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Sample records for inherited demyelinating neuropathies

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  2. Electrophysiologic features of inherited demyelinating neuropathies: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1999-09-14

    The observation that inherited demyelinating neuropathies tend to have uniform conduction slowing and acquired disorders (CIDP and variants) have nonuniform or multifocal slowing was made before the identification of genetic defects of specific myelin constituents that cause the different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth and other inherited disorders involving peripheral nerve myelin. It is becoming clear that the electrophysiologic aspects of these disorders are more complex than previously realized. We review the current information available on the electrophysiologic features of the inherited demyelinating neuropathies in hopes of clarifying the clinical electrodiagnostic features of these disorders as well as to shed light on the physiologic consequences of the different genetic mutations.

  3. Electrophysiological features of inherited demyelinating neuropathies: A reappraisal in the era of molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J; Shy, M E

    2000-10-01

    The observation that inherited demyelinating neuropathies have uniform conduction slowing and that acquired disorders have nonuniform or multifocal slowing was made prior to the identification of mutations in myelin-specific genes which cause many of the inherited disorders involving peripheral nerve myelin. It is now clear that the electrophysiological aspects of these disorders are more complex than previously realized. Specifically, certain mutations appear to induce nonuniform slowing of conduction which resemble the findings in acquired demyelinating neuropathies. It is clinically important to recognize the different electrodiagnostic patterns of the various inherited demyelinating neuropathies. In addition, an understanding of the relationship between mutations of specific genes and their associated neurophysiological findings is likely to facilitate understanding of the role of these myelin proteins in peripheral nerve function and of how abnormalities in myelin proteins lead to neuropathy. We therefore review the current information on the electrophysiological features of the inherited demyelinating neuropathies in hopes of clarifying their electrodiagnostic features and to shed light on the physiological consequences of the different genetic mutations.

  4. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  5. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  7. Inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Mario A; Shy, Michael E

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurologic or multisystem syndrome. Because of the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. This article reviews the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineates major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes, and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  9. Inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in genes expressed in Schwann cells and the axons they ensheathe cause the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). More than 40 different genes have been shown to cause inherited neuropathies; chromosomal localizations of many other distinct inherited neuropathies have been mapped, and new genetic causes for inherited neuropathies continue to be discovered. How to keep track of all of these disorders, when to pursue genetic testing, and what tests to order for specific patients are difficult challenges for any neurologist. This review addresses these issues and provides illustrative cases to help in dealing with them. CMT serves as a living system to identify molecules necessary for normal peripheral nervous system (PNS) function. Understanding how these various molecules interact will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in general as well as other neurodegenerative disorders involving the PNS.

  10. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  11. Inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Griffiths, P G; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F

    2009-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies and they result in significant visual morbidity among young adults. Both disorders are the result of mitochondrial dysfunction: LHON from primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations affecting the respiratory chain complexes; and the majority of DOA families have mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for an inner mitochondrial membrane protein critical for mtDNA maintenance and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional genetic and environmental factors modulate the penetrance of LHON, and the same is likely to be the case for DOA which has a markedly variable clinical phenotype. The selective vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a key pathological feature and understanding the fundamental mechanisms that underlie RGC loss in these disorders is a prerequisite for the development of effective therapeutic strategies which are currently limited. PMID:19001017

  12. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies and their variants

    PubMed

    Vallat, J.-M.; Tabaraud, F.; Magy, L.; Macian, F.

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become predominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  13. Biology of peripheral inherited neuropathies: Schwann cell axonal interactions.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Development and maintenance of PNS myelin depends on continual signaling from axons ensheathed by myelin. Recent advances have demonstrated the roles of neuregulin 1 type III, Erb2/3 and intracellular signal transduction pathways in inducing Schwann cell myelination. Alternatively, maintenance of myelinated axons depends on healthy myelinating Schwann cells. Axonal degeneration is a feature of virtually all inherited demyelinating neuropathies and in many cases is more responsible for clinical impairment than the primary demyelination. Signaling mechanisms through which demyelinating Schwann cells damage axons are not well understood. In this review several examples of potential mechanisms by which demyelinating neuropathies damage axons will be presented. Understanding the molecular basis of Schwann cell-axonal interactions will not only increase the understanding of PNS biology but also identify therapeutic targets for inherited neuropathies.

  14. Chronic dysimmune neuropathies: Beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Deshmukh, Shrikant S.; Dhonde, Pramod D.

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of chronic dysimmune neuropathies has widened well beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Pure motor (multifocal motor neuropathy), sensorimotor with asymmetrical involvement (multifocal acquired demylinating sensory and motor neuropathy), exclusively distal sensory (distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy) and very proximal sensory (chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy) constitute the variants of CIDP. Correct diagnosis of these entities is of importance in terms of initiation of appropriate therapy as well as prognostication of these patients. The rates of detection of immune-mediated neuropathies with monoclonal cell proliferation (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, multiple myeloma, etc.) have been facilitated as better diagnostic tools such as serum immunofixation electrophoresis are being used more often. Immune neuropathies associated with malignancies and systemic vasculitic disorders are being defined further and treated early with better understanding of the disease processes. As this field of dysimmune neuropathies will evolve in the future, some of the curious aspects of the clinical presentations and response patterns to different immunosuppressants or immunomodulators will be further elucidated. This review also discusses representative case studies. PMID:21808468

  15. The electrodiagnostic distinctions between chronic familial and acquired demyelinative neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1982-06-01

    We compared the electrodiagnostic studies of 40 patients with chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and 18 patients with familial demyelinative neuropathy. Patients with acquired neuropathy had differential slowing of conduction velocity when distal latencies were compared with more proximal conduction velocities in the same nerve, when equivalent segments of different nerves were compared, and when dispersion of compound motor action potentials was examined. Conduction block was noted in some patients. Patients with familial disease had uniform conduction slowly of all nerve segments, and conduction block was not seen. Chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by multifocal slowing of nerve conduction, whereas familial demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by uniform conduction slowing.

  16. Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

  17. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies.

  18. Multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shin J

    2017-10-01

    Multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy has not been adequately reported in the literature. A 42-year-old man with numbness of the left hand for 3 years and of the right hand for 6 months had a pure multifocal sensory neuropathy involving both hands, most prominently affecting 2-point discrimination, number writing, and object recognition of the left hand. Near-nerve needle sensory and mixed nerve conduction studies were performed on the left ulnar nerve. Studies of the left ulnar nerve documented a demyelinating neuropathy characterized by temporal dispersion and marked decrease in the amplitudes of the sensory and mixed compound nerve potentials in the above-elbow-axilla segment. With intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, there was improvement in his neuropathic condition. In this study I describe a case of multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy as a counterpart of multifocal motor neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 56: 825-828, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  20. Inherited neuropathies: clinical overview and update.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christopher J; Duan, Xiaohui; Shy, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-09-15

    to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy.

  2. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  3. Orthostatic intolerance in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tramontozzi, Louis A; Russell, James A

    2012-09-01

    We report a patient with orthostatic intolerance and syncope as a major clinical manifestation of an acquired multifocal neuropathy with the clinical, electrodiagnostic, and cerebrospinal fluid features of multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy or the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Immunomodulatory therapy led to clinical remission of both somatic and autonomic signs and symptoms. We are unaware of a previous description of symptomatic dysautonomia in this disorder.

  4. Systematic reviews of treatment for inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, RAC

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the progress made in preparing Cochrane systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials for Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the demyelinating neuropathies associated with paraproteins. The discovery of antibodies against myelin andaxolemmal glycolipids and proteins has not yet replaced the clinicopathological classificationon which treatment trials have been based. Systematic reviews have endorsed the equivalence of plasma exchange (PE) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and the lack of efficacy of steroids in GBS. Systematic reviews have also endorsed the value of steroids, PE and IVIg in CIDP butrandomized controlled trials have only shown benefit from IVIg in MMN. There is a paucity of evidence concerning the efficacy of treatments in paraproteinaemic demyelinating neuropathy apartment from small trials showing short-term benefit from PE or IVIg. There is a lack of good quality controlled trials of immunosuppressive agents in any of these conditions. As the numberof treatment trials increases, Cochrane systematic reviews will be an increasingly valuable resource for summarizing the evidence from randomised controlled trials on which to base clinical practice. They already demonstrate major deficiencies in the existing evidence base. PMID:12090400

  5. Are electrophysiological criteria useful in distinguishing childhood demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Aragon-Gawinska, Karolina; Kabzinska, Dagmara; Seroka, Andrzej; Lipowska, Marta; Kaminska, Anna M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) needs to be differentiated from hereditary neuropathy. We aimed to validate existing CIDP nerve conduction study (NCS) criteria in a group of children with demyelinating neuropathies of chronic or subacute onset. Retrospective analysis of clinical and NCS results in 18 children with CIDP, 7 with hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsy (HNPP), and 24 with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1a (CMT1a). AAN and EFNS electrodiagnostic CIDP criteria were fulfilled in 17 of 18 CIDP, 3 of 7 HNPP, and 23 of 24 CMT1a patients. A distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) of >9 ms was observed in 14 of 18 CIDP patients but not in any patients with HNPP. Abnormal median/normal sural SNAP (AMNS) and a 10 m/s difference between conduction velocities (CV) of two corresponding nerves were not observed in any CMT1a patients. NCS in CMT1a, HNPP, and CIDP reflect demyelination. dCMAP duration, sensory AMNS, and a 10 m/s CV difference parameter are most useful in the differential diagnosis of pediatric CIDP.

  6. Testing for anti-glycolipid IgM antibodies in chronic immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Giannotta, Claudia

    2011-06-01

    Antibodies to several nerve antigens have been reported in patients with chronic immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and IgM paraproteinemic demyelinating polyneuropathy. The association of some reactivities with specific neuropathies, such as IgM antibodies to the myelin-associated glycoprotein in neuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy, permitted to cast some light in their pathogenetic mechanisms and introduced new useful tools in their diagnosis. Other antibodies have been variably associated with other forms of neuropathy or with neuropathy itself, casting some doubts on their diagnostic relevance in the workout of these neuropathies. This is particularly true for IgM antibodies to glycolipids, including ganglioside and sulfatides, whose possible role in immune-mediated neuropathies is still debated and will be here reviewed. © 2011 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome in inherited neuropathies: A retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Francis B; Kirk, Callyn A; Marking, Devon; Reilly, Mary M; Scherer, Steven S; Shy, Michael E; Herrmann, David N

    2017-07-10

    This study evaluates carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptom severity, functional status, and outcome of CTS therapies in patients with inherited neuropathies. Validated questionnaires were used to compare symptom severity and functional status in patients with and without a diagnosis of CTS and a diagnosis of an inherited neuropathy. 309 patients with inherited neuropathies participated in this study. The CTS symptom severity score (SSS) was found to be the most useful tool in assessing CTS severity in patients with inherited neuropathy. Splint therapy and surgery were associated with significant improvement in carpal tunnel symptoms as measured through the SSS. This study provides insight into the assessment of CTS symptom severity and patient-reported outcomes to CTS therapy in individuals with inherited neuropathies. The SSS appears useful for evaluation of CTS symptoms and patient-reported outcomes following CTS interventions in individuals with inherited neuropathies. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of pain in pediatric inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Jaiswal, Mamta; Feldman, Eva; Shy, Michael

    2014-03-04

    Assess the prevalence and impact of pain in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. In this prospective cross-sectional study on children with CMT disease seen at study sites of the Inherited Neuropathy Consortium, we collected standardized assessments of pain (Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale) from 176 patients (140 children aged 8-18 years, and 36 children aged 2-7 years through parent proxies), along with standardized clinical assessments and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes. We then developed a series of multivariate regression models to determine whether standardized measures of neuropathy severity, functional impact, or structural changes to the feet explained the observed pain scores. The mean score on the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale was 2 (range 0-5). Increased pain strongly correlated with worse QOL scores but not with more severe neuropathy. Independent determinants of increased pain in children with CMT disease included measures of ankle inflexibility. Pain is present in children with CMT disease and negatively affects QOL. Pain scores do not positively correlate with neuropathy severity but do correlate in limited univariate analyses with measures of ankle inflexibility. Further studies to elucidate the mechanisms of pain may help identify treatments that can reduce pain and improve QOL in patients with CMT disease.

  9. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  10. Role of immune cells in animal models for inherited neuropathies: facts and visions.

    PubMed

    Mäurer, Mathias; Kobsar, Igor; Berghoff, Martin; Schmid, Christoph D; Carenini, Stefano; Martini, Rudolf

    2002-04-01

    Mice heterozygously deficient in the peripheral myelin adhesion molecule P0 (P0+/- mice) are models for some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies. In addition to the characteristic hallmarks of demyelination, elevated numbers of CD8-positive T-lymphocytes and F4/80-positive macrophages are striking features in the nerves of these mice. These immune cells increase in number with age and progress of demyelination, suggesting that they might be functionally related to myelin damage. In order to investigate the pathogenetic role of lymphocytes, the myelin mutants were cross-bred with recombination activating gene 1 (RAG-1)-deficient mice, which lack mature T- and B-lymphocytes. The immunodeficient myelin mutants showed a less severe myelin degeneration. The beneficial effect of lymphocyte-deficiency was reversible, since demyelination worsened in immunodeficient myelin-mutants when reconstituted with bone marrow from wild-type mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed macrophages in close apposition to myelin and demyelinated axons. We therefore cross-bred the P0+/- mice with spontaneous osteopetrotic (op) mutants deficient in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), hence displaying impaired macrophage activation. In the corresponding double mutants the numbers of macrophages were not elevated in the peripheral nerves, and the demyelinating phenotype was less severe than in the genuine P0+/- mice, demonstrating that macrophages are also functionally involved in the pathogenesis of genetically mediated demyelination. We also examined other models for inherited neuropathies for a possible involvement of immune cells. We chose mice deficient in the gap junction component connexin 32, a model for the X-linked form of CMT. Similar to P0-deficient mice, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were elevated and macrophages showed a close apposition to degenerating myelin. We conclude that the involvement of T-lymphocytes and macrophages is a common pathogenetic

  11. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  12. Therapeutic strategies for the inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    More than 30 genetic causes have been identified for the inherited neuropathies collectively referred to as Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Previous therapies for CMT were limited to traditional approaches such as rehabilitation medicine, ambulation aids, and pain management. Identification of the genes causing CMT has led to improved genetic counseling and assistance in family planning. Identification of these genes is beginning to delineate common molecular pathways in multiple forms of CMT that can be exploited in future molecular therapies. Scientifically based clinical trials for CMT are currently being implemented. Techniques of gene therapy are advancing to the point that they may become feasible options for patients with CMT and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Wan; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Jou, Shuo-Bin

    2004-03-01

    Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM) neuropathy is characterized by an asymmetric multifocal pattern of motor and sensory loss, and conduction block and other features of demyelination in nerve conduction studies. MADSAM neuropathy needs to be differentiated from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In classic CIDP, there are symmetric proximal and distal weakness, sensory deficit in both upper and lower extremities and reduced deep tendon reflex. In MMN, limb weakness without sensory loss is asymmetric in the distribution of individual peripheral nerves and the weakness typically begins in the distal upper extremities. We report one patient with chronic progression of asymmetric numbness and weakness in four extremities. MADSAM neuropathy was diagnosed after extensive clinical and laboratory evaluations. It is very important to distinguish between CIDP, MADSAM neuropathy, and MMN by clinical, laboratory, and histological features because of different effective therapeutic strategies.

  14. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy: the Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saperstein, D S; Amato, A A; Wolfe, G I; Katz, J S; Nations, S P; Jackson, C E; Bryan, W W; Burns, D K; Barohn, R J

    1999-05-01

    We report 11 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM) neuropathy, defined clinically by a multifocal pattern of motor and sensory loss, with nerve conduction studies showing conduction block and other features of demyelination. The clinical, laboratory, and histological features of these patients were contrasted with those of 16 patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Eighty-two percent of MADSAM neuropathy patients had elevated protein concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid, compared with 9% of the MMN patients (P < 0.001). No MADSAM neuropathy patient had elevated anti-GM1 antibody titers, compared with 56% of MMN patients (P < 0.01). In contrast to the subtle abnormalities described for MMN, MADSAM neuropathy patients had prominent demyelination on sensory nerve biopsies. Response to intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was similar in both groups (P = 1.0). Multifocal motor neuropathy patients typically do not respond to prednisone, but 3 of 6 MADSAM neuropathy patients improved with prednisone. MADSAM neuropathy more closely resembles chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and probably represents an asymmetrical variant. Given their different clinical patterns and responses to treatment, it is important to distinguish between MADSAM neuropathy and MMN.

  15. Loss of function mutations in HARS cause a spectrum of inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Safka Brozkova, Dana; Deconinck, Tine; Griffin, Laurie Beth; Ferbert, Andreas; Haberlova, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Lassuthova, Petra; Roth, Christian; Pilunthanakul, Thanita; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Janecke, Andreas R; Zavadakova, Petra; Chrast, Roman; Rivolta, Carlo; Zuchner, Stephan; Antonellis, Anthony; Beg, Asim A; De Jonghe, Peter; Senderek, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by distal muscle weakness and sensory loss. Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that these tRNA charging enzymes are uniquely important for the peripheral nerve. Recently, a mutation in histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) was identified in a single patient with a late-onset, sensory-predominant peripheral neuropathy; however, the genetic evidence was lacking, making the significance of the finding unclear. Here, we present clinical, genetic, and functional data that implicate HARS mutations in inherited peripheral neuropathies. The associated phenotypic spectrum is broad and encompasses axonal and demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies, including four young patients presenting with pure motor axonal neuropathy. Genome-wide linkage studies in combination with whole-exome and conventional sequencing revealed four distinct and previously unreported heterozygous HARS mutations segregating with autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy in four unrelated families (p.Thr132Ile, p.Pro134His, p.Asp175Glu and p.Asp364Tyr). All mutations cause a loss of function in yeast complementation assays, and p.Asp364Tyr is dominantly neurotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrates the role of HARS mutations in peripheral neuropathy and expands the genetic and clinical spectrum of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-related human disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sederholm, Benson H

    2010-09-01

    Current treatment approaches for the management of chronic immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies are reviewed, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS). A summary of existing evidence for commonly used treatment modalities, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange is provided. Evidence for the use of additional immunosuppressant and immunomodulatory agents is also reviewed.

  17. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  18. Sphingomyelin as a myelin biomarker in CSF of acquired demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Capodivento, Giovanna; Visigalli, Davide; Garnero, Martina; Fancellu, Roberto; Ferrara, Michela Demetra; Basit, Abdul; Hamid, Zeeshan; Pastore, Vito Paolo; Garibaldi, Silvano; Armirotti, Andrea; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Serrati, Carlo; Capello, Elisabetta; Schenone, Angelo; Nobbio, Lucilla

    2017-08-10

    Fast, accurate and reliable methods to quantify the amount of myelin still lack, both in humans and experimental models. The overall objective of the present study was to demonstrate that sphingomyelin (SM) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients affected by demyelinating neuropathies is a myelin biomarker. We found that SM levels mirror both peripheral myelination during development and small myelin rearrangements in experimental models. As in acquired demyelinating peripheral neuropathies myelin breakdown occurs, SM amount in the CSF of these patients might detect the myelin loss. Indeed, quantification of SM in 262 neurological patients showed a significant increase in patients with peripheral demyelination (p = 3.81 * 10 - 8) compared to subjects affected by non-demyelinating disorders. Interestingly, SM alone was able to distinguish demyelinating from axonal neuropathies and differs from the principal CSF indexes, confirming the novelty of this potential CSF index. In conclusion, SM is a specific and sensitive biomarker to monitor myelin pathology in the CSF of peripheral neuropathies. Most importantly, SM assay is simple, fast, inexpensive, and promising to be used in clinical practice and drug development.

  19. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and other inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Mario A

    2014-10-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are among the most common genetic neuromuscular disorders worldwide. However, their diagnosis can be challenging due to genotypic and phenotypic variability. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common form, is associated with mutations or copy-number variations in over 70 genes, representing proteins with fundamental roles in the development and function of Schwann cells and peripheral axons. Other genetic peripheral neuropathies are associated with multisystem manifestations, including familial amyloid neuropathy and neuropathies associated with metabolic or other genetic syndromes. This article reviews the most recent discoveries in the field and how they are changing the way neurologists diagnose this specific group of peripheral neuropathies. In the past few years, several large cohort studies on the molecular diagnosis of CMT have been published, providing guidelines for genetic testing in clinical practice. In the same period, next-generation sequencing technology has accelerated the discovery of new CMT genes, expanding our knowledge on genotype-phenotype correlations. Recent advances in sequencing technology and genotype-phenotype correlation studies are changing the way neurologists diagnose inherited neuropathies. New therapeutic strategies for familial amyloid neuropathy are paving the way for innovative treatments for genetic neuropathies.

  20. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy in complex inherited diseases: an approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Alexander M; Carr, Aisling S; Devine, Helen; Chandrashekar, Hoskote; Pelayo-Negro, Ana Lara; Pareyson, Davide; Shy, Michael E; Scherer, Steven S; Reilly, Mary M

    2017-08-09

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common finding in patients with complex inherited neurological diseases and may be subclinical or a major component of the phenotype. This review aims to provide a clinical approach to the diagnosis of this complex group of patients by addressing key questions including the predominant neurological syndrome associated with the neuropathy, for example, spasticity, the type of neuropathy and the other neurological and non-neurological features of the syndrome. Priority is given to the diagnosis of treatable conditions. Using this approach, we associated neuropathy with one of three major syndromic categories: (1) ataxia, (2) spasticity and (3) global neurodevelopmental impairment. Syndromes that do not fall easily into one of these three categories can be grouped according to the predominant system involved in addition to the neuropathy, for example, cardiomyopathy and neuropathy. We also include a separate category of complex inherited relapsing neuropathy syndromes, some of which may mimic Guillain-Barré syndrome, as many will have a metabolic aetiology and be potentially treatable. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Severity of Demyelinating and Axonal Neuropathy Mouse Models Is Modified by Genes Affecting Structure and Function of Peripheral Nodes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Kathryn H; Seburn, Kevin L; Schroeder, David G; Spaulding, Emily L; Dionne, Loiuse A; Cox, Gregory A; Burgess, Robert W

    2017-03-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited polyneuropathies. Mutations in 80 genetic loci can cause forms of CMT, resulting in demyelination and axonal dysfunction. The clinical presentation, including sensory deficits, distal muscle weakness, and atrophy, can vary greatly in severity and progression. Here, we used mouse models of CMT to demonstrate genetic interactions that result in a more severe neuropathy phenotype. The cell adhesion molecule Nrcam and the Na(+) channel Scn8a (NaV1.6) are important components of nodes. Homozygous Nrcam and heterozygous Scn8a mutations synergized with both an Sh3tc2 mutation, modeling recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4C, and mutations in Gars, modeling dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D. We conclude that genetic variants perturbing the structure and function of nodes interact with mutations affecting the cable properties of axons by thinning myelin or reducing axon diameter. Therefore, genes integral to peripheral nodes are candidate modifiers of peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD.

  5. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy presenting as a peripheral nerve tumor.

    PubMed

    Allen, David C; Smallman, Clare A; Mills, Kerry R

    2006-09-01

    A man with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), or Lewis-Sumner syndrome, presented with a progressive left lumbosacral plexus lesion resembling a neurofibroma. After 7 years he developed a left ulnar nerve lesion with conduction block in its upper segment. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the symptoms and signs of both lesions. We conclude that inflammatory neuropathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve tumors, and that unifocal lesions may precede multifocal involvement in MADSAM by several years. In addition, we discuss the clinical features in 9 patients attending a specialist peripheral nerve clinic and review the literature.

  6. Demyelinating Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Kenya; Fujimaki, Motoki; Kanai, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Yuta; Nakazato, Tomoko; Tanaka, Ryota; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients who develop a paraneoplastic syndrome may present with neuromuscular disorders. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old man who suffered from progressive gait disturbance and muscle weakness. The results of a nerve conduction study fulfilled the criteria of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. An abdominal CT scan detected RCC, the pathological diagnosis of which was clear cell type. After tumor resection and a single course of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, the patient's symptoms drastically improved over the course of one year. The patient's neurological symptoms preceded the detection of cancer. A proper diagnosis and the initiation of suitable therapies resulted in a favorable outcome. PMID:28049985

  7. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  8. Chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibody without any detectable M-protein.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Tobisawa, Shinsuke; Isozaki, Eiji

    2017-10-04

    Previous case reports and studies have shown that anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibody can be detected in patients with polyneuropathy without any detectable M-protein. Nevertheless, the frequency of and related factors have not yet been adequately investigated. The objectives of this study are to examine the prevalence of anti-MAG antibody in patients with demyelinating neuropathy without M-protein and to determine their clinical characteristics. From January, 2004, to September, 2016, consecutive patients with chronic demyelinating neuropathy were recruited. Anti-MAG antibody presence was tested at the first evaluation. We determined the prevalence of anti-MAG antibody without M-protein among included patients and evaluated the clinical characteristics. A total of 44 patients were included in the present study (12 women; median age at first visit 60 years [interquartile range 47-67 years]; median duration between onset and first visit 9 months [3-26 months]). M-protein was found in eight patients (18%) at the first evaluation. Anti-MAG antibody was present in 2 of remaining 36 (5.6 [95% confidence interval 0-13.0] %) patients without M-protein. Patients with anti-MAG antibody exhibited slowly progressive and distal dominant neuropathy with elevated serum IgM levels and refractory to immunotherapy. There were no differences in clinical features between patients having anti-MAG antibody without M-protein, and those with M-protein. One patient with the anti-MAG antibody showed a delayed appearance of M-protein during a 4-year follow-up after diagnosis. The prevalence of the anti-MAG antibody in chronic demyelinating neuropathy without any detectable M-protein was 5.6%. Anti-MAG antibody may be detectable earlier than M-protein.

  9. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  10. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  11. An uncommon cause of bifacial weakness and non-length-dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, Mailankody; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare metabolic disorder that causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle-aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially diagnosed as leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26713019

  12. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  13. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J-T H; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-10-01

    To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Fifty-one incident, treatment-naive patients with CIDP (n = 23) or MMN (n = 28) underwent imaging of the brachial plexus using (i) a standardized MRI protocol to assess enlargement or T2 hyperintensity and (ii) bilateral HRUS to determine the extent of nerve (root) enlargement. We found enlargement of the brachial plexus in 19/51 (37%) and T2 hyperintensity in 29/51 (57%) patients with MRI and enlargement in 37/51 (73%) patients with HRUS. Abnormal results were only found in 6/51 (12%) patients with MRI and 12/51 (24%) patients with HRUS. A combination of the two imaging techniques identified 42/51 (83%) patients. We found no association between age, disease duration or Medical Research Council sum-score and sonographic nerve size, MRI enlargement or presence of T2 hyperintensity. Brachial plexus sonography could complement MRI in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected CIDP and MMN. Our results indicate that combined imaging studies may add value to the current diagnostic consensus criteria for chronic inflammatory neuropathies. © 2017 EAN.

  14. Heterozygous peripheral myelin protein 22-deficient mice are affected by a progressive demyelinating tomaculous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Adlkofer, K; Frei, R; Neuberg, D H; Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V; Suter, U

    1997-06-15

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is associated with a heterozygous 1.5 megabase deletion on chromosome 17 that includes the peripheral myelin protein (PMP) gene PMP22. We show that heterozygous PMP22 knock-out mice, which carry only one functional pmp22 allele and thus genetically mimic HNPP closely, display similar morphological and electrophysiological features as observed in HNPP nerves. As reported previously, focal hypermyelinating structures called tomacula, the pathological hallmarks of HNPP, develop progressively in young PMP22(+/0) mice. By following the fate of tomacula during aging, we demonstrate now that these mutant animals are also interesting models for examining HNPP disease mechanisms. Subtle electrophysiological abnormalities are detected in PMP22(+/0) mice >1 year old, and a significant number of abnormally swollen and degenerating tomacula are present. Thinly myelinated axons and supernumerary Schwann cells forming onion bulbs as fingerprints of repeated cycles of demyelination and remyelination are also encountered frequently. Quantitative analyses using electron microscopy on cross sections and light microscopy on single teased nerve fibers suggest that tomacula are intrinsically unstable structures that are prone to degeneration; however, the severity of morphological and electrophysiological abnormalities in PMP22(+/0) mice is variable. These combined findings are reminiscent of the disease progression in HNPP and offer a possible explanation about why some HNPP patients develop a chronic motor and sensory neuropathy later in life that resembles demyelinating forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease by both morphological and clinical criteria.

  15. Autophagy as an Emerging Common Pathomechanism in Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Mansour; Timmerman, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) comprise a growing list of genetically heterogeneous diseases. With mutations in more than 80 genes being reported to cause IPNs, a wide spectrum of functional consequences is expected to follow this genotypic diversity. Hence, the search for a common pathomechanism among the different phenotypes has become the holy grail of functional research into IPNs. During the last decade, studies on several affected genes have shown a direct and/or indirect correlation with autophagy. Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process, is required for the removal of cell aggregates, long-lived proteins and dead organelles from the cell in double-membraned vesicles destined for the lysosomes. As an evolutionarily highly conserved process, autophagy is essential for the survival and proper functioning of the cell. Recently, neuronal cells have been shown to be particularly vulnerable to disruption of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, autophagy has been shown to be affected in various common neurodegenerative diseases of both the central and the peripheral nervous system including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the genes involved in hereditary neuropathies which are linked to autophagy and we propose the disruption of the autophagic flux as an emerging common pathomechanism. We also shed light on the different steps of the autophagy pathway linked to these genes. Finally, we review the concept of autophagy being a therapeutic target in IPNs, and the possibilities and challenges of this pathway-specific targeting. PMID:28553203

  16. Autophagy as an Emerging Common Pathomechanism in Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Mansour; Timmerman, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) comprise a growing list of genetically heterogeneous diseases. With mutations in more than 80 genes being reported to cause IPNs, a wide spectrum of functional consequences is expected to follow this genotypic diversity. Hence, the search for a common pathomechanism among the different phenotypes has become the holy grail of functional research into IPNs. During the last decade, studies on several affected genes have shown a direct and/or indirect correlation with autophagy. Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process, is required for the removal of cell aggregates, long-lived proteins and dead organelles from the cell in double-membraned vesicles destined for the lysosomes. As an evolutionarily highly conserved process, autophagy is essential for the survival and proper functioning of the cell. Recently, neuronal cells have been shown to be particularly vulnerable to disruption of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, autophagy has been shown to be affected in various common neurodegenerative diseases of both the central and the peripheral nervous system including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the genes involved in hereditary neuropathies which are linked to autophagy and we propose the disruption of the autophagic flux as an emerging common pathomechanism. We also shed light on the different steps of the autophagy pathway linked to these genes. Finally, we review the concept of autophagy being a therapeutic target in IPNs, and the possibilities and challenges of this pathway-specific targeting.

  17. [Genetic diagnosis and molecular pathology of inherited neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic analysis technology have enabled a surprising progress in genetic diagnosis in the field of neurological disease research. High-throughput molecular biology techniques, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing, are the major contributors to this progress and to new discoveries. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a known hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic studies have revealed at least 35 disease causing-genes responsible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Genetic studies have revealed that abnormalities in the following factors are the cause of inherited neuropathies: myelin components, transcription factors controlling myelination, myelin maintenance system, differentiation factors related to the peripheral nerve, neurofilaments, protein transfer system, mitochondrial proteins, DNA repair, RNA/protein synthesis, ion channels, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. On the other hand concomitant with the increase in the number of genes that must be screened for mutations, the labor and reagent costs for molecular genetic testing have increased significantly. Therefore, new methodology for detecting gene mutations is required. Based on the recent progress in DNA analysis methods, resequencing microarray appears to be an economical and highly sensitive method for detecting mutations. We have been screening CMT patients for mutations using originally designed microarray DNA chips since 2007, thencehaving identified disease causing mutations in MPZ, GJB1, PMP22, EGR2, MFN2, NEFL, PRX, AARS, GARS, DNM2, and SETX genes in CMT patients.

  18. Office immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Peter J; Taylor, Bruce V; Davies, Jenny L; Mauermann, Michelle L; Litchy, William J; Klein, Christopher J; Dyck, P James B

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-based immunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons).

  19. Office Immunotherapy in Chronic Inflammatoryh Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, Peter J.; Taylor, Bruce V.; Davies, Jenny L.; Mauermann, Michelle L.; Litchy, William J.; Klein, Christopher J.; Dyck, P. James B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. Objective and Methods Results and Conclusions NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-basedimmunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons). PMID:25976871

  20. Steroid-responsive demyelinating peripheral neuropathy associated with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hironori; Maeda, Toshihiko; Omoto, Masatoshi; Ogasawara, Jun-Ichi; Koga, Michiaki; Kawai, Motoharu; Kanda, Takashi

    2017-09-28

    We herein report the findings of a 67-year-old woman with steroid-responsive multiple mononeuropathy associated with chronic natural killer (NK) cell lymphocytosis. The patient developed progressive, asymmetric weakness and numbness in all four extremities in the course of a three-month period. Nerve conduction studies revealed asymmetric demyelination in both the motor and sensory nerves, and a biopsy specimen of the sural nerve showed a conspicuous difference in the demyelination between the neighboring fascicles and the infiltration of NK cells in the endoneurium. We considered the multiple mononeuropathy in this patient to have been caused by NK cell infiltration in the endoneurium, and the observed asymmetry might have been due to differences in the NK cell intrusion among the fascicles. Corticosteroid administration resulted in a rapid neurological, electrophysiological and hematological improvement. The rapid clinical amelioration that was observed after corticosteroid therapy suggested that the neuropathy in this case had been mainly caused by the mechanical compression of the endoneurial NK cells or the inflammatory cytokines that had been released by them.

  1. [On the mechanisms and diagnosis of conduction disturbances due to demyelination with special reference to multifocal demyelinating neuropathy (Lewis-Sumner)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R; Kimura, J

    1991-12-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block can mimic motor neuron disease, but is potentially reversible. Its diagnosis rests upon electrophysiological demonstration of focal conduction block at multiple sites. Conduction block is the most important mechanism causing clinical symptoms in peripheral nerve demyelination. On the other hand, conduction slowing is not always associated with clinical symptoms. In 2 out of 9 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy, MRI showed focal swelling of the nerve at the site of conduction block. Both of them had elevated titers of anti-GM1 antibodies. In one, we biopsied a portion of the medial pectoral nerve, which was adjacent to the focal swelling, at surgical exploration. Pathological findings included very thin myelin associated with large diameter fibers and small onion bulb formation, suggesting that remyelinative process is abortive in this disease leading to persistent conduction block. Anti-GM1 antibodies bound to the denuded axoplasmic membrane may interfere with the process by masking the cell surface markers. The reason why the sensory fibers are spared is unclear, but it may be possible that GM1 in sensory axons have less affinity to the antibody than that in motor fibers.

  2. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations.

  3. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  4. Ultrasound pattern sum score, homogeneity score and regional nerve enlargement index for differentiation of demyelinating inflammatory and hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Vittore, Debora; Schubert, Victoria; Lipski, Christina; Heiling, Bianka; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the use of nerve ultrasound in the differentiation between Charcot-Marie Tooth hereditary neuropathy (CMT1) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathies (MADSAM). Ultrasound/electrophysiology of predefined nerves was performed in CMT1a/b, immunoneuropathies, and healthy controls. Ultrasound pattern sum score (UPSS, sum of the amount of 12 predefined measurement points), homogeneity score (HS) and regional nerve enlargement index (RNEI) in ulnar, median, and tibial nerve were used for evaluation of morphology. 13 CMT1, 27 CIDP, 10 MADSAM, 12 MMN, and 23 controls were included. Significant enlargement was shown in all neuropathies compared to the controls, (p<0.001), however the amount of enlargement as evaluated by the UPSS was most prominent in CMT compared to the others (median UPSS 18 vs. 11/8.5/5 in CIDP/MADSAM/MMN, p<0.001). Homogeneous enlargement was significantly more often seen in CMT (67%, HS 6 vs. 2-3 in immune-mediated PNP, p<0.001), while in CIDP the enlargement was regional, homogeneous or inhomogeneous with equal contribution. In MMN and MADSAM regional enlargement (48%/40%) next to normal segments (∼20%) predominated (RNEI in MMN=2, in MADSAM=1 vs. 0 in the others). CSAs were inversely correlated with motor conduction velocity. Ultrasound, quantified by UPSS, HS, and RNEI facilitates a reliable and reproducible differentiation of immunoneuropathies and hereditary neuropathies by the use of boundary values. By the use of quantitative scores, ultrasound differentiation of demyelinating neuropathies is operationalized and ameliorated compared to CSA measurements only. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optic Nerve Inflammation and Demyelination in a Rodent Model of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Bernard J.; Vilson, Fernandino L.; Guo, Yan; Weinreich, Daniel; Hwang, Shelly; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Optic nerve (ON) ischemia associated with nonarteric anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) results in axon and myelin damage. Myelin damage activates the intraneural Ras homolog A (RhoA), contributing to axonal regeneration failure. We hypothesized that increasing extrinsic macrophage activity after ON infarct would scavenge degenerate myelin and improve postischemic ON recovery. We used the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to upregulate ON macrophage activity, and evaluated GM-CSF's effects after ON ischemia in the NAION rodent model (rAION). Methods. Following rAION induction, GM-CSF was administered via intraventricular injection. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) stereologic analysis was performed 1 month postinduction. The retinae and optic nerve laminae of vehicle- and GM-CSF-treated animals were examined immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). RhoA activity was analyzed using a rhotekin affinity immunoanalysis and densitometry. Isolated ONs were analyzed functionally ex vivo by compound action potential (CAP) analysis. Results. Rodent NAION produces ON postinfarct demyelination and myelin damage, functionally demonstrable by CAP analysis and ultrastructurally by TEM. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increased intraneural inflammation, activating and recruiting endogenous microglia, with only a moderate amount of exogenous macrophage recruitment. Treatment with GM-CSF reduced postinfarct intraneural RhoA activity, but did not neuroprotect RGCs after rAION. Conclusions. Sudden ON ischemia results in previously unrecognized axonal demyelination, which may have a clinically important role in NAION-related functional defects and recovery. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is not neuroprotective when administered directly to the optic nerve following ON ischemia, and does not improve axonal regeneration. It dramatically increases ON

  6. Segmental somatosensory-evoked potentials as a diagnostic tool in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies, and other sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Koutlidis, R M; Ayrignac, X; Pradat, P-F; Le Forestier, N; Léger, J-M; Salachas, F; Maisonobe, T; Fournier, E; Viala, K

    2014-09-01

    Somatosensory-evoked potentials with segmental recordings were performed with the aim of distinguishing chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from other sensory neuropathies. Four groups of 20 subjects each corresponded to patients with (1) possible sensory chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, (2) patients with sensory polyneuropathy of unknown origin, (3) patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and (4) normal subjects. The patients selected for this study had preserved sensory potentials on electroneuromyogram and all waves were recordable in evoked potentials. Somatosensory-evoked potentials evaluations were carried out by stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle, recording peripheral nerve potential in the popliteal fossa, radicular potential and spinal potential at the L4-L5 and T12 levels, and cortical at C'z, with determination of distal conduction time, proximal and radicular conduction time and central conduction time. In the group of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, 80% of patients had abnormal conduction in the N8-N22 segment and 95% had abnormal N18-N22 conduction time. In the group of neuropathies, distal conduction was abnormal in most cases, whereas 60% of patients had no proximal abnormality. None of the patients in the group of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis had an abnormal N18-N22 conduction time. Somatosensory-evoked potentials with segmental recording can be used to distinguish between atypical sensory chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and other sensory neuropathies, at the early stage of the disease. Graphical representation of segmental conduction times provides a rapid and accurate visualization of the profile of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Immune deficiency in mouse models for inherited peripheral neuropathies leads to improved myelin maintenance.

    PubMed

    Schmid, C D; Stienekemeier, M; Oehen, S; Bootz, F; Zielasek, J; Gold, R; Toyka, K V; Schachner, M; Martini, R

    2000-01-15

    The adhesive cell surface molecule P(0) is the most abundant glycoprotein in peripheral nerve myelin and fulfills pivotal functions during myelin formation and maintenance. Mutations in the corresponding gene cause hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In mice heterozygously deficient in P(0) (P(0)(+/-) mice), an established animal model for a subtype of hereditary neuropathies, T-lymphocytes are present in the demyelinating nerves. To monitor the possible involvement of the immune system in myelin pathology, we cross-bred P(0)(+/-) mice with null mutants for the recombination activating gene 1 (RAG-1) or with mice deficient in the T-cell receptor alpha-subunit. We found that in P(0)(+/-) mice myelin degeneration and impairment of nerve conduction properties is less severe when the immune system is deficient. Moreover, isolated T-lymphocytes from P(0)(+/-) mice show enhanced reactivity to myelin components of the peripheral nerve, such as P(0), P(2), and myelin basic protein. We hypothesize that autoreactive immune cells can significantly foster the demyelinating phenotype of mice with a primarily genetically based peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  9. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  10. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristján R

    2014-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun(-/-) mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of the disease, on the

  11. Pupil abnormalities in 131 cases of genetically defined inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Houlden, H; Reilly, M M; Smith, S

    2009-04-01

    To investigate and correlate the frequency and types of pupil abnormalities that are associated with hereditary peripheral neuropathy in a large cohort of patients prospectively examined. A prospective study between 1998 and 2007. Patients were enrolled and examined after being seen in the neurology clinic. Data were collected on demographics, family and medical history. Patients had eye and pupillography testing carried out as well as being neurologically and genetically investigated. A consecutive series of 131 cases of inherited peripheral neuropathy were seen and categorized into five groups: familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT), hereditary neuropathywith liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Refsum's disease, and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. A number of unreported mutations were identified in these patient groups. Pupil abnormalities were common in the Refsum's group, with frequent abnormally small pupils. The inherited neuropathies commonly associated with autonomic abnormalities were frequently found to have developed bilateral Horner's syndrome, which was particularly prevalent in our FAP series. Abnormalities were rare in HNPP and CMT type 1, but CMT type 2 showed frequent and varied pupil defects. The results describe the pupil abnormalities that were frequently associated with the particular group of inherited neuropathy patients, but we could not predict the genetic defect or the neuropathy severity. This is the first study of the pupil abnormalities found in the inherited neuropathies and provides an overview of the frequency and type of defects seen in a large number of cases. This series along with the detailed tables will act as an important diagnostic aid in assessing these patients.

  12. Founder mutations in NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Roma/Gypsies in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Mistrik, Martin; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Bozikova, Alexandra; Behulova, Regina; Tothova, Iveta; Macekova, Sona

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) account for less than 10 % of all CMT cases, but are more frequent in the populations with a high rate of consanguinity. Roma (Gypsies) are a transnational minority with an estimated population of 10 to 14 million, in which a high degree of consanguineous marriages is a generally known fact. Similar to the other genetically isolated founder populations, the Roma harbour a number of unique or rare autosomal recessive disorders, caused by "private" founder mutations. There are three subtypes of autosomal recessive CMT with mutations private to the Roma population: CMT4C, CMT4D and CMT4G. We report on the molecular examination of four families of Roma origin in Slovakia with early-onset demyelinating neuropathy and autosomal recessive inheritance. We detected mutation p.R148X (g.631C>T) in the NDRG1 (NM_006096.3) gene in two families and mutation g.9712G>C in the HK1 (NM_033498) gene in the other two families. These mutations cause CMT4D and CMT4G, respectively. The success of molecular genetic analysis in all families confirms that autosomal recessive forms of CMT caused by mutations on the NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Slovak Roma. Providing genetic analysis of these genes for patients with Roma origin as a common part of diagnostic procedure would contribute to a better rate of diagnosed cases of demyelinating neuropathy in Slovakia and in other countries with a Roma minority.

  13. Defective axonal transport: A common pathological mechanism in inherited and acquired peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Prior, Robert; Van Helleputte, Lawrence; Benoy, Veronick; Van Den Bosch, Ludo

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are characterized by a progressive and length-dependent loss of peripheral nerve function. This can be caused either by genetic defects, classified as 'inherited peripheral neuropathies', or they can be acquired throughout life. In that case, the disease is caused by various insults such as toxins and mechanical injuries, or it can arise secondary to medical conditions such as metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies, inflammation and infections. Peripheral neuropathies are not only very heterogeneous in etiology, but also in their pathology and clinical presentation. A commonality amongst all peripheral neuropathies is that no pharmacological disease-modifying therapies currently exist that can reverse or cure these diseases. Moreover, the length-dependent nature of the disease, affecting the longest nerves at the most distal sites, suggests an important role for disturbances in axonal transport, directly or indirectly linked to alterations in the cytoskeleton. In this review, we will give a systematic overview of the main arguments for the involvement of axonal transport defects in both inherited and acquired peripheral neuropathies. In addition, we will discuss the possible therapeutic strategies that can potentially counteract these disturbances, as this particular pathway might be a promising strategy to find a cure. Since counteracting axonal transport defects could limit the axonal degeneration and could be a driving force for neuronal regeneration, the benefits might be twofold. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. DEFINING DISABILITY: DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A DISABILITY SEVERITY INDEX IN INHERITED NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Michael E.; Feldman, Eva L.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Siskind, Carly

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a reliable patient-reported scale that grades the severity of disability in inherited neuropathy, from an in-depth analysis of patient and healthcare provider perspectives on what constitutes mild, moderate and severe disability. Design In this prospective, cross-sectional study, a 19-item Disability questionnaire was developed following literature and expert review. Between 2011–2012, the Disability Questionnaire was provided to Health Care Providers experienced in inherited neuropathy attending national scientific meetings, and to patients self-registered with the Inherited Neuropathy Consortium – Rare Diseases Clinical Research Consortium on-line contact registry. Provider and patient responses were compared utilizing a 2-sided unpaired t-test with Bonferroni correction. The questionnaire was then assessed for validity, reliability, and unidimensionality. Results We analyzed 259 Disability Questionnaires (167 patients, 92 providers); these showed perfect agreement between patient and provider responses on qualitative descriptions of disability, but significant differences in quantitative responses on items corresponding to minimal or severe disability (p < 0.001). Validity and Test-retest reliability of the Questionnaire was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha =0.96; ICC= 0.977 [0.951–0.993]. Exploratory factor analysis and the Mokken Scaling Procedure supported the unidimensionality of the Disability Severity Index. Conclusion The Disability Severity Index is a unique instrument, categorizing disability from the patient’s perspective, and will undergo further cross-validation studies in inherited neuropathy. This Index may have applications to other peripheral neuropathies, and would thus benefit from future validation studies in the appropriate cohorts. PMID:25157034

  15. Evaluation of a patient with suspected chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jani-Acsadi, Agnes; Lewis, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Demyelinating neuropathies are typically characterized by physiological slowing of conduction velocity and pathologically by segmental loss of myelin and in some instances, evidence of remyelination. Clinically, patients with demyelinating neuropathy can be seen with inherited disorders (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) or acquired disorders, typically immune-mediated or inflammatory. The acquired disorders can be either acute or subacute as seen in the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) form of Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic progressive or relapsing disorders such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. It is important to develop a logical approach to diagnosing these disorders. This requires an understanding of the clinical, genetic, physiological, and pathological features of these neuropathies. Clinically, important features to consider are the temporal progression, degree of symmetry, and involvement of proximal as well as distal muscles. Genetically, recognizing the different inheritance patterns and age of onset allow for a coordinated approach to determining a specific genotype. Physiologically, besides nerve conduction slowing, other physiological hallmarks of demyelination include temporal dispersion of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) on proximal stimulation, conduction block, and distal CMAP duration prolongation with certain patterns of involvement pointing to specific disorders. This chapter focuses on these various aspects of the evaluation of patients with chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies to develop a comprehensive and thoughtful diagnostic concept.

  16. Differentiating Familial Neuropathies from Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Brett J; Monrad, Priya

    2017-02-01

    Differentiating Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) from inherited neuropathies and other acquired peripheral neuropathies requires understanding the atypical presentations of GBS and its variant forms, as well as historical and physical features suggestive of inherited neuropathies. GBS is typically characterized by the acute onset of ascending flaccid paralysis, areflexia, and dysesthesia secondary to peripheral nerve fiber demyelination. The disorder usually arises following a benign gastrointestinal or respiratory illness, is monophasic, reaches a nadir with several weeks, and responds to immunomodulatory therapy. Inherited neuropathies with onset before adulthood, whose presentation may mimic Guillain-Barré syndrome, are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Review of Mitochondrial Optic Neuropathies: From Inherited to Acquired Forms.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Yasmine L; Bass, Sherry J; Sherman, Jerome

    In recent years, the term mitochondrial optic neuropathy (MON) has increasingly been used within the literature to describe a group of optic neuropathies that exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Interestingly, MONs include genetic aetiologies, such as Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA), as well as acquired aetiologies resulting from drugs, nutritional deficiencies, and mixed aetiologies. Regardless of an inherited or acquired cause, patients exhibit the same clinical manifestations with selective loss of the RGCs due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Various novel therapies are being explored to reverse or limit damage to the RGCs. Here we review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, current treatment, and promising therapeutic targets of MON. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. Not all neuropathy in diabetes is of diabetic etiology: differential diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2009-12-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the most common peripheral neuropathy in the developed world; however, not all patients with diabetes and peripheral nerve disease have a peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. Several (although not all) studies have drawn attention to the presence of other potential causes of a neuropathy in individuals with diabetes; 10% to 50% of individuals with diabetes may have an additional potential cause of a peripheral neuropathy and some may have more than one cause. Neurotoxic medications, alcohol abuse, vitamin B(12) deficiency, renal disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, inherited neuropathy, and vasculitis are the most common additional potential causes of a peripheral neuropathy in these series. The most common disorders in the differential diagnosis of a generalized diabetic peripheral neuropathy are discussed in this article. Prospective studies to investigate the prevalence of other disorders that might be responsible for a peripheral neuropathy in individuals with diabetes are warranted.

  19. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present.

  20. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  1. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  2. [A case of X-linked recessive bulbospinal muscular atrophy with demyelinating neuropathy and hypertrophy of the calves].

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Matsuoka, M; Masaki, K; Torii, J; Kowa, H

    1993-05-01

    We report a 53-year-old man of X-BSMA with neuropathy. The patient developed slowly progressive muscular weakness and wasting over a 2-year period with an accompanying numbness in the finger tip. He can run normally but not so fast. When he was aged 52-year old, difficulty in running progressed. General physical examination revealed nothing particular except for hypertension and gynecomastia. He showed muscular weakness and atrophy in the tongue, shoulder girdle, and upper and lower limbs. Calf muscle hypertrophies were prominent on both sides. The tendon reflexes were absent. Slight sensory impairment for vibration and pin-prick was present distally in all limbs. Autonomic nerve dysfunction was not observed. Hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1c and elevated serum CK (1,242 IU/l) were seen. The computed tomographic analyses on skeletal muscle showed hypertrophic changes in the calf muscles with a few fatty infiltrations. Electromyography showed a systemic neurogenic pattern. Motor nerve conduction velocities were slightly delayed in the lower limits. Sensory nerve action potentials were not elicited in all nerves tested. Sural nerve biopsy disclosed marked reduction of myelinated fibres for that of large diameter with thin myelin. Teased fibre studies showed a definite increase in the incidence of fibres with segmental demyelination and remyelination. In electron microscopic examination, typical or atypical onion bulb formation was observed on individual fibres. Axonal changes were minimum. We believe that segmental demyelination observed in this patient is not secondary to axonal damage. We, also, investigated AR gene abnormality by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in this patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Antibody responses to peptides of peripheral nerve myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, H R; Csurhes, P A; McCombe, P A

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibodies with reactivity to peripheral nerve myelin have previously been found in the serum, and bound to peripheral nerves of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Aim To investigate the presence of antibodies reactive to specific peptide sequences within the myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with GBS, in patients with CIDP, in healthy controls and in patients with other neuropathies (ON). Methods Blood was obtained from 48 patients with GBS, 36 with CIDP, 48 with ON and 38 controls. ELISA was used to detect antibody responses to peptides of the human peripheral myelin proteins P0 and P2. Blood samples were collected from patients with GBS in early, peak and recovery stages of GBS to analyse antibody levels throughout the course of the disease. Results Significantly increased total IgG levels were found in patients with GBS compared with other groups. A higher percentage of patients with GBS at the peak of disease had antibody reactivity to P214–25 compared with patients with CIDP and control groups. In patients with GBS and CIDP, the percentages of patients with antibody reactivity to P261–70, and peptides derived from P0, were comparable to the control groups. Although some individual patients with GBS had high titres of reactivity to the peptide antigens tested, most patients with GBS and CIDP had levels of antibody similar to controls. Conclusion Our data suggest that increased IgG levels and increased antibody reactivity to P2 14–25 in patients with GBS at the peak of disease may play a contributory role in the disease process in some patients with demyelinating forms of GBS. PMID:17158557

  4. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive

  5. Are ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins targets for autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Chan, Yee-Cheun; Hirata, Koichi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Ezrin, radixin and moesin, which are strongly expressed in the Schwann cell microvilli, are putative targets for autoantibodies in acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP or CIDP). An association between anti-moesin IgG antibodies and cytomegalovirus-related AIDP has been postulated. None of 41 AIDP patients, including 8 cytomegalovirus-related AIDP patients, and 23 CIDP had IgG or IgM antibodies to ezrin, radixin and moesin; whereas, one patient with cytomegalovirus-related AIDP had anti-ezrin IgM antibodies. Ezrin, radixin and moesin are unlikely targets for autoantibodies in AIDP and CIDP, and the association of anti-moesin antibodies with cytomegalovirus-related AIDP was not confirmed.

  6. Tetraspan myelin protein PMP22 and demyelinating peripheral neuropathies: new facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Müller, H W

    2000-01-15

    It has been demonstrated that abnormal levels of PMP22 expression due to altered gene dosage in CMT1A neuropathy alters Schwann cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, disease-related missense mutations within transmembrane domains of PMP22 disturb intracellular protein trafficking leading to accumulation of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi compartment. Further, the recently reported association of PMP22 and P0 in peripheral myelin sheds new light on the almost identical phenotypes of CMT1A and CMT1B giving rise to a unifying hypothesis on disease mechanism. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Chronic Demyelinating Polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeffrey A

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the chronic demyelinating neuropathies, with a focus on the diagnosis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies and the features that can help differentiate immune-mediated neuropathies from other chronic demyelinating peripheral nerve conditions. Advances in clinical phenotyping and outcomes assessment have enabled neurologists to improve disease recognition, treatment, and disease monitoring. Our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of demyelinating neuropathies is evolving. Identification of new antibodies and recognition that node of Ranvier dysfunction may be an early pathogenic feature may herald further diagnostic and treatment advancements. The chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies are heterogeneous. The clinical and diagnostic features are sometimes overlapping, and the specific disorders are variable in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis. This heterogeneity underscores the importance of achieving diagnostic accuracy and implementing disease-specific treatment approaches.

  8. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C; Rakocevic, Goran; Salajegheh, Mohammad; Dambrosia, James M; Hahn, Angelika F; Raju, Raghavan; McElroy, Beverly

    2009-03-01

    Report a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of rituximab in patients with anti-MAG demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-MAG-DP). Twenty-six patients were randomized to four weekly infusions of 375 mg/m(2) rituximab or placebo. Sample size was calculated to detect changes of > or = 1 Inflammatory Neuropathy Course and Treatment (INCAT) leg disability scores at month 8. IgM levels, anti-MAG titers, B cells, antigen-presenting cells, and immunoregulatory T cells were monitored every 2 months. Thirteen A-MAG-DP patients were randomized to rituximab and 13 to placebo. Randomization was balanced for age, electrophysiology, disease duration, disability scores, and baseline B cells. After 8 months, by intention to treat, 4 of 13 rituximab-treated patients improved by > or = 1 INCAT score compared with 0 of 13 patients taking placebo (p = 0.096). Excluding one rituximab-randomized patient who had normal INCAT score at entry, and thus could not improve, the results were significant (p = 0.036). The time to 10m walk was significantly reduced in the rituximab group (p = 0.042) (intention to treat). Clinically, walking improved in 7 of 13 rituximab-treated patients. At month 8, IgM was reduced by 34% and anti-MAG titers by 50%. CD25+CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory cells significantly increased by month 8. The most improved patients were those with high anti-MAG titers and most severe sensory deficits at baseline. Rituximab is the first drug that improves some patients with A-MAG-DP in a controlled study. The benefit may be exerted by reducing the putative pathogenic antibodies or by inducing immunoregulatory T cells. The results warrant confirmation with a larger trial.

  9. Congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy (CCFDN) in 10 Czech Gypsy children--frequent and underestimated cause of disability among Czech Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Lassuthova, Petra; Sišková, Dana; Haberlová, Jana; Sakmaryová, Iva; Filouš, Aleš; Seeman, Pavel

    2014-04-01

    Congenital Cataract Facial Dysmorphism and demyelinating Neuropathy (CCFDN, OMIM 604468) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder which was first described in Bulgarian Gypsies in 1999. It is caused by the homozygous founder mutation c.863 + 389C > T in the CTDP1 gene. The syndrome has been described exclusively in patients of Gypsy ancestry. The prevalence of this disorder in the Gypsy population in the Czech Republic and Central Europe is not known and is probably underestimated and under-diagnosed. We clinically diagnosed and assessed 10 CCFDN children living in the Czech Republic. All patients are children of different ages, all of Gypsy origin born in the Czech Republic. Molecular genetic testing for the founder CTDP1 gene mutation was performed. All patients are homozygous for the c.863 + 389C > T mutation in the CTDP1 gene. All patients presented a bilateral congenital cataract and microphthalmos and had early cataract surgery. Correct diagnosis was not made until the age of two. All patients had variably delayed motor milestones. Gait is characteristically paleocerebellar in all the patients. Mental retardation was variable and usually mild. Clinical diagnosis of CCFDN should be easy for an informed pediatrician or neurologist by the obligate signalling trias of congenital bilateral cataract, developmental delay and later demyelinating neuropathy. Our data indicate a probably high prevalence of CCFDN in the Czech Gypsy ethnic subpopulation.

  10. Congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy (CCFDN) in 10 Czech gypsy children – frequent and underestimated cause of disability among Czech gypsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital Cataract Facial Dysmorphism and demyelinating Neuropathy (CCFDN, OMIM 604468) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder which was first described in Bulgarian Gypsies in 1999. It is caused by the homozygous founder mutation c.863 + 389C > T in the CTDP1 gene. The syndrome has been described exclusively in patients of Gypsy ancestry. The prevalence of this disorder in the Gypsy population in the Czech Republic and Central Europe is not known and is probably underestimated and under-diagnosed. Methods We clinically diagnosed and assessed 10 CCFDN children living in the Czech Republic. All patients are children of different ages, all of Gypsy origin born in the Czech Republic. Molecular genetic testing for the founder CTDP1 gene mutation was performed. Results All patients are homozygous for the c.863 + 389C > T mutation in the CTDP1 gene. All patients presented a bilateral congenital cataract and microphthalmos and had early cataract surgery. Correct diagnosis was not made until the age of two. All patients had variably delayed motor milestones. Gait is characteristically paleocerebellar in all the patients. Mental retardation was variable and usually mild. Conclusions Clinical diagnosis of CCFDN should be easy for an informed pediatrician or neurologist by the obligate signalling trias of congenital bilateral cataract, developmental delay and later demyelinating neuropathy. Our data indicate a probably high prevalence of CCFDN in the Czech Gypsy ethnic subpopulation. PMID:24690360

  11. Paraneoplastic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Srikanth; Vernino, Steven

    2014-10-01

    This article provides an approach to the recognition and management of paraneoplastic neuropathies. Paraneoplastic neuropathies may have unique phenotypic presentations, such as sensory neuronopathy, autonomic enteric neuropathy, demyelinating neuropathy, and, rarely, motor neuropathy. Paraneoplastic sensorimotor neuropathy, on the other hand, may be indistinguishable from other common types of axonal polyneuropathy. Certain patterns of neuropathies are commonly seen with different types of cancers, but this relationship is not exclusive and not all patients whose pattern of neuropathy suggests a paraneoplastic disorder have an underlying cancer. In addition to definitive therapy for malignancy, immunomodulatory therapy, such as corticosteroids, IV immunoglobulin (IVIg), or immunosuppressants, may benefit some patients, but there are very few published treatment data for paraneoplastic neuropathies. Prompt recognition of paraneoplastic neuropathies may lead to identification and treatment of an occult cancer. Treatment can potentially arrest the progression of neuropathy.

  12. Determinants of reduced health-related quality of life in pediatric inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Burns, J; Ramchandren, S; Ryan, M M; Shy, M; Ouvrier, R A

    2010-08-24

    We have shown that health-related quality of life (QOL) in children with inherited neuropathies (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT]) is significantly reduced compared to population norms, thus establishing its utility as an outcome measure in therapeutic trials. However, the Australian ascorbic acid trial in children with CMT type 1A (CMT1A) identified no change in QOL scores despite a trend toward improvement in nerve conduction velocities in the treated group. The objective of this study was to identify clinical, electrophysiologic, and functional correlates of QOL in children with CMT1A, to guide future investigations of strategies to improve QOL and reduce disability in these patients. In this cross-sectional study, a series of multivariate regression models were developed to determine whether QOL scores could be explained by demographic and symptom data, standardized measures of gross motor function, foot/ankle and hand/finger involvement, electrophysiology, and gait characteristics in 70 children aged 5-16 years with CMT1A. Independent determinants of reduced QOL in children with CMT1A, from strongest to weakest, were leg cramps, hand tremor, short step length, reduced long jump distance, ankle inflexibility, poor agility and endurance, advancing age, and foot drop. Many of the standardized clinical and electrophysiologic measures used as endpoints in clinical trials of CMT correlated poorly with QOL. QOL is negatively affected by CMT1A in children. Multivariate modeling suggests that interventions designed to improve leg cramps, tremor, agility, endurance, and ankle flexibility might have a substantial effect on QOL in children with CMT1A.

  13. Inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies are acquired disorders of peripheral nerves and occasionally of the central nervous system that can affect individuals at any age. The course can be monophasic, relapsing, or progressive. Inflammatory neuropathies are classified as acute or chronic. The acute form reaches a nadir by 4 weeks and the chronic form over 8 weeks or greater. The most common example of an acute inflammatory neuropathy is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is part of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The most common chronic inflammatory neuropathy is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). Other chronic inflammatory neuropathies are multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. The Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis occur acutely and have clinical overlap with AIDP.

  14. Association of an inherited genetic variant with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Crews, Kristine R; Lew, Glen; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie J; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Wheeler, Heather E; Wing, Claudia; Delaney, Shannon M; Komatsu, Masaaki; Paugh, Steven W; McCorkle, Joseph Robert; Lu, Xiaomin; Winick, Naomi J; Carroll, William L; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Devidas, Meenakshi; Pui, Ching-Hon; Dolan, M Eileen; Relling, Mary V; Evans, William E

    2015-02-24

    %; 95% CI, 11.6%-19.5%) homozygous for the risk allele (TT at rs924607). Among patients with the high-risk CEP72 genotype (TT at rs924607), 28 of 50 (56%; 95% CI, 41.2%-70.0%) developed at least 1 episode of grade 2 to 4 neuropathy, a higher rate than in patients with the CEP72 CC or CT genotypes (58/271 patients [21.4%; 95% CI, 16.9%-26.7%]; P = 2.4×10(-6)). The severity of neuropathy was greater in patients homozygous for the TT genotype compared with patients with the CC or CT genotype (2.4-fold by Poisson regression [P<.0001] and 2.7-fold based on mean grade of neuropathy: 1.23 [95% CI, 0.74-1.72] vs 0.45 [95% CI, 0.3-0.6]; P = .004 by t test). Reducing CEP72 expression in human neurons and leukemia cells increased their sensitivity to vincristine. In this preliminary study of children with ALL, an inherited polymorphism in the promoter region of CEP72 was associated with increased risk and severity of vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy. If replicated in additional populations, this finding may provide a basis for safer dosing of this widely prescribed anticancer agent.

  15. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  17. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  18. Association of an inherited genetic variant with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Crews, Kristine R.; Lew, Glen; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie J.; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Wheeler, Heather E.; Wing, Claudia; Delaney, Shannon M.; Komatsu, Masaaki; Paugh, Steven W.; McCorkle, Joseph Robert; Lu, Xiaomin; Winick, Naomi J.; Carroll, William L.; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Pui, Ching-Hon; Dolan, M. Eileen; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    the St. Jude cohort and in 22.2% of patients (n=22 of 99) in the COG cohort. A SNP in the promoter region of the CEP72 gene, which encodes a centrosomal protein involved in microtubule formation, had a significant association with vincristine neuropathy (meta p =6.3 × 10−9). This SNP had a minor allele frequency of 37% (235/642), with 50 of 321 patients (16%, 95% CI 11.6%–19.5%) homozygous for the risk allele (TT at rs924607). Among patients with the high-risk CEP72 genotype (TT at rs924607), 28 of 50 patients (56%, 95% CI 41.2–70.0) developed at least one episode of grade 2–4 neuropathy, a higher rate than in patients with the CEP72 CC or CT genotype (58 of 271 patients; 21.4%, 95% CI 16.9–26.7); p=2.4×10−6. The severity (grade) of neuropathy was greater (2.4-fold by Poisson regression (p<0.0001), 2.7-fold based on mean grade of neuropathy (1.23 [95% CI 0.74 – 1.72] versus 0.45 [95% CI 0.3 – 0.6]; t test p=0.004)) in patients homozygous for the CEP72 risk allele (TT genotype), compared to patients with the CC or CT genotype. The CEP72 promoter SNP was shown to create a binding site for a transcriptional repressor causing lower mRNA expression, and reducing CEP72 expression in human neurons and leukemia cells increased their sensitivity to vincristine. Conclusions In this preliminary study of children with ALL, an inherited polymorphism in the promoter region of CEP72 was associated with increased risk and severity of vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy. If replicated in additional populations, this finding may provide a basis for safer dosing of this widely prescribed anticancer agent. PMID:25710658

  19. MRI shows increased sciatic nerve cross sectional area in inherited and inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Miranda, M A; Cowley, P; Morrow, J M; Davagnanam, I; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Reilly, M M; Yousry, T A; Thornton, J S

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve are described in a group of 10 patients with genetically confirmed Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and 10 healthy controls using MRI. One mid-thigh of each individual was imaged using a short tau inversion recovery sequence and the nerve appearance evaluated radiologically with respect to the signal intensity and visibility of the internal neural structure. The cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve of each individual was measured by defining irregular enclosing regions of interest on the MRI images. The sciatic nerve area was enlarged in both CMT1A (p<0.001) and CIDP (p=0.008) compared with controls and in CMT1A compared with CIDP (p<0.001). Median (interquartile range) areas were 67.6 (16.2) mm(2) for the CIDP group, 135.9 (46.5) mm(2) for the CMT1A group and 43.3 (19.9) mm(2) for the control group. The critical upper value for discriminating pathologically enlarged nerves from normal controls with p<0.05 was 64.4 mm(2). Quantification of sciatic nerve hypertrophy on MRI may be of assistance in cases where the diagnosis is still in doubt, providing an objective pathological marker complimenting other clinical investigations.

  20. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P.

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  1. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  2. SLE Neuropathy-Anything New?

    PubMed

    Londhey, Vikram A

    2015-12-01

    SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology which can present with myriad clinical presentation. The neurological manifestations of SLE consist of central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system manifestations (PNS). The CNS manifestations are aseptic meningitis, cerebrovascular accidents (stroke), demyelinating disorders, headache, involuntary movements like chorea, myelopathy, acute confusional states, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorder, seizures, psychosis and cranial nerve palsies.1 The PNS manifestations are Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS), autonomic disorder, mononeuropathy, polyneuropathy and plexopathy.1 Neuropathy in SLE can be clinically classified as mononeuritis multiplex and symmetrical and asymmetrical polyneuropathy. Symmetrical polyneuropathy being the most commonly seen clinical entity amongst the neuropathies in SLE. The neuropathy can be slowly progressive or acute in onset. Electrophysiologically, neuropathy is classified as axonal neuropathy, small fibre neuropathy, demyelinating neuropathy, mixed axonal-demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy and plexopathy. Axonal neuropathy is further divided into sensory, sensorimotor and mononeuritis multiplex. Demyelinating neuropathy can be of two types: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and sensory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Anecdotal case reports also suggest that CIDP can occur as part of SLE neuropathy.2. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  3. Reliability and validity of the CMT neuropathy score as a measure of disability.

    PubMed

    Shy, M E; Blake, J; Krajewski, K; Fuerst, D R; Laura, M; Hahn, A F; Li, J; Lewis, R A; Reilly, M

    2005-04-12

    To determine the validity and reliability of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) neuropathy score (CMTNS) in patients with inherited neuropathy. Natural history studies and potential treatment trials for patients with various forms of CMT are limited by the lack of quantitative methodologies to monitor disease progression. Most cases of CMT can be considered length-dependent axonal neuropathies because disability for even the demyelinating forms correlates with length-dependent axonal degeneration. The total neuropathy score (TNS) is a validated composite measure of disability in length-dependent axonal neuropathies but is weighted toward predominantly sensory neuropathies. Thus, the authors have devised a CMTNS, modified from the TNS, to provide a single measure to quantify CMT disability. The authors measured inter- and intrainvestigator reliability of the CMTNS and performed a validation of the score with the Neuropathy Impairment Score (NIS), patient self-assessment scores, an ambulation index, and other measures of disability. Inter- and intrainvestigator reliability was more than 95% in the 60 patients evaluated. Patients could be divided into mild (CMTNS, < or =10), moderate (CMTNS, 11 to 20), and severe (CMTNS, > or =21) categories and demonstrated excellent correlations among all measures of disability. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) neuropathy score is a validated measure of length-dependent axonal and demyelinating CMT disability and can be investigated as an end point for longitudinal studies and clinical trials of CMT.

  4. Polygenic Inheritance of Paclitaxel-Induced Sensory Peripheral Neuropathy Driven by Axon Outgrowth Gene Sets in CALGB 40101 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aparna; Mefford, Joel; Stahl, Eli A.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Baldwin, R. Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Li, Megan; Winer, Eric P.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; McLeod, Howard L.; Ratain, Mark J.; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Witte, John S.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with paclitaxel. For most individuals there are no known risk factors that predispose patients to the adverse event, and pathogenesis for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is unknown. Determining whether there is a heritable component to paclitaxel induced peripheral neuropathy would be valuable in guiding clinical decisions and may provide insight into treatment of and mechanisms for the toxicity. Using genotype and patient information from the paclitaxel arm of CALGB 40101 (Alliance), a phase III clinical trial evaluating adjuvant therapies for breast cancer in women, we estimated the variance in maximum grade and dose at first instance of sensory peripheral neuropathy. Our results suggest that paclitaxel-induced neuropathy has a heritable component, driven in part by genes involved in axon outgrowth. Disruption of axon outgrowth may be one of the mechanisms by which paclitaxel treatment results in sensory peripheral neuropathy in susceptible patients. PMID:24513692

  5. Polygenic inheritance of paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy driven by axon outgrowth gene sets in CALGB 40101 (Alliance).

    PubMed

    Chhibber, A; Mefford, J; Stahl, E A; Pendergrass, S A; Baldwin, R M; Owzar, K; Li, M; Winer, E P; Hudis, C A; Zembutsu, H; Kubo, M; Nakamura, Y; McLeod, H L; Ratain, M J; Shulman, L N; Ritchie, M D; Plenge, R M; Witte, J S; Kroetz, D L

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with paclitaxel. For most individuals, there are no known risk factors that predispose patients to the adverse event, and pathogenesis for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is unknown. Determining whether there is a heritable component to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy would be valuable in guiding clinical decisions and may provide insight into treatment of and mechanisms for the toxicity. Using genotype and patient information from the paclitaxel arm of CALGB 40101 (Alliance), a phase III clinical trial evaluating adjuvant therapies for breast cancer in women, we estimated the variance in maximum grade and dose at first instance of sensory peripheral neuropathy. Our results suggest that paclitaxel-induced neuropathy has a heritable component, driven in part by genes involved in axon outgrowth. Disruption of axon outgrowth may be one of the mechanisms by which paclitaxel treatment results in sensory peripheral neuropathy in susceptible patients.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy.

  7. Paraneoplastic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe

    2017-10-01

    To review recent advances in paraneoplastic neuropathies with emphasis on their definition, different forms and therapeutic development. A strict definition of definite paraneoplastic neuropathies is necessary to avoid confusion. With carcinoma, seronegative sensory neuronopathies and neuronopathies and anti-Hu and anti-CV2/Contactin Response Mediator Protein 5 antibodies are the most frequent. With lymphomas, most neuropathies occur with monoclonal gammopathy including AL amyloidosis, Polyneuropathy-Organomegaly-Endocrinopathy-M component-Skin changes (POEMS) syndrome, type I cryoglobulinemia and antimyelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathies and Waldenström's disease. Neuropathies improving with tumor treatment are occasional, occur with a variety of cancer and include motor neuron disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and nerve vasculitis. If antibodies toward intracellular antigens are well characterized, it is not the case for antibodies toward cell membrane proteins. Contactin-associated protein-2 antibodies occur with neuromyotonia and thymoma with the Morvan's syndrome in addition to Netrin 1 receptor antibodies but may not be responsible for peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. The treatment of AL amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome, anti-MAG neuropathy and cryoglobulinemia is now relatively well established. It is not the case with onconeural antibodies for which the rarity of the disorders and a short therapeutic window are limiting factors for the development of clinical trials. A strict definition of paraneoplastic neuropathies helps their identification and is necessary to allow an early diagnosis of the underlying tumor.

  8. Demyelinating CMT--what's known, what's new and what's in store?

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kathryn M; Bai, Yunhong; Shy, Michael E

    2015-06-02

    Inherited neuropathies known collectively as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are one of the most common inherited neurological conditions affecting ∼1 in 2500 people. A heterogenous disorder, CMT is divided into subtypes based on the pattern of inheritance and also by neurophysiological studies. Despite the clinical similarities among patients with demyelinating CMT, it is recognized that this group of disorders is both genetically and phenotypically heterogenous. Understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders requires an intimate knowledge of normal myelin development and homeostasis. Improvements in genetic testing techniques over the last 20 years have contributed majorly to the identification of specific genes, proteins, and molecular pathways that are providing the basis for understanding the disease processes and developing rational approaches to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  10. Amyloid neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Susan C; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This article reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  11. Paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in serological screening of paraneoplastic antibodies and in diagnostic imaging techniques to detect malignancies has enabled a broadening of the concept of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes by integrating nonclassic clinical features. The peripheral nervous system is frequently involved in patients with paraneoplastic syndrome and may be seen alone or in combination with involvement of other areas of the nervous system. Destruction of dorsal root ganglion cells due to lymphocytic infiltration, especially with CD8-positive cytotoxic T cells, has been postulated to mediate the classic syndrome of subacute sensory neuronopathy. However, the motor and autonomic nervous systems are frequently affected. Indeed, patients can develop clinical features compatible with Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, or brachial plexopathy. Other forms of paraneoplastic neuropathy are vasculitic neuropathy, autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Various onconeural antibodies, including anti-Hu, anti-CV2/CRMP-5, and anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies, are associated with neuropathy. Somatic neuropathy is the most common manifestation in patients with anti-Hu and anti-CV2/CRMP-5 antibodies, while anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody is associated with autonomic neuropathies. A whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be useful to detect malignancy in patients with unremarkable conventional radiological findings. Recognition and diagnosis of paraneoplastic neuropathy is important, as neuropathic symptoms usually precede the identification of the primary tumor, and treatment at an earlier stage provides better chances of good outcomes.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  13. ABLATION OF THE UPR–MEDIATOR CHOP RESTORES MOTOR FUNCTION AND REDUCES DEMYELINATION IN CHARCOT MARIE TOOTH 1B MICE

    PubMed Central

    Pennuto, Maria; Tinelli, Elisa; Malaguti, MariaChiara; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Ron, David; Quattrini, Angelo; Feltri, M. Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Deletion of serine 63 from P0 glycoprotein (P0S63del) causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B neuropathy in humans, and P0S63del produces a very similar demyelinating neuropathy in transgenic mice. P0S63del is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and fails to be incorporated into myelin. Here we report that P0S63del is globally misfolded and Schwann cells mount a consequential canonical unfolded protein response (UPR), that includes expression of the transcription factor CHOP, previously associated with apoptosis in ER-stressed cells. UPR activation and CHOP expression respond dynamically to P0S63del levels and are reversible, but are associated with only limited apoptosis of Schwann cells. Nonetheless, Chop ablation in S63del mice completely rescues their motor deficit and reduces active demyelination two-fold. This is the first indication that signaling through the CHOP arm of the UPR provokes demyelination in inherited neuropathy. In addition, S63del mice provide a unique opportunity to explore how cells can dysfunction yet survive in prolonged ER stress—important for neurodegeneration related to misfolded proteins. PMID:18255032

  14. A Case of Paraneoplastic Demyelinating Motor Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mostoufizadeh, Sohrab; Souri, Maryam; de Seze, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is commonly accompanied by cancer but demyelinating ones are not commonly reported. We report the clinical, neurophysiological, and biological characteristics of an 82-year-old patient who presented with a demyelinating motor neuropathy and high titre of anti-ganglioside antibodies associated with oesophageal cancer. The neurological course worsened rapidly despite immunotherapy, leading to a bedridden status. We propose to suspect a paraneoplastic origin in older patients or when the clinical course progresses rapidly within a few weeks or months. PMID:22649345

  15. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-01-01

    Background The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. Methods We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). Results 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Conclusions Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. Clinical trial registration ID number NCT01193075. PMID:25430934

  16. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-08-01

    The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. ID number NCT01193075. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Molecular analysis of the genes causing recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makiko; Abe, Akiko; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Yamao, Satoshi; Arai, Hidee; Hattori, Hideji; Iai, Mizue; Watanabe, Kyoko; Oka, Nobuyuki; Chida, Keiji; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common hereditary neuropathy, has been classified into two types, demyelinating and axonal types. We previously analyzed the genes causing dominant demyelinating CMT in 227 Japanese patients to identify the genetic background, but could not find any mutations in 110 patients. To investigate the frequency of patients with autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT (CMT4) mutations, we analyzed the coding sequence of known causative genes of CMT4 in 103 demyelinating CMT patients, excluding seven patients owing to lack of specimens. We found one patient with a GDAP1 mutation, one patient with an MTMR2 mutation, two patients with SH3TC2/KIAA1985 mutations and three patients with FGD4 mutations. Twelve patients, including five previously detected patients with PRX mutations, were diagnosed as CMT4, accounting for 5.5% of demyelinating CMT. In the patient with GDAP1 mutation, only one mutation inherited from his mother was detected by genomic sequencing. Analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using messenger RNA (mRNA) from the patient's leukocytes revealed the absence of transcription from the allele inherited from his father, suggesting the existence of one more mutation leading to a lack or destabilization of mRNA. Most patients carrying CMT4 gene mutations present with early-onset and slowly progressive symptoms, which may be associated with the function of mutants. We could not identify the disease-causing gene in 96 patients (about 45%). Further studies including studies with next-generation sequencers will be required to identify the causative gene in Japanese CMT.

  18. Peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Hanewinckel, R; Ikram, M A; Van Doorn, P A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are diseases of the peripheral nervous system that can be divided into mononeuropathies, multifocal neuropathies, and polyneuropathies. Symptoms usually include numbness and paresthesia. These symptoms are often accompanied by weakness and can be painful. Polyneuropathies can be divided into axonal and demyelinating forms, which is important for diagnostic reasons. Most peripheral neuropathies develop over months or years, but some are rapidly progressive. Some patients only suffer from mild, unilateral, slowly progressive tingling in the fingers due to median nerve compression in the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome), while other patients can be tetraplegic, with respiratory insufficiency within 1-2 days due to Guillain-Barré syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome, with a prevalence of 5% and incidence of 1-2 per 1000 person-years, is the most common mononeuropathy. Population-based data for chronic polyneuropathy are relatively scarce. Prevalence is estimated at 1% and increases to 7% in persons over 65 years of age. Incidence is approximately 1 per 1000 person-years. Immune-mediated polyneuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are rare diseases, with an annual incidence of approximately 1-2 and 0.2-0.5 per 100 000 persons respectively. Most peripheral neuropathies are more prevalent in older adults and in men, except for carpal tunnel syndrome, which is more common in women. Diabetes is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy and is associated with both mono- and polyneuropathies. Among the group of chronic polyneuropathies, in about 20-25% no direct cause can be found. These are slowly progressive axonal polyneuropathies. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 22q11.2q13 duplication including SOX10 causes sex-reversal and peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Falah, Nadia; Posey, Jennifer E; Thorson, Willa; Benke, Paul; Tekin, Mustafa; Tarshish, Brocha; Lupski, James R; Harel, Tamar

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of genetic syndromes may be difficult when specific components of a disorder manifest at a later age. We present a follow up of a previous report [Seeherunvong et al., (2004); AJMGA 127: 149-151], of an individual with 22q duplication and sex-reversal syndrome. The subject's phenotype evolved to include peripheral and central demyelination, Waardenburg syndrome type IV, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH; MIM 609136). DNA microarray analysis defined the duplication at 22q11.2q13, including SOX10. Sequencing of the coding region of SOX10 did not reveal any mutations. Our data suggest that SOX10 duplication can cause disorders of sex development and PCWH, supporting the hypothesis that SOX10 toxic gain of function rather than dominant negative activity underlies PCWH.

  20. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: two cases of difficult diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, Said R; Cho, Justin

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that causes a polyneuropathy with predisposition for involvement at sites of compression and is often underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed due to its heterogeneity in clinical and electrophysiological presentation. We report 2 cases of HNPP, which were initially diagnosed and treated as either an acquired demyelinating disorder or alternative inherited demyelinating disorder. Thorough evaluation of repeat electrodiagnostic studies and genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of HNPP in both cases. One case showed the classic peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) deletion and the other case showed a previously reported single base pair deletion at Leu145 causing a frameshift mutation at the PMP22 gene. These cases underscore the difficulty of diagnosing HNPP, because of the variations in clinical and electrophysiological findings and reinforce the importance of a combination high index of clinical suspicion, electrodiagnostic testing, and genetic testing to make the diagnosis.

  2. A report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy: the value of complete electrodiagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Srinivas; McMillan, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    Patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) typically present with a mononeuropathy (particularly peroneal or ulnar palsy) or a brachial plexopathy. Careful electrodiagnostic testing has an important role in establishing the diagnosis of HNPP differentiating this condition from other inherited or acquired neuropathies as well as obviating the need for unnecessary surgeries. We present a case of a patient who presented with a painless brachial plexopathy who was found to have multiple sites of segmental demyelination on nerve conduction studies, consistent with HNPP. We review the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of HNPP including the key electrodiagnostic findings to screen for this disorder.

  3. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  4. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of history and examination for correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with hematemesis and a 6-month history of unsteady gait and falls due to tripping. Because of a history of alcohol abuse, the initial diagnosis was upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to alcoholic gastritis or gastric ulcer, with the neuropathy likely due to alcoholism or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. After further neurological examination and careful review of nerve conduction studies, however, an inherited neuropathy was suspected. Despite denial by the patient and her daughter of a family history of neuropathy, both had a pes cavus deformity with muscle atrophy and partial foot drop gait. Subsequent testing of the daughter revealed the same nerve conduction findings as the patient's. Genetic testing showed that both women had the myelin PMP22 repeat defect characteristic of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Endoscopy revealed that the patient had Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, which accounted for the hematemesis.

  5. Experimental therapeutics in hereditary neuropathies: the past, the present, and the future.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, David N

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathies represent approximately 40% of undiagnosed neuropathies in a tertiary clinic setting. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are the most common. Mutations in more than 40 genes have been identified to date in CMT. Approximately 50% of CMT cases are accounted for by CMT type 1A, due to a duplication within the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22). Mutations in the gap junction beta 1 gene (GJB1), the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ), and the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) account for a substantial proportion of other genetically definable CMT. Some 15% of demyelinating CMT and 70% of axonal CMT await genetic clarification. Other hereditary neuropathies include the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, the familial amyloid polyneuropathies, and multisystem disorders (e.g., lipid storage diseases and inherited ataxias) that have peripheral neuropathy as a major or minor component. This review surveys the challenges of developing effective therapies for hereditary neuropathies in terms of past, present, and future experimental therapeutics in CMT.

  6. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits.

  7. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms.

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    As a syndrome with typical and atypical cases, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has been a difficult disorder to diagnose and treat. The pathophysiologic basis for CIDP has not been established, contributing to the challenges in dealing with these patients. However, as one of only a handful of treatable peripheral neuropathies, there has been a tendency to diagnose CIDP to attempt a therapeutic intervention. We are also aware that there has also been overtreatment of some patients. This combination of overdiagnosis and prolonged treatment has been a concern. This chapter will review these challenges and discuss recent findings that will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. The factors leading to misdiagnosis of CIDP were explored in a cohort of patients referred to a neuromuscular center. On a more positive note, the identification of two disorders with antibodies directed at paranodal constituents has excited the field. Treatment options have increased and been clarified. Pulse corticosteroids have been compared with oral prednisone and with intravenous immunoglobulin. The clinical trial of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in CIDP has shown both efficacy and a very low side effect profile adding to our therapeutic options. The current review will identify recent developments that show both the challenges and the exciting growth in our ability to diagnose and treat CIDP.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ken-ya; Ishiguchi, Hiroshi; Ando, Ryuki; Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2013-12-01

    We report a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Except for minimal biochemical abnormalities, clinical symptoms of PBC were not observed, and we diagnosed our patient with asymptomatic PBC from the results of a liver biopsy. Although the patient noticed little muscle weakness, an electrophysiological study demonstrated slow conduction velocities and prolonged distal latencies, with definite conduction blocks in the median, ulnar, and tibial nerves. The disturbed sensory pattern was asymmetrical, and sensory nerve action potentials were not evoked. From these observations, we diagnosed this patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Neuropathy associated with PBC is very rare. We must differentiate demyelinating neuropathy with PBC in patients with asymmetrical sensory dominant neuropathy with high immunoglobulin M titers, and investigate for the presence of anti-mitochondrial antibodies to rule out a complication of asymptomatic PBC.

  10. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Donofrio, Peter D

    2012-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immunomodulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP.

  12. Challenges in pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, Göknur; Yüksel, Deniz; Temoçin, Cağri Mesut; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, a treatable immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system is less common in childhood compared to adults. Despite different sets of diagnostic criteria, lack of a reliable biologic marker leads to challenges in diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Our first aim was to review clinical presentation, course, response to treatment, and prognosis in our childhood patients. We also aimed to document diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls and challenges at the bedside. Our original cohort consisted of 23 pediatric patients who were referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. Seven patients reaching to an alternative diagnosis were excluded. In the remaining patients, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up data were compared in typical patients who satisfied both clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria and atypical patients who failed to meet minimal research chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy electrodiagnostic requirements. Eight of 16 patients (50%) met the minimal chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy research diagnostic requirements. There was only a statistically significant difference (p = 0.010) in terms of European Neuromuscular Centre childhood chronic inflammatory diagnostic mandatory clinical criteria between the two groups. Misdiagnosis due to errors in electrophysiological interpretation (100%, n = 8), cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation (100%, n = 4 and/or subjective improvement on any immunotherapy modality (80 ± 19.27%)) was frequent. Pediatric CIDP is challenging in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls at the bedside. Diagnostic errors due to electrophysiological interpretation, cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation, and/or subjective improvement on immunotherapy should be considered.

  13. Central and peripheral demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Gulati, Natasha Singh

    2014-01-01

    Several conditions cause damage to the inherently normal myelin of central nervous system, perepheral nervous system or both central and perepheral nervous system and hence termed as central demyelinating diseases, perepheral demyelinating diseases and combined central and perepheral demyelinating diseases respectively. Here we analysed and foccused on the etiology, prevalance, incidence and age of these demyelinating disorders. Clinical attention and various diagnostic tests are needed to adequately assess all these possibilities. PMID:24741263

  14. HCV-related central and peripheral nervous system demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered.

  15. HCV-Related Central and Peripheral Nervous System Demyelinating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered. PMID:25198705

  16. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  17. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    van Paassen, Barbara W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-03-19

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal.

  18. Ocular Neuromyotonia Associated with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nathan H; Bucelli, Robert C; McClelland, Collin M; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    Ocular neuromyotonia (ONM) is a neuro-ophthalmic disorder characterized by episodic diplopia caused by contraction of one or more ocular muscles due to spontaneous excitation of the respective ocular motor nerve. We report a patient whose ocular neuromyotonia arose in the setting of a subacute demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and subsequently resolved following the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for her neuropathy. Our patient provides additional evidence towards the role of demyelination and ephaptic neurotransmission in ocular neuromyotonia and also represents the first reported case of ocular neuromyotonia associated with a systemic neurological condition.

  19. An Inherited Genetic Variant in CEP72 Promoter Predisposes to Vincristine-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, W; Diouf, B; Crews, K R; Pei, D; Cheng, C; Laumann, K; Mandrekar, S J; Luger, S; Advani, A; Stone, R M; Larson, R A; Evans, W E

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major toxicity of vincristine, yet no strategies exist for identifying adult patients at high-risk. We used a case-control design of 48 adults receiving protocol therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who developed vincristine-induced neuropathy (NCI grade 2-4) during treatment, and 48 matched controls who did not develop grade 2-4 neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy was prospectively graded by National Cancer Institute (NCI) criteria. CEP72 promoter genotype (rs924607) was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Frequency of the CEP72 T/T genotype was higher in cases (31% vs. 10%, P = 0.0221) and the incidence of vincristine-induced neuropathy (grades 2-4) was significantly higher in patients homozygous for the CEP72 T/T genotype. 75% of the 20 patients homozygous for the CEP72 T allele developed grade 2-4 neuropathy, compared to 44% of patients with CEP72 CC or CT genotype (P = 0.0221). The CEP72 polymorphism can identify adults at increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  2. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Farnham, James M; Granger, Erin K; Teerlink, Craig C; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2016-04-01

    Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e(-13)), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e(-4)). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e(-3)) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression neuropathy. Observed increased risks in spouses and first

  3. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression

  4. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  5. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy associated with a relapsing multifocal sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    A family with neuralgic amyotrophy (idiopathic brachial plexus neuropathy) associated with a multifocal sensory neuropathy is described. Four members over two generations were affected by neuralgic amyotrophy, inherited as an apparent autosomal dominant trait; two also had a multifocal relapsing sensory neuropathy with the clinical features of Wartenberg's migrant neuropathy. PMID:8429311

  6. Characteristics of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with concurrent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Wu, Xiaohua; Xie, Huijun; Han, Ying; Guan, Yangtai; Qin, Yong; Zheng, Huimin; Jiang, Jianming; Niu, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common type of inherited peripheral neuropathy and has a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. CMT with concurrent diabetes mellitus (DM) is rare. The purpose of this study is to explore the genetic, clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients with CMT and concurrent DM. Methods: We investigated gene mutations (the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene, myelin protein zero gene, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor gene, early growth response gene and the neurofilament light chain gene loci) of a relatively large and typical Chinese family with CMT1 and concurrent DM2. From the literature, we also retrieved all reported families and single cases with CMT and concurrent DM. We comprehensively analyzed the characteristics of total 33 patients with CMT and concurrent DM, and further compared these characteristics with those of patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Results: Patients with CMT and concurrent DM had some relatively independent characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms. So we designated that kind of characteristic demyelinating CMT which accompanies DM as Yu-Xie syndrome (YXS), a new specific clinical subtype of CMT. Conclusion: CMT is an etiologic factor of DM, even though the intrinsic association between CMT and DM still remains further exploration. PMID:25120817

  7. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  8. [Atypical neuropathies associated with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lozeron, P

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of neuropathy worldwide and, due to the epidemic progression of the affection, prevalence of diabetic neuropathies will increase in the near future. Beside the typical diabetic neuropathy pattern and the common entrapment neuropathies, several unusual clinical forms have been described with either a symmetrical or an asymmetrical pattern. Treatment-induced neuropathy is an acute sensory affection most commonly related to acute glycemic control. Pain is debilitating and associated with vegetative dysfunction. Prevention is important, as resolution is often incomplete. Several patterns or asymmetrical neuropathies of inflammatory and ischemic origin were described long ago in the lower limb. They are debilitating, most often painful and require steroid treatment. Other patterns affecting the thoracolumbar region or the upper limbs or involving a painless motor deficit must be identified as specific treatments are sometimes needed. An association between diabetes and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has not been demonstrated but diagnosis may be suggested due to the misleading low conduction velocities seen in classical diabetic neuropathy. Like any other patient, the diabetic patient may present a neuropathy unrelated to diabetes. To facilitate patient care, neurologists should be aware of such clinical entities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathology of human diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic study of a disease provides insights into the precise mechanisms and targets of damage and may provide insights into new therapies. The main targets in diabetic neuropathy are myelinated and unmyelinated fibers as dysfunction and damage to them explains the symptoms of painful neuropathy and the major end points of foot ulceration and amputation as well as mortality. Demyelination and axonal degeneration are established hallmarks of the pathology of human diabetic neuropathy and were derived from pioneering light and electronmicroscopic studies of sural nerve biopsies in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Additional abnormalities, which are relevant to the pathogenesis of human diabetic neuropathy, include pathology of the microvessels and extracellular space. Intraepidermal and sudomotor nerve quantification in skin biopsies provides a minimally invasive means for the detection of early nerve damage. Studies of muscle biopsies are limited and show significant alterations in the expression of neurotrophins, but limited changes in muscle fiber size and capillary density.

  10. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  11. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  12. [Diagnosis of immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Diószeghy, Péter

    2011-09-25

    Separate discussion of immune-mediated neuropathies from other neuropathies is justified by the serious consequences of the natural course of these diseases, like disability and sometimes even life threatening conditions. On the other hand nowadays effective treatments already exist, and with timely and correct diagnosis an appropriately chosen treatment may result in significant improvement of quality of life, occasionally even complete recovery. These are rare diseases, and the increasing number of different variants makes it more difficult to recognize them. Their diagnosis is based on the precise knowledge of clinical signs and symptoms, and it is verified by the help of neurophysiologic and laboratory, first of all CSF examinations. Description of clinical features of the classic acute immune-mediated neuropathy, characterized by ascending paresis and demyelination is followed by a summary of characteristics of newly recognized axonal, regional and functional variants. Chronic immune-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathies are not diagnosed in due number even today. This paper does not only present the classic form but it also introduces the ever increasing special variants, like distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy, Lewis-Sumner syndrome, multifocal motor neuropathy and paraproteinemic neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathies can be divided into two groups: systemic and non-systemic ones. The first sign of a vasculitic neuropathy is a progressive, painful mononeuropathy; the classic clinical presentation is the mononeuritis multiplex. It is characterized by general signs like fever, loss of weight, fatigue. In systemic vasculitis organ specific symptoms are also present. From the paraneoplastic diseases the subacute sensory neuropathy and the sensory neuronopathy are members of the immune-mediated neuropathies, being most frequently associated with small cell lung cancer.

  13. Treatment of immune-mediated, dysimmune neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2005-08-01

    This review focuses on the actual status and recent advances in the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, including: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) with its subtypes acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, acute motor axonal neuropathy, acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy, Miller Fisher syndrome, and acute pandysautonomia; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with its subtypes classical CIDP, CIDP with diabetes, CIDP/monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), sensory CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy or Lewis-Sumner syndrome, multifocal acquired sensory and motor neuropathy, and distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy; IgM monoclonal gammopathies with its subtypes Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, myelin-associated glycoprotein-associated gammopathy, polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin changes syndrome, mixed cryoglobulinemia, gait ataxia, late-onset polyneuropathy syndrome, and MGUS. Concerning the treatment of GBS, there is no significant difference between intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), plasma exchange or plasma exchange followed by IVIG. Because of convenience and absent invasiveness, IVIG are usually preferred. In treating CIDP corticosteroids, IVIG, or plasma exchange are equally effective. Despite the high costs and relative lack of availability, IVIG are preferentially used. For the one-third of patients, who does not respond, other immunosuppressive options are available. In MMN IVIG are the treatment of choice. Inadequate response in 20% of the patients requires adjunctive immunosuppressive therapies. Neuropathies with IgM monoclonal gammopathy may respond to various chemotherapeutic agents, although the long-term effects are unknown. In addition, such treatment may be associated with serious side effects. Recent data support the use of rituximab, a monoclonal antibody against the B

  14. Ocular neuropathy in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Evliyaoglu, Ferhat; Karadag, Remzi; Burakgazi, Ahmet Z

    2012-11-01

    Ocular movements and coordination require complex and integrated functions of somatic and autonomic nervous systems. Neurological disorders affecting these nervous systems may cause ocular dysfunction involving extraocular muscles and pupils. In this article, the prevalence, clinical presentations, and management of ocular neuropathy related to certain peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory neuropathies, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neuropathy, and hereditary neuropathies, are examined in detail. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Multifocal-motor neuropathy and motor neuropathy with multifocal conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Mamoli, B

    1995-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy, which mimics lower motor neuron disease, is a rare and curious demyelinating neuropathy characterised by slowly progressive, asymmetric limb weakness within the distribution of individual peripheral nerves, wasting, cramps, fasciculations and rare sensory involvement, but without upper motor neuron signs. The cardinal feature and primary pathophysiological basis for the weakness is the multifocal motor conduction block which remains stable for years at the same site and is confined to motor axons. It is defined as > 50% reduction in both the CMAP and the negative peak area on proximal stimulation, as compared with the distal stimulus response without any change in the negative peak duration. Nerves at the site of the conduction block show demyelination, endoneural edema, rudimentary onion bulbs and lymphocytic inflammation. Sensory nerves may show mild demyelination, axon loss and lymphocytic inflammation. The majority of patients shows elevated titers of anti-glycolipid antibodies, which may block the Na+ channels, produce demyelination or interfere with remyelination. However, their role in the pathogenesis of multifocal motor neuropathy remains uncertain. Multifocal motor neuropathy is regarded as the predominantly motor variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and can be treated best with immunoglobulins and cyclophosphamide.

  16. Immunotherapy of idiopathic inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Peter D

    2003-09-01

    Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy is a common reason for referral to a neurologist. Recent advances in immunology have identified an inflammatory component in many neuropathies and have led to treatment trials using agents that attenuate this response. This article reviews the clinical presentation and treatment of the most common subacute inflammatory neuropathies, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Fisher syndrome, and describes the lack of response to corticosteroids and the efficacy of treatment with plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, although sharing some clinical, electrodiagnostic, and pathologic similarities to GBS, improves after treatment with plasma exchange and IVIG and numerous immunomodulatory agents. Controlled trials in multifocal motor neuropathy have shown benefit after treatment with IVIG and cyclophosphamide. Also discussed is the treatment of less common inflammatory neuropathies whose pathophysiology involves monoclonal proteins or antibodies directed against myelin-associated glycoprotein or sulfatide. Little treatment data exist to direct the clinician to proper management of rare inflammatory neuropathies resulting from osteosclerotic myeloma; POEMS syndrome; vasculitis; Sjögren's syndrome; and neoplasia (paraneoplastic neuropathy).

  17. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  18. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Katz, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. This article highlights our current understanding of the condition along with its phenotypic variants that are encountered in clinical practice. The diagnostic evaluation of CIDP includes laboratory studies to detect associated medical conditions and electrodiagnostic studies to assess for demyelination. Current treatment options include corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immune globulin, along with alternative therapies that may be used as corticosteroid-sparing agents or for treatment-refractory cases. Approximately 85% to 90% of patients eventually improve or stabilize with treatment, and the long-term prognosis of CIDP is favorable.

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Baloh, Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is perhaps the archetypal disease of axonal degeneration, characteristically involving degeneration of the longest axons in the body. Evidence from both inherited and acquired forms of peripheral neuropathy strongly supports that the primary pathology is in the axons themselves and points to disruption of axonal transport as an important disease mechanism. Recent studies in human genetics have further identified abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics--the fusion, fission, and movement of mitochondria--as a player in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This review provides an update on the mechanisms of mitochondrial trafficking in axons and the emerging relationship between the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics and axonal degeneration. Evidence suggests mitochondria are a "critical cargo" whose transport is necessary for proper axonal and synaptic function. Importantly, understanding the regulation of mitochondrial movement and the consequences of decreased axonal mitochondrial function may define new paths for therapeutic agents in peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Electrophysiological assessment of Guillain-Barré syndrome with both Gal-C and ganglioside antibodies; tendency for demyelinating type.

    PubMed

    Samukawa, Makoto; Kuwahara, Motoi; Morikawa, Miyuki; Ueno, Rino; Hamada, Yukihiro; Takada, Kazuo; Hirano, Makito; Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Sonoo, Masahiro; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-12-15

    Whether patients who have GBS with antibodies to galactocerebroside (Gal-C) and gangliosides (Gal-C-GS-GBS) more often have demyelinating or axonal neuropathy remains controversial. We assessed the electrophysiological data from 16 patients with Gal-C-GS-GBS based on the two established criteria to clarify this issue. In this largest cohort of Gal-C-GS-GBS, eight patients had demyelinating neuropathy and none exhibited axonal neuropathy on either criterion. These data indicated that antibodies to Gal-C, a myelin antigen, might predominantly be associated with demyelinating neuropathy, even in the presence of concomitant antibodies to gangliosides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic alcoholic intoxication].

    PubMed

    Kovrazhkina, E A

    2012-01-01

    Frequency and nosological attribution of demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and alcoholism were determined. Eighty-six inpatients with alcoholic (n=46) and diabetic (n=40) polyneuropathy were examined clinically and using electroneuromyography (ENMG). A demyelinating pathogenetic variant was identified by clinical and ENMG data in 27 (31%) patients. Nine patients (33%) had dysimmune polyneuropathies (acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). Polyneuropathies were specified as toxic/metabolic with the prevalence of a demyelinating component within the main disease in 18 (67%) patients. Clinical and ENMG-signs of the demyelinating variant of alcoholic and diabetic neuropathy are presented. The efficacy of the antioxidant berlition was shown for toxic/metabolic polyneuropathies while the addition of immune modulators was needed for treatment of dysimmune polyneuropathy.

  2. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an overview of 10 cases in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Ware, Tyson L; Kornberg, Andrew J; Rodriguez-Casero, M Victoria; Ryan, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a rare condition in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 10 cases of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a single center, in the era of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic microarray, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status. Robust neurophysiologic abnormalities were present in all cases and both MRI and lumbar puncture were useful adjuncts in diagnosis. Genetic microarray is a simple technique useful in excluding the most common hereditary demyelinating neuropathy. Intravenous immunoglobulin was an effective first-line therapy in most cases, with refractory cases responding to corticosteroids and rituximab. We found the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status useful for assessing outcome at final follow-up, whereas the modified Rankin score was better for assessing peak motor disability.

  3. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  4. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-05-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered.

  5. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  6. Toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2009-01-01

    Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  7. Genetic disruption of Pten in a novel mouse model of tomaculous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Goebbels, Sandra; Oltrogge, Jan H; Wolfer, Susanne; Wieser, Georg L; Nientiedt, Tobias; Pieper, Alexander; Ruhwedel, Torben; Groszer, Matthias; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2012-01-01

    ‘Tomacula’ and myelin outfoldings are striking neuropathological features of a diverse group of inherited demyelinating neuropathies. Whereas the underlying genetic defects are well known, the molecular mechanisms of tomacula formation have remained obscure. We hypothesized that they are caused by uncontrolled, excessive myelin membrane growth, a process, which is regulated in normal development by neuregulin-1/ErbB2, PI3 Kinase signalling and ERK/MAPK signalling. Here, we demonstrate by targeted disruption of Pten in Schwann cells that hyperactivation of the endogenous PI3 Kinase pathway causes focal hypermyelination, myelin outfoldings and tomacula, even when induced in adult animals by tamoxifen, and is associated with progressive peripheral neuropathy. Activated AKT kinase is associated with PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at paranodal loops and Schmidt–Lanterman incisures. This striking myelin pathology, with features of human CMT type 4B1 and HNPP, is dependent on AKT/mTOR signalling, as evidenced by a significant amelioration of the pathology in mice treated with rapamycin. We suggest that regions of non-compact myelin are under lifelong protection by PTEN against abnormal membrane outgrowth, and that dysregulated phosphoinositide levels play a critical role in the pathology of tomaculous neuropathies. PMID:22488882

  8. Diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, V; Kalita, J; Misra, U K

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) refers to symptoms and signs of neuropathy in a patient with diabetes in whom other causes of neuropathy have been excluded. Distal symmetrical neuropathy is the commonest accounting for 75% DN. Asymmetrical neuropathies may involve cranial nerves, thoracic or limb nerves; are of acute onset resulting from ischaemic infarction of vasa nervosa. Asymmetric neuropathies in diabetic patients should be investigated for entrapment neuropathy. Diabetic amyotrophy, initially considered to result from metabolic changes, and later ischaemia, is now attributed to immunological changes. For diagnosis of DN, symptoms, signs, quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction study, and autonomic testing are used; and two of these five are recommended for clinical diagnosis. Management of DN includes control of hyperglycaemia, other cardiovascular risk factors; α lipoic acid and L carnitine. For neuropathic pain, analgesics, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are recommended. The treatment of autonomic neuropathy is symptomatic. PMID:16461471

  9. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Christoph; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Rakowicz, Maryla; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, Jose; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Pedersen, Karine; Depondt, Chantal; Rola, Rafal; Klockgether, Thomas; García, Antonio; Mutlu, Gurkan; Schöls, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are characterized by autosomal dominantly inherited progressive ataxia but are clinically heterogeneous due to variable involvement of non-cerebellar parts of the nervous system. Non-cerebellar symptoms contribute significantly to the burden of SCAs, may guide the clinician to the underlying genetic subtype, and might be useful markers to monitor disease. Peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in SCA, but subtype-specific features and subclinical manifestations have rarely been evaluated. We performed a multicenter nerve conduction study with 162 patients with genetically confirmed SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6. The study proved peripheral nerves to be involved in the neurodegenerative process in 82 % of SCA1, 63 % of SCA2, 55 % of SCA3, and 22 % of SCA6 patients. Most patients of all subtypes revealed affection of both sensory and motor fibers. Neuropathy was most frequently of mixed type with axonal and demyelinating characteristics in all SCA subtypes. However, nerve conduction velocities of SCA1 patients were slower compared to other genotypes. SCA6 patients revealed less axonal damage than patients with other subtypes. No influence of CAG repeat length or biometric determinants on peripheral neuropathy could be identified in SCA1, SCA3, and SCA6. In SCA2, earlier onset and more severe ataxia were associated with peripheral neuropathy. We proved peripheral neuropathy to be a frequent site of the neurodegenerative process in all common SCA subtypes. Since damage to peripheral nerves is readily assessable by electrophysiological means, nerve conduction studies should be performed in a longitudinal approach to assess these parameters as potential progression markers.

  11. Vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Luzia; Silva, Lã Gia; Terroso, Georgina; Nadais, Goreti; Mariz, Eva; Ventura, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Vasculitic neuropathy corresponds to the occurrence of vasculitis at the level of vasa nervorum, resulting in ischemic damage of the peripheral nerve and axonal degeneration. Vasculitic neuropathy commonly occurs in association with systemic diseases and may be the initial manifestation or arise in the course of established disease. Although rare, vasculitis can be confined to the peripheral nervous system - non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy. This paper aims to review the classification, diagnosis and treatment of vasculitic neuropathy.

  12. Pmp22 mutant allele-specific siRNA alleviates demyelinating neuropathic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Su; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Koo, Ok Jae; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Mo, Won Min; Kwak, Geon; Moon, Hyo Won; Park, Hwan Tae; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic disorder that can be caused by aberrations in >80 genes. CMT has heterogeneous modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, and X-linked recessive. Over 95% of cases are dominantly inherited. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of a mutant allele by an allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) can alleviate the demyelinating neuropathic phenotype of CMT. We designed 19 different allele-specific siRNAs for Trembler J (Tr-J) mice harboring a naturally occurring mutation (Leu16Pro) in Pmp22. Using a luciferase assay, we identified an siRNA that specifically and selectively reduced the expression level of the mutant allele and reversed the low viability of Schwann cells caused by mutant Pmp22 over-expression in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of the allele-specific siRNA was assessed by its intraperitoneal injection to postnatal day 6 of Tr-J mice. Administration of the allele-specific siRNA to Tr-J mice significantly enhanced motor function and muscle volume, as assessed by the rotarod test and magnetic resonance imaging analysis, respectively. Increases in motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials were also observed in the treated mice. In addition, myelination, as evidenced by toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy, was augmented in the sciatic nerves of the mice after allele-specific siRNA treatment. After validating suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele at the mRNA level in the Schwann cells of Tr-J mice, we observed increased expression levels of myelinating proteins such as myelin basic protein and myelin protein zero. These data indicate that selective suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele by non-viral delivery of siRNA alleviates the demyelinating neuropathic phenotypes of CMT in vivo, implicating allele-specific siRNA treatment as a potent therapeutic strategy for dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies

  13. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 1: OVERVIEW AND SYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in US and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Various types of neuropathies can be associated with diabetes mellitus.1 Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Pathologically axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control. Many medications are available for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:23642717

  14. The Importance of Rare Subtypes in Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Brian C; Price, Raymond S; Chen, Kevin S; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination but has limited diagnostic evaluation. However, rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. References were identified from PubMed searches conducted on May 29, 2015, with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the authors' own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Effective disease-modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyotrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Recognition of rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important

  15. Peripheral neuropathy associated with mitochondrial disease in children.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Ouvrier, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases in children are often associated with a peripheral neuropathy but the presence of the neuropathy is under-recognized because of the overwhelming involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). These mitochondrial neuropathies are heterogeneous in their clinical, neurophysiological, and histopathological characteristics. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of childhood mitochondrial neuropathy. Early recognition of neuropathy may help with the identification of the mitochondrial syndrome. While it is not definite that the characteristics of the neuropathy would help in directing genetic testing without the requirement for invasive skin, muscle or liver biopsies, there appears to be some evidence for this hypothesis in Leigh syndrome, in which nuclear SURF1 mutations cause a demyelinating neuropathy and mitochondrial DNA MTATP6 mutations cause an axonal neuropathy. POLG1 mutations, especially when associated with late-onset phenotypes, appear to cause a predominantly sensory neuropathy with prominent ataxia. The identification of the peripheral neuropathy also helps to target genetic testing in the mitochondrial optic neuropathies. Although often subclinical, the peripheral neuropathy may occasionally be symptomatic and cause significant disability. Where it is symptomatic, recognition of the neuropathy will help the early institution of rehabilitative therapy. We therefore suggest that nerve conduction studies should be a part of the early evaluation of children with suspected mitochondrial disease.

  16. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Inna; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is one of the acquired demyelinating neuropathies and is considered to be immune mediated. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical history, neurologic examination, electrophysiologic studies, CSF studies, and pathologic examination. Early diagnosis and treatment is important to prevent irreversible axonal loss and optimize improvement in function. The first-line agents for treatment are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis, which have all been demonstrated to be effective in controlled studies. Studies have not shown a significant difference between these three treatments, and the initial choice of therapy is often based on availability, cost, ease of administration, and side effect profile. If patients do not respond to one of these agents, they may respond to one of the others and sometimes in combination. If the first-line agents are not effective, chemotherapeutic or immunosuppressive agents may be considered. There are limited controlled studies of these modalities, and they are often used in conjunction with a first-line treatment. The majority of patients require long-term therapy to maintain a response and to prevent relapse.

  17. Causes of neuropathy in patients referred as "idiopathic neuropathy".

    PubMed

    Farhad, Khosro; Traub, Rebecca; Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    The etiology of neuropathy was idiopathic in 20%-30% of patients despite thorough investigation, based on results from the 1980s and 1990s. Since then, new etiologies have been recognized, and skin biopsy has been used to confirm small-fiber neuropathy. The authors reviewed the charts of 373 patients with idiopathic neuropathy who were referred to a neuropathy center between 2002 and 2012. Among the 284 eligible patients, 93 (32.7%) remained idiopathic. The most common cause was impaired glucose metabolism (72 patients, 25.3%), including diabetes in 26 and prediabetes in 46. Other etiologies were chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in 57 (20%) and monoclonal gammopathy in 20 (7%), as well as toxic, Sjögren disease, celiac disease, other immune-mediated diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency, amyloidosis, vitamin B1 and B6 deficiency, vasculitis, hypothyroidism, hereditary, Lyme disease, and anti-sulfatide antibody. The major causes of undiagnosed neuropathies were impaired glucose metabolism, CIDP, and monoclonal gammopathies. Despite thorough evaluation 32.7% remained idiopathic. Muscle Nerve 53: 856-861, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Quek, Amy May Lin; Soon, Derek; Chan, Yee Cheun; Thamboo, Thomas Paulraj; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    Inflammatory neuropathies have been reported to occur in association with nephrotic syndrome. Their underlying immuno-pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. A 50-year-old woman concurrently presented with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and nephrotic syndrome secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Both neuropathy and proteinuria improved after plasma exchange and steroids. Literature review of cases of concurrent inflammatory neuropathies and nephrotic syndrome revealed similar neuro-renal presentations. This neuro-renal condition may be mediated by autoantibodies targeting myelin and podocytes.

  19. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sinéad M; Laurá, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Early onset (childhood) monogenic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) with onset in childhood are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission and, in selected cases, pathological findings. Especially relevant to pediatrics are the items "secondary" versus "primary" neuropathy, "syndromic versus nonsyndromic," and "period of life." Different combinations of these parameters frequently point toward specific monogenic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first concern in pediatrics. As a rule, metabolic diseases include additional, orienting symptoms or signs, and their biochemical diagnosis is based on logical algorithms. Primary, motor sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating autosomal dominant (AD) forms (CMT1). Other forms include demyelinating autosomal recessive (AR) forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Peripheral motor neuron disorders are dominated by AR SMN-linked spinal muscular atrophies. (Distal) hereditary motor neuropathies represent <10% of HN but exhibit large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Sensory/dysautonomic HN involves five classic subtypes, each one related to specific genes. However, genetic heterogeneity is larger than initially suspected. Syndromic HN distinguish "purely neurological syndromes", which are multisystemic, such as spinocerebellar atrophies +, spastic paraplegias +, etc. Peripheral neuropathy is possibly the presenting feature, including in childhood. Autosomal recessive forms, on average, start more frequently in childhood. "Multiorgan syndromes", on the other hand, are more specific to Pediatrics. AR forms, which are clearly degenerative, prompt the investigation of a large set of pleiotropic genes. Other syndromes expressed in the perinatal period are mainly developmental disorders, and can sometimes be related to specific transcription factors. Systematic

  1. Predicting response to treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y-C; Allen, D C; Fialho, D; Mills, K R; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    To discover whether Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) electrophysiological criteria for demyelinating neuropathy predict response to immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). This was a retrospective case note study of patients who had attended Guy's Hospital Peripheral Nerve Clinic between January 2001 and March 2004, been diagnosed as having CIDP, and given treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), or plasma exchange (PE). Patients' nerve conduction studies (NCS) were reviewed for evidence of demyelination and whether the abnormalities fulfilled modified INCAT electrophysiological criteria. Patients whose NCS fulfilled the criteria were assigned to the neurophysiologically definite CIDP group, while those that did not were labelled as neurophysiologically probable CIDP. Responses to any of the three immunotherapy agents were compared between the two groups. Out of 50 patients, 27 (54%) were classified as neurophysiologically definite and 23 (46%) as neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients. Twenty (74%) neurophysiologically definite and 17 (73.9%) neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients responded to treatment. INCAT electrophysiological criteria did not predict a higher rate of response to immunotherapy. Neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients should be given a trial of immunotherapy.

  2. Predicting response to treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y‐C; Allen, D C; Fialho, D; Mills, K R; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To discover whether Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) electrophysiological criteria for demyelinating neuropathy predict response to immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Methods This was a retrospective case note study of patients who had attended Guy's Hospital Peripheral Nerve Clinic between January 2001 and March 2004, been diagnosed as having CIDP, and given treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), or plasma exchange (PE). Patients' nerve conduction studies (NCS) were reviewed for evidence of demyelination and whether the abnormalities fulfilled modified INCAT electrophysiological criteria. Patients whose NCS fulfilled the criteria were assigned to the neurophysiologically definite CIDP group, while those that did not were labelled as neurophysiologically probable CIDP. Responses to any of the three immunotherapy agents were compared between the two groups. Results Out of 50 patients, 27 (54%) were classified as neurophysiologically definite and 23 (46%) as neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients. Twenty (74%) neurophysiologically definite and 17 (73.9%) neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients responded to treatment. Conclusions INCAT electrophysiological criteria did not predict a higher rate of response to immunotherapy. Neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients should be given a trial of immunotherapy. PMID:16361609

  3. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G.; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Methods: Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). Results: The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62–2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Conclusions: Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. PMID:28251916

  4. Motor and sensory neuropathy due to myelin infolding and paranodal damage in a transgenic mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1C

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Samuel M.; Sha, Di; Mohammed, Anum A.; Asress, Seneshaw; Glass, Jonathan D.; Chin, Lih-Shen; Li, Lian

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1C (CMT1C) is a dominantly inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Despite human genetic evidence linking missense mutations in SIMPLE to CMT1C, the in vivo role of CMT1C-linked SIMPLE mutations remains undetermined. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying CMT1C pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or CMT1C-linked W116G human SIMPLE. Mice expressing mutant, but not wild type, SIMPLE develop a late-onset motor and sensory neuropathy that recapitulates key clinical features of CMT1C disease. SIMPLE mutant mice exhibit motor and sensory behavioral impairments accompanied by decreased motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and reduced compound muscle action potential amplitude. This neuropathy phenotype is associated with focally infolded myelin loops that protrude into the axons at paranodal regions and near Schmidt–Lanterman incisures of peripheral nerves. We find that myelin infolding is often linked to constricted axons with signs of impaired axonal transport and to paranodal defects and abnormal organization of the node of Ranvier. Our findings support that SIMPLE mutation disrupts myelin homeostasis and causes peripheral neuropathy via a combination of toxic gain-of-function and dominant-negative mechanisms. The results from this study suggest that myelin infolding and paranodal damage may represent pathogenic precursors preceding demyelination and axonal degeneration in CMT1C patients. PMID:23359569

  5. Peripheral neuropathy associated with antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saltık, Sema; Türkeş, Muzaffer; Tüzün, Erdem; Cakır, Arif; Ulusoy, Canan

    2013-05-01

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase are found in some rare neurological diseases. However, acute peripheral neuropathy associated with antiglutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity has not been reported previously. Here we report a case of a patient who presented with acute cranial and peripheral neuropathy in association with the presence of serum antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our pediatric neurology clinic with diplopia due to sixth cranial nerve palsy and ascending motor weakness in all extremities. The nerve conduction studies showed bilateral motor and sensory demyelinating neuropathy. Full recovery was achieved following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity-associated neurological diseases spectrum may also include acute demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guillain Barré syndrome and other immune mediated neuropathies: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Eldar, Adi Hersalis; Chapman, Joab

    2014-01-01

    Immune mediated neuropathies are uncommon but important to diagnose because they are potentially treatable. This chapter summarizes the clinical approach to diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and related neuropathies which are thought to be caused by direct autoimmune attack on peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mild recurrent neuropathy in CMT1B with a novel nonsense mutation in the extracellular domain of the MPZ gene

    PubMed Central

    Lagueny, A; Latour, P; Vital, A; Le Masson, G; Rouanet, M; Ferrer, X; Vital, C; Vandenberghe, A

    2001-01-01

    Clinical, electrophysiological, and neuropathological features are reported associated with a novel heterozygote point mutation in the extracellular domain of the MPZ gene, where a transversion at codon 71 in exon 3 leads to a codon stop: Glu71stop (ie GAA→TAA). A 36 year old woman developed a mild recurrent neuropathy after intensive manual work. The motor nerve conduction velocities were slow without conduction blocks and the nerve biopsy showed signs of demyelination-remyelination, axonal loss, and regular uncompacted myelin lamellae. She inherited the mutation from her father who displayed the same mutation with a normal phenotype. This nonsense mutation may cause a dosage difference of normal P0, and is probably underrepresented in the current mutation data bases. This report further extends the phenotype of MPZ mutations and also emphasises that mild phenotype of CMT1B may be more frequent than has been appreciated.

 PMID:11160475

  8. Autoimmune neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Nucci, Anamarli; Appenzeller, Simone; França, Marcondes C

    2017-04-01

    Systemic manifestations are frequent in autoimmune rheumatic diseases and include peripheral nervous system damage. Neuron cell body, axons and myelin sheath may all be affected in this context. This involvement results in severe and sometimes disabling symptoms. Sensory, motor and autonomic features may be present in different patterns that emerge as peculiar clinical pictures. Prompt recognition of these neuropathies is pivotal to guide treatment and reduce the risks of long term disability. In this review, we aim to describe the main immune-mediated neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases: sensory neuronopathies, multiple mononeuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, with an emphasis on clinical features and therapeutic options.

  9. Pathogenic mechanisms in inflammatory and paraproteinaemic peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Simon; Bennett, David L H

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the major recent developments in understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in inflammatory and paraproteinaemic neuropathies. In the inflammatory neuropathies, there has been a particular focus on antibody-mediated disease affecting the nodal/paranodal regions. Disruption of electrical integrity at these sites on the axonal membrane can cause conduction block without other electrophysiological features of demyelination, which has led to calls for a revision in the classification of axonal versus demyelinating neuropathies to include the new category of 'nodo-paranodopathies'. There has likewise been an expansion in knowledge regarding the diverse disease mechanisms of the paraproteinaemic neuropathies. These also include disease mediated by antibodies binding to peripheral nerve antigens, but additionally encompass immune complex deposition, cellular infiltration, and cytokine production. An increasing range of laboratory tests for antibodies, growth factors, and cytokines are proposed as useful in the management of inflammatory and paraproteinaemic neuropathies. Furthermore, the traditional electrodiagnostic classification into axonal and demyelinating neuropathy may not always accurately reflect the underlying disease process. Understanding how these paraclinical tests aid in identifying the underlying disease has relevance to the practising clinician both in terms of diagnosis and for the selection of rational treatments.

  10. Bilateral Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy Associated With Golimumab.

    PubMed

    de Frutos-Lezaun, Marta; Bidaguren, Aritz; de la Riva, Patricia; Meneses, Carlos F; Olascoaga, Javier

    2017-03-09

    We report the first documented case of retrobulbar optic neuropathy associated with golimumab. A 48-year-old man was admitted with a 3-week history of progressive visual loss of his left eye. He had received a second infusion of golimumab for ankylosing spondylitis 10 days before admission. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed enhancement of both optic nerves and visual evoked potentials were consistent with demyelinating bilateral optic neuropathy, although visual acuity drop in the right eye could not be determined because of deep amblyopia. No improvement was observed after golimumab dechallenge or corticosteroid treatment. Demyelinating complications related to treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFAI) have been previously described. Golimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody, is the most recently developed TNFAI and thus, fewer adverse effects have been reported. Further studies should be developed to elucidate if variability in golimumab's pharmacokinetics or TNF receptor binding affinity could explain different safety profiles compared with other TNFAI.

  11. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  12. Cerebral demyelination in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Brinar, Vesna V; Cikes, Nada; Petelin, Zeljka; Hlavati, Marina; Poser, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    A 38-year-old woman with a history of a granulomatous lesion of the nose, developed blurred vision, ataxic gait, and spastic tetraparesis. The presence of demyelination on the brain MRI led to the diagnosis of cerebral demyelination associated with Wegener's granulomatosis. Pulse cyclophosphamide administration resulted in some clinical of improvement of her condition. Demyelinating lesions seen in Wegener's have been ascribed to multiple sclerosis, but in this case, they are much more reminiscent of disseminated encephalomyelitis (DEM). The immunological challenge of the underlying disease, may, in the genetically susceptible person, presumably trigger the appearance of MS lesions. Wegener's granulomatosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of MS.

  13. Contralateral recurrence of tumefactive demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Guranda, Mihail; Essig, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tumefactive demyelination refers to large focal demyelinating lesions in the brain, which can be mistaken for malignancy. In some patients, these lesions are monophasic with a self-limited course; however, other patients demonstrate recurrent disease with new tumefactive or non-tumefactive lesions, and a subsequent diagnosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is not uncommon. Owing to the limited data available in the literature, many questions about the patterns and prognostic significance of recurrent tumefactive lesions remain unanswered. The current case report involves a patient who recovered from tumefactive demyelination and presented two years later with a new recurrent tumefactive lesion in the contralateral brain. PMID:26427896

  14. Motor neuropathies and lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, A

    2017-05-01

    Motor or motor-predominant neuropathies may arise from disease processes affecting the motor axon and/or its surrounding myelin. Lower motor neuron syndrome (LMNS) arises from a disease process affecting the spinal motor neuron itself. The term LMNS is more generally used, rather than motor neuronopathy, although both entities are clinically similar. Common features are muscle weakness (distal or proximal) with atrophy and hyporeflexia, but no sensory involvement. They can be acquired or hereditary. Immune-mediated neuropathies (multifocal motor neuropathy, motor-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy) are important to identify, as effective treatments are available. Other acquired neuropathies, such as infectious, paraneoplastic and radiation-induced neuropathies are also well known. Focal LMNS is an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-mimicking syndrome especially affecting young adults. The main hereditary LMNSs in adulthood are Kennedy's disease, late-onset spinal muscular atrophy and distal hereditary motor neuropathies. Motor neuropathies and LMNS are all clinical entities that should be better known, despite being rare diseases. They can sometimes be difficult to differentially diagnose from other diseases, particularly from the more frequent ALS in its pure LMN form. Nevertheless, correct identification of these syndromes is important because their treatment and prognoses are definitely different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies.

  16. Amyloid neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, David; Lozeron, Pierre; Lacroix, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    As amyloid neuropathies have benefited from recent major progress, this review is timely and relevant. The main recent articles on amyloid neuropathy cover its description, methods for diagnosis and therapies. Varied clinical presentations are described in transthyretin (TTR)-familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy (FAP) and light chain amyloid neuropathy. Mass spectrometry is able to identify the biochemical nature of amyloidogenic protein in nerve biopsy and skin biopsy samples for diagnosis of small fiber polyneuropathy. Both nerve biopsy and TTR gene sequencing are important to identify sporadic cases of amyloid neuropathy. Nerve biopsy is useful in demonstrating the amyloid origin of neuropathies developing after domino liver transplant recipients. Liver transplantation improves long-term survival in Met30 TTR-FAP. Factors recognized as leading to cardiomyopathy progression or heart involvement after liver transplantation are late disease onset and fibril composition. Combined heart and liver transplantation is recommended in severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. Antiamyloid drugs are emerging: tafamidis, a TTR stabilizer, showed in a phase III controlled study its ability to slow stage 1 FAP progression. Other strategies are emerging for TTR-FAP (combination doxycycline-tauroursodeoxycholic acid, small interfering RNA, antisense oligonucleotide, monoclonal antibody antiserum amyloid P component). For light chain neuropathy, intensive chemotherapy may be helpful. There is better recognition of amyloid neuropathies, and hope for enrolling patients with FAP in future clinical trials testing new antiamyloid drugs.

  17. Transient deafness due to temperature-sensitive auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Starr, A; Sininger, Y; Winter, M; Derebery, M J; Oba, S; Michalewski, H J

    1998-06-01

    To define mechanisms accounting for transient deafness in three children (two siblings, ages 3 and 6, and an unrelated child, age 15) when they become febrile. Audiometric tests (pure-tone audiometry, speech and sentence comprehension), tympanometry, middle ear muscle reflex thresholds, otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), and electrophysiological methods (auditory brain stem responses [ABRs], sensory evoked potentials, peripheral nerve conduction velocities) were used to test the children when they were afebrile and febrile. ABRs, when afebrile, were abnormal with a profound delay of the IV-V and absence of waves I-III. The ABR in one of the children, tested when febrile, showed no ABR components. Measures of cochlear receptor function using OAEs were normal in both febrile and afebrile states. Cochlear microphonic potentials were present in the three children, and a summating potential was likely present in two. When afebrile, there was a mild threshold elevation for all frequencies in the 15-yr-old and a mild elevation of thresholds for just low frequencies in the two siblings. Speech comprehension in quiet was normal but impaired in noise. One of the siblings tested when febrile had a profound elevation (>80 dB) of pure-tone thresholds and speech comprehension was absent. Acoustic reflexes subserving middle ear muscles and olivocochlear bundle were absent when febrile and when afebrile. No other peripheral or cranial nerve abnormalities were found in any of the children. Sensory nerve action potentials from median nerve in one of the children showed no abnormalities on warming of the hand to 39 degrees C. These children have an auditory neuropathy manifested by a disorder of auditory nerve function in the presence of normal cochlear outer hair cell functions. They develop a conduction block of the auditory nerves when their core body temperature rises due, most likely, to a demyelinating disorder of the auditory nerve. The auditory neuropathy in the two affected

  18. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  19. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  20. n-Hexane neuropathy due to rubber cement sniffing.

    PubMed

    Smith, A G; Albers, J W

    1997-11-01

    n-Hexane neuropathy has been described after glue sniffing and industrial exposure. Onset may be subacute and reminiscent of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Although the primary pathology is axonal, electrophysiologic evaluation is frequently most remarkable for conduction slowing. We describe a patient with a severe subacute neuropathy following n-hexane exposure via glue sniffing. Although symptoms worsened after termination of exposure ("coasting"), strength gradually improved to near normal. Sources of toxic exposure should be sought in all patients with subacute demyelinating neuropathies.

  1. Serum cytokine and chemokine profiles in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    To identify serum cytokine networks specific to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), serum samples of two subgroups (18 patients with typical CIDP and 12 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy [MADSAM]) were analyzed with multiplex magnetic bead-based cytokine assay. TNF-α, HGF, MIP-1β and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in total CIDP patients than in normal controls. Of these, HGF levels were elevated in typical CIDP patients, but not in MADSAM patients. Patients with high HGF levels showed good responses to steroid treatment. Different cytokine profiles among the CIDP subtypes presumably reflect differences in pathophysiology.

  2. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vanasse, Michel; Rossignol, Elsa; Hadad, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized clinically by a progressive symmetrical weakness evolving over a period of at least 2 months. There is increased CSF protein and conduction block, reduced nerve conduction velocities, increased distal latencies, and/or absent F wave or prolonged F wave latency in two or more nerves. Incidence is lower in children (10 times less) than in adults, and the condition presents in an acute or subacute manner with frequent relapses. It is not associated with other systemic diseases such as neoplasia, diabetes mellitus, or monoclonal gammopathies. It appears to be immune-related as a variety of humoral and cellular autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated. Treatment is based on results obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted in adults as such studies are lacking in the pediatric population. The evolution of CIDP is more favorable in children than in adults, with 80-100% response rates to standard treatments (steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and/or plasmapheresis) and excellent outcome with complete functional recovery in most patients. Cases refractory to standard therapies do exist in children, for which azathioprine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil alone or more often in association with other treatments have been used. However, safety and efficacy data are still insufficient to give specific recommendations regarding the optimal choice.

  3. Autonomic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... harm. Alpha-lipoic acid Preliminary research suggests this antioxidant may be helpful in slowing or even reversing ... electrical waves transmitted through electrodes placed on the skin, may help ease pain associated with diabetic neuropathy. ...

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and resolve slowly as damaged nerves heal. In chronic forms, symptoms begin subtly and progress slowly. Some ... the same for many months or years. Some chronic neuropathies worsen over time, but very few forms ...

  5. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Said, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy in the world. Both type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 diabetes are commonly complicated by peripheral nerve disorders. Two main types of neuropathy are observed: the most common is a nerve fiber length-dependent, distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy with little motor involvement but frequent, and potentially life threatening, autonomic dysfunction. Alteration of temperature and pain sensations in the feet is an early manifestation of diabetic polyneuropathy. The second pattern is a focal neuropathy, which more commonly complicates or reveals type 2 diabetes. Poor diabetic control increases the risk of neuropathy with subsequent neuropathic pains and trophic changes in the feet, which can be prevented by education of patients.

  6. Vasculitic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, Kelly Graham; Burns, Ted Michael; Collins, Michael Paul; Dyck, P James Bonham

    2014-01-01

    The vasculitic neuropathies are a diverse group of disorders characterised by the acute-to-subacute onset of painful sensory and motor deficits that result from inflammatory destruction of nerve blood vessels and subsequent ischaemic injury. They are common in patients with primary systemic vasculitis and are seen in vasculitis secondary to disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, viral infections, and diabetic inflammatory neuropathies. It is imperative that neurologists recognise these disorders to initiate treatment promptly and thereby prevent morbidity and mortality. To simplify the approach to patients with vasculitis of the peripheral nerves, a straightforward, dichotomous classification scheme can be used in which the vasculitic neuropathies are divided into two groups-nerve large arteriole vasculitis and nerve microvasculitis-on the basis of the size of the involved vessels. The size of the affected blood vessels correlates with the clinical course and prognosis in patients with vasculitic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral neuropathy in genetically characterized patients with mitochondrial disorders: A study from south India.

    PubMed

    Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Govindaraju, Chikanna; Sonam, Kothari; Nagappa, Madhu; Chiplunkar, Shwetha; Kumar, Rakesh; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Bharath, M M Srinivas; Arvinda, Hanumanthapura R; Sinha, Sanjib; Khan, Nahid Akthar; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nunia, Vandana; Paramasivam, Arumugam; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Taly, Arun B

    2016-03-01

    There are relatively few studies, which focus on peripheral neuropathy in large cohorts of genetically characterized patients with mitochondrial disorders. This study sought to analyze the pattern of peripheral neuropathy in a cohort of patients with mitochondrial disorders. The study subjects were derived from a cohort of 52 patients with a genetic diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders seen over a period of 8 years (2006-2013). All patients underwent nerve conduction studies and those patients with abnormalities suggestive of peripheral neuropathy were included in the study. Their phenotypic features, genotype, pattern of peripheral neuropathy and nerve conduction abnormalities were analyzed retrospectively. The study cohort included 18 patients (age range: 18 months-50 years, M:F- 1.2:1).The genotype included mitochondrial DNA point mutations (n=11), SURF1 mutations (n=4) and POLG1(n=3). Axonal neuropathy was noted in 12 patients (sensori-motor:n=4; sensory:n=4; motor:n=4) and demyelinating neuropathy in 6. Phenotype-genotype correlations revealed predominant axonal neuropathy in mtDNA point mutations and demyelinating neuropathy in SURF1. Patients with POLG related disorders had both sensory ataxic neuropathy and axonal neuropathy. A careful analysis of the family history, clinical presentation, biochemical, histochemical and structural analysis may help to bring out the mitochondrial etiology in patients with peripheral neuropathy and may facilitate targeted gene testing. Presence of demyelinating neuropathy in Leigh's syndrome may suggest underlying SURF1 mutations. Sensory ataxic neuropathy with other mitochondrial signatures should raise the possibility of POLG related disorder. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of neuropathy associated with Tangier disease.

    PubMed

    Zyss, Julie; Béhin, Anthony; Couvert, Philippe; Bouhour, Françoise; Sassolas, Agnès; Kolev, Ivan; Denys, Violaine; Vial, Christophe; Lacour, A; Carrié, Alain; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) (OMIM#205400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ABCA1 gene, leading to decreased levels of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Peripheral neuropathy is a common finding in this disease, and may present as relapsing/remitting mono/polyneuropathies or as syringomyelia-like neuropathy. We retrospectively analyzed four patients, and report here their clinical, biological, electrophysiological, imaging, and genetic findings. Three patients had a typical pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy including facial diplegia, but asymmetrical onset was observed in one patient who had first been misdiagnosed with Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Electrophysiological pattern was heterogeneous, showing both signs of demyelination and axonal degeneration. Truncating mutations of the ABCA1 gene, including two previously undescribed mutations, were constantly found. Atypical symptom onset and demyelinating features on electrophysiological examination can be misleading in case of pseudosyringomyelic neuropathy. These reports illustrate two different neurological phenotypes in TD, namely the pseudosyringomyelic type and the Lewis-Sumner-like type, and advocate for a systematic assessment of lipid profile including HDL cholesterol in demyelinating neuropathies.

  9. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensory neuropathies, from symptoms to treatment.

    PubMed

    Botez, Stephan A; Herrmann, David N

    2010-10-01

    The present review focuses on recent developments in diagnosis and treatment of sensory neuropathies. It does not seek to establish a comprehensive classification of sensory neuropathies, nor treatment guidelines per se. Diagnostic criteria and guidelines have been developed for distal symmetric polyneuropathies, small fiber sensory neuropathies and sensory neuronopathies. Novel diagnostic tools such as skin biopsies now allow diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathies. Genetic testing has defined new subtypes of mitochondrial neuropathies and inherited neuropathies with sensory involvement. Intravenous immunoglobulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors show promise for some dysimmune sensory neuropathies or neuronopathies. Additional options for management of neuropathic pain are emerging. Diagnostic methods for both acquired and hereditary sensory neuropathies have progressed in recent years, leading to earlier and more specific diagnoses and a better understanding of disease mechanisms. Much progress remains to be made regarding symptomatic and disease-modifying therapy for a range of sensory neuropathies, including those due to diabetes, HIV infection and from dysimmune or hereditary causes.

  11. Etiologic spectrum of biopsy-proven peripheral neuropathies in childhood from a resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pramod; Mahadevan, Anita; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Taly, Arun B

    2015-05-01

    There are only a few studies describing the etiologic spectrum of biopsy-proven peripheral neuropathies in children. This study reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological, and pathologic profile of 239 children (≤18 years of age) who have undergone nerve biopsy in a tertiary care centre for neurologic disorders and analyzed the etiologic spectrum and utility of nerve biopsy. The clinical profile, neuropathologic findings, and other investigations were combined to infer the final diagnosis. Neuropathy was detected in 199 biopsies; axonal pathology in 43%; demyelination in 41%; mixed pattern in 8%; and nonspecific findings in 8%. The major diagnostic categories included hereditary neuropathies (48%), heredodegenerative and metabolic disorders (27%), and inflammatory neuropathies (12%). Nerve biopsy proved most helpful in diagnosis of demyelinating and inflammatory neuropathies, reiterating its usefulness in specific situations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. [Pathology and neurophysiology analysis for peripheral neuropathy of four patients with chemicals poisoning].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-bo; Zhang, Qiao-yun; Wang, Yong; Sun, Dao-yuan

    2012-02-01

    To study the nerve electromyogram results by analysing the pathological characters of 4 cases diagnosed as peripheral neuropathy caused by n-hexane and arsenic. The nerve electromyogram examination and pathology data of 4 patients, who had been diagnosed as toxic chemicals peripheral neuropathy, were studied retrospectively. Two patients in this group were exposed to n-hexane, their nerve electromyogram examinations and biopsy pathology of superficial peroneal nerve indicated the peripheral neuropathy was mainly manifests the lesion of medullary sheath. Another two patients were exposed to arsenic, their nerve electromyogram examinations showed axonal degeneration associated with demyelination, and their biopsy pathology showed the peripheral neuropathy was mainly axonal degeneration. Axonal degeneration and demyelination always coexist in peripheral neuropathy caused by chemicals.

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Khema R; Saadia, Daniela; Facca, Alicia G; Bhatia, Rita; Ayyar, D Ram; Sheremata, William

    2008-06-01

    To describe temporal profile of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in patients with definite, relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy has been rarely reported in association with central nervous system demyelinating disorder indistinguishable from MS. In addition to usual diagnostic studies for CIDP and MS in all 5 patients, we studied proximal segments of nerves using deep tendon reflex latency measurements of biceps reflex, patellar reflex, and ankle reflex. All patients with MS subsequently (4-22 years) developed definite CIDP. Two of these patients developed multiple cranial nerve and spinal root enhancement on subsequent imaging without new intraparenchymal enhancement after a diagnosis of CIDP. The deep tendon reflex latencies were prolonged at more than 2 sites in all patients. Cerebral spinal fluid protein increased (70 +/- 19 to 144.8 +/- 17.4 mg/dL, P = 0.0001) at time of diagnosis of CIDP. Clinical improvement was observed in all patients after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. When patients with MS develop CIDP, manifestations of central and peripheral disease involvement seem to respond to intravenous immunoglobulin. These cases suggest that there may be common antigenic targets in central and peripheral nervous system in this subset of patients.

  14. Sural-sparing is seen in axonal as well as demyelinating forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Li, Zongbin; Verma, Kamal; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    The "sural-sparing pattern" of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is believed to reflect demyelinating pathology. We asked if it is present in non-demyelinating GBS-subtypes, namely acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), in addition to acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). We studied the occurrence of sural-sparing pattern in clinically defined GBS and MFS patients. Using serial electrodiagnostic studies, GBS patients were divided into AIDP, according to appearance of demyelination-remyelination and AMAN/AMSAN, if there were signs of reversible conduction failure or Wallerian-like degeneration. Equivocal cases were left unclassified. We defined sural-sparing as a greater decrease in median and or ulnar sensory nerve action potential than that of the sural, compared to age and height-matched normal controls. Twelve of 30 GBS and 7 of 20 MFS patients had sural-sparing. This pattern was seen in 4 of 8 AIDP, 5 of 13 AMAN/AMSAN and 3 of 9 unclassified cases. Sequential studies uncovered sural-sparing, initially covert, in additional 1 MFS, 1 unclassified, 1 AIDP and 1 AMAN/AMSAN patient. Sural-sparing occurs in axonal and demyelinating GBS subtypes. The sural-sparing pattern reflects a pathological process common to axonal and demyelinating GBS-subtypes alike. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel mutation in LRSAM1 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with dominant inheritance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic motor and sensory neuropathies. According to the primary site of damage, a distinction is made between demyelinating and axonal forms (CMT1 and 2, respectively, when inherited as an autosomal dominant trait). Leucine-rich repeat and sterile alpha motif-containing protein 1 (LRSAM1) is a ubiquitin-protein ligase with a role in sorting internalised cell-surface receptor proteins. So far, mutations in the LRSAM1 gene have been shown to cause axonal CMT in three different families and can confer either dominant or recessive transmission of the disease. Case presentation We have identified a novel mutation in LRSAM1 in a small family with dominant axonal CMT. Electrophysiological studies show evidence of a sensory axonal neuropathy and are interesting in so far as giant motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) are present on needle electromyography (EMG), while motor nerve conduction studies including compound motor action potential (CMAP) amplitudes are completely normal. The underlying mutation c.2046+1G >T results in the loss of a splice donor site and the inclusion of 63 additional base pairs of intronic DNA into the aberrantly spliced transcript. This disrupts the catalytically active RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain of LRSAM1. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, beyond the typical length-dependent degeneration of motor axons, damage of cell bodies in the anterior horn might play a role in LRSAM1-associated neuropathies. Moreover, in conjunction with other data in the literature, our results support a model, by which disruption of the C-terminal RING domain confers dominant negative properties to LRSAM1. PMID:24894446

  16. Anticeramide antibody and butyrylcholinesterase in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sykam, Aparna; Gutlapalli, V R; Tenali, Sandeep P; Meena, A K; Chandran, Priscilla; Suneetha, Sujai; Suneetha, Lavanya M

    2017-08-01

    Ceramide is a glycosphingolipid, a component of nerve and non neuronal cell membrane and plays a role in maintaining the integrity of neuronal tissue. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a multifunctional enzyme, its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases has been well established. Anticeramide antibody (Ab-Cer) and enzyme BChE have been implicated in peripheral neuropathies. The present study investigates whether there is an association between Ab-Cer and BChE activities and peripheral neuropathies. Patients included: human immunodeficiency virus associated peripheral neuropathy (HIV-PN, n=39), paucibacillary leprosy (PB-L, n=36), multibacillary leprosy (MB-L, n=52), diabetic neuropathy (DN, n=22), demyelinating sensory motor polyneuropathy (DSMN, n=13) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, n=10). Plasma Ab-Cer was measured by indirect enzyme linked immune assay (ELISA) and BChE activity in plasma was measured by colorimetric method. Ab-Cer levels were significantly elevated in MB-L and DN as compared to healthy subjects (HS). BChE levels were significantly higher in MB-L and DN as well as in HIV and HIV-PN. There is no significant difference in either Ab-Cer or BChE levels in DSMN and CIDP. Elevated plasma Ab-Cer and BChE levels may be considered significant in the pathogenesis of neuropathies. The variation in concurrent involvement of both the molecules in the neuropathies of the study, suggest their unique involvement in neurodegenerative pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The dilemma of diabetes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Vera; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Noone, Joshua M.; Runken, M. Chris; Gelinas, Deborah; Russell, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We reviewed the literature on chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and explored real-world data on the prevalence and treatment of CIDP within DM. Methods: A literature search of Scopus was performed for the terms chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, CIDP, and prevalence, incidence, epidemiology, or diabetes; peripheral neuropathy and prevalence or diabetes. We also searched through the reference lists of the resulting publications for additional findings that may have been missed. Additional publications on guidelines for the diagnosis of CIDP and diabetic neuropathy were also included. A descriptive analysis of the 2009–2013 PharMetrics Plus™ Database was performed to estimate the prevalence and treatment of CIDP within the DM population. Results There is an increasing body of literature suggesting that the prevalence of CIDP tends to be higher in diabetic patients, especially in those of older age. Our real-world data seem to support published findings from the literature. For the total cohort (N = 101,321,694), the percent prevalence of CIDP (n = 8,173) was 0.008%; DM (n = 4,026,740) was 4%. The percent prevalence of CIDP without DM (n = 5,986) was 0.006%; CIDP with DM (n = 2,187) was 9-fold higher at 0.054%. For patients >50 years old, there was a significantly higher percentage of CIDP with DM than CIDP without DM. Approximately 50% of CIDP patients were treated with IVIg, 23%–24% with steroids, 1%–2% with PE, and 20%–23% received no treatment. Conclusions In addition to the growing evidence of higher prevalence of CIDP in DM, our findings reinforce the need for heightened awareness of the association of CIDP and DM. PMID:27389526

  18. Neurophysiological profile of peripheral neuropathy associated with childhood mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Rahman, Shamima; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Clark, Damian; Christodoulou, John; Ellaway, Carolyn; Farrar, Michelle; Pitt, Matthew; Sampaio, Hugo; Ware, Tyson L; Wedatilake, Yehani; Thorburn, David R; Ryan, Monique M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve involvement is common in mitochondrial disease but often unrecognised due to the prominent central nervous system features. Identification of the underlying neuropathy may assist syndrome classification, targeted genetic testing and rehabilitative interventions. Clinical data and the results of nerve conduction studies were obtained retrospectively from the records of four tertiary children's hospital metabolic disease, neuromuscular or neurophysiology services. Nerve conductions studies were also performed prospectively on children attending a tertiary metabolic disease service. Results were classified and analysed according to the underlying genetic cause. Nerve conduction studies from 27 children with mitochondrial disease were included in the study (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) - 7, POLG - 7, SURF1 - 10, PDHc deficiency - 3). Four children with mtDNA mutations had a normal study while three had mild abnormalities in the form of an axonal sensorimotor neuropathy when not acutely unwell. One child with MELAS had a severe acute axonal motor neuropathy during an acute stroke-like episode that resolved over 12months. Five children with POLG mutations and disease onset beyond infancy had a sensory ataxic neuropathy with an onset in the second decade of life, while the two infants with POLG mutations had a demyelinating neuropathy. Seven of the 10 children with SURF1 mutations had a demyelinating neuropathy. All three children with PDHc deficiency had an axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. Unlike CMT, the neuropathy associated with mitochondrial disease was not length-dependent. This is the largest study to date of peripheral neuropathy in genetically- classified childhood mitochondrial disease. Characterising the underlying neuropathy may assist with the diagnosis of the mitochondrial syndrome and should be an integral part of the assessment of children with suspected mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society

  19. Successful treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with oral cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, R; Sockalingam, S; Shahrizaila, N; Cheah, T-E; Zain, A A; Goh, K-J

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a known manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the association of primary autoimmune inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with SLE is uncommon. We report a 26-year-old man who simultaneously presented with severe CIDP and photosensitive rash, but was unresponsive to intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and continued to progress. He was found to have underlying SLE and improved with combined corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy with oral cyclophosphamide. CIDP with underlying SLE may be more resistant to conventional therapy with IVIG, requiring the addition of other immunosuppressive agents.

  20. Autonomic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Valeria; Sandroni, Paola

    2014-10-01

    This article focuses on the most prevalent forms of autonomic neuropathies, but also discusses conditions such as focal and dysfunctional syndromes (altered autonomic function in the absence of structural lesions). The goal of this review is to allow the reader to promptly recognize these disorders, identify potentially reversible or treatable causes, and implement the appropriate treatment as well as supportive care. Secondary forms of autonomic neuropathies (eg, diabetes mellitus, amyloidosis) are much more common than primary forms, of which autoimmune ganglioneuropathies represent a major component. However, the spectrum of the latter is continuously evolving and has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Testing modalities such as autonomic testing, serum autoimmune antibody testing, and skin biopsies are becoming more widely available. Autonomic neuropathies are relatively common conditions, and, because of the prognostic implications as well as impact on patient quality of life, they should be promptly recognized and treated aggressively. Testing is critical as other conditions may mimic autonomic neuropathies. Treatment is symptomatic in many cases, but specific therapies are also available in selected autonomic neuropathies.

  1. CNS demyelination in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Brinar, Vesna V; Petelin, Zeljka; Brinar, Marko; Djaković, Visnja; Zadro, Ivana; Vranjes, Davorka

    2006-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases represent a diverse group of disorders that have generally of unknown etiology and poorly understood pathogenesis. They may be organ-specific or systemic, giving rise to overlapping syndromes; more than one autoimmune disease may occur in the same patient. Numerous case reports have documented that multiple sclerosis (MS) may be present concurrently with other autoimmune diseases, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid disease, type I diabetes mellitus and pernicious anemia. Case reports of disseminated encephalomyelitis (DEM) coincidental with other autoimmune diseases are rare. Many of systemic autoimmune diseases cause central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and are frequently then diagnosed as MS, whereas they often are instances of DEM, the result of vascular, granulomatous or postinfectious manifestations. We have reviewed 15 patients with autoimmune diseases and CNS demyelination in order to determine the nature of the demyelinating process.

  2. [Multifocal demyelinating polyneuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kimura, J; Kameyama, M

    1990-11-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome) is a variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), which often clinically simulates a motor neuron disease (MND). We report here three patients initially suspected to have MND, who later were diagnosed as a Lewis-Sumner syndrome. One of them showed a remarkable clinical improvement after immunoglobulin therapy. The definitive diagnosis of this syndrome rests upon nerve conduction studies, uncovering multiple sites of persistent conduction block. Technically, it is important to exclude insufficient stimulus which may lead to an erroneous impression of conduction block. Magnetic stimulation, as compared to electric current, elicited larger responses possibly because of deeper current penetration. We found this mode of stimulation useful especially in testing focal demyelination requiring full activation of a diseased nerve at a most proximal segment.

  3. A 71-nucleotide deletion in the periaxin gene in a Romani patient with early-onset slowly progressive demyelinating CMT.

    PubMed

    Baránková, L; Sisková, D; Hühne, K; Vyhnálková, E; Sakmaryová, I; Bojar, M; Rautenstrauss, B; Seeman, P

    2008-06-01

    Mutations in the periaxin (PRX) gene cause autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4F. To date, 10 non-sense or frameshift PRX mutations have been reported in patients with early-onset neuropathy and further disease course consistent with either Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or slow-progressive demyelinating CMT. We sequenced 59 patients from 55 Czech families including four unrelated patients of Romani (Gypsy) origin with early-onset CMT displaying decreased nerve conduction velocities. We identified a novel homozygous mutation c.3286_3356del71 (K1095fsX18) in one Romani patient showing very slow disease progression. Amongst non-Romani Czech CMT patients, PRX mutations have been proven to be very rare.

  4. Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Izenberg, Aaron; Perkins, Bruce A; Bril, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common condition and diabetics are prone to develop a spectrum of neuropathic complications ranging from symmetric and diffuse to asymmetric and focal neuropathies that may be associated with significant morbidity. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common of these complications, occurring in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as in those with prediabetes and glucose intolerance. In this review, the authors discuss the wide variety of neuropathies that can present in the context of diabetes, including the clinical manifestations, diagnostic features, and approach to management. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Recurrent Isolated Sixth Nerve Palsy in Relapsing-Remitting Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bustani, Najwa; Weiss, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy that typically presents as a relapsing-remitting or progressive disorder. Cranial neuropathies infrequently occur in association with other more typical symptoms of CIDP. We report a case of CIDP with recurrent isolated sixth nerve palsy. Her physical examination showed a right sixth nerve palsy and absent deep tendon reflexes as the only indicator of her disease. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed thickening without enhancement of the trigeminal and sixth cranial nerves. Nerve conduction study (NCS) revealed a sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction block and temporal dispersion in multiple nerves consistent with CIDP. Cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminic-cytologic dissociation. She had a remarkable response to intravenous immunoglobulin and remains asymptomatic without any additional immunomodulating therapy. Isolated cranial neuropathies can rarely occur as the sole manifestation of relapsing-remitting CIDP. The profound demyelination found on NCS in this case demonstrates that there can be a dramatic discordance between the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in some patients with this disorder.

  6. Ultrasound of the peripheral nerves in systemic vasculitic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Décard, Bernhard F; Bischof, Antje; Axer, Hubertus

    2014-12-15

    Ultrasound of the peripheral nerves (PNUS) can be used to visualize nerve pathologies in polyneuropathies (PNP). The aim of this study was to investigate, whether PNUS provides additional information in patients with proven systemic vasculitic neuropathies (VN). Systematic ultrasound measurements of several peripheral nerves, the vagal nerve and the 6th cervical nerve root were performed in 14 patients and 22 healthy controls. Nerve conduction studies of the corresponding nerves were undertaken. Finally, the measured results were compared to a study population of demyelinating immune-mediated and axonal neuropathies. Patients with VN displayed significant smaller amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) (p<0.05) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) compared to healthy controls, while conduction velocity did not differ between groups. The mean nerve cross-sectional areas (CSA) were increased in several peripheral nerves compared to the controls, most prominent in tibial and fibular nerve (p<0.01). PNUS revealed nerve enlargement in most of the clinically and electrophysiologically affected nerves (22 out of 31) in VN. Nerve enlargement was more often seen in vasculitic neuropathies than in other axonal neuropathies, but significantly rarer than in demyelinating neuropathies. Focal CSA enlargement in one or more nerves in electrophysiologically axonal neuropathies can be a hint for VN and thus facilitate diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants: where we are and where we should go.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic and often disabling sensory motor neuropathy postulated as caused by an immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin. In addition to a classic sensory–motor polyneuropathy, other phenotypes of CIDP have been described including the Lewis- Sumner syndrome, distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy, pure motor CIDP, pure sensory CIDP including chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy (CISP), and focal CIDP. These phenotypes are currently considered to be variants of CIDP, even if the possibility that they represent different demyelinating neuropathies cannot be fully excluded considering differences in their response to therapy. Several data support the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of CIDP even if the precise targets and actors (antibodies and lymphocytes) of this immune response remain uncertain. Recent studies have shown that the therapeutic response may differ in patients with peculiar clinical presentations supporting the hypothesis that different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie the heterogeneity of CIDP. The majority of patients with CIDP show improvement after immune therapies including corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). It remains unclear why none of the other immune therapies that were reported to be variably effective in other immune disorders proved to be effective also in CIDP.

  8. Clinical spectrum of Castleman disease-associated neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2016-12-06

    To define the peripheral neuropathy phenotypes associated with Castleman disease. We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with biopsy-proven Castleman disease evaluated between January 2003 and December 2014. Patients with associated peripheral neuropathy were identified and divided into 2 groups: those with Castleman disease without POEMS syndrome (CD-PN) and those with Castleman disease with POEMS syndrome (CD-POEMS). We used a cohort of patients with POEMS as controls. Clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory characteristics were collected and compared among patient subgroups. There were 7 patients with CD-PN, 20 with CD-POEMS, and 122 with POEMS. Patients with CD-PN had the mildest neuropathy characterized by predominant sensory symptoms with no pain and mild distal sensory deficits (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 7 points). Although both patients with CD-POEMS and patients with POEMS had a severe sensory and motor neuropathy, patients with CD-POEMS were less affected (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 33 and 66 points, respectively). The degree of severity was also reflected on electrodiagnostic testing in which patients with CD-PN demonstrated a mild degree of axonal loss, followed by patients with CD-POEMS and then those with POEMS. Demyelinating features, defined by European Federation of Neurologic Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria, were present in 43% of the CD-PN, 78% of the CD-POEMS, and 86% of the POEMS group. There is a spectrum of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies associated with Castleman disease. CD-PN is sensory predominant and is the mildest phenotype, whereas CD-POEMS is a more severe sensory and motor neuropathy. Compared to the POEMS cohort, those with CD-POEMS neuropathy have a similar but less severe phenotype. Whether these patients respond differently to treatment deserves further study. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  10. Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Freeman, Roy; Veves, Aristidis

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the relationships among large, small, and autonomic fiber neurophysiological measures in a cross-sectional study of patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed 130 individuals: 25 healthy subjects and 105 subjects with diabetes. Subjects were classified by the presence or absence of neuropathy by physical examination. All subjects underwent autonomic testing, nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing, and nerve-axon reflex vasodilation in addition to quantifiable neurological examination and symptom scores. Correlation and cluster analysis were used to determine relationships between and among different neurophysiological testing parameters. RESULTS Results of neurophysiological tests were abnormal in patients with clinical evidence of diabetic neuropathy compared with results in healthy control subjects and in those without neuropathy (P < 0.01, all tests). The correlations among individual tests varied widely, both within (r range <0.5–>0.9, NS to <0.001) and between test groups (r range <0.2–>0.5, NS to <0.01). A two-step hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that neurophysiological tests do not aggregate by typical “small,” “large,” or “autonomic” nerve fiber subtypes. CONCLUSIONS The modest correlation coefficients seen between the different testing modalities suggest that these techniques measure different neurophysiological parameters and are therefore not interchangeable. However, the data suggest that only a small number of neurophysiological tests are actually required to clinically differentiate individuals with neuropathy from those without. The natural clustering of both patients and healthy control subjects suggests that variations in the population will need to be considered in future studies of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:20805259

  11. N-hexane neuropathy in screen printers.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Chaudhry, N; Tatke, M

    2007-01-01

    To study the clinical and electrophysiological profile of n-hexane neuropathy in a tertiary care center of India. Twenty five screen printers from five different factories, with peripheral neuropathy were included in the study. A detailed general physical, systemic and neurological examination was conducted Visual acuity, color vision and field charting was done in all the subjects. All patients were subjected to Folstein mini mental scale examination. Electrophysiological evaluation included motor and sensory conduction studies of the conventionally studied nerves of upper and lower limbs, Needle EMG of various distal and proximal muscles and patterned visual evoked responses. The electrophysiological profile was repeated every three months till one year. Sural nerve biopsy was studied in six patients. The patients were followed for a maximum of 4 years. Twenty three [92%] patients had sensory- motor neuropathy, while pure sensory neuropathy was seen in two. The sensory conductions were affected almost equally in upper as well as the lower limbs, while the motor conductions were affected more in the lower limbs than the upper limbs. The sensory conductions were not recordable in both the upper and the lower limbs in 18 [72%] patients. Motor conduction studies revealed an asymmetric and patchy involvement. Proximal conduction block was seen in 3 patients [12%]. On needle EMG features of denervation were seen in all patients. P100 latency was normal in all. Sural nerve biopsy showed a selective decrease in large myelinated axons with demyelination. Axonal swelling with focal areas of demyelination was observed in two patients. The electrophysiological patterns as well as the histopathology reflect the pathophysiology of n-hexane neuropathy.

  12. Autoimmune-mediated peripheral neuropathies and autoimmune pain.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies have diverse acquired and inherited causes. The autoimmune neuropathies represent an important category where treatment is often available. There are overlapping signs and symptoms between autoimmune neuropathies and other forms. Making a diagnosis can be challenging and first assisted by electrophysiologic and sometimes pathologic sampling, with autoimmune biomarkers providing increased assistance. Here we provide a review of the autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathies, their available biomarkers, and approaches to treatment. Also discussed is new evidence to support a mechanism of autoimmune pain. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  14. [Dysimmune peripheral neuropathies: evaluation of treatment].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G

    2007-09-01

    Despite a supposed common mechanism with demyelination, dysimmune peripheral neuropathies compose a heterogeneous group in term of symptoms (sensory, motor, autonomic), localization of lesions (focal, multifocal or widely spreaded) as well as evolutions (acute, relapsing or chronic). The lacks of reliable biological or electrophysiological markers of evolution in dysimmune neuropathies require development of clinical scales for therapeutic trials and therapeutic decisions in daily practice. As elaboration of a universal scale is not a realistic goal, several specific measurement tools have been proposed for dysimmune neuropathies this past ten years. Highlighting the interest of functional scales as the ONLS, the European INCAT group made a remarkable effort to validate these scales in dysimmune neuropathies. However, there is a controversy concerning the relative interest of deficit scales versus functional scales. The deficit scales may be more sensitive to progression of the disease whereas the functional scales reflect the impact of neuropathy. The use of composite scales, mixing the evaluation of deficits, electrophysiological data and functional issues, is a promising solution, but the relative value of these parameters still remains to be defined.

  15. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... as porphyria Severe infection throughout the body ( sepsis ) Thyroid disease Vitamin deficiencies (including vitamins B12 , B6 , E , and B1 ) Some metabolic disorders are passed down through families (inherited), while ...

  16. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of vitamin B1, B6, B12, or other vitamins Metabolic disease Poisoning due to heavy metals, such as lead Poor blood flow to the legs Underactive thyroid gland Bone marrow disorders Tumors Certain inherited disorders ...

  17. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections, metabolic problems, inherited causes and exposure to toxins. One of the most common causes is diabetes ... tissues Kidney, liver or thyroid disorders Exposure to toxins Repetitive motion, such as those performed for certain ...

  18. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results.

  19. Erythromelalgia-like presentation of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy in a setting of past alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Dhand, Upinder K

    2016-02-01

    Erythromelalgia may be primary or secondary to an underlying medical condition. Association with small fiber neuropathy and axonal large fiber peripheral neuropathy has been described. Erythromelalgia in the setting of acquired demyelinating neuropathy has not been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman with severe erythromelalgia, pain and burning, progressive weakness, hyporeflexia and distal pan-sensory deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid protein was 219 mg/dL. Nerve conduction study revealed extreme (ten-fold) prolongation of distal motor latencies, markedly slow motor nerve conduction, reduced terminal latency index, reduced distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, possible conduction blocks, and distal denervation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, prednisone and azathioprine resulted in marked clinical and electrophysiological improvement. Our patient fulfills the diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP); however, the unique electrodiagnostic features and presentation with erythromelalgia may represent a CIDP variant or a novel dysimmune neuropathy, or may partly be related to neurotoxic effects of prior alcohol abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Peripheral neuropathies and antiretroviral drugs. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Thiam, A; Diagne, M; Ndiaye, Ng; Ngom Gueye, N F; Diakhate, N D; Sow, P S; Ndiaye, I P

    2005-01-01

    In order to appreciate the antiretroviral drugs impact in the HIV positive patients with peripheral neuropathy, a clinical, electrophysiological and neurpathological study of nerve biopsies was performed. A group of 8 HIV seropositive patients with peripheral neuropathy was compared with an other group of 10 HIV seropositive patients treated with multiple antiretroviral drugs. Electrophysiological examination with motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) mesure of the median and the sciatic popliteal nerve was followed by nerve biopsy. Nerve fragments carried out the neuropathological technics for morphological examination. Eighteen seropositive HIV patients (16 HIV-1 and 2 HIV-2) were included in this study. Six patients among them had motor and sensitive neuropathy of the four limbs and 2 patients had sensitive neuropathy associated with pyramidal signs. In fine, 1 patient had sensitive neuropathy with distal amyotrophy of the four limbs. Slow MNCV was observed in all the patients and more severe in the lower limbs. Nerve were unexciting in the lower limbs in 2 patients. Nerve biopsy showed severe axonal loss in all the patients treated but one. They associated axonal lesion in 5 cases and myelinated lesions in 2 cases. Two patients non treated had normal nerve biopsy. Axonal loss was mild in 2 cases and very severe in one case associated with non inflammatory demyelinated lesions. we observed more severe and more frequent nerve lesions in treated patients than in no treated patients, as at the clinical, electrophysiological and neuropathological examination. Antiretroviral drugs cause more frequently pain motor and sensitive neuropathies at usual posologies. The occurence of recrudescence of pain peripheral neuropathy under antiretroviral treatment allows to reconsider drugs posologies.

  1. Family with inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and the HNPP 17p12 deletion.

    PubMed

    Korn-Lubetzki, Isabelle; Argov, Zohar; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Wirguin, Itzchak; Steiner, Israel

    2002-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), classically presenting as recurrent focal neuropathies precipitated by trauma or compression, is an autosomal dominant neuropathy due to a deletion at chromosomal locus 17p12. Inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (IDP), a putative autoimmune disorder presenting in an acute (AIDP) or a chronic form (CIDP), has been rarely reported as familial. We present a father and two daughters of Jewish Kurdish origin who developed IDP within 10 years. The unusual familial history led us to reevaluate the diagnosis of IDP, and suggested an autosomal dominant pedigree. DNA analysis identified the deletion typical of HNPP on chromosome 17. Screening for the HNPP deletion in patients with atypical, recurrent, or familial IDP might be warranted.

  2. [Antiglycolipid antibody in inflammatory neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S

    1995-12-01

    Antiglycolipid antibody is frequently detected in the acute phase sera from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome, GBS). The titer is highest in the serum sample taken first after the neurological onset, and decreases with clinical improvement. Antiglycolipid antibody may play a role in the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS. GM1 and GD1b are the antigens most commonly recognized. Monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody specifically bound to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Serum anti-GD1b antibody may cause demyelinative neuropathy by binding to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody is specifically raised in almost all the sera from Fisher syndrome and GBS with ophthalmoplegia. Anti-GQ1b monoclonal antibody immunostained specifically the paranodal myelin of the extramedullary portion of oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves, but no such staining was observed in the other peripheral nerves. Anti-GQ1b antibody may cause conduction block in the cranial nerves innervating the muscles for extraocular movement by binding to the paranodal myelin of those nerves. Anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody is detected in the patients with GBS with very low or inexcitable compound muscle action potentials. The sera from patients with GBS subsequent to mycoplasma infection had antigalactocerebroside antibody. Further study on antiglycolipid antibody is needed for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS.

  3. Corneal sensitivity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Surbhi; Myneni, Ajay A; Mu, Lina; Myers, Bennett H; Patel, Sangita P

    2014-07-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis may result from a variety of ocular or systemic diseases. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune neuropathy that affects any nerve plexus but with no known association with corneal disease. We observed 2 patients with CIDP and visually compromising neurotrophic corneal ulcers. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of neurotrophic corneas in patients with CIDP to identify a subpopulation of asymptomatic patients who are at risk for vision loss. This is an observational case series of 2 patients with CIDP with visually compromising neurotrophic corneal ulcers and a prospective clinical study comparing corneal sensitivity in 9 patients with CIDP versus 9 age- and sex-matched controls. Corneal sensitivity was tested with an esthesiometer. Statistical analyses were performed to determine patterns or significances in relation to the subject's age, gender, and duration and severity of the disease. The overall median corneal sensitivity was 5.7 for patients with CIDP and 6.0 for controls (P = 0.09). The mean corneal sensitivity was 5.6 ± 0.4 in patients with CIDP compared with 5.8 ± 0.3 in controls. No specific pattern was found with age, gender, or duration and severity of the disease among patients with CIDP. Although the case series demonstrated decreased corneal sensitivity in both patients with CIDP, the prospective study detected reduced corneal sensitivity in patients with CIDP when compared with controls, but did not reach statistical significance. Ophthalmic examinations with measurement of corneal sensitivity should be considered in the management of patients with CIDP.Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01379833.

  4. Inflammatory neuropathies: pathology, molecular markers and targets for specific therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies encompass groups of heterogeneous disorders characterized by pathogenic immune-mediated hematogenous leukocyte infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots or both, with resultant demyelination or axonal degeneration or both. Inflammatory neuropathies may be divided into three major disease categories: Guillain-Barré syndrome (particularly the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy variant), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy (or peripheral nerve vasculitis). Despite major advances in molecular biology, pathology and genetics, the pathogenesis of these disorders remains elusive. There is insufficient knowledge on the mechanisms of hematogenous leukocyte trafficking into the peripheral nervous system to guide the development of specific molecular therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory neuropathies compared to disorders such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis. The recent isolation and characterization of human endoneurial endothelial cells that form the blood-nerve barrier provides an opportunity to elucidate leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions critical to the pathogenesis of inflammatory neuropathies at the interface between the systemic circulation and peripheral nerve endoneurium. This review discusses our current knowledge of the classic pathological features of inflammatory neuropathies, attempts at molecular classification and genetic determinants, the utilization of in vitro and in vivo animal models to determine pathogenic mechanisms at the interface between the systemic circulation and the peripheral nervous system relevant to these disorders and prospects for future potential molecular pathology biomarkers and targets for specific therapeutic intervention.

  5. Inflammatory Neuropathies: Pathology, molecular markers and targets for specific therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ubogu, Eroboghene E.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies encompass groups of heterogeneous disorders characterized by pathogenic immune-mediated hematogenous leukocyte infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots or both, with resultant demyelination or axonal degeneration or both. Inflammatory neuropathies may be divided into three major disease categories: Guillain-Barré syndrome (particularly the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy variant), Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy (or peripheral nerve vasculitis). Despite major advances in molecular biology, pathology and genetics, the pathogenesis of these disorders remains elusive. There is insufficient knowledge on the mechanisms of hematogenous leukocyte trafficking into the peripheral nervous system to guide the development of specific molecular therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory neuropathies compared to disorders such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis. The recent isolation and characterization of human endoneurial endothelial cells that form the blood-nerve barrier provides an opportunity to elucidate leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions critical to the pathogenesis of inflammatory neuropathies at the interface between the systemic circulation and peripheral nerve endoneurium. This review discusses our current knowledge of the classic pathological features of inflammatory neuropathies, attempts at molecular classification and genetic determinants, the utilization of in vitro and in vivo animal models to determine pathogenic mechanisms at the interface between the systemic circulation and the peripheral nervous system relevant to these disorders and prospects for future potential molecular pathology biomarkers and targets for specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:26264608

  6. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H G; Chrast, Roman

    2008-06-15

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK-Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function.

  7. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T.; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H.G.; Chrast, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK–Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function. PMID:18559480

  8. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Viala, Karine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Créange, Alain; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Pouget, Jean; Clavelou, Pierre; Vial, Christophe; Steck, Andreas; Musset, Lucile; Marin, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether rituximab 375 mg/m2 was efficacious in patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy). Methods: Fifty-four patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The inclusion criteria were inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory score (ISS) ≥4 and visual analog pain scale >4 or ataxia score ≥2. The primary outcome was mean change in ISS at 12 months. Results: Twenty-six patients were randomized to a group receiving 4 weekly infusions of 375 mg/m2 rituximab, and 28 patients to placebo. Intention-to-treat analysis, with imputation of missing ISS values by the last observation carried forward method, showed a lack of mean change in ISS at 12 months, 1.0 ± 2.7 in the rituximab group, and 1.0 ± 2.8 in the placebo group. However, changes were observed, in per protocol analysis at 12 months, for the number of patients with an improvement of at least 2 points in the INCAT disability scale (p = 0.027), the self-evaluation scale (p = 0.016), and 2 subscores of the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Conclusions: Although primary outcome measures provide no evidence to support the use of rituximab in IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, there were improvements in several secondary outcomes in per protocol analysis. Level of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that rituximab is ineffective in improving ISS in patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy. PMID:23667063

  9. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Viala, Karine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Créange, Alain; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Pouget, Jean; Clavelou, Pierre; Vial, Christophe; Steck, Andreas; Musset, Lucile; Marin, Benoit

    2013-06-11

    To determine whether rituximab 375 mg/m(2) was efficacious in patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy). Fifty-four patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The inclusion criteria were inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory score (ISS) ≥4 and visual analog pain scale >4 or ataxia score ≥2. The primary outcome was mean change in ISS at 12 months. Twenty-six patients were randomized to a group receiving 4 weekly infusions of 375 mg/m(2) rituximab, and 28 patients to placebo. Intention-to-treat analysis, with imputation of missing ISS values by the last observation carried forward method, showed a lack of mean change in ISS at 12 months, 1.0 ± 2.7 in the rituximab group, and 1.0 ± 2.8 in the placebo group. However, changes were observed, in per protocol analysis at 12 months, for the number of patients with an improvement of at least 2 points in the INCAT disability scale (p = 0.027), the self-evaluation scale (p = 0.016), and 2 subscores of the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Although primary outcome measures provide no evidence to support the use of rituximab in IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, there were improvements in several secondary outcomes in per protocol analysis. This study provides Class I evidence that rituximab is ineffective in improving ISS in patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy.

  10. [Inflammatory neuropathies and multineuritis].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, Thierry; Chofflon, Michel

    2009-12-02

    Inflammatory neuropathies include those neuropathies in which the diagnosis, outcome and type of treatment are badly known, the reason of this review. They are expressed as diffuse (such as CIDP and ganglionopathies), multifocal (vasculitic neuropathy) or focal (MMN; plexopathies; immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). These forms of neuropathies are important to be known because the beneficial therapeutic possibilities of immunosuppression.

  11. CIDP and other inflammatory neuropathies in diabetes - diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Stettner, Mark; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Malik, Rayaz A

    2017-09-15

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSPN) is the most common neuropathy to occur in diabetes mellitus. However, patients with diabetes can also develop inflammatory neuropathies, the most common and most treatable of which is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Whether diabetes is a risk factor for CIDP remains under debate. Early studies suggested that patients with diabetes were at increased risk of CIDP, but epidemiological studies failed to confirm the association, and subsequent data have re-opened the debate. Inadequate interpretation of investigations and differentials between CIDP and other neuropathies that can occur in diabetes, such as DSPN, diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies and vasculitic multiple mononeuropathy, might mean that CIDP is under-recognized. Despite a response rate of >80% to first-line therapies for CIDP in patients with or without diabetes, those with diabetes often present with greater disability owing to late referral and axonal pathology attributed to DSPN. The increasing worldwide prevalence of diabetes creates an urgent need to improve identification of potentially treatable neuropathies, such as CIDP. In this Review, we consider the features of CIDP in patients with diabetes, and discuss how these features can be used to differentiate the condition from other neuropathies. We also review the management options for CIDP and other inflammatory neuropathies in patients with diabetes.

  12. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  13. Sporadic hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Advances in the diagnosis using next generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Fallerini, Chiara; Carignani, Giulia; Capoccitti, Giorgio; Federico, Antonio; Rufa, Alessandra; Pinto, Anna Maria; Rizzo, Caterina Lo; Rossi, Alessandro; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Giannini, Fabio; Renieri, Alessandra

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are genetically heterogeneous disorders affecting peripheral motor and sensory functions. Many different pathogenic variants in several genes involved in the demyelinating, the axonal and the intermediate HMSN forms have been identified, for which all inheritance patterns have been described. The mutation screening currently available is based on Sanger sequencing and is time-consuming and relatively expensive due to the high number of genes involved and to the absence of mutational hot spots. To overcome these limitations, we have designed a custom panel for simultaneous sequencing of 28 HMSN-related genes. We have applied this panel to three representative patients with variable HMSN phenotype and uncertain diagnostic classifications. Using our NGS platform we rapidly identified three already described pathogenic heterozygous variants in MFN2, MPZ and DNM2 genes. Here we show that our pre-custom platform allows a fast, specific and low-cost diagnosis in sporadic HMSN cases. This prompt diagnosis is useful for providing a well-timed treatment, establishing a recurrence risk and preventing further investigations poorly tolerated by patients and expensive for the health system. Importantly, our study illustrates the utility and successful application of NGS to mutation screening of a Mendelian disorder with extreme locus heterogeneity.

  14. [Occupational toxic neuropathies: morphology in peripheral nerve biopsies].

    PubMed

    Scelsi, Roberto; Candura, Stefano M

    2012-01-01

    Many peripheral neuropathies are caused by the (acute or chronic) toxic action of metals, solvents, pesticides, and other occupational and environmental contaminants. These agents often reproduce the anatomoclinical pictures of hereditary (e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease), autoimmune (Guillain-Barrè syndrome), or dysmetabolic (thiamine deficiency, diabetic neuropathy) forms. Toxic peripheral neuropathies can be classified on the basis of etiology, clinical features (sensitive, motor, sensitive-motor), or histopathology: neuronopathies (uncommon, mostly secondary to retrograde axonal degeneration; e.g., arsenic, thallium), axonopathies (acrylamide, esacarbons, CS2, organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy), myelinopathies (trichloroethylene), mixed forms (axonal and demyelinating: lead). For many substances, experimental research has led to the identification of the molecular and cellular targets of neurotoxicity. Several compounds are active by biotransformation (e.g., the esacarbons n-hexane and MnBK are neurotoxic since they are metabolized to 2,5-hexanedione), Genetic, physiological and environmental factors determine the individual metabolic set-up, and they may give origin to differences in the workers' sensitivity. Cessation of exposure is often followed by (microscopically observable) regenerative phenomena and clinical improvement. The morphology of neuropathies can be studied through peripheral nerve biopsy. Samples of sural nerve (or other nervous trunks of the limbs), adequately fixed, sectioned, and stained, allow the observation of alterations in axonal fibres (e.g., giant-axonal neuropathy, dying back neuropathy), myelin (demyelination), Schwann cells, interstitium, and blood vessels; possible inflammatory infiltrates; fibre density; regenerative phenomena (growth cone, remyelination). In occupational medicine, biopsy is indicated when the anamnestic-clinical picture, laboratory tests, and instrumental exams leave doubts about the nature, type

  15. Anti-Gal-C antibody in autoimmune neuropathies subsequent to mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S; Chiba, A; Hitoshi, S; Takizawa, H; Kanazawa, I

    1995-04-01

    Four of 82 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and 1 of 12 with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), who previously had had Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, had serum antibody to galactocerebroside (Gal-C). Two patients with GBS without mycoplasma infection also had anti-Gal-C antibody, whereas none of the normal or the disease controls had it. As Gal-C is a major glycolipid antigen in myelin, anti-Gal-C antibody may function in the pathogenesis of autoimmune demyelinative neuropathies. Mycoplasma pneumoniae appears to be an important preceding infectious agent in autoimmune neuropathies with anti-Gal-C antibody.

  16. Anti-MAG/SGPG associated neuropathy does not commonly cause distal nerve temporal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gondim, F A A; De Sousa, E A; Latov, N; Sander, H W; Chin, R L; Brannagan, T H

    2007-08-01

    Patients with anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) neuropathy have uniform slowing without temporal dispersion, but do usually have disproportionately distal slowing. We evaluated distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) dispersion in 29 patients with anti-MAG/sulphated glucuronyl paragloboside (SGPG) neuropathy (titres > or = 12,800). Among 138 motor responses, 15% (tibial), 7.3% (peroneal), 10.7% (median) and 13.8% (ulnar) had distal CMAP duration > 9 ms. Disproportionate distal slowing with normal distal CMAP duration in the arms may be useful to differentiate chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from anti-MAG/SGPG associated neuropathy.

  17. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  18. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with pulsed oral steroids.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Kelkar, Praful; Parry, Gareth J

    2008-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated neuropathy that responds to various immunosuppressive treatments. Oral daily prednisone therapy is effective and inexpensive, but the long-term treatment that is usually necessary leads to serious adverse effects. Consequently, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange have been widely used to treat CIDP, making treatment expensive and inconvenient. A steroid regimen that reduces adverse effects but preserves efficacy would simplify treatment. Pulsed steroids have nongenomic actions not seen with low-dose steroids, including rapid inhibition of arachidonic acid release and of calcium and sodium cycling across plasma membranes of immune cells. To study the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pulsed oral methylprednisolone therapy in patients with CIDP. Open-label prospective study. University of Minnesota Neuropathy Center, Minneapolis. Ten patients (3 women and 7 men) with CIDP followed up for at least 22 months. Neuromuscular score and Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) disability score were used as outcome measures for efficacy; weight, blood pressure, changes in bone density, and steroid-related adverse effect questionnaire were used as outcome measures for safety. This steroid regimen leads to significant improvement in weakness and disability in all patients treated and to off-treatment remission in 60% of patients. Treatment was fairly well tolerated, and only 1 patient discontinued treatment because of adverse effects. Steroid-induced osteoporosis remained a problem, especially in older patients. Pulsed oral methylprednisolone may be efficacious in the long-term treatment of CIDP and is relatively well tolerated. Remission can be induced in most patients, especially those with a shorter duration of disease.

  19. Severity and Patterns of Blood-Nerve Barrier Breakdown in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: Correlations with Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Sawai, Setsu; Sano, Yasuteru; Beppu, Minako; Misawa, Sonoko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Koga, Michiaki; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM) and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS)). The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) in each CIDP subtype. Methods We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs). Results The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. Conclusions Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes. PMID:25105500

  20. Diagnostic value of sonography in treatment-naive chronic inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Goedee, H Stephan; van der Pol, W Ludo; van Asseldonk, Jan-Thies H; Franssen, Hessel; Notermans, Nicolette C; Vrancken, Alexander J F E; van Es, Michael A; Nikolakopoulos, Stavros; Visser, Leo H; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2017-01-10

    To determine the diagnostic value of high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) for detection of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Between January 2013 and January 2015, we enrolled 75 consecutive treatment-naive patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies and 70 disease controls. We performed extensive nerve conduction and standardized HRUS studies bilaterally of large arm and leg nerves and brachial plexus. We determined optimal sonographic cutoff values of nerve size and used receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression models to identify nerve combinations with optimal diagnostic performance. Enlargement of median nerve at forearm >10 mm(2), upper arm >13 mm(2), and any trunk of brachial plexus >8 mm(2) was 99% specific for chronic inflammatory neuropathies. A shortened HRUS protocol for detecting this abnormal nerve enlargement showed high sensitivity (83%-95%), positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (98%) in discriminating CIDP, LSS, and MMN from clinical mimics. Sonographic enlargement of proximal median nerve segments in the arms and brachial plexus is a key feature of chronic inflammatory neuropathies, which helps to reliably distinguish them from axonal neuropathies and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study provides Class II evidence that, in absence of clinical features that suggest a hereditary demyelinating neuropathy, sonographic enlargement of proximal median nerve segments and brachial plexus accurately identifies patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Effect of noscapine and vincristine combination on demyelination and cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiser, Laree; Herrington, Betty; Lobert, Sharon

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common, dose-limiting side effect of vincristine, a frontline therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Combination chemotherapy that reduces the neurotoxicity without compromising the efficacy of vincristine would improve patient outcomes. We performed in vitro studies using a combination of microtubule-binding antimitotics, noscapine and vincristine. In cell cultures containing neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, vincristine caused demyelination as shown by transmission electron microscopy. A combination of vincristine and noscapine protected against demyelination. Human acute lymphoblastic and acute myelogenous leukemia cell lines CCRF-CEM and HL-60, respectively, were used to determine the antiproliferative effect of this novel drug combination. Vincristine and noscapine decreased cell proliferation with IC(50) concentrations of 1 nM and 20 microM, respectively. Analysis of dose-effect relationships using isobolograms and combination indices demonstrated that noscapine acts synergistically with vincristine. Thus, noscapine is a promising candidate for use with vincristine to decrease neurotoxicity and enhance antineoplastic effectiveness.

  2. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  3. Delayed Nerve Stimulation Promotes Axon-Protective Neurofilament Phosphorylation, Accelerates Immune Cell Clearance and Enhances Remyelination In Vivo in Focally Demyelinated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Nikki A.; Popescu, Bogdan F.; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W.; Verge, Valerie M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination) on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies. PMID:25310564

  4. Purple pigments: the pathophysiology of acute porphyric neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Lee, Ming-Jen; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-12-01

    The porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders arising from disturbance in the haem biosynthesis pathway. The neuropathy associated with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) occurs due to mutation involving the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterised by motor-predominant features. Definitive diagnosis often encompasses a combination of biochemical, enzyme analysis and genetic testing, with clinical neurophysiological findings of a predominantly motor axonal neuropathy. Symptomatic and supportive treatment are the mainstays during an acute attack. If administered early, intravenous haemin may prevent progression of neuropathy. While the pathophysiology of AIP neuropathy remains unclear, axonal dysfunction appears intrinsically linked to the effects of neural energy deficits acquired through haem deficiency coupled to the neurotoxic effects of porphyrin precursors. The present review will provide an overview of AIP neuropathy, including discussion of recent advances in understanding developed through neurophysiological approaches that have further delineated the pathophysiology of axonal degeneration.

  5. INHERITED CARDIOMYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies, diseases of the heart muscle, are major causes of morbidity and mortality. A significant percentage of patients with cardiomyopathies have genetic-based, inheritable disease and, over the past two decades the genetic causes of these disorders have been increasingly discovered. The genes causing these disorders when they are mutated appear to encode proteins that frame a “final common pathway” for that specific disorder but the specifics of the phenotype, including age of onset, severity, and outcome is variable for reasons not yet understood. The “final common pathways” for the classified forms of cardiomyopathy include the sarcomere in the primarily diastolic dysfunction disorders hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), the linkage of the sarcomere and sarcolemma in the systolic dysfunction disorder dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and the desmosome in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AVC). Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is an overlap disorder and appears that any of these “final common pathways” can be involved depending on the specific form of LVNC. The genetics and mechanisms responsible for these clinical phenotypes will be described. PMID:25186923

  6. Peripheral neuropathy in a cat with renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cavana, Paola; Sammartano, Federica; Capucchio, Maria T; Catalano, Deborah; Valazza, Alberto; Farca, Anna M

    2009-10-01

    A 12-year-old male cat was referred for progressive limb weakness lasting 2 weeks. Physical examination detected muscle atrophy and bilateral renomegaly with distortion of the renal contours. The cat was ambulatory but tetraparetic. It showed a peculiar posture on forelimbs with bilateral flexion of the carpi and extrarotation of forearms. The cat was unable to go upstairs or jump. Neurological examination showed findings compatible with peripheral nervous system involvement. Histopathological findings revealed a high grade non-B, non-T cell renal lymphoma and peripheral neuropathy characterised by demyelination, axonal degeneration and muscle denervation. In the absence of congenital, metabolic and infectious diseases or exposure to toxins, a paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy was hypothesised. In humans and dogs, paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies have been documented with different neoplastic processes including lymphoproliferative disorders. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of suspected paraneoplastic polyneuropathy in a cat with malignant tumour.

  7. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Acute Sensory Neuropathies and Acute Autonomic Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki

    2015-11-01

    From the perspective of neuropathies with an acute onset mimicking that of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), cases with profound sensory and/or autonomic impairment without any significant weakness have been reported. Although the possibility of infectious or toxic etiologies should be carefully excluded, immune mechanisms similar to those in GBS are suggested to be involved in these so-called acute sensory neuropathies and acute autonomic neuropathies. The types of neuropathy include those with predominant sensory manifestations, predominant autonomic manifestations such as autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and both sensory and autonomic manifestations such as acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Neuronopathy in the sensory and/or autonomic ganglia (i.e., ganglionopathy) has been commonly suggested in patients with these types of neuropathies. The presence of Anti-GD1b antibodies has been reported in some of the patients with acute sensory neuropathy with deep sensory impairment, whereas anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies are reported to be present in half of the patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. The discovery of anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies significantly expanded the spectrum of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. This is because some of the patients with chronic progression mimicking neurodegenerative diseases such as pure autonomic failure were positive for these antibodies. In contrast, pathologically significant autoantibodies have not been identified in acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenesis and the spectrum of these types of neuropathies.

  9. Upper Extremity Multifocal Neuropathy in a 10-Year-Old Boy Associated With NS6S Disaccharide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Frederick; Naddaf, Elie; Waclawik, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    We present a 10-year-old boy with a predominantly motor multifocal neuropathy with demyelinating and axonal changes with sensory involvement, affecting only one upper extremity. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated titer of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against the NS6S antigen. He responded to treatment with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins. Focal or multifocal immune-mediated neuropathies are not common in children and may be underdiagnosed.

  10. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  11. [Physiological approach to peripheral neuropathy. Conventional nerve conduction studies and magnetic motor root stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, I first show some points we should mind in the conventional peripheral nerve conduction studies and later present clinical usefulness of motor root stimulation for peripheral neuropathy. CONVENTIONAL NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES (NCS): The most important point revealed by the conventional NCSs is whether neuropathy is due to axonal degeneration or demyelinating process. Precise clinical examination with this neurophysiological information leads us to a diagnosis and treatment. Poor clinical examination makes these findings useless. Long standing axonal degeneration sometimes induces secondary demyelination at the most distal part of involved nerves. On the other hand, severe segmental demyelination often provokes secondary axonal degeneration at distal parts to the site of demyelination. These secondary changes show the same abnormal neurophysiological findings as those of the primary involvement. We should be careful of this possibility when interpreting the results of NCS. NCS of sensory nerves is not good at revealing demyelinating process. Mild temporal dispersion of potentials often reduces an amplitude of SNAP or loss of responses, which usually suggests axonal degeneration, because of short duration of sensory nerve potentials. MOTOR ROOT STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: Magnetic stimulation with a coil placed over the spine activates motor roots and evokes EMG responses from upper and lower limb muscles. The site of activation with this method was determined to be where the motor roots exit from the spinal canal (intervertebral foramina) (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52 (9): 1025-1032, 1989) because induced currents are very dense at such a foramen made by electric resistant bones. In several kinds of peripheral neuropathy, this method has been used to detect a lesion at a proximal part of the peripheral nerves which can not be detected by the conventional NCSs. I present a few cases in whom motor root stimulation had a clinical

  12. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000700.htm Neuropathy secondary to drugs To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation ...

  13. Secondary demyelination disorders and destruction of white matter.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Parmar, Hemant A

    2014-03-01

    Demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system are characterized by the breakdown of myelin, with or without preservation of the associated axons. Primary demyelinating diseases typically involve loss of myelin with relative sparing of axons. Secondary demyelinating disorders represent a spectrum of white matter disease characterized by damage to neurons or axons with the resultant breakdown of myelin. The pathologic changes seen in secondary demyelinating disorders are varied, ranging from pure demyelination to necrosis with subsequent demyelination. Secondary demyelinating diseases are associated with a wide variety of conditions, including infections/vaccinations, nutritional/vitamin deficiencies, chemical agents, genetic abnormalities, and vascular insult. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Small fiber neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Langlois, V; Bedat Millet, A-L; Lebesnerais, M; Miranda, S; Marguet, F; Benhamou, Y; Marcorelles, P; Lévesque, H

    2017-04-11

    Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is still unknown. Characterised by neuropathic pain, it typically begins by burning feet, but could take many other expression. SFN affects the thinly myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers, by an inherited or acquired mechanism, which could lead to paresthesia, thermoalgic disorder or autonomic dysfunction. Recent studies suggest the preponderant role of ion channels such as Nav1.7. Furthermore, erythromelalgia or burning mouth syndrome are now recognized as real SFN. Various aetiologies of SFN are described. It could be isolated or associated with diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, vitamin deficiency, alcohol, auto-immune disease, sarcoidosis etc. Several mutations have recently been identified, like Nav1.7 channel leading to channelopathies. Diagnostic management is based primarily on clinical examination and demonstration of small fiber dysfunction. Laser evoked potentials, Sudoscan(®), cutaneous biopsy are the main test, but had a difficult access. Treatment is based on multidisciplinary management, combining symptomatic treatment, psychological management and treatment of an associated etiology. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral neuropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Chatterjee, S; Maji, D

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is common complication of diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients on the basis of loss of vibration sensation had been studied. Detailed clinical history of each patient including age, gender, duration of diabetes, foot ulcer and biothesiometry was recorded in 211 diabetic patients between 20 and 80 years of age. It was observed that all patients under 30 years age (n = 8) felt vibration below 15 volts (no risk zone); 77% (24 out of 31) of the patients in the age group of 30-39 years were in the no risk zone, and 23% (n = 7) had mild peripheral neuropathy. Sixty per cent of the patients between 40 and 50 years (n = 44) were in the no risk zone, while 32% (n = 24) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 5% (n = 4) had moderate neuropathy and 3% (n = 2) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Amongst patients above 50 years of age, 31% (n = 31) were in no risk zone, 34% (n = 34) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 22% (n = 20) had moderate peripheral neuropathy and 13% (n = 13) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for less than 5 years, 58% had no neuropathy, and only 3% had severe neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for 5 to 15 years, 50% had no neuropathy, 30% had mild, and 10% had severe peripheral neuropathy. When patients with diabetes for over 15 years were studied, only 6% had no neuropathy and 19% had severe peripheral neuropathy. The study re-establishes that the severity of peripheral neuropathy increases with age and vibration perception decreses progressively with increased duration of diabetes. Vibration perception threshold testing helps to identify the high risk subjects who require special counselling and education to protect their feet.

  16. Transient auditory nerve demyelination as a new mechanism for hidden hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoqiang; Corfas, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Hidden hearing loss (HHL) is a recently described auditory neuropathy believed to contribute to speech discrimination and intelligibility deficits in people with normal audiological tests. Animals and humans with HHL have normal auditory thresholds but defective cochlear neurotransmission, that is, reduced suprathreshold amplitude of the sound-evoked auditory nerve compound action potential. Currently, the only cellular mechanism known for HHL is loss of inner hair cell synapses (synaptopathy). Here we report that transient loss of cochlear Schwann cells results in permanent auditory deficits characteristic of HHL. This auditory neuropathy is not associated with synaptic loss, but rather with disruption of the first heminodes at the auditory nerve peripheral terminal. Thus, this study identifies a new mechanism for HHL, highlights the long-term consequences of transient Schwann cell loss on hearing and might provide insights into the causes of the auditory deficits reported in patients that recover from acute demyelinating diseases such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. PMID:28211470

  17. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  18. New technologies for the assessment of neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gasparotti, Roberto; Padua, Luca; Briani, Chiara; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Technical advances are rapidly changing the clinical and instrumental approach to peripheral nerve diseases. Magnetic resonance neurography, diffusion tensor imaging and nerve ultrasonography are increasingly entering the diagnostic workup of peripheral neuropathies as tools that complement neurophysiology and enable investigation of proximal structures, such as plexuses and roots. Progress in the design of magnetic resonance scanners and sequences, and the development of high-frequency ultrasound probes mean that high-resolution peripheral nerve imaging is possible, enabling detailed examination of nerve size, morphology and internal fascicular structure that can integrate nerve conduction studies into clinical practice. In the growing field of small-fibre neuropathy, in which traditional nerve conduction studies are of little or no use, skin biopsy has become a reliable tool for diagnosis. Corneal confocal microscopy, nociceptive evoked potentials and microneurography are emerging techniques that are mainly used in clinical research settings, but have increasing relevance to clinical practice. We review these new and emerging techniques and their effects on diagnosis, treatment strategies and prognosis in a variety of peripheral neuropathies, including entrapments, brachial plexopathies, immune and inherited neuropathies, and small-fibre neuropathies. We discuss the most promising research findings and their potential for future application in clinical practice.

  19. The innate immune system in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Lior; Quintana, Francisco J; Weiner, Howard L

    2012-07-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis are chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Both the adaptive and the innate immune systems have been suggested to contribute to their pathogenesis and recovery. In this review, we discuss the role of the innate immune system in mediating demyelinating diseases. In particular, we provide an overview of the anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functions of dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, NK-T cells, γδ T cells, microglial cells, and astrocytes. We emphasize the interaction of astroctyes with the immune system and how this interaction relates to the demyelinating pathologies. Given the pivotal role of the innate immune system, it is possible that targeting these cells may provide an effective therapeutic approach for demyelinating diseases.

  20. Idiopathic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an epidemiological study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiò, A; Cocito, D; Bottacchi, E; Buffa, C; Leone, M; Plano, F; Mutani, R; Calvo, A

    2007-01-01

    Aim The clinical and epidemiological characteristics of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in an Italian population were assessed. Subjects and methods All subjects with a diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy after 1990 in Piemonte and Valle d'Aosta (4 334 225 inhabitants) were considered. The diagnosis of CIDP was based on the research criteria of the American Academy of Neurology. 165 of 294 patients met the diagnostic criteria. Results The crude prevalence rate was 3.58/100 000 population (95% CI 3.02 to 4.20). At the prevalence day, 76 (49.0%) cases had definite, 67 (43.2%) probable and 12 (7.7%) possible CIDP; disability was mild in 105 (67.7%) cases, moderate in 32 (20.6%) and severe in 18 (11.6%). The course was remitting–relapsing in 40 cases (25.8%), chronic progressive in 96 (61.9%) and monophasic in 19 (12.3%). Considering the 95 patients whose disorder presented in the period 1995–2001, the mean annual crude incidence rate was 0.36/100 000 population (95% CI 0.29 to 0.44), with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. 14 cases were affected by diabetes mellitus. In multivariate analysis, factors related to severe disability at the prevalence day were: age>60 years; failure of immunomodulating therapies at the time of diagnosis; worse disability at nadir; and chronic course. Conclusion Incidence and prevalence rates of CIDP in Italy were higher than those observed in most previous studies. At the prevalence day, more than 80% of cases had a mild or moderate disability, indicating either a good response to immunomodulating therapy or a tendency of CIDP to have a mild course in most cases. PMID:17494979

  1. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS): Advances in understanding and treating neuropathy, 24–25 October 2006; Bethesda, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Eva L.; Cornblath, David R.; Porter, John; Dworkin, Robert; Scherer, Steven

    2009-01-01

    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of basic and clinical research in peripheral neurobiology and clinical neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to identify areas where additional research could lead to the development of new therapeutics in the next 5 years. Participants discussed the current understanding of disease mechanisms of axonal and demyelinating neuropathies, existing techniques in research, disease biomarkers, and assessment of neuropathy. Painful neuropathies were discussed at the basic scientific and clinical levels in relation to new insights into etiology and treatment. The meeting concluded with a discussion on therapeutic development in neuropathy and the need for a unified approach to multicenter trials. Short-term goals of the workshop were to form a working group for neuropathy, the Peripheral Neuropathy Study Group, and to translate new scientific findings into therapies and complete clinical trials. PMID:18346227

  2. DNA methylation in demyelinated multiple sclerosis hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chomyk, Anthony M; Volsko, Christina; Tripathi, Ajai; Deckard, Sadie A; Trapp, Bruce D; Fox, Robert J; Dutta, Ranjan

    2017-08-18

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). Memory impairments and hippocampal demyelination are common features in MS patients. Our previous data have shown that demyelination alters neuronal gene expression in the hippocampus. DNA methylation is a common epigenetic modifier of gene expression. In this study, we investigated whether DNA methylation is altered in MS hippocampus following demyelination. Our results show that mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferase were increased in demyelinated MS hippocampus, while de-methylation enzymes were decreased. Comparative methylation profiling identify hypo-methylation within upstream sequences of 6 genes and hyper-methylation of 10 genes in demyelinated MS hippocampus. Genes identified in the current study were also validated in an independent microarray dataset generated from MS hippocampus. Independent validation using RT-PCR revealed that DNA methylation inversely correlated with mRNA levels of the candidate genes. Queries across cell-specific databases revealed that a majority of the candidate genes are expressed by astrocytes and neurons in mouse and human CNS. Taken together, our results expands the list of genes previously identified in MS hippocampus and establish DNA methylation as a mechanism of altered gene expression in MS hippocampus.

  3. Diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Ruple S; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies (DRPN) are neuropathies clinically and pathologically distinct from the neuropathy typically associated with diabetes (DPN). DRPN are usually subacute in onset, painful, and often demonstrate a monophasic course with incomplete recovery. Pathologically, these neuropathies are due to ischemic injury from altered immunity and often have features suggestive or diagnostic of microvasculitis. Unlike DPN, immune therapy may be helpful in treatment of these conditions given their pathological substrate and therefore are important to identify early and distinguish from other neuropathies that occur in patient with diabetes.

  4. [Case of chronic progressive encephalo-myelo-radiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kutoku, Yumiko; Inoue, Ken; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2010-05-01

    A 65-year-old man developed urinary impairment and gait disturbance over a period of four months. On admission, neurological examinations revealed paraplegia, decreased deep tendon reflexes in the extremities, bilateral positive Babinski and Chaddock signs, superficial and deep sensory disturbances and neurogenic bladder. Cerebrospinal fluid examination disclosed a total cell count of 70/mm3, and protein of 76 mg/dl. Nerve conduction studies and somatosensory evoked potential suggested demyelinating neuropathy and myelopathy. Brain MRI revealed irregular-shaped white matter lesions distributed over the bilateral cerebral hemispheres and the brain stem. In addition spinal MRI disclosed long spinal cord lesions disseminated from the higher cervical to the lower thoracic spine. A 1 microm-thick epon-embedded section and teased fiber preparations of a biopsied sural nerve showed segmental demyelination and remyelination. Treatments using intravenous methylprednisolone and IVIg were both effective. The positive responses to immunological treatment, along with the findings, strongly suggested that the demyelinating lesions occurred in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. We regarded this case as one of chronic progression of Encephalo-myelo-radiculo-neuropathy.

  5. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  6. Genotype–phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene

    PubMed Central

    Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S.; Herrmann, David N.; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E.; Day, John W.; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R.; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S.; Yum, Sabrina W.; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3–84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental

  8. Drug-induced optic neuropathy-TB or not TB.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Monika; Sharp, Dianne; Best, Stephen; Vincent, Andrea; Vaphiades, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is an inherited optic neuropathy manifesting with variable penetrance and expressivity. Other genetic and environmental factors are postulated to contribute to more marked visual loss in some affected individuals. Optic neuropathy is also a known adverse effect of ethambutol therapy for tuberculosis. This case report demonstrates an atypical presentation of ethambutol toxicity, with progressive profound loss of vision despite drug cessation. A subsequent diagnosis of autosomal dominant optic atrophy was made when the proband's sons presented with mild visual disturbances and color vision defects, confirmed with electrophysiology and OPA1 gene mutational analysis. This case emphasizes the importance of avoiding potentially neurotoxic therapy in predisposed individuals and the influence of environmental factors in patients with inherited optic neuropathies.

  9. Experimental germanium dioxide-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumuro, K; Izumo, S; Higuchi, I; Ronquillo, A T; Takahashi, K; Osame, M

    1993-01-01

    We report an experimental model of germanium dioxide (GeO2)-induced neuropathy in rats. More than 6 months administration of GeO2 to young rats produced neuropathy characterized by segmental demyelination/remyelination and nerve edema. Electron microscopic studies demonstrated that changes in Schwann cells, such as an increased cytoplasmic volume or disintegration of the cytoplasm, were the earliest pathological findings. Schwann cell mitochondria contained high electron-dense materials. Subsequent removal of necrotic Schwann cell debris and myelin by invading macrophages was evident. These findings suggested that the Schwann cells themselves are the primary target of the toxin. The deposition of electron-dense granules in the intra-axonal vesicles, which was suggestive of glycogen granules in mitochondria, was observed in the advanced stage of the neuropathy. The findings of endoneurial edema with splitting of myelin lamellae were noted at the early stage of demyelination. Nerve edema may be the result of GeO2-induced endothelial cell injury.

  10. Peripheral neuropathy in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Leonardis, L

    2017-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (dystrophia myotonica type 2-DM2) is an autosomal dominant multi-organ disorder. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system was found in 25%-45% of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1, although limited data are available concerning polyneuropathy in patients with DM2, which was the aim of this study with a thorough presentation of the cases with peripheral neuropathy. Patients with genetically confirmed DM2 underwent motor nerve conduction studies of the median, ulnar, tibial and fibular nerves and sensory nerve conduction studies of the median (second finger), ulnar (fifth finger), radial (forearm) and sural nerves. Seventeen adult patients with DM2 participated in the study. Fifty-three percent (9/17) of our patients had abnormality of one or more attributes (latency, amplitude or conduction velocity) in two or more separate nerves. Four types of neuropathies were found: (i) predominantly axonal motor and sensory polyneuropathy, (ii) motor polyneuropathy, (iii) predominantly demyelinating motor and sensory polyneuropathy and (iv) mutilating polyneuropathy with ulcers. The most common forms are axonal motor and sensory polyneuropathy (29%) and motor neuropathy (18% of all examined patients). No correlations were found between the presence of neuropathy and age, CCTG repeats, blood glucose or HbA1C. Peripheral neuropathy is common in patients with DM2 and presents one of the multisystemic manifestations of DM2. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Peripheral neuropathies associated with antibodies directed to intracellular neural antigens.

    PubMed

    Antoine, J-C

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies directed to intracellular neural antigens have been mainly described in paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies and mostly includes anti-Hu and anti-CV2/CRMP5 antibodies. These antibodies occur with different patterns of neuropathy. With anti-Hu antibody, the most frequent manifestation is sensory neuronopathy with frequent autonomic involvement. With anti-CV2/CRMP5 the neuropathy is more frequently sensory and motor with an axonal or mixed demyelinating and axonal electrophysiological pattern. The clinical pattern of these neuropathies is in keeping with the cellular distribution of HuD and CRMP5 in the peripheral nervous system. Although present in high titer, these antibodies are probably not directly responsible for the neuropathy. Pathological and experimental studies indicate that cytotoxic T-cells are probably the main effectors of the immune response. These disorders contrast with those in which antibodies recognize a cell surface antigen and are probably responsible for the disease. The neuronal cell death and axonal degeneration which result from T-cell mediated immunity explains why treating these disorders remains challenging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammatory demyelination alters subcortical visual circuits.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Sheila Espírito Santo; Mendonça, Henrique Rocha; Wheeler, Natalie A; Campello-Costa, Paula; Jacobs, Kimberle M; Gomes, Flávia C A; Fox, Michael A; Fuss, Babette

    2017-08-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease classically associated with axonal damage and loss; more recently, however, synaptic changes have been recognized as additional contributing factors. An anatomical area commonly affected in MS is the visual pathway; yet, changes other than those associated with inflammatory demyelination of the optic nerve, i.e., optic neuritis, have not been described in detail. Adult mice were subjected to a diet containing cuprizone to mimic certain aspects of inflammatory demyelination as seen in MS. Demyelination and inflammation were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Synaptic changes associated with inflammatory demyelination in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) were determined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and electrophysiological field potential recordings. In the cuprizone model, demyelination was observed in retinorecipient regions of the subcortical visual system, in particular the dLGN, where it was found accompanied by microglia activation and astrogliosis. In contrast, anterior parts of the pathway, i.e., the optic nerve and tract, appeared largely unaffected. Under the inflammatory demyelinating conditions, as seen in the dLGN of cuprizone-treated mice, there was an overall decrease in excitatory synaptic inputs from retinal ganglion cells. At the same time, the number of synaptic complexes arising from gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-generating inhibitory neurons was found increased, as were the synapses that contain the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN2B and converge onto inhibitory neurons. These synaptic changes were functionally found associated with a shift toward an overall increase in network inhibition. Using the cuprizone model of inflammatory demyelination, our data reveal a novel form of synaptic (mal)adaption in the CNS that is characterized by a shift of the excitation/inhibition balance toward inhibitory

  13. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular study of patients with auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Guilherme Machado De; Ramos, Priscila Zonzini; Castilho, Arthur Menino; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-07-01

    Auditory neuropathy is a type of hearing loss that constitutes a change in the conduct of the auditory stimulus by the involvement of inner hair cells or auditory nerve synapses. It is characterized by the absence or alteration of waves in the examination of brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with otoacoustic and/or cochlear microphonic issues. At present, four loci associated with non‑syndromic auditory neuropathy have been mapped: Autosomal recessive deafness‑9 [DFNB9; the otoferlin (OTOF) gene] and autosomal recessive deafness‑59 [DFNB59; the pejvakin (PJVK) gene], associated with autosomal recessive inheritance; the autosomal dominant auditory neuropathy gene [AUNA1; the diaphanous‑3 (DIAPH3) gene]; and AUNX1, linked to chromosome X. Furthermore, mutations of connexin 26 [the gap junction β2 (GJB2) gene] have also been associated with the disease. OTOF gene mutations exert a significant role in auditory neuropathy. In excess of 80 pathogenic mutations have been identified in individuals with non‑syndromic deafness in populations of different origins, with an emphasis on the p.Q829X mutation, which was found in ~3% of cases of deafness in the Spanish population. The identification of genetic alterations responsible for auditory neuropathy is one of the challenges contributing to understand the molecular bases of the different phenotypes of hearing loss. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate molecular changes in the OTOF gene in patients with auditory neuropathy, and to develop a DNA chip for the molecular diagnosis of auditory neuropathy using mass spectrometry for genotyping. Genetic alterations were investigated in 47 patients with hearing loss and clinical diagnosis of auditory neuropathy, and the c.35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene was identified in three homozygous patients, and the heterozygous parents of one of these cases. Additionally, OTOF gene mutations were tracked by complete sequencing of 48 exons, although these results

  15. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  16. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. 10 years' experience in a Mexican centre].

    PubMed

    San-Juan, O D; Castro-Macías, J I

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic, but potentially treatable, acquired autoimmune neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that few studies have been conducted on its epidemiology, presenting symptoms and long-term functional prognosis. To describe the clinical and neurophysiological forms of patients with CIDP at the outset and their follow-up at one year. We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study of patients who were hospitalised in our unit between 1995 and 2005. The cases were defined in accordance with Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) group criteria. Data gathered included demographic characteristics, forms of clinical presentation, neurophysiological findings, cerebrospinal fluid and functional prognosis at one year. A statistical descriptive analysis was performed. The sample consisted of 26 patients--12 males (46.15%) and 14 females (53.84%)--between 15 and 71 years of age (40.17 +/- 15.7 years). CIDP was associated with other autoimmune diseases in 20.8% of the patients. The predominant features at the outset of the disease were paresis and distal symmetrical paresthesias in the four limbs, high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and demyelination with axonal degeneration. Prednisone was administered in 43% of the cases. At one year, five patients remained asymptomatic (22.72%), there was a partial improvement in 13 (59.09%) and no improvement was seen in four cases (18.18%). The most frequent initial form of clinical presentation of CIDP in our population is quadriparesis and distal symmetrical paresthesias, high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and demyelination with axonal degeneration, which are related to a good functional prognosis at one year.

  17. Anti-sulfatide IgM antibodies in peripheral neuropathy: to test or not to test?

    PubMed

    Giannotta, C; Di Pietro, D; Gallia, F; Nobile-Orazio, E

    2015-05-01

    Anti-sulfatide immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies have been associated with different forms of neuropathies but their diagnostic role in neuropathy remains unclear. The clinical association of increased titers of anti-sulfatide IgM antibodies in 570 patients with neuropathy and related disorders examined in our laboratory since 2004 was reviewed. Sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the initial serum dilution of 1:32,000 and titrated by serial two-fold dilution. In all positive patients IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) were also measured by western blot. High titers of anti-sulfatide antibodies were found in 39 patients including 33 (85%) who also had anti-MAG IgM. Six patients did not have anti-MAG IgM including five in whom moderately increased anti-sulfatide titers were associated with different forms of neuropathy. One patient with a demyelinating neuropathy and IgM monoclonal gammopathy had markedly increased anti-sulfatide titers (1:256,000). Increased titers of anti-sulfatide IgM antibodies are not infrequent in patients with neuropathy where they are often associated with a concomitant reactivity to MAG. A selective reactivity to sulfatide, however, is rarely found and is associated with different forms of neuropathy limiting its usefulness in the diagnosis of neuropathy. © 2015 EAN.

  18. Comparing treatment options for chronic inflammatory neuropathies and choosing the right treatment plan.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Gallia, Francesca; Terenghi, Fabrizia; Bianco, Mariangela

    2017-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory neuropathies are disorders caused by an immune response to peripheral nerve. They include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and neuropathy associated with anti-MAG IgM monoclonal gammopathy and other less frequent neuropathies. Several immune therapies have been proven to be effective in these neuropathies even if the best therapeutic option is still unsettled. Areas covered: The authors reviewed the literature to compare the efficacy and safety of currently used immune therapies in these neuropathies. The authors also analyzed the effect of other immune suppressive agents and of biological agents including rituximab, eculizumab, natalizumab, alemtuzumab and fingolimod that were found effective in other autoimmune diseases. Expert commentary: Despite the reported efficacy of a number of new immune therapies in some patients with immune mediated neuropathies, their efficacy has not been so far confirmed in randomized controlled studies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) (and subcutaneous immunoglobulin [SCIg] for maintenance treatment), steroids and plasma exchange remain the only therapy of proven efficacy in CIDP, IVIg in MMN and, with certain limits, rituximab and, occasionally plasma exchange in neuropathy associated with anti-MAG antibodies. New biological agents are also on the horizon but their efficacy needs to be proved in controlled studies.

  19. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Genetics of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Gess, B; Schirmacher, A; Young, P

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathies belong to the most common neurogenetic disorders. They appear mostly as sensory and motor neuropathies but there are also pure sensory, pure motor as well as sensory and autonomic hereditary neuropathies. In clinical practice, knowledge of hereditary neuropathies is important in order to recognize them among polyneuropathies and achieve a successful genetic diagnosis. The molecular genetics of hereditary neuropathies are very heterogeneous with currently more than 40 known disease-causing genes. The 4 most common genes account for almost 90% of the genetically diagnosed hereditary neuropathies. In this review article we provide an overview of the currently known genes and propose a rational genetic work-up protocol of the most common genes.

  1. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  2. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Trompetto, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies. Methods Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD) in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index. Results Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged. Discussion Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open), and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed). PMID:26977594

  3. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome.

  4. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Leussink, Verena I; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C; Stettner, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients.

  5. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Leussink, Verena I.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Stettner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients. PMID:27366241

  6. Development profile in a patient with monosomy 10q and Dup(17p) associated with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, J.E.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H.

    1996-02-02

    We report on a patient with dup(17p) and monosomy (10q) resulting from a familial translocation. Manifestations typical of both syndromes were present. The overall development of this patient was better by comparison with similar reported cases of either anomaly. Our evaluation detected severe gross motor delay and signs of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. This patient is trisomic for the region of 17p which includes the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene, known to be duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1A (CMT1A). Our analysis in this patient suggests that trisomy for the PMP-22 gene led to the demyelinating neuropathy and contributed to his severe motor development delay. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Carcinoma associated paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies in patients with and without anti-onconeural antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, J.; Mosnier, J.; Absi, L.; Convers, P.; Honnorat, J.; Michel, D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—When to suspect a paraneoplastic disorder is a puzzling problem that has not recently been studied in a large series of patients referred for peripheral neuropathy.
METHODS—From 422 consecutive patients with peripheral neuropathy, 26 were analysed who concomitantly had carcinoma but no tumorous infiltration, drug toxicity, or cachexia. Their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological data were analysed according to the presence of anti-onconeural antibodies, the latency between presentation and cancer diagnosis, and the incidence of carcinoma in the corresponding types of neuropathy of the population of 422patients.
RESULTS—Seven patients (group I) had anti-onconeural antibodies (six anti-Hu, one anti-CV2) and 19 did not (groups IIA and B). In group I, subacute sensory neuropathy (SSN) was the most frequent but other neuropathies including demyelinating neuropathies were present. Patients in group II A had a short latency (mean 7.88months), and a rapidly and usually severe neuropathy which corresponded in 11/14 to an established inflammatory disorder including neuropathy with encephalomyelitis, mononeuritis multiplex, and acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Patients in group IIB had a long latency (mean 8.4 years) and a very chronic disorder corresponding in four of five to an axonal non-inflammatory polyneuropathy. In this population, the incidence of carcinoma occurring with a short latency was 47% in sensory neuronopathy, 1.7% in Guillain-Barré syndrome, 10% in mononeuritis multiplex and CIDP, and 4.5% in axonal polyneuropathy.
CONCLUSIONS—Paraneoplastic neuropathies associated with carcinoma are heterogeneous disorders. Neuropathies occurring with a long latency with tumours probably resulted from a coincidental association. Neuropathies which occurred within a few years of the tumour evolved rapidly and corresponded mostly to inflammatory disorders. As dysimmune neuropathies are probably

  8. Cardiac Involvement in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; AlMahameed, Soufian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is the least recognized and understood complication of peripheral neuropathy. However, because of its potential adverse effects including sudden death, CAN is one of the most important forms of autonomic neuropathies. CAN presents with different clinical manifestations including postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, fluctuation of blood pressure and heart rate, arrhythmia, and increased risk of myocardial infarction. In this article, the prevalence, clinical presentations, and management of cardiac involvement in certain peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy, hereditary neuropathies, and amyloid neuropathy are examined in detail.

  9. [Contribution of electroneuromyography to the evaluation of neuropathy in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Escobar-Rodríguez, David Alvaro; Rivera-Ibarra, Doris Beatriz; Juárez-López, Mercedes de Jesús; González-Carmona, Beatriz

    2006-01-01

    To determine the type and the frequency of diabetic neuropathy, diagnosed by electroneuromyography, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the correlation between the neuropathy diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Cross-sectional descriptive and correlative of patients with diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, sent for electroneuromyography study in 2000. Study place: Laboratory of electrodiagnosis of the Unidad de Medicina Física y Rehabilitación Región Norte. Measuring: Electroneuromyography was performed, and the type and frequency of the diabetic neuropathy, as well as the presence of clinical systematization, according to the initial diagnosis, were assessed. Furthermore, sex, occupation, and medical unit of reference were identified. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, as well as association by means of quadruple correlation ratio were considered. 219 electrodiagnostic studies were carried out in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, of which 152 were males. The age average was of 54.3 +/- 8.9 years old. The prevailing occupation was that of housewives with 128. The references of the Hospital General de Zona 24 were 39; those of Unidad de Medicina Física y Rehabilitación Región Norte were 32, and those of the Hospital General de Zona 98 were 28. There was a presence of clinical systematization in 186 (84.9%) patients. The electroneuromyography diagnosed diabetic neuropathy in 174 patients, of which 89 correspond to neuropathy due to segmental demyelination, and 85 to mixed neuropathy; in 21 patients, the electroneuromyography was normal. Of the 186 patients with clinical systematization, the electroneuromyography was positive in 170, with r = 0.70. The prevalence of diabetic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is of 80%, the type of variety is of segmental demyelination in 51% and of mixed type in 49%. There is a high correlation between the clinical diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy and the confirmation by

  10. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  11. Hyperglycemia and downregulation of caveolin-1 enhance neuregulin-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cuijuan; Rouen, Shefali; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2008-06-01

    Neuregulins (NRGs) are growth factors which bind to Erb receptor tyrosine kinases that localize to Schwann cells (SCs). Although NRGs can promote cell survival, mitogenesis, and myelination in undifferentiated SCs, they also induce demyelination of myelinated co-cultures of SCs and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have shown previously that Erb B2 activity increased in premyelinating SCs in response to hyperglycemia, and that this correlated with the downregulation of the protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1). As myelinated SCs undergo substantial degeneration in diabetic neuropathy, we used myelinated SC/DRG neuron co-cultures to determine if hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 expression could enhance NRG-induced demyelination. In basal glucose, NRG1 caused a 2.4-fold increase in the number of damaged myelin segments. This damage reached 3.8-fold under hyperglycemic conditions, and was also associated with a robust decrease in the expression of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins. The loss of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins following hyperglycemia and NRG treatment was not due to neuronal loss, since the axons remained intact and there was no loss of PGP 9.5, an axonal marker protein. To examine if changes in Cav-1 were sufficient to alter the extent of NRG-induced demyelination, SC/DRG neurons co-cultures were infected with antisense or dominant-negative Cav-1(P132L) adenoviruses. Either antisense-mediated downregulation or mis-localization of endogenous Cav-1 by Cav-1(P132L) resulted in a 1.5- to 2.4-fold increase in NRG-induced degeneration compared to that present in control cultures. These data support that hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 are sufficient to sensitize myelinated SC/DRG co-cultures to NRG-induced demyelination. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Hyperglycemia and Downregulation of Caveolin-1 Enhance Neuregulin-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    YU, CUIJUAN; ROUEN, SHEFALI; DOBROWSKY, RICK T.

    2008-01-01

    Neuregulins (NRGs) are growth factors which bind to Erb receptor tyrosine kinases that localize to Schwann cells (SCs). Although NRGs can promote cell survival, mitogenesis, and myelination in undifferentiated SCs, they also induce demyelination of myelinated co-cultures of SCs and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have shown previously that Erb B2 activity increased in premyelinating SCs in response to hyperglycemia, and that this correlated with the downregulation of the protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1). As myelinated SCs undergo substantial degeneration in diabetic neuropathy, we used myelinated SC/DRG neuron co-cultures to determine if hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 expression could enhance NRG-induced demyelination. In basal glucose, NRG1 caused a 2.4-fold increase in the number of damaged myelin segments. This damage reached 3.8-fold under hyperglycemic conditions, and was also associated with a robust decrease in the expression of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins. The loss of Cav-1 and compact myelin proteins following hyperglycemia and NRG treatment was not due to neuronal loss, since the axons remained intact and there was no loss of PGP 9.5, an axonal marker protein. To examine if changes in Cav-1 were sufficient to alter the extent of NRG-induced demyelination, SC/DRG neurons co-cultures were infected with antisense or dominant-negative Cav-1(P132L) adenoviruses. Either antisense-mediated downregulation or mis-localization of endogenous Cav-1 by Cav-1(P132L) resulted in a 1.5- to 2.4-fold increase in NRG-induced degeneration compared to that present in control cultures. These data support that hyperglycemia and changes in Cav-1 are sufficient to sensitize myelinated SC/DRG co-cultures to NRG-induced demyelination. PMID:18338795

  13. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively.

  14. [The place of neuropathy in the early diagnosis of Cockayne syndrome: Report on two siblings].

    PubMed

    Blin-Rochemaure, N; Allani-Essid, N; Carlier, R; Laugel, V; Quijano-Roy, S

    2017-04-01

    Two siblings affected with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are described: this diagnosis was suggested by the finding of a demyelinating neuropathy on electromyography in both children and consistent clinical features. CS is a rare genetic disorder with severe prognosis and a highly varied phenotype, making early diagnosis difficult. Taking into account these two cases and the literature, the current diagnosis criteria are insufficiently specific and appear late: the diagnosis may be delayed because multi-organ involvement and sensorial impairment suggests more frequent neurometabolic disorders. Neuroradiologic abnormalities are suggestive but may occur later. The finding of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy seems to be a more useful marker to suspect this disorder in the presence of other clinical features. Further studies are required to better define the chronology of the symptoms, not only for adequate genetic counseling and eventual prenatal diagnosis, but also to assess the efficacy of future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A recurrent WARS mutation is a novel cause of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Soong, Bing-Wen; Mademan, Inès; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liu, Chia-Rung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Wu, Hung-Ta; Liu, Tze-Tze; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Kon-Ping; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; De Jonghe, Peter; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Yi-Chu; Züchner, Stephan; Baets, Jonathan; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-03-22

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies characterized by distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Although at least 15 genes have been implicated in distal hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetic causes remain elusive in many families. To identify an additional causal gene for distal hereditary motor neuropathy, we performed exome sequencing for two affected individuals and two unaffected members in a Taiwanese family with an autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy in which mutations in common distal hereditary motor neuropathy-implicated genes had been excluded. The exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.770A > G (p.His257Arg), in the cytoplasmic tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) gene (WARS) that co-segregates with the neuropathy in the family. Further analyses of WARS in an additional 79 Taiwanese pedigrees with inherited neuropathies and 163 index cases from Australian, European, and Korean distal hereditary motor neuropathy families identified the same mutation in another Taiwanese distal hereditary motor neuropathy pedigree with different ancestries and one additional Belgian distal hereditary motor neuropathy family of Caucasian origin. Cell transfection studies demonstrated a dominant-negative effect of the p.His257Arg mutation on aminoacylation activity of TrpRS, which subsequently compromised protein synthesis and reduced cell viability. His257Arg TrpRS also inhibited neurite outgrowth and led to neurite degeneration in the neuronal cell lines and rat motor neurons. Further in vitro analyses showed that the WARS mutation could potentiate the angiostatic activities of TrpRS by enhancing its interaction with vascular endothelial-cadherin. Taken together, these findings establish WARS as a gene whose mutations may cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy and alter canonical and non-canonical functions of TrpRS. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  16. [Acquired inflammatory neuropathies in children and their therapy].

    PubMed

    Kaciński, M

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathies where there is an association with acquired peripheral nerves dysfunction and inflammation include inflammatory neuropathies (IN), as well as sequelae of vaccinations involving peripheral nerves. In a small portion of these diseases central nervous system is involved. In the years 1996-2000, among 22 children with acute flaccid paresis who were hospitalized in the Kraków Department of Paediatric Neurology, there were 16 patients with IN, including 13 with Guillain-Barré syndrome, single cases of Miller-Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy involving central nervous system and neuroborreliosis. Additionally, four children were hospitalized for optic neuritis. The author presents data on aetiology, electrophysiology and follow-up of these patients, as well as describes the management and outcome. Apart from their cognitive and practical value, these data significantly correspond with the currently implemented program of poliomyelitis eradication.

  17. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  18. Nutritional optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Pierko, Anna; Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional optic neuropathy (aka deficiency optic neuropathy) is a dysfunction of the optic nerve resulting from improper dietary content of certain nutrients essential for normal functioning of the nerve fibers. Most commonly, it results from folic acid and vitamin B complex deficiency associated with malnutrition or poor dietary habits, incorrectly applied vegetarian diet, or chronic alcohol abuse. Obese patients after bariatric surgery constitute another risk group of optic neuropathy. Nutritional optic neuropathy is characterized by painless, gradually progressing, bilateral and symmetrical decrease in visual acuity, which can be accompanied by the color vision dysfunction. Progression of the neuropathy is associated with optic nerve atrophy, manifesting as complete disc pallor. Treatment of nutritional neuropathy includes dietary supplementation, aimed at compensating for the deficient nutrients. The treatment is mostly based on folic acid, vitamin B complex, and protein replacement, as well as eliminating risk factors of neuropathy. Early treatment commencement, prior to irreversible optic nerve atrophy, is a prerequisite of effective treatment. We would like to highlight this problem by presenting the case of a young woman in whom chronic use "water-based" diet resulted in anemia and bilateral nutritional optic neuropathy.

  19. Clinical Neuropathy Scales in Neuropathy Associated with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay A.; Ruby, Sandra K.; Singh, Sujal; Zhan, Min; Russell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Disagreement exists on effective and sensitive outcome measures in neuropathy associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are costly, invasive and may have their problems with reproducibility and clinical applicability. A clinical measure of neuropathy that has sufficient sensitivity and correlates to invasive measures would enable significant future research. METHODS Data was collected prospectively on patients with IGT and symptomatic early neuropathy (neuropathy symptoms < 2 years) and normal controls. The seven scales that were examined were the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limb (NIS-LL), Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score (MNDS), modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scale (mTCNS), Total Neuropathy Score (Clinical) (TNSc), The Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), the Early Neuropathy Score (ENS), and the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS). RESULTS All seven clinical scales were determined to be excellent in discriminating between patients with neuropathy from controls without neuropathy. The strongest discrimination was seen with the mTCNS. The best sensitivity and specificity for the range of scores obtained, as determined by using receiver operating characteristic curves, was seen for the mTCNS followed by the TNSc. Most scales show a stronger correlation with measures of large than small fiber neuropathy. CONCULSIONS All seven scales identify patients with neuropathy. For the purpose of screening potential patients for a clinical study, the mTCNS followed by the TNSc would be most helpful to select patients with neuropathy. PMID:25690405

  20. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: decreased claudin-5 and relocated ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, T; Numata, Y; Mizusawa, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the dynamics of molecules composing the blood–nerve barrier (BNB) in inflammatory neuropathies. Methods: The expression of four tight junction (TJ) proteins—claudin-1, claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1—was analysed immunohistochemically in sural nerve biopsy specimens obtained from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Results: Claudin-1 was detected only in perineurial cells, whereas claudin-5 was present in endothelial cells, irrespective of vessel location or size. Occludin and ZO-1 were found in perineurial cells, in addition to some epineurial and endoneurial endothelial cells. In CIDP, percentages of endoneurial small vessels immunoreactive for claudin-5 were significantly decreased, as were ZO-1 immunoreactive endoneurial small vessels, with staining localised to interfaces between cells. Claudin-1 and occludin immunoreactivity did not differ appreciably between the neuropathies examined. Conclusions: The downregulation of claudin-5 and altered localisation of ZO-1 seen in CIDP specimens may indicate that BNB derangement occurs in inflammatory neuropathies. Further investigation of TJ molecules may suggest new treatments based on properties of the BNB. PMID:15090575

  2. Mitochondrial inheritance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Basse, Christoph W

    2010-12-01

    Faithful inheritance of mitochondria is essential for growth and development. Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria is a common phenomenon in sexual eukaryotes and has been reported for numerous fungal species. Uniparental inheritance is a genetically regulated process, aimed to gain a homoplasmic state within cells, and this is often associated with selective elimination of one parental mitochondria population. This review will focus on recent developments in our understanding of common and specified regulatory circuits of selective mitochondrial inheritance during sexual development. It further refers to the influence of mitochondrial fusion on generation of recombinant mitochondrial DNA molecules. The latter aspect appears rather exciting in the context of intron homing and could bring a new twist to the debate on the significance of uniparental inheritance. The emergence of genome-wide studies offers new perspectives to address potential relationships between uniparental inheritance, vegetative inheritance and last but not least cellular scavenging systems to dispose of disintegrated organelles.

  3. Mitochondria as Crucial Players in Demyelinated Axons: Lessons from Neuropathology and Experimental Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Graham R.; Mahad, Don J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro. PMID:21331147

  4. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  5. Peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial diseases: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, M; Sauchelli, D; Primiano, G; Cuccagna, C; Bernardo, D; Lo Monaco, M; Servidei, S

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial diseases (MDs) may vary from a subclinical finding in a multisystem syndrome to a severe, even isolated, manifestation in some patients. To investigate the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in MDs extensive electrophysiological studies were performed in 109 patients with morphological, biochemical and genetic diagnosis of MD [12 A3243G progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO)/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 16 myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF), four mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), 67 PEO with single or multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA, 10 others]. A neuropathy was found in 49 patients (45%). The incidence was very high in MNGIE (100%), MELAS (92%) and MERRF (69%), whilst 28% of PEO patients had evidence of peripheral involvement. The most frequent abnormality was a sensory axonal neuropathy found in 32/49 patients (65%). A sensory-motor axonal neuropathy was instead detected in 16% of the patients and sensory-motor axonal demyelinating neuropathy in 16%. Finally one Leigh patient had a motor axonal neuropathy. It is interesting to note that the great majority had preserved tendon reflexes and no sensory disturbances. In conclusion, peripheral involvement in MD is frequent even if often mild or asymptomatic. The correct identification and characterization of peripheral neuropathy through electrophysiological studies represents another tile in the challenge of MD diagnosis. © 2016 EAN.

  6. Recurrence Quantification Analysis of F-Waves and the Evaluation of Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Morris A; Patil, Vijaya K; Webber, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Electrodiagnostic (EDX) patterns of neuropathic dysfunction have been based on axonal/demyelinating criteria requiring prior assumptions. This has not produced classifications of desired sensitivity or specificity. Furthermore, standard nerve conduction studies have limited reproducibility. New methodologies in EDX seem important. Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA) is a nonlinear method for examining patterns of recurrence. RQA might provide a unique method for the EDX evaluation of neuropathies. RQA was used to analyze F-wave recordings from the abductor hallucis muscle in 61 patients with neuropathies. Twenty-nine of these patients had diabetes as the sole cause of their neuropathies. In the other 32 patients, the etiologies of the neuropathies were diverse. Commonly used EDX variables were also recorded. RQA data could separate the 29 patients with diabetic neuropathies from the other 32 patients (P < 0.009). Statistically significant differences in two EDX variables were also present: compound muscle action potential amplitudes (P < 0.007) and F-wave persistence (P < 0.001). RQA analysis of F-waves seemed able to distinguish diabetic neuropathies from the other neuropathies studied, and this separation was associated with specific physiological abnormalities. This study would therefore support the idea that RQA of F-waves can distinguish between types of neuropathic dysfunction based on EDX data alone without prior assumptions.

  7. Recurrence Quantification Analysis of F-Waves and the Evaluation of Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Morris A.; Patil, Vijaya K.; Webber, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Electrodiagnostic (EDX) patterns of neuropathic dysfunction have been based on axonal/demyelinating criteria requiring prior assumptions. This has not produced classifications of desired sensitivity or specificity. Furthermore, standard nerve conduction studies have limited reproducibility. New methodologies in EDX seem important. Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA) is a nonlinear method for examining patterns of recurrence. RQA might provide a unique method for the EDX evaluation of neuropathies. RQA was used to analyze F-wave recordings from the abductor hallucis muscle in 61 patients with neuropathies. Twenty-nine of these patients had diabetes as the sole cause of their neuropathies. In the other 32 patients, the etiologies of the neuropathies were diverse. Commonly used EDX variables were also recorded. RQA data could separate the 29 patients with diabetic neuropathies from the other 32 patients (P < 0.009). Statistically significant differences in two EDX variables were also present: compound muscle action potential amplitudes (P < 0.007) and F-wave persistence (P < 0.001). RQA analysis of F-waves seemed able to distinguish diabetic neuropathies from the other neuropathies studied, and this separation was associated with specific physiological abnormalities. This study would therefore support the idea that RQA of F-waves can distinguish between types of neuropathic dysfunction based on EDX data alone without prior assumptions. PMID:26688754

  8. Siblings with optic neuropathy and RTN4IP1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Miya, Fuyuki; Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kawato, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yuto; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Shinji; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2017-10-01

    Inherited optic neuropathies (IONs) are neurodegenerative disorders affecting the optic nerve and the nervous system. Dominant and recessive IONs are known. Many of the dominant IONs are caused by mutations of OPA1. Autosomal-recessive IONs are rare. OPA10 is an autosomal-recessive ION due to mutations in RTN4IP1. Patients with RTN4IP1 mutations show extraocular manifestations. We report brothers with optic neuropathy who had novel mutations in the RTN4IP1 gene. This is the first report of Japanese patients with OPA10. They showed extraocular manifestations resembling mitochondrial encephalopathy.

  9. Peripheral Nerve Demyelination Caused by a Mutant Rho GTPase Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, Frabin/FGD4

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, Claudia ; Roos, Andreas ; Deconinck, Tine ; Pereira, Jorge ; Castagner, François ; Niemann, Axel ; Kirschner, Janbernd ; Korinthenberg, Rudolf ; Ketelsen, Uwe-Peter ; Battaloglu, Esra ; Parman, Yesim ; Nicholson, Garth ; Ouvrier, Robert ; Seeger, Jürgen ; Jonghe, Peter De ; Weis, Joachim ; Krüttgen, Alexander ; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Suter, Ueli ; Zerres, Klaus ; Timmerman, Vincent ; Relvas, João B. ; Senderek, Jan 

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho subfamily are widely involved in the myelination of the vertebrate nervous system. Rho GTPase activity is temporally and spatially regulated by a set of specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we report that disruption of frabin/FGD4, a GEF for the Rho GTPase cell-division cycle 42 (Cdc42), causes peripheral nerve demyelination in patients with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. These data, together with the ability of frabin to induce Cdc42-mediated cell-shape changes in transfected Schwann cells, suggest that Rho GTPase signaling is essential for proper myelination of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:17564972

  10. Peripheral nerve demyelination caused by a mutant Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor, frabin/FGD4.

    PubMed

    Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Deconinck, Tine; Pereira, Jorge; Castagner, Francois; Niemann, Axel; Kirschner, Janbernd; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Ketelsen, Uwe-Peter; Battaloglu, Esra; Parman, Yesim; Nicholson, Garth; Ouvrier, Robert; Seeger, Jürgen; De Jonghe, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Krüttgen, Alexander; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Bergmann, Carsten; Suter, Ueli; Zerres, Klaus; Timmerman, Vincent; Relvas, João B; Senderek, Jan

    2007-07-01

    GTPases of the Rho subfamily are widely involved in the myelination of the vertebrate nervous system. Rho GTPase activity is temporally and spatially regulated by a set of specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we report that disruption of frabin/FGD4, a GEF for the Rho GTPase cell-division cycle 42 (Cdc42), causes peripheral nerve demyelination in patients with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. These data, together with the ability of frabin to induce Cdc42-mediated cell-shape changes in transfected Schwann cells, suggest that Rho GTPase signaling is essential for proper myelination of the peripheral nervous system.

  11. Neuropathy in a cohort of restless leg syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Bastia, Jogendra K; Bhoi, Sanjeev K; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the types of neuropathy in a cohort of restless leg syndrome (RLS) patients and compare them with primary RLS. RLS symptoms can occur in peripheral neuropathy and may cause diagnostic confusion, and there is a paucity of studies comparing neuropathic RLS and primary RLS. Patients with RLS diagnosed according to the international restless legs syndrome study group criteria were categorized as primary RLS or secondary. Those with evidence of peripheral neuropathy were categorized as neuropathic RLS. The demographic, clinical, laboratory profile and therapeutic response to dopamine agonists at 6 months and 1 year of neuropathic RLS patients were compared between primary and secondary RLS patients. There were 82 patients with RLS of whom 22 had peripheral neuropathy and 28 had primary RLS. The etiology of neuropathic RLS was diabetes mellitus in 13, renal failure in six, hypothyroidism in five, demyelinating in two, nutritional deficiency in three, leprosy in one, and miscellaneous etiologies in four patients. The neuropathic RLS patients were older (46.0±14.1 versus 35.8±15.4 years), had shorter duration of illness (1.4±1.4 versus 6.2±6.2 years) and were more frequently symptomatic. RLS symptoms were asymmetric in primary RLS patients compared to neuropathic RLS (25% versus 0%). The therapeutic response was similar in both groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Höke, Ahmet; Ray, Mitali

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and dose-limiting side effect of many chemotherapeutic drugs. These include platinum compounds, taxanes, vinca alkaloids, proteasome inhibitors, and others such as thalidomide and suramin. Although many rodent models have been developed using either mice or rats, there is limited consistency in the dose or mode of delivery of the drug; the sex, age, and genetic background of the animal used in the study; and the outcome measures used in evaluation of the peripheral neuropathy. Behavioral assays are commonly used to evaluate evoked sensory responses but are unlikely to be a good representation of the spontaneous sensory paresthesias that the patients experience. Electrophysiologic tests evaluate the integrity of large myelinated populations and are useful in drugs that cause either demyelination or degeneration of large myelinated axons but are insensitive to degeneration of unmyelinated axons in early stages of neuropathy. Histopathologic tools offer an unbiased way to evaluate the degree of axonal degeneration or changes in neuronal cell body but are often time consuming and require processing of the tissue after the study is completed. Nevertheless, use of drug doses and mode of delivery that are relevant to the clinical protocols and use of outcome measures that are both sensitive and objective in evaluation of the length-dependent distal axonal degeneration seen in most chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies may improve the translational utility of these rodent models.

  13. Inflammatory/demyelinating central nervous system involvement in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF): coincidence or association?

    PubMed

    Akman-Demir, G; Gul, A; Gurol, E; Ozdogan, H; Bahar, S; Oge, A E; Gurvit, H; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Yazici, H; Eraksoy, M

    2006-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in FMF is uncommon, but recently cases with multiple sclerosis (MS) and FMF have been reported. Here we assess patients with both FMF and MS, in order to clarify any relationship between FMF and MS, and to evaluate disease characteristics. Our MS database between 1986-2005 was screened retrospectively, and patients with both FMF and inflammatory/demyelinating CNS disease were evaluated among a total of 2800 patients including definite MS (n = 2268) and other demyelinating disorders. There were 12 patients with FMF, who developed a CNS disorder with multifocal white matter lesions. Median age at onset of FMF was 7 years, and median age at neurological onset was 26.8 years. Nine patients (including two siblings) had definite MS according to clinical and MRI findings, whereas 3 patients had atypical features suggesting other demyelinating disorders. Disease severity varied among the patients between very mild to a fatal course. All 8 patients evaluated for oligoclonal IgG bands in CSF were positive. The rate of FMF among our patients with definite MS is almost 4 times the expected prevalence in Turkey. Our series including a sibling pair concordant for FMF and MS may suggest that similar genetic susceptibility and environmental factors might be responsible, although coincidence still remains a possibility. A prospective study on a larger sample seems to be justified.

  14. [The clinical electrophysiology and pathological characteristics of 15 cases of vasculitic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingshuang; Sun, Aping; Zhang, Bin; Zhong, Yanfeng; Dong, Rongfang; Fan, Dongsheng

    2014-05-01

    To summarize the clinical features, electrophysiology and neuropathological characteristics of peripheral nerves in patients with vasculitic neuropathy. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical, electrophysiology and neuropathological characteristics of 15 patients with vasculitic neuropathy who underwent electrophysiology and sural nerve biopsy in our department from January 2009 to June 2013. There were 8 males and 7 females, aged from 38 to 82 years old, with a peripheral neuropathy course ranged from 0.5 month to 60 months. In the total of 15 patients, 3 patients were diagnosed as nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy, while the other 12 patients were diagnosed as systemic vasculitis neuropathy (SVN) including 5 cases of primary systemic vasculitis and 7 cases of secondary systemic vasculitis. In patients diagnosed as primary systemic vasculitis, there were 2 cases of Churg-Strass syndrome (CSS) and 3 cases of ANCA associated vasculitis. In patients diagnosed as secondary systemic vasculitis, there were 1 case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 2 cases of sicca syndrome (SS), 3 cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 1 case of Behcet' s disease associated with thyroid papillary carcinoma, 1 case of hepatitis B and 1 case of RA-associated SS. For the pathological features of vasculitic neuropathy, type 1 lesion was found in 4 patients, type 2 lesion in 2 patients, and type 3 lesion in 9 patients. Axon degeneration was observed in 8 patients, while 7 patients manifested as axon degeneration associated with demyelination and local thickening of the perineurium was found in 2 patients. Multiple mononeuropathy and asymmetric polyneuropathy are the common clinical presentations of vasculitic neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic testing almost always reveals the evidence of a predominantly axonal and sensorimotor process with associated demyelination presented in some cases. Sural nerve biopsy shows changes indicative of an axonopathy.

  15. Nerve ultrasound findings in neuropathy associated with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, M; Padua, L; Granata, G; Luigetti, M; Campagnolo, M; Dalla Torre, C; Coraci, D; Sabatelli, M; Briani, C

    2015-01-01

    No systematic nerve ultrasound (US) studies on patients with neuropathy and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) antibodies are available. Twenty-eight patients (18 men, 10 women, mean age 69.2 ± 10.9 years; mean disease duration 6.9 years) with anti-MAG neuropathy underwent nerve US. Echotexture, nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and intra-nerve and inter-nerve CSA variability were assessed. The frequency (number of nerves with enlarged CSA, 'enlarged nerves sum score') and distribution (proximal versus distal, arms versus legs, symmetry) of US abnormalities were considered. Controls included two groups: four patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) paraproteinaemic neuropathy without anti-MAG antibodies and five with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated with IgM paraprotein. In all, 26/28 patients had increased CSA (23 with at least one nerve outside entrapment sites). Intra-nerve CSA variability was abnormal in 21/28 patients (in 14 for increased nerve CSA outside entrapment sites). Inter-nerve CSA variability was abnormal in 16 patients (of whom half for CSA increase out of entrapment sites). The enlarged nerves sum score in anti-MAG neuropathy patients was greater than in MAG-negative paraproteinaemic neuropathies and lower than in CIDP. Intra-nerve variability appeared instead similar in anti-MAG and controls. No correlation was found between US findings and Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) disability score or disease duration. Amongst the different measures to assess the US pattern (symmetry/asymmetry, proximal/distal distribution and sum score), the enlarged nerves sum score was the most useful for differentiating the three groups of patients with demyelinating neuropathies and may contribute to diagnosis in a typical cases. © 2014 EAN.

  16. Epigenetic inheritance: Uncontested?

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Reinberg, Danny

    2011-01-01

    “Epigenetics” is currently defined as “the inheritance of variation (-genetics) above and beyond (epi-) changes in the DNA sequence”. Despite the fact that histones are believed to carry important epigenetic information, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the inheritance of histone-based epigenetic information, including histone modifications and histone variants. Here we review recent progress and discuss potential models for the mitotic inheritance of histone modifications-based epigenetic information. PMID:21321606

  17. [Pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Aranami, Toshimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is considered to be a demyelinating autoimmune disorder in the peripheral nervous system. Concerning cellular immune response, activity of IFN-gamma producing Th1 and IL-17 producing Th17 cells might be accelerated in patients with CIDP, while regulatory function of CD4+ CD25(high) Foxp3+ regulatory T cells might be diminished. Humoral immune responses against several myelin components such as myelin protein zero and gangliosides such as GM1 might be also induced in a part of patients with CIDP. Besides, growing body of evidences suggest that immune response against several molecules expressed in the noncompact myelin might be involved in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  18. Th17 cells in autoimmune demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recently published studies in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have demonstrated an association between the development of demyelinating plaques and the accumulation of Th17 cells in the central nervous system and periphery. However, a causal relationship has been difficult to establish. In fact, in reports published thus far, interleukin (IL)-17A deficiency or neutralization in vivo attenuates, but does not completely abrogate, EAE. There is growing evidence that clinically similar forms of autoimmune demyelinating disease can be driven by myelin-specific T cells of distinct lineages with different degrees of dependence on IL-17A production to achieve their pathological effects. While such observations cast doubts about the potential therapeutic efficacy of Th17 blocking agents in MS, the collective data suggest that IL-17A expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could serve as a surrogate biomarker of neuroinflammation and plaque formation and be a useful outcome measure for future clinical trials. PMID:20195867

  19. The Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Response to Demyelination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    oligodendrocyte regeneration associated with reduced apoptosis during recovery. The effect of increased PDGF-A is likely as a survival factor during the...also a substantial loss of mature oligodendrocyte cells. Within lesions associated with spinal cord injury, mature oligodendrocytes undergo apoptosis...models of demyelination with remyelination: infection with murine hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59) and ingestion of the neurotoxicant cuprizone

  20. Glutamate Receptors in Neuroinflammatory Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Christopher; Paul, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). The condition predominantly affects young adults and is characterised by immunological and inflammatory changes in the periphery and CNS that contribute to neurovascular disruption, haemopoietic cell invasion of target tissues, and demyelination of nerve fibres which culminate in neurological deficits that relapse and remit or are progressive. The main features of MS can be reproduced in the inducible animal counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The search for new MS treatments invariably employs EAE to determine drug activity and provide a rationale for exploring clinical efficacy. The preclinical development of compounds for MS has generally followed a conventional, immunotherapeutic route. However, over the past decade, a group of compounds that suppress EAE but have no apparent immunomodulatory activity have emerged. These drugs interact with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate family of glutamate receptors reported to control neurovascular permeability, inflammatory mediator synthesis, and resident glial cell functions including CNS myelination. The review considers the importance of the glutamate receptors in EAE and MS pathogenesis. The use of receptor antagonists to control EAE is also discussed together with the possibility of therapeutic application in demyelinating disease. PMID:16883070

  1. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  2. Painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda; Goutman, Stephen A; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-05-06

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease [corrected]. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.

  3. POEMS Syndrome in a Juvenile Initially Diagnosed as Treatment Resistant Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Krish, Sonia N; Nguyen, Thy; Biliciler, Suur; Kumaravel, Manickam; Wahed, Amer; Risin, Semyon; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2015-12-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) is a disorder that mainly affects adults. We report a pediatric patient, initially considered to have Guillain-Barré syndrome, who continued to have progression of neuropathic disease leading to the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diagnosis of POEMS was established by an abnormal bone marrow biopsy, prompted by laboratory and imaging findings, which became abnormal later in the course of the disease. POEMS syndrome is extremely rare in children, and neuropathic features in this age group have not been previously described. This case illustrates that "Guillain-Barré syndrome-like" initial presentation for POEMS, which has not been previously reported. It also emphasizes that in children with progressive acquired neuropathies that are treatment unresponsive, POEMS syndrome should be considered.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  5. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  6. Elevated protein carbonylation, and misfolding in sciatic nerve from db/db and Sod1(-/-) mice: plausible link between oxidative stress and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Ryan T; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Walsh, Michael E; Shi, Yun; Wei, Rochelle; Zhang, Yiqiang; Rodriguez, Karl A; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Chaudhuri, Asish R; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy is associated with decrements in motor/sensory neuron myelination, nerve conduction and muscle function; however, the mechanisms of reduced myelination in diabetes are poorly understood. Chronic elevation of oxidative stress may be one of the potential determinants for demyelination as lipids and proteins are important structural constituents of myelin and highly susceptible to oxidation. The goal of the current study was to determine whether there is a link between protein oxidation/misfolding and demyelination. We chose two distinct models to test our hypothesis: 1) the leptin receptor deficient mouse (dbdb) model of diabetic polyneuropathy and 2) superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-) ) mouse model of in vivo oxidative stress. Both experimental models displayed a significant decrement in nerve conduction, increase in tail distal motor latency as well as reduced myelin thickness and fiber/axon diameter. Further biochemical studies demonstrated that oxidative stress is likely to be a potential key player in the demyelination process as both models exhibited significant elevation in protein carbonylation and alterations in protein conformation. Since peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a key component of myelin sheath and has been found mutated and aggregated in several peripheral neuropathies, we predicted that an increase in carbonylation and aggregation of PMP22 may be associated with demyelination in dbdb mice. Indeed, PMP22 was found to be carbonylated and aggregated in sciatic nerves of dbdb mice. Sequence-driven hydropathy plot analysis and in vitro oxidation-induced aggregation of purified PMP22 protein supported the premise for oxidation-dependent aggregation of PMP22 in dbdb mice. Collectively, these data strongly suggest for the first time that oxidation-mediated protein misfolding and aggregation of key myelin proteins may be linked to demyelination and reduced nerve conduction in peripheral neuropathies.

  7. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  8. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  9. Transcriptional Changes in Canine Distemper Virus-Induced Demyelinating Leukoencephalitis Favor a Biphasic Mode of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms “viral replication” and “humoral immune response” as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to “metabolite and energy

  10. Comparison of electrophysiological findings in axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yadegari, Samira; Nafissi, Shahriar; Kazemi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incidence and predominant subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) differs geographically. Electrophysiology has an important role in early diagnosis and prediction of prognosis. This study is conducted to determine the frequent subtype of GBS in a large group of patients in Iran and compare nerve conduction studies in axonal and demyelinating forms of GBS. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and electrodiagnostic study (EDS) of 121 GBS patients who were managed in our hospital during 11 years. After regarding the exclusion criteria, patients classified as three groups: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN). The most frequent subtype and then electrophysiological characteristic based on the time of EDS and their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile were assessed. Results: Among 70 patients finally included in the study, 67% were men. About 63%, 23%, and 14% had AIDP, AMAN, and AMSAN, respectively. AIDP patients represented a wider range of ages compared with other groups. Higher levels of CSF protein, abnormal late responses and sural sparing were more frequent in AIDP subtype. Five AMSAN patients also revealed sural sparing. Conduction block (CB) was observed in one AMAN patient. Prolonged F-wave latency was observed only in AIDP cases. CB and inexcitable sensory nerves were more frequent after 2 weeks, but reduced F-wave persistency was more prominent in the early phase. Conclusion: AIDP was the most frequent subtype. Although the electrophysiology and CSF are important diagnostic tools, classification should not be made based on a distinct finding. PMID:25422732

  11. Atypical electrophysiologic findings in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP)--diagnosis confirmed by nerve biopsy.

    PubMed

    Boukhris, S; Magy, L; Kabore, R; Mabrouk, T; Li, Y; Sindou, P; Tabaraud, F; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2004-04-01

    Numerous sets of electrophysiological criteria of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) have been proposed, among which the criteria established by an ad hoc subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) in 1991 (Neurology 41 (1991) 617) are the most widely used. As they seemed rather restrictive, the Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) group (Ann. Neurol. 50 (2001) 195) proposed modifications of these electrophysiological criteria. However, even using these criteria, some cases of CIDP may not be recognized. In such cases, nerve biopsy has proven useful for confirmation of the diagnosis by demonstrating specific abnormalities. The objective of the study was to determine the profile of electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with atypical electrophysiologic criteria of CIDP and the diagnostic value of multiple A waves and a low median to sural amplitude ratio. Over a period of 3 years, we classified 44 patients into two categories: those presenting the strict AAN and/or INCAT criteria and those who we regarded as cases of CIDP not meeting these criteria. All patients benefited from one or more clinical and electrophysiological examination. Extensive biological workup and genetic study when appropriate excluded other causes of neuropathy. Nerve biopsies were taken from all patients and samples were included in paraffin and epon for systematic light, teasing and electron microscopic examination. Out of 44 patients, 36 fulfilled the INCAT or AAN criteria. In eight other patients, the diagnosis of CIDP was suspected on clinical and EMG examinations and confirmed by nerve biopsy. In these cases, the electrophysiological exploration showed some abnormalities such as multiple A waves in four out of eight patients or an abnormal pattern of the sensory responses of the median and sural nerves in four out of eight patients that were more indicative of an initial demyelinating process. Six of our patients received

  12. Selective vulnerability of peripheral nerves in avian riboflavin deficiency demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Blumbergs, P C; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Thompson, P D

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency in young chickens produces a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this study, day-old broiler meat chickens were fed a riboflavin-deficient diet (1.8 mg/kg) and killed on posthatch days 6, 11, 16, 21, and 31, while control chickens were given a conventional diet containing 5.0 mg/kg riboflavin. Pathologic changes were found in sciatic, cervical, and lumbar spinal nerves of riboflavin-deficient chickens from day 11 onwards, characterized by endoneurial oedema, hypertrophic Schwann cells, tomacula (redundant myelin swellings), demyelination/remyelination, lipid deposition, and fibroblastic onion bulb formation. Similar changes were also found in large and medium intramuscular nerves, although they were less severe in the latter. However, by contrast, ventral and dorsal spinal nerve roots, distal intramuscular nerves, and subcutaneous nerves were normal at all time points examined. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that riboflavin deficiency in young, rapidly growing chickens produces selective injury to peripheral nerve trunks, with relative sparing of spinal nerve roots and distal nerve branches to muscle and skin. These novel findings suggest that the response of Schwann cells in peripheral nerves with riboflavin deficiency differs because either there are subsets of these cells in, or there is variability in access of nutrients to, different sites within the nerves.

  13. Autophagic myelin destruction by Schwann cells during Wallerian degeneration and segmental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Young; Park, Joo Youn; Lee, Hye Jeong; Yoo, Young Hyun; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Hwan Tae

    2016-05-01

    As lysosomal hydrolysis has long been suggested to be responsible for myelin clearance after peripheral nerve injury, in this study, we investigated the possible role of autophagolysosome formation in myelin phagocytosis by Schwann cells and its final contribution to nerve regeneration. We found that the canonical formation of autophagolysosomes was induced in demyelinating Schwann cells after injury, and the inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific knockout of the atg7 gene or pharmacological intervention of lysosomal function caused a significant delay in myelin clearance. However, Schwann cell dedifferentiation, as demonstrated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and c-Jun induction, and redifferentiation were not significantly affected, and thus the entire repair program progressed normally in atg7 knockout mice. Finally, autophagic Schwann cells were also found during segmental demyelination in a mouse model of inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is the self-myelin destruction mechanism of Schwann cells, but mechanistically, it is a process distinct from Schwann cell plasticity for nerve repair. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acute clinical onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Molín, Jéssica; Márquez, Mercedes; Raurell, Xavier; Matiasek, Kaspar; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of acute-onset ambulatory paraparesis with electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with axonal and demyelinating lesions in a Rottweiler dog. Although the clinical findings were compatible with acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy, postmortem investigations revealed a chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy affecting the nerve roots. Due to the combination of acute clinical presentation and chronic pathologic features, this case is consistent with the acute-onset form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP).

  15. Peripheral neuropathy in chronic liver disease: clinical, electrodiagnostic, and nerve biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R. P.; Goodwill, C. J.; Dayan, A. D.; Williams, Roger

    1972-01-01

    In a prospective study of 70 unselected patients with chronic liver disease, clinical signs of a peripheral neuropathy were observed in 13 patients. Abnormal nerve conduction was demonstrated in nine of these and in one further patient who had no abnormal neurological signs. The occurrence of a neuropathy (in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, haemochromatosis, active chronic hepatitis as well as in alcoholic cirrhosis) could not be related to liver function, although it was associated with higher IgA and IgM values. Clinical diabetes was present in six of the 14 patients with neuropathy but there was no relation in the non-diabetic patients between neuropathy and minor impairment of carbohydrate tolerance. Those with neuropathy had a significantly higher incidence of oesophageal varices and there was also a relationship to a history of previous encephalopathy. Sural nerve biopsy was carried out on 14 patients, eight of whom had clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of neuropathy. Single nerve fibres were examined by teasing and in all nerves histological evidence was found of an indolent process which had damaged whole Schwann cells and which resulted in demyelination and remyelination. Diabetic angiopathy was not seen and axonal degeneration, which was never severe, was found in all disease groups equally. Images PMID:4337271

  16. Diagnosis and management of neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Evan; Marks, Douglas; Raza, Shahzad

    2017-04-10

    Neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias are a major cause of morbidity for patients managed by medical oncologists. Because of similarities in clinical presentation and on nerve conduction studies, identifying the underlying disease leading to a paraproteinemic neuropathy can often be difficult. In addition, the degree of neurologic deficit does not strictly correlate with the extent of abnormalities on common clinical laboratory testing. Fortunately, with increasing understanding into the biologic mechanisms of underlying hematologic diseases, additional biomarkers have recently been developed, thus improving our diagnostic capacity. Neuropathies associated with plasma cells dyscrasias are seen with Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) particularly IgM subtype, followed by IgG and IgA MGUS, multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, amyloid, Castleman's disease, and POEMS syndrome. The mechanisms of neuronal injury associated with plasma cell dyscrasia vary based on underlying diagnosis and include malignant infiltration, immune-mediated antibody deposition, or local compression of nerve roots. The polyneuropathies are frequently demyelinating, although axonal and mixed neuropathies can also be seen. As demonstrated by the cases included in this review, patients frequently present with symmetric sensory disturbance, followed by progressive motor weakness. Unfortunately, because of the complexity of diagnostic testing, patients are frequently examined late, often after receiving several ineffective therapies. The aim of this case-based review is to provide clinicians with insight on how to properly recognize these atypical neuropathies and send the appropriate diagnostic work, increasing the likelihood of accurately classify the patient's underlying hematologic disorder. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Review of the recent literature on peripheral neuropathies: therapeutic advances].

    PubMed

    Adams, D

    2013-12-01

    Improvement of therapeutic strategies for peripheral neuropathies requires multicentric clinical trials. For chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), a randomized controlled multicentric study compared IgIV to pulses of methylprednisolone (MP) given for 6 months. The primary endpoint was treatment discontinuation due to inefficacy or intolerance; 45 patients were enrolled: more patients had interrupted MP than IVIg, usually because of inefficacy. A multicentric randomized clinical trial (PREDICT) evaluated long-term remission of CIDP after short-term corticosteroid therapy (pulses of dexamethasone or prednisolone); 39 patients were enrolled: 26% achieved cure or remission, a relapse occurred in 50% after a delay of 11 to 17 months. Differential diagnosis was identified in 58% of patients who had not responded to any therapy. For refractory CIDP, a retrospective study showed the possibility of functional improvement in 24% of cases after adjunction of an immunomodulatory agent; cyclosporine was associated with the highest rate of adverse events or side effects. In familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, a multicentric controlled study against placebo with tafamidis, an akinetic stabilizer of transthyretin (TTR) 20mg/d, in early stage of Val30MetTTR showed efficiency in the evaluable group and led to marketing authorization by the EMA in stage 1 to slow the progression of the neuropathy. A Cochrane database system review showed that there are no randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials of treatment for POEMS syndrome, for neuropathies with anti-MAG antibodies, or multifocal motor neuropathy on which to base practice. This review underlines the usefulness of multicentric randomized trials to assess treatments in peripheral neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The association of neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy has been known for several years, even if the clinical and pathogenetic relevance of this association is not completely defined. This is not a marginal problem since monoclonal gammopathy is present in 1-3% of the population above 50 years in whom it is often asymptomatic, and in at least 8% of patients is associated with a symptomatic neuropathy, representing one of the leading causes of neuropathy in aged people. Monoclonal gammopathy may result from malignant lymphoproliferative diseases including multiple myeloma or solitary plasmocytoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), other IgM-secreting lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and primary systemic amyloidosis (AL). In most instances it is not associated with any of these disorders and is defined monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for its possible, though infrequent, evolution into malignant forms. Several data support the pathogenetic role of the monoclonal gammopathy in the neuropathy particularly when of IgM isotype where IgM reactivity to several neural antigens has been reported. Increased levels of VEGF have been implicated in POEMS syndrome. However, there are as yet no defined therapies for these neuropathies, as their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized trials.

  19. Anti-ganglioside complex IgM antibodies in multifocal motor neuropathy and chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Giannotta, Claudia; Briani, Chiara

    2010-02-26

    Anti-ganglioside complexes (GSCs) IgG antibodies have been reported in patients with Guillain-Barré (GBS) or Fisher syndrome but little is known on their presence in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) or other chronic immune-mediated neuropathies. We examined 24 patients with MMN, 34 with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), 23 with neuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (PN+IgM), 13 with GBS, 34 with motor neuron disease (MND), 24 with other neuropathies and 20 normal subjects. Patients' sera were tested by ELISA for IgM reactivity to GM1, GM2, GD1a, GD1b and GT1b and with GSCs made by any combination of two of these gangliosides. In all GM1 positive patients with MMN (11), PN+IgM (1), CIDP (1) and POEMS (1), binding to GM1 was abolished or consistently reduced when tested in GSCs also containing GD1a or other gangliosides. This only occurred in one of the three GM1 positive MND patients. In a patient with PN-IgM and anti-GM2 and GD1a IgM, both reactivities were reduced when tested in GSCs also containing GM1. New reactivities were found in a patient with CIDP and anti-GD1b IgM who presented an additional reactivity to GT1b/GM1 and GT1b/GM2 GSCs, and in one with PN-IgM who had reactivity to GM2/GD1b but not to individual gangliosides. Testing for IgM antibodies to GSCs rarely permitted to identify new reactivities in chronic immune neuropathies. IgM binding to gangliosides was however often modified in GSCs suggesting that these reactivities may be affected by contiguous gangliosides possibly influencing their pathogenicity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diabetic neuropathies: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Deli, Gabriella; Bosnyak, Edit; Pusch, Gabriella; Komoly, Samuel; Feher, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Changes in human behaviour and lifestyle over the last century have resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes worldwide. Neuropathy is a common and costly complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of neuropathy is estimated to be about 8% in newly diagnosed patients and greater than 50% in patients with long-standing disease. There are two main types of diabetic neuropathies, named as sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathies. Sensorimotor neuropathy is marked by pain, paraesthesia and sensory loss, and autonomic neuropathy may contribute to myocardial infarction, malignant arrhythmia and sudden death. In this article we reviewed the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathies. Sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathies (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and genitourinary autonomic neuropathies) are common in diabetic patients. Apart from strict glycaemic control, no further therapeutic approach exists in the prevention of this phenomenon. Intensive diabetes therapy, intensive multifactorial cardiovascular risk reduction and lifestyle intervention are recommended in patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. Gastroparesis is the most debilitating complication of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy and genitourinary autonomic neuropathy can cause sexual dysfunction and neurogenic bladder; these conditions are hard to manage. The symptomatic treatment of sensory symptoms includes tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin, pregabalin and opioids. Other treatment strategies are not so effective. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  2. Children's Understanding of Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Elizabeth Engel; Wood-Robinson, Colin

    1985-01-01

    Investigated common belief patterns secondary school students (N=84) have about inheritance, noting the most prevalent misconceptions about genetics which occur at different age levels. Implications based on findings and suggestions for teaching lower secondary courses are included. (ML)

  3. [Peripheral neuropathies: Diagnostic strategy].

    PubMed

    Magy, L

    2017-02-28

    Diagnosing a peripheral neuropathy is sometimes challenging, as the causes are diverse and the clinical pictures heterogeneous. Overall, diagnosing a patient with peripheral neuropathy will require some knowledge in almost every field of medicine. Therefore, it appears crucial to adopt a diagnostic strategy that is based on solid clinical and neurophysiological grounds. The present paper describes a three-step diagnostic strategy: (1) to delineate a clinico-pathologic entity from clinical and electrodiagnostic findings; (2) to propose a list of plausible causes based on step one, history and clinical context; (3) to use appropriate workup in order to determine the cause or mechanism of the neuropathy. The three steps of this diagnostic strategy necessitate a high level of expertise and interaction between physicians is highly desirable. Finally, an aggressive course and a severe impairment should lead to relentlessly look for a curable cause.

  4. Glue sniffer's neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Towfighi, J; Gonatas, N K; Pleasure, D; Cooper, H S; McCree, L

    1976-03-01

    Progressive sensorimotor neuropathy developed in two patients exposed to prolonged (chronic) inhalation of n-hexane (glue sniffing). Sural nerve biopsies showed loss of axons; remaining axons were either normal or showed accumulation of filaments of 90 to 100 A thick, widened nodes of Ranvier, and focal enlargements. The muscle biopsy revealed neurogenic atrophy. Intramuscular nerve twigs and end-plates, studied in one patient, showed loss of axons and nerve terminals. Unmyelinated axons also showed accululation of 60 to 100 A thick filaments. The similarities between the pathologic findings in the peripheral nerve of these patients and those with acrylamide neuropathy suggest that the n-hexane inhalation produces a dying back neuropathy.

  5. [Inherited aplastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Esteves, A C; Freitas, O; Almeida, T; Rosado, L

    2010-08-01

    The inherited aplastic anaemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone marrow failure, frequent association with one or more somatic anomalies and increased risk of cancer. They are rare disorders, usually diagnosed at paediatric age, and have significant premature mortality. The authors report 11 cases of inherited aplastic anaemias, 8 of Fanconi's anaemia and 3 of Dyskeratosis congenita. These cases were diagnosed in the last 14 years in the Dona Estefânia Hospital.

  6. Distribution patterns of demyelination correlate with clinical profiles in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, S; Ogawara, K; Misawa, S; Mori, M; Hattori, T

    2002-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a heterogeneous disorder having a wide clinical range, and is characterised by multifocal demyelination that can involve the distal nerve terminals, intermediate nerve segments, and nerve roots. Objective: To investigate whether the distribution patterns of demyelination along the course of the nerve correlate with clinical profiles in patients with CIDP. Methods: Motor nerve conduction studies were carried out on 42 consecutive patients. According to the physiological criteria for demyelination, the presence of a demyelinative lesion was determined in the distal nerve segments (distal pattern) or intermediate nerve segments (intermediate pattern), or in both (diffuse pattern). The serum concentration of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α was measured by immunoassay. Results: Patients were classified as having a distal (n=10), intermediate (n=13), or diffuse (n=15) pattern, or were unclassified (n=4). Patients with the distal or diffuse pattern had common clinical features such as subacute onset, symmetric symptoms, and weakness involving proximal as well as distal muscles. Patients with the distal pattern had a good response to treatment and a monophasic remitting course, but the diffuse pattern was associated with a treatment dependent relapsing course, reflecting longer disease activity. The serum TNF-α concentrations increased only in the "diffuse" subgroup of patients, and this might be associated with breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier and therefore, involvement of the intermediate segments. The intermediate pattern was characterised by a chronic course, asymmetric symptoms, less severe disability, and refractoriness to treatments. Conclusions: CIDP consists of subtypes with varying predilections for lesions along the course of the nerve. The distribution patterns of conduction abnormalities may be useful in the prediction of outcome of patients with CIDP. PMID:11784822

  7. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text.

  8. The Armadillo as a Model for Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Pena, Maria T.; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Scollard, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  9. Ulnar Neuropathy in Cyclists.

    PubMed

    Brubacher, Jacob W; Leversedge, Fraser J

    2017-02-01

    The form and function of the cyclist exposes the ulnar nerve to both traction and compressive forces at both the elbow and wrist. Prevention of ulnar neuropathy and treatment of early symptoms include bike fitting, avoidance of excessive or prolonged weight-bearing through the hands, and the use of padded gloves. For persisting or progressive symptoms, a thorough history and physical examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out other sites of nerve compression. The majority of compression neuropathies in cyclists resolve after appropriate rest and conservative treatment; however, should symptoms persist, nerve decompression may be indicated.

  10. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with cholesterol deposits in a dog.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Pablo; Sponenberg, D Philip; Pancotto, Theresa; King, Rosalind H M; Jortner, Bernard S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy occurred in an 11-year-old Labrador Retriever dog. Spinal cord compression resulted from massive radiculitis with prominent cholesterol granulomas. Cholesterol deposition and associated granuloma formation is unique in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in both its human and canine expressions. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. PMID:22257488

  13. Clinical description of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Little, Ann A; Albers, James W

    2015-01-01

    Toxic neuropathy, although rare, is an important consideration in the setting of a known or suspected toxic exposure in the workplace or other environment. This chapter discusses the clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies, highlighting findings that direct further workup and may point to specific toxins as etiology. The difficulty of establishing causality of a toxin in relation to peripheral neuropathy is discussed; guidelines for establishing causality are presented. Examples of common industrial toxins are listed, including their typical industrial uses and their mechanisms of action in producing neuropathy. Characteristic clinical presentations of specific toxic neuropathies are highlighted with selected case studies. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic strategies for diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ali A; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy globally. Duration of diabetes, glycemic control, and preexisting cardiovascular risk factors independently correlate with the development and progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy as well as cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy remains unclear, although insulin resistance, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism, advanced glycation end products, neurotrophic factors, and protein kinase C activation all may play a role. Strict glycemic control remains the only available treatment option, although other treatments are in development. Multiple options are available for symptom management. In this article, we review factors associated with development and progression of diabetic neuropathy and discuss available treatment options.

  15. Stem cell therapy for demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Pazour, Jan; Mokrý, Jaroslav

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that attacks mainly young people. It leads to the progressive deterioration of the neurological status. Histopatologically, this disease is characterized by appearance of multiple foci of the demyelination in white matter of the CNS, with various grade of an axonal loss. The current treatment is targeted on moderating the inflammatory process and symptomatic therapy. In spite of all this therapy, the course of the disease often progresses. The tissue of the CNS in mammalians, including humans, is able to provide some degree of spontaneous remyelination. Unfortunatelly the extent of this process is not sufficient for the complete restoration. The support of remyelination by using the cell manipulations is the aim of many experimental studies. Theoretically, it is possible to achieve remyelination either by exogenous induction of remyelination from endogenous sources (precursor cells) or by the real transplantation of myelin-forming cells intrafocally, intracerebroventricularly or into the blood stream. In this work, we present the brief view on the recent state of this topic. We present the list of the cell types, useable for cell transplantations and the summary of the growth factors influencing the behaviour of the oligodendroglial precursors. We are considering the hampers in usage of the cell therapy of demyelinating disorders in clinics.

  16. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination with underlying combined germ cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, Jack R; Archer, Hilary A; Coulthard, Elizabeth; Appelman, Auke P A; Sutak, Judit; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Love, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Paraneoplastic demyelination is a rare disorder of the central nervous system. We describe a 60-year-old man with tumefactive demyelination who had an underlying retroperitoneal germ cell cancer. He presented with visuospatial problems and memory loss and had a visual field defect. His MRI was interpreted as a glioma but stereotactic biopsy showed active demyelination. Investigation for multiple sclerosis was negative but CT imaging showed retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, and nodal biopsy confirmed a combined germ cell cancer. He responded poorly to corticosteroid treatment, and his visual field defect progressed. However, 6 months after plasma exchange and successful chemotherapy, he has partially improved clinically and radiographically. Tumefactive demyelination is typically associated with multiple sclerosis but may be paraneoplastic. It is important to recognise paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination early, as the neurological outcome relies on treating the associated malignancy.

  18. [Pathophysiology of sensory ataxic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Sobue, G

    1996-12-01

    The main lesions of sensory ataxic neuropathy such as chronic idiopathic sensory ataxic neuropathy, (ISAN), carcinomatous neuropathy, Sjögren syndrome-associated neuropathy and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy (AASN) are the large-diameter sensory neurons and dosal column of the spinal cord and the large myelinated fibers in the peripheral nerve trunks. In addition, afferent fibers to the Clarke's nuclei are also severely involved, suggesting Ia fibers being involved in these neuropathies. In NT-3 knockout mouse, an animal model of sensory ataxia, large-sized la neurons as well as muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organs are depleted, and are causative for sensory ataxia. Thus, the proprioceptive Ia neurons would play a role in pathogenesis of sensory ataxia in human sensory ataxic neuropathies, but the significance of dorsal column involvement in human sensory ataxia is still needed to evaluate.

  19. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Divergent effects of T cell costimulation and inflammatory cytokine production on autoimmune peripheral neuropathy provoked by Aire deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaopei L; Nagavalli, Anil; Smith, Colin-Jamal; Howard, James F; Su, Maureen A

    2013-04-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy results from autoimmune destruction of the peripheral nervous system and is a component of the multiorgan autoimmunity syndrome that results from Aire gene mutations in humans. In parallel, peripheral nervous system autoimmunity resembling chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy develops spontaneously in NOD mice with a partial loss of Aire function (NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice) and is a T cell-mediated disease. In this study, we analyze how key aspects of T cell activation and function modulate disease development in Aire-deficient mice. We show that genetic ablation of the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ completely prevents clinical and electrophysiological evidence of neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. IFN-γ deficiency is associated with absence of immune infiltration and decreased expression of the T cell chemoattractant IP-10 in sciatic nerves. Thus, IFN-γ is absolutely required for the development of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Because IFN-γ secretion is enhanced by B7-CD28 costimulation of T cells, we sought to determine the effects of these costimulatory molecules on neuropathy development. Surprisingly, B7-2 deficiency accelerated neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice, and Ab blockade of both B7-1 and B7-2 resulted in fulminant, early-onset neuropathy. Thus, in contrast to IFN-γ, B7-2 alone and B7-1/B7-2 in combination function to ameliorate neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Together, these findings reveal distinct and opposing effects of the T cell costimulatory pathway and IFN-γ production on the pathogenesis of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

  1. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is one of the major causes of blindness or seriously impaired vision, yet there is disagreement as to its pathogenesis, clinical features and especially its management. This is because ischemic optic neuropathy is not one disease but a spectrum of several different types, each with its own etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and management. They cannot be lumped together. Ischemic optic neuropathy is primarily of two types: anterior (AION) and posterior (PION), involving the optic nerve head (ONH) and the rest of the optic nerve respectively. Furthermore, both AION and PION have different subtypes. AION comprises arteritic (A-AION - due to giant cell arteritis) and, non-arteritic (NA-AION - due to causes other than giant cell arteritis); NA-AION can be further classified into classical NA-AION and incipient NA-AION. PION consists of arteritic (A-PION - due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic (NA-PION - due to causes other than giant cell arteritis), and surgical (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). Thus, ischemic optic neuropathy consists of six distinct types of clinical entities. NA-AION is by far the most common type and one of the most prevalent and visually crippling diseases in the middle-aged and elderly. A-AION, though less common, is an ocular emergency and requires early diagnosis and immediate treatment with systemic high dose corticosteroids to prevent further visual loss, which is entirely preventable. Controversy exists regarding the pathogenesis, clinical features and especially management of the various types of ischemic optic neuropathy because there are multiple misconceptions about its many fundamental aspects. Recently emerging information on the various factors that influence the optic nerve circulation, and also the various systemic and local risk factors which play important roles in the development of various types of ischemic optic neuropathy have given us a better understanding of

  2. A clinical and electrophysiological study of a family with hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Salu, P; Ceulemans, L; Deconinck, H; Claeskens, W; Trau, R

    1985-04-01

    A family with hereditary optic neuropathy was investigated. Visual acuity, Goldmann perimetry, colour vision test, fundoscopy and electrophysiological examination (flash and pattern ERG and VER) were performed. The pattern of inheritance and the results of all these tests are discussed in this article.

  3. Intravenous transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cells attenuates demyelination in an ICR outbred mouse model of demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pringproa, Kidsadagon; Sathanawongs, Anucha; Khamphilai, Chananthida; Sukkarinprom, Sarocha; Oranratnachai, Apichart

    2016-01-01

    Induction of demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) of experimental mice using cuprizone is widely used as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of demyelination. However, different mouse strains used result in different pathological outcomes. Moreover, because current medicinal treatments are not always effective in multiple sclerosis patients, so the study of exogenous cell transplantation in an animal model is of great importance. The aims of the present study were to establish an alternative ICR outbred mouse model for studying demyelination and to evaluate the effects of intravenous cell transplantation in the present developed mouse model. Two sets of experiments were conducted. Firstly, ICR outbred and BALB/c inbred mice were fed with 0.2% cuprizone for 6 consecutive weeks; then demyelinating scores determined by luxol fast blue stain or immunolabeling with CNPase were evaluated. Secondly, attenuation of demyelination in ICR mice by intravenous injection of mES cells was studied. Scores for demyelination in the brains of ICR mice receiving cell injection (mES cells-injected group) and vehicle (sham-inoculated group) were assessed and compared. The results showed that cuprizone significantly induced demyelination in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of both ICR and BALB/c mice. Additionally, intravenous transplantation of mES cells potentially attenuated demyelination in ICR mice compared with sham-inoculated groups. The present study is among the earliest reports to describe the cuprizone-induced demyelination in ICR outbred mice. Although it remains unclear whether mES cells or trophic effects from mES cells are the cause of enhanced remyelination, the results of the present study may shed some light on exogenous cell therapy in central nervous system demyelinating diseases. PMID:27904491

  4. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  5. Perk Ablation Ameliorates Myelination in S63del-Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1B Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Musner, Nicolò; Sidoli, Mariapaola; Zambroni, Desireè; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; D’Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, P0 glycoprotein accounts for more than 20% of myelin protein content. P0 is synthesized by Schwann cells, processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enters the secretory pathway. However, the mutant P0 with S63 deleted (P0S63del) accumulates in the ER lumen and induces a demyelinating neuropathy in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B)–S63del mice. Accumulation of P0S63del in the ER triggers a persistent unfolded protein response. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER stress sensor that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha) in order to attenuate protein synthesis. We have shown that increasing phosphophorylated-eIF2alpha (P-eIF2alpha) is a potent therapeutic strategy, improving myelination and motor function in S63del mice. Here, we explore the converse experiment: Perk haploinsufficiency reduces P-eIF2alpha in S63del nerves as expected, but surprisingly, ameliorates, rather than worsens S63del neuropathy. Motor performance and myelin abnormalities improved in S63del//Perk+/− compared with S63del mice. These data suggest that mechanisms other than protein translation might be involved in CMT1B/S63del neuropathy. In addition, Perk deficiency in other cells may contribute to demyelination in a non–Schwann-cell autonomous manner. PMID:27095827

  6. Perk Ablation Ameliorates Myelination in S63del-Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Musner, Nicolò; Sidoli, Mariapaola; Zambroni, Desireè; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ungaro, Daniela; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, Maria L; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, P0 glycoprotein accounts for more than 20% of myelin protein content. P0 is synthesized by Schwann cells, processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enters the secretory pathway. However, the mutant P0 with S63 deleted (P0S63del) accumulates in the ER lumen and induces a demyelinating neuropathy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B)-S63del mice. Accumulation of P0S63del in the ER triggers a persistent unfolded protein response. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER stress sensor that phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha) in order to attenuate protein synthesis. We have shown that increasing phosphophorylated-eIF2alpha (P-eIF2alpha) is a potent therapeutic strategy, improving myelination and motor function in S63del mice. Here, we explore the converse experiment:Perkhaploinsufficiency reduces P-eIF2alpha in S63del nerves as expected, but surprisingly, ameliorates, rather than worsens S63del neuropathy. Motor performance and myelin abnormalities improved in S63del//Perk+/- compared with S63del mice. These data suggest that mechanisms other than protein translation might be involved in CMT1B/S63del neuropathy. In addition,Perkdeficiency in other cells may contribute to demyelination in a non-Schwann-cell autonomous manner. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Serial electrophysiological studies in a Guillain-Barré subtype with bilateral facial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Cheun; Therimadasamy, Aravind-Kannan; Sainuddin, Nurul M; Wilder-Smith, Einar; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Bifacial weakness with paraesthesias subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is thought to be demyelinating in nature but the evolution of serial nerve conduction study (NCS) findings has not been studied. We retrospectively analyzed the changes on serial NCS of patients with bilateral facial neuropathy. We described the clinical features, serial blink reflex, facial nerve and limb NCS of such patients. Five patients fulfilled our study criteria. Patients 1 and 2 were diagnosed clinically to have bilateral Bell's palsy, patients 3 and 4 as bifacial GBS subtype and patient 5 as facial palsy associated with acute HIV infection. In all, the initial neurophysiological tests showed absent blink response and normal facial NCS. Patient 1's repeat tests were normal. Patient 2's repeat blink reflex showed mildly prolonged latency. Repeat blink reflex latency of patients 3, 4 and 5 were in the demyelinating range. Patient 3 also had prolonged facial nerve latency. Patients 3 and 4 had serial limb NCS showing progressively prolonged latency. Serial NCS suggests that the bifacial GBS subtype is demyelinating in nature. This study provides further evidence for a bifacial subtype of GBS with a demyelinating pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult-onset demyelinating neuropathy associated with FBLN5 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Si; Lv, He; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2017-03-23

    Rare forms of autosomal-dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (AD-CMT) may be associated with mutations in Fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as AD-CMT is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we report the first pathological study of an Asian family. The proband was a 46-year-old man with slowly progressive distal numbness and weakness for 12 years. He had a history of diabetes mellitus for 12 years. His mother was 81 years old and had mild polyneuropathy. His 16-year-old daughter was asymptomatic. The nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) and compound muscular action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were moderately to severely reduced in the proband, and moderately reduced in his daughter and mother. A sensory response could not be elicited in the proband and was moderately to severely decreased in the daughter and mother. Nerve ultrasound indicated a general enlargement of the peripheral nerves in the proband, daughter, and mother. A sural nerve biopsy from the proband demonstrated a pronounced depletion of myelinated fibers, thin myelinated fibers, and onion-bulb formations. A reported heterozygous mutation of c.1117C>T in FBLN5 was identified in the proband, mother, and daughter. These findings confirm a novel subtype of AD-CMT 1 due to a mutation in the FBLN5 gene.
.

  9. Subacute peripheral and optic neuropathy syndrome with no evidence of a toxic or nutritional cause.

    PubMed

    Allen, D; Riordan-Eva, P; Paterson, R W; Hadden, R D M

    2013-08-01

    The syndrome of subacute simultaneous peripheral neuropathy and bilateral optic neuropathy is known to occur in tropical countries, probably due to malnutrition or toxicity, but not often seen in developed countries. We report seven patients in London who were not malnourished or alcoholic, and in whom no clear cause was found. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and arranged some further investigations. All patients developed peripheral and bilateral optic neuropathy within 6 months. Patients were aged 30-52, and all of Jamaican birth and race but lived in the UK. Most had subacute, painful ataxic sensory axonal neuropathy or neuronopathy, some with myelopathy. Nerve conduction studies revealed minor demyelinating features in two cases. The optic neuropathy was symmetrical, subacute and monophasic, usually with marked reduction in visual acuity. CSF protein concentration was usually elevated but other laboratory investigations were normal. Patients showed only modest improvement at follow-up. These patients share a common clinical and electrophysiological phenotype, age, ethnicity and elevated CSF protein, but otherwise normal laboratory investigations. The syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity in young people. The cause remains uncertain despite thorough investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by intravenous mangafodipir

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Alexandre, Jérôme; Nicco, Carole; Quinquis, Laurent; Benoit, Evelyne; Chéreau, Christiane; Lemaréchal, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Borderie, Didier; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Weill, Bernard; Coste, Joel; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Background. The majority of patients receiving the platinum-based chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin develop peripheral neurotoxicity. Because this neurotoxicity involves ROS production, we investigated the efficacy of mangafodipir, a molecule that has antioxidant properties and is approved for use as an MRI contrast enhancer. Methods. The effects of mangafodipir were examined in mice following treatment with oxaliplatin. Neurotoxicity, axon myelination, and advanced oxidized protein products (AOPPs) were monitored. In addition, we enrolled 23 cancer patients with grade ≥2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in a phase II study, with 22 patients receiving i.v. mangafodipir following oxaliplatin. Neuropathic effects were monitored for up to 8 cycles of oxaliplatin and mangafodipir. Results. Mangafodipir prevented motor and sensory dysfunction and demyelinating lesion formation. In mice, serum AOPPs decreased after 4 weeks of mangafodipir treatment. In 77% of patients treated with oxaliplatin and mangafodipir, neuropathy improved or stabilized after 4 cycles. After 8 cycles, neurotoxicity was downgraded to grade ≥2 in 6 of 7 patients. Prior to enrollment, patients received an average of 880 ± 239 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Patients treated with mangafodipir tolerated an additional dose of 458 ± 207 mg/m2 oxaliplatin despite preexisting neuropathy. Mangafodipir responders managed a cumulative dose of 1,426 ± 204 mg/m2 oxaliplatin. Serum AOPPs were lower in responders compared with those in nonresponders. Conclusion. Our study suggests that mangafodipir can prevent and/or relieve oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in cancer patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00727922. Funding. Université Paris Descartes, Ministère de la Recherche et de l’Enseignement Supérieur, and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. PMID:24355920

  11. Mitochondrial immobilization mediated by syntaphilin facilitates survival of demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Nobuhiko; Chiang, Hao; Mahad, Don J.; Kidd, Grahame J.; Liu, LiPing; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a primary cause of permanent neurological disability in individuals with the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Dysfunction of axonal mitochondria and imbalanced energy demand and supply are implicated in degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons. The purpose of this study was to define the roles of mitochondrial volume and distribution in axonal degeneration following acute CNS demyelination. We show that the axonal mitochondrial volume increase following acute demyelination of WT CNS axons does not occur in demyelinated axons deficient in syntaphilin, an axonal molecule that immobilizes stationary mitochondria to microtubules. These findings were supported by time-lapse imaging of WT and syntaphilin-deficient axons in vitro. When demyelinated, axons deficient in syntaphilin degenerate at a significantly greater rate than WT axons, and this degeneration can be rescued by reducing axonal electrical activity with the Na+ channel blocker flecainide. These results support the concept that syntaphilin-mediated immobilization of mitochondria to microtubules is required for the volume increase of axonal mitochondria following acute demyelination and protects against axonal degeneration in the CNS. PMID:24958879

  12. Therapeutic options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is a rare acquired immune-mediated progressive or relapsing disorder causing peripheral neuropathic disease of duration more than two months. Many individuals with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy fail to make a long-term recovery with current treatment regimes. The aim of this study was to prospectively review the literature to determine the effectiveness of therapies for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Methods Articles published from January 1990 to December 2012 were searched for studies to treat adults with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Peer-reviewed full-text articles published in English were included. Results Nine placebo-controlled double-blinded randomised trials were reviewed to treat subjects with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy exhibiting various degrees of effectiveness. The most effect treatments were; three randomised controlled trials using intravenous immunoglobulin, a study comparing pulsed dexamethasone and short term prednisolone and rituximab all showed promising results and were well tolerated. Conclusion IVIg and corticosteroids remain first line treatments for CIDP. Therapies using monoclonal antibodies, such as Rituximab and Natalizumab offer the most promise for treatment of Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy however they also need further research, as does the use of stem cell therapy for treating Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Large randomised controlled trials and better patient selection are required to address responsiveness of CIDP patients to conventional treatments to elucidate mechanisms of action and future directions for therapeutic improvement. PMID:24507546

  13. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  14. Incomplete penetrance in mitochondrial optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Leonardo; Maresca, Alessandra; Capristo, Mariantonietta; Del Dotto, Valentina; Tagliavini, Francesca; Valentino, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Carelli, Valerio

    2017-07-14

    Incomplete penetrance characterizes the two most frequent inherited optic neuropathies, Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA), due to genetic errors in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the nuclear DNA (nDNA), respectively. For LHON, compelling evidence has accumulated on the complex interplay of mtDNA haplogroups and environmental interacting factors, whereas the nDNA remains essentially non informative. However, a compensatory mechanism of activated mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mtDNA copy number, possibly driven by a permissive nDNA background, is documented in LHON; when successful it maintains unaffected the mutation carriers, but in some individuals it might be hampered by tobacco smoking or other environmental factors, resulting in disease onset. In females, mitochondrial biogenesis is promoted and maintained within the compensatory range by estrogens, partially explaining the gender bias in LHON. Concerning DOA, none of the above mechanisms has been fully explored, thus mtDNA haplogroups, environmental factors such as tobacco and alcohol, and further nDNA variants may all participate as protective factors or, on the contrary, favor disease expression and severity. Next generation sequencing, complemented by transcriptomics and proteomics, may provide some answers in the next future, even if the multifactorial model that seems to apply to incomplete penetrance in mitochondrial optic neuropathies remains problematic, and careful stratification of patients will play a key role for data interpretation. The deep understanding of which factors impinge on incomplete penetrance may shed light on the pathogenic mechanisms leading to optic nerve atrophy, on their possible compensation and, thus, on development of therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute autonomic, sensory and motor neuropathy associated with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satoko; Sugie, Kazuma; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Sugie, Miho; Hirano, Makito; Ueno, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    We report the first case of acute autonomic, motor and sensory neuropathy (AASMN) associated with meningoencephalitis. A 62-year-old man presented with fever, neck stiffness, and coma. Respiratory failure developed. Magnetic resonance images showed an abnormality in the medial temporal lobe. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis with a high protein level. Intensive care gradually improved the consciousness level, but paralysis of the four extremities persisted. Nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating sensory and motor polyneuropathy. Severe orthostatic hypotension, urinary retention, and constipation were also present. Clinical autonomic tests suggested both sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction. After intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, motor and sensory symptoms resolved rapidly; dysautonomia resolved gradually over the next 2 months. The response to immunological therapy and the presence of antecedent infection suggest that AASMN is a postinfectious, immune-mediated, autonomic, sensory and motor nervous system dysfunction.

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (Lewis-Sumner)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R

    1999-01-01

    We made a retrospective long-term follow-up study of 25 patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (Lewis-Sumner). The diagnosis was based upon criteria modified from those of AAEM (Sumner 1997). The electrophysiological findings indicating conduction block or focal demyelinative lesions were more diagnostic than anti-GM 1 antibody titers, which were elevated in only 40% of these patients. Demonstration of definite conduction block was not always possible in those patients who responded favorably to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), whereas indirect pieces of evidence such as F-wave abnormalities or focal conduction delay or dispersion were equally helpful. IVIg had superior outcome to cyclophosphamide, which sometimes caused serious adverse effects. Three patients with severe axonal involvement showed elevated monospecific antibodies to GalNAc-GD1a.

  17. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  19. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions called ...

  1. Glue-sniffing neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Korobkin, R; Asbury, A K; Sumner, A J; Nielsen, S L

    1975-03-01

    Although industrial exposure to n-hexane is known to cause neuropathy, it is less well recognized that inhalation of n-hexane present in the vapors of some commercial contact cements is also neurotoxic to peripheral nerves. A young man with a long history of addictive glue-sniffing developed severe distal symmetrical polyneuropathy several months after switching to a cement containing n-hexane and gradually improved several months after switching to another cement containing no n-hexane. Fascicular biopsy of radial cutaneous nerve showed striking segmental distention of axons by neurofilamentous masses with secondary thinning of myelin sheath, paranodal myelin retraction, and widening velocities were correspondingly slow. We conclude that n-hexane used as a solvent in some contact cements may be neurotoxic when inhaled to excess and, further, that the neuropathy has characteristic electrophysiological and pathological features.

  2. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  3. Forearm neuropathy and pruritus.

    PubMed

    Massey, E W; Massey, J M

    1986-10-01

    Five adult patients (four of them men) had episodic brachioradial pruritus associated with forearm paresthesia and hypalgesia. No cervical, shoulder, or forearm trauma was known. Onset was variable, but two had had the condition for more than ten years. In each, sensory alteration was detectable by pinprick and temperature in the distribution of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm supplying the skin over the proximal portion of the brachioradial muscle. This seems to be a benign neuropathy.

  4. Benzine-sniffing neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, M; Cosnett, J E; Moosa, A

    1981-04-04

    Eight children and adolescents with a predominantly motor neuropathy of which the most likely cause was n-hexane are described. n-Hexane is one of the impurities in highest concentration in benzine, a petroleum product freely available at most corner stores in South Africa. It is bought freely by a large number of Black children in Natal and sniffed to produce a state of euphoria. Benzine sniffing by children constitutes a major health hazard in Natal.

  5. Health-related quality of life in chronic inflammatory neuropathies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2015-01-15

    Chronic inflammatory neuropathies represent a heterogeneous group of disorders which affect patients' functional status and quality of life. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature on the effects of both disease and treatment interventions on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in this patient population. The available data are limited, as few studies have systematically considered HRQoL in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. Moreover, in treatment trials, HRQoL measures have exclusively been used as secondary outcome measures. There is some evidence suggesting that baseline pre-treatment HRQoL reports are lower in patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathy than in age and gender-matched controls. Following treatment interventions, improvements in self-reported measures were consistently documented in the physical domain of HRQoL, which in turn correlated with improvements in traditional strength and functional scales. The impact of available treatments on the quality of life of patients with inflammatory neuropathies remains largely under-investigated. Interestingly, recent, although limited evidence from generic HRQoL measures may partly or completely contradict the results found with the primary, traditional outcome measures used (rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; immunoglobulins versus corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). Similarly, HRQoL measures may suggest superiority, rather than equivalence, of certain drug administration methods (subcutaneous over intravenous immunoglobulins). Further research is needed to assess HRQOL in patients with untreated chronic inflammatory neuropathies in comparison to normative values, as well as precisely quantify treatment benefit. The role of both generic and disease-specific HRQoL measures in the evaluation of patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies is also worthy of further consideration. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Efficacy and tolerability of different brands of intravenous immunoglobulin in the maintenance treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Francesca; Balducci, Claudia; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is effective in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Not all brands of IVIg are however licensed for these neuropathies. We reviewed six patients with CIDP and seven with MMN treated with maintenance therapy with IVIg from 2009 to 2013. In all patients, we measured the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale (ONLS) scores before each infusion, registered the monthly dose and brand of IVIg, and recorded adverse events. Patients were treated for 25-60 months (mean 49 months) alternating different brands of IVIg including IgVena, Gammagard, Kiovig, and Flebogamma. Minor and transient side effects were equally observed with each brand. No difference in the MRC or ONLS scores was observed in relation to the brand of IVIg used. Chronic maintenance treatment with IVIg in patients with MMN and CIDP was not associated with a different tolerability or efficacy despite the use of different brands of IVIg.

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy with Reversible Dementia: A New Clinical Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    /4 deep tendon reflexes. Left sural nerve biopsy would eventually reveal moderate peripheral neuropathy with axonal degeneration, moderate loss of large and small myelinated nerve fibers, confirming diagnosis of CIDP. Discussion CIDP encompasses several different variants, including Lewis-Sumner syndrome, distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy, sensory predominant CIDP among other variants. However, none of the variations of CIDP have a reversible cognitive impairment component. Patient met diagnosis of CIDP according to Koski criteria, as he had chronic polyneuropathy progressive for at least 8 weeks with no serum paraprotein, no genetic abnormality, and symmetric exam revealing weakness in all four limbs and proximal weakness in both lower extremities. Potentially, the patient could have had simultaneous diagnosis of dementia and CIDP, but the marked improvement in cognitive function after just one dose of IVIG makes that theory unlikely. PubMed search yielded no single case of CIDP with supratentorial manifestations in a patient with normal brain MRI. This case may represent a new clinical variant: CIDP with cognitive impairment.

  8. Involvement of morbilliviruses in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Sips, G J; Chesik, D; Glazenburg, L; Wilschut, J; De Keyser, J; Wilczak, N

    2007-01-01

    Two members of the morbillivirus genus of the family Paramyxoviridae, canine distemper virus (CDV) and measles virus (MV), are well-known for their ability to cause a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS in their natural hosts, dogs and humans, respectively. Both viruses have been studied for their potential involvement in the neuropathogenesis of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Recently, three new members of the morbillivirus genus, phocine distemper virus (PDV), porpoise morbillivirus (PMV) and dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), have been discovered. These viruses have also been shown to induce multifocal demyelinating disease in infected animals. This review focuses on morbillivirus-induced neuropathologies with emphasis on aetiopathogenesis of CNS demyelination. The possible involvement of a morbillivirus in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis is discussed.

  9. Astrocytes Are an Early Target in Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Soupart, Alain; Boom, Alain; Schiettecatte, Johan; Pochet, Roland; Brion, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Abrupt osmotic changes during rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia result in demyelinative brain lesions, but the sequence of events linking rapid osmotic changes to myelin loss is not yet understood. Here, in a rat model of osmotic demyelination syndrome, we found that massive astrocyte death occurred after rapid correction of hyponatremia, delineating the regions of future myelin loss. Astrocyte death caused a disruption of the astrocyte-oligodendrocyte network, rapidly upregulated inflammatory cytokines genes, and increased serum S100B, which predicted clinical manifestations and outcome of osmotic demyelination. These results support a model for the pathophysiology of osmotic brain injury in which rapid correction of hyponatremia triggers apoptosis in astrocytes followed by a loss of trophic communication between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, secondary inflammation, microglial activation, and finally demyelination. PMID:21885671

  10. Transgenic mouse model for central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, T; Feigenbaum, L; Jay, G

    1991-01-01

    A common feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis in humans and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rodents is the marked elevation in the expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the involved sites. By specific targeting of a syngeneic MHC class I gene to oligodendrocytes, we have generated transgenic mice which not only exhibit severe involuntary tremors and develop tonic seizures but also show extensive demyelination in both the brain and the spinal cord. The fact that demyelination in these mice occurs in the absence of immune infiltration dismisses an autoimmune involvement but suggests that the MHC class I antigens play a direct role in inducing disease. Our findings lend support to the possibility that demyelinating diseases are induced by infectious agents such as viruses which can either directly activate MHC gene expression in oligodendroglia or indirectly activate expression through the release by reactive T cells of gamma interferon in the brain. Images PMID:1717829

  11. The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Markus; Di Pauli, Franziska; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) has been identified as a target of demyelinating autoantibodies in animal models of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Numerous studies have aimed to establish a role for MOG antibodies in patients with MS, although the results have been controversial. Cell-based immunoassays using MOG expressed in mammalian cells have demonstrated the presence of high-titre MOG antibodies in paediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, MS, aquaporin-4-seronegative neuromyelitis optica, or isolated optic neuritis or transverse myelitis, but only rarely in adults with these disorders. These studies indicate that MOG antibodies could be associated with a broad spectrum of acquired human CNS demyelinating diseases. This Review article discusses the current literature on MOG antibodies, their potential clinical relevance, and their role in the pathogenesis of MOG antibody-associated demyelinating disorders.

  12. Contactin-1 and Neurofascin-155/-186 Are Not Targets of Auto-Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Doppler, Kathrin; Appeltshauser, Luise; Krämer, Heidrun H; Ng, Judy King Man; Meinl, Edgar; Villmann, Carmen; Brophy, Peter; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy is an immune mediated disease presenting with multifocal muscle weakness and conduction block. IgM auto-antibodies against the ganglioside GM1 are detectable in about 50% of the patients. Auto-antibodies against the paranodal proteins contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 and the nodal protein neurofascin-186 have been detected in subgroups of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Recently, auto-antibodies against neurofascin-186 and gliomedin were described in more than 60% of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy. In the current study, we aimed to validate this finding, using a combination of different assays for auto-antibody detection. In addition we intended to detect further auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins, specifically contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 in multifocal motor neuropathy patients' sera. We analyzed sera of 33 patients with well-characterized multifocal motor neuropathy for IgM or IgG anti-contactin-1, anti-neurofascin-155 or -186 antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, binding assays with transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and murine teased fibers. We did not detect any IgM or IgG auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 or -186 in any of our multifocal motor neuropathy patients. We conclude that auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 and -186 do not play a relevant role in the pathogenesis in this cohort with multifocal motor neuropathy.

  13. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Søren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most common type of pain in neuropathy. In painful polyneuropathies the pain usually has a "glove and stocking" distribution. The pain may be predominantly spontaneous, e.g., with a burning, pricking, or shooting character or characterized by evoked pain such as mechanical or cold allodynia. In the clinical setting, the prevention of painful neuropathies and treatment of underlying neuropathy remains inadequate and thus symptomatic treatment of the pain and related disability needs to be offered. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) published in painful neuropathy have been conducted in patients with diabetes and to what extent a treatment which is found effective in painful diabetic polyneuropathy can be expected to relieve other conditions like chemotherapy- or HIV-induced neuropathy is unknown. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), gabapentin, pregabalin, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are first drug choices. In patients with localized neuropathic pain, a topical lidocaine patch may also be considered. Second-line treatments are tramadol and other opioids. New types of treatment include botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), high-dose capsaicin patches, and cannabinoids. Other types of anticonvulsant drugs such as lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and lacosamide have a more questionable efficacy in painful polyneuropathy but may have an effect in a subgroup of patients. Combination therapy may be considered in patients with insufficient effect from one drug. Treatment is usually a trial-and-error process and has to be individualized to the single patient, taking into account all comorbidities such as possible concomitant depression, anxiety, diseases, and drug interactions. Side-effects to antidepressants include dry mouth, nausea, constipation, orthostatic hypotension, and sedation. ECG should always be obtained prior to treatment with TCAs, which also should not be used in patients with cardiac

  14. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  15. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  16. Demyelination in canine distemper virus infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes severe immunosuppression and neurological disease in dogs, associated with demyelination, and is a model for multiple sclerosis in man. In the early stage of the infection, demyelination is associated with viral replication in the white matter. In acute demyelinating lesions there is massive down-regulation of myelin transcription and metabolic impairment of the myelin-producing cells, but there is no evidence that these cells are undergoing apoptosis or necrosis. Oligodendroglial change is related to restricted infection of these cells (transcription but no translation) and marked activation of microglial cells in acute lesions. Concomitant with immunological recovery during the further course of the disease, inflammation occurs in the demyelinating plaques with progression of the lesions in some animals. A series of experiments in vitro suggests that chronic inflammatory demyelination is due to a bystander mechanism resulting from interactions between macrophages and antiviral antibodies. Autoimmune reactions are also observed, but do not correlate with the course of the disease. The progressive or relapsing course of the disease is associated with viral persistence in the nervous system. Persistence of CDV in the brain appears to be favored by non-cytolytic selective spread of the virus and restricted infection, in this way escaping immune surveillance in the CNS. The CDV Fusion protein appears to play an important role in CDV persistence. Similarities between canine distemper and rodent models of virus-induced demyelination are discussed.

  17. Lipedema: an inherited condition.

    PubMed

    Child, Anne H; Gordon, Kristiana D; Sharpe, Pip; Brice, Glen; Ostergaard, Pia; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S

    2010-04-01

    Lipedema is a condition characterized by swelling and enlargement of the lower limbs due to abnormal deposition of subcutaneous fat. Lipedema is an under-recognized condition, often misdiagnosed as lymphedema or dismissed as simple obesity. We present a series of pedigrees and propose that lipedema is a genetic condition with either X-linked dominant inheritance or more likely, autosomal dominant inheritance with sex limitation. Lipedema appears to be a condition almost exclusively affecting females, presumably estrogen-requiring as it usually manifests at puberty. Lipedema is an entity distinct from obesity, but may be wrongly diagnosed as primary obesity, due to clinical overlap. The phenotype suggests a condition distinct from obesity and associated with pain, tenderness, and easy bruising in affected areas. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Mitochondrial inheritance and disease.

    PubMed

    Fine, P E

    1978-09-23

    Spontaneously occurring variants of the D.N.A. content of mitochondria may be responsible for human disease. Among the prime candidates for such a mitochondrial aetiology are certain drug-induced blood dyscrasias, particularly that due to chloramphenicol. Because mitochondria are generally inherited from the female parent, such disorders should be clustered among matroclinally related individuals. The clinical manifestations of such diseases are a function of the manner in which mitochondria are allocated to somatic cells and tissues during development.

  19. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are critical environmental exposures that influence health and can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and abnormal physiology. Advances in 2015 included analyses of the effects of endocrine disruptors on human disease, further examples of endocrine disruptors promoting transgenerational behavioural effects, insights into effects of endocrine disruptors on epigenetic programming of primordial germ cells and the finding that endocrine disruptors can transgenerationally promote genetic mutations. PMID:26585656

  20. Inherited hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Augusto; Newell, Pippa; Hoshida, Yujin

    2010-10-01

    Inherited liver disorders that cause chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis can lead to the development of liver cancer. Because of the rarity and diversity of some of these syndromes, the relative risk of developing HCC in these patients and the age at which tumours typically arise cannot be accurately estimated. Among patients with hereditary hemachromatosis (HH), the annual incidence of HCC is 4% once cirrhosis has been established. Fibrosis and portal hypertension associated with HH can be partially reversed with therapeutic phlebotomy, but it is unclear whether this treatment alters the incidence of HCC in these patients. Importantly, it seems likely that coincidence of these genetic disorders with known HCC risk factors such as alcoholism and viral hepatitis would amplify their oncogenic potential. For this reason, patients with known genetic disorders of the liver should be repeatedly counselled to avoid environmental and toxic injury to the liver. Treatment of HCC in patients with inherited liver disease mirrors that of HCC associated with other etiologies. Unfortunately, there are case series which suggest these patients with inherited liver disease and HCC tend to present at more advanced stages and are therefore not eligible for curative therapies, causing overall decreased survival relative to patients with HCC of viral or other etiologies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Movement disorders and the osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    With the advent of MRI, osmotic demyelination syndromes (ODS) are increasingly recognised to affect varied sites in the brain in addition to the classical central pontine lesion. Striatal involvement is seen in a large proportion of cases and results in a wide variety of movement disorders. Movement disorders and cognitive problems resulting from ODS affecting the basal ganglia may occur early in the course of the illness, or may present as delayed manifestations after the patient survives the acute phase. Such delayed symptoms may evolve over time, and may even progress despite treatment. Improved survival of patients in the last few decades due to better intensive care has led to an increase in the incidence of such delayed manifestations of ODS. While the outcome of ODS is not as dismal as hitherto believed - with the acute akinetic-rigid syndrome associated with striatal myelinolysis often responding to dopaminergic therapy - the delayed symptoms often prove refractory to medical therapy. This article presents a review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, imaging, and therapy of movement disorders associated with involvement of the basal ganglia in ODS. A comprehensive review of 54 previously published cases of movement disorders due to ODS, and a video recording depicting the spectrum of delayed movement disorders seen after recovery from ODS are also presented.

  2. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Saberio; Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Pirela, Daniela; Morlote, Diana; Cusnir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly); endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly. PMID:27790622

  3. Neuropathy in a petrol sniffer.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, D M; Ramsey, J; Schwartz, M S; Dookun, D

    1986-01-01

    A 4 year old boy developed a profound motor neuropathy after repeated deliberate inhalation of petroleum vapour. The condition was characterised by extreme slowing of the nerve conduction velocity. He made a gradual recovery over six months. The neuropathy was attributed to the N-hexane component of petroleum. PMID:3021070

  4. Neuropathy in a petrol sniffer.

    PubMed

    Hall, D M; Ramsey, J; Schwartz, M S; Dookun, D

    1986-09-01

    A 4 year old boy developed a profound motor neuropathy after repeated deliberate inhalation of petroleum vapour. The condition was characterised by extreme slowing of the nerve conduction velocity. He made a gradual recovery over six months. The neuropathy was attributed to the N-hexane component of petroleum.

  5. P2X7-mediated Increased Intracellular Calcium Causes Functional Derangement in Schwann Cells from Rats with CMT1A Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Sturla, Laura; Fiorese, Fulvia; Usai, Cesare; Basile, Giovanna; Moreschi, Iliana; Benvenuto, Federica; Zocchi, Elena; De Flora, Antonio; Schenone, Angelo; Bruzzone, Santina

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) is the most frequent inherited neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 person in 2500. CMT1A, the most common form of CMT, is usually caused by a duplication of chromosome 17p11.2, containing the PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein-22) gene; overexpression of PMP22 in Schwann cells (SC) is believed to cause demyelination, although the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report an abnormally high basal concentration of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in SC from CMT1A rats. By the use of specific pharmacological inhibitors and through down-regulation of expression by small interfering RNA, we demonstrate that the high [Ca2+]i is caused by a PMP22-related overexpression of the P2X7 purinoceptor/channel leading to influx of extracellular Ca2+ into CMT1A SC. Correction of the altered [Ca2+]i in CMT1A SC by small interfering RNA or with pharmacological inhibitors of P2X7 restores functional parameters of SC (migration and release of ciliary neurotrophic factor), which are typically defective in CMT1A SC. More significantly, stable down-regulation of the expression of P2X7 restores myelination in co-cultures of CMT1A SC with dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons. These results establish a pathogenetic link between high [Ca2+]i and impaired SC function in CMT1A and identify overexpression of P2X7 as the molecular mechanism underlying both abnormalities. The development of P2X7 inhibitors is expected to provide a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of CMT1A neuropathy. PMID:19546221

  6. Painful neuropathy: Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-01-01

    Painful neuropathy, like the other complications of diabetes, is a growing healthcare concern. Unfortunately, current treatments are of variable efficacy and do not target underlying pathogenic mechanisms, in part because these mechanisms are not well defined. Rat and mouse models of type 1 diabetes are frequently used to study diabetic neuropathy, with rats in particular being consistently reported to show allodynia and hyperalgesia. Models of type 2 diabetes are being used with increasing frequency, but the current literature on the progression of indices of neuropathic pain is variable and relatively few therapeutics have yet been developed in these models. While evidence for spontaneous pain in rodent models is sparse, measures of evoked mechanical, thermal and chemical pain can provide insight into the pathogenesis of the condition. The stocking and glove distribution of pain tantalizingly suggests that the generator site of neuropathic pain is found within the peripheral nervous system. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that amplification in the spinal cord, via spinal disinhibition and neuroinflammation, and also in the brain, via enhanced thalamic activity or decreased cortical inhibition, likely contribute to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. Several potential therapeutic strategies have emerged from preclinical studies, including prophylactic treatments that intervene against underlying mechanisms of disease, treatments that prevent gains of nociceptive function, treatments that suppress enhancements of nociceptive function, and treatments that impede normal nociceptive mechanisms. Ongoing challenges include unraveling the complexity of underlying pathogenic mechanisms, addressing the potential disconnect between the perceived location of pain and the actual pain generator and amplifier sites, and finding ways to identify which mechanisms operate in specific patients to allow rational and individualized choice of targeted therapies.

  7. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post-hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early-stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1-8, 2016.

  8. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a systematic literature review on psychological and behavioral comorbidities in patients with inflammatory neuropathies. In Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), psychotic symptoms are reported during early stages in 30% of patients. Typical associations include mechanical ventilation, autonomic dysfunction, inability to communicate, and severe weakness. Anxiety and depression are frequent comorbidities. Anxiety may increase post‐hospital admissions and be a predictor of mechanical ventilation. Posttraumatic stress disorder may affect up to 20% of ventilated patients. Sleep disturbances are common in early‐stage GBS, affecting up to 50% of patients. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, memory and quality of sleep may be impaired. An independent link between depression and pretreatment upper limb disability and ascites was reported in POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M‐protein, skin) syndrome, with an association with early death. Hematological treatment of POEMS appears effective on depression. Published literature on psychological/behavioral manifestations in inflammatory neuropathies remains scarce, and further research is needed. Muscle Nerve 54: 1–8, 2016 PMID:26999767

  9. A prospective study of acute idiopathic neuropathy. III. Immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Winer, J B; Gray, I A; Gregson, N A; Hughes, R A; Leibowitz, S; Shepherd, P; Taylor, W A; Yewdall, V

    1988-01-01

    The immune responses of 100 patients who presented with an acute idiopathic neuropathy were compared with those of age and sex matched controls. Blood lymphocytes and their subsets were counted with a fluorescent activated cell sorter. CD8+ (putative suppressor) lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the first week of the disease but total lymphocytes, total T and CD4+ (putative helper) cells were not altered. This reduction depended on the nature of the preceding infection. Serum complement C3 and C4 concentrations remained normal and immune complexes were rarely detected with a C1q binding assay. Complement-fixing antibodies to human peripheral nerve antigens were discovered in the serum of 7% of patients but only 1% of controls. Complement-fixing antibodies to galactocerebroside were not discovered in any sera. Enzyme-linked immunoassays detected increased antibody responses to galactocerebroside but none at all to human P2 myelin protein in the patient sera. Forty microliter of serum from five patients injected into the sciatic nerves of rats did not induce significantly more demyelination than the serum from control patients. It is concluded that auto-immune responses can only be detected by these techniques in a small minority of patients with acute idiopathic neuropathy. PMID:2969956

  10. Lewis-Sumner syndrome and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Annie; Azulay, Jean Philippe; Attarian, Shahram; Boucraut, José; Pellissier, Jean François; Pouget, Jean

    2005-01-01

    We compared the clinical, electrophysiological, laboratory, and pathological features of 13 patients with Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS) with those of 20 patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). LSS and MMN patients have several common clinical features: age at onset, weakness in the distribution of individual peripheral nerves, mild wasting, cramps and fasciculations, partial areflexia, and frequent stepwise disease course. Cerebrospinal fluid protein level was normal or slightly elevated, but always less than 100 mg/dl. Conduction blocks are the electrophysiological hallmarks of these two neuropathies, and no differences in distribution and number of blocks were found. Contrary to MMN, lower-limb involvement at onset was frequent in LSS but extension to the upper limbs was a frequent later feature of the disease. Cranial nerve involvement was noted in 4 LSS patients during relapses and absent in all MMN patients. The major distinguishing features were the clinical and electrophysiological sensory involvement in LSS, and the lack of anti-GM1 antibodies in LSS, whereas IgM anti-GM1 were found in 40% of MMN patients. Some LSS patients responded to steroid therapy, whereas this was ineffective in MMN. From these features, LSS can be considered an entity distinct from MMN, with its own clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological characteristics, and as an intermediate link between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and MMN.

  11. Pain as the presenting symptom of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

    PubMed

    Boukhris, S; Magy, L; Khalil, M; Sindou, P; Vallat, J-M

    2007-03-15

    Numerous clinical forms of CIDP have been described, but pain is generally considered a rare or secondary sign. We describe here the clinical, electrophysiological and neuropathological characteristics of five patients with CIDP and pain as the main presenting symptom, and their course with treatment. Between January 2003 and December 2004, we selected five patients with prominent or isolated pain among 27 patients diagnosed with CIDP. All patients were subjected to clinical and electrophysiological examinations, and had a complete laboratory work up to exclude other causes of neuropathy. In view of the atypical clinical presentation, all five patients underwent nerve biopsy. There were two men and three women. The mean age at onset of neuropathy was 70+/-7.39 years. All patients initially presented with pain in the lower limbs associated with modest motor impairment (1 case), distal paresthesia (4 cases), cramps (1 case) and fatigue (2 cases). CSF was normal in three cases. On electrophysiological examination, three patients had nerve conduction abnormalities with subtle or clear signs of demyelination: three (case 1, 2 and 4) fulfilled the criteria of Rotta et al. and two (case 2 and 4) the criteria of both Nicolas et al and the INCAT group. Patients were all given symptomatic treatment and four patients received an immunomodulatory treatment, which was constantly effective. Pain may be a major and disabling symptom in patients with CIDP, so this diagnosis has to be considered in patients referred for a painful polyneuropathy. Moreover, immunomodulatory treatment has to be considered in such patients as symptomatic therapy may be ineffective.

  12. Anti-ganglioside antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chenghe; Jin, Haiqiang; Hao, Hongjun; Gao, Feng; Sun, Yongan; Lu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lv, Pu; Cui, Wei; Teng, Yuming; Huang, Yining

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigated the relationships between anti-ganglioside antibodies and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Samples from 48 Chinese patients diagnosed with GBS and 18 patients diagnosed with CIDP were retrospectively reviewed. In the GBS patients, 62.5% were classified as having acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), 27.1% were found to have acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), and 10.4% were unclassified. Serum IgG anti-ganglioside antibodies were detected in 46.2% of the AMAN patients and in 6.7% of the AIDP patients (P < 0.05); 5.6% of the 18 CIDP patients were IgG antibody positive, and 27.8% were IgM antibody positive. Facial palsy and sensory impairment were significantly associated with IgM antibodies. These results suggest that IgG anti-GM1 antibodies are associated with AMAN, but not with AIDP, and that IgM antibodies against GM1, GM2, and GM3 are associated with facial nerve palsy. Muscle Nerve 55: 470-475, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  14. [Regional anaesthesia for labor adn delivery in a parturient with neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (tomaculous neuropathy)].

    PubMed

    Berdai, S; Benhamou, D

    2004-10-01

    Tomaculous neuropathy (or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy [HNLPP]) is a rare and hereditary disease which incidence has probably been underestimated. It is characterised by demyelination resulting in numbness and weakness after nerve pressure, injury or stretch. Despite a well-documented genetic pathophysiologic mechanism, implications for anaesthesia in patients with HNLPP are only speculative and the use of regional anaesthesia is debatable. We report here the case of a patient with HNLPP who was followed during two consecutive pregnancies in the same hospital and for whom an expert of the SOS-RA hotline service was consulted before each delivery. For the first delivery, epidural analgesia was performed for labour pain control but a caesarean section was necessary because of failure to progress (0.0625% bupivacaine with 0.2 microg/ml sufentanil for labour then 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for surgery). Two years later, the patient was again seen for a preanaesthetic visit because elective Caesarean section was planned. Spinal anaesthesia using hyperbaric bupivacaine and sufentanil was used. Both deliveries were uneventful and there were no neurologic complaints in the postpartum periods.

  15. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  16. [2012 literature review on peripheral neuropathies: immune neuropathies (treatments excluded)].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G

    2013-12-01

    In 2012, interest remains high in the field of dysimmune neuropathies, chiefly concerning Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The pathophysiological mechanisms are now better known but electrophysiological criteria should be updated. The risk of GBS in H1N1 vaccination is now well evaluated. Nerve ultrasonography provides new prospects for diagnosis and follow-up of dysimmune neuropathies but cannot substitute for electrophysiology. This paper aims to present some noteworthy articles published in 2012 in the field of dysimmune neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Inheritance and testicular cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P. W.; Harland, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Statistical analysis of published data on the age of onset of germ cell tumours of the testis and of the prevalence of bilateral disease in familial and general cases suggest the following: 1. Patients with bilateral disease carry the same genetic predisposition as familial cases. 2. Males with the hereditary predisposition develop none, unilateral or bilateral tumours in the proportions 55%, 38% and 7% respectively. 3. One-third of all testis cancer patients are genetically predisposed to the disease. 4. The 2.2% risk to brothers of cases as reported elsewhere can be accounted for by the homozygous (recessive) inheritance of a single predisposing gene. PMID:7841065

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps in neuropathy with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kawasaki, Teruaki; Shigematsu, Kazuo; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    To clarify the roles of neutrophils in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitic neuropathy, we studied neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in peripheral nerve vasculitis. Stored nerve samples from 17 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) were immunohistochemically analyzed using antibodies for citrullinated histone H3 (citH3) and various neutrophil enzymes. We defined merged citH3 and extracellularly released myeloperoxidase (MPO) as NET formation. We also compared NET formation between MPO-ANCA-positive/negative MPA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated vasculitic neuropathy. NETs were identified mostly in vasculitic small arterioles of 6 of 12 MPO-ANCA-positive MPA patients, and their frequency was higher (p < 0.05) than in ANCA-negative patients. NETs were not found in vasculitic neuropathy with RA or patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. NETs were also observed in the peripheral nervous system of MPA patients as well as in the lung and kidney. These results suggest that NETs may be involved in the pathogenesis of MPA neuropathy.

  19. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed.

  20. Biology of the blood-nerve barrier and its alteration in immune mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic and competent interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and the surrounding extracellular space or blood. It is localised at the innermost layer of the multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels, and is the key structure that controls the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma. Since the endoneurial BNB is the point of entry for pathogenic T cells and various soluble factors, including cytokines, chemokines and immunoglobulins, understanding this structure is important to prevent and treat human immune mediated neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein and skin changes) syndrome and a subset of diabetic neuropathy. However, compared with the blood-brain barrier, only limited knowledge has been accumulated regarding the function, cell biology and clinical significance of the BNB. This review describes the basic structure and functions of the endoneurial BNB, provides an update of the biology of the cells comprising the BNB, and highlights the pathology and pathomechanisms of BNB breakdown in immune mediated neuropathies. The human immortalised cell lines of BNB origin established in our laboratory will facilitate the future development of BNB research. Potential therapeutic strategies for immune mediated neuropathies manipulating the BNB are also discussed.

  1. Multifocal motor neuropathy: update on clinical characteristics, pathophysiological concepts and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Meuth, Sven G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is an acquired immune-mediated neuropathy characterized by chronic or stepwise progressive asymmetrical limb weakness without sensory deficits. The upper extremities are more often affected than the lower extremities with distal paresis dominating over proximal paresis. Important diagnostic features are persistent multifocal partial conduction blocks (CBs) and the presence of high-titer anti-GM1 serum antibodies. Motor neuron disease, other chronic dysimmune neuropathies, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome (MADSAM neuropathy), are important differential diagnoses. While corticosteroids and plasma exchange are largely ineffective, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins are regarded as first-line treatment. In spite of significant success in elucidating the underlying disease mechanisms in MMN during the past few years, important pathophysiological issues and the optimum long-term therapy remain to be clarified. The present review summarizes the clinical picture and current pathophysiological concepts of MMN with a special focus on the molecular and electrophysiological basis of CBs and highlights established therapies as well as possible novel treatment options.

  2. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney.

  3. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Schaik, I N; Winer, J B; De Haan, R; Vermeulen, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is an immune mediated disorder characterised by progressive or relapsing symmetrical motor or sensory symptoms and signs in more than one limb, developing over at least two months. It may cause prolonged periods of disability and even death. Several uncontrolled studies have suggested a beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials concerning the efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulin in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. We used the Search Strategy of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Review Group to search the Disease Group register and other databases for randomised controlled trials from 1985 onwards. Randomised controlled studies examining the effects of any dose of intravenous immunoglobulin versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in patients with definite or probable chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Outcome measures had to include one of the following: a disability score, the Medical Research Council sum score, electrophysiological data or walking distance. Studies which reported the frequency of adverse effects were used to assess the safety of treatment. Two reviewers independently reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant trials, scored their quality and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data, we calculated relative risks, and for continuous data, effect sizes (for definition see statistical analysis section) and weighted pooled effect sizes. Statistical uncertainty was expressed in 95% confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis excluding studies with quality scores below A 0.50 and below B 0.75 was planned but not performed as all studies had quality scores above 0.75. Six randomised controlled trials were considered eligible including 170 patients. Four studies on 113 patients compared intravenous immunoglobulin against

  5. Anconeus Epitrochlearis Muscle Causing Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow: Clinical and Neurophysiological Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Erdem Bagatur, A; Yalcin, Mehmet Burak; Ozer, Utku Erdem

    2016-09-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is the second most frequent entrapment neuropathy and is considered idiopathic in most patients. However, several anatomic variations, including the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle, have been reported to cause ulnar nerve compression. The anconeus epitrochlearis muscle is a common anatomic variation, with a prevalence of up to 34%, but the clinical diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy of the elbow as a result of this variation is rare, with an unknown prevalence. It is a congenital accessory muscle between the medial humeral epicondyle and the olecranon that covers the posterior aspect of the cubital tunnel and is usually an operative finding, not a preoperative diagnosis. Ulnar neuropathy as a result of the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle usually has different characteristics than idiopathic disease, including younger age at onset, more rapid progression with a short duration of symptoms, distinct neurophysiology with velocity drop or conduction block of the ulnar nerve, and edema of the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle on magnetic resonance imaging. Neurophysiologic findings in anconeus epitrochlearis-associated ulnar neuropathy indicate subacute onset of symptoms rather than the chronic demyelinating process that is seen in idiopathic ulnar neuropathy. Medial elbow pain may be more exacerbated in these patients rather than the more common sensorial symptoms. This is probably the result of static compression of the nerve and increased cubital tunnel pressure, even when the elbow is in extension. This article describes a case of ulnar nerve entrapment of the elbow in a 28-year-old woman as a result of compression by the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle and includes magnetic resonance imaging findings, surgical correlations, and clinical and neurophysiologic findings. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e988-e991.].

  6. The heterogeneity of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sima, Anders A F

    2008-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy and its underlying pathogenesis are reviewed. It has been documented for some time that diabetic neuropathy differs in both human and experimental type 1 versus type 2 diabetes. Such differences are accounted for by impaired insulin action and signal transduction in type 1 diabetes, whereas hyperglycemia per se contributes equally to neuropathy in the two types of diabetes. Such differences in basic initiating factors and pathogenesis translate into differences in the functional and structural expressions of neuropathy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 neuropathy shows a more rapid progression with more severe functional and structural changes. Several experimental mono-therapies have been tested over the last decades which unfortunately have not been efficacious. Therefore discrepancies in underlying pathogenetic mechanisms in the two types of diabetic neuropathy will have to be taken into account in the design of future therapies, which should target several key pathogenetic mechanisms. Therapies that meet these criteria include replacement of acetyl-L-carnitine and replenishment of C-peptide in type 1 diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Diabetic neuropathy: an intensive review.

    PubMed

    Duby, Jeremiah John; Campbell, R Keith; Setter, Stephen M; White, John Raymond; Rasmussen, Kristin A

    2004-01-15

    The epidemiology, classification, pathology, and treatment of diabetic neuropathy are reviewed. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Some 30% of hospitalized and 20% of community-dwelling diabetes patients have peripheral neuropathy; the annual incidence rate is approximately 2%. The primary risk factor is hyperglycemia. Sensorimotor neuropathy is marked by pain, paresthesia, and sensory loss. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) may contribute to myocardial infarction, malignant arrhythmia, and sudden death. Gastroparesis is the most debilitating complication of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy. Genitourinary autonomic neuropathy can cause sexual dysfunction and neurogenic bladder. The pathology of diabetic neuropathy involves oxidative stress, advanced glycation end products, polyol pathway flux, and protein kinase C activation; all contribute to microvascular disease and nerve dysfunction. For symptom management current evidence from clinical trials supports the use of desipramine, amitriptyline, capsaicin, tramadol, gabapentin, bupropion, and venlafaxine as preferred medications. Citalopram, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and opioid analgesics may be used as adjuvant agents. Lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, paroxetine, levodopa, and alpha-lipoic acid are alternative considerations. Evidence supporting the use of zonisamide, fluoxetine, mexiletine, dextromethorphan, and phenytoin is considered equivocal. Complementary therapies have also shown efficacy. The symptoms of CAN may be ameliorated with fludrocortisone, clonidine, midodrine, dihydroergotamine or caffeine, octreotide, and beta-blockers. Gastroparesis may be treated with metoclopramide or erythromycin. The most promising disease-modifying therapy is ruboxistaurin, which is in Phase III trials. Glycemic control remains the foundation of prevention and the prerequisite of adequate treatment. Diabetic neuropathy is a many

  8. Hepatitic inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, May; Crawford, James M

    2006-01-01

    Primary metabolic disorders are a disparate group of diseases that may or may not be accompanied by hepatic manifestations. Those with liver involvement may show a range of histopathologic changes. Proper histologic diagnosis requires correlation with clinical and laboratory data, including evaluation for mutations either via serum protein electrophoresis or through formal genetic analysis. This article is a review of the three most common inherited metabolic disorders which may present with a hepatitic pattern. In alpha1-antitrypsin disorder, there is a broad range of clinical presentations, age at presentation, and histological features ranging from "neonatal hepatitis" to a chronic progressive hepatitis in later childhood and adulthood. Hence, this disorder must be in the differential diagnosis of liver disease of the very young, and in older children and adults, with or without coexistent overt pulmonary symptoms. In Wilson disease, presentation tends to be in older childhood or the adult, with a progressive chronic hepatitis. Cystic fibrosis may feature a characteristic obstructive biliary syndrome, coexisting with the many extrahepatic manifestations of this debilitating disease. Lastly, the progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) syndromes are given as examples of inherited metabolic conditions in which relentlessly progressive cholestatic liver disease eventuates over years in end-stage cholestatic liver disease with cirrhosis. Distinguishing features include absence of elevated serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) in PFIC-1 and PFIC-2, and elevated GGT in PFIC-3. However, molecular studies are required for a confident diagnosis of the rare PFIC syndromes.

  9. Blood nerve barrier in rat and cellular mechanisms of lead-induced segmental demyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Dyck, P.J.; Windebank, A.J.; Low, P.A.; Baumann, W.J.

    1980-11-01

    Feeding of lead carbonate to rats causes widespread and reproducible segmental de- and remyelination of myelinated fibers (MFs) of peripheral nerve. Such segmental demyelination might be explained by increased permeability of endoneurial capillaries to serum containing protein-bound lead. The perineurium of control and lead nerves was impermeable to fluorescein-labeled bovine albumin (FBA) and to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Epineurial capillaries in both conditions allowed HRP to pass freely between and, to a lesser extent, through endothelial cells. Contrary to expectation, flooding of the endoneurium with HRP was seen in only 1 of 36 tissue blocks of lead nerves from rats fed 4% lead carbonate for 7 1/2 and 12 weeks. Abundant HRP reaction product was seen in the epineurium in more than half of these tissue blocks. HRP was not generally found in endoneurial fluid, even in lead nerves with marked edema and widespread segmental de- and remyelination. These findings are against a massive breakdown of the blood nerve barrier. These studies suggest that there may be an increased transfer of HRP through endoneurial cells in lead neuropathy.

  10. Immunoadsorption in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with unsatisfactory response to first-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Galldiks, Norbert; Burghaus, Lothar; Dohmen, Christian; Teschner, Sven; Pollok, Manfred; Leebmann, Josef; Frischmuth, Nikolaus; Hollinger, Peter; Nazli, Nahed; Fassbender, Cordula; Klingel, Reinhard; Benzing, Thomas; Fink, Gereon R; Haupt, Walter F

    2011-01-01

    First-line treatment options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) are corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange. In a significant number of patients, first-line therapy fails, and long-term maintenance treatment still remains a therapeutic challenge. Immunoadsorption (IA) may be an alternative to classical plasma exchange in the therapy of immune-mediated neurologic diseases. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate efficacy and safety of IA in patients with CIDP with unsatisfactory response to first-line treatment options. CIDP patients received adjunct IA treatment using tryptophan-immune adsorbers. The inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment disability (INCAT) score was used to grade disability and monitor treatment effects. In total, 14 CIDP patients were analyzed. Ten patients were treated in hospital. After one IA treatment series, the INCAT score decreased significantly in all 10 patients. Four of these 14 patients were treated in outpatient clinics using long-term maintenance IA with 1-2 treatments per week. In these 4 patients, effects of long-term maintenance IA resulted in an improvement of overall disability. In all patients, IA was safe, well tolerated, and no severe adverse effects occurred. IA could be an effective and safe option for CIDP patients with unsatisfactory response to first-line treatment options and for long-term maintenance treatment. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Erbas, Tomris

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy, once considered to be the Cinderella of diabetes complications, has come of age. The autonomic nervous system innervates the entire human body, and is involved in the regulation of every single organ in the body. Thus, perturbations in autonomic function account for everything from abnormalities in pupillary function to gastroparesis, intestinal dysmotility, diabetic diarrhea, genitourinary dysfunction, amongst others. "Know autonomic function and one knows the whole of medicine!" It is now becoming apparent that before the advent of severe pathological damage to the autonomic nervous system there may be an imbalance between the two major arms, namely the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the heart and blood vessels, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been linked to resting tachycardia, postural hypotension, orthostatic bradycardia and orthostatic tachycardia (POTTS), exercise intolerance, decreased hypoxia-induced respiratory drive, loss of baroreceptor sensitivity, enhanced intraoperative or perioperative cardiovascular lability, increased incidence of asymptomatic ischemia, myocardial infarction, and decreased rate of survival after myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. Autonomic dysfunction can affect daily activities of individuals with diabetes and may invoke potentially life-threatening outcomes. Intensification of glycemic control in the presence of autonomic dysfunction (more so if combined with peripheral neuropathy) increases the likelihood of sudden death and is a caveat for aggressive glycemic control. Advances in technology, built on decades of research and clinical testing, now make it possible to objectively identify early stages of CAN with the use of careful measurement of time and frequency domain analyses of autonomic function. Fifteen studies using different end points report prevalence rates of 1% to 90

  12. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M.; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P2 levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P2-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  13. Optimizing IgG Therapy in Chronic Autoimmune Neuropathies: A Hypothesis Driven Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; Allen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy is used for the chronic autoimmune neuropathies chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy, but the doses and treatment intervals are usually chosen empirically due to a paucity of data from dose–response studies. Recent studies of the electrophysiology and immunology of these diseases suggest that antibody-induced reversible dysfunction of nodes of Ranvier may play a role in conduction block and disability which responds to immunotherapy more rapidly than would be expected for demyelination or axonal damage per se. Clinical reports suggest that in some cases, the effects of each dose of IVIG may be transient, wearing-off before the next dose is due. These observations lead us to hypothesize that that therapeutic IgG acts by competing with pathologic autoantibodies and that individual patients may require different IgG levels for optimal therapeutic effects. Frequent IVIG dosing and weekly subcutaneous IgG have been tried as ways of continuously maintaining high serum IgG levels, resulting in stabilization of neuromuscular function in small case series. Frequent grip strength and disability measurements, performed by the patient at home and reported electronically, can be used to assess the extent and duration of responses to IgG doses. Individualization of IgG treatment regimens may optimize efficacy, minimize disability, and identify nonresponders. Muscle Nerve 51: 315–326, 2015 PMID:25418426

  14. Dominantly-inherited lop ears.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander K C; Kong, Albert Y F; Robson, W Lane M; McLeod, D Ross

    2007-10-01

    We describe a four-generation Chinese family that included five members who had an isolated bilateral lop ear anomaly. The presentation suggested a dominant mode of inheritance. The absence of male-to-male transmission does not exclude an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance. Since the phenotypic anomaly of the male proband was no more severe than the affected female members, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is most likely. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  15. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  16. Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy: defective neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Westerman, R A; Block, A; Nunn, A; Delaney, C A; Hahn, A; Dennett, X; Carr, R W

    1992-01-01

    Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy exhibits autosomal dominant inheritance with complete penetrance in males and incomplete penetrance in females. Newer tests of small sensory nerve function were used in screening 8 family members aged between 14 and 66 years. All exhibited some frequent features of the disorder with an onset in the 2nd or 3rd decade, foot ulceration, foot callus, loss of pin prick, thermal and light touch sensation, and some reduction in vibration acuity and proprioception in the lower limbs. The hands were involved in 3 of 8, muscle involvement was present in 5 of 8, but deafness was not detected by audiometry. Nerve conduction velocity, sensory action potentials, latency and amplitude, thermal acuity, vibration acuity and axon reflex flares were measured in all patients. One sural nerve biopsy confirmed the presence of peripheral fibre loss in this predominantly sensory neuropathy. Chemically evoked axon reflex tests were used to evaluate the extent of primary sensory nerve fibre involvement. All patients were tested using a Moor MBF 3-D dual channel laser Doppler velocimeter. Acetylcholine or phenylephrine iontophoretically applied as 16 mC doses evoked absent or tiny axon reflexes in areas of impaired pin prick sensation. By contrast, direct microvascular dilator responses to nitroprusside (smooth muscle dependent) and acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) were present but somewhat reduced in areas with defective neurogenic inflammation. These results differ significantly from the responses obtained in age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.05). Foot pressure analysis was performed for orthoses in 2 affected members with foot ulceration using the Musgrave Footprint system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  18. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N

    2009-01-21

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials concerning the efficacy and safety of IVIg in CIDP. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI from January 1985 to May 2008. Randomised controlled studies testing any dose of IVIg versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in definite or probable CIDP. Two authors reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant trials, scored their quality and extracted data independently. We contacted authors for additional information. Seven randomised controlled trials were considered eligible including 287 participants. These trials were homogeneous and overall quality was high. Five studies on 235 participants compared IVIg against placebo. One trial with 20 participants compared IVIg with plasma exchange and one trial compared IVIg with prednisolone in 32 participants. A significantly higher proportion of participants improved in disability within one month after IVIg treatment as compared with placebo (relative risk 2.40, 95% confidence interval 1.72 to 3.36). Whether all these improvements are equally clinically relevant cannot be deduced from this analysis because each trial used different disability scales and definitions of significant improvement. In three trials including 84 participants the disability could be transformed to the modified Rankin score, on which significantly more patients improved one point after IVIg treatment compared to placebo (relative risk 2.40, 95% confidence interval 0.98 to 5.83). Only one study included in this review had a long-term follow-up. The results of this study suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin improves disability more than placebo over 24 and 48 weeks. The

  19. Optical measurement of conduction in single demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Demyelination was initiated in Xenopus sciatic nerves by an intraneural injection of lysolecithin over a 2-3-mm region. During the next week macrophages and Schwann cells removed all remaining damaged myelin by phagocytosis. Proliferating Schwann cells then began to remyelinate the axons, with the first few lamellae appearing 13 d after surgery. Action potentials were recorded optically through the use of a potential- sensitive dye. Signals could be detected both at normal nodes of Ranvier and within demyelinated segments. Before remyelination, conduction through the lesion occurred in only a small fraction of the fibers. However, in these particular cases we could demonstrate continuous (nonsaltatory) conduction at very low velocities over long (greater than one internode) lengths of demyelinated axons. We have previously found through loose patch clamp experiments that the internodal axolemma contains voltage-dependent Na+ channels at a density approximately 4% of that at the nodes. These channels alone, however, are insufficient for successful conduction past the transition point between myelinated and demyelinated regions. Small improvements in the passive cable properties of the axon, adequate for propagation at this site, can be realized through the close apposition of macrophages and Schwann cells. As the initial lamellae of myelin appear, the probability of success at the transition zone increases rapidly, though the conduction velocity through the demyelinated segment is not appreciably changed. A detailed computational model is used to test the relative roles of the internodal Na+ channels and the new extracellular layer. The results suggest a possible mechanism that may contribute to the spontaneous recovery of function often seen in demyelinating disease. PMID:2163432

  20. Posterior interosseous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kele, Henrich; Xia, Annie; Weiler, Markus; Schwarz, Daniel; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the spatial pattern of lesion dispersion in posterior interosseous neuropathy syndrome (PINS) by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. Methods: This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. In 19 patients with PINS and 20 healthy controls, a standardized magnetic resonance neurography protocol at 3-tesla was performed with coverage of the upper arm and elbow (T2-weighted fat-saturated: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 milliseconds, in-plane resolution 0.27 × 0.27 mm2). Lesion classification of the radial nerve trunk and its deep branch (which becomes the posterior interosseous nerve) was performed by visual rating and additional quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal of radial nerve voxels. Results: Of 19 patients with PINS, only 3 (16%) had a focal neuropathy at the entry of the radial nerve deep branch into the supinator muscle at elbow/forearm level. The other 16 (84%) had proximal radial nerve lesions at the upper arm level with a predominant lesion focus 8.3 ± 4.6 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Most of these lesions (75%) followed a specific somatotopic pattern, involving only those fascicles that would form the posterior interosseous nerve more distally. Conclusions: PINS is not necessarily caused by focal compression at the supinator muscle but is instead frequently a consequence of partial fascicular lesions of the radial nerve trunk at the upper arm level. Neuroimaging should be considered as a complementary diagnostic method in PINS. PMID:27683851

  1. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Visiting Your Doctor Evaluation + Tests Autonomic Testing Nerve/Skin/Muscle Biopsy Computerized Axial Tomography Scan (CAT) Electrodiagnostic Testing Lumbar Puncture Imaging Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Peripheral Neuropathy ...

  2. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... sensation or freezing pain Sharp, jabbing, shooting, or electric-like pain Extreme sensitivity to touch Difficulty sleeping ... damaged. There are three types of peripheral nerves: motor, sensory and autonomic. Some neuropathies affect all three ...

  4. Mitochondrial inheritance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondria are the site of oxidative phosphorylation, play a key role in cellular energy metabolism, and are critical for cell survival and proliferation. The propagation of mitochondria during cell division depends on replication and partitioning of mitochondrial DNA, cytoskeleton-dependent mitochondrial transport, intracellular positioning of the organelle, and activities coordinating these processes. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a valuable model organism to study the mechanisms that drive segregation of the mitochondrial genome and determine mitochondrial partitioning and behavior in an asymmetrically dividing cell. Here, I review past and recent advances that identified key components and cellular pathways contributing to mitochondrial inheritance in yeast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  5. Inherited disorders of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John A

    2005-11-01

    Desmosomes are highly organized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical integrity to tissues by anchoring intermediate filaments to sites of strong adhesion. These cell-cell adhesion junctions are found in skin, heart, lymph nodes and meninges. Over the last 8 years, several naturally occurring human gene mutations in structural components of desmosomes have been reported. These comprise autosomal dominant or recessive mutations in plakophilin 1, plakophilin 2, desmoplakin, plakoglobin, desmoglein 1, desmoglein 4 and corneodesmosin. These discoveries have often highlighted novel or unusual phenotypes, including abnormal skin fragility and differentiation, and developmental anomalies of various ectodermal appendages, especially hair. Some desmosomal gene mutations may also result in cardiac disease, notably cardiomyopathy. This article describes the spectrum of clinical features that may be found in the inherited disorders of desmosomes and highlights the key functions of several of the desmosomal proteins in tissue adhesion and cell biology.

  6. Motor variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Durriyah D; Darras, Basil T; Yamout, Bassem I; Rebeiz, Jean G; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2008-06-01

    Only 2 cases of pure motor chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy in the pediatric age group have been reported in the literature. We report on a motor variant of chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy with anti-ganglioside antibodies, diagnosed in a 5-year-old girl who presented with progressive motor weakness over a period of 12 months with no sensory involvement. She initially responded partially to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (1 gm/kg/month for 6 months), and then demonstrated sustained but incomplete improvement on chronic prednisone therapy (1-2 mg/kg/day), on which she has continued since 1 year and 4 months after her initial presentation 3 years ago.

  7. The spectrum of post-vaccination inflammatory CNS demyelinating syndromes.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of inflammatory diseases temporally associated with the administration of various vaccines, has been reported in the literature. A PubMed search from 1979 to 2013 revealed seventy one (71) documented cases. The most commonly reported vaccinations that were associated with CNS demyelinating diseases included influenza (21 cases), human papilloma virus (HPV) (9 cases), hepatitis A or B (8 cases), rabies (5 cases), measles (5 cases), rubella (5 cases), yellow fever (3 cases), anthrax (2 cases),meningococcus (2 cases) and tetanus (2 cases). The vast majority of post-vaccination CNS demyelinating syndromes, are related to influenza vaccination and this could be attributed to the high percentage of the population that received the vaccine during the HI1N1 epidemia from 2009 to 2012. Usually the symptoms of the CNS demyelinating syndrome appear few days following the immunization (mean: 14.2 days) but there are cases where the clinical presentation was delayed (more than 3 weeks or even up to 5 months post-vaccination) (approximately a third of all the reported cases). In terms of the clinical presentation and the affected CNS areas, there is a great diversity among the reported cases of post-vaccination acute demyelinating syndromes. Optic neuritis was the prominent clinical presentation in 38 cases, multifocal disseminated demyelination in 30, myelitis in 24 and encephalitis in 17. Interestingly in a rather high proportion of the patients (and especially following influenza and human papiloma virus vaccination-HPV) the dominant localizations of demyelination were the optic nerves and the myelon, presenting as optic neuritis and myelitis (with or without additional manifestations of ADEM), reminiscent to neuromyelitic optica (or, more generally, the NMO-spectrum of diseases). Seven patients suffered an NMO-like disease following HPV and we had two similar cases in our Center. One patient with post-vaccination ADEM, subsequently developed NMO. Overall, the

  8. Clinical and electrophysiological parameters distinguishing acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Annie; Nicolle, Michael W; Hahn, Angelika F

    2010-02-01

    Up to 16% of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients may present acutely. We performed a retrospective chart review on 30 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and 15 acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP) patients looking for any clinical or electrophysiological parameters that might differentiate AIDP from acutely presenting CIDP. A-CIDP patients were significantly more likely to have prominent sensory signs. They were significantly less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or need for mechanical ventilation. With regard to electrophysiological features, neither sural-sparing pattern, sensory ratio >1, nor the presence of A-waves was different between the two groups. This study suggests that patients presenting acutely with a demyelinating polyneuropathy and the aforementioned clinical features should be closely monitored as they may be more likely to have CIDP at follow-up.

  9. Noninvasive Detection and Differentiation of Axonal Injury/Loss, Demyelination, and Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    spectrum imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, EAE, inflammation, axonal injury, curizone, demyelination, optic neuritis, axonal loss 16. SECURITY...diffusion basis spectrum imaging (DBSI) to simultaneously quantify axonal injury, demyelination, and inflammation in CNS white matter, correlating with...Multiple sclerosis, diffusion basis spectrum imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, EAE, inflammation, axonal injury, demyelination, axonal loss, optic

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N

    2013-12-30

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. This review was first published in 2002 and has since been updated, most recently in 2013. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the efficacy and safety of IVIg in CIDP. On 4 December 2012, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (2012, issue 11 in the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE to December 2012 and ISI from January 1985 to May 2008. We searched for ongoing trials through two metaRegistries (World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal and Current Controlled Trials). We selected RCTs testing any dose of IVIg versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in definite or probable CIDP. Two authors reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant RCTs, scored their quality and extracted data independently. We contacted authors for additional information. We considered eight RCTs, including 332 participants, to be eligible for inclusion in the review. These trials were homogeneous and the overall risk of bias low. Five studies, in a total of 235 participants compared IVIg against placebo. One trial with 20 participants compared IVIg with plasma exchange, one trial compared IVIg with prednisolone in 32 participants, and one trial, newly included at this update, compared IVIg with intravenous methylprednisolone in 46 participants.A significantly higher proportion of participants improved in disability within one month after IVIg treatment as compared with placebo (risk ratio (RR) 2.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.72 to 3.36; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome 3.03 (95% CI 2.33 to 4.55), high quality evidence). Whether all these improvements

  11. Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Veronika M; Czub, Markus; Schreiner, Nicole; Moore, Peter F; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Tipold, Andrea

    2004-08-01

    Microglia cells are the principal immune effector elements of the brain responding to any pathological event. To elucidate the possible role of microglia in initial non-inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, microglia from experimentally CDV infected dogs were isolated ex vivo by density gradient centrifugation and characterized immunophenotypically and functionally using flow cytometry. Results from dogs with demyelinating lesions were compared to results from recovered dogs and two healthy controls. CDV antigen could be detected in microglia of dogs with histopathologically confirmed demyelination. Microglia of these dogs showed marked upregulation of the surface molecules CD18, CD11b, CD11c, CD1c, MHC class I and MHC class II and a tendency for increased expression intensity of ICAM-1 (CD54), B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), whereas no increased expression was found for CD44 and CD45. Functionally, microglia exhibited distinctly enhanced phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was concluded that in CDV infection, there is a clear association between microglial activation and demyelination. This strongly suggests that microglia contribute to acute myelin destruction in distemper.

  12. Late central demyelination after Fischer's syndrome: MRI studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, X; Ellie, E; Larrivière, M; Deleplanque, B; Lagueny, A; Julien, J

    1993-01-01

    The case of a patient who presented with clinical, electrophysiological, and MRI evidence of central demyelination is described. The patient had been admitted to hospital for Fischer's syndrome a few years previously. The association of these two events suggests that central and peripheral myelinopathy may be related in Fischer's syndrome. PMID:8509787

  13. Subacute CNS Demyelination after Treatment with Nivolumab for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Catherine; Schneider, Raphael; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Bavi, Prashant; Roehrl, Michael H A; Mason, Warren P; Hogg, David

    2015-12-01

    Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) has improved the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. These agents carry a certain risk of adverse immune-related events. We present a patient with widely metastatic melanoma who was initially treated with ipilimumab and subsequently with nivolumab. After four infusions of nivolumab, he developed subacute multifocal central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Nivolumab was discontinued and, despite immunosuppressive therapy, the largest lesion progressed significantly, whereas another lesion showed radiographic improvement. After further progression, the patient succumbed to his CNS lesions 4 months later. Autopsy revealed extensive demyelination, a mild multifocal T-cell-rich perivascular lymphoid infiltrate, abundant macrophages, and necrosis. There was no metastatic melanoma in the brain. CNS demyelination has not been described in association with nivolumab. We hypothesize that the combination therapy of ipilimumab and subsequent nivolumab accounted for the severity of the demyelinating process in this patient. This case, with comprehensive clinical, molecular, and neuropathologic characterization, illustrates the need for awareness of these potential CNS complications with the use of multiple checkpoint inhibitors.

  14. Therapeutic Value or Harm of Neuregulin 1 in Demyelinating Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Abberant neuregulin 1 signaling in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis . J Neuropath Exp Neurol, 71:104-15. APPENDICES: none SUPPORTING OAT A: Here is some new...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is still not clear whether the primary process in multiple sclerosis is degenerative... sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Neuregulin, Multiple sclerosis , myelin, axogilial interactions, therapeutics. 16

  15. Influence of laser irradiation on demyelination of nervous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Nataly O.; Plaksij, Yu. S.; Mamilov, Serge A.

    2000-11-01

    Problem demyelinating diseases from actual in modern of neurology. Main disease of this group - multiple sclerosis, which morphological manifestation is the process demyelineation - disintegration of myelin, which covers axial cylinders of nervous filaments. The outcome of such damage is violation of realization of nervous impulses, dissonance of implement and coordination functions. Most typical the feature of a multiple sclerosis is origin of repeated remissions, which compact with indication remyelination. In development of disease the large role is played by modifications of immunological of a reactivity of an organism. The purpose of the title is development of new methods of treatment of a multiple sclerosis because of lasertherapy. For thsi purpose the influence of a laser exposure on demyelination and remyelination processes will be investigated, is investigated pathological fabrics at microscopic and submicroscopic levels. The study of proceses demyelination and remyelination will be conducted on experimental animals (rats), which are sick experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), that is the most adequate model of a multiple sclerosis. The patients' EAE animals will be subjected to treatment by a laser exposure. For want of it there will be determinate optimum lengths of waves, dozes and modes of laser radiation.

  16. Familial long thoracic nerve palsy: a manifestation of brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L H

    1986-09-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy causes weakness of the serratus anterior muscle and winging of the scapula. It is usually traumatic in origin. Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy has not been recognized as the major manifestation of familial brachial plexus neuropathy, but I have studied the syndrome in four members of three generations of one family. One individual suffered an episode of facial paresis. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant.

  17. Exome sequencing reveals HINT1 mutations as a cause of distal hereditary motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Race, Valérie; Matthijs, Gert; De Jonghe, Peter; Robberecht, Wim; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Damme, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMNs) are a heterogenous group of genetic disorders with length-dependent degeneration of motor axons. Obtaining a genetic diagnosis in patients with dHMN remains challenging. We performed exome sequencing in a diagnostic setting in 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of dHMN. Potential disease-causing variants in genes associated with dHMN and other forms of inherited neuropathies/motor neuron diseases were validated using Sequenom. The coverage in the genes studied was >95% with an average coverage of >50 times. In none of the patients a mutations was found in genes previously reported to be associated with dHMN. However, in 2/12 patients a recessive mutation in histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1, recently discovered as a cause of axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia) was identified. Our results demonstrate the diagnostic value of exome sequencing for patients with inherited neuropathies. The phenotypic spectrum of recessive mutations in HINT1 includes dHMN. HINT1 should be added to the list of genes to check for in dHMN. PMID:24105373

  18. Complexity of the Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathies: Clinical and Cellular Characterization of the MPZ p.D90E Mutation.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Sancho, Paula; Calpena, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Molina, Manuel; Mateo-Martínez, Gonzalo; Espinós, Carmen; Arriola-Pereda, Gema

    2015-10-01

    Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are rare diseases representing a broad clinical and genetic spectrum. Without a notable familial history, the clinical diagnosis is complicated because acquired causes of peripheral neuropathy, such as inflammatory neuropathies, neuropathies with toxic causes, and nutritional deficiencies, must be considered. We examined the clinical, electrophysiological, and pathologic manifestations of a boy with an initial diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. The progression of the disease despite treatment led to a suspicion of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Genetic testing revealed the presence of the MPZ p.D90E mutation in heterozygosis. To clarify the pathogenicity of this mutation and achieve a conclusive diagnosis, we investigated the MPZ p.D90E mutation through in silico and cellular approaches. This study broadens the clinical phenotype of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy due to MPZ mutation and emphasises the difficulty of achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis in a sporadic patient to provide an appropriate pharmacologic treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) encompasses a number of disorders characterized by recurrent blister formation as the result of structural fragility within the skin and selected other tissues. All types and subtypes of EB are rare; the overall incidence and prevalence of the disease within the United States is approximately 19 per one million live births and 8 per one million population, respectively. Clinical manifestations range widely, from localized blistering of the hands and feet to generalized blistering of the skin and oral cavity, and injury to many internal organs. Each EB subtype is known to arise from mutations within the genes encoding for several different proteins, each of which is intimately involved in the maintenance of keratinocyte structural stability or adhesion of the keratinocyte to the underlying dermis. EB is best diagnosed and subclassified by the collective findings obtained via detailed personal and family history, in concert with the results of immunofluorescence antigenic mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and in some cases, by DNA analysis. Optimal patient management requires a multidisciplinary approach, and revolves around the protection of susceptible tissues against trauma, use of sophisticated wound care dressings, aggressive nutritional support, and early medical or surgical interventions to correct whenever possible the extracutaneous complications. Prognosis varies considerably and is based on both EB subtype and the overall health of the patient. PMID:20507631

  20. Increased Mortality and Comorbidity Associated With Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Nanna; Rosenberg, Thomas; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Vorum, Henrik; Andersen, Carl U; Aasbjerg, Kristian

    2017-09-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial genetic disease in which optic neuropathy is considered a key feature. Several other manifestations of LHON have been reported; however, only little is known of their incidence and the life expectancy in LHON patients. This study, based on Danish nationwide health registries, included 141 patients diagnosed with LHON and 297 unaffected family members in the maternal line. The incidence of comorbidities and mortality for patients with LHON and unaffected family members was compared with that in the general population. Having LHON was associated with an almost 2-fold risk of mortality with a rate ratio (RR) of 1.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.47-2.59; P < 0.001). The incidence of several diseases was increased for LHON patients, but not for family members. The incidence of stroke was 5.73 per 1000 patient-years for LHON patients compared to 2.33 for the general population, and the RR was 2.38 (95% CI: 1.58-3.58; P < 0.001). The incidence of demyelinating disorders was 2.24 compared to 0.21 for the general population; RR was 12.89 (95% CI: 6.70-24.77; P < 0.001). A 4-fold risk of dementia was seen for LHON patients (RR: 4.26, 95% CI: 1.91-9.48; P < 0.001), incidence 1.45 for LHON and 0.37 for the general population. Moreover, LHON patients had an increased risk of epilepsy, atherosclerosis, nerve symptoms, neuropathy, and alcohol-related disorders. The manifestation of LHON was associated with increased mortality and increased incidence of several disorders including stroke, demyelinating disorder, dementia, and epilepsy.

  1. Small fibre neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Daniele; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    To provide a review on the state-of-art of clinical features, diagnostics, genetics and treatments of small fibre neuropathy (SFN). The spectrum of clinical features has been widened from the classical presentation of burning feet as length-dependent SFN to that of small fibre dysfunction and/or degeneration associated with focal, diffuse and episodic neuropathic pain syndromes. The involvement of small nerve fibres in neurodegenerative diseases has been further defined, challenging the relationship between neuropathic pain symptoms and small fibre loss. The clinical reliability of skin biopsy has b