transcriptional factor EGR2, and others have been implicated. Thus, DSD is now a component of the hereditary demyelinating polyneuropathies of infancy that also include subsets of the recently individualized CMT4 neuropathies. The presumed recessive transmission of patients with DSD should be confirmed by molecular genetic analysis, which is still negative in a significant proportion of patients. The nerve biopsy can be useful in patients in whom genealogical or DNA abnormalities in favor of a genetic disorder are missing, because in a few patients with a progressive or relapsing course the diagnosis of early-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy must be considered. PMID:12402282

  11. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  12. [SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Massenet, V; Crielaard, J M

    2016-05-01

    Supra-scapular nerve (SSN) damage is a rare, but classical diagnosis that can often be overlooked since the nonspecific clinical history and examination commonly lead to the misdiagnosis of another shoulder disorder. This article details the etiopathology, the patients at risk, the reasons for consultation and the clinical aspects of suprascapular neuropathy; it also outlines its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27337843

  13. [Molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease].

    PubMed

    Pouget, J

    2004-02-01

    During the last decade, molecular biology has demonstrated the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic abnormalities in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The main phenotypes are either of the demyelinating or axonal type, transmitted with dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance. X-linked CMT is less rare than it was initially described and is often misdiagnosed as autosomal dominant type. Linked phenotypes are Dejerine-Sottas disease, congenital hypomyelinization and hereditary neuropathy with susceptibility to pressure palsies. Each phenotype can be due to different genotypes and concerned genes are numerous. Conversely, each genotype can express different phenotypes. Molecular diagnostic strategy of CMT is mainly baised on three elements: - phenotypic expertise which is based on the analysis of the inheritance mode and on electrophysiological data, which are peculiar in CMTX - knowledge of respective occurrence of the different genotypes and phenotypes which is increasing - technical feasibility of molecular biology methods which is important to consider, even though progress are fastly coming. According to these considerations, a strategy is proposed for molecular diagnosis of CMT. PMID:15034475

  14. [Inherited thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-02-01

    Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a genetically determined predisposition to develop thromboembolic complications. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors include antithrombin deficiency, protein C and protein S deficiencies, activated protein C resistance due to Leiden factor V mutation, inherited hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombin G20210A variant, dysfibrinogenemia and elevated factor VIII levels. In this review we briefly analyze, from an epidemiologic, clinic and diagnostic point of view, the main inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Finally, we discuss the synergism between genetic and acquired prothrombotic risk factors in some conditions such as pregnancy and cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  16. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  17. Chronic multifocal demyelinating neuropathy simulating motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, P; Logullo, F; Dionisi, L; Danni, M; Scarpelli, M; Angeleri, F

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient with a chronic acquired predominantly motor polyneuropathy. His clinical picture initially led to a diagnosis of lower motor neuron form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However electrophysiological examination revealed multifocal, prevalently proximal, conduction blocks at sites not prone to compression. Distinguishing this unusual polyneuropathy from motor neuron diseases is critical, since the former is a potentially, treatable disorder.

  18. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  19. Neuroradiological evaluation of demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease can affect patients across the life span. Consensus definitions and criteria of all of the different acquired demyelinating diseases that fall on this spectrum have magnetic resonance imaging criteria. The advances of both neuroimaging techniques and important discoveries in immunology have produced an improved understanding of these conditions and classification. Neuroimaging plays a central role in the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring and research efforts that are being undertaken in this disease. This review focuses on the imaging spectrum of acquired demyelinating disease. PMID:23858328

  20. Demyelination increases axonal stationary mitochondrial size and the speed of axonal mitochondrial transport

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Kidd, Grahame J.; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to permanent neurological disability in inherited and acquired diseases of myelin. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a major contributor to this axonal degeneration. It remains to be determined, however, if myelination, demyelination or remyelination alter the size and distribution of axonal mitochondrial stationary sites or the rates of axonal mitochondrial transport. Using live myelinated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, we investigated whether myelination and lysolecithin-induced demyelination affect axonal mitochondria. Myelination increased the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites by 2.3 fold. Following demyelination, the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites was increased by an additional 2.2 fold and the transport velocity of motile mitochondria was increased by 47%. These measures returned to the levels of myelinated axons following remyelination. Demyelination induced activating transcription factor (ATF) 3 in DRG neurons. Knockdown of neuronal ATF3 by shRNA abolished the demyelination-induced increase in axonal mitochondrial transport and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in axonal mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal ATF3 expression and increased mitochondrial transport protect demyelinated axons from oxidative damage. In response to insufficient ATP production, demyelinated axons increase the size of stationary mitochondrial sites and thereby balance ATP production with the increased energy needs of nerve conduction. PMID:20463228

  1. Acute Toxic Neuropathy Mimicking Guillain Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Fernandez, Shirley Joan; Menon, Murali Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Case: A 30 year old male presented with numbness of palms and soles followed by weakness of upper limbs and lower limbs of 5 days duration, which was ascending and progressive. Three months back he was treated for oral and genital ulcers with oral steroids. His ulcers improved and shifted to indigenous medication. His clinical examination showed polyneuropathy. CSF study did not show albuminocytological dissociation. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating polyneuropathy. His blood samples and the ayurvedic drug samples were sent for toxicological analysis. Inference: Acute toxic neuropathy - Arsenic PMID:25811007

  2. Olfactory system and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, D; Murcia-Belmonte, V; Clemente, D; De Castro, F

    2013-09-01

    Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system represents one of the most exciting scenarios since it presents relevant examples of long-life sustained neurogenesis and continuous axonal outgrowth from the olfactory epithelium with the subsequent plasticity phenomena in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory nerve is composed of nonmyelinated axons with interesting ontogenetic interpretations. However, the centripetal projections from the olfactory bulb are myelinated axons which project to more caudal areas along the lateral olfactory tract. In consequence, demyelination has not been considered as a possible cause of the olfactory symptoms in those diseases in which this sense is impaired. One prototypical example of an olfactory disease is Kallmann syndrome, in which different mutations give rise to combined anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, together with different satellite symptoms. Anosmin-1 is the extracellular matrix glycoprotein altered in the X-linked form of this disease, which participates in cell adhesion and migration, and axonal outgrowth in the olfactory system and in other regions of the central nervous system. Recently, we have described a new patho-physiological role of this protein in the absence of spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis. In the present review, we hypothesize about how both main and satellite neurological symptoms of Kallmann syndrome may be explained by alterations in the myelination. We revisit the relationship between the olfactory system and myelin highlighting that minor histological changes should not be forgotten as putative causes of olfactory malfunction.

  3. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  4. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis: Harding's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parry-Jones, A R; Mitchell, J D; Gunarwardena, W J; Shaunak, S

    2008-04-01

    We describe a 32-year-old woman with sequential, severe, painless visual loss in one eye and then the other, and three temporally distinct episodes of neurological disturbance suggestive of demyelination in the spinal cord. She was positive for the T14484C mutation in the mitochondrial genome, one of three common mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In addition, MRI identified areas of demyelination within the periventricular white matter of the brain and within the spinal cord. The coexistence of multiple sclerosis and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Harding's syndrome) is known to occur more often than would be expected by chance; therefore, screening for the Leber's mutations in multiple sclerosis patients with severe visual loss should be considered because this has important prognostic and genetic implications.

  5. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants: where we are and where we should go.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic and often disabling sensory motor neuropathy postulated as caused by an immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin. In addition to a classic sensory–motor polyneuropathy, other phenotypes of CIDP have been described including the Lewis- Sumner syndrome, distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy, pure motor CIDP, pure sensory CIDP including chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy (CISP), and focal CIDP. These phenotypes are currently considered to be variants of CIDP, even if the possibility that they represent different demyelinating neuropathies cannot be fully excluded considering differences in their response to therapy. Several data support the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of CIDP even if the precise targets and actors (antibodies and lymphocytes) of this immune response remain uncertain. Recent studies have shown that the therapeutic response may differ in patients with peculiar clinical presentations supporting the hypothesis that different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie the heterogeneity of CIDP. The majority of patients with CIDP show improvement after immune therapies including corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). It remains unclear why none of the other immune therapies that were reported to be variably effective in other immune disorders proved to be effective also in CIDP.

  6. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Viala, Karine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Créange, Alain; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Pouget, Jean; Clavelou, Pierre; Vial, Christophe; Steck, Andreas; Musset, Lucile; Marin, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether rituximab 375 mg/m2 was efficacious in patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy). Methods: Fifty-four patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The inclusion criteria were inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory score (ISS) ≥4 and visual analog pain scale >4 or ataxia score ≥2. The primary outcome was mean change in ISS at 12 months. Results: Twenty-six patients were randomized to a group receiving 4 weekly infusions of 375 mg/m2 rituximab, and 28 patients to placebo. Intention-to-treat analysis, with imputation of missing ISS values by the last observation carried forward method, showed a lack of mean change in ISS at 12 months, 1.0 ± 2.7 in the rituximab group, and 1.0 ± 2.8 in the placebo group. However, changes were observed, in per protocol analysis at 12 months, for the number of patients with an improvement of at least 2 points in the INCAT disability scale (p = 0.027), the self-evaluation scale (p = 0.016), and 2 subscores of the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Conclusions: Although primary outcome measures provide no evidence to support the use of rituximab in IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, there were improvements in several secondary outcomes in per protocol analysis. Level of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that rituximab is ineffective in improving ISS in patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy. PMID:23667063

  7. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  8. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    PubMed Central

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  9. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  10. Erythromelalgia-like presentation of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy in a setting of past alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Dhand, Upinder K

    2016-02-01

    Erythromelalgia may be primary or secondary to an underlying medical condition. Association with small fiber neuropathy and axonal large fiber peripheral neuropathy has been described. Erythromelalgia in the setting of acquired demyelinating neuropathy has not been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman with severe erythromelalgia, pain and burning, progressive weakness, hyporeflexia and distal pan-sensory deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid protein was 219 mg/dL. Nerve conduction study revealed extreme (ten-fold) prolongation of distal motor latencies, markedly slow motor nerve conduction, reduced terminal latency index, reduced distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, possible conduction blocks, and distal denervation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, prednisone and azathioprine resulted in marked clinical and electrophysiological improvement. Our patient fulfills the diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP); however, the unique electrodiagnostic features and presentation with erythromelalgia may represent a CIDP variant or a novel dysimmune neuropathy, or may partly be related to neurotoxic effects of prior alcohol abuse. PMID:26804376

  11. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy: a reversible case.

    PubMed

    Ghamdi, M; Armstrong, D L; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    A boy was born at 39 weeks gestation with severe weakness and hypotonia, fractured femurs, poor suck and swallow, and absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed marked slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities and normal muscle electrical activity with no evidence of acute denervation. Muscle biopsy showed mild type 2 fiber predominance, and sural nerve biopsy revealed large axons without myelin, and axons with insufficient amount of myelin for their diameter. There was no evidence of inflammation or demyelination. Gradual clinical improvement in tone and strength occurred in a cephalocaudal direction. By 4 months, motor nerve conduction velocities and clinical examination were normal apart from absent deep tendon reflexes. On review at 19 months, motor development and neurological examination were completely normal. Pathogenesis of this reversible pathologically documented case of congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy is unclear. No evidence was found for an inflammatory, toxic, metabolic, or demyelinating cause. Abnormal expression of a developmental gene, as in reversible cytochrome oxidase deficiency, may be a cause of this neuropathy.

  12. Sporadic hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Advances in the diagnosis using next generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Fallerini, Chiara; Carignani, Giulia; Capoccitti, Giorgio; Federico, Antonio; Rufa, Alessandra; Pinto, Anna Maria; Rizzo, Caterina Lo; Rossi, Alessandro; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Giannini, Fabio; Renieri, Alessandra

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are genetically heterogeneous disorders affecting peripheral motor and sensory functions. Many different pathogenic variants in several genes involved in the demyelinating, the axonal and the intermediate HMSN forms have been identified, for which all inheritance patterns have been described. The mutation screening currently available is based on Sanger sequencing and is time-consuming and relatively expensive due to the high number of genes involved and to the absence of mutational hot spots. To overcome these limitations, we have designed a custom panel for simultaneous sequencing of 28 HMSN-related genes. We have applied this panel to three representative patients with variable HMSN phenotype and uncertain diagnostic classifications. Using our NGS platform we rapidly identified three already described pathogenic heterozygous variants in MFN2, MPZ and DNM2 genes. Here we show that our pre-custom platform allows a fast, specific and low-cost diagnosis in sporadic HMSN cases. This prompt diagnosis is useful for providing a well-timed treatment, establishing a recurrence risk and preventing further investigations poorly tolerated by patients and expensive for the health system. Importantly, our study illustrates the utility and successful application of NGS to mutation screening of a Mendelian disorder with extreme locus heterogeneity.

  13. Neuropathic pain in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Na Young; Shin, Youn Ho; Jung, Junyang

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT referred by CMT patients. However, neuropathic pain is not considered a significant symptom in CMT patient and no researchers have studied profoundly the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain in CMT. Here, we highlight the relationship between CMT disease and neuropathic pain via previous several studies. PMID:24278891

  14. Rituximab Improves Subclinical Temporal Dispersion of Distal Compound Muscle Action Potential in Anti-MAG/SGPG Neuropathy Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Minori; Yamamoto, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Patients with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG)/sulfated glucuronyl paragloboside (SGPG) neuropathy associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia show demyelinating neuropathy, but the temporal dispersion of distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in motor nerve conduction studies (NCS), which represents heterogeneous demyelination at the motor nerve terminal, is rare. We report on a 70-year-old man with anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia; he had a 2-year history of mild dysesthesia of the foot sole without any motor symptoms. He showed marked temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in the tibial nerve with other demyelinating findings in the NCS. The temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in the tibial nerve improved significantly, and motor function was again normal 1 year after rituximab monotherapy. The temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy is rare, but it could occur from an early stage when the patients show mild or no motor symptoms. Rituximab therapy before secondary axonal degeneration has great potential to reverse the effects of the demyelination including the temporal dispersion of distal CMAP, and to prevent the deterioration of neuropathy in anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy.

  15. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS): Advances in understanding and treating neuropathy, 24–25 October 2006; Bethesda, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Eva L.; Cornblath, David R.; Porter, John; Dworkin, Robert; Scherer, Steven

    2009-01-01

    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of basic and clinical research in peripheral neurobiology and clinical neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to identify areas where additional research could lead to the development of new therapeutics in the next 5 years. Participants discussed the current understanding of disease mechanisms of axonal and demyelinating neuropathies, existing techniques in research, disease biomarkers, and assessment of neuropathy. Painful neuropathies were discussed at the basic scientific and clinical levels in relation to new insights into etiology and treatment. The meeting concluded with a discussion on therapeutic development in neuropathy and the need for a unified approach to multicenter trials. Short-term goals of the workshop were to form a working group for neuropathy, the Peripheral Neuropathy Study Group, and to translate new scientific findings into therapies and complete clinical trials. PMID:18346227

  16. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  17. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  18. [Genetics of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Gess, B; Schirmacher, A; Young, P

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathies belong to the most common neurogenetic disorders. They appear mostly as sensory and motor neuropathies but there are also pure sensory, pure motor as well as sensory and autonomic hereditary neuropathies. In clinical practice, knowledge of hereditary neuropathies is important in order to recognize them among polyneuropathies and achieve a successful genetic diagnosis. The molecular genetics of hereditary neuropathies are very heterogeneous with currently more than 40 known disease-causing genes. The 4 most common genes account for almost 90% of the genetically diagnosed hereditary neuropathies. In this review article we provide an overview of the currently known genes and propose a rational genetic work-up protocol of the most common genes.

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  20. Drug-induced optic neuropathy-TB or not TB.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Monika; Sharp, Dianne; Best, Stephen; Vincent, Andrea; Vaphiades, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is an inherited optic neuropathy manifesting with variable penetrance and expressivity. Other genetic and environmental factors are postulated to contribute to more marked visual loss in some affected individuals. Optic neuropathy is also a known adverse effect of ethambutol therapy for tuberculosis. This case report demonstrates an atypical presentation of ethambutol toxicity, with progressive profound loss of vision despite drug cessation. A subsequent diagnosis of autosomal dominant optic atrophy was made when the proband's sons presented with mild visual disturbances and color vision defects, confirmed with electrophysiology and OPA1 gene mutational analysis. This case emphasizes the importance of avoiding potentially neurotoxic therapy in predisposed individuals and the influence of environmental factors in patients with inherited optic neuropathies. PMID:20083290

  1. Different intracellular pathomechanisms produce diverse Myelin Protein Zero neuropathies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wrabetz, Lawrence; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Pennuto, Maria; Dati, Gabriele; Tinelli, Elisa; Fratta, Pietro; Previtali, Stefano; Imperiale, Daniele; Zielasek, Jurgen; Toyka, Klaus; Avila, Robin L; Kirschner, Daniel A; Messing, Albee; Feltri, M Laura; Quattrini, Angelo

    2006-02-22

    Missense mutations in 22 genes account for one-quarter of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) hereditary neuropathies. Myelin Protein Zero (MPZ, P0) mutations produce phenotypes ranging from adult demyelinating (CMT1B) to early onset [Déjérine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) or congenital hypomyelination] to predominantly axonal neuropathy, suggesting gain of function mechanisms. To test this directly, we produced mice in which either the MpzS63C (DSS) or MpzS63del (CMT1B) transgene was inserted randomly, so that the endogenous Mpz alleles could compensate for any loss of mutant P0 function. We show that either mutant allele produces demyelinating neuropathy that mimics the corresponding human disease. However, P0S63C creates a packing defect in the myelin sheath, whereas P0S63del does not arrive to the myelin sheath and is instead retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it elicits an unfolded protein response (UPR). This is the first evidence for UPR in association with neuropathy and provides a model to determine whether and how mutant proteins can provoke demyelination from outside of myelin. PMID:16495463

  2. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown.

  3. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  4. Nervonic acid and demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J R; Coupland, K; Wilson, R

    1994-04-01

    Demyelination in adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is associated with an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids such as 26:0 stemming from a genetic defect in the peroxisomal beta oxidation system responsible for the chain shortening of these fatty acids. Long chain monoenoic acids such as erucic acid, 22:1(n-9), can normalise elevated serum levels of 26:0 in ALD by depressing their biosynthesis from shorter chain saturated fatty acids. Sphingolipids from post mortem ALD brain have decreased levels of nervonic acid, 24:1(n-9), and increased levels of stearic acid, 18:0. Increased levels of 26:0 are accompanied by decreased nervonic acid biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts from ALD patients. Sphingolipids from post mortem MS brain have the same decreased 24:1(n-9) and increased 18:0 seen in post mortem ALD brain. The 24:1(n-9) content of sphingomyelin is depressed in erythrocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Defects in the microsomal biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids including 24:1(n-9) in 'jumpy' and 'quaking' mice are accompanied by impaired myelination. An impairment in the provision of nervonic acid in demyelinating diseases is indicated, suggesting that dietary therapy with oils rich in very long chain monenoic acid fatty acids may be beneficial in such conditions.

  5. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Leussink, Verena I.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Stettner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients. PMID:27366241

  6. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  7. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  8. Development profile in a patient with monosomy 10q and Dup(17p) associated with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, J.E.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H.

    1996-02-02

    We report on a patient with dup(17p) and monosomy (10q) resulting from a familial translocation. Manifestations typical of both syndromes were present. The overall development of this patient was better by comparison with similar reported cases of either anomaly. Our evaluation detected severe gross motor delay and signs of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. This patient is trisomic for the region of 17p which includes the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene, known to be duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1A (CMT1A). Our analysis in this patient suggests that trisomy for the PMP-22 gene led to the demyelinating neuropathy and contributed to his severe motor development delay. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A novel MPZ gene mutation in exon 2 causing late-onset demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Chavada, Govindsinh; Rao, D Ganesh; Martindale, Joanne; Hadjivassiliou, Marios

    2012-06-01

    The myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) encodes the major structural protein component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. More than 120 mutations in MPZ have been detected so far. Clinical phenotypes include CMT1B, CMT2, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelination neuropathy. We report a new previously unreported mutation in the MPZ gene causing a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The initial apparent absence of a family history resulted in the patient being treated for an inflammatory neuropathy with some subjective improvement. We subsequently identified another affected member of the same family with the same genotype leading to the correct diagnosis. Both the affected individuals had an 8-base pair deletion, c.160_167delTCCCGGGT in MPZ exon 2. PMID:22622165

  10. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  11. A review of primary hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Votruba, M; Aijaz, S; Moore, A T

    2003-01-01

    The primary inherited optic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders that result in loss of retinal ganglion cells, leading to the clinical appearance of optic atrophy. They affect between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 people. The main clinical features are a reduction in visual acuity, colour vision abnormalities, centro-caecal visual field defects and pallor of the optic nerve head. Electrophysiological testing shows a normal flash electroretinogram, absent or delayed pattern visually evoked potentials suggestive of a conduction deficit and N95 waveform reduction on the pattern electroretinogram, consistent with a primary ganglion cell pathology. The primary inherited optic neuropathies may be sporadic or familial. The mode of inheritance may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked recessive or mitochondrial. Within each of these groups, the phenotypic characteristics vary in such features as the mode and age of onset, the severity of the visual loss, the colour deficit and the overall prognosis. A number of different genes (most as yet unidentified) in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, underlie these disorders. The elucidation of the role of the encoded proteins will improve our understanding of basic mechanisms of ganglion cell development, physiology and metabolism and further our understanding of the pathophysiology of optic nerve disease. It will also improve diagnosis, counselling and management of patients, and eventually lead to the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  12. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively.

  13. [Acquired inflammatory neuropathies in children and their therapy].

    PubMed

    Kaciński, M

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathies where there is an association with acquired peripheral nerves dysfunction and inflammation include inflammatory neuropathies (IN), as well as sequelae of vaccinations involving peripheral nerves. In a small portion of these diseases central nervous system is involved. In the years 1996-2000, among 22 children with acute flaccid paresis who were hospitalized in the Kraków Department of Paediatric Neurology, there were 16 patients with IN, including 13 with Guillain-Barré syndrome, single cases of Miller-Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy involving central nervous system and neuroborreliosis. Additionally, four children were hospitalized for optic neuritis. The author presents data on aetiology, electrophysiology and follow-up of these patients, as well as describes the management and outcome. Apart from their cognitive and practical value, these data significantly correspond with the currently implemented program of poliomyelitis eradication.

  14. Traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Steinsapir, K D; Goldberg, R A

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the pathophysiologic mechanisms of traumatic optic neuropathy is limited. The optic nerve is a tract of the brain. Therefore, the cellular and biochemical pathophysiology of brain and spinal cord trauma and ischemia provide insight into mechanisms that may operate in traumatic optic neuropathy. The dosage of methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/6 hours) which was successful in the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study 2 (NASCIS 2) evolved from the unique pharmacology of corticosteroids as antioxidants. The management of traumatic optic neuropathy rests on an accurate diagnosis which begins with a comprehensive clinical assessment and appropriate neuroimaging. The results of medical and surgical strategies for treating this injury have not been demonstrated to be better than those achieved without treatment. The spinal cord is a mixed grey and white matter tract of the brain in contrast to the optic nerve which is a pure white matter tract. The treatment success seen with methylprednisolone in the NASCIS 2 study may not generalize to the treatment of traumatic optic neuropathy. Conversely, if the treatment does generalize to the optic nerve, NASCIS 2 data suggests that treatment must be started within eight hours of injury, making traumatic optic neuropathy one of the true ophthalmic emergencies. Given the uncertainties in the treatment, ophthalmologists involved in the management of traumatic optic neuropathy are encouraged to participate in the collaborative study of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  15. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-07-30

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic.

  16. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  17. Recurrence Quantification Analysis of F-Waves and the Evaluation of Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Morris A.; Patil, Vijaya K.; Webber, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Electrodiagnostic (EDX) patterns of neuropathic dysfunction have been based on axonal/demyelinating criteria requiring prior assumptions. This has not produced classifications of desired sensitivity or specificity. Furthermore, standard nerve conduction studies have limited reproducibility. New methodologies in EDX seem important. Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA) is a nonlinear method for examining patterns of recurrence. RQA might provide a unique method for the EDX evaluation of neuropathies. RQA was used to analyze F-wave recordings from the abductor hallucis muscle in 61 patients with neuropathies. Twenty-nine of these patients had diabetes as the sole cause of their neuropathies. In the other 32 patients, the etiologies of the neuropathies were diverse. Commonly used EDX variables were also recorded. RQA data could separate the 29 patients with diabetic neuropathies from the other 32 patients (P < 0.009). Statistically significant differences in two EDX variables were also present: compound muscle action potential amplitudes (P < 0.007) and F-wave persistence (P < 0.001). RQA analysis of F-waves seemed able to distinguish diabetic neuropathies from the other neuropathies studied, and this separation was associated with specific physiological abnormalities. This study would therefore support the idea that RQA of F-waves can distinguish between types of neuropathic dysfunction based on EDX data alone without prior assumptions. PMID:26688754

  18. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino; Targher, Giovanni; Zaffanello, Marco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2008-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders are a rare, but probably underdiagnosed, cause of symptomatic bleeding. They are characterized by abnormalities of platelet number (inherited thrombocytopenias), function (inherited disorders of platelet function) or both. This review briefly discusses the inherited platelet disorders with respect to molecular defects, diagnostic evaluation and treatment strategies.

  19. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  20. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  1. Gliopathy of Demyelinating and Non-Demyelinating Strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lawrence C.; Biswas, Kaushiki; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Nabar, Manasi; Stout, Marjorie; Hingley, Susan T.; Grinspan, Judith B.; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59) and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2) viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease. PMID:26733813

  2. Challenges in the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Costa, R; Iancu Ferfoglia, R; Viala, K; Léger, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare disease, the most frequent one within the spectrum of the so-called "chronic immune-mediated neuropathies". Challenges in the treatment of CIDP firstly concern its diagnosis, which may be difficult, mainly for the atypical forms. Secondly, challenges encompass the choice of the first-line treatment, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchanges (PE) that have been proven as efficacious by several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Recent reports have focused on both different regimens of corticosteroids, and the occurrence of relapses following treatment with either corticosteroids or IVIg. These data may be helpful for the choice of the first-line treatment and may result in changing the guidelines for treatment of CIDP in clinical practice. The third and more difficult challenge is to manage long-term treatment for CIDP, since no immunomodulatory treatment has to date been proven as efficacious in this situation. Lastly, challenges in the treatment concern the choice of the best outcome measure for CIDP in RCT and clinical practice. The aim of this article is to overview the results of the more recently reported published trials for CIDP, and to give some insights for the current and future management of CIDP.

  3. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Trompetto, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies. Methods Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD) in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index. Results Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged. Discussion Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open), and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed). PMID:26977594

  4. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  5. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  6. Differential diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and related neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D

    2004-06-01

    The diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies (e. g. Déjèrine-Sottas disease; hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) appears to be easy. However, the incredible advances in molecular genetics have greatly complicated the classification of these disorders, and the proper diagnosis of the CMT subtype may be important for correct genetic counselling and prognosis. Moreover, these diseases may be confused with potentially treatable acquired and inherited neuropathies, such as dysimmune neuropathies, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and Refsum's disease. A number of clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological, morphological and neuroradiological features that may help in the diagnostic process are reviewed in the present paper. DNA investigations are fundamental but need to be properly addressed. Currently, great interest is focused on the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies, and surprising findings are coming from research on animal models. PMID:15221625

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: decreased claudin-5 and relocated ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, T; Numata, Y; Mizusawa, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the dynamics of molecules composing the blood–nerve barrier (BNB) in inflammatory neuropathies. Methods: The expression of four tight junction (TJ) proteins—claudin-1, claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1—was analysed immunohistochemically in sural nerve biopsy specimens obtained from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Results: Claudin-1 was detected only in perineurial cells, whereas claudin-5 was present in endothelial cells, irrespective of vessel location or size. Occludin and ZO-1 were found in perineurial cells, in addition to some epineurial and endoneurial endothelial cells. In CIDP, percentages of endoneurial small vessels immunoreactive for claudin-5 were significantly decreased, as were ZO-1 immunoreactive endoneurial small vessels, with staining localised to interfaces between cells. Claudin-1 and occludin immunoreactivity did not differ appreciably between the neuropathies examined. Conclusions: The downregulation of claudin-5 and altered localisation of ZO-1 seen in CIDP specimens may indicate that BNB derangement occurs in inflammatory neuropathies. Further investigation of TJ molecules may suggest new treatments based on properties of the BNB. PMID:15090575

  8. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Athappilly, Geetha; Pelak, Victoria S; Mandava, Naresh; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2008-10-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most frequent cause of vision loss in middle age. Clinical and laboratory research studies have begun to clarify the natural history, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of various ischemic nerve injuries. As a result, physicians are acquiring new tools to aid in the diagnosis and potential treatment of ischemic nerve injury. The aim of this review is to examine recent data on anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to provide a framework for physicians to manage and counsel affected individuals. PMID:18826805

  9. [Demyelinating processes of a viral nature].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, G V; Dobykin, A M

    1981-01-01

    Demyelination processes due to viral infections (encephalomyelitis induced by mouse hepatitis virus, Theiler's encephalomyelitis, canine distemper, and marek's disease) were simulated in laboratory animals to study the corresponding human diseases (multiple sclerosis, multifocal leucoencephalopathy, Guillain-Barre's syndrome). The following mechanisms of tissue injury are discussed: (1) viral damage of myelin-supporting cells, (2) demyelination occurring as a side effect of specific and non-specific inflammatory reactions to the viruses persisting in the nervous system, (3) autoimmune reaction triggered by virus infection. Special attention is paid to the role of virus agents in the development of these processes.

  10. Mutation in FAM134B causing severe hereditary sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinead M; Davidson, Gabrielle L; Brandner, Sebastian; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are rare inherited neuropathies presenting with sensory loss and complications, including ulcers, infections, osteomyelitis and amputations. Usually, sensory symptoms predominate although motor involvement can occur. Autonomic features may be minimal (then hereditary sensory neuropathy, HSN, is preferred). HSAN has been classified into five subtypes depending on clinical presentation.1 Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy II (HSANII or HSNII) is an early onset, autosomal recessive sensory neuropathy with ulcero-mutilating complications due to mutations in the HSN2 isoform of the WNK1 gene.2 Recently, a similar phenotype was described in a Saudi-Arabian family, and a homozygous nonsense mutation found in a new gene, FAM134B (family with sequence similarity 134, member B), encoding a newly identified Golgi protein. The index case in this family was initially thought to have leprosy. Three additional families (out of 75 patients) with similar phenotypes were found to have homozygous loss of function mutations in FAM134B.3 Here, we report the clinical and pathological findings in a further patient with HSNII due to a homozygous mutation in FAM134B. PMID:21115472

  11. Clinical description of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Little, Ann A; Albers, James W

    2015-01-01

    Toxic neuropathy, although rare, is an important consideration in the setting of a known or suspected toxic exposure in the workplace or other environment. This chapter discusses the clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies, highlighting findings that direct further workup and may point to specific toxins as etiology. The difficulty of establishing causality of a toxin in relation to peripheral neuropathy is discussed; guidelines for establishing causality are presented. Examples of common industrial toxins are listed, including their typical industrial uses and their mechanisms of action in producing neuropathy. Characteristic clinical presentations of specific toxic neuropathies are highlighted with selected case studies. PMID:26563794

  12. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-01-01

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic. PMID:871863

  13. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy.

  14. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  15. Mitochondria and peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2012-12-01

    There has been considerable progress during the past 24 years in the molecular genetics of mitochondrial DNA and related nuclear DNA mutations, and more than 100 nerve biopsies from hereditary neuropathies related to mitochondrial cytopathy have been accurately examined. Neuropathies were first reported in diseases related to point mutations of mitochondrial DNA, but they proved to be a prominent feature of the phenotype in mitochondrial disorders caused by defects in nuclear DNA, particularly in 3 genes: polymerase gamma 1 (POLG1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2), and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1). Most patients have sensory-motor neuropathy, sometimes associated with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, seizures, parkinsonism, myopathy, or visceral disorders. Some cases are caused by consanguinity, but most are sporadic with various phenotypes mimicking a wide range of other etiologies. Histochemistry on muscle biopsy, as well as identification of crystalloid inclusions at electron microscopy, may provide a diagnostic clue to mitochondriopathy, but nerve biopsy is often less informative. Nevertheless, enlarged mitochondria containing distorted or amputated cristae are highly suggestive, particularly when located in the Schwann cell cytoplasm. Also noticeable are clusters of regenerating myelinated fibers surrounded by concentric Schwann cell processes, and such onion bulb-like formations are frequently observed in neuropathies caused by GDAP1 mutations. PMID:23147504

  16. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  17. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  18. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  19. Inherited thrombophilia: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a genetically determined predisposition to develop thromboembolic complications. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors include antithrombin deficiency, protein C and protein S deficiencies, activated protein C resistance due to factor V Leiden mutation, inherited hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombin G20210A variant, dys- and hyperfibrinogenemia and elevated factor VIII levels. In this review we briefly analyze, from an epidemiologic, laboratory and clinical point of view, the main inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Finally, we discuss the synergism between genetic and acquired prothrombotic risk factors in some conditions such as pregnancy and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Divergent effects of T cell costimulation and inflammatory cytokine production on autoimmune peripheral neuropathy provoked by Aire deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaopei L; Nagavalli, Anil; Smith, Colin-Jamal; Howard, James F; Su, Maureen A

    2013-04-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy results from autoimmune destruction of the peripheral nervous system and is a component of the multiorgan autoimmunity syndrome that results from Aire gene mutations in humans. In parallel, peripheral nervous system autoimmunity resembling chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy develops spontaneously in NOD mice with a partial loss of Aire function (NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice) and is a T cell-mediated disease. In this study, we analyze how key aspects of T cell activation and function modulate disease development in Aire-deficient mice. We show that genetic ablation of the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ completely prevents clinical and electrophysiological evidence of neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. IFN-γ deficiency is associated with absence of immune infiltration and decreased expression of the T cell chemoattractant IP-10 in sciatic nerves. Thus, IFN-γ is absolutely required for the development of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Because IFN-γ secretion is enhanced by B7-CD28 costimulation of T cells, we sought to determine the effects of these costimulatory molecules on neuropathy development. Surprisingly, B7-2 deficiency accelerated neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice, and Ab blockade of both B7-1 and B7-2 resulted in fulminant, early-onset neuropathy. Thus, in contrast to IFN-γ, B7-2 alone and B7-1/B7-2 in combination function to ameliorate neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Together, these findings reveal distinct and opposing effects of the T cell costimulatory pathway and IFN-γ production on the pathogenesis of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  2. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for a treatable condition.

    PubMed

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Sommer, Claudia; Magy, Laurent

    2010-04-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic neuropathy of supposed immune origin. Understanding of its pathophysiology has recently improved, although its causes remain unclear. The classic presentation of CIDP includes sensory and motor symptoms in the distal and proximal segments of the four limbs with areflexia, evolving over more than 8 weeks. Raised protein concentrations in CSF and heterogeneous slowing of nerve conduction are typical of the condition. In addition to this usual phenotype, distribution of symptoms, disease course, and disability can be heterogeneous, leading to underdiagnosis of the disorder. Diagnosis is sometimes challenging and can require use of imaging and nerve biopsy. Steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin are effective, and plasma exchange can be helpful as rescue therapy. The usefulness of immunosuppressants needs to be established. The identification of specific diagnostic markers and new therapeutic strategies with conventional or targeted immunotherapy are needed to improve the outlook for patients with CIDP.

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a boy with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zoilo, Morel Ayala; Eduardo, Benadón; Enrique, Faugier; del Rocio, Maldonado V M

    2010-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired, autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic, autoimmune disease that can affect the central nervous system in about 40% of patients, with prevalence and incidence unknown in the pediatric population due to lack of multicenter studies. We report the case of a 13-year-old Mexican boy, diagnosed with CIDP at the onset of SLE, beginning with progressive muscle weakness of lower and upper limbs, without affection of the central nervous system. The patient had positive ANA, antiDNAdc, antiBeta2glycoprotein, anti-cardiolipin, ANCA-C and X. He received intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclophosphamide, steroids, and azathioprine and showed clinical improvement. It is important to take into account the presence of peripheral neurological disorders in patients with pediatric SLE, considering CIDP as an uncommon presentation, making the diagnosis important for better treatment and evolution.

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  5. [Treatment options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, T

    2006-04-01

    Limits of treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating poly(radiculo)neuropathies (CIDP) patients are better known thanks to recent Cochrane reviews. (1) Randomized controlled trials have only focused on short-term effects, but most patients need long-term therapy, (2) There are three proven effective treatments available (prednisone; intravenous immunoglobulin or IVIg and plasma exchange or PE) which are useful in more than 60 p. 100 of patients, (3) New open studies indicated possible efficacy for mycophenolate, rituximab, etanercept, ciclosporine and interferons, and (4) Whether CIDP variants need specific treatment is still unknown. Many CIDP patients need treatment for years. The fear of side effects during long-term steroid treatment, the high costs of IVIg, the necessity for specialized equipment and the invasive nature of PE, are important factors determining the choice for one of these treatments. In most up-to-date treatment options, patients are initially treated with IVIg at a dosage of 2 g/kg administered for 25 days, clinical improvement can be judged within 10 days. The percentage of patients responding seems to be approximately 70 percent, with a very high chance (approximately 85 percent) that repeated administration of IVIg will be necessary, explaining why most neurologists add an immunosuppressive drug at this stage, but there is no consensus concerning the best drug to be used. Combinations of drugs are most likely to be useful in the next future, using IVIg, prednisone, and a immunosuppressor agent, such as mycophenolate, rituximab, etanercept, or ciclosporine. General measures to rehabilitate patients and to manage symptoms like fatigue and other residual findings are important.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  8. Clinical, pathological and genetic characterization of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN I).

    PubMed

    Houlden, Henry; King, Rosalind; Blake, Julian; Groves, Mike; Love, Seth; Woodward, Cathy; Hammans, Simon; Nicoll, James; Lennox, Graham; O'Donovan, Dominic G; Gabriel, Carolyn; Thomas, P K; Reilly, Mary M

    2006-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN I) is the most frequent type of hereditary neuropathy that primarily affects sensory neurons. The genetic locus for HSAN I has been mapped to chromosome 9q22.1-22.3 and recently the gene was identified as SPTLC1, encoding serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit-1. Sequencing in HSAN I families have previously identified mutations in exons 5, 6 and 13 of this gene. We analysed the SPTLC1 gene for mutations in 8 families with HSAN I, 60 individuals with sporadic sensory neuropathy, 6 HSAN II families, 20 Charcot-Marie-Tooth type I families and 20 families with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type II. Six HSAN I families and a single sporadic neuropathy case had an identical SPTLC1 mutation. No mutations were found in the other groups. Genetic haplotyping across the HSAN I critical region in 5 families and the sporadic case suggested a common founder. Several characteristics, previously not widely recognized were identified, including lack of penetrance of the SPTLC1 mutation in some individuals, variability in age of onset along with an earlier age of onset in younger generations, in some patients surprisingly early and often severe motor involvement and an earlier onset characterized by motor involvement with demyelinating features in males compared to females in 4 families. The sensory findings were often disassociated with prominent pain and temperature loss. Neurophysiology mainly showed a sensory axonal neuropathy but in many individuals there was electrical evidence of demyelination. Sural nerve biopsies from six affected individuals and the post-mortem findings in 1 case showed mainly axonal loss. This in depth study on the phenotype of HSAN I in 6 families and a single sporadic case with a common founder identifies a number of poorly recognized features in this disorder and highlights the clinical heterogeneity both within and between families suggesting the influence of other genetic and acquired

  9. Arsenical peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Liberty; Vale, Allister; Adcock, Jane E

    2010-02-01

    A 49-year-old white man returned urgently to the UK after spending 3 months in Goa. He had a several week history of vomiting, weight loss, a widespread desquamating skin rash, and symptoms and signs of a progressive painful sensorimotor neuropathy. He had a mild normocytic anaemia and lymphopenia. Nerve conduction studies revealed a severe predominantly axonal large fibre sensorimotor neuropathy, confirmed on subsequent sural nerve biopsy. Once he had left Goa most of his symptoms started to rapidly settle although the neuropathic symptoms remained severe. Arsenic poisoning was suspected. A spot urine arsenic concentration was 300 microg/l, confirming the diagnosis. He was treated with chelation therapy. Deliberate arsenic poisoning was highly likely.

  10. Perk Ablation Ameliorates Myelination in S63del-Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1B Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Musner, Nicolò; Sidoli, Mariapaola; Zambroni, Desireè; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; D’Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, P0 glycoprotein accounts for more than 20% of myelin protein content. P0 is synthesized by Schwann cells, processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enters the secretory pathway. However, the mutant P0 with S63 deleted (P0S63del) accumulates in the ER lumen and induces a demyelinating neuropathy in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B)–S63del mice. Accumulation of P0S63del in the ER triggers a persistent unfolded protein response. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER stress sensor that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha) in order to attenuate protein synthesis. We have shown that increasing phosphophorylated-eIF2alpha (P-eIF2alpha) is a potent therapeutic strategy, improving myelination and motor function in S63del mice. Here, we explore the converse experiment: Perk haploinsufficiency reduces P-eIF2alpha in S63del nerves as expected, but surprisingly, ameliorates, rather than worsens S63del neuropathy. Motor performance and myelin abnormalities improved in S63del//Perk+/− compared with S63del mice. These data suggest that mechanisms other than protein translation might be involved in CMT1B/S63del neuropathy. In addition, Perk deficiency in other cells may contribute to demyelination in a non–Schwann-cell autonomous manner. PMID:27095827

  11. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B F; Ewing, D J; Campbell, I W

    1979-10-01

    This review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasinly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added disturbances of thermoregulatory function and pupillary reflexes. Possible effects on neuroendocrine and peptidergic secretion and respiratory control await definition. Current interest centres around the development of a new generation of tests of autonomic nerve function that are simple, non-invasive, reproducible and allow precision in diagnosis and accurate quantitation. Most are based on cardiovascular reflexes and abnormality in them is assumed to reflect autonomic damage elsewhere. Probably no single test suffices and a battery of tests reflecting both parasympathetic and sympathetic function is preferable. Little is known of the natural history. The prevalence may be greater than previously suspected and although symptoms are mild in the majority, a few develop florid features. The relation of control and duration of diabetes to the onset and progression of autonomic neuropathy is not clearly established. Once tests of autonomic function become abnormal they usually remain abnormal. Symptomatic autonomic neuropathy carries a greatly increased mortality rate possibly due to indirect mechanisms such as renal failure and direct mechanisms such as cardio-resiratory arrest. Improved treatment of some of the more disabling symptoms has been possible in recent years. PMID:387501

  12. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes. PMID:16775373

  13. Selective vulnerability of peripheral nerves in avian riboflavin deficiency demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Blumbergs, P C; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Thompson, P D

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency in young chickens produces a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this study, day-old broiler meat chickens were fed a riboflavin-deficient diet (1.8 mg/kg) and killed on posthatch days 6, 11, 16, 21, and 31, while control chickens were given a conventional diet containing 5.0 mg/kg riboflavin. Pathologic changes were found in sciatic, cervical, and lumbar spinal nerves of riboflavin-deficient chickens from day 11 onwards, characterized by endoneurial oedema, hypertrophic Schwann cells, tomacula (redundant myelin swellings), demyelination/remyelination, lipid deposition, and fibroblastic onion bulb formation. Similar changes were also found in large and medium intramuscular nerves, although they were less severe in the latter. However, by contrast, ventral and dorsal spinal nerve roots, distal intramuscular nerves, and subcutaneous nerves were normal at all time points examined. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that riboflavin deficiency in young, rapidly growing chickens produces selective injury to peripheral nerve trunks, with relative sparing of spinal nerve roots and distal nerve branches to muscle and skin. These novel findings suggest that the response of Schwann cells in peripheral nerves with riboflavin deficiency differs because either there are subsets of these cells in, or there is variability in access of nutrients to, different sites within the nerves. PMID:19112122

  14. Multiple sclerosis associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palace, Jacqueline

    2009-11-15

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown although it is recognised to involve an inflammatory process associated with demyelinating plaques and more widespread neurodegeneration. It appears to have become progressively more common in females which is further discussed in this issue, and genetic factors, as identified to date, appear to play only a moderate role. One curious observation is that Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic syndrome, presents clinically overwhelmingly in males, but can be associated with an MS-like illness and when it does it occurs mainly in females. It is interesting to examine this further to assess if this could give us any clues as to the pathogenesis of MS.

  15. Nodes of Ranvier and Paranodes in Chronic Acquired Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Dubourg, Odile; Irinopoulou, Theano; Vigny, Marc; Lachkar, Sylvie; Decker, Laurence; Charnay, Patrick; Denisenko, Natalia; Maisonobe, Thierry; Léger, Jean-Marc; Viala, Karine; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic acquired neuropathies of unknown origin are classified as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP) and chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathies (CIAP). The diagnosis can be very difficult, although it has important therapeutic implications since CIDP can be improved by immunomodulating treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the possible abnormalities of nodal and paranodal regions in these two types of neuropathies. Longitudinal sections of superficial peroneal nerves were obtained from biopsy material from 12 patients with CIDP and 10 patients with CIAP and studied by immunofluorescence and in some cases electron microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed multiple alterations in the nodal and paranodal regions which predominated in Schwann cells in CIDP and in axons in CIAP. In CIDP paranodin/Caspr immunofluorescence was more widespread than in control nerves, extending along the axon in internodes where it appeared intense. Nodal channels Nav and KCNQ2 were less altered but were also detected in the internodes. In CIAP paranodes, paranodin labeling was irregular and/or decreased. To test the consequences of acquired primary Schwann cells alteration on axonal proteins, we used a mouse model based on induced deletion of the transcription factor Krox-20 gene. In the demyelinated sciatic nerves of these mice we observed alterations similar to those found in CIDP by immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting demonstrated increased levels of paranodin. Finally we examined whether the alterations in paranodin immunoreactivity could have a diagnosis value. In a sample of 16 biopsies, the study of paranodin immunofluorescence by blind evaluators led to correct diagnosis in 70±4% of the cases. This study characterizes for the first time the abnormalities of nodes of Ranvier in CIAP and CIDP, and the altered expression and distribution of nodal and paranodal proteins. Marked differences were observed between CIDP and CIAP and the alterations

  16. Nodes of ranvier and paranodes in chronic acquired neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Dubourg, Odile; Irinopoulou, Theano; Vigny, Marc; Lachkar, Sylvie; Decker, Laurence; Charnay, Patrick; Denisenko, Natalia; Maisonobe, Thierry; Léger, Jean-Marc; Viala, Karine; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic acquired neuropathies of unknown origin are classified as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP) and chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathies (CIAP). The diagnosis can be very difficult, although it has important therapeutic implications since CIDP can be improved by immunomodulating treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the possible abnormalities of nodal and paranodal regions in these two types of neuropathies. Longitudinal sections of superficial peroneal nerves were obtained from biopsy material from 12 patients with CIDP and 10 patients with CIAP and studied by immunofluorescence and in some cases electron microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed multiple alterations in the nodal and paranodal regions which predominated in Schwann cells in CIDP and in axons in CIAP. In CIDP paranodin/Caspr immunofluorescence was more widespread than in control nerves, extending along the axon in internodes where it appeared intense. Nodal channels Nav and KCNQ2 were less altered but were also detected in the internodes. In CIAP paranodes, paranodin labeling was irregular and/or decreased. To test the consequences of acquired primary Schwann cells alteration on axonal proteins, we used a mouse model based on induced deletion of the transcription factor Krox-20 gene. In the demyelinated sciatic nerves of these mice we observed alterations similar to those found in CIDP by immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting demonstrated increased levels of paranodin. Finally we examined whether the alterations in paranodin immunoreactivity could have a diagnosis value. In a sample of 16 biopsies, the study of paranodin immunofluorescence by blind evaluators led to correct diagnosis in 70 ± 4% of the cases. This study characterizes for the first time the abnormalities of nodes of Ranvier in CIAP and CIDP, and the altered expression and distribution of nodal and paranodal proteins. Marked differences were observed between CIDP and CIAP and the

  17. Peripheral neuropathies in Sjögren's syndrome: a critical update on clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, P P; Alexopoulos, H; Kosmidis, M L; Mamali, I; Moutsopoulos, H M; Tzioufas, A G; Dalakas, M C

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease that, apart from exocrine glands, may affect every organ or system. Involvement of different sections of the peripheral nervous system results in a wide spectrum of neuropathic manifestations. Based on distinct clinical, electrophysiological and histological criteria, the types of neuropathies seen in Sjögren's syndrome include: a) pure sensory which presents with distal symmetric sensory loss due to axonal degeneration of sensory fibers; sensory ataxia due to loss of proprioceptive large fibers (ganglionopathy); or with painful dysethesias (small fiber sensory neuropathy) due to degeneration of cutaneous axons. The latter appears to be the most common neuropathy in Sjögren's syndrome and requires skin biopsy for diagnosis to document loss or reduction of nerve fiber density; b) sensorimotor polyneuropathy affecting sensory and motor axons, often associated with severe systemic or pro-lymhomatous manifestations, such as palpable purpura and cryoglobulinemia, and c) rare types that include autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. In this review, the frequency, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for each neuropathy subset are discussed and possible pathogenetic mechanisms are outlined.

  18. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  19. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Niamh; Silverman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  20. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic: description of six cases.

    PubMed

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda; Locht, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all patients who developed neurological symptoms during this time period. We found six patients with signs of demyelinizing neurological disorders: four resembling MS, one MS-like condition, and one multifocal motor neuropathy. During a relatively short time period, we found a remarkably high number of neurological demyelinizing AEs probably linked to anti TNF-alpha treatment. The AEs were not associated with a single anti TNF-alpha agent and were thus presumably a class effect. The data presented suggest that neurological AEs may be underreported. We advocate that physicians handling patients during treatment with TNF inhibitors are aware of this potentially serious AE and report these events to the proper medical authorities.

  1. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  2. A prospective study of acute idiopathic neuropathy. III. Immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Winer, J B; Gray, I A; Gregson, N A; Hughes, R A; Leibowitz, S; Shepherd, P; Taylor, W A; Yewdall, V

    1988-01-01

    The immune responses of 100 patients who presented with an acute idiopathic neuropathy were compared with those of age and sex matched controls. Blood lymphocytes and their subsets were counted with a fluorescent activated cell sorter. CD8+ (putative suppressor) lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the first week of the disease but total lymphocytes, total T and CD4+ (putative helper) cells were not altered. This reduction depended on the nature of the preceding infection. Serum complement C3 and C4 concentrations remained normal and immune complexes were rarely detected with a C1q binding assay. Complement-fixing antibodies to human peripheral nerve antigens were discovered in the serum of 7% of patients but only 1% of controls. Complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside were not discovered in any sera. Enzyme-linked immunoassays detected increased antibody responses to galactocerebroside but none at all to human P2 myelin protein in the patient sera. Forty microliter of serum from five patients injected into the sciatic nerves of rats did not induce significantly more demyelination than the serum from control patients. It is concluded that auto-immune responses can only be detected by these techniques in a small minority of patients with acute idiopathic neuropathy. PMID:2969956

  3. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post-hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early-stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1-8, 2016. PMID:26999767

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  5. Tumefactive demyelination-an unusual neurological presentation of HIV.

    PubMed

    Uriel, Alison; Stow, Rachael; Johnson, Leann; Varma, Anoop; du Plessis, Daniel; Gray, Francois; Herwadkar, Amit; Holland, Jeremy; Lewthwaite, Penny; Wilkins, Ed

    2010-11-15

    We describe 3 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus with unusual focal brain syndromes; magnetic resonance imaging revealed "open-ring" pattern space occupying lesions. After deterioration while the patients were receiving anti-Toxoplasma therapy, brain biopsy was performed, which revealed aggressive demyelination consistent with tumefactive demyelination. Treatment with high-dose steroids resulted in complete recovery in all cases.

  6. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with cholesterol deposits in a dog.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Pablo; Sponenberg, D Philip; Pancotto, Theresa; King, Rosalind H M; Jortner, Bernard S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy occurred in an 11-year-old Labrador Retriever dog. Spinal cord compression resulted from massive radiculitis with prominent cholesterol granulomas. Cholesterol deposition and associated granuloma formation is unique in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in both its human and canine expressions.

  8. [Diagnosis of inherited thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Baccini, V; Alessi, M C

    2016-02-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are rare, heterogenous and probably under-diagnosed because often classified as autoimmune thrombocytopenia. About 20 genes were described responsible for these thrombocytopenias. Precise diagnosis is necessary because the prognosis is different and some of them can evolve into hemopathies. First of all, it is important to gather a body of evidence to orientate towards an inherited cause: presence of the thrombocytopenia since childhood and of other family cases is a strong argument. Secondly, it is difficult to target the genetic investigations that settle the precise diagnosis. Genetic variants responsible for inherited thrombocytopenias affect different stage during megakaryocytopoiesis and cause thrombocytopenias with distinct characteristics. Presence of extra-hematological features, platelets' size measurement and evaluation of bone marrow megakaryocyte morphology when it is possible allow a primary orientation. We propose a diagnostic approach considering extra-hematological features, mode of inheritance, morphology, molecular and functional platelets' studies and bone marrow megakaryocyte morphology in order to better target genetic study. Nevertheless, despite this approach, some inherited thrombocytopenias remain still unexplained and could benefit from new methods of new generation sequencing in the future. PMID:26617290

  9. Paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination with underlying combined germ cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, Jack R; Archer, Hilary A; Coulthard, Elizabeth; Appelman, Auke P A; Sutak, Judit; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Love, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Paraneoplastic demyelination is a rare disorder of the central nervous system. We describe a 60-year-old man with tumefactive demyelination who had an underlying retroperitoneal germ cell cancer. He presented with visuospatial problems and memory loss and had a visual field defect. His MRI was interpreted as a glioma but stereotactic biopsy showed active demyelination. Investigation for multiple sclerosis was negative but CT imaging showed retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, and nodal biopsy confirmed a combined germ cell cancer. He responded poorly to corticosteroid treatment, and his visual field defect progressed. However, 6 months after plasma exchange and successful chemotherapy, he has partially improved clinically and radiographically. Tumefactive demyelination is typically associated with multiple sclerosis but may be paraneoplastic. It is important to recognise paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination early, as the neurological outcome relies on treating the associated malignancy. PMID:26088612

  10. [Acute-Onset Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Takamichi; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized by an insidious onset showing progression over two months. However, up to 16% of CIDP patients may show acute presentation similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Such cases are termed acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP). Distinguishing A-CIDP from GBS, especially the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) subtype, is critical because therapeutic strategies and outcomes may differ between the two syndromes. Regarding clinical features, A-CIDP is less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or the need for mechanical ventilation, in comparison with AIDP. Electrophysiological features are usually quite similar between the two, although follow-up studies may elucidate key differences. Around 8%-16% of GBS patients may show clinical deterioration shortly after improvement or stabilization following initial immunological therapy. Such a situation is termed treatment-related fluctuation (TRF; GBS-TRF). The distinction between GBS-TRF and A-CIDP is an important clinical issue because maintenance treatment is often required in CIDP. The diagnosis of A-CIDP should be considered when the condition of a patient with GBS deteriorates after nine weeks from onset, or when deterioration occurs three times or more.

  11. CNS demyelination in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Kan, Lixin; Kitterman, Joseph A; Procissi, Daniele; Chakkalakal, Salin; Peng, Chian-Yu; McGuire, Tammy L; Goldsby, Robert E; Pignolo, Robert J; Shore, Eileen M; Kaplan, Frederick S; Kessler, John A

    2012-12-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare genetic disorder of progressive heterotopic ossification (HO) caused by a recurrent activating mutation of ACVR1/ALK2, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor. FOP is characterized by progressive HO, which is associated with inflammation in the setting of dysregulated BMP signaling, however, a variety of atypical neurologic symptoms are also reported by FOP patients. The main objective of this study is to investigate the potential underlying mechanism that is responsible for the observed atypical neurologic symptoms. We evaluated two mouse models of dysregulated BMP signaling for potential CNS pathology through non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and histological and immunohistochemical approaches. In one model, BMP4 is over-expressed under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter; the second model is a knock-in of a recurrent FOP mutation of ACVR1/ALK2. We also retrospectively examined MRI scans of four FOP patients. We consistently observed demyelinated lesions and focal inflammatory changes of the CNS in both mouse models but not in wild-type controls, and also found CNS white matter lesions in each of the four FOP patients examined. These findings suggest that dysregulated BMP signaling disturbs normal homeostasis of target tissues, including CNS where focal demyelination may manifest as the neurologic symptoms frequently observed in FOP.

  12. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  13. Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Daphalapurkar, Nitin; White, Helen; Nguyen, Thao D; Panghat, Lijo; Chang, Jessica; McCulley, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON) refers to optic nerve injury resulting from impact remote to the optic nerve. The mechanism of injury is not understood, and there are no confirmed protocols for prevention, mitigation or treatment. Most data concerning this condition comes from case series of civilian patients suffering blunt injury, such as from sports- or motor vehicle-related concussion, rather than military-related ballistic or blast damage. Research in this field will likely require the development of robust databases to identify patients with ITON and follow related outcomes, in addition to both in-vivo animal and virtual human models to study the mechanisms of damage and potential therapies. PMID:26759722

  14. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  15. Suprascapular neuropathy in pitchers.

    PubMed

    Ringel, S P; Treihaft, M; Carry, M; Fisher, R; Jacobs, P

    1990-01-01

    The clinical features and preoperative and postoperative electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed in two professional pitchers with a suprascapular neuropathy. These studies demonstrate that denervation of the infraspinatus and/or supraspinatus muscle is not always due to entrapment of the nerve at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notches, as is often proposed. Similar studies in healthy pitchers during spring training and again at midseason demonstrate that slowing of suprascapular nerve conduction is detectable in some cases as the season progresses. Sagittal sections of a cadaver with the arm fixed in the acceleration phase of the pitching motion demonstrate five possible sites of trauma to the suprascapular nerve. Mechanisms proposed to explain these progressive, but potentially reversible, changes include consideration of biomechanical factors as well as anatomical features. An alternative hypothesis to nerve trauma that explains this symptom complex is intimal damage to the axillary or suprascapular artery and subsequent production of microemboli which become trapped in the suprascapular nerve vasa nervorum.

  16. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  17. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  18. Epigenetic inheritance of centromeres.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, S; Furuyama, T

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically maintained; however, the mechanism that underlies centromere inheritance is unknown. Centromere identity and inheritance require the assembly of nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant in place of canonical H3. Work from our laboratory has led to the proposal that epigenetic inheritance of centromeres evolved as adaptations of CenH3 and other centromere proteins to resist drive of selfish centromeres during female meiosis. Our molecular studies have revealed that the Drosophila CenH3 nucleosome is equivalent to half of the canonical H3 nucleosome and induces positive supercoils, as opposed to the negative supercoils induced by an H3 nucleosome. CenH3 likewise induces positive supercoils in functional yeast centromeres in vivo. The right-handed wrapping of DNA around the histone core implied by positive supercoiling indicates that centromeric nucleosomes are unlikely to be octameric and that the exposed surfaces holding the nucleosome together would be available for kinetochore protein recruitment. The mutual incompatibility of nucleosomes with opposite topologies could explain how centromeres are efficiently maintained as unique loci on chromosomes. We propose that the opposite wrapping of DNA around a half-nucleosome core particle facilitates a mode of inheritance that does not depend on DNA sequence, DNA modification or protein conformation.

  19. Functional recovery of callosal axons following demyelination: a critical window.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D K; Mangiardi, M; Xia, X; López-Valdés, H E; Tiwari-Woodruff, S K

    2009-12-29

    Axonal dysfunction as a result of persistent demyelination has been increasingly appreciated as a cause of functional deficit in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the ultimate causes of ongoing axonal dysfunction and find effective measures to prevent axon loss. Our findings related to functional deficit and functional recovery of axons from a demyelinating insult are important preliminary steps towards understanding this issue. Cuprizone diet for 3-6 wks triggered extensive corpus callosum (CC) demyelination, reduced axon conduction, and resulted in loss of axon structural integrity including nodes of Ranvier. Replacing cuprizone diet with normal diet led to regeneration of myelin, but did not fully reverse the conduction and structural deficits. A shorter 1.5 wk cuprizone diet also caused demyelination of the CC, with minimal loss of axon structure and nodal organization. Switching to normal diet led to remyelination and restored callosal axon conduction to normal levels. Our findings suggest the existence of a critical window of time for remyelination, beyond which demyelinated axons become damaged beyond the point of repair and permanent functional loss follows. Moreover, initiating remyelination early within the critical period, before prolonged demyelination-induced axon damage ensues, will improve functional axon recovery and inhibit disease progression. PMID:19800949

  20. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Helmar C; Hughes, Richard A C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a sporadically occurring, acquired neuropathic condition of autoimmune origin with chronic progressive or relapsing-remitting disease course. CIDP is a treatable disorder; a variety of immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory agents are available to modify, impede, and even reverse the neurological deficits and sequelae that manifest in the course of the disease. However, in many cases CIDP is not curable. Challenges that remain in the treatment of CIDP patients are well recognized and include a remarkably individual heterogeneity in terms of disease course and treatment response as well as a lack of objective and feasible measures to predict and monitor the responsiveness to the available therapies. In this chapter an overview of the currently used drugs in the treatment of CIDP patients is given and some important and controversial issues that arise in the context of care for CIDP patients are discussed.

  1. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination. PMID:27572856

  2. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  3. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  4. Physical examination of upper extremity compressive neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Popinchalk, Samuel P; Schaffer, Alyssa A

    2012-10-01

    A thorough history and physical examination are vital to the assessment of upper extremity compressive neuropathies. This article summarizes relevant anatomy and physical examination findings associated with upper extremity compressive neuropathies.

  5. Mixed or immune complex cryoglobulinaemia and neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cream, J. J.; Hern, J. E. C.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Mackenzie, I. C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Three patients with peripheral neuropathy and mixed or immune complex cryoglobulinaemia are reported. The significance of mixed cryoglobulinaemia and the pathogenesis of the peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Images PMID:4360402

  6. Optic nerve degeneration and mitochondrial dysfunction: genetic and acquired optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2002-05-01

    Selective degeneration of the smallest fibers (papillo-macular bundle) of the human optic nerve occurs in a large number of optic neuropathies characterized primarily by loss of central vision. The pathophysiology that underlies this peculiar pattern of cell involvement probably reflects different forms of genetic and acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), dominant optic atrophy (Kjer disease), the optic atrophy of Leigh's syndrome, Friedreich ataxia and a variety of other conditions are examples of inherited mitochondrial disorders with different etiologies. Tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA), the Cuban epidemic of optic neuropathy (CEON) and other dietary (Vitamins B, folate deficiencies) optic neuropathies, as well as toxic optic neuropathies such as due to chloramphenicol, ethambutol, or more rarely to carbon monoxide, methanol and cyanide are probably all related forms of acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Biochemical and cellular studies in LHON point to a partial defect of respiratory chain function that may generate either an ATP synthesis defect and/or a chronic increase of oxidative stress. Histopathological studies in LHON cases and a rat model mimicking CEON revealed a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the corresponding axons, particularly in the temporal-central part of the optic nerve. Anatomical peculiarities of optic nerve axons, such as the asymmetric pattern of myelination, may have functional implications on energy dependence and distribution of mitochondrial populations in the different sections of the nerve. Histological evidence suggests impaired axonal transport of mitochondria in LHON and in the CEON-like rat model, indicating a possible common pathophysiology for this category of optic neuropathies. Histological evidence of myelin pathology in LHON also suggests a role for oxidative stress, possibly affecting the oligodendrocytes of the optic nerves.

  7. Epigenetic inheritance in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Mariusz; Landweber, Laura F

    2009-12-01

    2009 marks not only the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth but also publication of the first scientific evolutionary theory, Lamarck's Philosophie Zoologique. While Lamarck embraced the notion of the inheritance of acquired characters, he did not invent it (Burkhardt, 1984). New phenomena discovered recently offer molecular pathways for the transmission of several acquired characters. Ciliates have long provided model systems to study phenomena that bypass traditional modes of inheritance. RNA, normally thought of as a conduit in gene expression, displays a novel mode of action in ciliated protozoa. For example, maternal RNA templates provide both an organizing guide for DNA rearrangements in Oxytricha and a template that can transmit spontaneous mutations that may arise during somatic growth to the next generation, providing two such mechanisms of so-called Lamarckian inheritance. This suggests that the somatic ciliate genome is really an 'epigenome', formed through templates and signals arising from the previous generation. This review will discuss these new biological roles for RNA, including non-coding 'template' RNA molecules. The evolutionary consequences of viable mechanisms in ciliates to transmit acquired characters may create an additional store of heritable variation that contributes to the cosmopolitan success of this diverse lineage of microbial eukaryotes.

  8. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  9. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  10. Paraproteinemic neuropathy: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-01-01

    The term paraproteinemic neuropathy describes a heterogeneous set of neuropathies characterized by the presence of homogeneous immunoglobulin in the serum. An abnormal clonal proliferation of B-lymphocytes or plasma cells, which may or may not occur in the context of a hematologic malignancy, produces the immunoglobulins in excess. If malignancy is identified, treatment should be targeted to the neoplasm. Most cases, however, occur as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Few prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are available to inform the management of paraproteinemic neuropathies. Clinical experience combined with data from smaller, uncontrolled studies provide a basis for recommendations, which depend on the specific clinical setting in which the paraprotein occurs. In this review, we provide a clinically practical approach to diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26821540

  11. Generalized pruritus preceding paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hébant, Benjamin; Miret, Nicolas; Berthelot, Lucile; Jaafar, Mohamad; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving non-metastatic systemic effects accompanying malignancies, and occur remotely from the tumor itself. Chronic pruritus lasting more than 6 weeks can be from paraneoplastic origin. A 65-year-old woman was admitted for generalized pruritus lasting for 1 month, despite treatment with prednisolone, levocetirizine and hydroxyzine. General examination was normal. Biological data and gastroscopy were normal. One month later, the patient was readmitted for worsening of her pruritus and walking impairment, revealing a severe sensory neuropathy. Blood anti-Hu antibodies returned positive at a level of 400 (normal <100). Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies revealed small-cell lung carcinoma. To our knowledge, the association of generalized pruritus and paraneoplastic neuropathy has been rarely reported. Our observation raises the question of a pathophysiological continuum between pruritus and neuropathy in a paraneoplastic context. PMID:26633089

  12. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  13. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  14. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  15. Circulating subsets and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cell function in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Lara; Makowska, Anna; Gregson, Norman; Nemni, Raffaello; Hughes, Richard A C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is probably autoimmune in origin. Different components of the adaptive and innate immunity may be responsible for the aberrant response towards nerve antigens. To investigate this, we examined lymphocyte subsets and regulatory T cell (Treg) function in the blood of CIDP patients, healthy controls (HC) and subjects with non-immune mediated neuropathies (other neuropathies, ON). We used flow cytometry to determine the frequency of monocytes, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NK-T cells, total and activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, effector memory and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treg function was studied after polyclonal stimulation and antigen specific stimulation with myelin protein peptides in CIDP and HC. There was an increased frequency of monocytes (p = 0.02) and decreased frequency of NK cells (p = 0.02) in CIDP compared with HC but not ON. There were no significant differences in other populations. Treg function was impaired in CIDP compared to HC (p = 0.02), whilst T cell proliferation to myelin protein peptides before and after depletion of Tregs was not different between patients and controls. This study shows increased circulating monocytes and reduced NK cells in CIDP. Although Treg frequency was not altered, we confirm that Tregs display a defect of suppressive function. Myelin protein peptides were not the target of the altered peripheral regulation of the immune response. The mechanisms of peripheral immune tolerance in CIDP and their relevance to the pathogenesis deserve further exploration.

  16. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    2001-03-01

    Patients treated with nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) develop a varying degree of myopathy or neuropathy after long-term therapy. Zidovudine (AZT) causes myopathy; zalcitabine (ddC), didanosine (ddl) and lamuvidine (3TC) cause neuropathy; stavudine (d4T) and fialuridine (FIAU) cause neuropathy or myopathy and lactic acidosis. The tissue distribution of phosphorylases responsible for phosphorylation of NRTIs relates to their selective tissue toxicity. The myopathy is characterized by muscle wasting, myalgia, fatigue, weakness and elevation of CK. The neuropathy is painful, sensory and axonal. In vitro, NRTIs inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase, responsible for replication of mtDNA, and cause mtDNA dysfunction. In vivo, patients treated with AZT, the best studied NRTI, develop a mitochondrial myopathy with mtDNA depletion, deficiency of COX (complex IV), intracellular fat accumulation, high lactate production and marked phosphocreatine depletion, as determined with in vivo MRS spectroscopy, due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Animals or cultured cells treated with NRTIs develop neuropathy, myopathy, or cell destruction with similar changes in the mitochondria. There is evidence that the NRTI-related neuropathy is also due to mitochondrial toxicity. The NRTIs (AZT, ddC, ddl, d4T, 3TC) contain azido groups that compete with natural thymidine triphosphate as substrates of DNA pol-gamma and terminate mtDNA synthesis. In contrast, FIAU that contains 3'-OH groups serves as an alternate substrate for thymidine triphosphate with DNA pol-gamma and is incorporated into the DNA causing permanent mtDNA dysfunction. The NRTI-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has an influence on the clinical application of these agents, especially at high doses and when combined. They have produced in humans a new category of acquired mitochondrial toxins that cause clinical manifestations resembling the genetic mitochondrial disorders.

  17. [Dynamics of blood concentration of neurospecific proteins and risk of neuropathy development in the conditions of 105-day confinement].

    PubMed

    Nichiporuk, I A; Vasil'eva, G Iu; Rykova, M P; Morukov, B V

    2011-01-01

    Six male volunteers (aged 25 to 40 years) were subjects in all-round psychophysiological, hormonal and immunological studies before, in and after 105-day isolation and confinement. Blood was drawn and the 16-factorial Cattell personality inventory was filled out every 30 days. Concentrations of blood hormones, neurospecific proteins and cytokines point to a close interrelation between antibody titers to myelin-associated glycoprotein and changes in the parameters of metabolism and reproduction-related hormones, as well as cytokines and individual psychophysiology (extra-introversion, dominance, intropunitiveness, social contact selectivity, etc.), and suggest a minimum risk of demyelinizing neuropathy due to exposure to the conditions of isolation and confinement.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy caused by methaqualone.

    PubMed

    Marks, P; Sloggem, J

    1976-01-01

    Three patients are described who each received methaqualone and developed signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. The subsequent improvement after cessation of methaqualone was highly suggestive or a direct toxic action of the drug or one of its metabolites. In one patient methaqualone was recommended with reappearance of signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Again cessation of the drug caused disappearance of these signs. There was no evidence whatsoever of any electrolyte or metabolic disturbance or any other pathology which might have given rise to this symptom complex. In addition, no other drugs were prescribed besides methaqualone.

  19. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  20. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  1. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Saberio; Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Pirela, Daniela; Morlote, Diana; Cusnir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly); endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly. PMID:27790622

  2. Inflammation: therapeutic targets for diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen

    2014-02-01

    There are still no approved treatments for the prevention or of cure of diabetic neuropathy, and only symptomatic pain therapies of variable efficacy are available. Inflammation is a cardinal pathogenic mechanism of diabetic neuropathy. The relationships between inflammation and the development of diabetic neuropathy involve complex molecular networks and processes. Herein, we review the key inflammatory molecules (inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and pathways (nuclear factor kappa B, JUN N-terminal kinase) implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Advances in the understanding of the roles of these key inflammatory molecules and pathways in diabetic neuropathy will facilitate the discovery of the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches for the inhibition of the development of neuropathy. Specifically, many anti-inflammatory drugs significantly inhibit the development of different aspects of diabetic neuropathy in animal models and clinical trials.

  3. Electrophysiological profile in arsenic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Oh, S J

    1991-12-01

    Comprehensive electrophysiological studies were performed on 13 patients with arsenic neuropathy. The most prominent finding was a marked abnormality in sensory nerve conduction in the presence of moderate abnormalities in motor nerve conduction. The motor nerve conduction studies and needle EMG were typical of those seen in axonal degeneration which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy.

  4. Phrenic neuropathy in arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bansal, S K; Haldar, N; Dhand, U K; Chopra, J S

    1991-09-01

    A patient presented with acute arsenic neuropathy with asymmetric bilateral phrenic nerve involvement. The clinical and roentgenographic observations of phrenic nerve dysfunction were confirmed by prolonged phrenic nerve conduction time. The patient made a significant recovery with d-penicillamine therapy.

  5. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  6. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic

  7. Steroid-dependent sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease showing auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yukihide; Kataoka, Yuko; Sugaya, Akiko; Kariya, Shin; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2015-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common form of hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy and sometimes involves disorders of the peripheral auditory system. We present a case of steroid-dependent auditory neuropathy associated with CMT, in which the patient experienced 3 episodes of acute exacerbation of hearing loss and successful rescue of hearing by prednisolone. An 8-year-old boy was referred to the otolaryngology department at the University Hospital. He had been diagnosed with CMT type 1 (demyelinating type) at the Child Neurology Department and was suffering from mild hearing loss due to auditory neuropathy. An audiological diagnosis of auditory neuropathy was confirmed by auditory brainstem response and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. At 9 years and 0 months old, 9 years and 2 months old, and 10 years and 0 months old, he had experienced acute exacerbations of hearing loss, each of which was successfully rescued by intravenous or oral prednisolone within 2 weeks. Steroid-responsive cases of CMT have been reported, but this is the first case report of steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss in CMT. The present case may have implications for the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss.

  8. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic: description of six cases.

    PubMed

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda; Locht, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all patients who developed neurological symptoms during this time period. We found six patients with signs of demyelinizing neurological disorders: four resembling MS, one MS-like condition, and one multifocal motor neuropathy. During a relatively short time period, we found a remarkably high number of neurological demyelinizing AEs probably linked to anti TNF-alpha treatment. The AEs were not associated with a single anti TNF-alpha agent and were thus presumably a class effect. The data presented suggest that neurological AEs may be underreported. We advocate that physicians handling patients during treatment with TNF inhibitors are aware of this potentially serious AE and report these events to the proper medical authorities. PMID:24202614

  9. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  10. [Therapeutic responsiveness in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    CIDP is autoimmune-associated peripheral neuropathy characterized by motor and sensory disturbances in each limb. While various phenotypes have been reported in CIDP, the essential pathogenesis is not elucidated yet. Clinicopathological study indicated axonal dysfunction (muscle atrophy and decreased compound muscular action potentials) is one of the most important factors in IVIg Non-responders. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype/diplotype analysis within a linkage disequilibrium block indicates transient axonal glycoprotein 1 (TAG-1), which controls proper distribution of potassium channels in juxtaparanode, is an important factor for IVIg responsiveness. Gene expression analysis of biopsied nerves supported the hypothesis that CIDP pathogenesis is involved in humoral and cellular immune system. With respect to IVIg responsiveness, expression profiles indicate whole CIDP patients need conventional immune-modulating therapies in somewhat, while we should re-consider how to use them. From aspects of gene expression results, Non-responders need not only conventional immune-modulating therapies but also other original modalities which could intervene the pathogenesis except Schwann/inflammatory cells while Responders with IVIg dependence should need stronger and longer immune-suppression.

  11. Curcumin treatment abrogates endoplasmic reticulum retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing myelin protein zero-truncating mutants.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Inoue, Ken; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Ohyama, Tomoko; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2005-11-01

    Mutations in MPZ, the gene encoding myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major protein constituent of peripheral myelin, can cause the adult-onset, inherited neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, as well as the more severe, childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Most MPZ-truncating mutations associated with severe forms of peripheral neuropathy result in premature termination codons within the terminal or penultimate exons that are not subject to nonsense-mediated decay and are stably translated into mutant proteins with potential dominant-negative activity. However, some truncating mutations at the 3' end of MPZ escape the nonsense-mediated decay pathway and cause a mild peripheral neuropathy phenotype. We examined the functional properties of MPZ-truncating proteins that escaped nonsense-mediated decay, and we found that frameshift mutations associated with severe disease cause an intracellular accumulation of mutant proteins, primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which induces apoptosis. Curcumin, a chemical compound derived from the curry spice tumeric, releases the ER-retained MPZ mutants into the cytoplasm accompanied by a lower number of apoptotic cells. Our findings suggest that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and may potentially have a therapeutic role in treating selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:16252242

  12. Self-inflicted tourniquet paralysis mimicking acute demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Storm, S; Weiss, M D

    2003-05-01

    Tourniquet paralysis is an uncommon complication of surgery, and self-inflicted tourniquet paralysis has never been documented to our knowledge. We report a patient with bilateral self-induced tourniquet paralysis of the lower extremities, whose symptoms were initially attributed to an acute demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy based on clinical presentation and electrodiagnostic study. After investigations failed to reveal a cause, he was found to have placed tourniquets on his legs because of a rare obsession with limb amputation known as apotemnophilia. Significant spontaneous partial resolution of clinical symptoms was noted after 6 weeks. Electrophysiologic evidence of segmental demyelination of multiple motor nerves localized to the same region may help to distinguish this condition from other forms of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidity in pediatric patients with demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Weisbrot, Deborah M; Ettinger, Alan B; Gadow, Kenneth D; Belman, Anita L; MacAllister, William S; Milazzo, Maria; Reed, Michael L; Serrano, Daniel; Krupp, Lauren B

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about psychiatric aspects of pediatric demyelinating conditions. A total of 23 youths (6-17 years) with demyelinating conditions underwent semistructured psychiatric interviews using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version. Adolescents and parents completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4 and the Youth's Inventory-4. Fears and conceptions of their neurological problems were elicited. In all, 48% (n = 11) met criteria for current psychiatric diagnoses, including 27% (n = 3) with depressive disorders and 64% (n = 7) with anxiety disorders. Fears and conceptions of the illness were severe and diverse. Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in pediatric demyelinating disease. Clinicians should therefore screen for psychiatric comorbidity symptoms as part of the routine evaluation of such patients.

  14. Tart Cherry Juice as a Treatment for Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Cindy Alberts

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tart cherries have a long history as a treatment for gout and joint pain. While the exact mechanism of action is unknown, it is believed that acanthocyanin pigments and related bioflavonoids found in tart cherries and other red fruits scavenge free radicals, modulate cytokines, reduce DNA degradation, decrease capillary permeability, inhibit cyclooxygenase, and strengthen biological membranes. Many of these biochemical reactions would be expected to reduce inflammation, pain, and edema. Significance of Study Peripheral polyneuropathies are common and are believed to affect up to 9% of the US population older than 50 y. These neuropathies may develop from direct compression of peripheral nerves, toxic or metabolic injury to nerve tissue, autoimmune attack, or nutritional deficiency. No cause is identified in approximately 30% of patients. The pathophysiology of polyneuropathies is complex and not fully understood, but 3 common patterns of damage occur: (1) distal axonopathy, where the cell bodies remain intact, but axons degenerate from distal to proximal, usually as the result of toxic or metabolic injury; (2) demyelination neuropathy, where damage to the myelin sheath from autoimmune, infectious, or other causes disrupts electrical signaling; and (3) ganglionopathies, where damage occurs at the cell body or neuron, a relatively rare occurrence. While weakness and loss of sensation are common in many peripheral polyneuropathies, “gain of function” symptoms, such as paresthesias and allodynia, are the most distressing and are very difficult to treat. It is believed that these symptoms are caused by alterations in ion channels, alterations in neurotransmitters and their receptors, and altered gene expression. Common conventional treatments include antiepileptics, antidepressants, NSAIDs, and narcotics. These medications alter ion channels and neurotransmitters, decrease the sensitivity of nociceptive receptors, and desensitize C fibers. Most patients

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies Enable Javascript to ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a disorder ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve ...

  19. The inheritance of centromere identity.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Yohei; Kitagawa, Risa; Kitagawa, Katsumi

    2016-07-01

    CENP-A (Centromere protein A) is a histone H3 variant that epigenetically determines the centromere position, but the mechanism of its centromere inheritance is obscure. We propose that CENP-A ubiquitylation, which is inherited through dimerization between rounds of cell division, is a candidate for the epigenetic mark of centromere identity. PMID:27652331

  20. Molecular alterations resulting from frameshift mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22: implications for neuropathy severity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Roux, K J; Fletcher, B S; Fortun, J; Notterpek, L

    2005-12-15

    Alterations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) expression are associated with a heterogeneous group of hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Two mutations at glycine 94, a single guanine insertion or deletion in PMP22, result in different reading frameshifts and, consequently, an extended G94fsX222 or a truncated G94fsX110 protein, respectively. Both of these autosomal dominant mutations alter the second half of PMP22 and yet are linked to clinical phenotypes with distinct severities. The G94fsX222 is associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, whereas G94fsX110 causes severe neuropathy diagnosed as Dejerine-Sottas disease or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type IA. To investigate the subcellular changes associated with the G94 frameshift mutations, we expressed epitope-tagged forms in primary rat Schwann cells. Biochemical and immunolabeling studies indicate that, unlike the wild-type protein, which is targeted for the plasma membrane, frameshift PMP22s are retained in the cell, prior to reaching the medial Golgi compartment. Similar to Wt-PMP22, both frameshift mutants are targeted for proteasomal degradation and accumulate in detergent-insoluble, ubiquitin-containing aggregates upon inhibition of this pathway. The extended frameshift PMP22 shows the ability to form spontaneous aggregates in the absence of proteasome inhibition. On the other hand, Schwann cells expressing the truncated protein proliferate at a significantly higher rate than Schwann cells expressing the wild-type or the extended PMP22. In summary, these results suggest that a greater potential for PMP22 aggregation is associated with a less severe phenotype, whereas dysregulation of Schwann cell proliferation is linked to severe neuropathy. PMID:16273544

  1. Child neurology: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jennifer A; Jeste, Shafali S; Kang, Peter B

    2008-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by patchy demyelination of nerve roots and distal nerves. The course may be monophasic progressive or relapsing-remitting. CIDP is less common in children than in adults. As in adults, children with CIDP present with proximal and distal weakness and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Children are most often brought to medical attention due to gait disturbance and falling. As in adults, immunomodulatory treatment is the mainstay of therapy. Based on the small number of case series available, children with CIDP seem have a more favorable long-term course than adults.

  2. Characteristic MRI features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuichi; Terashima, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Hideki; Sassa, Kaori; Sakai, Tetsuro; Ohtake, Akira; Kubota, Masaya; Yamanouchi, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    We present characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in a pediatric female patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Muscle weakness developed at 8 years old and fluctuated during the clinical course over 7 years. Electrophysiological studies showed a demyelination pattern with moderately delayed nerve conduction velocity, as well as dispersion phenomenon. MRI showed marked changes in thickening of the spinal nerve roots and their peripheral nerves in the lumber and brachial plexuses, as well as in the bilateral trigeminal nerves. It is suggested that these MRI features are characteristic and strongly supportive of the diagnosis of CIDP with a prolonged clinical course.

  3. The spectrum of post-vaccination inflammatory CNS demyelinating syndromes.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of inflammatory diseases temporally associated with the administration of various vaccines, has been reported in the literature. A PubMed search from 1979 to 2013 revealed seventy one (71) documented cases. The most commonly reported vaccinations that were associated with CNS demyelinating diseases included influenza (21 cases), human papilloma virus (HPV) (9 cases), hepatitis A or B (8 cases), rabies (5 cases), measles (5 cases), rubella (5 cases), yellow fever (3 cases), anthrax (2 cases),meningococcus (2 cases) and tetanus (2 cases). The vast majority of post-vaccination CNS demyelinating syndromes, are related to influenza vaccination and this could be attributed to the high percentage of the population that received the vaccine during the HI1N1 epidemia from 2009 to 2012. Usually the symptoms of the CNS demyelinating syndrome appear few days following the immunization (mean: 14.2 days) but there are cases where the clinical presentation was delayed (more than 3 weeks or even up to 5 months post-vaccination) (approximately a third of all the reported cases). In terms of the clinical presentation and the affected CNS areas, there is a great diversity among the reported cases of post-vaccination acute demyelinating syndromes. Optic neuritis was the prominent clinical presentation in 38 cases, multifocal disseminated demyelination in 30, myelitis in 24 and encephalitis in 17. Interestingly in a rather high proportion of the patients (and especially following influenza and human papiloma virus vaccination-HPV) the dominant localizations of demyelination were the optic nerves and the myelon, presenting as optic neuritis and myelitis (with or without additional manifestations of ADEM), reminiscent to neuromyelitic optica (or, more generally, the NMO-spectrum of diseases). Seven patients suffered an NMO-like disease following HPV and we had two similar cases in our Center. One patient with post-vaccination ADEM, subsequently developed NMO. Overall, the

  4. Neuropathy in Navajo children: clinical and epidemiologic features.

    PubMed

    Singleton, R; Helgerson, S D; Snyder, R D; O'Conner, P J; Nelson, S; Johnsen, S D; Allanson, J E

    1990-02-01

    We describe a rare and apparently unique neuropathic syndrome among Navajo children living on the Navajo Reservation. Clinical features include sensorimotor neuropathy, corneal ulcerations, acral mutilation, poor weight gain, short stature, sexual infantilism, serious systemic infections, and liver derangement including Reye's syndrome-like episodes. Progressive CNS white matter lesions were diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging. We identified 20 definite and 4 probable cases occurring between 1959 and 1986. Mean age at the time of 1st recognized symptom was 13 months (range, 1 month to 4 years 6 months). Ten individuals have died; 6 of the deaths occurred before 5 years of age. The incidence of this syndrome on the western Navajo reservation is 5 times higher than that on the eastern reservation (38 compared with 7 cases per 100,000 births). Although the etiology is unknown, this syndrome is consistent with an inborn error of metabolism, inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. PMID:2300261

  5. Neuromuscular ultrasound in common entrapment neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Walker, Francis O

    2013-11-01

    Neuromuscular ultrasound involves the use of high-resolution ultrasound to image the peripheral nervous system of patients with suspected neuromuscular diseases. It complements electrodiagnostic studies well by providing anatomic information regarding nerves, muscles, vessels, tendons, ligaments, bones, and other structures that cannot be obtained with nerve conduction studies and electromyography. Neuromuscular ultrasound has been studied extensively over the past 10 years and has been used most often in the assessment of entrapment neuropathies. This review focuses on the use of neuromuscular ultrasound in 4 of the most common entrapment neuropathies: carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and wrist, and fibular neuropathy at the knee.

  6. Peripheral neuropathy in arsenic smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R G; Niles, C A; Kelly-Hayes, M; Sax, D S; Dixon, W J; Thompson, D J; Landau, E

    1979-07-01

    We conducted a double-blind controlled study of individuals exposed to arsenic trioxide in a copper-smelting factory. Subjects fell into three categories of peripheral neuropathy: none, subclinical, and clinical. The subclinical group had no symptoms or signs of numbness or reduced reflexes, but did have reduced nerve conduction velocity and amplitude measurements. Clinical neuropathy groups had signs and symptoms of neuropathy and electrophysiologic abnormalities. The clinical and subclinical groups correlated with increased content of arsenic in urine, hair and nails. The incidence of subclinical and clinical neuropathy was greater in arsenic workers than in unexposed controls.

  7. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  8. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  9. A light and electron microscopic study of the neuropathy of equine idiopathic laryngeal hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Duncan, I D; Griffiths, I R; Madrid, R E

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the pathological changes in the recurrent laryngeal nerves from horses with clinical and sub-clinical idiopathic laryngeal hemiplegia. Qualitative and quantitative studies showed in clinical cases there was a progressive distal loss of large myelinated fibres in the left recurrent nerve. Regenerating clusters and onion bulbs were frequently seen in affected nerves both at proximal and distal levels. Degenerating axons were characterized by collections of organelles, and denervated bands of Bungner were common. Similar but less severe changes were seen in the left recurrent nerve of sub-clinical cases, and in both the clinical and sub-clinical cases the distal right recurrent nerve was also affected. Teased fibre studies showed evidence of chronic demyelination and remyelination. The aetiology of this chronic neuropathy remains uncertain but the possibility of nerve compression is discussed.

  10. Mechanisms of disease: a molecular genetic update on hereditary axonal neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Züchner, Stephan; Vance, Jeffery M

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary axonal peripheral neuropathies comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that are clinically subsumed under the name of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2). Historically, two classes of CMT have been differentiated: demyelinating forms of CMT (CMT1), in which nerve conduction velocities are decreased, and the axonal CMT2 forms, in which nerve conduction velocities are preserved. Recently, a number of genes that are defective in patients with the main forms of CMT2 have been identified. The molecular dissection of cellular functions of the related gene products has only just begun, and detailed pathophysiological models are still lacking. The known CMT2-related genes represent key players in these pathways, however, and are likely to provide powerful tools for identifying targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:16932520

  11. Mechanism of Theiler's virus-induced demyelination in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, A; Fujinami, R S; Lampert, P W

    1986-05-01

    In its natural murine host, infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) produces a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease. To help elucidate the role of host immune mechanisms involved in demyelination, we studied TMEV infection in Nude mice. These animals demonstrated rising titers of infectious virus within the central nervous system and failed to produce anti-TMEV antibody. Neurologic signs including the development of severe hind limb paralysis were evident approximately 2 weeks postinfection with most animals succumbing within the first month. Immunoperoxidase studies demonstrated viral antigen in the cytoplasm of neurons and glial cells for the entire period of observation. Plaques of demyelination associated with scanty inflammatory infiltrates were present in the spinal cord by 14 days postinfection. Electron microscopic studies of the involved white matter revealed numerous degenerating glial cells, many of which contained paracrystalline arrays of picornavirus within their cytoplasm. Some of the infected glial cells were identified as oligodendrocytes by demonstrating their myelin-plasma membrane connections. The studies indicate that in Nude mice TMEV causes a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes producing demyelination independent of the T lymphocyte immune system.

  12. Inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charil, Arnaud; Filippi, Massimo

    2007-08-15

    A number of recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the classical view of multiple sclerosis (MS) as a "two-stage" disease where an early inflammatory demyelinating phase with focal macroscopic lesions formed in the white matter (WM) of the central nervous system is followed by a late neurodegenerative phase, which is believed to be a mere consequence of repeated inflammatory insults and irreversible demyelination. These studies have consistently shown the presence of diffuse normal-appearing WM damage, marked gray matter involvement and significant cortical functional reorganization, as well as the occurrence of the neurodegenerative component of MS from the earliest clinical stages of the disease with only a partial relation to MRI markers of inflammatory demyelination. The present review argues that MS can no longer be viewed as a "two-stage" disease, which suggests that the two pathological components are dissociated in time, but rather as a "simultaneous two-component" disease, where the relative contributions of the various pathological processes of the disease to the development of "fixed" disability, their relationship and their evolution over time need to be clarified. This new view of MS should inform the development of future research protocols to define its actual physiopathology and prompt the institution of early treatment which should ideally target not only inflammatory demyelination, but also the neurodegenerative aspects of the disease, as well as promote neuroprotection and enhance reparative mechanisms and adaptive functional reorganization of the cortex. PMID:17397873

  13. Influence of laser irradiation on demyelination of nervous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Nataly O.; Plaksij, Yu. S.; Mamilov, Serge A.

    2000-11-01

    Problem demyelinating diseases from actual in modern of neurology. Main disease of this group - multiple sclerosis, which morphological manifestation is the process demyelineation - disintegration of myelin, which covers axial cylinders of nervous filaments. The outcome of such damage is violation of realization of nervous impulses, dissonance of implement and coordination functions. Most typical the feature of a multiple sclerosis is origin of repeated remissions, which compact with indication remyelination. In development of disease the large role is played by modifications of immunological of a reactivity of an organism. The purpose of the title is development of new methods of treatment of a multiple sclerosis because of lasertherapy. For thsi purpose the influence of a laser exposure on demyelination and remyelination processes will be investigated, is investigated pathological fabrics at microscopic and submicroscopic levels. The study of proceses demyelination and remyelination will be conducted on experimental animals (rats), which are sick experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), that is the most adequate model of a multiple sclerosis. The patients' EAE animals will be subjected to treatment by a laser exposure. For want of it there will be determinate optimum lengths of waves, dozes and modes of laser radiation.

  14. Altered transition metal homeostasis in the cuprizone model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Nataliya; Al-Ebraheem, Alia; Lobo, Lianne; Park, Raina; Farquharson, Michael J; Bock, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    In the cuprizone model of demyelination, the neurotoxin cuprizone is fed to mice to induce a reproducible pattern of demyelination in the brain. Cuprizone is a copper chelator and it has been hypothesized that it induces a copper deficiency in the brain, which leads to demyelination. To test this hypothesis and investigate the possible role of other transition metals in the model, we fed C57Bl/6 mice a standard dose of cuprizone (0.2% dry chemical to dry food weight) for 6 weeks then measured levels of copper, manganese, iron, and zinc in regions of the brain and visceral organs. As expected, this treatment induced demyelination in the mice. We found, however, that while the treatment significantly reduced copper concentrations in the blood and liver in treated animals, there was no significant difference in concentrations in brain regions relative to control. Interestingly, cuprizone disrupted concentrations of the other transition metals in the visceral organs, with the most notable changes being decreased manganese and increased iron in the liver. In the brain, manganese concentrations were also significantly reduced in the cerebellum and striatum. These data suggest a possible role of manganese deficiency in the brain in the cuprizone model. PMID:25749275

  15. Late central demyelination after Fischer's syndrome: MRI studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, X; Ellie, E; Larrivière, M; Deleplanque, B; Lagueny, A; Julien, J

    1993-01-01

    The case of a patient who presented with clinical, electrophysiological, and MRI evidence of central demyelination is described. The patient had been admitted to hospital for Fischer's syndrome a few years previously. The association of these two events suggests that central and peripheral myelinopathy may be related in Fischer's syndrome. PMID:8509787

  16. Pathological heterogeneity of idiopathic central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Lucchinetti, C

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in MS neuropathology. This resurgence was partly fueled by the development of new molecular and histochemical tools to examine the MS lesion microscopically, as well as technological advances in neuroimaging, which permit a dynamic assessment of lesion formation and disease progression. The heterogeneous pathology of MS in relation to stage of lesion activity, phase of disease, and clinical course is discussed. Pathological studies reveal that the immune factors associated with multiple different effector mechanisms contribute to the inflammation, demyelination, and tissue injury observed in MS lesions. While many agree that pathological heterogeneity exists in white matter demyelinated lesions, it is uncertain whether these observations are patient-dependent and reflect pathogenic heterogeneity or, alternatively, are stage-dependent with multiple mechanisms occurring sequentially within a given patient. Evidence supporting both concepts is presented. Remyelination is present in MS lesions; however, the factors contributing to the extent of repair and oligodendrocyte survival differ depending on the disease phase. A variable and patient-dependent extent of remyelination is observed in chronic MS cases and will likely need to be considered when designing future clinical trials aimed to promote CNS repair. MS is one member of a spectrum of CNS idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders that share the basic pathological hallmark of CNS inflammatory demyelination. Advances based on recent systematic clinicopathologic-serologic correlative approaches have led to novel insights with respect to the classification of these disorders, as well as a better understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms.

  17. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies.

  18. Multifocal motor neuropathy: pathologic alterations at the site of conduction block.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Engelstad, JaNean; Gruener, Gregory; Grant, Ian; Dyck, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The pathologic changes of nerves in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), a rare neuropathy with selective focal conduction block of motor fibers in mixed nerves, remain essentially unstudied. Fascicular nerve biopsy of 8 forearm or arm nerves in 7 patients with typical MMN was undertaken for diagnostic reasons at the site of the conduction block. Abnormalities were seen in 7 of 8 nerves, including a varying degree of multifocal fiber degeneration and loss, an altered fiber size distribution with fewer large fibers, an increased frequency of remyelinated fiber profiles, and frequent and prominent regenerating fiber clusters. Small epineurial perivascular inflammatory infiltrates were observed in 2 nerves. We did not observe overt segmental demyelination or onion bulb formation. We hypothesize that an antibody-mediated attack directed against components of axolemma at nodes of Ranvier could cause conduction block, transitory paranodal demyelination and remyelination, and axonal degeneration and regeneration. Alternatively, the antibody attack could be directed at components of paranodal myelin. We favor the first hypothesis because in nerves studied by us, axonal pathological alteration predominated over myelin pathology. Irrespective of which mechanism is involved, we conclude that the unequivocal multifocal fiber degeneration and loss and regenerative clusters at sites of conduction block explains the observed clinical muscle weakness and atrophy and alterations of motor unit potentials. The occurrence of conduction block and multifocal fiber degeneration and regeneration at the same sites suggests that the processes of conduction block and fiber degeneration and regeneration are linked. Finding discrete multifocal fiber degeneration may also provide an explanation for why the functional abnormalities remain unchanged over long periods of time at discrete proximal to distal levels of nerve and may emphasize a need for early intervention (assuming that efficacious

  19. The formation of inflammatory demyelinated lesions in cerebral white matter

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Pietro; Cummings Macri, Sheila M.; Gaitán, María I.; Leibovitch, Emily; Wholer, Jillian E; Knight, Heather L.; Ellis, Mary; Wu, Tianxia; Silva, Afonso C.; Massacesi, Luca; Jacobson, Steven; Westmoreland, Susan; Reich, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vascular permeability and inflammatory demyelination are intimately linked in the brain, but what is their temporal relationship? We aimed to determine the radiological correlates of the earliest tissue changes accompanying demyelination in a primate model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset. Methods At 7 tesla MRI, T1 maps, proton density and T2-weighted images were acquired before and after EAE induction in 5 marmosets (every other week before lesions appeared, weekly thereafter). From scans before and after intravenous injection of contrast material, we measured the evolution of lesional blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability, comparing in vivo MRI to postmortem tissue examination. Results On average, BBB permeability increased 3.5 fold (p<0.0001) over the 4 weeks prior to lesion appearance. Permeability gradually decreased after lesion appearance, with attendant changes in the distribution of inflammatory cells (predominantly macrophages and microglia) and demyelination. On tissue analysis, we also identified small perivascular foci of microglia and T cells without blood-derived macrophages or demyelination. These foci had no visible MRI correlates, though permeability within the foci, but not outside, increased in the weeks before the animals died (p<0.0001). Interpretation This study provides compelling evidence that in marmoset EAE, which forms lesions strongly resembling those of MS, early changes in vascular permeability are associated with perivascular inflammatory cuffing and parenchymal microglial activation but precede the arrival of blood-derived monocytes that accompany demyelination. Prospective detection of transient permeability changes could afford an opportunity for early intervention to forestall tissue damage in newly forming lesions. PMID:25088017

  20. Demyelination determinants map to the spike glycoprotein gene of coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Das Sarma, J; Fu, L; Tsai, J C; Weiss, S R; Lavi, E

    2000-10-01

    Demyelination is the pathologic hallmark of the human immune-mediated neurologic disease multiple sclerosis, which may be triggered or exacerbated by viral infections. Several experimental animal models have been developed to study the mechanism of virus-induced demyelination, including coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection in mice. The envelope spike (S) glycoprotein of MHV contains determinants of properties essential for virus-host interactions. However, the molecular determinants of MHV-induced demyelination are still unknown. To investigate the mechanism of MHV-induced demyelination, we examined whether the S gene of MHV contains determinants of demyelination and whether demyelination is linked to viral persistence. Using targeted RNA recombination, we replaced the S gene of a demyelinating virus (MHV-A59) with the S gene of a closely related, nondemyelinating virus (MHV-2). Recombinant viruses containing an S gene derived from MHV-2 in an MHV-A59 background (Penn98-1 and Penn98-2) exhibited a persistence-positive, demyelination-negative phenotype. Thus, determinants of demyelination map to the S gene of MHV. Furthermore, viral persistence is insufficient to induce demyelination, although it may be a prerequisite for the development of demyelination.

  1. Defective Aire-Dependent Central Tolerance to P0 Is Linked to Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Maureen A.; Davini, Dan; Cheng, Philip; Giang, Karen; Fan, Una; DeVoss, Jason J.; Johannes, Kellsey P.A.; Taylor, Lorelei; Shum, Anthony K.; Valenzise, Mariella; Meloni, Antonella; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Anderson, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy is a debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by peripheral nerve demyelination and dysfunction. How the autoimmune response is initiated, identity of provoking antigens, and pathogenic effector mechanisms are not well-defined. The Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) plays a critical role in central tolerance by promoting thymic expression of self-antigens and deletion of self-reactive T cells. Here, we utilized mice with hypomorphicAire function and two patients with Aire mutations to define how Aire deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Autoimmunity against peripheral nerves in both mice and humans targets Myelin Protein Zero (P0), an antigen whose expression is Aire-regulated in the thymus. Consistent with a defect in thymic tolerance, CD4+ T cells are sufficient to transfer disease in mice and produce IFN-gamma in infiltrated peripheral nerves. Our findings suggest that defective Aire-mediated central tolerance to P0 initiates an autoimmune Th1 effector response toward peripheral nerves. PMID:22490868

  2. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy (Aman) With Motor Conduction Blocks In Childhood; Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Serhan; Adviye, Rahşan; Gül, Hakan Levent; Türk Börü, Ülkü

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), characterized with decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and absence of demyelinating findings in electrophysiological studies, is a subtype of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS). A 4 yr-old male patient presented with ascending weakness, dysarthria and dysphagia to İstanbul Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital Neurology outpatient for three days to in 2012. Dysphonia, restricted eye movements, flaccid tetraplegia and areflexia were found in neurological examination. There were motor conduction blocks in all peripheral nerves in electrophysiological studies.According to these findings the patient was diagnosed as Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP). Reduction of CMAP amplitudes in posterior tibial nerve, absence of CMAPs in median, ulnar and peroneal nerves and loss of motor conduction blocks were found in following electrophysiological studies. According to these findings, patient was diagnosed as AMAN. Motor conduction blocks may appear in early stage of AMAN and they disappear in later examinations. That's why electrophysiological studies must be repeated in patients with GBS. PMID:27057191

  3. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jančić, Jasna; Dejanović, Ivana; Radovanović, Saša; Ostojić, Jelena; Kozić, Duško; Đurić-Jovičić, Milica; Samardžić, Janko; Ćetković, Mila; Kostić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression.

  4. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jančić, Jasna; Dejanović, Ivana; Radovanović, Saša; Ostojić, Jelena; Kozić, Duško; Đurić-Jovičić, Milica; Samardžić, Janko; Ćetković, Mila; Kostić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression. PMID:26540208

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy: One disease or two?

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To compare and contrast the evidence for the effect of glucose control on the prevention of neuropathy in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus. Recent findings In T1DM, multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a large benefit from enhanced glucose control, whereas the benefit in T2DM is much more modest. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence exists to support factors other than hyperglycemia in the development of neuropathy including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Summary T1DM neuropathy and T2DM neuropathy are fundamentally different. In T1DM, glucose control has a large effect on the prevention of neuropathy; therefore future efforts should continue to concentrate on this avenue of treatment. In contrast, in T2DM, glucose control has a small effect on the prevention of neuropathy; as a result, more research is needed to define the underlying mechanisms for the development of neuropathy. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22892951

  6. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  7. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players

    PubMed Central

    Witvrouw, E; Cools, A; Lysens, R; Cambier, D; Vanderstraeten, G; Victor, J; Sneyers, C; Walravens, M

    2000-01-01

    Background—Suprascapular nerve entrapment with isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle is uncommon. However, this pathology has been reported in volleyball players. Despite a lack of scientific evidence, excessive strain on the nerve is often cited as a possible cause of this syndrome. Previous research has shown a close association between shoulder range of motion and strain on the suprascapular nerve. No clinical studies have so far been designed to examine the association between excessive shoulder mobility and the presence of this pathology. Aim—To study the possible association between the range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of suprascapular neuropathy by clinically examining the Belgian male volleyball team with respect to several parameters. Methods—An electromyographic investigation, a clinical shoulder examination, shoulder range of motion measurements, and an isokinetic concentric peak torque shoulder internal/external rotation strength test were performed in 16 professional players. Results—The electrodiagnostic study showed a severe suprascapular neuropathy in four players which affected only the infraspinatus muscle. In each of these four players, suprascapular nerve entrapment was present on the dominant side. Except for the hypotrophy of the infraspinatus muscle, no significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were observed on clinical examination. Significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were found for range of motion measurements of external rotation, horizontal flexion and forward flexion, and for flexion of the shoulder girdle (protraction); all were found to be higher in the affected players than the non-affected players. Conclusions—This study suggests an association between increased range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle in volleyball players. However, the small number of patients in this

  8. Progressive auditory neuropathy in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceranic, B; Luxon, L

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate auditory neural involvement in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods: Auditory assessment was undertaken in two patients with LHON. One was a 45 year old woman with Harding disease (multiple-sclerosis-like illness and positive 11778mtDNA mutation) and mild auditory symptoms, whose auditory function was monitored over five years. The other was a 59 year old man with positive 11778mtDNA mutation, who presented with a long standing progressive bilateral hearing loss, moderate on one side and severe to profound on the other. Standard pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, stapedial reflex threshold measurements, stapedial reflex decay, otoacoustic emissions with olivo-cochlear suppression, auditory brain stem responses, and vestibular function tests were undertaken. Results: Both patients had good cochlear function, as judged by otoacoustic emissions (intact outer hair cells) and normal stapedial reflexes (intact inner hair cells). A brain stem lesion was excluded by negative findings on imaging, recordable stapedial reflex thresholds, and, in one of the patients, olivocochlear suppression of otoacoustic emissions. The deterioration of auditory function implied a progressive course in both cases. Vestibular function was unaffected. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with auditory neuropathy—a lesion of the cochlear nerve presenting with abnormal auditory brain stem responses and with normal inner hair cells and the cochlear nucleus (lower brain stem). The association of auditory neuropathy, or any other auditory dysfunction, with LHON has not been recognised previously. Further studies are necessary to establish whether this is a consistent finding. PMID:15026512

  9. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 in a Portuguese family-electrodiagnostic and autonomic nervous system studies.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Ruth; de Carvalho, Mamede; Santos-Bento, Mariana; Nicholson, Garth

    2004-12-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN 1) is a dominantly inherited disorder; its gene locus is mapped on chromosome 9q22. Three different missense mutations (C133Y, C133W and V144D) have been described in 11 families from Australia, England and Austria. Common clinical features have been found in these families. We report the clinical and electrophysiological features of three members of a large Portuguese family with HSAN 1 and the C133Y missense mutation. The affected members showed typical clinical features. Electrophysiological findings were consistent with a distal axonal predominantly sensory neuropathy with motor involvement, in three different severity stages. No autonomic involvement was detected in sudomotor and cardiovascular tests. This report documents the lesion of the motor nerve fibers in this disease, as well as the preservation of the autonomic nervous system function, therefore suggesting that HSNA is an inappropriate name for this disorder. PMID:15546589

  10. Mutation testing in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, G A

    1999-09-14

    In order to determine the optimal approach for mutation testing in the form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, consecutive patients with a CMT phenotype, available family history information on at least first-degree relatives, and median motor conduction velocities of less than 50 m/sec were tested for the CMT1A duplication and for connexin32, peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) and myelin protein zero (P0) point mutations. A cutoff value for median motor conduction velocity of less than 50 m/sec was adopted to include all CMTX families. All of the connexin32 mutations, except for one sporadic case, were found by first selecting families with no male-to-male inheritance of CMT and neurophysiological indicators of CMTX. All PMP22 and P0 mutations were found by selecting Dejerine-Sottas cases or dominantly inherited CMT1 with a very severe phenotype. It is concluded that "blind" testing of CMT1 families for connexin32, P0, and PMP22 mutations is of limited value. PMID:10586262

  11. Novel OTOF mutations in Brazilian patients with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Jihane; Kimura, Lilian; Fávero, Mariana Lopes; Izarra, Fernanda Attanasio R; de Mello Auricchio, Maria Teresa Balester; Batissoco, Ana Carla; Lezirovitz, Karina; Abreu-Silva, Ronaldo Serafim; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2009-07-01

    The OTOF gene encoding otoferlin is associated with auditory neuropathy (AN), a type of non-syndromic deafness. We investigated the contribution of OTOF mutations to AN and to non-syndromic recessive deafness in Brazil. A test for the Q829X mutation was carried out on a sample of 342 unrelated individuals with non-syndromic hearing loss, but none presented this mutation. We selected 48 cases suggestive of autosomal recessive inheritance, plus four familial and seven isolated cases of AN, for genotyping of five microsatellite markers linked to the OTOF gene. The haplotype analysis showed compatibility with linkage in 11 families (including the four families with AN). Samples of the 11 probands from these families and from seven isolated cases of AN were selected for an exon-by-exon screening for mutations in the OTOF gene. Ten different pathogenic variants were detected, among which six are novel. Among the 52 pedigrees with autosomal recessive inheritance (including four familial cases of AN), mutations were identified in 4 (7.7%). Among the 11 probands with AN, seven had at least one pathogenic mutation in the OTOF gene. Mutations in the OTOF gene are frequent causes of AN in Brazil and our results confirm that they are spread worldwide.

  12. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy due to a novel EGR2 gene mutation with mild phenotype--usefulness of human mapping chip linkage analysis in a Czech family.

    PubMed

    Safka Brožková, Dana; Nevšímalová, Soňa; Mazanec, Radim; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Seeman, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Selection of candidate disease genes for mutation analysis is sometimes difficult since more than 40 genes and loci are known to be associated with CMT neuropathies. Hence a Czech family Cz-CMT with demyelinating type of autosomal dominant CMT disease was investigated by genome-wide linkage analysis by means of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Among 35 regions with linkage, five carried known CMT genes. In the final result a novel early growth response 2 - missense mutation c.1235 A>G, p.Glu412Gly was found. Surprisingly, the more severely affected proband carried an additional heterozygous myelin protein zero variant p.Asp246Asn detected previously, which may modify the phenotype. However, this MPZ variant is benign in heterozygous state alone, because it is also carried by the patient's healthy father. PMID:22546699

  13. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  14. Peroneal neuropathy after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, A; Arpa, J; Palau, F

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological findings in peroneal mononeuropathies following a weight-reduction diet. Thirty patients with acute peroneal palsy and weight loss were studied. Complete nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed in upper and lower limbs. NCS showed conduction block (CB) of the peroneal nerve at the fibular head that recovered in 29 patients within 3 weeks to 3 months. Severity of CB was correlated with clinical weakness. Three patients had abnormalities consistent with polyneuropathy (PNP). NCS in asymptomatic relatives confirmed familial neuropathy. Nerve biopsy and molecular study were consistent with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). One of these peroneal palsies (6 months) recovered after neurolysis. Weight loss might be a risk factor in peroneal mononeuropathies. NCS is a tool in the diagnosis of the site and severity of the nerve injury. Testing should be considered for relatives of patients with PNP because peroneal mononeuropathies may be the first expression of HNPP.

  15. Novel Compound Heterozygous Nonsense PRX Mutations in a Korean Dejerine-Sottas Neuropathy Family

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ye Ji; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Hong, Young Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene encoding periaxin (PRX) are known to cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F. However, there have been no reports describing Korean patients with these mutations. Case Report We examined a Korean DSN patient with an early-onset, slowly progressive, demyelinating neuropathy with prominent sensory involvement. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent capillary sequencing revealed novel compound heterozygous nonsense mutations (p.R392X and p.R679X) in PRX. One mutation was transmitted from each of the patient's parents. No unaffected family member had both mutations, and the mutations were not found in healthy controls. Conclusions We believe that these novel compound heterozygous nonsense mutations are the underlying cause of DSN. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and pathologic phenotypes in this family were similar to those described previously for patients with PRX mutations. We have identified the first PRX mutation in a Korean patient with DSN. PMID:25628743

  16. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment. PMID:26567516

  17. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  18. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment.

  19. [Autopsy case of a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and suspected chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which was later diagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Nishihira, Yasushi; Endo, Kazuhiro; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of a 74-year-old man with late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) diagnosed by genetic screening, later associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At the age of 70 years, the patient was admitted to our hospital because of progressive weakness and dysesthesia in the right upper limb. In the early stages of the illness, he was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and transient improvement was achieved with intravenous immunoglobulin. However, the symptoms progressively worsened and became refractory. Gene analysis revealed PMP22 gene duplication, which confirmed CMT1A. On sural nerve biopsy, severe demyelinating neuropathy and abundant onion-bulb formations with endoneurial infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed. Thereafter, pseudo-bulbar palsy and respiratory muscle weakness developed insidiously and progressed rapidly along with muscle weakness in the limbs and trunk. The patient died about four years after the onset of this disease. Postmortem examination showed moderate neuronal cell loss, Bunina bodies, and TDP-43-positive inclusions in the anterior horn cells. The spinal cord revealed axonal loss and extensive macrophage permeation in the corticospinal tracts. On the basis of these findings, the final neuropathological diagnosis was ALS. This is the first report of an autopsy case of CMT1A complicated with ALS. We here discuss the significant clinical and neuropathological findings of this case.

  20. DNA analysis in Finnish patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed Central

    Silander, K; Halonen, P; Sara, R; Kalimo, H; Falck, B; Savontaus, M L

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a dominantly inherited disorder that presents as recurrent mononeuropathies precipitated by apparently trivial traumas. The presence of a deletion in 17p11.2 was analysed in 13 Finnish families with HNPP. The deletion was found in all patients who were neurologically and neurophysiologically confirmed to have HNPP. In the problematic cases the detection of the gene defect is the method of choice in the diagnosis of HNPP. Analysis of DNA can also be used to detect clinically unaffected family members. Images PMID:7931393

  1. Identification of small molecules that improve ATP synthesis defects conferred by Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy mutations.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Tomilov, Alexey; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-09-01

    Inherited mitochondrial complex I mutations cause blinding Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), for which no curative therapy exists. A specific biochemical consequence of LHON mutations in the presence of trace rotenone was observed: deficient complex I-dependent ATP synthesis (CIDAS) and mitochondrial O2 consumption, proportional to the clinical severity of the three primary LHON mutations. We optimized a high-throughput assay of CIDAS to screen 1600 drugs to 2, papaverine and zolpidem, which protected CIDAS in LHON cells concentration-dependently. TSPO and cAMP were investigated as protective mechanisms, but a conclusive mechanism remains to be elucidated; next steps include testing in animal models.

  2. Electrodiagnostic testing in diabetic neuropathy: Which limb?

    PubMed

    Rota, E; Cocito, D

    2015-10-01

    Electrodiagnosis of subclinical diabetic neuropathies by nerve conduction studies remains challenging. The question arises about which nerves should be tested and what the best electrodiagnostic protocol to make an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathies would be. On the basis of our findings and other evidence, which highlighted the remarkable prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in nerve conduction studies of the upper limbs, often in the presence of normal lower limb conduction parameters, we suggest that both ulnar and median nerves, in their motor and sensitive component, should be the two target nerves for electrodiagnostic protocols in diabetic neuropathies.

  3. Structure and stability of internodal myelin in mouse models of hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Avila, Robin L; Inouye, Hideyo; Baek, Rena C; Yin, Xinghua; Trapp, Bruce D; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2005-11-01

    showed that the amount of P0 affected myelin's stability against swelling, thus directly supporting the hypothesis that packing defects underlie instability in "live" or intact myelin. Our findings demonstrate that diffraction can provide a quantitative basis for understanding, at a molecular level, the membrane packing defects that occur in internodal myelin in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:16254492

  4. The potential for oligodendrocyte proliferation during demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Prayoonwiwat, N; Rodriguez, M

    1993-01-01

    The potential for oligodendrocytes to proliferate in response to central nervous system injury was examined. We used intracerebral infection of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, a model for multiple sclerosis, which results in chronic demyelinating disease of SJL/J mice. Proliferating cells in spinal cord sections of adult mice were identified using simultaneous immunohistochemistry and in situ autoradiography ([3H]-thymidine incorporation). Seven different cell-specific markers were used to characterize proliferating cells as oligodendrocytes (myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, galactocerebroside, CNPase), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglia/macrophages (Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4) or T-lymphocytes (CD3). The average number of proliferating cells per area of spinal cord white matter was 11/mm2 in normal young adult mice compared to 61/mm2 in chronically infected mice. Most proliferating cells in normal spinal cord were not identified with these markers and were presumed to be progenitor glial cells. However, in spinal cord white matter of mice infected with Theiler's virus for approximately 4 months, 88% of proliferating cells were identified. Approximately one-third of all proliferating cells were in the oligodendrocyte lineage and expressed markers observed late in myelin differentiation. In demyelinated areas as compared to normal white matter, there was an 80- to 211-fold increase in the number of proliferating oligodendrocytes expressing myelin basic protein or proteolipid protein, respectively. The remainder of the proliferating cells in areas of demyelination were astrocytes, microglial cells and T-cells. These experiments support the hypothesis that factors within a demyelinating lesion promote the proliferation and differentiation of cells within the oligodendroglial lineage.

  5. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  6. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  7. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  8. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease. PMID:25601643

  9. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease.

  10. Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?

    PubMed

    Misiak, Rana Tawil; Wegienka, Ganesa; Zoratti, Edward

    2010-09-01

    A family history of an allergic condition is a well-accepted risk factor for the development of an allergic condition in an individual, particularly for allergic disorders such as asthma, eczema, and allergic rhinitis. However, the question of whether specific allergen sensitization is inherited requires a complicated answer, as environmental exposure plays an important role in the development of allergen-specific IgE. This article summarizes the findings of recent studies in the literature regarding what is known about the inheritance of specific allergens. Overall, properly collected and analyzed data appear to both support and refute the hypothesis that specific allergen sensitization is inherited, even when attempting to account for the complexities of varying study methodologies and the evaluation of diverse populations and communities. PMID:20574668

  11. Varicella-zoster virus encephalomyelitis with a prominent demyelinating component.

    PubMed

    Berth, Sarah; Carbunar, Olimpia; Yang, Ning Sarah; Fredericks, Brian; Lipton, Howard L; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2015-12-01

    The histopathologic presentation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the central nervous system is varied and is not well understood. Here we report a case of VZV encephalomyelitis with prominent demyelinating pathology in a patient with a history of follicular lymphoma treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient presented with waxing and waning bilateral limb weakness and mental status changes. MRI showed leptomeningeal, peripheral spinal cord and periventricular cerebral white matter lesions in the brain, and polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid detected VZV DNA. The patient expired from developing atrial fibrillation that rapidly progressed to ventricular fibrillation 10 days after admission to our hospital. Autopsy revealed macrophage-rich areas of demyelination in the spinal cord and cerebrum with relative preservation of axons associated with inclusion bodies and positive immunostaining for VZV. This case represents a rare example of VZV encephalomyelitis presenting with a predominantly demyelinating, "multiple sclerosis-like" pathology. The clinical and histopathologic findings and relevant literature are presented and discussed.

  12. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Reddymasu, Savio C; Bonino, John; McCallum, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastroparesis has a number of etiologies. The main ones are secondary to a complication from diabetes mellitus, related to post vagotomy or post gastric surgical resections, or idiopathic when the etiology is unclear. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease of the brain is unusual. Case presentation A 22-year-old woman was referred for acute onset of intractable nausea and vomiting. She also had cerebellar deficits, dysphagia and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed an isolated area of demyelination in the medullary region. Another 24-year-old woman had a similar presentation with right hemiplegia and MRI of the brain revealed a distal medullary region. Both these patients had an abnormal gastric emptying test. Gastroparesis and neurological deficits improved with intravenous corticosteroids. While the former patient has had no further recurrences, the latter patient developed multiple sclerosis within three months of presentation. Conclusion A demyelinating disease is a rare cause gastropareis, but should be suspected when symptoms of gastroparesis are associated with neurological deficits. MRI might help in the diagnosis and intravenous coriticosteroids can address the underlying disease process and improve gastric emptying, especially when used early during the course of the disease. PMID:17266755

  13. Cuprizone-induced demyelination in CNP::GFP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Silvestroff, Lucas; Bartucci, Sandra; Soto, Eduardo; Gallo, Vittorio; Pasquini, Juana; Franco, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Cuprizone (bis-cyclohexanone oxaldihydrazone) was previously shown to induce demyelination in white matter enriched brain structures. In the present study we used the cuprizone demyelination model in transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) promoter. The use of these particular transgenic mice allows easy detection of cells belonging to the entire oligodendroglial (OLG) lineage, ranging from OLG precursors to mature myelinating OLGs. We were able to evaluate the precise extent of oligodendroglial cell damage and recovery within the murine adult central nervous system (CNS) after inducing demyelination by acute cuprizone intoxication. A generalized loss of GFP+ cells was observed after cuprizone exposure and correlated with a decline in myelin basic protein (MBP) expression. OLGs were depleted in many brain areas that were previously thought to be unaffected by cuprizone treatment. Thus, in addition to the well-known cuprizone effects on the medial corpus callosum, we also found a loss of GFP+ cells in most brain structures, particularly in the caudatus putamen, cortex, anterior commissure, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, optic chiasm, brainstem, and cingulum. Loss of GFP+ cells was accompanied by extensive astrogliosis and microglial activation, although neurons were not affected. Interestingly, cuprizone-treated animals showed both activation of GFAP expression and a higher proliferation rate in subventricular zone cells. A week after cuprizone removal from the diet, GFP+ oligodendroglial cells began repopulating the damaged structures. GFP expression precedes that of MBP and allows OLG detection before myelin restoration.

  14. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  15. Fingolimod Attenuates Splenocyte-Induced Demyelination in Cerebellar Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Adam J.; Mir, Anis K.; Dev, Kumlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The family of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) is G-protein-coupled, comprised of subtypes S1PR1-S1PR5 and activated by the endogenous ligand S1P. The phosphorylated version of Fingolimod (pFTY720), an oral therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), induces S1PR1 internalisation in T cells, subsequent insensitivity to S1P gradients and sequestering of these cells within lymphoid organs, thus limiting immune response. S1PRs are also expressed in neuronal and glial cells where pFTY720 is suggested to directly protect against lysolecithin-induced deficits in myelination state in organotypic cerebellar slices. Of note, the effect of pFTY720 on immune cells already migrated into the CNS, prior to treatment, has not been well established. We have previously found that organotypic slice cultures do contain immune cells, which, in principle, could also be regulated by pFTY720 to maintain levels of myelin. Here, a mouse organotypic cerebellar slice and splenocyte co-culture model was thus used to investigate the effects of pFTY720 on splenocyte-induced demyelination. Spleen cells isolated from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunised mice (MOG-splenocytes) or from 2D2 transgenic mice (2D2-splenocytes) both induced demyelination when co-cultured with mouse organotypic cerebellar slices, to a similar extent as lysolecithin. As expected, in vivo treatment of MOG-immunised mice with FTY720 inhibited demyelination induced by MOG-splenocytes. Importantly, in vitro treatment of MOG- and 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 also attenuated demyelination caused by these cells. In addition, while in vitro treatment of 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 did not alter cell phenotype, pFTY720 inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNγ) and interleukin 6 (IL6) from these cells. This work suggests that treatment of splenocytes by pFTY720 attenuates demyelination and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine release, which likely contributes to enhanced

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584552

  17. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. PMID:26892473

  18. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Campos, J; Ramos-Peek, J; Martínez-Barros, M; Zamora-Peralta, M; Martínez-Cerrato, J

    1998-01-01

    Although peripheral neuropathy is a fairly common finding in chronic arsenic poisoning, little is known about the acute effects of this metal on peripheral nerves. This report shows clinical and electrophysiological findings in a patient who developed peripheral neuropathy only three days after a high-dose ingestion of this metal due to a failed suicide attempt. We speculate that peripheral nerves and some cranial nerves can show not only clinical but also subclinical involvement that can only be detected by neurophysiological studies.

  19. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  20. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  1. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment.

  2. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  3. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series. PMID:27432685

  4. Muscle performance relates to physical function and quality of life in long-term chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Harbo, Thomas; Andersen, Henning; Overgaard, Kristian; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the severity and distribution of assessed muscle weakness and to relate muscle performance to measures of function and quality of life in long-term chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Fourteen patients with 8.7 years (3.3-11.5) of confirmed CIDP consecutively referred to the referral center for CIDP patients at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, during the period 1992-2002 were compared with matched healthy controls. The main outcome parameter was muscle performance assessed with isokinetic dynamometry. Overall disability sum score (ODSS), neurological symptom score (NSS), neuropathy impairment score (NIS), health-related quality-of-life survey (SF-36), nerve conduction studies, physical fitness, hand and walking performance, and quantitative sensory testing were secondary variables. The mean (95% CI) isokinetic strength of all measured muscles was reduced by 19.4% (5.9-32.8%) (p < 0.01). In the legs, distal weakness was predominant, strength at ankle being 37.0% (14.7-59.2%) reduced. Isokinetic strength was closely related to manual muscle strength, ODSS, NIS, walking performance, and physical components of SF-36. In conclusion, isokinetic strength relates to measures of function, impairments, gait performance, and physical components of health-related quality of life in long-term CIDP. Furthermore, a detailed characterization of severity and distribution of weakness has been provided using this technique. PMID:18844787

  5. Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1 (GDAP1) gene in intermediate type autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Senderek, Jan; Bergmann, Carsten; Ramaekers, Vincent T; Nelis, Eva; Bernert, Günther; Makowski, Astrid; Züchner, Stephan; De Jonghe, Peter; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Zerres, Klaus; Schröder, J Michael

    2003-03-01

    Mutations in the gene for the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1 (GDAP1) on 8q21 recently were reported to cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) sensorimotor neuropathy. Neurophysiology and nerve pathology were heterogeneous in these cases: a subset of GDAP1 mutations was associated with peripheral nerve demyelination, whereas others resulted in axonal degeneration. In this study, we identified two novel mutations disrupting the GDAP1 reading frame. Homozygosity for a single base pair insertion in exon 3 (c.349_350insT) was observed in affected children from a Turkish inbred pedigree. The other novel allele detected in a German patient was a homozygous mutation of the intron 4 donor splice site (c.579 + 1G>A). Patients with GDAP1 mutations displayed severe, early childhood-onset CMT neuropathy with prominent pes equinovarus deformity and impairment of hand muscles. Nerve conduction velocities were between 25 and 35 m/s and peripheral nerve pathology showed axonal as well as demyelinating changes. These findings fitted the definition of intermediate type CMT and further support the view that GDAP1 is vital for both, axonal integrity and Schwann cell properties.

  6. Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy Type I: Haplotype Analysis Shows Founders in Southern England and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, G. A.; Dawkins, J. L.; Blair, I. P.; Auer-Grumbach, M.; Brahmbhatt, S. B.; Hulme, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN1) is the most common dominantly inherited degenerative disorder of sensory neurons. The gene mutation was mapped to chromosome 9 in a large Australian family, descended from an ancestor from southern England who was a convict. Dawkins et al. recently reported gene mutations in the SPTLC1 gene, in this and other families. The first description of hereditary sensory neuropathy, by Hicks, was in a family from London and Exeter. To determine if the families in the present study that have SPTLC1 mutations are related to English families with HSN1 and, possibly, to the family studied by Hicks, we performed haplotype analysis of four Australian families of English extraction, four English families, and one Austrian family. Three Australian families of English extraction and three English families (two of whom have been described elsewhere) had the 399T→G SPTLC1 mutation, the same chromosome 9 haplotype, and the same phenotype. The Australian and English families may therefore have a common founder who, on the basis of historical information, has been determined to have lived in southern England prior to 1800. The sensorimotor neuropathy phenotype caused by the 399T→G SPTLC1 mutation is the same as that reported by Campbell and Hoffman and, possibly, the same as that originally described by Hicks. PMID:11479835

  7. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I: haplotype analysis shows founders in southern England and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, G A; Dawkins, J L; Blair, I P; Auer-Grumbach, M; Brahmbhatt, S B; Hulme, D J

    2001-09-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN1) is the most common dominantly inherited degenerative disorder of sensory neurons. The gene mutation was mapped to chromosome 9 in a large Australian family, descended from an ancestor from southern England who was a convict. Dawkins et al. recently reported gene mutations in the SPTLC1 gene, in this and other families. The first description of hereditary sensory neuropathy, by Hicks, was in a family from London and Exeter. To determine if the families in the present study that have SPTLC1 mutations are related to English families with HSN1 and, possibly, to the family studied by Hicks, we performed haplotype analysis of four Australian families of English extraction, four English families, and one Austrian family. Three Australian families of English extraction and three English families (two of whom have been described elsewhere) had the 399T-->G SPTLC1 mutation, the same chromosome 9 haplotype, and the same phenotype. The Australian and English families may therefore have a common founder who, on the basis of historical information, has been determined to have lived in southern England prior to 1800. The sensorimotor neuropathy phenotype caused by the 399T-->G SPTLC1 mutation is the same as that reported by Campbell and Hoffman and, possibly, the same as that originally described by Hicks. PMID:11479835

  8. A mitochondrial DNA mutation as a cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Lott, M T; Wallace, D C

    1989-05-18

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease associated with the late onset of bilateral loss of central vision and cardiac dysrhythmias. The maternal inheritance is explained by the mitochondrial origin of the disease. Analysis of the sequence of a mitochondrial DNA has indicated that a single nucleotide change at position 11778 is associated with this disease. This mutation converts the 340th amino acid of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 from an arginine to a histidine and eliminates an SfaNI endonuclease restriction site. A survey of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA of three independent families with this disease (an American black and two white European families) and 10 controls confirmed that this SfaNI site is associated with the disease. A phylogenetic tree for mitochondrial DNA polymorphism and sequence variants from three probands with Leber's disease and four controls was constructed, and the mutation at position 11778 was found to be associated with two mitochondrial DNA backgrounds--an American black mitochondrial DNA and a European mitochondrial DNA. Thus, this mutation must have arisen twice independently. Since the mutation correlated with symptoms of Leber's disease in both cases, these findings indicate that the mutation is a cause of the disease. This genetic analysis has identified the specific point mutation in the mitochondrial DNA that results in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:2566116

  9. Inhibition of System Xc(-) Transporter Attenuates Autoimmune Inflammatory Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Baker, Brandi J; Doyle, Ryan E; Moseley, Carson E; Sestero, Christine M; Johnston, Bryce P; De Sarno, Patrizia; Tang, Andrew; Gembitsky, Igor; Hewett, Sandra J; Weaver, Casey T; Raman, Chander; DeSilva, Tara M

    2015-07-15

    T cell infiltration into the CNS is a significant underlying pathogenesis in autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Several lines of evidence suggest that glutamate dysregulation in the CNS is an important consequence of immune cell infiltration in neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases; yet, the causal link between inflammation and glutamate dysregulation is not well understood. A major source of glutamate release during oxidative stress is the system Xc(-) transporter; however, this mechanism has not been tested in animal models of autoimmune inflammatory demyelination. We find that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of system Xc(-) attenuates chronic and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of system Xc(-) 7 d after induction of EAE attenuated T cell infiltration into the CNS, but not T cell activation in the periphery. Mice harboring a Slc7a11 (xCT) mutation that inactivated system Xc(-) were resistant to EAE, corroborating a central role for system Xc(-) in mediating immune cell infiltration. We next examined the role of the system Xc(-) transporter in the CNS after immune cell infiltration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the system Xc(-) transporter administered during the first relapse in a SJL animal model of relapsing-remitting EAE abrogated clinical disease, inflammation, and myelin loss. Primary coculture studies demonstrate that myelin-specific CD4(+) Th1 cells provoke microglia to release glutamate via the system Xc(-) transporter, causing excitotoxic death to mature myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Taken together, these studies support a novel role for the system Xc(-) transporter in mediating T cell infiltration into the CNS as well as promoting myelin destruction after immune cell infiltration in EAE.

  10. Inhibition of system xc− transporter attenuates autoimmune inflammatory demyelination1

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Ryan E.; Moseley, Carson E.; Sestero, Christine M.; Johnston, Bryce P.; De Sarno, Patrizia; Tang, Andrew; Gembitsky, Igor; Hewett, Sandra J.; Weaver, Casey T.; Raman, Chander; DeSilva, Tara M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) is a significant underlying pathogenesis in autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Several lines of evidence suggest that glutamate dysregulation in the CNS is an important consequence of immune cell infiltration in neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases; yet, the causal link between inflammation and glutamate dysregulation is not well understood. A major source of glutamate release during oxidative stress is the system xc− transporter, however, this mechanism has not been tested in animal models of autoimmune inflammatory demyelination. We find that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of system xc− attenuates chronic and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of system xc− seven days after induction of EAE attenuated T cell infiltration into the CNS, but not T cell activation in the periphery. Mice harboring a Slc7a11 (xCT) mutation that inactivated system xc− were resistant to EAE, corroborating a central role for system xc− in mediating immune cell infiltration. We next examined the role of the system xc− transporter in the CNS after immune cell infiltration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the system xc− transporter administered during the first relapse in a SJL animal model of relapsing-remitting EAE abrogated clinical disease, inflammation, and myelin loss. Primary co-culture studies demonstrate that myelin-specific CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) cells provoke microglia to release glutamate via the system xc− transporter causing excitotoxic death to mature myelin-producing OLs. Taken together these studies support a novel role for the system xc− transporter in mediating T cell infiltration into the CNS as well as promoting myelin destruction after immune cell infiltration in EAE. PMID:26071560

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ohyagi, Masaki; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yagi, Yousuke; Ishibashi, Satoru; Akiyama, Junko; Nagahori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is frequently accompanied by systemic complications. Neuropathologies have not been well investigated as extraintestinal manifestations of CD. We herein report the case of a 36-year-old man with CD who presented with progressive weakness and numbness. A neurological examination and the results of a nerve conduction study and a sural nerve biopsy led to a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Plasma exchanges were initially effective; however, the effects gradually declined starting 10 days after the plasma exchange (PE). These results suggest that humoral factors may play an important role in CIDP associated with CD.

  12. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: clinical heterogeneity and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Leger, Jean-Marc; Bombelli, Francesco; Tran-Thanh, Hung; Chassande, Bénédicte; Maisonobe, Thierry; Viala, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Since the first description of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) by PJ Dyck's group at the Mayo Clinic 35 years ago, a wide range of publications have underlined the clinical, electrophysiologic and histopathologic heterogeneity of this disease. Expert consensus opinion is that CIDP should be considered in any patient with progressive symmetrical or asymmetrical polyradiculoneuropathy whose clinical course is relapsing and remitting or progresses for more than two months, especially if there are positive sensory symptoms, proximal weakness, are flexia without wasting, or preferential loss of vibration or joint-position sense. Electrophysiologic features of demyelinating polyneuropathy (especially conduction blocks) and elevated protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid may assist with the diagnosis. However, various clinical pictures have been described in patients with CIDP including pure motor or sensory impairment, and distal, multifocal or focal distribution. Two specific points have recently been emphasized:--while most CIDP patients have chronic onset, acute onset resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome may sometimes occur;--pure sensory forms may require different diagnostic strategies, including the use of somatosensory evoked potentials showing abnormal proximal sensory conduction, and nerve biopsy showing macrophage-associated demyelination, onion bulb formation, demyelinated and partially remyelinated nerve fibres, endoneurial edema, endoneurial mononuclear cell infiltration, and variation between fascicles. Several sets of diagnostic criteria for CIDP have been proposed, with different sensitivities and specificities. The European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria strike a balance between specificity, which needs to be higher for research purposes than for clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity, which, if too low, might lead to some cases being missed. CIDP patients may have a variety of

  13. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  14. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  15. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Phillipe D.; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. DPN is characterized by progressive, distal-to-proximal degeneration of peripheral nerves that leads to pain, weakness, and eventual loss of sensation. The mechanisms underlying DPN pathogenesis are uncertain, and other than tight glycemic control in type 1 patients, there is no effective treatment. Mouse models of type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are critical to improving our understanding of DPN pathophysiology and developing novel treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss the most widely used T1DM and T2DM mouse models for DPN research, with emphasis on the main neurologic phenotype of each model. We also discuss important considerations for selecting appropriate models for T1DM and T2DM DPN studies and describe the promise of novel emerging diabetic mouse models for DPN research. The development, characterization, and comprehensive neurologic phenotyping of clinically relevant mouse models for T1DM and T2DM will provide valuable resources for future studies examining DPN pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24615439

  16. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Dramis, Asterios; Pimpalnerkar, Ashvin

    2005-06-01

    Entrapment neuropathy of the suprascapular nerve (SNE), although a recognised clinical entity, is a relatively rare cause of shoulder pain and subjective weakness in the athlete involved in overhead sports like volleyball and badminton. This study deals with the presentation and management of four unusual cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment in volleyball players. Four male volleyball players presented to our department with intractable shoulder pain and subjective sensation of shoulder weakness. They all had visible wasting of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles, together with weakness of abduction and external rotation of the arm. They all responded temporarily to a diagnostic injection of local anaesthetic. MR imaging was useful in diagnosing space occupying lesions in three cases and the presence of a hypertrophic suprascapular ligament in one case. Due to failure of non- operative treatment, which included activity modification, rest, analgesics and rehabilitation programme over 6 months, surgery was then required to decompress the suprascapular nerve. All patients were symptom free at 6 months postoperatively and after an intensive rehabilitation programme, they were able to return to their normal level of activity including sport.

  17. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  18. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  19. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2007-01-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III), which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive. PMID:17915006

  20. Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine for Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasalu, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic demyelinating disorders have multifactorial origin but common important physiologic and anaesthetic considerations. Choice of anaesthesia technique and the drugs used, undertanding the pros and cons of using central neuraxial blocks will help in successful management of such patients. We describe the anaesthetic management of a 34-year-old male with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy posted for cystolithotripsy. PMID:27790558

  1. Microglial cystatin F expression is a sensitive indicator for ongoing demyelination with concurrent remyelination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmei; Tanaka, Kenji F; Shimizu, Takahiro; Bernard, Claude C A; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Pfeiffer, Steven E; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Demyelination coincides with numerous changes of gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Cystatin F, which is a papain-like lysosomal cysteine proteinase inhibitor that is normally expressed by immune cells and not in the brain, is massively induced in the CNS during acute demyelination. We found that microglia, which are monocyte/macrophage-lineage cells in the CNS, express cystatin F only during demyelination. By using several demyelinating animal models and the spinal cord tissues from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, we examined spatiotemporal expression pattern of cystatin F by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We found that the timing of cystatin F induction matches with ongoing demyelination, and the places with cystatin F expression overlapped with the remyelinating area. Most interestingly, cystatin F induction ceased in chronic demyelination, in which remyelinating ability was lost. These findings demonstrate that the expression of cystatin F indicates the occurrence of ongoing demyelination/remyelination and the absence of cystatin F expression indicates the cessation of remyelination in the demyelinating area.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor promotes repair of chronically demyelinated white matter.

    PubMed

    Vana, Adam C; Flint, Nicole C; Harwood, Norah E; Le, Tuan Q; Fruttiger, Marcus; Armstrong, Regina C

    2007-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis, remyelination becomes limited after repeated or prolonged episodes of demyelination. To test the effect of platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A) in recovery from chronic demyelination we induced corpus callosum demyelination using cuprizone treatment in hPDGF-A transgenic (tg) mice with the human PDGF-A gene under control of an astrocyte-specific promoter. After chronic demyelination and removal of cuprizone from the diet, remyelination and oligodendrocyte density improved significantly in hPDGF-A tg mice compared with wild-type mice. In hPDGF-A tg mice, oligodendrocyte progenitor density and proliferation values were increased in the corpus callosum during acute demyelination but not during chronic demyelination or the subsequent recovery period, compared with hPDGF-A tg mice without cuprizone or to treatment-matched wild-type mice. Proliferation within the subventricular zone and subcallosal zone was elevated throughout cuprizone treatment but was not different between hPDGF-A tg and wild-type mice. Importantly, hPDGF-A tg mice had reduced apoptosis in the corpus callosum during the recovery period after chronic demyelination. Therefore, PDGF-A may support oligodendrocyte generation and survival to promote remyelination of chronic lesions. Furthermore, preventing oligodendrocyte apoptosis may be important not only during active demyelination but also for supporting the generation of new oligodendrocytes to remyelinate chronic lesions.

  3. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    PubMed

    Davidson, G L; Murphy, S M; Polke, J M; Laura, M; Salih, M A M; Muntoni, F; Blake, J; Brandner, S; Davies, N; Horvath, R; Price, S; Donaghy, M; Roberts, M; Foulds, N; Ramdharry, G; Soler, D; Lunn, M P; Manji, H; Davis, M B; Houlden, H; Reilly, M M

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  4. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, G. L.; Murphy, S. M.; Polke, J. M.; Laura, M.; Salih, M. A. M.; Muntoni, F.; Blake, J.; Brandner, S.; Davies, N.; Horvath, R.; Price, S.; Donaghy, M.; Roberts, M.; Foulds, N.; Ramdharry, G.; Soler, D.; Lunn, M. P.; Manji, H.; Davis, M. B.; Houlden, H.; Reilly, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN. PMID:22302274

  5. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    PubMed

    Davidson, G L; Murphy, S M; Polke, J M; Laura, M; Salih, M A M; Muntoni, F; Blake, J; Brandner, S; Davies, N; Horvath, R; Price, S; Donaghy, M; Roberts, M; Foulds, N; Ramdharry, G; Soler, D; Lunn, M P; Manji, H; Davis, M B; Houlden, H; Reilly, M M

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN. PMID:22302274

  6. Structural and Functional Abnormalities of the Neuromuscular Junction in the Trembler-J Homozygote Mouse Model of Congenital Hypomyelinating Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scurry, Alexandra N; Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Gephart, Gregory B; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) result in the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A. This hereditary peripheral neuropathy is characterized by dysmyelination of peripheral nerves, reduced nerve conduction velocity, and muscle weakness. APMP22 point mutation in L16P (leucine 16 to proline) underlies a form of human CMT1A as well as the Trembler-J mouse model of CMT1A. Homozygote Trembler-J mice (Tr(J)) die early postnatally, fail to make peripheral myelin, and, therefore, are more similar to patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy than those with CMT1A. Because recent studies of inherited neuropathies in humans and mice have demonstrated that dysfunction and degeneration of neuromuscular synapses or junctions (NMJs) often precede impairments in axonal conduction, we examined the structure and function of NMJs in Tr(J)mice. Although synapses appeared to be normally innervated even in end-stage Tr(J)mice, the growth and maturation of the NMJs were altered. In addition, the amplitudes of nerve-evoked muscle endplate potentials were reduced and there was transmission failure during sustained nerve stimulation. These results suggest that the severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy that characterizes Tr(J)mice results in structural and functional deficits of the developing NMJ.

  7. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  8. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  9. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model.

    PubMed

    Das, H K; Das, D; Doley, R; Sahu, P P

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  10. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    PubMed Central

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  11. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G; Meier, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2011-09-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated. PMID:21788663

  12. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G; Meier, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2011-09-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated.

  13. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies.

  14. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  15. Pediatric acquired CNS demyelinating syndromes: Features associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Neuteboom, Rinze F; Mar, Soe; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-08-30

    Approximately one-third of children with an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS) will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), either at onset according to the 2010 McDonald criteria, or on the basis of clinical or MRI evidence of relapsing disease, in the majority of patients within 2-4 years. ADS in adolescents, female patients, and patients with polyfocal deficits is associated with the highest likelihood of MS, while children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, those with documented preceding infection, and ADS presentation in young children more commonly portends a monophasic outcome. While pediatric MS associates with similar genetic risk alleles as have been documented in adult-onset MS, such associations are not diagnostically valuable at the individual level. The presence of antibodies directed against aquaporin-4 strongly supports a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica, and should be assayed in children manifesting with severe optic neuritis, longitudinally extensive myelitis, or brainstem/hypothalamic syndromes. Further research will determine whether other antibody signatures are indicative of relapsing demyelination distinct from MS. PMID:27572864

  16. Neuro-oncology dilemma: Tumour or tumefactive demyelinating lesion.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Mohammad; Freedman, Mark S

    2015-11-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) are not an uncommon manifestation of demyelinating disease but can pose diagnostic challenges in patients without a pre-existing diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) as well as in known MS patients. Brain tumours can also arise in MS patients and can be seen in chronic MS patients as co-morbidities. Delayed diagnosis or unnecessary intervention or treatment will affect the ultimate prognosis of these patients. In this article, we will review some typical cases illustrating the dilemma and review the information that helps to differentiate the two conditions. The intention is not to present an extensive differential diagnosis of both entities, but to examine some typical examples when the decision arises to decide between the two. We take a somewhat different approach, by presenting the cases in "real time", allowing the readers to consider in their own minds which diagnosis they favour, discussing in detail some of the pertinent literature, then revealing later the actual diagnosis. We would urge readers to consider re-visiting their first thoughts about each case after reading the discussion, before reading the follow-up of each case. The overall objective is to highlight the real possibility of being forced to decide between these two entities in clinical practise, present a reasonable approach to help differentiate them and especially to focus on the possibility of TDLs in order to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  17. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination.

  18. Axonal and perikaryal involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, M; Terao, S; Misu, K; Li, M; Hattori, N; Ichimura, M; Sakai, M; Yamamoto, H; Watanabe, H; Riku, S; Ikeda, E; Hata, J; Oda, M; Satake, M; Nakamura, N; Matsuya, S; Hashizume, Y; Sobue, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the extent of loss of myelinated nerve fibres and spinal motor neuron loss in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), a clinicopathological study was conducted on biopsied sural nerves and necropsied spinal cords from patients with CIDP.
METHODS—The myelinated fibre pathology of 71 biopsied sural nerves and motor neuron pathology of nine necropsied spinal cords at L4 levels in patients with CIDP were quantitatively and immunohistochemically assessed.
RESULTS—Myelinated nerve fibre density was significantly diminished to 65.4% of the control values (p <0.0001), correlating inversely with the extent of segmental demyelination and remyelination (r = −0.43, p < 0.0005) and duration of illness (r = −0.31, p < 0.01). Numbers of large spinal motor neurons in CIDP were variably but significantly diminished (range from 46.0 to 97.6% of the age matched control value (p < 0.005)), and reactive astrogliosis was evident in the ventral horn in CIDP. The frequency of ventral horn neurons exhibiting central chromatolysis and the accumulation of phosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament protein was significantly higher in CIDP than in controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—The loss of nerve axons and spinal motor neurons is common in CIDP, and extensive in some cases. These neuronal and axonal losses may influence the functional prognosis in CIDP.

 PMID:10329744

  19. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  20. Pupillary signs in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S E; Smith, S A; Brown, P M; Fox, C; Sönksen, P H

    1978-01-01

    Pupillary function was investigated in 36 insulin-dependent diabetics and 36 controls matched for age and sex. About half of the diabetics had evidence of peripheral somatic or autonomic neuropathy, or both. The diabetic patients had abnormally small pupil diameters in the dark and less fluctuation in pupil size (hippus) during continuous illumination than the controls. They also had reduced reflex responses to light flashes of an intensity adjusted for individual retinal sensitivities. The pupillary findings were compared with results of five tests of cardiovascular function and five tests of peripheral sensory and motor nerve function. Almost all the patients with autonomic neuropathy had pupillary signs, which we therefore conclude are a common manifestation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:709128

  1. Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Modeled In Vitro?

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N J; Freeman, O J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common secondary complication of diabetes that impacts on patient's health and well-being. Distal axon degeneration is a key feature of diabetic neuropathy, but the pathological changes which underlie axonal die-back are incompletely understood; despite decades of research a treatment has not yet been identified. Basic research must focus on understanding the complex mechanisms underlying changes that occur in the nervous system during diabetes. To this end, tissue culture techniques are invaluable as they enable researchers to examine the intricate mechanistic responses of cells to high glucose or other factors in order to better understand the pathogenesis of nerve dysfunction. This chapter describes the use of in vitro models to study a wide range of specific cellular effects pertaining to diabetic neuropathy including apoptosis, neurite outgrowth, neurodegeneration, activity, and bioenergetics. We consider problems associated with in vitro modeling and future refinement such as use of induced pluripotent stem cells and microfluidic technology. PMID:27133145

  2. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  3. Subacute arsenic neuropathy: clinical and electrophysiological observations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M J; Lyon, L W; Taylor, J W

    1981-10-01

    Two patients with subacute arsenic neuropathy are described and the results of serial conduction velocity determinations from the very early stages of the illness to partial recovery are reported. Sensory and motor deficits were maximal within four weeks of the estimated time of exposure. Recovery was slow, with only partial improvement of the neurological deficits two years after onset of the illness. Progressive slowing of motor conduction velocity was observed in the first three months followed by a gradual increase in velocity thereafter. The possible mechanisms underlying the temporal profile of the electrophysiological changes are considered. The need for initiating chelation therapy before the development of the neuropathy is emphasised.

  4. Persisting nutritional neuropathy amongst former war prisoners.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, G V; Bell, D R

    1982-01-01

    Of 898 former Far East prisoners of war, assessed between 1968 and 1981, 49 (5.5%) had evidence of persisting symptomatic neurological disease dating back to their periods of malnutrition in captivity. The commonest syndromes were peripheral neuropathy (often of "burning foot" type), optic atrophy, and sensori-neural deafness. Though nutritional neuropathies disappeared soon after release in most ex-Far East prisoners of war, in some they have persisted up to 36 years since exposure to the nutritional insult. PMID:6292369

  5. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  6. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D. A.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto subduction about 4Ga, evident in geochemical analysis from ancient cratons, to global tectonics by 3-2.7Ga, suggests that plates and plate boundaries spread globally over a 1Gyr period. We hypothesize that when sufficient lithospheric damage, which promotes shear-localization and long-lived weak zones, combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of plate boundaries and eventually fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We demonstrate this process with an idealized model of pressure-driven flow (wherein a low pressure zone is equivalent to downwelling suction or slab pull) in a lithosphere that self-weakens according to a mylonitic-type polycrystalline grain-damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. v.202-203, pp27-55, 2012). In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, four successive orthogonal rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damage zones that are inherited to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even as flow is only driven by subduction. For Venus' hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which is compatible with observations. After plates are developed, continued changes in driving forces combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor and micro plates.

  7. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  8. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  9. Neuromuscular rehabilitation and electrodiagnosis. 4. Specialized neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Agre, J C; Sliwa, J A

    2000-03-01

    This self-directed learning module briefly highlights the differential diagnosis for acute weakness in patients with acute respiratory failure requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. It is part of the chapter on neuromuscular rehabilitation and electrodiagnosis in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article includes a discussion on the role of exercise in the treatment of patients with the late effects of poliomyelitis or with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

  10. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  11. Inherited disorders of bilirubin clearance.

    PubMed

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-03-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective (i) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, (ii) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g., Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), (iii) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or (iv) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  12. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  13. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most of these requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions but are quite controversial. PMID:23642718

  14. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types.

  15. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:25326571

  16. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts.

  17. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy as the presenting feature of tyrosinaemia type I and effectively treated with an inhibitor of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, T C; Payan, J; Brett, E M; Lindstedt, S; Holme, E; Clayton, P T

    1993-10-01

    A 21 month old girl presented with a short history of frequent falls and a right sided foot drop. She went on to suffer recurrent episodes of distal weakness in her arms and legs with hyporeflexia. Electrophysiological studies were consistent with inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (IDP) and treatment with corticosteroids appeared to lead to an improvement. However, the development of hypertension, evidence of tubulopathy, and hepatomegaly led to re-evaluation. A diagnosis of type I tyrosinaemia was made, based on increased urinary excretion of succinylacetone and decreased activity of fumarylacetoacetase in her cultured skin fibroblasts. A low tyrosine diet did not prevent life-threatening exacerbations of neuropathy but intravenous haemarginate appeared to aid her recovery from one exacerbation. An immediate improvement in strength was seen after starting treatment with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methyl-benzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC), an inhibitor of 4-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate dioxygenase. A liver transplant was performed but the patient died of immediate postoperative complications. Tyrosinaemia needs to be considered in a child with recurrent peripheral neuropathy because (i) the signs of liver disease and renal tubular dysfunction may be subtle; (ii) acute exacerbations may be life threatening; (iii) specific forms of treatment are available.

  19. Behavioural changes observed in demyelination model shares similarities with white matter abnormalities in humans.

    PubMed

    Serra-de-Oliveira, Nathalia; Boilesen, Sabine Nunes; Prado de França Carvalho, Carolina; LeSueur-Maluf, Luciana; Zollner, Ricardo de Lima; Spadari, Regina Célia; Medalha, Carla Cristina; Monteiro de Castro, Gláucia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Further to the symptoms resulting from demyelination, new studies point to the involvement of neuroinflammation and white matter abnormalities in psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Cuprizone, a model of MS, produces consistent demyelination and elicits behavioural, morphological and inflammatory changes in animals that share some similarities with those observed in humans. In this study, we used the cuprizone model in Lewis rats to evaluate clinical signs triggered by the demyelination process which could be comparable with the symptoms seen in white matter abnormalities in human beings. To induce the demyelination process, 0.6% cuprizone was added to the Lewis rats' diet for 4 weeks. We proceeded with behavioural, morphological and immunological analyses. Animals fed with cuprizone exhibited behavioural changes: higher scores in the neurotoxicity test, reduced exploratory and locomotion behaviour, and also an increase of permanency in the closed arm of the elevated plus maze test, were observed. In these analyses, the animals showed motor coordination impairment and anxiety-like behaviour. Demyelination also triggered changes in discrimination of objects identified by an increase in the time spent close to a familiar object. These behavioural alterations were associated with a significant increase in the levels of TNF-alpha and corticosterone, consistent with the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, the results of this work show the cuprizone/Lewis rat model demyelination as an attractive paradigm for studying the correlation between white matter abnormalities and behaviour.

  20. Recurrent demyelination in chronic central nervous system infection produced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Dal Canto, M C; Lipton, H L

    1979-08-01

    A morphologic study of demyelination produced by Theiler's encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection in C3H/He mice was performed. Demyelination in this strain of mouse was less intense and had a milder gliomesodermal response than that observed in SJL mice. As early as 80 days after infection numerous remyelinated axons were present in C3H/He mice, and later, extensive remyelination was observed and was mainly by Schwann cells. About one-third of remyelinated plaques showed recurrent demyelinating activity at 200 days. The best evidence of recurrent demyelination was the loss of myelin by abons which had been previously remyelinated by Schwann cells. In addition, acute areas of demyelination were also seen in spinal cords which contained chronic or quiescent plaques. The demonstration of recurrent demyelination in TMEV infection is important for it increases the relevance of this model to multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition TMEV infection of C3H/He mice appears to be an excellent model for further studies of Schwann cell remyelination and recurrent demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS).

  1. Microglial Hv1 proton channel promotes cuprizone-induced demyelination through oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junli; Tian, Daishi; Murugan, Madhuvika; Eyo, Ukpong B.; Dreyfus, Cheryl F.; Wang, Wei; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in inflammatory cells including microglia plays an important role in demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism underlying microglial ROS production and demyelination remains largely unknown. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of microglial Hv1 proton channels in a mouse model of cuprizone-induced demyelination, a model for MS. Following cuprizone exposure, wild-type mice presented obvious demyelination, decreased myelin basic protein expression, loss of mature oligodendrocytes, and impaired motor coordination in comparison to mice on a normal chow diet. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1−/−) are partially protected from demyelination and motor deficits compared with those in wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1−/− mice in cuprizone-induced demyelination is accompanied by reduced ROS production, ameliorated microglial activation, increased oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (NG2) proliferation, and increased number of mature oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate that the Hv1 proton channel is required for cuprizone-induced microglial oxidative damage and subsequent demyelination. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for controlling NOX-dependent ROS production in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:26173779

  2. Microglial Hv1 proton channel promotes cuprizone-induced demyelination through oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Tian, Daishi; Murugan, Madhuvika; Eyo, Ukpong B; Dreyfus, Cheryl F; Wang, Wei; Wu, Long-Jun

    2015-10-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in inflammatory cells including microglia plays an important role in demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism underlying microglial ROS production and demyelination remains largely unknown. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of microglial Hv1 proton channels in a mouse model of cuprizone-induced demyelination, a model for MS. Following cuprizone exposure, wild-type mice presented obvious demyelination, decreased myelin basic protein expression, loss of mature oligodendrocytes, and impaired motor coordination in comparison to mice on a normal chow diet. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1(-/-) ) are partially protected from demyelination and motor deficits compared with those in wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1(-/-) mice in cuprizone-induced demyelination is accompanied by reduced ROS production, ameliorated microglial activation, increased oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (NG2) proliferation, and increased number of mature oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate that the Hv1 proton channel is required for cuprizone-induced microglial oxidative damage and subsequent demyelination. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for controlling NOX-dependent ROS production in the pathogenesis of MS.

  3. Digenic inheritance in medical genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2013-01-01

    Digenic inheritance (DI) is the simplest form of inheritance for genetically complex diseases. By contrast with the thousands of reports that mutations in single genes cause human diseases, there are only dozens of human disease phenotypes with evidence for DI in some pedigrees. The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has made it simpler to identify monogenic disease causes and could similarly simplify proving DI because one can simultaneously find mutations in two genes in the same sample. However, through 2012, I could find only one example of human DI in which HTS was used; in that example, HTS found only the second of the two genes. To explore the gap between expectation and reality, I tried to collect all examples of human DI with a narrow definition and characterise them according to the types of evidence collected, and whether there has been replication. Two strong trends are that knowledge of candidate genes and knowledge of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have been helpful in most published examples of human DI. By contrast, the positional method of genetic linkage analysis, has been mostly unsuccessful in identifying genes underlying human DI. Based on the empirical data, I suggest that combining HTS with growing networks of established PPIs may expedite future discoveries of human DI and strengthen the evidence for them. PMID:23785127

  4. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance after SCNT.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is under dual genetic control and requires extensive interaction between biparentally inherited nuclear genes and maternally inherited mitochondrial genes. Standard SCNT procedures deprive an oocytes' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the corresponding maternal nuclear DNA and require it to interact with an entirely foreign nucleus that is again interacting with foreign somatic mitochondria. As a result, most SCNT embryos, -fetuses, and -offspring carry somatic cell mtDNA in addition to recipient oocyte mtDNA, a condition termed heteroplasmy. It is thus evident that somatic cell mtDNA can escape the selective mechanism that targets and eliminates intraspecific sperm mitochondria in the fertilized oocyte to maintain homoplasmy. However, the factors responsible for the large intra- and interindividual differences in heteroplasmy level remain elusive. Furthermore, heteroplasmy is probably confounded with mtDNA recombination. Considering the essential roles of mitochondria in cellular metabolism, cell signalling, and programmed cell death, future experiments will need to assess the true extent and impact of unorthodox mtDNA transmission on various aspects of SCNT success.

  5. Skeletal muscle MRI magnetisation transfer ratio reflects clinical severity in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Morrow, J M; Miranda, M A; Davagnanam, I; Cowley, P C; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Yousry, T A; Reilly, M M; Thornton, J S

    2012-01-01

    MRI may provide treatment outcome measures in neuromuscular conditions. The authors assessed MRI magnetisation transfer ratios (MTRs) in lower-limb musculature as markers of pathology in peripheral neuropathies and compared the findings with associated clinical data. Ten patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) were compared with 10 healthy subjects. The MTR in the calf muscles was significantly lower than controls in the two patient groups (both p<0.001). The median MTRs (IQR) were 50.5(1.6) percentage units (p.u.) (control), 41.5(10.6) p.u. (CMT1A) and 39.3(8.7) p.u. (CIDP). Moreover, anterior lower leg MTR correlated strongly with strength of ankle dorsiflexion, measured with the Medical Research Council scale, in CIDP (ρ=0.88, p<0.001) and also in CMT1A (ρ=0.50, p<0.05), where MTR also showed an association with disease duration (ρ=-0.86, p<0.001). Short tau inversion recovery MRI of the same muscles showed abnormalities associated with regions of reduced MTR (p<0.001), and MTR was also reduced in other muscles otherwise deemed normal appearing (p<0.001), indicating that MTR may be more sensitive to muscle damaged by denervation than conventional MRI. The significant reductions in muscle MTR in peripheral neuropathies and the associated correlations with clinical measures indicate that MTR has potential as an imaging outcome measure in future therapeutic trials.

  6. Regional regulation of glutamate signaling during cuprizone-induced demyelination in the brain.

    PubMed

    Azami Tameh, Abolfazl; Clarner, Tim; Beyer, Cordian; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Naderian, Homayoun

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is associated with a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders and also seems to be involved in the pathology of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Cuprizone-induced toxic demyelination shows clear characteristics of MS such as demyelination and axonal damage without the involvement of the innate immune system. In this study, we have evaluated glutamate signaling during cuprizone-induced demyelination in the white and gray matter of mouse brain by studying the expression of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate-receptors and -transporters by Affymetrix gene array analysis, followed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cellular localization of glutamate transporters was investigated by fluorescence double-labeling experiments. Comparing white and gray matter areas, the expression of glutamate receptors was region-specific. Among NMDA receptor subunits, NR2A was up-regulated in the demyelinated corpus callosum (CC), whereas the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR2 was down-regulated in demyelinated gray matter. Glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) co-localizing with GFAP(+) astrocytes was increased in both demyelinated CC and telencephalic cortex, whereas Slc1a4 transporter was up-regulated only in CC. Our data indicate that cuprizone treatment affects glutamate-receptors and -transporters differently in gray and white matter brain areas revealing particularly regulation of GLAST and Slc1a4 compared with other genes. This might have an important influence on brain-region selective sensitivity to neurotoxic compounds and the progression of demyelination as has been reported for MS and other demyelinating neurological diseases. PMID:23711509

  7. [Painful neuropathies and small fiber involvement].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2014-12-01

    It is customary to consider that a purely sensory and painful neuropathy accompanied by normal electroneuromyographic examination may be or must be a small fiber neuropathy. This leads to perform specific tests, such as measuring the intra-epidermal nerve fiber density on skin biopsy or neurophysiological tests, such as evoked potentials to noxious stimuli (laser) or quantification of thermal sensory thresholds. However, these tests are only sensitive to the loss of small fibers (A-delta and C), which does not reflect the mechanisms responsible for peripheral neuropathic pain. Selective loss of small sensory fibers inherently generates a sensory deficit that does not necessarily present a painful character. Also, assigning the cause of a painful neuropathy to a small fiber neuropathy has no pathophysiological sense, although there are indirect links between these two conditions. In fact, it is not possible to explain univocally peripheral neuropathic pain, which reflects complex and diverse mechanisms, involving different types of nerve fibers. In this context, the clinical and laboratory approach must be improved to better understand the underlying mechanisms. It is imperative to interpret the data provided by laboratory tests and to correlate these data to the clinical signs and symptoms presented by the patients. Thus, one must go beyond many a priori and misinterpretations that unfortunately exist in this area at present and are not based on any solid pathophysiological basis.

  8. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  9. Speech Perception in Individuals with Auditory Neuropathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Speech perception in participants with auditory neuropathy (AN) was systematically studied to answer the following 2 questions: Does noise present a particular problem for people with AN: Can clear speech and cochlear implants alleviate this problem? Method: The researchers evaluated the advantage in intelligibility of clear speech over…

  10. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrix, Linda W.; Velenovsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, or ANSD, can be a confusing diagnosis to physicians, clinicians, those diagnosed, and parents of children diagnosed with the condition. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an understanding of the disorder, the limitations in current tools to determine site(s) of lesion, and…

  11. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  12. Improving the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeffrey A; Bril, Vera

    2016-06-01

    This article considers several issues of current interest relating to the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), including diagnostic pitfalls, differences between CIDP patients with and without concurrent diabetes mellitus and how to best measure treatment response in daily practice. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria, many patients diagnosed with CIDP do not meet these criteria; reasons for misdiagnosis are discussed. There are no definitive predictors of treatment response in CIDP; however, certain clinical and electrophysiological characteristics may be helpful. Patients with CIDP and concurrent diabetes present an additional diagnostic challenge; the differences between these groups, including possible differences in response predictors are discussed. Finally, the most appropriate outcome measures for use in daily practice are considered.

  13. Long-term immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulins are an effective but expensive treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Although the goal is to improve function, use of functional scales to monitor therapy is not widespread. Limited recent evidence suggests that doses lower than those used traditionally may be as effective. There are no proven correlations of effective dose with weight, disease severity, or duration. The clinical course of CIDP is heterogeneous and includes monophasic forms and complete remissions. Careful monitoring of immunoglobulin use is necessary to avoid overtreatment. Definitive evidence for immunoglobulin superiority over steroids is lacking. Although latest trial evidence favors immunoglobulins over steroids, the latter may result in higher remission rates and longer remission periods. This article addresses the appropriateness of first-line, high-dose immunoglobulin treatment for CIDP and reviews important clinical questions regarding the need for long-term therapy protocols, adequate monitoring, treatment withdrawal, and consideration of corticosteroids as an alternative to immunoglobulin therapy.

  14. New insights into the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Blomkwist-Markens, Patricia H; Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and its variants can be challenging to diagnose and treat. A combination of clinical, electrophysiological and laboratory features is often required to reach a diagnosis. New data are emerging about potential biomarkers and factors that may indicate treatment needs in individual patients. High-quality evidence exists for the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in the treatment of CIDP, including quality of life (QoL) benefits. Besides pharmacological treatment, psychological factors must also be addressed to improve patients' QoL. Home-based IVIG infusion therapy is currently a well-established approach in some countries. A 6-month pilot study conducted in Ontario, Canada, provided proof of safety and patient acceptance of home-based IVIG therapy, although some logistical issues emerged.

  15. Standard and escalating treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Chan, Andrew; Gold, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuritis that is progressive or relapsing over a period of at least 8 weeks. Although the exact pathogenesis is unclear, it is thought to be mediated by both cellular and humoral immune reactions directed against the peripheral nerve myelin or axon. CIDP also involves spinal nerve roots. Early medical treatment of CIDP is important to prevent axonal loss. Only three treatment regimens for CIDP have demonstrated benefit in randomized, controlled studies: corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). Approximately 25% of patients respond inadequately to corticosteroids, plasma exchange or IVIg. Large placebo-controlled trials with alternative immunosuppressive compounds, e.g. mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, or monoclonal antibodies, are lacking. PMID:21694819

  16. Treatment of refractory chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy with lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N.L.; Lacy, J.R.; Kennaugh, R.C.; Holers, V.M.; Neville, H.E.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-03-01

    Four patients with refractory or poorly responsive chronic progressive demyelinating polyneuropathy (CPDP) were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study. All patients had previously failed conventional therapy for CPDP, as well as other unconventional treatments. During a follow-up period of 7 to 12 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 to Leu-3 T cells in the blood. Three of the four patients demonstrated improvement in distal muscle strength, and this was associated with increased functional capabilities in two patients. In contrast, no clinical improvement in sensation was noted in any patient. Nerve conduction studies showed patchy improvement in three patients. The results of this preliminary uncontrolled study indicate that radiotherapy deserves further study in the treatment of CPDP.

  17. Newer therapeutic options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kuitwaard, Krista; van Doorn, Pieter A

    2009-05-29

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disorder with variable symptoms and severity that can be difficult to diagnose. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and corticosteroids have all been proven to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials, although the proof for corticosteroids is less clear. Although these treatments are likely to be similar in efficacy, they differ in terms of their cost, availability and adverse effects. These characteristics should be taken into account when deciding which treatment to offer a patient. If there is no response to the first treatment option, one of the other treatments should be tried. Patients with a pure motor CIDP may deteriorate after corticosteroid treatment. Some patients do not respond or become refractory or intolerant to these conventional treatments. Those who become unresponsive to therapy should be checked again for the appearance of a monoclonal protein or other signs of malignancy. Over the years, small non-randomized studies have reported possible beneficial effects of various immunosuppressive agents. A Cochrane review concluded that currently there is insufficient evidence to decide whether these immunosuppressive drugs are beneficial in CIDP. When giving immunosuppressive drugs, one should be aware that some might even cause demyelinating disease. It is difficult to prove beneficial effects of these newer treatments since they have only been used in small groups of patients, who are refractory to other treatments, and often in combination with other treatments. CIDP patients can deteriorate during or after infections or improve spontaneously, making it more difficult to judge treatment efficacy. Various treatments for CIDP are described such as azathioprine, ciclosporin, cyclophosphamide, interferons, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab and etanercept. An overview of these newer treatments, their mode of action, adverse effects and

  18. Epigenetic inheritance: a contributor to species differentiation?

    PubMed

    Boffelli, Dario; Martin, David I K

    2012-10-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules.

  19. Epigenetic Inheritance: A Contributor to Species Differentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Boffelli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules. PMID:22966965

  20. Experimental models of virus-induced demyelination of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dal Canto, M C; Rabinowitz, S G

    1982-02-01

    One of the arguments in favor of a viral pathogenesis for multiple sclerosis is the existence of several experimental and natural animal models of virus-induced primary demyelination. This review deals comprehensively with such models. Well-known examples of demyelinating viral infections in their natural host are JHM, Theiler, visna, and canine distemper encephalomyelitides. Recent reports of experimental murine infections with pathogens such as vesicular stomatitis, Chandipura, herpes simplex, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, and Semliki Forest viruses are also discussed. The thrust of the review is to include viral models suspected of producing primary demyelination on an immunopathological basis.

  1. Ozone partially prevents diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Erken, H A; Genç, O; Erken, G; Ayada, C; Gündoğdu, G; Doğan, H

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus. Although the beneficial effects of good blood glucose control on diabetic neuropathy are known, this control cannot completely prevent the occurrence and progression of diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ozone prevents diabetic neuropathy. 36 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=6): control (C), ozone (O), diabetic (D), ozone-treated diabetic (DO), insulin-treated diabetic (DI), and ozone- and insulin-treated diabetic (DOI). Diabetes was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), after which insulin was administered (3 IU, i.p.) to the DI and DOI groups for 28 days, and 1.1 mg/kg (50 µg/ml) ozone was given to the O, DO, and DOI groups for 15 days. 4 weeks after the induction of diabetes, the nerve conduction velocity (NCV), amplitude of the compound action potential (CAP), total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured, and the oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. The NCV, amplitude of CAP, and TAS of the DI and DOI groups were higher than those of the D group; the amplitudes of CAP and TAS of the DO group were higher than those of the D group; and the TOS and OSI of the DO, DI, and DOI groups were lower than those of the D group. These findings indicate that ozone partially prevents diabetic neuropathy in rats. It appears that the preventive effects of ozone are mediated through oxidant/antioxidant mechanisms.

  2. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  3. Amplitudes of Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Are Useful to Detect Small Fiber Involvement in Painful Mixed Fiber Neuropathies in Addition to Quantitative Sensory Testing – An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels; Kahn, Ann-Kathrin; Zeller, Daniel; Katsarava, Zaza; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of pain-related evoked potentials (PREP) elicited by electrical stimulation for the identification of small fiber involvement in patients with mixed fiber neuropathy (MFN). Eleven MFN patients with clinical signs of large fiber impairment and neuropathic pain and ten healthy controls underwent clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Small fiber function, electrical conductivity and morphology were examined by quantitative sensory testing (QST), PREP, and skin punch biopsy. MFN was diagnosed following clinical and electrophysiological examination (chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy: n = 6; vasculitic neuropathy: n = 3; chronic axonal ­neuropathy: n = 2). The majority of patients with MFN characterized their pain by descriptors that mainly represent C-fiber-mediated pain. In QST, patients displayed elevated cold, warm, mechanical, and vibration detection thresholds and cold pain thresholds indicative of MFN. PREP amplitudes in patients correlated with cold (p < 0.05) and warm detection thresholds (p < 0.05). Burning pain and the presence of par-/dysesthesias correlated negatively with PREP amplitudes (p < 0.05). PREP amplitudes correlating with cold and warm detection thresholds, burning pain, and par-/dysesthesias support employing PREP amplitudes as an additional tool in conjunction with QST for detecting small fiber impairment in patients with MFN. PMID:26696950

  4. The frequencies of Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are similar to those in Guillian Barre syndrome but differ from those of controls, suggesting a role for NK cells in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Stefan; Csurhes, Peter; McCombe, Pamela

    2015-08-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired inflammatory neuropathy, which has similar clinical and pathological features to Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), but differs in time course. We investigated the frequency of genes encoding Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in subjects with CIDP, in subjects with GBS and in healthy controls. There were no differences in KIR gene frequency among the 3 groups. The gene frequencies for HLA-B Bw4-I were significantly greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from GBS. The frequency of the combination of 3DL1/HLA-B Bw4I was greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from that of GBS. These data raise the possibility of NK cell function being an important factor in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  5. Inheritance of goat coat colors.

    PubMed

    Adalsteinsson, S; Sponenberg, D P; Alexieva, S; Russel, A J

    1994-01-01

    Goat color inheritance was evaluated based on color description of 218 kids and their parents (10 sires, 178 dams) from mixed crosses between several goat populations in an experiment on cashmere fiber production. Altogether 10 color patterns were observed. They were postulated to be caused by 10 alleles at the Agouti locus, with the allele for white or tan color being the top dominant allele, and the nine others codominant. The bottom recessive allele, for nonagouti color, was the 11th allele at this locus. The postulated alleles are white or tan (A(wt)), black mask (A(blm)), bezoar (A(bz)), badgerface (A(b)), grey (A(g)), lightbelly (A(lb)), swiss markings (A(sm)), lateral stripes (A(ls)), mahogany (A(mh)), red cheek (A(rc)), and nonagouti (Aa). Two types of eumelanin pigment were observed, black and light brown, the latter being dominant. Recessive brown was not observed.

  6. Inheritance of epigenetic chromatin silencing

    PubMed Central

    David-Rus, Diana; Mukhopadhyay, Swagatam; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of alternative chromatin states through cell divisions pose some fundamental constraints on the dynamics of histone modifications. In this paper, we study the systems biology of epigenetic inheritance by defining and analyzing general classes of mathematical models. We discuss how the number of modification states involved plays an essential role in the stability of epigenetic states. In addition, DNA duplication and the consequent dilution of marked histones act as a large perturbation for a stable state of histone modifications. The requirement that this large perturbation falls into the basin of attraction of the original state sometimes leads to additional constraints on effective models. Two such models, inspired by two different biological systems, are compared in their fulfilling the requirements of multistability and of recovery after DNA duplication. We conclude that in the presence of multiple histone modifications that characterize alternative epigenetic stable states, these requirements are more easily fulfilled. PMID:19174167

  7. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  8. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Herţea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist. PMID:23610977

  9. Axonopathy in peripheral neuropathies: Mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Dyck, P James B; Engelstad, JaNean; Taylor, Bruce V

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathies (PNs) are injuries or diseases of the nerves which arise from varied aetiology, including metabolic disease, trauma and drug toxicity. The clinical presentation depends on the type of neuropathy, and may include the loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions, or development of debilitating neuropathic pain distal to the injury site. It can be challenging to identify the aetiology of PNs, as the clinical syndromes are often indistinct. However, the mechanisms that underlie pathological changes in peripheral neuropathy are fundamentally different, depending on the trigger. This review focuses on the axonopathy observed in two frequently encountered forms of peripheral neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A key manifestation of axonopathy in PN is the degeneration of terminal arbors of peripheral nerves, resulting in a loss of epidermal nerve fibres and inappropriate termination of nerve endings. Many symptoms of PN arise from aberrant termination of nerve endings, and the underlying axonopathy may be non-reversible, as nerve regeneration after injury and disease is often poor, absent, or aberrant. Directed guidance of terminal arbors back into the epidermis is therefore a suggested approach to treat peripheral neuropathy. This review will outline potential strategies to enhance and guide axonal regeneration and reinnervation in the skin. Using diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy as specific examples, this review examines the setbacks encountered with the translation of growth factors into therapeutics for human neuropathy, and suggests a number of approaches for topical drug delivery.

  10. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis: a model of demyelination and persistence of virus.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Oleszak, E; Leibowitz, J

    1987-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes immune-mediated demyelination in susceptible mice which is similar to human demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. In addition, the picornavirus persists within the central nervous system throughout the course of the chronic demyelinating disease. This article reviews the neuropathology, virology, immunology, and molecular biology of the model system. We analyze the possible mechanisms by which this virus induces demyelination and persists in the nervous system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis that the specificity of primary white matter destruction in the TMEV model depends on immune-sensitized cells which interact with viral antigen plus major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on the surfaces of oligodendrocytes or myelin sheaths.

  11. Strains from both Theiler's virus subgroups encode a determinant for demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, J; Rodriguez, M; Roos, R P

    1990-01-01

    The GDVII strain and other members of the GDVII subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses (TMEV) cause an acute lethal neuronal infection in mice, whereas the DA strain and other members of the TO subgroup of TMEV cause a chronic demyelinating disease associated with a persistent virus infection. We used GDVII/DA chimeric infectious cDNAs to produce intratypic recombinant viruses in order to clarify reasons for the TMEV subgroup-specific difference in demyelinating activity. We found that both the GDVII and DA strains contain a genetic determinant(s) for demyelinating activity. No demyelination occurs following GDVII strain inoculation because this strain produces an early neuronal disease that kills mice before white matter disease and persistent infection can occur. Images PMID:2243399

  12. Demyelination as a Rational Therapeutic Target for Ischemic or Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K.; Shi, Yejie; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) heavily emphasized pathological alterations in neuronal cells within gray matter. However, recent studies have highlighted the equal importance of white matter integrity in long-term recovery from these conditions. Demyelination is a major component of white matter injury and is characterized by loss of the myelin sheath and oligodendrocyte cell death. Demyelination contributes significantly to long-term sensorimotor and cognitive deficits because the adult brain only has limited capacity for oligodendrocyte regeneration and axonal remyelination. In the current review, we will provide an overview of the major causes of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death following acute brain injuries, and discuss the crosstalk between myelin, axons, microglia, and astrocytes during the process of demyelination. Recent discoveries of molecules that regulate the processes of remyelination may provide novel therapeutic targets to restore white matter integrity and improve long-term neurological recovery in stroke or TBI patients. PMID:25819104

  13. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Krutenkova, E. Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  14. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-01

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  15. Thymoquinone Alleviates the Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Modulation of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Li, Bing; Chen, Biqin; Shao, Yiye; Luo, Qiong; Shi, Xiaohong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Inflammation plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study investigated the effects of TQ on proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells exposed to high glucose conditions and electrophysiological and morphological changes of the sciatic nerve in a DPN rat model as well as relevant inflammatory mechanism. Cell proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells were measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. DPN model was established in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve conduction velocity was measured before and after treatment. Morphologic changes were observed by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and Caspase-3 expression was investigated by western blotting and Bio-Plex ProTM Assays. Finally, TQ alleviated the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation and protected against Schwann cell apoptosis. It improved nerve conduction velocity, and alleviated the DPN-induced morphological changes and demyelination of the sciatic nerve. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Caspase-3 expression in sciatic nerve or isolated cultured Schwann cells, were also decreased by TQ. These results indicate TQ has a protective effect on peripheral nerves in a DPN rat model. The mechanism may be mediated partly by the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27545310

  16. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  17. Thymoquinone Alleviates the Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy by Modulation of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Li, Bing; Chen, Biqin; Shao, Yiye; Luo, Qiong; Shi, Xiaohong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Inflammation plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study investigated the effects of TQ on proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells exposed to high glucose conditions and electrophysiological and morphological changes of the sciatic nerve in a DPN rat model as well as relevant inflammatory mechanism. Cell proliferation and apoptosis of Schwann cells were measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. DPN model was established in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Nerve conduction velocity was measured before and after treatment. Morphologic changes were observed by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and Caspase-3 expression was investigated by western blotting and Bio-Plex Pro(TM) Assays. Finally, TQ alleviated the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation and protected against Schwann cell apoptosis. It improved nerve conduction velocity, and alleviated the DPN-induced morphological changes and demyelination of the sciatic nerve. COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Caspase-3 expression in sciatic nerve or isolated cultured Schwann cells, were also decreased by TQ. These results indicate TQ has a protective effect on peripheral nerves in a DPN rat model. The mechanism may be mediated partly by the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. PMID:27545310

  18. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Masked by Previous Gunshots and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gencik, Martin; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Although hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) presents with a distinct phenotype on history, clinical exam, and nerve conduction studies, it may be masked if diagnostic work-up suggests other causes. Case Report. In a 37-year-old male with pseudoradicular lumbar pain, neurological exam revealed sore neck muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy, right anacusis and left hypoacusis, hemihypesthesia of the right face, mild distal quadriparesis, diffuse wasting, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. He had a history of skull fracture due to a gunshot behind the right ear and tuberculosis for which he had received adequate treatment for 3 years; MRI revealed a disc prolapse at C6/7 and Th11/12. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction blocks. Despite elevated antinuclear antibodies and elevated CSF-protein, HNPP was diagnosed genetically after having excluded vasculitis, CIDP, radiculopathy, and the side effects of antituberculous treatment. Conclusions. HNPP may manifest with mild, painless, distal quadriparesis. The diagnosis of HNPP may be blurred by a history of tuberculosis, tuberculostatic treatment, hepatitis, and the presence of elevated CSF-protein. PMID:26640726

  19. AAV1.NT-3 Gene Therapy for Charcot–Marie–Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sahenk, Zarife; Galloway, Gloria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Kaspar, Brian K.; Chen, Lei; Braganza, Cilwyn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathies represent a heterogeneous group of peripheral nerve disorders affecting 1 in 2,500 persons. One variant, CMT1A, is a primary Schwann cell (SC) disorder, and represents the single most common variant. In previous studies, we showed that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) improved the tremblerJ (TrJ) mouse and also showed efficacy in CMT1A patients. Long-term treatment with NT-3 was not possible related to its short half-life and lack of availability. This led to considerations of NT-3 gene therapy via adenoassociated virus (AAV) delivery to muscle, acting as secretory organ for widespread distribution of this neurotrophic agent. In the TrJ model of demyelinating CMT, rAAV1.NT-3 therapy resulted in measurable NT-3 secretion levels in blood sufficient to provide improvement in motor function, histopathology, and electrophysiology of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, we showed that the compound muscle action potential amplitude can be used as surrogate for functional improvement and established the therapeutic dose and a preferential muscle-specific promoter to achieve sustained NT-3 levels. These studies of intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of rAAV1.NT-3 serve as a template for future CMT1A clinical trials with a potential to extend treatment to other nerve diseases with impaired nerve regeneration. PMID:24162799

  20. Experimental alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy: role of insulin/IGF resistance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Anh; Le, Tran; Tong, Ming; Mellion, Michelle; Gilchrist, James; de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-08-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy (ALPN) are poorly understood. We hypothesize that, like alcohol-related liver and brain degeneration, ALPN may be mediated by combined effects of insulin/IGF resistance and oxidative stress. Adult male Long Evans rats were chronically pair-fed with diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol (caloric), and subjected to nerve conduction studies. Chronic ethanol feeding slowed nerve conduction in the tibial (p = 0.0021) motor nerve, and not plantar sensory nerve, but it did not affect amplitude. Histological studies of the sciatic nerve revealed reduced nerve fiber diameters with increased regenerative sprouts, and denervation myopathy in ethanol-fed rats. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated reduced mRNA levels of insulin, IGF-1, and IGF-2 polypeptides, IGF-1 receptor, and IRS2, and ELISAs revealed reduced immunoreactivity for insulin and IGF-1 receptors, IRS-1, IRS-4, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and tau in sciatic nerves of ethanol-fed rats (all p < 0.05 or better). The findings suggest that ALPN is characterized by (1) slowed conduction velocity with demyelination, and a small component of axonal degeneration; (2) impaired trophic factor signaling due to insulin and IGF resistance; and (3) degeneration of myelin and axonal cytoskeletal proteins. Therefore, ALPN is likely mediated by molecular and signal transduction abnormalities similar to those identified in alcoholic liver and brain degeneration.

  1. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes. PMID:26060356

  2. Cause and prevention of demyelination in a model multiple sclerosis lesion

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Andrew L.; Tachrount, Mohamed; Kasti, Marianne; Laulund, Frida; Golay, Xavier; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Demyelination is a cardinal feature of multiple sclerosis, but it remains unclear why new lesions form, and whether they can be prevented. Neuropathological evidence suggests that demyelination can occur in the relative absence of lymphocytes, and with distinctive characteristics suggestive of a tissue energy deficit. The objective was to examine an experimental model of the early multiple sclerosis lesion and identify pathogenic mechanisms and opportunities for therapy. Methods Demyelinating lesions were induced in the rat spinal dorsal column by microinjection of lipopolysaccharide, and examined immunohistochemically at different stages of development. The efficacy of treatment with inspired oxygen for 2 days following lesion induction was evaluated. Results Demyelinating lesions were not centered on the injection site, but rather formed 1 week later at the white–gray matter border, preferentially including the ventral dorsal column watershed. Lesion formation was preceded by a transient early period of hypoxia and increased production of superoxide and nitric oxide. Oligodendrocyte numbers decreased at the site shortly afterward, prior to demyelination. Lesions formed at a site of inherent susceptibility to hypoxia, as revealed by exposure of naive animals to a hypoxic environment. Notably, raising the inspired oxygen (80%, normobaric) during the hypoxic period significantly reduced or prevented the demyelination. Interpretation Demyelination characteristic of at least some early multiple sclerosis lesions can arise at a vascular watershed following activation of innate immune mechanisms that provoke hypoxia, and superoxide and nitric oxide formation, all of which can compromise cellular energy sufficiency. Demyelination can be reduced or eliminated by increasing inspired oxygen to alleviate the transient hypoxia. Ann Neurol 2016;79:591–604 PMID:26814844

  3. Nogo Receptor Inhibition Enhances Functional Recovery following Lysolecithin-Induced Demyelination in Mouse Optic Chiasm

    PubMed Central

    Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Mozafari, Sabah; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Pierre-Simons, Jacqueline; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Javan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitory factors have been implicated in the failure of remyelination in demyelinating diseases. Myelin associated inhibitors act through a common receptor called Nogo receptor (NgR) that plays critical inhibitory roles in CNS plasticity. Here we investigated the effects of abrogating NgR inhibition in a non-immune model of focal demyelination in adult mouse optic chiasm. Methodology/Principal Findings A focal area of demyelination was induced in adult mouse optic chiasm by microinjection of lysolecithin. To knock down NgR levels, siRNAs against NgR were intracerebroventricularly administered via a permanent cannula over 14 days, Functional changes were monitored by electrophysiological recording of latency of visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Histological analysis was carried out 3, 7 and 14 days post demyelination lesion. To assess the effect of NgR inhibition on precursor cell repopulation, BrdU was administered to the animals prior to the demyelination induction. Inhibition of NgR significantly restored VEPs responses following optic chiasm demyelination. These findings were confirmed histologically by myelin specific staining. siNgR application resulted in a smaller lesion size compared to control. NgR inhibition significantly increased the numbers of BrdU+/Olig2+ progenitor cells in the lesioned area and in the neurogenic zone of the third ventricle. These progenitor cells (Olig2+ or GFAP+) migrated away from this area as a function of time. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that inhibition of NgR facilitate myelin repair in the demyelinated chiasm, with enhanced recruitment of proliferating cells to the lesion site. Thus, antagonizing NgR function could have therapeutic potential for demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis. PMID:25184636

  4. Infection with B. burgdorferi s.l., and the CNS demyelinating disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Durovska, Judita; Bazovska, Sylvia; Pancak, Jaroslav; Zaborska, Magdalena; Derdakova, Marketa; Traubner, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The work describes three cases of patients at various ages, diagnosed for CNS demyelinating disease. The presence of specific antibodies to B. burgdorferi sensu lato, and findings of B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA, identified in one case as the genospecies B. garinii in the liquor, indicated previous experience with the infection. Presumably, persistence of borrelia in the organism could act as one of the autoimmune process triggers, resulting in the demyelinating disease. PMID:21876503

  5. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  6. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  7. Inherited factor XI deficiency: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Inherited factor XI (FXI) deficiency, also called Hemophilia C, is an uncommon autosomal recessive disorder, which is associated with a variable bleeding tendency that usually manifests after trauma or surgery. This concise report reviews current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, genetics, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management of this inherited bleeding disorder.

  8. Novel insights on diagnosis, cause and treatment of diabetic neuropathy: focus on painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Asghar, Omar; Alam, Uazman; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Fadavi, Hassan; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is common, under or misdiagnosed, and causes substantial morbidity with increased mortality. Defining and developing sensitive diagnostic tests for diabetic neuropathy is not only key to implementing earlier interventions but also to ensure that the most appropriate endpoints are employed in clinical intervention trials. This is critical as many potentially effective therapies may never progress to the clinic, not due to a lack of therapeutic effect, but because the endpoints were not sufficiently sensitive or robust to identify benefit. Apart from improving glycaemic control, there is no licensed treatment for diabetic neuropathy, however, a number of pathogenetic pathways remain under active study. Painful diabetic neuropathy is a cause of considerable morbidity and whilst many pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are currently used, only two are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We address the important issue of the ‘placebo effect’ and also consider potential new pharmacological therapies as well as nonpharmacological interventions in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23148152

  9. Central Nervous System Demyelination and Remyelination is Independent from Systemic Cholesterol Level in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Sun, Wenhui; Brogden, Graham; Sun, Yanyong; Kammeyer, Patricia; Kalkuhl, Arno; Colbatzky, Florian; Deschl, Ulrich; Naim, Hassan Y; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    High dietary fat and/or cholesterol intake is a risk factor for multiple diseases and has been debated for multiple sclerosis. However, cholesterol biosynthesis is a key pathway during myelination and disturbances are described in demyelinating diseases. To address the possible interaction of dyslipidemia and demyelination, cholesterol biosynthesis gene expression, composition of the body's major lipid repositories and Paigen diet-induced, systemic hypercholesterolemia were examined in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) using histology, immunohistochemistry, serum clinical chemistry, microarrays and high-performance thin layer chromatography. TME-virus (TMEV)-infected mice showed progressive loss of motor performance and demyelinating leukomyelitis. Gene expression associated with cholesterol biosynthesis was overall down-regulated in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. Spinal cord levels of galactocerebroside and sphingomyelin were reduced on day 196 post TMEV infection. Paigen diet induced serum hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipidosis. However, high dietary fat and cholesterol intake led to no significant differences in clinical course, inflammatory response, astrocytosis, and the amount of demyelination and remyelination in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. The results suggest that down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is a transcriptional marker for demyelination, quantitative loss of myelin-specific lipids, but not cholesterol occurs late in chronic demyelination, and serum hypercholesterolemia exhibited no significant effect on TMEV infection.

  10. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  11. Thyroid hormones promote differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and improve remyelination after cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Franco, P G; Silvestroff, L; Soto, E F; Pasquini, J M

    2008-08-01

    In the present work we analyzed the capacity of thyroid hormones (THs) to improve remyelination using a rat model of cuprizone-induced demyelination previously described in our laboratories. Twenty one days old Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 0.6% cuprizone for two weeks to induce demyelination. After cuprizone withdrawal, rats were injected with triiodothyronine (T3). Histological studies carried out in these animals revealed that remyelination in the corpus callosum (CC) of T3-treated rats improved markedly when compared to saline treated animals. The cellular events occurring in the CC and in the subventricular zone (SVZ) during the first week of remyelination were analyzed using specific oligodendroglial cell (OLGc) markers. In the CC of saline treated demyelinated animals, mature OLGcs decreased and oligodendroglial precursor cells (OPCs) increased after one week of spontaneous remyelination. Furthermore, the SVZ of these animals showed an increase in early progenitor cell numbers, dispersion of OPCs and inhibition of Olig and Shh expression compared to non-demyelinated animals. The changes triggered by demyelination were reverted after T3 administration, suggesting that THs could be regulating the emergence of remyelinating oligodendrocytes from the pool of proliferating cells residing in the SVZ. Our results also suggest that THs receptor beta mediates T3 effects on remyelination. These results support a potential role for THs in the remyelination process that could be used to develop new therapeutic approaches for demyelinating diseases.

  12. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  13. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Elif; Tastaban, Engin; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Turan, Yasemin; Şendur, Ömer Faruk

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to assess and compare the impact of ultrasound on demyelinating nerve and healthy nerve conduction parameters. [Subjects and Methods] Carpal tunnel syndrome was used as a focal demyelination model. Thirty-two hands of 25 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in the study. Ultrasound parameters were 3.3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 8 minutes, and continuous wave. Electrodiagnostic studies were performed initially, at the midpoint (4th min), and immediately after (8th min) ultrasound application. [Results] Reduced motor conduction velocity was found in demyelinating nerves at the 4th and 8th minutes. Ulnar nerve onset latency was significantly prolonged in the 8th minute recording, compared to the initial value. There were no significant differences in relative velocity and latency changes between demyelinating and normal nerves. [Conclusion] Deep heating via ultrasound may inversely affect conduction velocity in demyelinating nerves.

  14. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Elif; Tastaban, Engin; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Turan, Yasemin; Şendur, Ömer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to assess and compare the impact of ultrasound on demyelinating nerve and healthy nerve conduction parameters. [Subjects and Methods] Carpal tunnel syndrome was used as a focal demyelination model. Thirty-two hands of 25 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in the study. Ultrasound parameters were 3.3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 8 minutes, and continuous wave. Electrodiagnostic studies were performed initially, at the midpoint (4th min), and immediately after (8th min) ultrasound application. [Results] Reduced motor conduction velocity was found in demyelinating nerves at the 4th and 8th minutes. Ulnar nerve onset latency was significantly prolonged in the 8th minute recording, compared to the initial value. There were no significant differences in relative velocity and latency changes between demyelinating and normal nerves. [Conclusion] Deep heating via ultrasound may inversely affect conduction velocity in demyelinating nerves. PMID:27190467

  15. Dysregulation of axonal sodium channel isoforms after adult-onset chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Rasband, Matthew N; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Park, Eunice W; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Trimmer, James S

    2003-08-15

    Demyelination results in conduction block through changes in passive cable properties of an axon and in the expression and localization of axonal ion channels. We show here that adult-onset chronic demyelination, such as occurs in demyelinating disorders and after nerve injury, alters the complement of axonal voltage-dependent Na+ (Nav) channel isoforms and their localization. As a model, we used heterozygous transgenic mice with two extra copies of the proteolipid protein gene (Plp/-). Retinal ganglion cell axons in these mice myelinate normally, with young Plp/- and wild-type mice expressing Nav1.2 at low levels, whereas Nav1.6 is clustered in high densities at nodes of Ranvier. At 7 months of age, however, Plp/- mice exhibit severe demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death, leading to a profound reduction in Nav1.6 clusters, loss of the paranodal axoglial apparatus, and a marked increase in Nav1.2. We conclude that myelin is crucial not only for node of Ranvier formation, but also to actively maintain the proper localization and complement of distinct axonal Nav channel isoforms throughout life. The altered Nav channel isoform localization and complement induced by demyelination may contribute to the pathophysiology of demyelinating disorders and nerve injury. PMID:12898531

  16. Influenza Vaccine-Induced CNS Demyelination in a 50-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Aaron; Bauer, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Acute post-vaccination CNS demyelinating disorder Symptoms: Blurred vision • hemiparesis • hemiplegia • hypertonia • itching • paresthesia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: There are several categories of primary inflammatory demyelinating disorders, which comprise clinically similar neurologic sequelae. Of interest, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are 2 demyelinating conditions of the central nervous system (CNS), whose clinical similarity pose a significant challenge to definitive diagnosis. Yet, both remain important clinical considerations in patients with neurologic signs and symptoms in the context of recent vaccination. Case Report: We report a case of a 50-year-old Caucasian male with a course of progressive, focal, neurologic deficits within 24 h after receiving the influenza vaccine. Subsequent work-up revealed the possibility of an acute central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating episode secondary to the influenza vaccine, best described as either CIS or ADEM. Conclusions: Case reports of CNS demyelination following vaccinations have been previously noted, most often occurring in the context of recent influenza vaccination. This report serves to document a case of CNS demyelination occurring 24 h after influenza vaccination in a middle-aged patient, and will describe some salient features regarding the differential diagnosis of CIS and ADEM, as well as their potential management. PMID:25175754

  17. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Nadia C; Whitelaw, Emma

    2008-06-01

    Over the past century, patterns of phenotypic inheritance have been observed that are not easily rationalised by Mendel's rules of inheritance. Now that we have begun to understand more about non-DNA based, or 'epigenetic', control of phenotype at the molecular level, the idea that the transgenerational inheritance of these epigenetic states could explain non-Mendelian patterns of inheritance has become attractive. There is a growing body of evidence that abnormal epigenetic states, termed epimutations, are associated with disease in humans. For example, in several cases of colorectal cancer, epimutations have been identified that silence the human mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2. But strong evidence that the abnormal epigenetic states are primary events that occur in the absence of genetic change and are inherited across generations is still absent.

  18. Suprascapular neuropathy in a collegiate pitcher.

    PubMed

    Smith, A N

    1995-03-01

    A healthy, 20-year-old, highly competitive collegiate baseball pitcher developed vague pain and soreness in the dominant posterior shoulder with live pitching. The symptoms intensified, and, after a particularly poor starting performance, the athlete presented for physical examination. Examination revealed visible atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle and decreased strength in external rotation and abduction. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was inconclusive. Electromyographic examination revealed decreased suprascapular nerve conduction to the infraspinatus muscle. Our diagnosis was entrapment neuropathy from traction on the suprascapular nerve at the spinoglenoid notch, causing delayed conduction to the infraspinatus muscle. We took a conservative approach of shoulder rehabilitation and activity modification, which resulted in the athlete returning to a highly competitive level without further problems, despite the remaining atrophy and muscle weakness. Examination of injuries to the shoulder complex, especially in athletes involved in repetitive overhead motions, should take suprascapular neuropathy into consideration.

  19. Arsenical neuropathy: residual effects following acute industrial exposure.

    PubMed

    Garb, L G; Hine, C H

    1977-08-01

    A case report is presented describing a worker who was splashed with arsenic acid in an industrial accident and subsequently developed symptoms of systemic arsenicalism and peripheral neuropathy. This is the only report, to the authors' knowledge, of a single episode of cutaneous absorption of arsenic resulting in peripheral neuropathy. Previous reports of arsenical neuropathy and rationale for BAL therapy early in the treatment of systemic arsenicalism are discussed.

  20. North America and South America (NA-SA) neuropathy project.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Trivedi, Jaya; Wolfe, Gil I; Nations, Sharon; Herbelin, Laura; de Freitas, M G; Quintanilha, Giseli; Khan, Saud; Dimachkie, Mazen; Barohn, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological disorder. There may be important differences and similarities in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy between North America (NA) and South America (SA). Neuromuscular databases were searched for neuropathy diagnosis at two North American sites, University of Kansas Medical Center and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and one South American site, Federal Fluminense University in Brazil. All patients were included into one of the six major categories: immune-mediated, diabetic, hereditary, infectious/inflammatory, systemic/metabolic/toxic (not diabetic) and cryptogenic. A comparison of the number of patients in each category was made between North America and South America databases. Total number of cases in North America was 1090 and in South America was 1034 [immune-mediated: NA 215 (19.7%), SA 191 (18%); diabetic: NA 148 (13.5%), SA 236 (23%); hereditary: NA 292 (26.7%), SA 103 (10%); infectious/inflammatory: NA 53 (4.8%), SA 141 (14%); systemic/metabolic/toxic: NA 71 (6.5%), SA 124 (12%); cryptogenic: NA 311 (28.5%), SA 239 (23%)]. Some specific neuropathy comparisons were hereditary neuropathies [Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) cases] in NA 246/292 (84.2%) and SA 60/103 (58%); familial amyloid neuropathy in SA 31/103 (30%) and none in NA. Among infectious neuropathies, cases of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) neuropathy in SA were 36/141(25%), Chagas disease in SA were 13/141(9%) and none for either in NA; cases of neuropathy due to leprosy in NA were 26/53 (49%) and in SA were 39/141(28%). South American tertiary care centers are more likely to see patients with infectious, diabetic and hereditary disorders such as familial amyloid neuropathies. North American tertiary centers are more likely to see patients with CMT. Immune neuropathies and cryptogenic neuropathies were seen equally in North America and South America.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  2. Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Lower Extremity Function

    PubMed Central

    Chiles, Nancy S.; Phillips, Caroline L.; Volpato, Stefano; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes among older adults causes many complications, including decreased lower extremity function and physical disability. Diabetes can cause peripheral nerve dysfunction, which might be one pathway through which diabetes leads to decreased physical function. The study aims were to determine: (1) whether diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with objective measures of physical function in older adults, (2) which peripheral nerve function (PNF) tests are associated with diabetes, and (3) whether PNF mediates the diabetes-physical function relationship. Research Design and Methods This study included 983 participants, age 65 and older from the InCHIANTI Study. Diabetes was diagnosed by clinical guidelines. Physical performance was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), scored from 0-12 (higher values, better physical function) and usual walking speed (m/s). PNF was assessed via standard surface electroneurographic study of right peroneal nerve conduction velocity, vibration and touch sensitivity. Clinical cut-points of PNF tests were used to create a neuropathy score from 0-5 (higher values, greater neuropathy). Multiple linear regression models were used to test associations. Results and Conclusion 12.8% (n=126) of participants had diabetes. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other confounders, diabetic participants had decreased SPPB (β= −0.99; p< 0.01), decreased walking speed (β= −0.1m/s; p< 0.01), decreased nerve conduction velocity (β= −1.7m/s; p< 0.01), and increased neuropathy (β= 0.25; p< 0.01) compared to non-diabetic participants. Adjusting for nerve conduction velocity and neuropathy score decreased the effect of diabetes on SPPB by 20%, suggesting partial mediation through decreased PNF. PMID:24120281

  3. Giant axonal neuropathy-like disease in an Alexandrine parrot (Psittacula eupatria).

    PubMed

    Stent, Andrew; Gosbell, Matthew; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Summers, Brian A

    2015-09-01

    A chronic progressive neurological condition in an Alexandrine parrot (Psittacula eupatria) was manifest as intention tremors, incoordination, and seizure activity. Histology revealed large eosinophilic bodies throughout the central nervous system, and electron microscopy demonstrated that these bodies were greatly expanded axons distended by short filamentous structures that aggregated to form long strands. The presence of periodic acid-Schiff-positive material within the neuronal bodies of Purkinje cells and ganglionic neurons is another distinctive feature of this disease. The histological features of this case display some features consistent with giant axonal neuropathy as reported in humans and dogs. Based on investigation of the lineage in this case, an underlying inherited defect is suspected, but some additional factor appears to have altered the specific disease presentation in this bird. PMID:26330398

  4. Giant axonal neuropathy-like disease in an Alexandrine parrot (Psittacula eupatria).

    PubMed

    Stent, Andrew; Gosbell, Matthew; Tatarczuch, Liliana; Summers, Brian A

    2015-09-01

    A chronic progressive neurological condition in an Alexandrine parrot (Psittacula eupatria) was manifest as intention tremors, incoordination, and seizure activity. Histology revealed large eosinophilic bodies throughout the central nervous system, and electron microscopy demonstrated that these bodies were greatly expanded axons distended by short filamentous structures that aggregated to form long strands. The presence of periodic acid-Schiff-positive material within the neuronal bodies of Purkinje cells and ganglionic neurons is another distinctive feature of this disease. The histological features of this case display some features consistent with giant axonal neuropathy as reported in humans and dogs. Based on investigation of the lineage in this case, an underlying inherited defect is suspected, but some additional factor appears to have altered the specific disease presentation in this bird.

  5. Long-term evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-like symptoms in rotenone administered rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Laura; Philip, Ann L; Martinez, Juan C; Guttierez, Juan C; Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao; Thomas, Biju B

    2015-01-12

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons that lead to the loss of central vision. This study is aimed at evaluating the LHON symptoms in rats administered with rotenone microspheres into the superior colliculus (SC). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) analysis showed substantial loss of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in rotenone injected rats. Optokinetic testing in rotenone treated rats showed decrease in head-tracking response. Electrophysiological mapping of the SC surface demonstrated attenuation of visually evoked responses; however, no changes were observed in the ERG data. The progressive pattern of disease manifestation in rotenone administered rats demonstrated several similarities with human disease symptoms. These rats with LHON-like symptoms can serve as a model for future investigators to design and implement reliable tests to assess the beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions for LHON disease.

  6. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth.

  7. Inherited disorders of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-08-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as a physiological response to blood vessel injury and bleeding, which entails a co-ordinated process involving the blood vessel, platelets, and blood clotting proteins (i.e. coagulation factors). Hemostasis can be divided into primary and secondary components. The former rapidly initiates after endothelial damage and is characterized by vascular contraction, platelet adhesion, and formation of a soft aggregate plug. The latter is initiated following the release of tissue factor and involves a complex sequence of events known as the blood coagulation cascade, encompassing serial steps where each coagulation factor activates another in a chain reaction that culminates in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Patients carrying abnormalities of the coagulation cascade (i.e. deficiencies of coagulation factors) have an increased bleeding tendency, where the clinical severity is mostly dependent upon the type and the plasma level of the factor affected. These disorders also impose a heavy medical and economic burden on individual patients and society in general. The aim of this article is to provide a general overview on the pathophysiology, clinics, diagnostics, and therapy of inherited disorders of coagulation factors.

  8. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth. PMID:27491196

  9. [Inherited thrombopathia in Simmental cattle].

    PubMed

    Aebi, M; Wiedemar, N; Drögemüller, C; Zanolari, R

    2016-02-01

    During the years 2012 to 2014, a total of 5 affected Simmental cattle showing persistent bleeding after minor or unknown trauma, were presented at the Clinic for Ruminants or at the Institute for Genetics of the Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Berne. The homozygous mutation RASGRP2, initially reported in 2007, was present in all these cases and all available parents were heterozygous carriers thus confirming the recessive mode of inheritance. Three affected animals died as a result of persistent bleeding. One animal was stabilized at the Clinic for Ruminants and was slaughtered one month later. Another case showing persistent bleeding and several hematomas was euthanized after genotyping. A frequency of 10% carriers for the associated mutation was detected in a sample of 145 Simmental sires which were used 2013 for artificial insemination in Switzerland. These bulls are designated as TP carriers and should not be used uncontrolled. Breeding organizations in Switzerland make use of the gene test to select bulls which do not carry the mutation. PMID:27145685

  10. The inheritance of fingerprint patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Slatis, H M; Katznelson, M B; Bonné-Tamir, B

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the fingerprints of 571 members of the Habbanite isolate suggest inherited patterns and pattern sequences. A genetic theory has been developed; it assumes that the basic fingerprint pattern sequence is all ulnar loops and that a variety of genes cause deviations from this pattern sequence. Genes that have been proposed include: (1) a semidominant gene for whorls on the thumbs (one homozygote has whorls on both thumbs, the other has ulnar loops on both thumbs and the heterozygote usually has two ulnar loops or one ulnar loop and one whorl); (2) a semidominant gene for whorls on the ring fingers which acts like the gene for whorls on the thumbs; (3) a dominant gene for arches on the thumbs and often on other fingers; (4) one or more dominant genes for arches on the fingers; (5) a dominant gene for whorls on all fingers except for an ulnar loop on the middle finger; (6) a dominant gene for radial loops on the index fingers, frequently associated with an arch on the middle fingers; and (7) a recessive gene for radial loops on the ring and little fingers. These genes may act independently or may show epistasis. PMID:1266855

  11. Coalgebraic structure of genetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Li, Bai-Lian

    2004-09-01

    Although in the broadly defined genetic algebra, multiplication suggests a forward direction of from parents to progeny, when looking from the reverse direction, it also suggests to us a new algebraic structure-coalge- braic structure, which we call genetic coalgebras. It is not the dual coalgebraic structure and can be used in the construction of phylogenetic trees. Math- ematically, to construct phylogenetic trees means we need to solve equations x([n]) = a, or x([n]) = b. It is generally impossible to solve these equations inalgebras. However, we can solve them in coalgebras in the sense of tracing back for their ancestors. A thorough exploration of coalgebraic structure in genetics is apparently necessary. Here, we develop a theoretical framework of the coalgebraic structure of genetics. From biological viewpoint, we defined various fundamental concepts and examined their elementary properties that contain genetic significance. Mathematically, by genetic coalgebra, we mean any coalgebra that occurs in genetics. They are generally noncoassociative and without counit; and in the case of non-sex-linked inheritance, they are cocommutative. Each coalgebra with genetic realization has a baric property. We have also discussed the methods to construct new genetic coalgebras, including cocommutative duplication, the tensor product, linear combinations and the skew linear map, which allow us to describe complex genetic traits. We also put forward certain theorems that state the relationship between gametic coalgebra and gametic algebra. By Brower's theorem in topology, we prove the existence of equilibrium state for the in-evolution operator. PMID:20369970

  12. Paternity and inheritance of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, John

    1981-06-01

    One of the oldest conjectures in anthropology is that men transfer wealth to their sister's son when the biological paternity of their `own' children is in doubt1-12. Because maternity is certain, a man is necessarily related to his sister's son and his brother (see Fig. 1). It is argued here that relatedness to male heirs can be assured by passing wealth to sister's sons or down a line of brothers, whether the prevailing kinship system reckons those brothers matrilineally or patrilineally. It is also argued that when several transfers of wealth are considered, a man's likelihood of being cuckolded need not be unrealistically high13 for his successive matrilineal heirs to be more related to him than his successive patrilineal heirs (see Fig. 2). Cross-cultural data on sister's son/brother inheritance14 and frequency of extramarital sex for females15 support the hypothesis that men tend to transmit wealth to their sister's son and/or brother when the probability that their putative children are their genetic children is relatively low.

  13. Inherited bleeding syndromes in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mondhiry, H A

    1977-06-30

    This paper presents data on the occurence and pattern of inherited bleeding syndromes (IBS) in Iraq, a hitherto unexplored problem. During the first fourteen months of a prospective on-going study at a major university center, 116 patients from 62 families were diagnosed as having IBS. All patients were referred because of moderate to severe bleeding diatheses. They included 62 haemophiliacs 32 patients with von Willebrand's disease (VWD), 9 with Christmas disease (CD), 6 with afibrinogenemia, 1 with prothrombin deficiency, and 6 were thought to have platelet dysfunction. 32 other bleeders (16 hemophiliacs, 14 VWD, and 2 CD) were also recognized among the pedigrees studied but were not available for full investigations. The clinical and laboratory features of the patients observed in Iraq do not seem to be significantly different from those of patients in Western Europe or North America. Although the absolute incidence and relative distribution of these disorders in the entire population cannot yet be determined, the rate of occurence per segment population is likely to be high, most likely due to the high rate of consanguinity and large number of births per family, phenomena still prevalent in this country.

  14. Arsenic intoxication presenting with macrocytosis and peripheral neuropathy, without anemia.

    PubMed

    Heaven, R; Duncan, M; Vukelja, S J

    1994-01-01

    A case of arsenic intoxication associated with macrocytosis and neuropathy, without anemia, is presented. Evaluation of a 68-year-old man with a long history of peripheral neuropathy and persistent macrocytosis revealed exposure to an insecticide. Analysis of urine and hair revealed elevated levels of arsenic. A short course of d-penicillamine failed to promote urinary excretion of arsenic. Removal of the insecticide resulted in resolution of macrocytosis and slight improvement of neuropathy. This case emphasizes that arsenic intoxication should be considered in patients with macrocytosis with peripheral neuropathy, even in the absence of anemia.

  15. Validity of the neurological examination in diagnosing diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Höliner, Isabella; Haslinger, Vera; Lütschg, Jürg; Müller, Guido; Barbarini, Daniela Seick; Fussenegger, Jörg; Zanier, Ulrike; Saely, Christoph H; Drexel, Heinz; Simma, Burkhard

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and examine whether the neurological examination validly diagnoses diabetic peripheral neuropathy as compared with the gold standard of nerve conduction velocity in these patients. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in an unselected consecutive series of patients aged 8-18 years who had been suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 1 year. For the neurological examination, neuropathy disability scores and neuropathy sign scores were used. Of the 39 patients, six (15%) had clinically evident diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas nerve conduction velocity testing revealed diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 15 (38%) patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the neurological examination for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy were 40% and 100%, respectively. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 72.7%, respectively. This conclusions from this study are that in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, diabetic peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent, but in the majority of patients it is subclinical. Sensitivity and negative predictive values of the neurological examination are low. Therefore, routine nerve conduction velocity measurement for the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy appears to be warranted in these patients.

  16. Diabetic neuropathy part 2: proximal and asymmetric phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, many other subtypes have been defined since the 1800s, including proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control. Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions however are controversial.

  17. Abnormal Nutritional Factors in Patients Evaluated at a Neuropathy Center.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman; Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Carey, Bridget T; Langsdorf, Jennifer A; Feuer, Naomi T

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal concentrations of nutritional factors were found in 24.1% of 187 patients with neuropathy who were newly seen at our academic neuropathy referral center over a 1-year period. All patients presented with sensory axonal or small fiber neuropathy. In 7.3%, they were present in association with at least one other identifiable cause for neuropathy. Elevated levels of pyridoxal phosphate or mercury occurred more frequently than deficiencies in vitamins B1, B12, or B6. The nutritional abnormalities are amenable to correction by dietary intervention. PMID:27224436

  18. Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type IV in 9 Year Old Boy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    AZADVARI, Mohaddeseh; EMAMI RAZAVI, Seyedeh Zahra; KAZEMI, Shahrbanoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) is a rare group of neuropathies that affects the Sensory and Autonomic nervous system. The patients do not have the ability of sensing different sensations such as pain and temperature, which tends to lead to different injuries. In addition, due to autonomic involvement, the patients suffer from fluctuation in body temperature periodically and lack of precipitation. HSAN is divided into 5 types according to the age of onset, clinical features, and inheritance. Our case was a 9-yr old boy from cousin parents. He had some developmental delay and history of recurrent fever and convulsion in the first year of his life. Gradually, other symptoms added to patient’ feature such as multiple painless skin ulcers, tooth loss, destruction of toes and fingers. In electrodiagnostic study, we found decreased amplitude of sensory nerves, while the other studies were normal. Laboratory test and imaging studies were also normal. All clinical and paraclinical findings were in favor of HSAN type IV. There is no cure for such patients; as a result, these patients and their families need receiving appropriate education and timely rehabilitation services. PMID:27247588

  19. Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type IV in 9 Year Old Boy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Azadvari, Mohaddeseh; Emami Razavi, Seyedeh Zahra; Kazemi, Shahrbanoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) is a rare group of neuropathies that affects the Sensory and Autonomic nervous system. The patients do not have the ability of sensing different sensations such as pain and temperature, which tends to lead to different injuries. In addition, due to autonomic involvement, the patients suffer from fluctuation in body temperature periodically and lack of precipitation. HSAN is divided into 5 types according to the age of onset, clinical features, and inheritance. Our case was a 9-yr old boy from cousin parents. He had some developmental delay and history of recurrent fever and convulsion in the first year of his life. Gradually, other symptoms added to patient' feature such as multiple painless skin ulcers, tooth loss, destruction of toes and fingers. In electrodiagnostic study, we found decreased amplitude of sensory nerves, while the other studies were normal. Laboratory test and imaging studies were also normal. All clinical and paraclinical findings were in favor of HSAN type IV. There is no cure for such patients; as a result, these patients and their families need receiving appropriate education and timely rehabilitation services. PMID:27247588

  20. Oxidative phosphorylation differences between mitochondrial DNA haplogroups modify the risk of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Durán, Aurora; Pacheu-Grau, David; Martínez-Romero, Iñigo; López-Gallardo, Ester; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited optic atrophy caused by mitochondrial DNA point mutations. Previous epidemiological studies have shown that individuals from mitochondrial genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) J/Uk and H have a higher and a lower risk, respectively, of suffering this disorder. To analyze the bases of these associations at cellular and molecular levels, functional studies with cybrids provide high quality evidence. Cybrids from haplogroup J contain less mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) and synthesize a smaller amount of mitochondrial DNA-encoded polypeptides than those from haplogroup H. Haplogroup J cybrids also display lower oxygen consumption, mitochondrial inner membrane potential and total adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA levels correlate with many parameters of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These results suggest that the mitochondrial DNA amount determines oxidative phosphorylation capacity and, along with other recently published observations, support the possibility that mitochondrial DNA levels may be responsible for the bias of the disorder toward males, for the incomplete penetrance of mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and for the association of the disease with particular mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

  1. Recurrent Episodes of Stroke-Like Symptoms in a Patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy X Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Said, Sarita; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Wicklund, Matthew; Stahl, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of disorders best known for causing inherited forms of peripheral neuropathy. The X-linked form, CMTX1, is caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene, expressed both by peripheral Schwann cells and central oligodendrocytes. Central manifestations are known but are rare, and there are few case reports of leukoencephalopathy with transient or persistent neurological deficits in patients with this CMT subtype. Here, we report the case of a man with multiple male and female family members affected by neuropathy who carries a pathologic mutation in GJB1. He has experienced three transient episodes with variable neurological deficits over the course of 7 years with corresponding changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This case illustrates CMT1X as a rare cause of transient neurological deficit and demonstrates the evolution of associated reversible abnormalities on MRI over time. To the best of our knowledge, this report provides the longest period of serial imaging in a single patient with this condition in the English language literature. PMID:26955336

  2. Search for mutations in the EGR2 corepressor proteins, NAB1 and NAB2, in human peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen; Di Maria, Emilio; Bellone, Emilia; Balestra, Piercesare; Cassandrini, Denise; Mandich, Paola; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent; Svaren, John

    2002-03-01

    EGR2/Krox-20, a Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor, plays an essential role in the regulation of myelination in the peripheral nervous system. Dominant and recessive mutations in EGR2 are associated with peripheral myelinopathies, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. One recessive mutation (I268N) is known to affect the inhibitory domain that binds the NAB transcriptional corepressors, NAB1 and NAB2. This mutation abolishes the interaction of EGR2 with the NAB corepressors and thereby increases transcriptional activity. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutations in the EGR2-interacting domains of NAB1 and NAB2 might be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathies in currently unexplained cases. However, screening 87 such cases failed to identify any disease-causing mutations within the EGR2-interacting domains of either NAB1 or NAB2. A further mutation analysis of the complete coding regions of NAB1 and NAB2 in these genomic DNA samples did not uncover any disease-causing mutation. Therefore, our analysis indicates that mutations in the human NABI and NAB2 genes are most likely not involved in the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:12030330

  3. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreERT;ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26656646

  4. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination.

    PubMed

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreER(T);ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  5. Chronic Severe Hyponatremia and Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Avoiding Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canaday, Susan; Rompala, John; Rowles, John; Fisher, Josh; Holt, David

    2015-12-01

    Serum sodium concentration affects every cell in the body with respect to cellular tonicity. Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered, occurring at clinical admission in 22% of elderly patients. Any rapid correction of chronic severe hyponatremia can result in rapid cellular shrinking due to loss of intracellular free water. This is commonly associated with paralysis and severe brain damage due to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS). ODS occurs because the body has the ability to compensate for cellular fluid shifts due to chronic hyponatremia (by a decrease in brain concentration of several ions, amino acids, and organic osmolytes). Thus, the neurons are often at a functional state of fluid balance despite the sodium imbalance. The initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can introduce between 1 and 2 L of priming solution containing a normal sodium concentration creating a rapid rise in sodium concentration within the extracellular fluid. This abrupt change establishes a situation where intracellular free water can be lost resulting in cellular shrinking and ODS. In presenting this case study, we hope to add to the current literature with a specific isotonic approach to treating the chronically severe hyponatremic patient pre-CPB, during CPB, and post-CPB. PMID:26834285

  6. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  7. Law & psychiatry: Murder, inheritance, and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, Azgad; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2011-07-01

    Should a murderer be allowed to inherit the victim's estate? The question dates from biblical times, but most jurisdictions today have statutes in place that bar inheritance by convicted murderers. However, a special problem arises when the killer has a severe mental illness and has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Should such people, who have not been convicted of a crime, be permitted to collect their inheritance? Jurisdictions vary in their responses, with the rules reflecting a mix of practical and moral considerations influenced by different perspectives about what determines the behavior of persons with mental illness.

  8. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in an 8-year-old girl, complicated by deafness and kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Vesna D; Doronjski, Aleksandra R; Spasojevic, Slobodan D; Pavlovic, Vesna S; Nikolic, Marko M; Kovacevic, Branka B

    2009-08-01

    Based on case history and clinical and electrophysiological examinations, the authors report on a case of an 8-year-old girl who was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. The disease was complicated by deafness and kidney fibrosis. During treatment with methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin, followed by mycophenolate mofetil, prompt improvement of neurological findings occurred. The improvement of hearing was poor. Because the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy has still not been clear, and on the grounds of several cases of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy conjoined with the kidney disease described in literature (glomerulopathy, interstitial nephritis), every patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy needs to undergo the urinalyses.

  10. Nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal axonal proteins during demyelination and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coman, I; Aigrot, M S; Seilhean, D; Reynolds, R; Girault, J A; Zalc, B; Lubetzki, C

    2006-12-01

    Saltatory conduction in myelinated fibres depends on the specific molecular organization of highly specialized axonal domains at the node of Ranvier, the paranodal and the juxtaparanodal regions. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) have been shown to be deployed along the naked demyelinated axon in experimental models of CNS demyelination and in multiple sclerosis lesions. Little is known about aggregation of nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal constituents during the repair process. We analysed by immunohistochemistry on free-floating sections from multiple sclerosis brains the expression and distribution of nodal (Na(v) channels), paranodal (paranodin/Caspr) and juxtaparanodal (K(v) channels and Caspr2) molecules in demyelinated and remyelinated lesions. Whereas in demyelinated lesions, paranodal and juxtaparanodal proteins are diffusely distributed on denuded axons, the distribution of Na(v) channels is heterogeneous, with a diffuse immunoreactivity but also few broad Na(v) channel aggregates in all demyelinated lesions. In contrast to the demyelinated plaques, all remyelinated lesions are characterized by the detection of aggregates of Na(v) channels, paranodin/Caspr, K(v) channels and Caspr2. Our data suggest that these aggregates precede remyelination, and that Na(v) channel aggregation is the initial event, followed by aggregation of paranodal and then juxtaparanodal axonal proteins. Remyelination takes place in multiple sclerosis tissue but myelin repair is often incomplete, and the reasons for this remyelination deficit are many. We suggest that a defect of Na(v) channel aggregation might be involved in the remyelination failure in demyelinated lesions with spared axons and oligodendroglial cells. PMID:16766541

  11. Understanding the consequences of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy from impairments to activity and participation restrictions and reduced quality of life: the ICE study.

    PubMed

    Merkies, Ingemar S J; Hughes, Richard A C; Donofrio, Peter; Bril, Vera; Dalakas, Marinos C; Hanna, Kim; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Latov, Norman; van Doorn, Pieter A; Deng, Chunqin

    2010-09-01

    A randomized trial (ICE trial) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) demonstrated significantly more improvement with intravenous immunoglobulin (Gamunex(®), Talecris Biotherapeutics, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC) than placebo. To understand the relationship between CIDP impairments, activity and participation restrictions, and quality of life (QoL) in this trial, we investigated the association between scales representing these outcome levels. Gamunex or placebo was given every 3 weeks for up to 24 weeks to 117 patients in an initial treatment period after which treatment failures were crossed over (alternative treatment). We assessed impairments, activity and participation, and SF-36 component mental (MCS) and physical summaries (PCS). Regression analyses of baseline data were performed (all subjects) and change from baseline to endpoint (Gamunex-treated group only) to determine correlations between outcomes. Grip strength, medical research council (MRC) sum score, and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory sum score were the strongest explanatory variables of disability (at baseline: r(2) = 0.46; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.66). Only up to half of the variance in QoL scores (PCS at baseline: r(2) = 0.30; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.41; MCS: at baseline: r(2) = 0.10; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.24) was explained by impairment and activity and participation measures. Future studies are required to elucidate the impact of CIDP on disability and QoL changes, because the obtained correlations provide only partial explanation.

  12. Hyperglycemia Promotes Schwann Cell De-differentiation and De-myelination via Sorbitol Accumulation and Igf1 Protein Down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wu; Tashiro, Syoichi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Tando, Toshimi; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Morioka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Amizuka, Norio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-07-10

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently accompanied by complications, such as peripheral nerve neuropathy. Schwann cells play a pivotal role in regulating peripheral nerve function and conduction velocity; however, changes in Schwann cell differentiation status in DM are not fully understood. Here, we report that Schwann cells de-differentiate into immature cells under hyperglycemic conditions as a result of sorbitol accumulation and decreased Igf1 expression in those cells. We found that de-differentiated Schwann cells could be re-differentiated in vitro into mature cells by treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor, to reduce sorbitol levels, or with vitamin D3, to elevate Igf1 expression. In vivo DM models exhibited significantly reduced nerve function and conduction, Schwann cell de-differentiation, peripheral nerve de-myelination, and all conditions were significantly rescued by aldose reductase inhibitor or vitamin D3 administration. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying pathological changes in Schwann cells seen in DM and suggest ways to treat neurological conditions associated with this condition.

  13. Inheritance patterns and phenotypic features of myofibrillar myopathy associated with a BAG3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Sarkozy, Anna; Lee, Hee-Suk; McKenna, Caoimhe; Rankin, Julia; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Paola, Francalanci; D’Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by disintegration of myofibrils. The inheritance pattern in MFMs is commonly autosomal dominant, but there has been a striking absence of secondary cases noted in a BAG3-associated subtype. We studied three families with BAG3 p.Pro209Leu mutation showing a severe phenotype of myofibrillar myopathy and axonal neuropathy with giant axons. In one family, transmission to a pair of siblings has occurred from their asymptomatic father who showed somatic mosaicism. In two other families, neither of the parents was affected or showed detectable level of somatic mosaicism. These observations suggest that the BAG3 variant of MFM may result from a spontaneous mutation at an early point of embryonic development and that transmission from a mosaic parent may occur more than once. The study underlines the importance of parental evaluation as it may have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:20605452

  14. Developmental origins of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Mark A.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors can induce epigenetic alterations in the germ cells that can potentially be transmitted transgenerationally. This non-genetic form of inheritance is termed epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and has been shown in a variety of species including plants, flies, worms, fish, rodents, pigs, and humans. This phenomenon operates during specific critical windows of exposure, linked to the developmental biology of the germ cells (sperm and eggs). Therefore, concepts of the developmental origins of transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation and subsequent disease risk need to include epigenetic processes affecting the developmental biology of the germ cell. These developmental impacts on epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, in contrast to multigenerational exposures, are the focus of this Perspective. PMID:27390622

  15. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  16. Lithium-Induced Motor Neuropathy: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; Rath, Neelmadhav

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy secondary to lithium is under-recognized. Most cases of polyneuropathy were reported with lithium intoxication. However, very few cases were reported without lithium toxicity. We present a case of motor neuropathy due to the use of lithium in a 26-year-old male with a therapeutic lithium level. PMID:27335523

  17. Isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral exostosis.

    PubMed

    Juel, V C; Kiely, J M; Leone, K V; Morgan, R F; Smith, T; Phillips, L H

    2000-01-25

    We report an isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral osteochondroma that became symptomatic after the patient played recreational basketball. Lesion resection resulted in complete deficit resolution. Mass lesions involving the musculocutaneous nerve should be considered in patients with atraumatic, isolated musculocutaneous neuropathies that are recurrent or fail to recover, even in the setting of strenuous exercise.

  18. Bilateral demyelinating tumefactive lesions in three children with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Zuhal; Eraksoy, Mefkure

    2002-09-01

    We present the results from the evaluations of three children ages of 2, 7, and 11 years with hemiparesis and multiple white-matter lesions on magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The initial symptoms were mainly acute/subacute hemiparesis in all and headache/vomiting in one of them. Before admission, one of them had a history of upper respiratory tract infection, whereas another had undergone urinary tract surgery, and the other reported no history of any infection or stress-related factor. In all of the children, MRI showed multiple superficial and deep white-matter hyperintensity in T2-weighted and proton density images with perifocal edema in the acute phase. During the symptomatic period, all of the patients underwent corticosteroid treatment. Whereas two of the patients demonstrated signs of recovery during the first week of treatment, the other patient demonstrated almost a full recovery with minimal neurologic sequela. Follow-up MRI demonstrated not only a remarkable decrease in the size and number of the lesions, with complete resolution for many of them, it also demonstrated a loss of contrast enhancement. None of these three patients, who had been followed up clinically and through MRI for 5 years, have shown either a clinical relapse or new lesions. The clinical pictures and MRI of the children were different in some aspects from acute multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Regarding both the clinical follow-up and treatment strategy, it is essential and interesting to state the fact that tumefactive lesions involving both hemispheres are likely to appear during the monitoring of the monophasic courses among inflammatory demyelinating diseases of childhood such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  19. Interleukin‐10 is a critical regulator of white matter lesion containment following viral induced demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Puntambekar, Shweta S.; Hinton, David R.; Yin, Xinghua; Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C.; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotropic coronavirus induces an acute encephalomyelitis accompanied by focal areas of demyelination distributed randomly along the spinal column. The initial areas of demyelination increase only slightly after the control of infection. These circumscribed focal lesions are characterized by axonal sparing, myelin ingestion by macrophage/microglia, and glial scars associated with hypertrophic astrocytes, which proliferate at the lesion border. Accelerated virus control in mice lacking the anti‐inflammatory cytokine IL‐10 was associated with limited initial demyelination, but low viral mRNA persistence similar to WT mice and declining antiviral cellular immunity. Nevertheless, lesions exhibited sustained expansion providing a model of dysregulated white matter injury temporally remote from the acute CNS insult. Expanding lesions in the absence of IL‐10 are characterized by sustained microglial activation and partial loss of macrophage/microglia exhibiting an acquired deactivation phenotype. Furthermore, IL‐10 deficiency impaired astrocyte organization into mesh like structures at the lesion borders, but did not prevent astrocyte hypertrophy. The formation of discrete foci of demyelination in IL‐10 sufficient mice correlated with IL‐10 receptor expression exclusively on astrocytes in areas of demyelination suggesting a critical role for IL‐10 signaling to astrocytes in limiting expansion of initial areas of white matter damage. GLIA 2015;63:2106–2120 PMID:26132901

  20. The Effect of Melatonin on Behavioral, Molecular, and Histopathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Gorji, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The protective effects of melatonin (MLT) on various neurodegenerative diseases, including MS, have been suggested. In the present study, we examined the effect of MLT on demyelination, apoptosis, inflammation, and behavioral dysfunctions in the cuprizone toxic model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed a chaw containing 0.2 % cuprizone for 5 weeks and received two doses of MLT (50 and 100 mg/kg) intraperitoneally for the last 7 days of cuprizone diet. Administration of MLT improved motor behavior deficits induced by cuprizone diet. MLT dose-dependently decreased the mean number of apoptotic cells via decreasing caspase-3 and Bax as well as increasing Bcl-2 levels. In addition, MLT significantly enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation and decreased heme oxygenase-1 level. However, MLT had no effect on interleukin-6 and myelin protein production. Our data revealed that MLT improved neurological deficits and enhanced cell survival but was not able to initiate myelin production in the cuprizone model of demyelination. These findings may be important for the design of potential MLT therapy in demyelinating disorders, such as MS. PMID:26310973

  1. Gadolinium enhancement patterns of tumefactive demyelinating lesions: correlations with brain biopsy findings and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Shimizu, Yuko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-10-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) can mimic brain tumors on radiological images. TDLs are often referred to as tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS), but the heterogeneous nature and monophasic course of TDLs do not fulfill clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for multiple sclerosis. Redefining TDLs, TMS and other inflammatory brain lesions is essential for the accurate clinical diagnosis of extensive demyelinating brain lesions. We retrospectively analyzed MRI from nine TDL cases that underwent brain biopsy. Patterns of gadolinium enhancement on MRI were categorized as homogenous, inhomogeneous, patchy and diffuse, open ring or irregular rim, and were compared with pathological hallmarks including demyelination, central necrosis, macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis and perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. All cases had coexistence of demyelinating features and axonal loss. Open-ring and irregular rim patterns of gadolinium enhancement were associated with macrophage infiltrations and angiogenesis at the inflammatory border. An inhomogeneous pattern of gadolinium enhancement was associated with perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. Central necrosis was seen in cases of severe multiple sclerosis and hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy. These results suggest that the radiological features of TDLs may be related to different pathological processes, and indicate that MRI may be useful in understanding their pathophysiology. Further investigation is needed to determine the precise disease entity of these inflammatory demyelinating brain lesions.

  2. Behavioural consequences of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation into experimental demyelinating lesions in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, N D; Crang, A J; O'leary, M T; Hodge, S J; Blakemore, W F

    1999-05-01

    Glial cell transplantation has the potential to be developed into a clinical treatment for human demyelinating diseases because of its demonstrated efficacy in remyelinating experimentally demyelinated axons. As a step towards clinical application it is necessary to demonstrate that the procedure is safe and efficacious in promoting behavioural recovery. In this study we transplanted glial cell progenitors into demyelinating lesions induced by intraspinal injection of ethidium bromide in the rat. Locomotor function after transplantation was assessed using a beam-walking test that has previously been shown able to detect deficits associated with demyelination in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord. Two groups of animals with transplants were examined. In one group, spontaneous remyelination was prevented by exposure of the lesion to 40 Gy of X-irradiation; in the other, male glial cells were transplanted into nonirradiated female recipients, permitting their identification by use of a probe specific to the rat Y chromosome. Following transplantation, there was severe axon loss in a large proportion of the irradiated animals and those affected did not recover normal behavioural function. In contrast, both the small proportion of the irradiated group that sustained only mild axon loss and the nonirradiated recipients of transplants recovered normal function on our behavioural test. We conclude that glial cell transplantation is able to reverse the functional deficits associated with demyelination, provided axonal loss is minimal. PMID:10215903

  3. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pain in Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy manifests in a variety of different diseases and often results in symptoms of burning pain, shooting pain, allodynia, and hyperesthesia. Diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy is determined primarily by the history and physical exam, but functional neurophysiologic testing and skin biopsy evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fiber density can provide diagnostic confirmation. Management of small fiber neuropathy depends on the underlying etiology with concurrent treatment of associated neuropathic pain. A variety of recent guidelines propose the use of antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, topical therapies, and nonpharmacologic treatments as part of the overall management of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, little data about the treatment of pain specifically in small fiber neuropathy exist because most studies combine mixed neuropathic pain syndromes in the analysis. Additional studies targeting the treatment of pain in small fiber neuropathy are needed to guide decision making. PMID:21286866

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Vitamin Deficiency, Toxins, and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Peripheral neuropathies secondary to vitamin deficiencies, medications, or toxins are frequently considered but can be difficult to definitively diagnose. Accurate diagnosis is important since these conditions are often treatable and preventable. This article reviews the key features of different types of neuropathies caused by these etiologies and provides a comprehensive list of specific agents that must be kept in mind. Recent Findings: While most agents that cause peripheral neuropathy have been known for years, newly developed medications that cause peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Summary: Peripheral nerves are susceptible to damage by a wide array of toxins, medications, and vitamin deficiencies. It is important to consider these etiologies when approaching patients with a variety of neuropathic presentations; additionally, etiologic clues may be provided by other systemic symptoms. While length-dependent sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy is the most common presentation, several examples present in a subacute severe fashion, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:25299283

  6. Optic neuropathy associated with periostitis in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Hirunwiwatkul, Parima; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2007-03-01

    Optic neuropathy is an uncommon manifestation of relapsing polychondritis (RPC), a rare systemic disease affecting cartilaginous and proteoglycan-rich structures. The optic neuropathy has been attributed to ischemia, intrinsic inflammation of the optic nerve, or spread of inflammation to the nerve from adjacent intraconal orbital tissues. We report a case of recurrent corticosteroid-responsive optic neuropathy in which MRI did not show ocular, optic nerve, or intraconal orbital abnormalities but did show periosteal thickening and enhancement in the apical orbit and adjacent intracranial space consistent with periostitis. The periostitis, which is a manifestation of a systemic vasculitis or an autoimmune reaction to progenitors of cartilage, probably caused the optic neuropathy by compression or inflammation. It is important to recognize this mechanism of optic neuropathy as its imaging features may be a subtle yet critical clue to an underlying systemic condition that can be life-threatening if not properly managed.

  7. HSMNR belongs to the most frequent types of hereditary neuropathy in the Czech Republic and is twice more frequent than HMSNL.

    PubMed

    Šafka Brožková, D; Haberlová, J; Mazanec, R; Laštůvková, J; Seeman, P

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), also called CMT4G, is an autosomal recessive inherited peripheral neuropathy (IPN) caused by a founder mutation in the HK1 gene. HMSNR affects only patients with Roma origin, similar to the better known HMSN type Lom clarified earlier. By testing IPN patients with Roma origin, we realized that HMSNR affects surprisingly many patients in the Czech Republic. HMSNR is one of the most frequent types of IPN in this country and appears to be twice more frequent than HMSNL. Pronounced lower limb atrophies and severe deformities often lead to walking inability in even young patients, but hands are usually only mildly affected even after many years of disease duration. The group of 20 patients with HMSNR presented here is the first report about the prevalence of HMSNR from central Europe. PMID:26822750

  8. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2013-02-01

    In this review, we delineate clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar mononeuropathies. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is most commonly due to lesions at the level of the retroepicondylar groove (RTC), with approximately 25% at the humeroulnar arcade (HUA). The term 'cubital tunnel syndrome' should be reserved for the latter. The diagnostic accuracy of nerve conduction studies is limited by biological (e.g. low elbow temperature) and technical factors. Across-elbow distance measurements greater than 10 cm improve diagnostic specificity at the expense of decreased sensitivity. Short-segment incremental studies can differentiate lesions at the HUA from those at the RTC.

  9. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  10. Demyelinating lesions due to Theiler's virus are associated with ongoing central nervous system infection.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, M; Aubert, C; Brahic, M

    1986-03-01

    We used in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to look for a correlation between virus expression and white matter lesions during late demyelinating disease due to persistent Theiler's virus infection. We found the following. (i) Tissue lesions developed at the site of virus infection. This correlation was not explained by infection of lymphocytes and macrophages. (ii) Large differences in the extent of pathology existed between mice. The amount of inflammation paralleled the number of cells containing viral RNA or viral capsid antigens. (iii) C57BL/6 mice, which are resistant to demyelination, were able to eradicate the infection. Our results are strongly in favor of a mechanism of demyelination in which viral gene products play a central role.

  11. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  12. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-06-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option.

  13. MHC class II exacerbates demyelination in vivo independently of T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Meenaxi M; Chen, Vivian S; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ting, Jenny P Y; Matsushima, Glenn K

    2008-10-15

    We have shown previously the importance of MHC class II for central nervous system remyelination; however, the function of MHC class II during cuprizone-induced demyelination has not been examined. Here, we show that I-A(beta)-/- mice exhibit significantly reduced inflammation and demyelination. RAG-1(1/1) mice are indistinguishable from controls, indicating T cells may not play a role. The role of MHC class II depends on an intact cytoplasmic tail that leads to the production of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and nitric oxide, and oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Thus, the function of MHC class II cytoplasmic tail appears to increase microglial proliferation and activation that exacerbates demyelination. PMID:18805594

  14. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J.; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi

    2015-01-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option. PMID:25808373

  15. [Magnetic-resonance tomography in differential diagnosis of brain lesions in demyelinating and systemic autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Totolian, N A

    2005-01-01

    An aim of the study was to establish MRT signs that may be useful for differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Three groups of patients have been examined: 300 patients with MS, 35 with demyelinating diseases (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica--Devic's syndrome); 90 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, sclerodermatitis, Sjugren's syndrome, autoimmune thyroiditis, vasculitis and vasculopathy). Classification of MRT syndromes in MS and their frequency are presented: syndrome of chronic inflammatory demyelination (79%), syndrome of acute inflammatory demyelination (9%), syndrome of multifocal degenerative leucoencephalopathy (8%), syndrome of combined multifocal diffusive leucoencephalopathy (4%). The similarity and differences in MRT semiotics of the above diseases and MS are described.

  16. The internodal axon membrane: electrical excitability and continuous conduction in segmental demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, H; Sears, T A

    1978-01-01

    1. Longitudinal action currents were recorded from single undissected myelinated nerve fibres in intact, perfused ventral roots of normal rats and ones treated with diphtheria toxin to produce demyelination. 2. Closely spaced recording electrodes (120 micron), signal averaging and the use of a calibrating current throught the root permitted membrane currents to be determined over 240 micron lengths of nerve. Contour plotting was used to plot membrane current density as a function of space and time. 3. The previous result of Rasminsky & Sears (1972) of delayed saltation in demyelinated nerve fibres was confirmed. 4. In addition a new phenomenon of continuous conduction was observed, along distances of up to 1 1/2 times the afferent internodal distance. The continuous spatial distribution of inward current in these cases showed that electrical excitability was distributed along the internodes. 5. Internodal excitability was also revealed in demyelinated fibres by extra foci of inward current judged to be internodal on the basis of the spacing of the other (nodal) foci. 6. Continuous conduction occurred at velocities in the range of 1.1-2.3 m/sec or roughly 1/20th-1/40th of the velocities expected for normal stretches of the same fibres. 7. The continuous conduction was attributed to conduction along lengths of demyelinated axon. This was supported by estimates of 0.86 and 1.5 muF/cm2 for membrane capacity from the foot of a continuously conducted action potential. 8. The implications of internodal electrical excitability in demyelinated nerve fibres are discussed in relation to (a) recent estimates of the density of sodium channels in intact and homogenized normal nerves, (b) the pathophysiology of demyelinating disease. PMID:690876

  17. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  18. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Nadia; Gorman, Mark P; Benson, Leslie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI) and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1) pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2) their distinguishing features; and (3) current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis. PMID:26509120

  19. Intravenous Administration of Human ES-derived Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Cuprizone-induced CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Bajpai, Ruchi; Moore, Craig S.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Brown, Graham D.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential for human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hES-NPCs) in autoimmune and genetic animal models of demyelinating diseases. Herein, we tested whether intravenous (i.v) administration of hES-NPCs would impact central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in a cuprizone model of demyelination. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were fed cuprizone (0.2%) for two weeks and then separated into two groups that either received an i.v. injection of hES-NPCs or i.v. administration of media without these cells. After an additional two weeks of dietary cuprizone treatment, CNS tissues were analyzed for detection of transplanted cells and differences in myelination in the region of the corpus callosum (CC). Results Cuprizone-induced demyelination in the CC was significantly reduced in mice treated with hES-NPCs compared with cuprizone-treated controls that did not receive stem cells. hES-NPCs were identified within the brain tissues of treated mice and revealed migration of transplanted cells into the CNS. A limited number of human cells were found to express the mature oligodendrocyte marker, O1, or the astrocyte marker, GFAP. Reduced apoptosis and attenuated microglial and astrocytic responses were also observed in the CC of hES-NPC-treated mice. Conclusions These findings indicated that systemically-administered hES-NPCs migrated from circulation into a demyelinated lesion within the CNS and effectively reduced demyelination. Observed reductions in astrocyte and microglial responses, and (c) the benefit of hES-NPC treatment in this model of myelin injury was not obviously accountable to tissue replacement by exogenously administered cells. PMID:21276029

  20. Laquinimod prevents cuprizone-induced demyelination independent of Toll-like receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Menken, Lena; Hayardeny, Liat; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test whether Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling plays a key role for reduced nuclear factor B (NF-κB) activation after laquinimod treatment in the model of cuprizone-induced demyelination, oligodendrocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and axonal damage. Methods: Ten-week-old C57BL/6J, TLR4−/−, and MyD88−/− mice received 0.25% cuprizone for 6 weeks and were treated daily with 25 mg/kg laquinimod or vehicle. After 6 weeks of demyelination, extent of demyelination, oligodendrocyte density, microglia infiltration, and axonal damage were analyzed in the corpus callosum. Additionally, we analyzed primary mouse astrocytes from C57BL/6J, TLR4−/−, MyD88−/−, and TRIF−/− mice for alteration in NF-κB signaling. Results: Vehicle-treated controls from C57BL/6J, TLR4−/−, and MyD88−/− mice displayed extensive callosal demyelination as well as microglial activation. In contrast, mice treated with 25 mg/kg laquinimod showed mainly intact callosal myelin. The demyelination score was significantly higher in all untreated mice compared to mice treated with laquinimod. There were significantly fewer APP-positive axonal spheroids, Mac3-positive macrophages/microglia, and less oligodendrocyte apoptosis in the corpus callosum of laquinimod-treated mice in comparison to untreated controls. Stimulated primary mouse astrocytes from laquinimod-treated groups show reduced NF-κB activation compared to vehicle-treated controls. Conclusions: Our results confirm that laquinimod prevents demyelination in the cuprizone mouse model for multiple sclerosis via downregulation of NF-κB activation. This laquinimod effect, however, does not involve upstream Toll-like receptor signaling. PMID:27231712