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Sample records for inherited skin diseases

  1. Insights into desmosome biology from inherited human skin disease and cardiocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nitoiu, Daniela; Etheridge, Sarah L; Kelsell, David P

    2014-06-01

    The importance of desmosomes in tissue homeostasis is highlighted by natural and engineered mutations in desmosomal genes, which compromise the skin or heart and in some instances both. Desmosomal gene mutations account for 45-50% of cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and are mutated in an array of other disorders such as striate palmoplantar keratoderma, hypotrichosis with or without skin vesicles and lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa. Recently, we reported loss-of-function mutations in the human ADAM17 gene, encoding for the 'sheddase' ADAM17, a transmembrane protein which cleaves extracellular domains of substrate proteins including TNF-α, growth factors and desmoglein (DSG) 2. Patients present with cardiomyopathy and an inflammatory skin and bowel syndrome with defective DSG processing. In contrast, the dominantly inherited tylosis with oesophageal cancer appears to result from gain-of-function in ADAM17 due to increased processing via iRHOM2. This review discusses the heterogeneity of mutations in desmosomes and their regulatory proteins.

  2. Mitochondrial inheritance and disease.

    PubMed

    Fine, P E

    1978-09-23

    Spontaneously occurring variants of the D.N.A. content of mitochondria may be responsible for human disease. Among the prime candidates for such a mitochondrial aetiology are certain drug-induced blood dyscrasias, particularly that due to chloramphenicol. Because mitochondria are generally inherited from the female parent, such disorders should be clustered among matroclinally related individuals. The clinical manifestations of such diseases are a function of the manner in which mitochondria are allocated to somatic cells and tissues during development.

  3. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  4. ‘…Re-written in the skin’ – Clues to skin biology and aging from inherited disease

    PubMed Central

    Monnat, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The growing diversity of heritable skin diseases, a practical challenge to clinicians and dermatonosologists alike, has nonetheless served as a rich source of insight into skin biology and disease mechanisms. I summarize below some key insights from the recent gene-driven phase of research on Werner syndrome, a heritable adult progeroid syndrome with prominent dermatologic features, constitutional genomic instability and an elevated risk of cancer. I also indicate how new insights into skin biology, disease and aging may come from unexpected sources. PMID:25810110

  5. PGD for inherited cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, Anver; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Polling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Rechitsky, Svetlana

    2012-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been applied for more than 200 different inherited conditions, with expanding application to common disorders with genetic predisposition. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. This paper presents the first, as far as is known, cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A total of 18 PGD cycles were performed, resulting in transfer in 15 of them, which yielded nine unaffected pregnancies and the births of seven disease- or disease predisposition-free children. The data open the prospect of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, allowing couples carrying cardiac disease predisposing genes to reproduce without much fear of having offspring with these genes, which are at risk for premature or sudden death. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is currently an established clinical procedure in assisted reproduction and genetic practices. Its application has been expanding beyond traditional indications of prenatal diagnosis and currently includes common disorders with genetic predisposition, such as inherited forms of cancer. This applies also to the diseases with no current prospect of treatment, which may manifest despite presymptomatic diagnosis and follow up, when PGD may provide the only relief for the at-risk couples to reproduce. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. We present here our first cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A

  6. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  7. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment.

  8. Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Genetics & Inheritance

    MedlinePlus

    ... twitter share with linkedin Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Genetics & Inheritance Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Types of PIDDs Genetics & Inheritance Talking to Your Doctor Featured Research Credit: ...

  9. Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease and Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks in an organism can be altered by environmental factors throughout life. Although changes in the epigenetic code can be positive, some are associated with severe diseases, in particular, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent evidence has indicated that certain epigenetic marks can be inherited, and reshape developmental and cellular features over generations. This review examines the challenging possibility that epigenetic changes induced by environmental factors can contribute to some of the inheritance of disease and disease risk. This concept has immense implications for the understanding of biological functions and disease etiology, and provides potential novel strategies for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of epigenetic inheritance relevant to human disease, such as the detrimental effects of traumatic stress or drug/toxic exposure on brain functions, are reviewed. Different possible routes of transmission of epigenetic information involving the germline or germline-independent transfer are discussed, and different mechanisms for the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic information like chromatin remodeling and small noncoding RNAs are considered. Future research directions and remaining major challenges in this field are also outlined. Finally, the adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance, and the cost and benefit of allowing acquired epigenetic marks to persist across generations is critically evaluated. PMID:22781843

  10. Molecular basis of inherited skin-blistering disorders, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Monique; Has, Cristina; Tunggal, Lucy; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2006-10-13

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and associated skin-fragility syndromes are a group of inherited skin diseases characterised by trauma-induced blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. Mutations in at least 14 distinct genes encoding molecular components of the epidermis or the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) can cause blistering skin diseases that differ by clinical presentation and severity of the symptoms. Despite great advances in discerning the genetic basis of this group of diseases, the molecular pathways leading to symptoms are not yet fully understood. Unravelling these pathways by molecular analysis of the structure and in vitro assessment of functional properties of the human proteins involved, combined with genetic models in lower organisms, should pave the way for specific cures for inherited skin fragility.

  11. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  12. Multicentre consensus recommendations for skin care in inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a highly heterogeneous group of rare diseases characterized by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Clinical features combined with immunofluorescence antigen mapping and/or electron microscopy examination of a skin biopsy allow to define the EB type and subtype. Molecular diagnosis is nowadays feasible in all EB subtypes and required for prenatal diagnosis. The extent of skin and mucosal lesions varies greatly depending on EB subtype and patient age. In the more severe EB subtypes lifelong generalized blistering, chronic ulcerations and scarring sequelae lead to multiorgan involvement, major morbidity and life-threatening complications. In the absence of a cure, patient management remains based on preventive measures, together with symptomatic treatment of cutaneous and extracutaneous manifestations and complications. The rarity and complexity of EB challenge its appropriate care. Thus, the aim of the present study has been to generate multicentre, multidisciplinary recommendations on global skin care addressed to physicians, nurses and other health professionals dealing with EB, both in centres of expertise and primary care setting. Methods Almost no controlled trials for EB treatment have been performed to date. For this reason, recommendations were prepared by a multidisciplinary team of experts from different European EB centres based on available literature and expert opinion. They have been subsequently revised by a panel of external experts, using an online-modified Delphi method to generate consensus. Results Recommendations are reported according to the age of the patients. The major topics treated comprise the multidisciplinary approach to EB patients, global skin care including wound care, management of itching and pain, and early diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Aspects of therapeutic patient education, care of disease burden and continuity of care are also developed

  13. Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease Allison L. Cirino , ... for developing the family’s heart condition. What Is Genetic Testing and What Can it Tell Me? Genetic ...

  14. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  15. How Is Wilson Disease Inherited?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect with Wilson Disease Association Send Email Physician Contacts List of Physicians and Institutions in Your Area View Contacts Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View ...

  16. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Inherited Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially-expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production, or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stresses in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases; Friedreich's ataxia (FA), LHON, MELAS, MERRF and Leigh Syndrome (LS) is discussed. Published reports for oxidative stress involvement in pathomechanism in these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest for oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was in Friedreich's ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for oxidative stress citation count frequency within each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is in Friedreich's ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich's diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26073122

  18. Inherited ion channel diseases: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Lieve, Krystien V V; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2015-10-01

    Ion channelopathies are diseases caused by dysfunctional ion channels that may lead to sudden death. These diseases can be either acquired or inherited. The main phenotypes observed in patients carrying these heritable arrhythmia syndromes are congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome. In the recent years, tremendous progress has been made in the recognition, mechanisms, and treatment of these diseases. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the main phenotypes, genetic underpinnings, risk stratification, and treatment options for these so-called cardiac ion channelopathies.

  19. Rheumatologic Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Kalus, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    In common rheumatologic diseases skin findings are an important diagnostic clue for astute clinicians. Skin manifestations can help identify systemic disease or may require therapy uniquely targeted at the cutaneous problem. This article discusses 3 common rheumatologic conditions seen in adults by dermatologists: cutaneous lupus, dermatomyositis, and morphea. The focus is on the cutaneous findings and clinical presentation. Some approaches to treatment are explored. Clues to help identify systemic disease are also highlighted.

  20. The Genetics of Human Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Gina M.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is composed of a variety of cell types expressing specific molecules and possessing different properties that facilitate the complex interactions and intercellular communication essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the skin. Importantly, a single mutation in one of these molecules can disrupt the entire organization and function of these essential networks, leading to cell separation, blistering, and other striking phenotypes observed in inherited skin diseases. Over the past several decades, the genetic basis of many monogenic skin diseases has been elucidated using classical genetic techniques. Importantly, the findings from these studies has shed light onto the many classes of molecules and essential genetic as well as molecular interactions that lend the skin its rigid, yet flexible properties. With the advent of the human genome project, next-generation sequencing techniques, as well as several other recently developed methods, tremendous progress has been made in dissecting the genetic architecture of complex, non-Mendelian skin diseases. PMID:25274756

  1. Arrhythmogenic inherited heart muscle diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure, leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device, or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the origin is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30% to 40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy, the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, 2 genes for X-linked familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and 4 genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In 1 form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators, and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. This review describes the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  2. The Mode of Inheritance of Scheuermann's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, A. M.; Zaidman, M. N.; Strokova, E. L.; Korel, A. V.; Kalashnikova, E. V.; Rusova, T. V.; Mikhailovsky, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The mode of Scheuermann's disease inheritance and its phenotypic traits in probands and their relatives were studied in 90 pedigrees (90 probands and 385 relatives). The disorder was identified as a genetically related pathology inherited by autosomal dominant type, controlled by a mutant major gene, as a kyphotic deformity without signs of vertebral bodies' anomaly and torsion. Morphological and biochemical studies showed disturbance in the structure of vertebral growth plate anterior aspects at the level of deformity, defects in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and change in proteoglycan spectrum in cells and matrix. Twelve candidate genes were studied in chondrocytes isolated from vertebral growth plates of patients with Scheuermann's disease. The study results included disorder in the IHH gene expression and preservation of the expression of PAX1, two aggrecan isoforms, link protein, types I and II collagen, lumican, versican, growth hormone and growth factor receptor genes, and proliferation gene. Preservation of the SOX9 gene (transcription gene) probably indicates posttranscriptional genetic disorders. The study is under way. PMID:24102061

  3. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy.

  4. Natural repair mechanisms in correcting pathogenic mutations in inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Jonkman, M F; Castellanos Nuijts, M; van Essen, A J

    2003-11-01

    This review assesses molecular aspects of the rescue of disease-causing mutations in genodermatoses by means of naturally occurring secondary genetic phenomena. Such data have important implications for the design of gene therapy approaches for inherited skin diseases. Reversal of the phenotype depends on three elements: the number of cells involved; the degree of gene reversal; and the specific timing of the reversion. If reversion occurs in somatic cells, revertant mosaicism may occur. This is the situation in which a patient's skin is generally affected by the genodermatosis, but islands of normal skin stand out. These reflect the presence of revertant cells that are sufficient to restore a normal local skin phenotype. Reversion of the original mutation may also be partial, in which case the phenotype may display no, or only limited, improvement. Nevertheless, the phenotype may ameliorate with age if the reverted cells preferentially expand in time or if the time of onset of reversion is after birth. In essence, the complexities of naturally occurring rescue processes are important to understand because the inherent mechanisms may provide clues and insight into optimal therapeutic gene manipulation, and the possibility of mimicking nature in the management of patients with diverse genodermatoses.

  5. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Ao, A

    1996-12-01

    Research on diagnosis of inherited disease in human embryo before implantation was initiated to help those couples who would prefer to select embryos at this stage rather than during pregnancy. Following in vitro fertilization (IVF), one to two cells were removed from 3 day cleavage stage embryo and cells were analysed for genetic defects. Embryos diagnosed as unaffected were returned to the uterus and thus the resulting pregnancies were assured to be normal. First babies born after the preimplantation diagnosis were using DNA amplification of Y-linked sequences by PCR to avoid X-linked disease. Several pregnancies were obtained by identifying sex of embryos using dual fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorochrome labelled DNA sequences specific for X- and Y-chromosomes to interphase nuclei. Development of single cell PCR for single gene defects led to diagnose several genetic disorders. Preimplantation diagnosis was successfully achieved for predominant delta 508 deletion causing cystic fibrosis, and pregnancies were also diagnosed for Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, Tay-Sachs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  6. Ex vivo gene therapy cures a blistering skin disease.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Carol; Uitto, Jouni

    2007-06-01

    A recent publication that describes gene therapy treatment of a patient with an inherited blistering skin disease, epidermolysis bullosa, demonstrates for the first time that gene therapy can cure a disease of solid tissue. The treatment relies on ex vivo transduction of autologous epidermal stem cells with a normal copy of the defective gene, followed by reconstitution of the patient's skin with epithelial sheets that are grown from these genetically corrected cells. This approach holds promise for treatment not only of inherited disorders of the skin but also of other solid tissues that are becoming amenable to tissue engineering.

  7. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Reproductive Disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive disease and fertility issues have dramatically increased in the human population over the last several decades, suggesting environmental impacts. Epigenetics provides a mechanistic link by which an organism can respond to environmental factors. Interestingly, environmentally induced epigenetic alterations in the germ line can promote aberrant gene expression and disease generationally. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance is defined as germ-line transmission of altered epigenetic information between generations in the absence of continued environmental exposures. This form of nongenetic inheritance has been shown to directly influence fertility and reproductive disease. This review describes the studies in a variety of species that impact reproductive disease and abnormalities. Observations suggest serious attention be paid to the possibility that ancestral exposures to environmental insults promotes transgenerational inheritance of reproductive disease susceptibility. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance appears to be an important contributing factor to reproductive disease in many organisms, including humans.

  8. New patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Marianne; Vissing, John

    2003-10-17

    With the identification of a patient with mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of paternal origin, it has been unequivocally proven that not only does paternal mtDNA survive in the zygote, but it can also contribute substantially to the mtDNA pool of adult, human skeletal muscle. The questions are: how often does paternal mtDNA inheritance occur and what mechanisms are involved? In this paper, we will review current knowledge on the fate of sperm mitochondria after fertilization and discuss the impact paternal inheritance may have on our understanding of mitochondrial biology.

  9. Endocrine disruptor induction of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K

    2014-12-01

    Environmental exposures such as toxicants, nutrition and stress have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease susceptibility. Endocrine disruptors are one of the largest groups of specific toxicants shown to promote this form of epigenetic inheritance. These environmental compounds that interfere with normal endocrine signaling are one of the largest classes of toxicants we are exposed to on a daily level. The ability of ancestral exposures to promote disease susceptibility significantly increases the potential biohazards of these toxicants. Therefore, what your great-grandmother was exposed to during pregnancy may influence your disease development, even in the absence of any exposure, and you are going to pass this on to your grandchildren. This non-genetic form of inheritance significantly impacts our understanding of biology from the origins of disease to evolutionary biology. The current review will describe the previous studies and endocrine disruptors shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease.

  10. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Martos, Suzanne N; Tang, Wan-Yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

  11. Interdisciplinary psychosocial care for families with inherited cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Caleshu, Colleen; Kasparian, Nadine A; Edwards, Katharine S; Yeates, Laura; Semsarian, Christopher; Perez, Marco; Ashley, Euan; Turner, Christian J; Knowles, Joshua W; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Inherited cardiovascular diseases pose unique and complex psychosocial challenges for families, including coming to terms with life-long cardiac disease, risk of sudden death, grief related to the sudden death of a loved one, activity restrictions, and inheritance risk to other family members. Psychosocial factors impact not only mental health but also physical health and cooperation with clinical recommendations. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to the care of families with inherited cardiovascular disease, in which psychological care provided by specialized cardiac genetic counselors, nurses, and psychologists is embedded within the cardiovascular care team. We report illustrative cases and the supporting literature to demonstrate common scenarios, as well as practical guidance for clinicians working in the inherited cardiovascular disease setting.

  12. Medical Problems in Obstetrics: Inherited Metabolic Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elaine

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of women with rare inherited disorders of metabolism are becoming pregnant. Although, in general, outcomes for women and their children are good, there are a number of issues that need to be considered. Currently, limited specific guidance on the management of these conditions in pregnancy is available. Prepregnancy counselling with information on inheritance, options for reproduction, teratogenicity risk, potential impact on maternal health and long-term health of children should be offered. With appropriate specialist management, the teratogenic risk of conditions such as maternal phenylketonuria (PKU) can be eliminated, and the risk of metabolic decompensation in disorders of energy metabolism or intoxication significantly reduced. Multidisciplinary management, and close liaison between obstetricians and other specialists, is required for those women in whom there is cardiac, renal, respiratory, joint or other organ involvement.

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance in a mitochondrially mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Egger, J; Wilson, J

    1983-07-21

    Mendelian inheritance involves the transmission to successive generations of DNA contained in genes in the nucleus, but DNA is also contained in mitochondria, where it is believed to be responsible for the encoding of certain mitochondrial enzymes. Since nearly all mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted, one might expect a nonmendelian pattern of inheritance in mitochondrial cytopathy, a syndrome in which there are abnormalities in mitochondrial structure and deficiencies in a variety of mitochondrial enzymes. We studied the pedigrees of 6 affected families whose members we had examined personally and of 24 families described in the literature. In 27 families, exclusively maternal transmission occurred; in 3 there was also paternal transmission in one generation. Altogether, 51 mothers but only 3 fathers had transmitted the condition. These results are consistent with mitochondrial transmission of mitochondrial cytopathy; the inheritance and enzyme defects of mitochondrial cytopathy can be considered in the light of recent evidence that subunits of respiratory-enzyme complexes are encoded solely by mitochondrial DNA. The occasional paternal transmission may be explained if certain enzyme subunits that are encoded by nuclear DNA are affected.

  14. Genetic manipulation for inherited neurodegenerative diseases: myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic diseases affect about 7% of the general population and over 7000 distinct clinical syndromes have been described with the majority being due to single gene defects. This review will provide a critical overview of genetic strategies that are being pioneered to halt or reverse disease progression in inherited neurodegenerative diseases. This field of research covers a vast area and only the most promising treatment paradigms will be discussed with a particular focus on inherited eye diseases, which have paved the way for innovative gene therapy paradigms, and mitochondrial diseases, which are currently generating a lot of debate centred on the bioethics of germline manipulation. PMID:27002113

  15. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Environmental insults, such as exposure to toxicants or nutritional abnormalities, can lead to epigenetic changes that are in turn related to increased susceptibility to disease. The focus of this review is on the transgenerational inheritance of such epigenetic abnormalities (epimutations), and how it is that these inherited epigenetic abnormalities can lead to increased disease susceptibility, even in the absence of continued environmental insult. Observations of environmental toxicant specificity and exposure-specific disease susceptibility are discussed. How epimutations are transmitted across generations and how epigenetic changes in the germline are translated into an increased disease susceptibility in the adult is reviewed with regard to disease etiology.

  16. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  17. Rare inherited kidney diseases: challenges, opportunities, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V A M; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-05-24

    At least 10% of adults and nearly all children who receive renal-replacement therapy have an inherited kidney disease. These patients rarely die when their disease progresses and can remain alive for many years because of advances in organ-replacement therapy. However, these disorders substantially decrease their quality of life and have a large effect on health-care systems. Since the kidneys regulate essential homoeostatic processes, inherited kidney disorders have multisystem complications, which add to the usual challenges for rare disorders. In this review, we discuss the nature of rare inherited kidney diseases, the challenges they pose, and opportunities from technological advances, which are well suited to target the kidney. Mechanistic insights from rare disorders are relevant for common disorders such as hypertension, kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Travel-associated skin disease.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Morris-Jones, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Travel associated skin disease is extremely common and a frequent cause of the returning traveller seeking medical attention. Widespread cutaneous eruptions usually represent reactive rashes, indicating an underlying systemic infection or allergic reaction. Patients with disseminated or spreading rashes following travel often present with fever and malaise. In contrast, those presenting with localised skin disease such as a blister, nodule, plaque, ulcer etc are usually well in themselves but have sustained a bite/sting/penetrating injury or introduction of infection directly into the skin at the affected site. As a general rule widespread rashes are investigated with blood tests/serology and localised lesions with a skin biopsy for culture and histology.

  19. Skin Diseases and the Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Marjorie

    1970-01-01

    Discusses such concerns as acne, syphilis, drug abuse, and tatoos. Indicates need for physician not only to treat skin diseases but to help adolescents to accept themselves and find constructive directions. (CJ)

  20. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  1. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric; Larsen, Ginger; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina I; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    The actions of environmental toxicants and relevant mixtures in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease was investigated with the use of a fungicide, a pesticide mixture, a plastic mixture, dioxin and a hydrocarbon mixture. After transient exposure of an F0 gestating female rat during embryonic gonadal sex determination, the F1 and F3 generation progeny adult onset ovarian disease was assessed. Transgenerational disease phenotypes observed included an increase in cysts resembling human polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) and a decrease in the ovarian primordial follicle pool size resembling primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The F3 generation granulosa cells were isolated and found to have a transgenerational effect on the transcriptome and epigenome (differential DNA methylation). Epigenetic biomarkers for environmental exposure and associated gene networks were identified. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease states was induced by all the different classes of environmental compounds, suggesting a role of environmental epigenetics in ovarian disease etiology.

  2. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Ovarian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Eric; Larsen, Ginger; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina I.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The actions of environmental toxicants and relevant mixtures in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease was investigated with the use of a fungicide, a pesticide mixture, a plastic mixture, dioxin and a hydrocarbon mixture. After transient exposure of an F0 gestating female rat during embryonic gonadal sex determination, the F1 and F3 generation progeny adult onset ovarian disease was assessed. Transgenerational disease phenotypes observed included an increase in cysts resembling human polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) and a decrease in the ovarian primordial follicle pool size resembling primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The F3 generation granulosa cells were isolated and found to have a transgenerational effect on the transcriptome and epigenome (differential DNA methylation). Epigenetic biomarkers for environmental exposure and associated gene networks were identified. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease states was induced by all the different classes of environmental compounds, suggesting a role of environmental epigenetics in ovarian disease etiology. PMID:22570695

  3. Window panes of eternity. Health, disease, and inherited risk.

    PubMed Central

    Scriver, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Personal health reflects harmony between individual and experience; it is optimal homeostasis. Disease is an outcome of incongruity leading to dishomeostasis. Relative to earlier times, disease in modern society has higher "heritability" (in the broad meaning of the term). Inherited risks are facts compatible with anticipation and prevention of disease. This viewpoint has major implications for medical practice, deployment of health services, themes of research, and education of health care personnel and citizens. PMID:6763817

  4. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  5. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14 . ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT...ANSI Std. Z39.18 14 . Abstract (cont.) genotypes and phenotypes; and (iv) evaluations of the reliability and validity of different...preventive interventions for inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry age-related macular degeneration ( AMD ) through the conduct of clinical

  6. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental

  8. Gene editing for skin diseases: designer nucleases as tools for gene therapy of skin fragility disorders.

    PubMed

    March, Oliver P; Reichelt, Julia; Koller, Ulrich

    2017-03-07

    The current treatment of inherited blistering skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is largely restricted to wound care and pain management. More effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required and targeting the genetic basis of these severe diseases is now within reach. Here we describe current gene editing tools and their potential to correct gene function in monogenetic blistering skin diseases. We present the features of the most frequently used gene editing techniques TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9, determining their preferential application under specific genetic conditions, including the type of mutational inheritance, the targeting site within the gene or the possibility to specifically target the mutation. Both tools have traits beneficial in specific situations. Promising developments in the field engender gene editing as a potentially powerful therapeutic option for future clinical applications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Nutrition and skin diseases in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Veterinarians are confronted with a variety of food and nutrition-related skin diseases, with cutaneous food adverse reaction the most common in small animal dermatology. In addition to canine atopic dermatitis, cutaneous food adverse reaction has been an area of interest for extensive research for the last decade. Nutritional deficiencies and toxicoses are rare these days due to commercially available high-quality diets; however, poorly stored diets, inadequate husbandry of exotic pets, or problems in a farm animal environment may result in zinc, vitamin A, vitamin C, and fatty acid, or copper deficiency. Inherited deficiencies due to abnormal zinc absorption through the gastrointestinal tract must be considered in Nordic breed dogs and goats.

  10. The skin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Flint, A

    1977-09-01

    The characteristic oily skin in individuals with parkinsonism has long been observed by clinicians. The oiliness seems to be associated with periods when the disease is most active. This seborrhea has been observed particularly in post-encephalitic parkinsonism, as well as in idiopathic paralysis agitans. It also occurs in phenothiazine-induced parkinsonism.

  11. The Role of the Skin Barrier in Occupational Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kasemsarn, Pranee; Bosco, Joanna; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2016-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are the second most common occupational diseases worldwide. Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is the most frequent OSD, and comprises irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis. There are many endogenous and exogenous factors which affect the development of OCD, including age, sex, ethnicity, atopic skin diathesis, certain occupations and environmental factors. One of the most important contributing causes is skin barrier dysfunction. The skin provides a first-line defense from environmental assaults and incorporates physical, chemical and biological protection. Skin barrier disturbance plays a crucial role in various skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), ichthyosis, ICD and ACD. Genetic factors, such as filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, and external factors, such as skin irritants interfering with stratum corneum structure and composition, may lead to abnormalities in skin barrier function and increased vulnerability to skin diseases. FLG encodes the cornified envelope protein, filaggrin, which is involved in skin barrier function. FLG mutation is associated with the development of OCD. High-risk occupations for OCD include health care workers, hairdressers and construction workers. There are often multiple contributing causes to OCD, as workers are exposed to both irritants and allergens. AD is also associated with skin barrier disruption and plays an important role in OCD. ICD often precedes and facilitates the development of ACD, with impairment of the skin barrier contributing to the concurrence of ICD and ACD in many workers with OCD.

  12. [Skin changes in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Dobrić, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The Intruduction includes those eflorescences that might be useful for diagnostics in rheumatology. Further in the text we have described four groups of rheumatic disorders. The first group: rheumatic diseases (lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, the mixed connective tissue disease, allergic vasculitis, polyarteritis) which are the most common from the dermatological point of view. The second group: rheumatic diseases (Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren, Reiter and Behçet syndrome and Kawasaki's disease) which are rarely of interest to our dermatologists. In this group there is also psoriatic arthritis, which is not rare in dermatology but its diagnostics and treatment belong to rheumatologists' field of expertise. The third group: infections (rheumatic fever, diseminated gonococcal infection, subacute bacterial endocarditis, Lyme disesease). The fourth group: metabolic disorders (gout). The diseases of the first group are described completely. In the second, third and fourth group of the diseases we have included only skin changes.

  13. Germline Mutation in EXPH5 Implicates the Rab27B Effector Protein Slac2-b in Inherited Skin Fragility

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John A.; Stone, Kristina L.; Begum, Rumena; Simpson, Michael A.; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J.; Liu, Lu; McMillan, James R.; South, Andrew P.; Pourreyron, Celine; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Martinez, Anna E.; Mellerio, Jemima E.; Parsons, Maddy

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase Rab27B and one of its effector proteins, Slac2-b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin-5), have putative roles in intracellular vesicle trafficking but their relevance to human disease is not known. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in EXPH5 in three siblings with inherited skin fragility born to consanguineous Iraqi parents. All three individuals harbor the mutation c.5786delC (p.Pro1929Leufs∗8) in EXPH5, which truncates the 1,989 amino acid Slac2-b protein by 52 residues. The clinical features comprised generalized scale-crusts and occasional blisters, mostly induced by trauma, as well as mild diffuse pigmentary mottling on the trunk and proximal limbs. There was no increased bleeding tendency, no neurologic abnormalities, and no increased incidence of infection. Analysis of an affected person's skin showed loss of Slac2-b immunostaining (C-terminal antibody), disruption of keratinocyte adhesion within the lower epidermis, and an increased number of perinuclear vesicles. A role for Slac2-b in keratinocyte biology was supported by findings of cytoskeletal disruption (mainly keratin intermediate filaments) and decreased keratinocyte adhesion in both keratinocytes from an affected subject and after shRNA knockdown of Slac2-b in normal keratinocytes. Slac2-b was also shown to colocalize with Rab27B and β4 integrin to early adhesion initiation sites in spreading normal keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings identify an unexpected role for Slac2-b in inherited skin fragility and expand the clinical spectrum of human disorders of GTPase effector proteins. PMID:23176819

  14. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically. PMID:24692191

  15. Research on Skin Diseases - USSR -

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    wide-spread a skin disease as eczema , is for the most part considered in class VIII, i.e. in the group of allergy <■■•■ disorders, together with...the group of pyodermas microbe eczemas and other eczema -like diseases, often recorded as strepto- or straphilodermia and treated as pyodermas, — we...put them in the eczema group. It is very probable that the great work being carried out in Leningrad in the fight against pyodermas in industrial

  16. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to the risk of PD. Methods We examined the possibility of a maternal inheritance bias as well as the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and maternal inheritance and disease risk in a case-control study of 168 multiplex PD families in which the proband and one parent were diagnosed with PD. 2-tailed Fisher Exact Tests and McNemar's tests were used to compare allele frequencies, and a t-test to compare ages of onset. Results The frequency of affected mothers of the proband with PD (83/167, 49.4%) was not significantly different from the frequency of affected females of the proband generation (115/259, 44.4%) (Odds Ratio 1.22; 95%CI 0.83 - 1.81). After correcting for multiple tests, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of mitochondrial haplogroups or of the 10398G complex I gene polymorphism in PD patients compared to controls, and no significant associations with age of onset of PD. Mitochondrial haplogroup and 10398G polymorphism frequencies were similar in probands having an affected father as compared to probands having an affected mother. Conclusions These data fail to demonstrate a bias towards maternal inheritance in familial PD. Consistent with this, we find no association of common haplogroup-defining mtDNA variants or for the 10398G variant with the risk of PD. However, these data do not exclude a role for mtDNA variants in other populations, and it remains possible that other inherited mitochondrial DNA variants, or somatic mDNA mutations, contribute

  17. Generation of Transgenic Monkeys with Human Inherited Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W.S; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2009-01-01

    Modeling human diseases using nonhuman primates including chimpanzee, rhesus, cynomolgus, marmoset and squirrel monkeys has been reported in the past decades. Due to the high similarity between nonhuman primates and humans, including genome constitution, cognitive behavioral functions, anatomical structure, metabolic, reproductive, and brain functions; nonhuman primates have played an important role in understanding physiological functions of the human body, clarifying the underlying mechanism of human diseases, and the development of novel treatments for human diseases. However, nonhuman primate research has been restricted to cognitive, behavioral, biochemical and pharmacological approaches of human diseases due to the limitation of gene transfer technology in nonhuman primates. The recent advancement in transgenic technology that has led to the generation of the first transgenic monkey in 2001 and a transgenic monkey model of Huntington's disease (HD) in 2008 has changed that focus. The creation of transgenic HD monkeys that replicate key pathological features of human HD patients further suggests the crucial role of nonhuman primates in the future development of biomedicine. These successes have opened the door to genetic manipulation in nonhuman primates and a new era in modeling human inherited genetic disorders. We focused on the procedures in creating transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys, but our work can be applied to transgenesis in other nonhuman primate species. PMID:19467335

  18. Gluten intolerance and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Philippe; Pelletier, Fabien; Dreno, Brigitte; Puzenat, Eve; Aubin, François

    2006-01-01

    Gluten sensitivity with or without coeliac disease (CD) symptoms and intestinal pathology has been suggested as a potentially treatable cause of various diseases. CD is a chronic disease which improves on withdrawal of wheat gliadins and barley, rye and oat prolamins from the diet. There have been numerous reports linking CD with several skin conditions. A body of evidence shows that dermatitis herpetiformis is actually a cutaneous manifestation of CD. Autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, psoriasis and miscellaneous diseases have also been described with gluten intolerance. Dermatologists should be familiar with the appraisal of gluten sensitive enteropathy and should be able to search for an underlying gluten intolerance (GI). Serological screening by means of antigliadin, antiendomysial and transglutaminase antibodies should be performed. HLA typing is often useful in association with serologic tests. Intestinal biopsy is usually needed to establish the diagnosis of CD or GI. Thus, gluten intolerance gives rise to a variety of dermatological manifestations which may benefit from a gluten-free diet.

  19. Diseases of the Earth's skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The German Government's Scientific Advisory Council on Global Climate Change recently diagnosed a score of ailments of the “Earth's skin,” according to the German Research Service. Like numerous viral and bacterial diseases, many of the earthidermal diseases are named for the regions where scientists first discovered them. For some symptoms, the German Council has also recommended therapeutic treatments, such as terracing of slopes near rivers. It remains to be seen whether universities worldwide will start cranking out specialists in Earth dermatology. But judging by the condition of many regions of the world, it appears this field may offer great growth potential for the Earth sciences, which is welcome news in the current tight job market.

  20. Genetics in Parkinson disease: Mendelian versus non-Mendelian inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Dena G; Reed, Xylena; Singleton, Andrew B

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common, progressive neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 3% of those older than 75 years of age. Clinically, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with resting tremor, postural instability, rigidity, bradykinesia, and a good response to levodopa therapy. Over the last 15 years, numerous studies have confirmed that genetic factors contribute to the complex pathogenesis of PD. Highly penetrant mutations producing rare, monogenic forms of the disease have been discovered in singular genes such as SNCA, Parkin, DJ-1, PINK 1, LRRK2, and VPS35. Unique variants with incomplete penetrance in LRRK2 and GBA have been shown to be strong risk factors for PD in certain populations. Additionally, over 20 common variants with small effect sizes are now recognized to modulate the risk for PD. Investigating Mendelian forms of PD has provided precious insight into the pathophysiology that underlies the more common idiopathic form of disease; however, no treatment methodologies have developed. Furthermore, for identified common risk alleles, the functional basis underlying risk principally remains unknown. The challenge over the next decade will be to strengthen the findings delivered through genetic discovery by assessing the direct, biological consequences of risk variants in tandem with additional high-content, integrated datasets. This review discusses monogenic risk factors and mechanisms of Mendelian inheritance of Parkinson disease. Highly penetrant mutations in SNCA, Parkin, DJ-1, PINK 1, LRRK2 and VPS35 produce rare, monogenic forms of the disease, while unique variants within LRRK2 and GBA show incomplete penetrance and are strong risk factors for PD. Additionally, over 20 common variants with small effect sizes modulate disease risk. The challenge over the next decade is to strengthen genetic findings by assessing direct, biological consequences of risk variants in tandem with high-content, integrated datasets. This article is part of a special

  1. Current and future therapies for inherited cholestatic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    van der Woerd, Wendy L; Houwen, Roderick HJ; van de Graaf, Stan FJ

    2017-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestasis (FIC) comprises a group of rare cholestatic liver diseases associated with canalicular transport defects resulting predominantly from mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4. Phenotypes range from benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), associated with recurrent cholestatic attacks, to progressive FIC (PFIC). Patients often suffer from severe pruritus and eventually progressive cholestasis results in liver failure. Currently, first-line treatment includes ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with ABCB4 deficiency (PFIC3) and partial biliary diversion in patients with ATP8B1 or ABCB11 deficiency (PFIC1 and PFIC2). When treatment fails, liver transplantation is needed which is associated with complications like rejection, post-transplant hepatic steatosis and recurrence of disease. Therefore, the need for more and better therapies for this group of chronic diseases remains. Here, we discuss new symptomatic treatment options like total biliary diversion, pharmacological diversion of bile acids and hepatocyte transplantation. Furthermore, we focus on emerging mutation-targeted therapeutic strategies, providing an outlook for future personalized treatment for inherited cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:28223721

  2. Morgellons Disease: Managing a Mysterious Skin Condition

    MedlinePlus

    Morgellons disease: Managing a mysterious skin condition Morgellons disease is mysterious and controversial. Here you'll find answers to common questions about Morgellons disease — and suggestions for coping with it. By ...

  3. Molecular findings from 537 individuals with inherited retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellingford, Jamie M; Barton, Stephanie; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; O'Sullivan, James; Williams, Simon G; Lamb, Janine A; Panda, Binay; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Gillespie, Rachel L; Daiger, Stephen P; Hall, Georgina; Gale, Theodora; Lloyd, I Christopher; Bishop, Paul N; Ramsden, Simon C; Black, Graeme C M

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous set of disorders, for which diagnostic second-generation sequencing (next-generation sequencing, NGS) services have been developed worldwide. Methods We present the molecular findings of 537 individuals referred to a 105-gene diagnostic NGS test for IRDs. We assess the diagnostic yield, the spectrum of clinical referrals, the variant analysis burden and the genetic heterogeneity of IRD. We retrospectively analyse disease-causing variants, including an assessment of variant frequency in Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). Results Individuals were referred from 10 clinically distinct classifications of IRD. Of the 4542 variants clinically analysed, we have reported 402 mutations as a cause or a potential cause of disease in 62 of the 105 genes surveyed. These variants account or likely account for the clinical diagnosis of IRD in 51% of the 537 referred individuals. 144 potentially disease-causing mutations were identified as novel at the time of clinical analysis, and we further demonstrate the segregation of known disease-causing variants among individuals with IRD. We show that clinically analysed variants indicated as rare in dbSNP and the Exome Variant Server remain rare in ExAC, and that genes discovered as a cause of IRD in the post-NGS era are rare causes of IRD in a population of clinically surveyed individuals. Conclusions Our findings illustrate the continued powerful utility of custom-gene panel diagnostic NGS tests for IRD in the clinic, but suggest clear future avenues for increasing diagnostic yields. PMID:27208204

  4. Skin protection in the prevention of skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases comprise a wide spectrum of conditions. Under epidemiological aspects, occupational contact dermatitis that is usually manifested on the hands is the most frequent occupational skin disease with an estimated average incidence rate of 0.7-1.5 cases per 1,000 workers per year. Irritant dermatitis is due to individual susceptibility and the exposure to irritants such as wet work combined with detergents or other hydrophilic irritants or solvents at the workplace. Chronic irritant dermatitis is a risk factor for delayed-type sensitization and subsequently allergic contact dermatitis. It is therefore the prevention of chronic or cumulative irritant dermatitis that is the decisive factor in the prevention of occupational skin disease. Within prevention programs at the workplace, skin protection plays an important, but limited role. Others are technical and organizational means to avoid or reduce skin exposure to irritants and allergens. Educational measures to increase the awareness of workers for workplace hazards and to motivate them to use skin protection measures appropriately are just as important as the careful selection of skin protection materials.

  5. Complex Inheritance of Melanoma and Pigmentation of Coat and Skin in Grey Horses

    PubMed Central

    Druml, Thomas; Seltenhammer, Monika; Sundström, Elisabeth; Pielberg, Gerli Rosengren; Andersson, Leif

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The dominant phenotype of greying with age in horses, caused by a 4.6-kb duplication in intron 6 of STX17, is associated with a high incidence of melanoma and vitiligo-like skin depigmentation. However, the progressive greying and the incidence of melanoma, vitiligo-like depigmentation, and amount of speckling in these horses do not follow a simple inheritance pattern. To understand their inheritance, we analysed the melanoma grade, grey level, vitiligo grade, and speckling grade of 1,119 Grey horses (7,146 measurements) measured in six countries over a 9-year period. We estimated narrow sense heritability (h2), and we decomposed this parameter into polygenic heritability (h2 POLY), heritability due to the Grey (STX17) mutation (h2 STX17), and heritability due to agouti (ASIP) locus (h2 ASIP). A high heritability was found for greying (h2 = 0.79), vitiligo (h2 = 0.63), and speckling (h2 = 0.66), while a moderate heritability was estimated for melanoma (h2 = 0.37). The additive component of ASIP was significantly different from zero only for melanoma (h2 ASIP = 0.02). STX17 controlled large proportions of phenotypic variance (h2 STX17 = 0.18–0.55) and overall heritability (h2 STX17/h2 = 0.28–0.83) for all traits. Genetic correlations among traits were estimated as moderate to high, primarily due to the effects of the STX17 locus. Nevertheless, the correlation between progressive greying and vitiligo-like depigmentation remained large even after taking into account the effects of STX17. We presented a model where four traits with complex inheritance patterns are strongly influenced by a single mutation. This is in line with evidence of recent studies in domestic animals indicating that some complex traits are, in addition to the large number of genes with small additive effects, influenced by genes of moderate-to-large effect. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the STX17 mutation explains to a large extent the moderate to high

  6. In silico Mapping of Protein Unfolding Mutations for Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of disease-causing missense mutations on protein folding is difficult to evaluate. To understand this relationship, we developed the unfolding mutation screen (UMS) for in silico evaluation of the severity of genetic perturbations at the atomic level of protein structure. The program takes into account the protein-unfolding curve and generates propensities using calculated free energy changes for every possible missense mutation at once. These results are presented in a series of unfolding heat maps and a colored protein 3D structure to show the residues critical to the protein folding and are available for quick reference. UMS was tested with 16 crystal structures to evaluate the unfolding for 1391 mutations from the ProTherm database. Our results showed that the computational accuracy of the unfolding calculations was similar to the accuracy of previously published free energy changes but provided a better scale. Our residue identity control helps to improve protein homology models. The unfolding predictions for proteins involved in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Leber’s congenital amaurosis matched well with data from previous studies. These results suggest that UMS could be a useful tool in the analysis of genotype-to-phenotype associations and next-generation sequencing data for inherited diseases. PMID:27905547

  7. Inheritance of Pigeonpea Sterility Mosaic Disease Resistance in Pigeonpea

    PubMed Central

    Daspute, Abhijit; Fakrudin, B.; Bhairappanavar, Shivarudrappa. B.; Kavil, S. P.; Narayana, Y. D.; Muniswamy; Kaumar, Anil; Krishnaraj, P. U.; Yerimani, Abid; Khadi, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted using PPSMV resistant (BSMR 736) and susceptible (ICP 8863) genotypes to develop a segregating population and understand the inheritance of PPSMV resistance. The observed segregation was comparable to 13 (susceptible): 3 (resistant). Hence, the inheritance was controlled by two genes, SV1 and SV2, with inhibitory gene interaction. PMID:25289002

  8. Plants used to treat skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nahida; Hamdani, Mariya

    2014-01-01

    Skin diseases are numerous and a frequently occurring health problem affecting all ages from the neonates to the elderly and cause harm in number of ways. Maintaining healthy skin is important for a healthy body. Many people may develop skin diseases that affect the skin, including cancer, herpes and cellulitis. Some wild plants and their parts are frequently used to treat these diseases. The use of plants is as old as the mankind. Natural treatment is cheap and claimed to be safe. It is also suitable raw material for production of new synthetic agents. A review of some plants for the treatment of skin diseases is provided that summarizes the recent technical advancements that have taken place in this area during the past 17 years. PMID:24600196

  9. Skin microbiome and skin disease: the example of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Picardo, Mauro; Ottaviani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance and/or the perturbation of the microbial populations that colonize the skin and that contribute to its defense may represent one of the causes of the development of noninfectious skin diseases. Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, and rosacea can be listed among these kinds of pathologies. In particular, considering that microbes have been long addressed as having a role in rosacea, this common dermatosis can be an interesting model to evaluate the correlation between microbiome alterations and the occurrence of clinical manifestations. Different microorganisms have been suggested to have a role in rosacea, but no direct correlation with the incidence of the pathology has been clearly defined. Skin microbiome composition is crucial for the correct skin immune functions and recent findings indicate an abnormal activation of innate immune system associated with the rosacea. The enhanced expression of toll-like receptor 2 in the epidermis of rosacea patients can represent a possible explanation for the amplified inflammatory response to external stimuli observed during the disease. In addition, significantly higher small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in rosacea subjects has been found and its eradication has been associated with a regression of the skin lesions. In conclusion, both skin and gut microbiome seem to have a role, even if synergistic with other factors, in the pathogenesis of rosacea. A deeper knowledge of human microbiome composition and microbe-host interactions will contribute to clarify the mechanism of development of rosacea and possibly will provide innovative therapeutic approaches.

  10. Crohn’s disease and skin

    PubMed Central

    Gravina, AG; Federico, A; Ruocco, E; Lo Schiavo, A; Romano, F; Miranda, A; Sgambato, D; Dallio, M; Ruocco, V; Loguercio, C

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease potentially involving any segment of the gastrointestinal tract. Extra-intestinal manifestations may occur in 6%–40% of patients, and disorders of the skin are among the most common. This manuscript will review skin manifestations associated to Crohn’s disease, with a particular focus on lesions associated to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. PMID:27087942

  11. Endocrine Dysfunctions in Patients with Inherited Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Erdöl, Şahin; Sağlam, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) can affect many organ systems, including the endocrine system. There are limited data regarding endocrine dysfunctions related to IMDs in adults, however, no data exist in pediatric patients with IMDs. The aim of this study was to investigate endocrine dysfunctions in patients with IMDs by assessing their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. Methods: Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical reports of patients with IMDs who were followed by the division of pediatric metabolism and nutrition between June 2011 and November 2013. Results: In total, 260 patients [139 males (53%) and 121 females (47%)] with an IMD diagnosis were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 5.94 (range; 0.08 to 49) years and 95.8% (249 of 260 patients) were in the pediatric age group. Growth status was evaluated in 258 patients and of them, 27 (10.5%) had growth failure, all cases of which were attributed to non-endocrine reasons. There was a significant correlation between growth failure and serum albumin levels below 3.5 g/dL (p=0.002). Only three of 260 (1.1%) patients had endocrine dysfunction. Of these, one with lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency and another with Kearns-Sayre syndrome had diabetes, and one with glycerol kinase deficiency had glucocorticoid deficiency. Conclusion: Endocrine dysfunction in patients with IMDs is relatively rare. For this reason, there is no need to conduct routine endocrine evaluations in most patients with IMDs unless a careful and detailed history and a physical examination point to an endocrine dysfunction. PMID:27086477

  12. Risk assessment of skin in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Firth, Jill

    Patients with a rheumatic disease are considered to be at high risk of developing skin problems because of their restricted mobility, vascular complications and the type of medication they are taking.

  13. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  14. Inherited Thrombophilia in Pediatric Venous Thromboembolic Disease: Why and Who to Test

    PubMed Central

    van Ommen, C. Heleen; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in childhood is a multifactorial disease. Risk factors include acquired clinical risk factors such as a central venous catheter and underlying disease and inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia is defined as a genetically determined tendency to develop venous thromboembolism. In contrast to adults, acquired clinical risk factors play a larger role than inherited thrombophilia in the development of thrombotic disease in children. The contributing role of inherited thrombophilia is not clear in many pediatric thrombotic events, especially catheter-related thrombosis. Furthermore, identification of inherited thrombophilia will not often influence acute management of the thrombotic event as well as the duration of anticoagulation. In some patients, however, detection of inherited thrombophilia may lead to identification of other family members who can be counseled for their thrombotic risk. This article discusses the potential arguments for testing of inherited thrombophilia, including factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin mutation, and deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, or protein S and suggests some patient groups in childhood, which may be tested. PMID:28352625

  15. Inherited Thrombophilia in Pediatric Venous Thromboembolic Disease: Why and Who to Test.

    PubMed

    van Ommen, C Heleen; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in childhood is a multifactorial disease. Risk factors include acquired clinical risk factors such as a central venous catheter and underlying disease and inherited thrombophilia. Inherited thrombophilia is defined as a genetically determined tendency to develop venous thromboembolism. In contrast to adults, acquired clinical risk factors play a larger role than inherited thrombophilia in the development of thrombotic disease in children. The contributing role of inherited thrombophilia is not clear in many pediatric thrombotic events, especially catheter-related thrombosis. Furthermore, identification of inherited thrombophilia will not often influence acute management of the thrombotic event as well as the duration of anticoagulation. In some patients, however, detection of inherited thrombophilia may lead to identification of other family members who can be counseled for their thrombotic risk. This article discusses the potential arguments for testing of inherited thrombophilia, including factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin mutation, and deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, or protein S and suggests some patient groups in childhood, which may be tested.

  16. Skin diseases in internationally adopted children.

    PubMed

    Rigal, Émilie; Nourrisson, Céline; Sciauvaud, Julie; Pascal, Julie; Texier, Charlotte; Corbin, Violaine; Poirier, Véronique; Beytout, Jean; Labbe, André; Lesens, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Internationally adopted children often present diseases contracted in the country of origin. Skin diseases are common in new arrivals, and diagnosis may prove challenging for GPs or even dermatologists if they are inexperienced in the extensive geographic and ethnic diversity of international adoptees. To analyse the frequency and characteristics of skin diseases in international adoptees. In total, 142 adoptees were evaluated for a cross-sectional cohort study. The most frequent diseases observed at arrival were dermatological conditions. Of the adoptees, 70% presented at least one skin disease, of which 57.5% were infectious; Tinea capitis being the most frequent (n = 42). The recovery rate of Tinea capitis was 89% (n = 32/36). Ten cases of scabies were diagnosed. Other diseases included viral skin infection (n = 22), with 16 cases of Molluscum contagiosum and bacterial infection. Skin diseases are very common in internationally adopted children. There is a need for close collaboration between dermatologists and paediatricians to diagnose such infections, as well as clear guidelines to treat them.

  17. [Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) : A genetic disease sheds light on UV-induced skin cancer].

    PubMed

    Emmert, B; Hallier, E; Schön, M P; Emmert, S

    2011-02-01

    The recessively inherited nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) serves as a model disease for UV-induced skin cancer. XP is characterized by sun-sensitivity, freckling, and poikilodermic skin changes in sun-exposed areas, and a more than 1000-fold increased risk of skin cancer including melanoma as well as basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Seven XP complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G) are known to date representing the defective genes in XP patients. An additional "variant" form (XPV) which is clinically indistinguishable from the complementation groups exhibits defective translesional synthesis. An enhanced understanding of skin cancer development in general can help to identify individuals at an increased risk who should take special precautions, for example to avoid occupational exposures. The position of skin cancer induced by UV-light as an occupational disease in the ordinance on industrial diseases (BKV) is currently a topic of research and discussion in Germany.

  18. A Novel and Likely Inherited Lymphoproliferative Disease in British Shorthair Kittens.

    PubMed

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Fairley, R A; Vernau, W; Thompson, K G

    2015-11-01

    An unusual lymphoproliferative disease was identified in multiple closely related British Shorthair (BSH) kittens, suggesting an inherited predisposition to disease. Affected kittens typically developed rapidly progressive and marked generalized lymphadenopathy, moderate splenomegaly, and regenerative and likely hemolytic anemia from 6 weeks of age. Microscopic findings were suggestive of multicentric T-cell lymphoma, but additional testing revealed a polyclonal population of CD3+/CD4-/CD8- "double negative" T cells (DNT cells). This is a novel disease presentation with similarities to the human disorder autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a rare inherited disease causing lymphoproliferation and variable manifestations of autoimmunity. The human disease is most commonly due to the presence of Fas gene mutations causing defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and further investigations of both the mode of inheritance and genetic basis for disease in affected cats are currently in progress.

  19. Laser treatment for skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima; Cepulis, Vytautas; Ponomarev, Igor V.

    1996-12-01

    The correct selection of patients is the most difficult part of the laser treatment. Since 1985 the total number of patients treated by us using different laser systems was 1544. High power lasers: Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers were used by us for surgical treatment. Low power lasers: Helium-Neon, Copper vapor, gold vapor and dye lasers were applied by us to PDT or to treatment of port wine hemangiomas. this paper reports our efforts in selecting the patients with different skin lesions for the treatment with different laser systems.

  20. Hydrocarbons (jet fuel JP-8) induce epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of obesity, reproductive disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Rebecca; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2013-04-01

    Environmental compounds have been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. The current study was designed to determine if a hydrocarbon mixture involving jet fuel (JP-8) promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed during the fetal gonadal development period. The direct exposure F1 generation had an increased incidence of kidney abnormalities in both females and males, prostate and pubertal abnormalities in males, and primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease in females. The first transgenerational generation is the F3 generation, and the jet fuel lineage had an increased incidence of primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease in females, and obesity in both females and males. Analysis of the jet fuel lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 33 differential DNA methylation regions, termed epimutations. Observations demonstrate hydrocarbons can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and sperm epimutations, potential biomarkers for ancestral exposures.

  1. Influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Drahansky, Martin; Dolezel, Michal; Urbanek, Jaroslav; Brezinova, Eva; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2012-01-01

    There are many people who suffer from some of the skin diseases. These diseases have a strong influence on the process of fingerprint recognition. People with fingerprint diseases are unable to use fingerprint scanners, which is discriminating for them, since they are not allowed to use their fingerprints for the authentication purposes. First in this paper the various diseases, which might influence functionality of the fingerprint-based systems, are introduced, mainly from the medical point of view. This overview is followed by some examples of diseased finger fingerprints, acquired both from dactyloscopic card and electronic sensors. At the end of this paper the proposed fingerprint image enhancement algorithm is described.

  2. Influence of Skin Diseases on Fingerprint Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Drahansky, Martin; Dolezel, Michal; Urbanek, Jaroslav; Brezinova, Eva; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2012-01-01

    There are many people who suffer from some of the skin diseases. These diseases have a strong influence on the process of fingerprint recognition. People with fingerprint diseases are unable to use fingerprint scanners, which is discriminating for them, since they are not allowed to use their fingerprints for the authentication purposes. First in this paper the various diseases, which might influence functionality of the fingerprint-based systems, are introduced, mainly from the medical point of view. This overview is followed by some examples of diseased finger fingerprints, acquired both from dactyloscopic card and electronic sensors. At the end of this paper the proposed fingerprint image enhancement algorithm is described. PMID:22654483

  3. Understanding of and attitudes to genetic testing for inherited retinal disease: a patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Willis, T A; Potrata, B; Ahmed, M; Hewison, J; Gale, R; Downey, L; McKibbin, M

    2013-01-01

    Background/aims The views of people with inherited retinal disease are important to help develop health policy and plan services. This study aimed to record levels of understanding of and attitudes to genetic testing for inherited retinal disease, and views on the availability of testing. Methods Telephone questionnaires comprising quantitative and qualitative items were completed with adults with inherited retinal disease. Participants were recruited via postal invitation (response rate 48%), approach at clinic or newsletters of relevant charitable organisations. Results Questionnaires were completed with 200 participants. Responses indicated that participants’ perceived understanding of genetic testing for inherited retinal disease was variable. The majority (90%) considered testing to be good/very good and would be likely to undergo genetic testing (90%) if offered. Most supported the provision of diagnostic (97%) and predictive (92%) testing, but support was less strong for testing as part of reproductive planning. Most (87%) agreed with the statement that testing should be offered only after the individual has received genetic counselling from a professional. Subgroup analyses revealed differences associated with participant age, gender, education level and ethnicity (p<0.02). Participants reported a range of perceived benefits (eg, family planning, access to treatment) and risks (eg, impact upon family relationships, emotional consequences). Conclusions Adults with inherited retinal disease strongly support the provision of publicly funded genetic testing. Support was stronger for diagnostic and predictive testing than for testing as part of reproductive planning. PMID:23813418

  4. Age at onset in Huntington's disease: effect of line of inheritance and patient's sex.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R A; Vegter-van der Vlis, M; Hermans, J; Elshove, H M; Moll, A C; van de Kamp, J J; Bruyn, G W

    1991-01-01

    The Leiden Roster for Huntington's disease (HD) contained data on 2617 cases up to July 1988. The age at onset (AO) was known in 1084 cases and in 1020 of these both their AO and the sex of the affected parent was known. The mean AO was higher for females than for males and higher for maternal than for paternal cases. However, in the group born before 1925 only females with maternal inheritance had a higher mean AO. Data on influence of sex and line of inheritance were present for the grandparents as well as for the great grandparents. Influence of the line of inheritance from the grandparents was particularly present for the grandmother-father (MP) lineage; regarding the great grandparents a significant difference was found between the MPM and PMP lineage. The results obtained for juvenile HD cases were comparable to those previously published. In late onset cases (over 50 years) no maternal preponderance in inheritance was found. PMID:1833547

  5. Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brian L.; Chandra, Stephanie; Shih, David Quan

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease that affects the intestinal tract via an inflammatory process. Patients who suffer from IBD often have diseases that affect multiple other organ systems as well. These are called extraintestinal manifestations and can be just as, if not more debilitating than the intestinal inflammation itself. The skin is one of the most commonly affected organ systems in patients who suffer from IBD. The scientific literature suggests that a disturbance of the equilibrium between host defense and tolerance, and the subsequent over-activity of certain immune pathways are responsible for the cutaneous disorders seen so frequently in IBD patients. The purpose of this review article is to give an overview of the types of skin diseases that are typically seen with IBD and their respective pathogenesis, proposed mechanisms, and treatments. These cutaneous disorders can manifest as metastatic lesions, reactive processes to the intestinal inflammation, complications of IBD itself, or side effects from IBD treatments; these can be associated with IBD via genetic linkage, common autoimmune processes, or other mechanisms that will be discussed in this article. Ultimately, it is important for healthcare providers to understand that skin manifestations should always be checked and evaluated for in patients with IBD. Furthermore, skin disorders can predate gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may serve as important clinical indicators leading physicians to earlier diagnosis of IBD. PMID:22347192

  6. Managing Amphibian Disease with Skin Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bletz, Molly; Kueneman, Jordan; McKenzie, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The contribution of emerging amphibian diseases to the sixth mass extinction is driving innovative wildlife management strategies, including the use of probiotics. Bioaugmentation of the skin mucosome, a dynamic environment including host and microbial components, may not provide a generalized solution. Multi-omics technologies and ecological context underlie effective implementation.

  7. Managing Amphibian Disease with Skin Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bletz, Molly; Kueneman, Jordan; McKenzie, Valerie

    2016-01-16

    The contribution of emerging amphibian diseases to the sixth mass extinction is driving innovative wildlife management strategies, including the use of probiotics. Bioaugmentation of the skin mucosome, a dynamic environment including host and microbial components, may not provide a generalized solution. Multi-omics technologies and ecological context underlie effective implementation.

  8. DANDRUFF: THE MOST COMMERCIALLY EXPLOITED SKIN DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; Mukhopadhyay, T

    2010-01-01

    The article discuss in detail about the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of dandruff including the etio-pathology. The article also discusses in detail about various treatment methods available for dandruff. The status of dandruff being amphibious – a disease/disorder, and relatively less medical intervention is sought after for the treatment, dandruff is the most commercially exploited skin and scalp disorder/disease by personal care industries. PMID:20606879

  9. Tropical skin diseases in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Skin complaints are common in travellers to foreign countries and are responsible for up to 25% of medical consultations by military personnel during deployments in the tropics. They also have relatively high rates of field hospital admission, medical evacuation and referral to UK Role 4 healthcare facilities. Non-infectious tropical skin diseases include sunburn, heat rash, arthropod bites, venomous bites, contact dermatitis and phytophotodermatitis. During tropical deployments skin infections that commonly occur in military personnel may become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat. Several systemic tropical infections have cutaneous features that can be useful in making early diagnoses. Tropical skin infections such as cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous myiasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy do occur in British troops and require specialist clinical management. This illustrated review focuses on the most significant tropical skin diseases that have occurred in British military personnel in recent years. Clinical management of these conditions on deployments would be improved and medical evacuations could be reduced if a military dermatology 'reach-back' service (including a telemedicine facility) was available.

  10. Guiametabolica.org: empowerment through internet tools in inherited metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Web-based interventions are effective on the patient empowerment. Guiametabolica.org constitutes an interface for people involved in inherited metabolic diseases, trying to facilitate access to information and contact with professionals and other patients, offering a platform to develop support groups. Guiametabolica.org is widely considered for Spanish-speaking patients and caregivers with inherited metabolic diseases. Preliminary evaluations show changes in their habits, decrease in their senses of isolation and improvement regarding self-efficacy. Specific inherited metabolic diseases websites, especially participative websites, should be considered as a complement to more traditional clinical approaches. Their contribution lies in patient’s general well-being, without interfering with traditional care. PMID:22909005

  11. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  12. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  13. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  14. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  15. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  16. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  17. Dioxin (TCDD) induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

  18. Immunology and Skin in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Jillian M.; Harris, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ that, in addition to providing a strong barrier against external insults, serves as an arena for a wide variety of inflammatory processes, including immunity against infections, tumor immunity, autoimmunity, and allergy. A variety of cells collaborate to mount functional immune responses, which are initiated by resident populations and evolve through the recruitment of additional cell populations to the skin. Inflammatory responses are quite diverse, resulting in a wide range of signs and symptoms that depend on the initiating signals, characteristics of the infiltrating cell populations, and cytokines that are produced (cytokines are secreted protein that allows for cell–cell communication; usually refers to communication between immune–immune cells or stromal–immune cells). In this work, we will review the skin architecture and resident and recruited cell populations and discuss how these populations contribute to inflammation using human diseases and treatments when possible to illustrate their importance within a clinical context. PMID:25452424

  19. Highly consistent patterns for inherited human diseases at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    López-Bigas, Núria; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2006-02-01

    Over 1600 mammalian genes are known to cause an inherited disorder, when subjected to one or more mutations. These disease genes represent a unique resource for the identification and quantification of relationships between phenotypic attributes of a disease and the molecular features of the associated disease genes, including their ascribed annotated functional classes and expression patterns. Such analyses can provide a more global perspective and a deeper understanding of the probable causes underlying human hereditary diseases. In this perspective and critical view of disease genomics, we present a comparative analysis of genes reported to cause inherited diseases in humans in terms of their causative effects on physiology, their genetics and inheritance modes, the functional processes they are involved in and their expression profiles across a wide spectrum of tissues. Our analysis reveals that there are more extensive correlations between these attributes of genetic disease genes than previously appreciated. For instance, the functional pattern of genes causing dominant and recessive diseases is markedly different. Also, the function of the genes and their expression correlate with the type of disease they cause when mutated. The results further indicate that a comparative genomics approach for the analysis of genes linked to human genetic diseases will facilitate the elucidation of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms.

  20. Flood-related skin diseases: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Tempark, Therdpong; Lueangarun, Saoraya; Chatproedprai, Susheera; Wananukul, Siriwan

    2013-10-01

    Flood is one of the most common natural disasters, which commonly occurs in all parts of the world. The effects of the disasters considerably become enormous problems to overall public health systems. Flood-related skin diseases are a portion of these consequences presenting with cutaneous manifestations and/or signs of systemic illnesses. We conducted a systematic literature review of research publications relating to flooding and skin diseases. The purpose of this review was to provide dermatologists as well as general practitioners with comprehensive conditions of flood-related skin diseases and suggested treatments. Moreover, we categorized these flood-related diseases into four groups comprising inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, traumatic skin diseases, and other miscellaneous skin diseases in a bid to implement early interventions and educate, prevent, and efficaciously handle those skin diseases under such a catastrophic situation so that better treatment outcomes and prevention of further complications could be ultimately achieved and accomplished.

  1. The New Human Genetics. How Gene Splicing Helps Researchers Fight Inherited Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Maya

    The science of genetics is perceived to offer hope that a large number of the 3,000 inherited diseases which afflict human beings may be prevented or controlled. This document addresses some of the advances that have been made in this field. It includes an introduction and sections on: "The Beginning of Human Genetics"; "Unlocking the Secrets of…

  2. Human skin pigmentation, migration and disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Nina G.; Chaplin, George

    2012-01-01

    Human skin pigmentation evolved as a compromise between the conflicting physiological demands of protection against the deleterious effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and photosynthesis of UVB-dependent vitamin D3. Living under high UVR near the equator, ancestral Homo sapiens had skin rich in protective eumelanin. Dispersals outside of the tropics were associated with positive selection for depigmentation to maximize cutaneous biosynthesis of pre-vitamin D3 under low and highly seasonal UVB conditions. In recent centuries, migrations and high-speed transportation have brought many people into UVR regimes different from those experienced by their ancestors and, accordingly, exposed them to new disease risks. These have been increased by urbanization and changes in diet and lifestyle. Three examples—nutritional rickets, multiple sclerosis (MS) and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM)—are chosen to illustrate the serious health effects of mismatches between skin pigmentation and UVR. The aetiology of MS in particular provides insight into complex and contingent interactions of genetic and environmental factors necessary to trigger lethal disease states. Low UVB levels and vitamin D deficiencies produced by changes in location and lifestyle pose some of the most serious disease risks of the twenty-first century. PMID:22312045

  3. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M

    2014-09-15

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement.

  4. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement. PMID:24647603

  5. Genetics in Parkinson disease: Mendelian vs. non-Mendelian inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Dena G.; Reed, Xylena; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a common, progressive neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 3% of those older than 75 years of age. Clinically PD is associated with resting tremor, postural instability, rigidity, bradykinesia and a good response to levodopa therapy. Over the last fifteen years, numerous studies have confirmed that genetic factors contribute to the complex pathogenesis of PD. Highly penetrant mutations producing rare, monogenic forms of the disease have been discovered in singular genes such as SNCA, Parkin, DJ-1, PINK 1, LRRK2 and VPS35. Unique variants with incomplete penetrance in LRRK2 and GBA have been shown to be strong risk factors for PD in certain populations. Additionally, over 20 common variants with small effect sizes are now recognized to modulate the risk for PD. Investigating Mendelian forms of PD has provided precious insight into the pathophysiology that underlies the more common idiopathic form of disease; however, no treatment methodologies have developed. Furthermore, for identified common risk alleles, the functional basis underlying risk principally remains unknown. The challenge over the next decade will be to strengthen the findings delivered through genetic discovery by assessing the direct, biological consequences of risk variants in tandem with additional high-content, integrated datasets. PMID:27090875

  6. Skin function and skin disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Gemende, I; Marsch, W C; Fischer, P A

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous symptoms (seborrhoea and hyperhidrosis) in Parkinson's disease were investigated. In 70 treated patients with Parkinson's disease and 22 control subjects, non-invasive bioengineering methods (sebumetry, corneometry, pH) were carried out on the forehead, sternum and forearm. In addition, concomitant dermatoses and medication were recorded. 18.6% of the patients had seborrhoea on the forehead (>220 microg/cm2), 51.4% showed normal sebum values (100-220 microg/cm2) and 30% a sebostasis (<100 microg/cm2). Males has significantly higher sebum values than females. No relationship between the seborrhoea and the therapy for Morbus Parkinson was found. Patients with hyperhidrosis (n = 36) had significantly lower pH values (p < 0.05) on the forehead than those without hyperhidrosis. 22 patients (31.9%) reported a cold/hot flush and a further 13 (18.8%) had clinical rosacea. Seborrhoea is rare in treated Parkinsonian patients but hyperhidrosis is frequently found. Furthermore, a particular lack of vasostability (flush) appears to be an autonomic dysregulation in the skin related to Morbus Parkinson, which has not been studied to any extent to date.

  7. Oedematous skin disease of buffalo in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Selim, S A

    2001-05-01

    This review covers a historical view and etiology of oedematous skin disease which affects buffalo in Egypt, the microbiology of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causing the disease: its virulence; clinical signs; mechanism of pathogenesis; histopathology; mode of transmission; immunological aspects; treatment and control. It is concluded that C. pseudotuberculosis serotype II is the main cause of OSD and exotoxin phospholipase D and its lipid contents of the cell wall are the major causes of pathogenesis. After declaring the role of Hippobosca equina in transmission of the causative agent among buffaloes, control of OSD is now available.

  8. Infections and skin diseases mimicking diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Van Gysel, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Diaper dermatitis is a common condition that often prompts parents to seek medical attention. Irritant diaper dermatitis is by far the most common cause, but numerous potentially serious diseases can present with changes of the skin in the diaper area. The differential diagnosis can include psoriasis, metabolic disorders, rare immune diseases and infection. Clinical examination can be helpful in distinguishing the underlying cause. General screening laboratory tests, as well as select testing when a specific condition is suspected, can be used to challenge or confirm the putative diagnosis.

  9. IgG4-related skin disease.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Yagi, H; Yanaguchi, H; Majima, Y; Kasuya, A; Ito, T; Maekawa, M; Hashizume, H

    2014-11-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently established clinical entity characterized by high levels of circulating IgG4, and tissue infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells. IgG4-RD exhibits a distinctive fibroinflammatory change involving multiple organs, such as the pancreas and salivary and lacrimal glands. The skin lesions of IgG4-RD have been poorly characterized and may stem not only from direct infiltration of plasma cells but also from IgG4-mediated inflammation. Based on the documented cases together with ours, we categorized the skin lesions into seven subtypes: (1) cutaneous plasmacytosis (multiple papulonodules or indurations on the trunk and proximal part of the limbs), (2) pseudolymphoma and angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (plaques and papulonodules mainly on the periauricular, cheek and mandible regions), (3) Mikulicz disease (palpebral swelling, sicca syndrome and exophthalmos), (4) psoriasis-like eruption (strikingly mimicking psoriasis vulgaris), (5) unspecified maculopapular or erythematous eruptions, (6) hypergammaglobulinaemic purpura (bilateral asymmetrical palpable purpuric lesions on the lower extremities) and urticarial vasculitis (prolonged urticarial lesions occasionally with purpura) and (7) ischaemic digit (Raynaud phenomenon and digital gangrene). It is considered that subtypes 1-3 are induced by direct infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells, while the other types (4-7) are caused by secondary mechanisms. IgG4-related skin disease is defined as IgG4(+) plasma-cell-infiltrating skin lesions that form plaques, nodules or tumours (types 1-3), but may manifest secondary lesions caused by IgG4(+) plasma cells and/or IgG4 (types 4-7).

  10. Data Mining and Pattern Recognition Models for Identifying Inherited Diseases: Challenges and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Iddamalgoda, Lahiru; Das, Partha S.; Aponso, Achala; Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava S.; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Valadi, Jayaraman K.

    2016-01-01

    Data mining and pattern recognition methods reveal interesting findings in genetic studies, especially on how the genetic makeup is associated with inherited diseases. Although researchers have proposed various data mining models for biomedical approaches, there remains a challenge in accurately prioritizing the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with the disease. In this commentary, we review the state-of-art data mining and pattern recognition models for identifying inherited diseases and deliberate the need of binary classification- and scoring-based prioritization methods in determining causal variants. While we discuss the pros and cons associated with these methods known, we argue that the gene prioritization methods and the protein interaction (PPI) methods in conjunction with the K nearest neighbors' could be used in accurately categorizing the genetic factors in disease causation. PMID:27559342

  11. Dioxin induction of transgenerational inheritance of disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tracie R; King-Heiden, Tisha C; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2014-12-01

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD) is an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist, an endocrine disruptor, and a potent global pollutant. TCDD exposure is associated with diseases of almost every organ system, and its toxicity is highly conserved across vertebrates. While the acute developmental effects of dioxin exposure have been extensively studied, the ability of early sublethal exposure to produce toxicity in adulthood or subsequent generations is poorly understood. This type of question is difficult to study because of the time frame of the effects. With human subjects, such a study could span more than a lifetime. We have chosen zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model because they are vertebrates with short generation times and consistent genetic backgrounds. Zebrafish have very modest housing needs, facilitating single and multigenerational studies with minimal time and expense. We have used this model to identify transgenerational effects of TCDD on skeletal development, sex ratio, and male-mediated decreases in reproductive capacity. Here we compare these findings with transgenerational effects described in laboratory rodent species. We propose that the zebrafish is a cost-effective model system for evaluating the transgenerational effects of toxic chemicals and their role in the fetal basis of adult disease.

  12. Histone methylation: a dynamic mark in health, disease and inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric L.; Shi, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Organisms require an appropriate balance of stability and reversibility in gene expression programs, to maintain cell identity or to enable responses to stimuli; epigenetic regulation is integral to this dynamic control. Post-translational modification of histones by methylation is an important and widespread type of chromatin modification that is known to influence biological processes in the context of development and cellular responses. We provide a broad overview of how histone methylation is regulated and leads to biological outcomes, to evaluate how histone methylation contributes to stable or reversible control. The importance of maintaining or reprogramming histone methylation appropriately is illustrated by links to disease and aging, or possibly transmission of traits across generations. PMID:22473383

  13. Recent advances in the molecular analysis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S

    1990-12-12

    Many important human genes have been cloned during the last ten years. In some cases, using reverse genetic techniques [Orkin, S. H. (1986) Cell 47, 845-850], disease-causing genes have been isolated whose product was previously unknown. Important examples include the dystrophin protein which, when mutated, gives rise to either Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy [Koenig, M., Hoffman, E. P., Bertelson, C. J., Monaco, A. P., Feener, C. and Kunkel, L. M. (1987) Cell 50, 509-517; Monaco, A. P., Bertelson, C. J., Liechti-Gallati, S. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Genomics 2, 90-95; Koenig, M., Monaco, A. P. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Cell 53, 219-228] and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) [Riordan, J. R., Rommens, J. M., Kerem, B.-S., Alon, N., Rozmahel, R., Grzelczak, Z., Zielenski, J., Lok, S., Plavsic, N., Chou, J.-L., Drumm, M. L., Ianuzzi, M. C., Collins, F. S. & Tsui, L.-C. (1989) Science 245, 1066-1073]. Recently the technology for systematically detecting single base-pair changes by chemical methods, enzymatic methods or direct DNA sequencing has greatly expanded and simplified. In addition to providing structural information about these clinically important genes and information on disease-causing mutations, these studies have led to an increased understanding of mechanisms of mutation, to the discovery of novel genetic mechanisms and to important clinical applications of carrier detection and pre-natal diagnosis. The recent rapid progress has been made possible by the development of DNA amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (pcr) invented by Saiki and colleagues [Saiki, R. K., Chang, C-A., Levenson, C. H., Warren, T. C., Boehm, C. D., Kazazian, H. H. & Ehrlich, H. A. (1988) N. Engl. J. Med. 319, 537-541].

  14. Medicinal plants used in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ providing contact with the environment and protecting the human body from unfavourable external factors. Skin inflammation, reflected adversely in its functioning and appearance, also unfavourably affects the psyche, the condition of which is important during treatment of chronic skin diseases. The use of plants in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases results from their influence on different stages of inflammation. The paper presents results of the study regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of the plant raw material related to its influence on skin. The mechanism of action, therapeutic indications and side effects of medicinal plants used for treatment of inflammatory diseases of the skin are described. PMID:24278070

  15. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease.

  16. Mutation databases for inherited renal disease: are they complete, accurate, clinically relevant, and freely available?

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dagher, Hayat; Povey, Sue

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether gene-specific DNA variant databases for inherited diseases of the kidney fulfilled the Human Variome Project recommendations of being complete, accurate, clinically relevant and freely available. A recent review identified 60 inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in 132 genes. The disease name, MIM number, gene name, together with "mutation" or "database," were used to identify web-based databases. Fifty-nine diseases (98%) due to mutations in 128 genes had a variant database. Altogether there were 349 databases (a median of 3 per gene, range 0-6), but no gene had two databases with the same number of variants, and 165 (50%) databases included fewer than 10 variants. About half the databases (180, 54%) had been updated in the previous year. Few (77, 23%) were curated by "experts" but these included nine of the 11 with the most variants. Even fewer databases (41, 12%) included clinical features apart from the name of the associated disease. Most (223, 67%) could be accessed without charge, including those for 50 genes (40%) with the maximum number of variants. Future efforts should focus on encouraging experts to collaborate on a single database for each gene affected in inherited renal disease, including both unpublished variants, and clinical phenotypes.

  17. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  18. Plan of Action for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases: Synthesis of Recommendations and Action Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan Ramón; Zorio-Grima, Esther; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Evangelista-Masip, Artur; Moya-Mitjans, Angel; Serratosa-Fernández, Luis; Albert-Brotons, Dimpna C; García-Pinilla, José Manuel; García-Pavía, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    The term inherited cardiovascular disease encompasses a group of cardiovascular diseases (cardiomyopathies, channelopathies, certain aortic diseases, and other syndromes) with a number of common characteristics: they have a genetic basis, a familial presentation, a heterogeneous clinical course, and, finally, can all be associated with sudden cardiac death. The present document summarizes some important concepts related to recent advances in sequencing techniques and understanding of the genetic bases of these diseases. We propose diagnostic algorithms and clinical practice recommendations and discuss controversial aspects of current clinical interest. We highlight the role of multidisciplinary referral units in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  19. Pesticide methoxychlor promotes the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease through the female germline.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  20. Phototherapy and photochemotherapy of skin diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    One important aspect of photomedicine is the use of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation with and without exogenous photosensitizers to treat diseases. Phototoxicity (cell injury by photons) is a likely mechanism for phototherapy and photochemotherapy of several skin diseases. The mechanism of action for phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia and of uremic pruritus appears to be photochemical alteration of extracellular metabolites. Psoriasis is an example of a disease benefitted by several forms of phototherapy and photochemotherapy with varying relative effectiveness and safety. Two successful forms of treatment are oral psoralen photochemotherapy and UVB plus topical adjunctive agents. New information about UVB therapy of psoriasis includes data about the therapeutic action spectrum and about the relative roles of various topical agents such as coal tar, mineral oil, ''lubricants'' and steroids. Although there are many surface similarities, phototherapy and psoralen photochemotherapy have fundamental differences which may alter longterm risks in quantitative and qualitative ways.

  1. The clinical spectrum of inherited diseases involved in the synthesis and remodeling of complex lipids. A tentative overview.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Mochel, Fanny; Lamari, Foudil; Saudubray, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Over one hundred diseases related to inherited defects of complex lipids synthesis and remodeling are now reported. Most of them were described within the last 5 years. New descriptions and phenotypes are expanding rapidly. While the associated clinical phenotype is currently difficult to outline, with only a few patients identified, it appears that all organs and systems may be affected. The main clinical presentations can be divided into (1) Diseases affecting the central and peripheral nervous system. Complex lipid synthesis disorders produce prominent motor manifestations due to upper and/or lower motoneuron degeneration. Motor signs are often complex, associated with other neurological and extra-neurological signs. Three neurological phenotypes, spastic paraparesis, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and peripheral neuropathies, deserve special attention. Many apparently well clinically defined syndromes are not distinct entities, but rather clusters on a continuous spectrum, like for the PNPLA6-associated diseases, extending from Boucher-Neuhauser syndrome via Gordon Holmes syndrome to spastic ataxia and pure hereditary spastic paraplegia; (2) Muscular/cardiac presentations; (3) Skin symptoms mostly represented by syndromic (neurocutaneous) and non syndromic ichthyosis; (4) Retinal dystrophies with syndromic and non syndromic retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, cone rod dystrophy, Stargardt disease; (5) Congenital bone dysplasia and segmental overgrowth disorders with congenital lipomatosis; (6) Liver presentations characterized mainly by transient neonatal cholestatic jaundice and non alcoholic liver steatosis with hypertriglyceridemia; and (7) Renal and immune presentations. Lipidomics and molecular functional studies could help to elucidate the mechanism(s) of dominant versus recessive inheritance observed for the same gene in a growing number of these disorders.

  2. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person.

  3. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus vectors are attractive for clinical use because (1) adeno-associated viruses do not cause human disease and (2) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of gene therapy with adeno-associated virus for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders are presented, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and x-linked myotubular myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed.

  4. Identifying strains that contribute to complex diseases through the study of microbial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Faith, Jeremiah J; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-20

    It has been 35 y since Carl Woese reported in PNAS how sequencing ribosomal RNA genes could be used to distinguish the three domains of life on Earth. During the past decade, 16S rDNA sequencing has enabled the now frequent enumeration of bacterial communities that populate the bodies of humans representing different ages, cultural traditions, and health states. A challenge going forward is to quantify the contributions of community members to wellness, disease risk, and disease pathogenesis. Here, we explore a theoretical framework for studies of the inheritance of bacterial strains and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various study designs for assessing the contribution of strains to complex diseases.

  5. "COV'COP" allows to detect CNVs responsible for inherited diseases among amplicons sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Derouault, P; Parfait, B; Moulinas, R; Barrot, C-C; Sturtz, F; Merillou, S; Lia, A-S

    2017-01-30

    In order to help molecular geneticists to rapidly identify CNVs responsible for inherited diseases among amplicons sequencing data generated by NGS, we designed a user-friendly tool "Cov'Cop". Using the run's coverage file provided by the sequencer, Cov'Cop simultaneously analyzes all the patients of the run using a two-stage algorithm containing correction and normalization levels and provides an easily understandable output, showing with various colors, potentially deleted and duplicated amplicons.

  6. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease.

  7. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  8. Genetic testing for inherited heart diseases: longitudinal impact on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Yeates, Laura; O'Brien, Lisa; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-05-03

    Purpose:A genetic diagnosis is an extremely useful tool in the management and care of families with inherited heart diseases, particularly in allowing clarification of risk status of asymptomatic family members. The psychosocial consequences of genetic testing in this group are poorly understood. This longitudinal pilot study sought to determine changes in health-related quality of life in patients and asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.Methods:Individuals attending two specialized multidisciplinary cardiac genetic clinics in Australia were invited to participate. Patients undergoing proband or predictive genetic testing for an inherited cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmogenic disorder were eligible. The Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (version 2) was administered before the genetic result was given, and follow-up surveys were completed 1-3, 6, and 12 months after the result was given.Results:A total of 54 individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, familial dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and long QT syndrome completed baseline and at least one follow-up survey, including 33 probands and 21 asymptomatic relatives. Physical and mental component scores analyzed at baseline and 1-3 months were found to be unchanged in all groups. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed up to 12 months after result.Conclusion:In this longitudinal pilot study, no change in health-related quality of life was observed up to 12 months after the result was given in patients and their asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for an inherited heart disease.Genet Med 2012 advance online publication 3 May 2012.

  9. Update of the G2D tool for prioritization of gene candidates to inherited diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Bork, Peer; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2007-01-01

    G2D (genes to diseases) is a web resource for prioritizing genes as candidates for inherited diseases. It uses three algorithms based on different prioritization strategies. The input to the server is the genomic region where the user is looking for the disease-causing mutation, plus an additional piece of information depending on the algorithm used. This information can either be the disease phenotype (described as an online Mendelian inheritance in man (OMIM) identifier), one or several genes known or suspected to be associated with the disease (defined by their Entrez Gene identifiers), or a second genomic region that has been linked as well to the disease. In the latter case, the tool uses known or predicted interactions between genes in the two regions extracted from the STRING database. The output in every case is an ordered list of candidate genes in the region of interest. For the first two of the three methods, the candidate genes are first retrieved through sequence homology search, then scored accordingly to the corresponding method. This means that some of them will correspond to well-known characterized genes, and others will overlap with predicted genes, thus providing a wider analysis. G2D is publicly available at http://www.ogic.ca/projects/g2d_2/ PMID:17478516

  10. Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    cytokines, DNA, RNA , skin biopsy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...scans. In the first year we have focused on patient recruitment, clinical characterization, specimen collection (DNA, RNA , skin biopsies, serum...Genes versus Environment in Scleroderma Outcome Study), Interstitial Lung Disease, cytokines, DNA, RNA , skin biopsy 3. Overall Project Summary

  11. Dupuytren Disease Infiltrating a Full-Thickness Skin Graft.

    PubMed

    Wade, Ryckie George; Igali, Laszlo; Figus, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of the skin in the development and propagation of Dupuytren disease remains unclear, dermofasciectomy and full-thickness skin grafting (FTSG) appears to delay recurrence. In 2011, a 71-year-old, left-handed man presented with recurrent Dupuytren disease in the dominant hand. In 1991, he originally underwent a primary dermofasciectomy and FTSG for Dupuytren disease involving the palmar skin. Twenty years later, the left middle finger was drawn into flexion by a recurrent cord, and the old graft and adjacent palmar skin were clinically involved by fibromatosis. We performed a revision dermofasciectomy and FTSG. Microscopic analysis of the excised graft demonstrated dense infiltration of the entire skin graft by Dupuytren disease, with areas of active and burnt-out fibromatosis distinct from hypertrophic scarring. This report of Dupuytren fibromatosis infiltrating a skin graft raises questions about the pathophysiology of Dupuytren disease.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M.; Basler, Rodney S. W.; Foley, Jack; Scarlata, Chris; Vasily, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, education, and management of skin infections in athletes. Background: Trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents act together to continually attack the integrity of the skin. Close quarters combined with general poor hygiene practices make athletes particularly vulnerable to contracting skin diseases. An understanding of basic prophylactic measures, clinical features, and swift management of common skin diseases is essential for certified athletic trainers to aid in preventing the spread of infectious agents. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on skin infections and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:20617918

  13. Pesticide and insect repellent mixture (permethrin and DEET) induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    Environmental compounds are known to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. The current study was designed to determine if a "pesticide mixture" (pesticide permethrin and insect repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide, DEET) promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and associated DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were exposed during fetal gonadal sex determination and the incidence of disease evaluated in F1 and F3 generations. There were significant increases in the incidence of total diseases in animals from pesticide lineage F1 and F3 generation animals. Pubertal abnormalities, testis disease, and ovarian disease (primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease) were increased in F3 generation animals. Analysis of the pesticide lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 363 differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) termed epimutations. Observations demonstrate that a pesticide mixture (permethrin and DEET) can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and potential sperm epigenetic biomarkers for ancestral environmental exposures.

  14. GJB2 Gene Mutations in Syndromic Skin Diseases with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Iossa, Sandra; Marciano, Elio; Franzé, Annamaria

    2011-11-01

    The GJB2 gene is located on chromosome 13q12 and it encodes the connexin 26, a transmembrane protein involved in cell-cell attachment of almost all tissues. GJB2 mutations cause autosomal recessive (DFNB1) and sometimes dominant (DFNA3) non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that connexins are involved in regulation of growth and differentiation of epidermis and, in fact, GJB2 mutations have also been identified in syndromic disorders with hearing loss associated with various skin disease phenotypes. GJB2 mutations associated with skin disease are, in general, transmitted with a dominant inheritance pattern. Nonsyndromic deafness is caused prevalently by a loss-of-function, while literature evidences suggest for syndromic deafness a mechanism based on gain-of-function. The spectrum of skin manifestations associated with some mutations seems to have a very high phenotypic variability. Why some mutations can lead to widely varying cutaneous manifestations is poorly understood and in particular, the reason why the skin disease-deafness phenotypes differ from each other thus remains unclear. This review provides an overview of recent findings concerning pathogenesis of syndromic deafness imputable to GJB2 mutations with an emphasis on relevant clinical genotype-phenotype correlations. After describing connexin 26 fundamental characteristics, the most relevant and recent information about its known mutations involved in the syndromic forms causing hearing loss and skin problems are summarized. The possible effects of the mutations on channel expression and function are discussed.

  15. GJB2 Gene Mutations in Syndromic Skin Diseases with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed Central

    Iossa, Sandra; Marciano, Elio; Franzé, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    The GJB2 gene is located on chromosome 13q12 and it encodes the connexin 26, a transmembrane protein involved in cell-cell attachment of almost all tissues. GJB2 mutations cause autosomal recessive (DFNB1) and sometimes dominant (DFNA3) non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that connexins are involved in regulation of growth and differentiation of epidermis and, in fact, GJB2 mutations have also been identified in syndromic disorders with hearing loss associated with various skin disease phenotypes. GJB2 mutations associated with skin disease are, in general, transmitted with a dominant inheritance pattern. Nonsyndromic deafness is caused prevalently by a loss-of-function, while literature evidences suggest for syndromic deafness a mechanism based on gain-of-function. The spectrum of skin manifestations associated with some mutations seems to have a very high phenotypic variability. Why some mutations can lead to widely varying cutaneous manifestations is poorly understood and in particular, the reason why the skin disease-deafness phenotypes differ from each other thus remains unclear. This review provides an overview of recent findings concerning pathogenesis of syndromic deafness imputable to GJB2 mutations with an emphasis on relevant clinical genotype-phenotype correlations. After describing connexin 26 fundamental characteristics, the most relevant and recent information about its known mutations involved in the syndromic forms causing hearing loss and skin problems are summarized. The possible effects of the mutations on channel expression and function are discussed. PMID:22547955

  16. The skin microbiome: Associations between altered microbial communities and disease.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, Laura S; Dixit, Shreya; Farrer, Andrew G; Cooper, Alan J; Cooper, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    A single square centimetre of the human skin can contain up to one billion microorganisms. These diverse communities of bacteria, fungi, mites and viruses can provide protection against disease, but can also exacerbate skin lesions, promote disease and delay wound healing. This review addresses the current knowledge surrounding the healthy skin microbiome and examines how different alterations to the skin microbial communities can contribute to disease. Current methodologies are considered, changes in microbial diversity and colonisation by specific microorganisms are discussed in the context of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne vulgaris and chronic wounds. The recent impact of modern Westernised lifestyles on the human skin microbiome is also examined, as well as the potential benefits and pitfalls of novel therapeutic strategies. Further analysis of the human skin microbiome, and its interactions with the host immune system and other commensal microorganisms, will undoubtedly elucidate molecular mechanisms for disease and reveal gateways for novel therapeutic treatment strategies.

  17. Biochemical basis for dominant inheritance, variable penetrance and maternal effects in RBP4 congenital eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Christopher M.; Nelson, Christine; Tarlè, Susan A.; Pribila, Jonathan T.; Bardakjian, Tanya; Woods, Sean; Schneider, Adele; Glaser, Tom

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gestational vitamin A (retinol) deficiency poses a risk for ocular birth defects and blindness. We identified missense mutations in RBP4, encoding serum retinol binding protein (RBP), in three families with eye malformations of differing severity. The mutant phenotypes exhibit dominant inheritance but incomplete penetrance. Maternal inheritance significantly increases the probability of phenotypic expression. RBP normally delivers retinol from hepatic stores to peripheral tissues, including the placenta and fetal eye. The disease mutations greatly reduce retinol binding to RBP yet paradoxically increase RBP affinity for its cell surface receptor, STRA6. By occupying STRA6 nonproductively, the dominant-negative proteins are predicted to disrupt vitamin A delivery from wild-type proteins within the fetus but also, in the case of maternal transmission, at the placenta. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized mode of maternal inheritance, distinct from imprinting and oocyte-derived mRNA, and define a group of hereditary disorders plausibly modulated by dietary vitamin A levels. PMID:25910211

  18. The ethical framework for performing research with rare inherited neurometabolic disease patients.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzi, Viviana; Devlieger, Hugo; Margari, Lucia; Odlind, Viveca Lena; Ragab, Lamis; Bellettato, Cinzia Maria; D'Avanzo, Francesca; Lampe, Christina; Cassis, Linda; Cortès-Saladelafont, Elisenda; Cazorla, Ángels Garcia; Barić, Ivo; Cvitanović-Šojat, Ljerka; Fumić, Ksenija; Dali, Christine I; Bartoloni, Franco; Bonifazi, Fedele; Scarpa, Maurizio; Ceci, Adriana

    2017-03-01

    The need for performing clinical trials to develop well-studied and appropriate medicines for inherited neurometabolic disease patients faces ethical concerns mainly raising from four aspects: the diseases are rare; include young and very young patients; the neurological impairment may compromise the capability to provide 'consent'; and the genetic nature of the disease leads to further ethical implications. This work is intended to identify the ethical provisions applicable to clinical research involving these patients and to evaluate if these cover the ethical issues. Three searches have been performed on the European regulatory/legal framework, the literature and European Union-funded projects. The European legal framework offers a number of ethical provisions ruling the clinical research on paediatric, rare, inherited diseases with neurological symptoms. In the literature, relevant publications deal with informed consent, newborn genetic screenings, gene therapy and rights/interests of research participants. Additional information raised from European projects on sharing patients' data from different countries, the need to fill the gap of the regulatory framework and to improve information to stakeholders and patients/families.

  19. A Post-Developmental Genetic Screen for Zebrafish Models of Inherited Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Wu, Shu-Yu; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Su, Yanhui; Flynn, Charles R.; Gamse, Joshua T.; Ess, Kevin C.; Hardiman, Gary; Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Abumrad, Naji N.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease such as simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and fibrosis. However, the molecular pathogenesis and genetic variations causing NAFLD are poorly understood. The high prevalence and incidence of NAFLD suggests that genetic variations on a large number of genes might be involved in NAFLD. To identify genetic variants causing inherited liver disease, we used zebrafish as a model system for a large-scale mutant screen, and adopted a whole genome sequencing approach for rapid identification of mutated genes found in our screen. Here, we report on a forward genetic screen of ENU mutagenized zebrafish. From 250 F2 lines of ENU mutagenized zebrafish during post-developmental stages (5 to 8 days post fertilization), we identified 19 unique mutant zebrafish lines displaying visual evidence of hepatomegaly and/or steatosis with no developmental defects. Histological analysis of mutants revealed several specific phenotypes, including common steatosis, micro/macrovesicular steatosis, hepatomegaly, ballooning, and acute hepatocellular necrosis. This work has identified multiple post-developmental mutants and establishes zebrafish as a novel animal model for post-developmental inherited liver disease. PMID:25950913

  20. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bayzigitov, Daniel R.; Medvedev, Sergey P.; Dementyeva, Elena V.; Bayramova, Sevda A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Karaskov, Alexander M.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:27110425

  1. Polar body genome transfer for preventing the transmission of inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Sha, Hongying; Ji, Dongmei; Zhang, Helen L; Chen, Dawei; Cao, Yunxia; Zhu, Jianhong

    2014-06-19

    Inherited mtDNA diseases transmit maternally and cause severe phenotypes. Currently, there is no effective therapy or genetic screens for these diseases; however, nuclear genome transfer between patients' and healthy eggs to replace mutant mtDNAs holds promises. Considering that a polar body contains few mitochondria and shares the same genomic material as an oocyte, we perform polar body transfer to prevent the transmission of mtDNA variants. We compare the effects of different types of germline genome transfer, including spindle-chromosome transfer, pronuclear transfer, and first and second polar body transfer, in mice. Reconstructed embryos support normal fertilization and produce live offspring. Importantly, genetic analysis confirms that the F1 generation from polar body transfer possesses minimal donor mtDNA carryover compared to the F1 generation from other procedures. Moreover, the mtDNA genotype remains stable in F2 progeny after polar body transfer. Our preclinical model demonstrates polar body transfer has great potential to prevent inherited mtDNA diseases.

  2. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  3. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  4. Identifying strains that contribute to complex diseases through the study of microbial inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Jeremiah J.; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    It has been 35 y since Carl Woese reported in PNAS how sequencing ribosomal RNA genes could be used to distinguish the three domains of life on Earth. During the past decade, 16S rDNA sequencing has enabled the now frequent enumeration of bacterial communities that populate the bodies of humans representing different ages, cultural traditions, and health states. A challenge going forward is to quantify the contributions of community members to wellness, disease risk, and disease pathogenesis. Here, we explore a theoretical framework for studies of the inheritance of bacterial strains and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various study designs for assessing the contribution of strains to complex diseases. PMID:25576328

  5. Genetic correction of stem cells in the treatment of inherited diseases and focus on xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Rouanet, Sophie; Warrick, Emilie; Gache, Yannick; Scarzello, Sabine; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Bernerd, Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2013-10-09

    Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)) have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  6. Inherited disorders of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John A

    2005-11-01

    Desmosomes are highly organized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical integrity to tissues by anchoring intermediate filaments to sites of strong adhesion. These cell-cell adhesion junctions are found in skin, heart, lymph nodes and meninges. Over the last 8 years, several naturally occurring human gene mutations in structural components of desmosomes have been reported. These comprise autosomal dominant or recessive mutations in plakophilin 1, plakophilin 2, desmoplakin, plakoglobin, desmoglein 1, desmoglein 4 and corneodesmosin. These discoveries have often highlighted novel or unusual phenotypes, including abnormal skin fragility and differentiation, and developmental anomalies of various ectodermal appendages, especially hair. Some desmosomal gene mutations may also result in cardiac disease, notably cardiomyopathy. This article describes the spectrum of clinical features that may be found in the inherited disorders of desmosomes and highlights the key functions of several of the desmosomal proteins in tissue adhesion and cell biology.

  7. Inherited Disease Genetics Improves the Identification of Cancer-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biologically significant variants in cancer genomes is critical to therapeutic discovery, but it is limited by the statistical power needed to discern driver from passenger. Independent biological data can be used to filter cancer exomes and increase statistical power. Large genetic databases for inherited diseases are uniquely suited to this task because they contain specific amino acid alterations with known pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms. However, no rigorous method to overlay this information onto the cancer exome exists. Here, we present a computational methodology that overlays any variant database onto the somatic mutations in all cancer exomes. We validate the computation experimentally and identify novel associations in a re-analysis of 7362 cancer exomes. This analysis identified activating SOS1 mutations associated with Noonan syndrome as significantly altered in melanoma and the first kinase-activating mutations in ACVR1 associated with adult tumors. Beyond a filter, significant variants found in both rare cancers and rare inherited diseases increase the unmet medical need for therapeutics that target these variants and may bootstrap drug discovery efforts in orphan indications. PMID:27304678

  8. [Role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    IL-22 is an IL-10 family cytokine that acts mainly on epithelial cells. It is produced by immune cell subsets, including CD4⁺ T cells, natural killer cells, and natural killer T cells. In the skin, IL-22 mediates keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia, inhibits terminal differentiation of keratinocytes, and induces the production of antimicrobial proteins. Although IL-22 production was initially linked with IL-17 expression in Th17 cells, IL-22 production can also occur in an apparently unique subset of cells that lacks the production of IL-17 and IFN-γ (Th22). Interestingly, Th22 cells express skin homing chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR10. Indeed, Th22 cells reside in the normal skin and are shown to be enriched in the lesional skin of inflammatory skin diseases, indicating the importance of IL-22 in skin homeostasis and pathogenesis of skin diseases. Although psoriasis is the first example of an organ-specific immune disorder for which the role of IL-22 has been comprehensively studied, a growing body of evidence indicates that this cytokine also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In this review, we discuss the role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of skin diseases, particularly focusing on psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Targeting IL-22 may have promise as a potential therapeutic for various skin diseases.

  9. Skin Diseases: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person's immune cells to attack the skin cancer cells. Other forms of immunotherapy are also being studied. A recent small study showed that treating patients with immune system cells found in tumors could shrink skin cancer tumors and possibly prolong life, too. Another study ...

  10. Regional distribution of ten common skin diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sischo, W M; Ihrke, P J; Franti, C E

    1989-09-15

    We investigated the regional distributions of the most commonly diagnosed skin diseases in dogs from 17 North American veterinary teaching hospitals. Between January 1983 and December 1983, 11,456 diagnoses of skin disease were made. The 10 most common diagnoses were fleabite allergic dermatitis, skin cancer, pyoderma, seborrhea, allergy, demodectic acariasis (demodicosis), sarcoptic acariasis, immune-mediated skin disease, endocrine related skin disease, and acral lick dermatitis. Regional differences in the frequency of skin diseases were apparent. The northeast region had high frequencies of fleabite allergic dermatitis, allergy, and immune-mediated disease, and a low frequency of seborrhea. The midwest had a high frequency of seborrhea, and low frequencies of demodectic acariasis and allergy. In the plains region, low frequencies of fleabite allergic dermatitis, pyoderma, seborrhea, allergy, and demodectic acariasis were detected. In the west, the frequencies of fleabite allergic dermatitis, skin cancer, pyoderma, seborrhea, and acral lick dermatitis were high, whereas few dogs had allergic disease and sarcoptic acariasis. The southwest had high frequencies of fleabite allergic dermatitis and demodectic and sarcoptic acariasis. Fleabite allergic dermatitis, pyoderma, and demodectic and sarcoptic acariasis were frequently diagnosed in the southeast, but the number of dogs with seborrhea was low.

  11. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  12. Metamaterial-based sensor for skin disease diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spada, L.; Iovine, R.; Tarparelli, R.; Vegni, L.

    2013-05-01

    Skin absorption properties, under diseases conditions, are modified due to the structural variations of chromophores and pigments. The measurement of such different absorptions can be a useful tool for the recognition of different skin diseases. In this study the design of a multi-resonant metamaterial-based sensor operating in the optical frequency range is presented. The sensor has been designed, in order to have multiple specific resonant frequencies, tuned to the skin components spectral characteristics. A change in the frequency amplitude of the sensor response is related to the different absorption rate of skin chromophores and pigments. A new analytical model, describing the multi-resonant sensor behaviour, is developed. Good agreement among analytical and numerical results was achieved. Full-wave simulations have validated the capability of the proposed sensor to identify different skin diseases.

  13. Skin microbiota: overview and role in the skin diseases acne vulgaris and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Nathalia; Raoult, Didier

    2013-02-01

    As the first barrier to environmental exposures, human skin has developed an integrated immune system to protect the inner body from chemical, physical or microbial insults. Microorganisms inhabiting superficial skin layers are known as skin microbiota and include bacteria, viruses, archaea and fungi. The microbiota composition is crucial in the instruction and support of the skin's immune system. Changes in microbiota can be due to individual, environmental or behavioral factors, such as age, climate, hygiene or antibiotic consumption, which can cause dysbiosis. The contribution of skin microbiota to disease development is known in atopic dermatitis, where there is an increase in Staphylococcus aureus. Culture-independent studies have enabled more accurate descriptions of this complex interplay. Microbial imbalance is associated with the development of various diseases. This review focuses on microbial imbalances in acne vulgaris and rosacea.

  14. Inherited heart rhythm disease: negotiating the minefield for the practicing cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Andrew D; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gardner, Martin J; Arbour, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Inherited heart rhythm disorders are uncommon conditions that have emerged as a challenge to recognize and treat for the practicing clinician. The common electrical forms are long QT and Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic ventricular tachycardia, and early repolarization syndrome. Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction can also cause serious cardiac rhythm disturbances and sudden death. We review the key historic and diagnostic considerations to provide guidance for day-to-day management, and the resources accessible to health care professionals and patients including a Canadian network of expert clinics. This allows for the initiation of disease-specific treatments and enables family screening. These heterogenous conditions can be challenging to diagnose with equally difficult management decisions. However, some common measures can be applied that will assist health care providers and reduce risk for patients. Condition-specific treatment strategies that are deployed in regional clinics are discussed, including the role of the referring health care team.

  15. Early behavioural changes in familial Alzheimer's disease in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Liang, Li-Jung; Zhou, Yan; Vangala, Sitaram; Teng, Edmond; Kremen, Sarah; Wharton, David; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Farlow, Martin; Ghetti, Bernardino; McDade, Eric; Masters, Colin L; Mayeux, Richard P; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Buckles, Virginia; Bateman, Randall; Morris, John C

    2015-04-01

    Prior studies indicate psychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy and anxiety are risk factors for or prodromal symptoms of incipient Alzheimer's disease. The study of persons at 50% risk for inheriting autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations allows characterization of these symptoms before progressive decline in a population destined to develop illness. We sought to characterize early behavioural features in carriers of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations. Two hundred and sixty-one persons unaware of their mutation status enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, a study of persons with or at-risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Ninety-seven asymptomatic (CDR = 0), 25 mildly symptomatic (CDR = 0.5), and 33 overtly affected (CDR > 0.5) autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers were compared to 106 non-carriers with regard to frequency of behavioural symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire and severity of depressive symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale using generalized linear regression models with appropriate distributions and link functions. Results from the adjusted analyses indicated that depressive symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire were less common in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers than in non-carriers (5% versus 17%, P = 0.014) and the odds of experiencing at least one behavioural sign in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers was lower than in non-carriers (odds ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.98, P = 0.042). Depression (56% versus 17%, P = 0.0003), apathy (40% versus 4%, P < 0.0001), disinhibition (16% versus 2%, P = 0.009), irritability (48% versus 9%, P = 0.0001), sleep changes (28% versus 7%, P = 0.003), and agitation (24% versus 6%, P = 0.008) were more common and

  16. Pattern of Skin Diseases in a Tertiary Institution in Kolkata

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Chinmay; Das, Sudip; Roy, Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are very little elaborative studies in India about various patterns of skin diseases and various factors those influence the diseases in a tertiary institution. Aims: To find out the various patterns of skin diseases in relation to age, sex, occupation, and socio-economic status. To find out the magnitude of skin diseases and compare with other similar studies. Materials and Methods: Collection of data of all new skin cases in a specified period of one year and put on proforma for diagnosis. Few investigations were done for correct diagnosis. Results: It was found that skin OPD patients (new) were 4.16% of total new OPD patients, and male female ratio was 1.1:1. Among all patients (12910), infection was commonest (39.54%), followed by allergic skin disorder (29.20%). 25.05% patients were housewives, followed by students (23.21%). Study showed that 33.28% patients had per capita income of ` 361-720/month, and 22.35% patients were educated and/or studied up to class V. Conclusion: Pattern of skin diseases are mostly depend not only on environmental factors but also on occupation, socio-economic status, literacy, and age of the patients. PMID:24700954

  17. Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy The sometimes deadly conditions cost $75 billion in ... a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin ...

  18. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... Sun—Not a good mix / Questions for Your Health Care Provider Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 4 ...

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a neglected component of skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Bauer, Johann W; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial structure and function influence tissue homeostasis and thereby contribute to multiple human disorders and ageing. Ten per cent of patients with primary mitochondrial disorders present skin manifestations that can be categorized into hair abnormalities, rashes, pigmentation abnormalities and acrocyanosis. Less attention has been paid to the fact that several disorders of the skin are linked to alterations of mitochondrial energy metabolism. This review article summarizes the contribution of mitochondrial pathology to both common and rare skin diseases. We explore the intriguing observation that a wide array of skin disorders presents with primary or secondary mitochondrial pathology and that a variety of molecular defects can cause dysfunctional mitochondria. Among them are mutations in mitochondrial- and nuclear DNA-encoded subunits and assembly factors of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes; mutations in intermediate filament proteins involved in linking, moving and shaping of mitochondria; and disorders of mitochondrial DNA metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and heme synthesis. Thus, we assume that mitochondrial involvement is the rule rather than the exception in skin diseases. We conclude the article by discussing how improving mitochondrial function can be beneficial for aged skin and can be used as an adjunct therapy for certain skin disorders. Consideration of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skin creates a new perspective for both dermatologists and experts in metabolic disease.

  20. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  1. [Glycoproteins, inherited diseases of platelets, and the role of platelets in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita

    2013-02-01

    Recognition that platelets have a glycocalyx rich in membrane glycoproteins prompted the discovery in France that inherited bleeding syndromes due to defects of platelet adhesion and aggregation were caused by deficiencies in major receptors at the platelet surface. Identification of the alpha IIb beta3 integrin prompted the development of powerful anti-thrombotic drugs that have gained worldwide use. Since these discoveries, the genetic causes of many other defects of platelet function and production have been elucidated, with the identification of an ADP receptor, P2 Y12, another widespread target for anti-thrombotic drugs. Discovery of the molecular basis of a rare disease of storage of biologically active proteins in platelet alpha-granules has been accompanied by the recognition of the roles of platelets in inflammation, the innate immune system and tissue repair, opening new avenues for therapeutic advances.

  2. Genetic testing for inherited ocular disease: delivering on the promise at last?

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Rachel L; Hall, Georgina; Black, Graeme C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic testing is of increasing clinical utility for diagnosing inherited eye disease. Clarifying a clinical diagnosis is important for accurate estimation of prognosis, facilitating genetic counselling and management of families, and in the future will direct gene-specific therapeutic strategies. Often, precise diagnosis of genetic ophthalmic conditions is complicated by genetic heterogeneity, a difficulty that the so-called 'next-generation sequencing' technologies promise to overcome. Despite considerable counselling and ethical complexities, next-generation sequencing offers to revolutionize clinical practice. This will necessitate considerable adjustment to standard practice but has the power to deliver a personalized approach to genomic medicine for many more patients and enhance the potential for preventing vision loss.

  3. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed.

  4. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed. PMID:26120276

  5. APOE AND ALZHEIMER DISEASE: A MAJOR GENE WITH SEMI-DOMINANT INHERITANCE

    PubMed Central

    Genin, Emmanuelle; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David; Sleegers, Kristel; Hiltunen, Mikko; Combarros, Onofre; Bullido, Maria J; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; Berr, Claudine; Pasquier, Florence; Dubois, Bruno; Tognoni, Gloria; Fiévet, Nathalie; Brouwers, Nathalie; Bettens, Karolien; Arosio, Beatrice; Coto, Eliecer; Zompo, Maria Del; Mateo, Ignacio; Epelbaum, Jacques; Frank-Garcia, Ana; Helisalmi, Seppo; Porcellini, Elisa; Pilotto, Alberto; Forti, Paola; Ferri, Raffaele; Scarpini, Elio; Siciliano, Gabriele; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sorbi, Sandro; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Valdivieso, Fernando; Vepsäläinen, Saila; Alvarez, Victoria; Bosco, Paolo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Panza, Francesco; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bossù, Paola; Hanon, Olivier; Piccardi, Paola; Annoni, Giorgio; Seripa, Davide; Galimberti, Daniela; Licastro, Federico; Soininen, Hilkka; Dartigues, Jean-François; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Lambert, Jean Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Campion, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) dependent lifetime risks (LTRs) for Alzheimer Disease (AD) are currently not accurately known and odds ratios (ORs) alone are insufficient to assess these risks. We calculated AD lifetime risk in 7,351 cases and 10,132 controls from Caucasian ancestry using Rochester (USA) incidence data. At the age of 85 the LTR of AD without reference to APOE genotype was 11% in males and 14% in females. At the same age, this risk ranged from 51% for APOE44 male carriers to 60% for APOE44 female carriers, and from 23% for APOE34 male carriers to 30% for APOE34 female carriers, consistent with semi-dominant inheritance of a moderately penetrant gene. Using PAQUID (France) incidence data, estimates were globally similar except that at age 85 the LTRs reached 68% and 35 % for APOE 44 and APOE 34 female carriers, respectively. These risks are more similar to those of major genes in Mendelian diseases, such as BRCA1 in breast cancer, than those of low-risk common alleles identified by recent GWAS in complex diseases. In addition, stratification of our data by age- groups clearly demonstrates that APOE4 is a risk factor not only for late- onset but for early- onset AD as well. Together, these results urge a reappraisal of the impact of APOE in Alzheimer disease. PMID:21556001

  6. Inherited glaucoma in DBA/2J mice: pertinent disease features for studying the neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Libby, Richard T; Anderson, Michael G; Pang, Iok-Hou; Robinson, Zachary H; Savinova, Olga V; Cosma, I Mihai; Snow, Amy; Wilson, Lawriston A; Smith, Richard S; Clark, Abbot F; John, Simon W M

    2005-01-01

    The glaucomas are neurodegenerative diseases involving death of retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve head excavation. A major risk factor for this neurodegeneration is a harmfully elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Human glaucomas are typically complex, progressive diseases that are prevalent in the elderly. Family history and genetic factors are clearly important in human glaucoma. Mouse studies have proven helpful for investigating the genetic and mechanistic basis of complex diseases. We previously reported inherited, age-related progressive glaucoma in DBA/2J mice. Here, we report our updated findings from studying the disease in a large number of DBA/2J mice. The period when mice have elevated IOP extends from 6 months to 16 months, with 8-9 months representing an important transition to high IOP for many mice. Optic nerve degeneration follows IOP elevation, with the majority of optic nerves being severely damaged by 12 months of age. This information should help with the design of experiments, and we present the data in a manner that will be useful for future studies of retinal ganglion cell degeneration and optic neuropathy.

  7. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  8. Treating skin disease: self-management behaviors of Latino farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Vallejos, Quirina M; Feldman, Steven R; Quandt, Sara A

    2006-01-01

    Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers experience high rates of skin disease that result from their working and living conditions. Knowledge of the ways farmworkers treat skin disease symptoms will provide a foundation for developing culturally appropriate health education, improving the delivery of health services, and improving occupational health policy for agricultural workers. The purpose of this paper is to describe skin disease self-management practices among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers in North Carolina. This analysis uses a qualitative design based on in-depth interviews with 30 Latino farmworkers (six females, 24 males). Computer assisted, systematic procedures are used to analyze the verbatim transcripts of these interviews. Participants shared a consistent set of health self-management actions in treating skin disease. These actions were within the domains of self-care and medical care. A model of skin disease self-management among Latino farmworkers includes the self-care actions of hygiene, use of home remedies and use of over-the-counter remedies, with farmworkers often combining different domains of self-care. While farmworkers acknowledge the benefits of medical care, they are also mindful of barriers to its use, including cost, transportation and language. The large percentage of farmworkers who experience skin problems indicates that health outreach workers who serve this population need to provide education on preventing and treating skin problems, and they need to recommend to farmworkers appropriate over-the-counter medicines for the treatment of these skin problems. Appropriate medical care for treating skin problems that are dangerous and reduce farmworkers' quality-of-life needs to be made available to this population.

  9. Comprehensive Rare Variant Analysis via Whole-Genome Sequencing to Determine the Molecular Pathology of Inherited Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Carss, Keren J; Arno, Gavin; Erwood, Marie; Stephens, Jonathan; Sanchis-Juan, Alba; Hull, Sarah; Megy, Karyn; Grozeva, Detelina; Dewhurst, Eleanor; Malka, Samantha; Plagnol, Vincent; Penkett, Christopher; Stirrups, Kathleen; Rizzo, Roberta; Wright, Genevieve; Josifova, Dragana; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Scott, Richard H; Clement, Emma; Allen, Louise; Armstrong, Ruth; Brady, Angela F; Carmichael, Jenny; Chitre, Manali; Henderson, Robert H H; Hurst, Jane; MacLaren, Robert E; Murphy, Elaine; Paterson, Joan; Rosser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dorothy A; Wakeling, Emma; Ouwehand, Willem H; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Raymond, F Lucy

    2017-01-05

    Inherited retinal disease is a common cause of visual impairment and represents a highly heterogeneous group of conditions. Here, we present findings from a cohort of 722 individuals with inherited retinal disease, who have had whole-genome sequencing (n = 605), whole-exome sequencing (n = 72), or both (n = 45) performed, as part of the NIHR-BioResource Rare Diseases research study. We identified pathogenic variants (single-nucleotide variants, indels, or structural variants) for 404/722 (56%) individuals. Whole-genome sequencing gives unprecedented power to detect three categories of pathogenic variants in particular: structural variants, variants in GC-rich regions, which have significantly improved coverage compared to whole-exome sequencing, and variants in non-coding regulatory regions. In addition to previously reported pathogenic regulatory variants, we have identified a previously unreported pathogenic intronic variant in CHM in two males with choroideremia. We have also identified 19 genes not previously known to be associated with inherited retinal disease, which harbor biallelic predicted protein-truncating variants in unsolved cases. Whole-genome sequencing is an increasingly important comprehensive method with which to investigate the genetic causes of inherited retinal disease.

  10. Dietary flax oil during pregnancy and lactation retards disease progression in rat offspring with inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Deepa; Bankovic-Calic, Neda; Peng, Claudia Yu-Chen; Ogborn, Malcolm R; Aukema, Harold M

    2006-12-01

    Dietary flax oil (FO) retards disease progression in growing or adult animal models of kidney disease. To determine whether dietary flax oil during the perinatal period would alter renal disease progression in offspring, Han-SPRD-cy rats with inherited cystic kidney disease were given diets with either 7% FO or corn oil (CO), throughout pregnancy and lactation. At 3 wk of age, offspring were then given either the same or the alternate diet for 7 wk. Rats given FO during the maternal period had 15% less renal cyst growth compared with rats given FO only in the postweaning period. Dietary FO, compared with CO, in the maternal period also resulted in 12% lower cell proliferation and 15% less oxidant injury in diseased kidneys of offspring. Including FO in both the maternal and postweaning period resulted in 29-34% less renal interstitial fibrosis and 22-23% lower glomerular hypertrophy. Along with improved histology, these rats exhibited 13% less proteinuria and 30% lower creatinine clearance when dietary FO was given in the maternal period. The potential for dietary FO during pregnancy and lactation to positively modulate adult renal disease has significant implications for the 1 in 1000 individuals with congenital cystic kidney disease.

  11. Co-inheritance of mild hemophilia A and heterozygosity for type 2N von Willebrand disease: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Holly; Bergstrom, Katie; Srivaths, Lakshmi

    2014-10-01

    Hemophilia A and von Willebrand disease are the two most common inherited bleeding disorders. Despite their frequency, however, there are very few reports of co-inheritance of the two disorders. We present the first report of a patient with mild hemophilia A and heterozygosity for type 2N von Willebrand disease (VWD). We discuss the patient's phenotype and highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges caused by this co-inheritance.

  12. Pesticide and Insect Repellent Mixture (Permethrin and DEET) Induces Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease and Sperm Epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds are known to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. The current study was designed to determine if a “pesticide mixture” (pesticide permethrin and insect repellent N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, DEET) promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and associated DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were exposed during fetal gonadal sex determination and the incidence of disease evaluated in F1 and F3 generations. There were significant increases in the incidence of total diseases in animals from pesticide lineage F1 and F3 generation animals. Pubertal abnormalities, testis disease, and ovarian disease (primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease) were increased in F3 generation animals. Analysis of the pesticide lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 363 differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) termed epimutations. Observations demonstrate that a pesticide mixture (permethrin and DEET) can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and potential sperm epigenetic biomarkers for ancestral environmental exposures. PMID:22975477

  13. New and emerging technologies for the treatment of inherited retinal diseases: a horizon scanning review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Ward, D; Michaelides, M; Moore, A T; Simpson, S

    2015-01-01

    The horizon scanning review aimed to identify new and emerging technologies in development that have the potential to slow or stop disease progression and/or reverse sight loss in people with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs). Potential treatments were identified using recognized horizon scanning methods. These included a combination of online searches using predetermined search terms, suggestions from clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups, and contact with commercial developers. Twenty-nine relevant technologies were identified. These included 9 gene therapeutic approaches, 10 medical devices, 5 pharmacological agents, and 5 regenerative and cell therapies. A further 11 technologies were identified in very early phases of development (typically phase I or pre-clinical) and were included in the final report to give a complete picture of developments ‘on the horizon'. Clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups provided helpful information and insights, such as the availability of specialised services for patients, the potential impacts of individual technologies on people with IRDs and their families, and helped to identify additional relevant technologies. This engagement ensured that important areas of innovation were not missed. Most of the health technologies identified are still at an early stage of development and it is difficult to estimate when treatments might be available. Further, well designed trials that generate data on efficacy, applicability, acceptability, and costs of the technologies, as well as the long-term impacts for various conditions are required before these can be considered for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:26113499

  14. Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Diseases in Indigenous African Populations by Whole-Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa; Ratnapriya, Rinki; du Plessis, Morné; Chaitankar, Vijender; Ramesar, Raj S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A majority of genes associated with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) have been identified in patients of European origin. Indigenous African populations exhibit rich genomic diversity, and evaluation of reported genetic mutations has yielded low returns so far. Our goal was to perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) to examine variants in known IRD genes in underrepresented African cohorts. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 56 samples from 16 families with diverse IRD phenotypes that had remained undiagnosed after screening for known mutations using genotyping-based microarrays (Asper Ophthalmics). Variants in reported IRD genes were identified using WES and validated by Sanger sequencing. Custom TaqMan assays were used to screen for identified mutations in 193 unrelated indigenous Africans with IRDs. Results A total of 3494 variants were identified in 217 known IRD genes, leading to the identification of seven different mutations (including six novel) in six genes (RHO, PRPF3, PRPF31, ABCA4, CERKL, and PDE6B) in six distinct families. TaqMan screening in additional probands revealed identical homozygous CERKL and PDE6B variants in four more patients. Conclusions This is the first report of WES of patients with IRDs in indigenous African populations. Our study identified genetic defects in almost 40% of the families analyzed, significantly enhancing the molecular diagnosis of IRD in South Africa. Thus, WES of understudied cohorts seems to present an effective strategy for determining novel mutations in heterogeneous retinal diseases. PMID:27898983

  15. The Adeno-Associated Virus - A Safe and Effective Vehicle For Liver-Specific Gene Therapy of Inherited and Non-Inherited Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mak, Kai Yan; Rajapaksha, Indu G; Angus, Peter W; Herath, Chandana B

    2017-03-14

    The first human adeno-associated virus (AAV) was originally discovered in 1960s as a contaminant of adenovirus stocks preparation and thus it had not been of medical interest. Throughout last three decades AAV has gained popularity to be used in gene therapy, mainly due to its replicative defectiveness and lack of pathogenicity in human. In addition, the ability to mediate a stable and long-term expression in both non-dividing and dividing cells with specific tissue tropism makes AAV as one of the most promising candidates for therapeutic gene transfer to treat many genetic as well as non-genetic disorders. Moreover, the use of AAV is not only restricted to over-expression of recombinant transgene and protein, but also includes short hairpin RNAs and microRNAs to knock down the expression of genes in targeted tissues. This review will be organized into four parts. Firstly, we will discuss the discovery and history of AAV, followed by detailed AAV biology such as virus genome and virion structure and life cycle of AAV. In the second part of the review, molecular mechanisms of AAV tissue transduction will be discussed extensively, including receptor recognition and cell binding, endosomal and nucleus entry, virus uncoating and genome replication, capsid assembly and packaging. Advantages and limitations of using AAV as a vehicle for gene deliver will also be discussed. In the third part of the review, we will discuss the most commonly used AAV serotypes and variants isolated from human and primate origins, focusing on their diverse tissue tropisms, transduction efficiency, immunological profiles and their applications in animal studies. The final part of the review we will discuss the recent progress in in-vivo gene transfer for inherited and non-inherited diseases in both preclinical and clinical settings using AAV, with a special emphasis on its potential clinical application in the field of liver disease.

  16. Identification of Malassezia pachydermatis from healthy and diseased human skin.

    PubMed

    Prohic, Asja; Kasumagic-Halilovic, Emina

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is the only species in the genus Malassezia that is classically considered to be zoophilic. This yeast is only occasionally isolated from human skin, although it has been found to cause septic epidemics, especially in neonates. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of M. pachydermatis on the skin of patients with Malassezia-associated diseases and of healthy subjects. One hundred and sixty skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor (PV), seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis (PS) and healthy individuals, forty each, were inoculated into Sabouraud dextrose agar and into modified Dixon agar. The yeasts isolated were identified according to their macroscopic and microscopic features and physiological properties. M. globosa was the most commonly isolated species in lesional skin of PV (65%) and PS (55%), M. restricta in lesional skin of SD (27.5%), while M. sympodialis was the predominant species recovered from healthy skin, representing 30% of the isolates. Zoophilic species, M. pachydermatis was identified in only one case, from the lesional skin of SD. The results of our study confirm that M. pachydermatis is not a member of the normal human flora and its presence on human skin is rare and indicates transmission from an external source.

  17. Complex Inheritance of ABCA4 Disease: Four Mutations in a Family with Multiple Macular Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Zernant, Jana; Yuan, Bo; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen H.; Lupski, James R.; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Over 800 mutations in the ABCA4 gene cause autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Due to extensive genetic heterogeneity, observed variant-associated phenotypes can manifest tremendous variability of expression. Furthermore, the high carrier frequency of pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in the general population (~1:20) often results in pseudo-dominant inheritance patterns further complicating the diagnosis and characterization of affected individuals. This study describes a genotype/phenotype analysis of an unusual family with multiple macular disease phenotypes spanning across two generations and segregating four distinct ABCA4 mutant alleles. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 discovered two known missense mutations, p.C54Y and p.G1961E. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a large novel deletion combined with a small insertion, c.6148-698_c.6670del/insTGTGCACCTCCCTAG, and complete sequencing of the entire ABCA4 genomic locus uncovered a new deep intronic variant, c.302+68C>T. Patients with the p.G1961E mutation had the mildest, confined maculopathy phenotype with peripheral flecks while those with all other mutant allele combinations exhibited a more advanced stage of generalized retinal and choriocapillaris atrophy. This family epitomizes the clinical and genetic complexity of ABCA4-associated diseases. It contained variants from all classes of mutations, in the coding region, deep intronic, both single nucleotide variants (SNV) and copy number variants (CNV) that accounted for varying phenotypes segregating in an apparent dominant fashion. Unequivocally defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires a multifaceted approach that includes advanced mutation detection methods and a thorough analysis of clinical phenotypes. PMID:26527198

  18. The canine and feline skin microbiome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott

    2013-02-01

    The skin harbours a diverse and abundant, yet inadequately investigated, microbial population. The population is believed to play an important role in both the pathophysiology and the prevention of disease, through a variety of poorly explored mechanisms. Early studies of the skin microbiota in dogs and cats reported a minimally diverse microbial composition of low overall abundance, most probably as a reflection of the limitations of testing methodology. Despite these limitations, it was clear that the bacterial population of the skin plays an important role in disease and in changes in response to both infectious and noninfectious diseases. Recent advances in technology are challenging some previous assumptions about the canine and feline skin microbiota and, with preliminary application of next-generation sequenced-based methods, it is apparent that the diversity and complexity of the canine skin microbiome has been greatly underestimated. A better understanding of this complex microbial population is critical for elucidation of the pathophysiology of various dermatological (and perhaps systemic) diseases and to develop novel ways to manipulate this microbial population to prevent or treat disease.

  19. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma. PMID:23860041

  20. Loss of corneodesmosin leads to severe skin barrier defect, pruritus, and atopy: unraveling the peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Oji, Vinzenz; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Aufenvenne, Karin; Nätebus, Marc; Tarinski, Tatjana; Ackermann, Katharina; Seller, Natalia; Metze, Dieter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hausser, Ingrid; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2010-08-13

    Generalized peeling skin disease is an autosomal-recessive ichthyosiform erythroderma characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the skin. After genome-wide linkage analysis, we have identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CDSN in a large consanguineous family with generalized peeling skin, pruritus, and food allergies, which leads to a complete loss of corneodesmosin. In contrast to hypotrichosis simplex, which can be associated with specific dominant CDSN mutations, peeling skin disease is characterized by a complete loss of CDSN expression. The skin phenotype is consistent with a recent murine Cdsn knockout model. Using three-dimensional human skin models, we demonstrate that lack of corneodesmosin causes an epidermal barrier defect supposed to account for the predisposition to atopic diseases, and we confirm the role of corneodesmosin as a decisive epidermal adhesion molecule. Therefore, peeling skin disease will represent a new model disorder for atopic diseases, similarly to Netherton syndrome and ichthyosis vulgaris in the recent past.

  1. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress. PMID:22194706

  2. Inherited deficiency of the second component of complement. Rheumatic disease associations.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, D; Raum, D; Gibson, D; Stillman, J S; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The prevalence of homozygous and heterozygous deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was determined in patients with rheumatic disease including 137 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 274 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and 134 with rheumatoid arthritis. 1 C2 homozygous deficient and 19 possible heterozygous deficient individuals were identified by using both immunochemical and functional assays to determine C2 levels. Of the 20, 8 had SLE (5.9%), 10 had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (3.7%), and 2 had rheumatoid arthritis (1.4%), the homozygous deficient individual having SLE. The prevalence of C2 deficiency in the SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients was significantly increased (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.02, respectively) when compared with controls, 6 (1.2%) of 509 blood donors having C2 levels consistent with heterozygous deficiency. 15 of the 20 C2 deficient patients were HLA typed and found to have antigens A10(Aw25), B18, or both. The patients with C2 deficiency and SLE had earlier age of onset of disease and less antinuclear antibody when compared with the C2 normal SLE patients. 11 families of the propositi were studied and found to have one or more C2 heterozygous deficient individuals. The family members had an equal distribution of rheumatic disease and antinuclear antibody in the C2 deficient and C2 normal groups. C2 deficient individuals were found to have significantly lower levels of properdin Factor B (242 mug/ml+/-54) when compared with the non-C2 deficient family members (282 mug/ml+/-73). These data support the concept that inherited deficiency of C2 is significantly associated with both SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:965492

  3. Genetic skin diseases related to desmosomes and corneodesmosomes.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Igawa, Satomi

    2014-05-01

    The integrity of the epidermis depends on the cohesion between keratinocytes, and desmosomes are the main adhesion structures. When cells become cornified, desmosomes are modified and transformed into corneodesmosomes. Mutations in the genes encoding desmosomal components underlie several skin diseases including palmoplantar keratoderma and forms of epidermolysis bullosa, indicating the importance of desmosomes as mechanical stress-bearing structures. Other types of genetic defects in a desmosome component (desmoglein 1), a corneodesmosome component (corneodesmosin), and an inhibitor for proteases involved in corneodesmosome degradation (LEKTI) result in three clinically overlapping conditions: SAM syndrome, an inflammatory type of peeling skin disease, and Netherton syndrome. All three result in allergies to multiple allergens due to severe barrier impairment. Conversely, impaired corneodesmosomal degradation due to matriptase mutations could lead to ichthyosis. By discovering the diverse clinical phenotypes of these diseases, we can enrich our understanding of the multifunctional roles of desmosomes and corneodesmosomes in skin biology.

  4. Interlocus gene conversion events introduce deleterious mutations into at least 1% of human genes associated with inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Casola, Claudio; Zekonyte, Ugne; Phillips, Andrew D; Cooper, David N; Hahn, Matthew W

    2012-03-01

    Establishing the molecular basis of DNA mutations that cause inherited disease is of fundamental importance to understanding the origin, nature, and clinical sequelae of genetic disorders in humans. The majority of disease-associated mutations constitute single-base substitutions and short deletions and/or insertions resulting from DNA replication errors and the repair of damaged bases. However, pathological mutations can also be introduced by nonreciprocal recombination events between paralogous sequences, a phenomenon known as interlocus gene conversion (IGC). IGC events have thus far been linked to pathology in more than 20 human genes. However, the large number of duplicated gene sequences in the human genome implies that many more disease-associated mutations could originate via IGC. Here, we have used a genome-wide computational approach to identify disease-associated mutations derived from IGC events. Our approach revealed hundreds of known pathological mutations that could have been caused by IGC. Further, we identified several dozen high-confidence cases of inherited disease mutations resulting from IGC in ∼1% of all genes analyzed. About half of the donor sequences associated with such mutations are functional paralogous genes, suggesting that epistatic interactions or differential expression patterns will determine the impact upon fitness of specific substitutions between duplicated genes. In addition, we identified thousands of hitherto undescribed and potentially deleterious mutations that could arise via IGC. Our findings reveal the extent of the impact of interlocus gene conversion upon the spectrum of human inherited disease.

  5. Skin-specific drug delivery: a rapid solution to skin diseases?

    PubMed

    Sadik, Christian D; Zillikens, Detlef

    2013-09-01

    In this issue of The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Kouno et al. achieve skin-specific drug delivery using an antibody to deliver substances in a highly specific manner to nontransformed cells. They make use of a nonpathogenic anti-desmoglein 3 autoantibody that had been derived from a patient with pemphigus vulgaris to deliver drugs to the surface of keratinocytes. This approach may turn out to be a new "magic bullet", thereby revolutionizing the therapy of skin disease. The authors then used a conjugate of this antibody with a new drug entity, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, to demonstrate, as a proof-of-principle, that their approach has the potential to facilitate the treatment of both cancerous and inflammatory skin diseases.

  6. The Jeremiah Metzger Lecture: gene therapy for inherited disorders: from Christmas disease to Leber's amaurosis.

    PubMed

    High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    This paper will focus on recent developments in the field of gene therapy for inherited disorders. From a historical perspective, this Metzger lecture is a follow-on to one presented by Dr. William Kelley in 1987, entitled "Current Status of Human Gene Therapy" (Transactions Am Clin. Climatol. Assoc. 99:152-169) (1). In 1987, gene transfer studies in human subjects were yet to be undertaken; the first clinical studies, infusion of genetically modified autologous T cells into two young girls with ADA-SCID, would not take place until 1990 (2). Today's lecture will summarize progress since that time in one area, that of in vivo gene transfer for genetic disease. I will describe progress in two areas, gene therapy for the bleeding disorder hemophilia B, and for a subset of retinal degenerative disorders termed Leber's congenital amaurosis, due to mutations in the gene encoding retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kilodalton protein (RPE65). This lecture will demonstrate the interconnected nature of progress in these two areas, as careful delineation of the obstacles in hemophilia led to the realization that success could be achieved in Leber's.

  7. Diseases of the tooth: the genetic and molecular basis of inherited anomalies affecting the dentition.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    In humans, inherited variation in the number, size, and shape of teeth within the dentitions are relatively common, while rarer defects of hard tissue formation, including amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, and problems associated with tooth eruption are also seen. In many cases, these anomalies occur in isolation, but they can also present as a feature of numerous well-characterized developmental syndromes. Complex reiterative signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme is a feature of normal tooth development in the embryo, occurring from early patterning through morphogenesis, hard tissue formation and during root development. Significant events also occur during postnatal development of the dentition, including hard tissue maturation and tooth eruption. In the last decade, advances in human and mouse genetics have meant that in many cases candidate genes have been identified for these anomalies. These genes have provided a useful platform for developmental biologists, allowing them to begin elucidating how these signals interact to generate a functional dentition and understand the mechanisms underlying many of the anomalies that are seen in human populations. In this article, we review current concepts relating to the developmental biology of tooth number, size, and shape, formation of the dental hard tissues and eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. We will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in both health and disease.

  8. Signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, Igor B

    2010-06-01

    For many years the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS) and (RNS) in living organisms has been considered to be dangerous phenomenon due to their damaging action on biomolecules. However, present studies demonstrated another important activity of ROS and RNS: their signaling functions in physiological and pathological processes. In this work we discuss the new data concerning a role of ROS and RNS in many enzymatic/gene cascades causing damaging changes during the development of skin diseases and pathological disorders (skin cancer, the toxic effects of irradiation on the skin, and skin wounding). It has been suggested that the enhancement of ROS formation in tumor cells through the inactivation of mitochondrial MnSOD or the activation of NADPH oxidase leads to apoptosis and might be applied for developing a new cancer therapy. On the other hand ROS overproduction might stimulate malignant transformation of melanoma. Role of ROS signaling is also considered in the damaging action of UVA, UVB, and IRA irradiation on the skin and the processes of wound healing. In the last part of review the possibility of the right choice of antioxidants and free radical scavengers for the treatment of skin disease is discussed.

  9. 78 FR 40486 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis,, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  10. Over-the-counter topical skin products--a common component of skin disease management.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Curt A; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Fleischer, Alan B; Cayce, Kimberly A; Feldman, Steven R

    2004-07-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) products are widely recommended by physicians and utilized by the public for the treatment and prevention of disease. The use of OTC drugs has been studied extensively, but the patterns of physician recommendations for OTC topical skin products and the characteristics associated with patients receiving such recommendations remain unclear. We aimed to look at patterns of OTC topical skin product recommendations by physician specialty, patient demographics, geographical region, diagnosis, and metropolitan status to determine whether there are differences in the utilization of these products in the treatment of dermatologic conditions. We analyzed office-based physician visits for OTC topical skin product recommendations recorded in the 1995 to 2000 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). From 1995 to 2000, there were an estimated 36 million physician recommendations for OTC topical skin products. Although dermatologists were responsible for 53.8% of recommendations, pediatricians had the largest proportion of recommendations per prescription recommendation (OTC/Rx=0.58). Women patients, white patients, patients younger than 20 years, urban residents, and those living in the Southern United States received greater numbers of OTC topical skin product recommendations. Of the leading products recommended, hydrocortisone (27.6%), anti-infectives (23.4%), and moisturizers (13.4%) were the most common. OTC topical skin product recommendations by US physicians are substantial, particularly among dermatologists and primary care physicians. Physician specialty, gender, race, and age appear to be factors associated with those recommendations.

  11. A novel mutation in LRSAM1 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with dominant inheritance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic motor and sensory neuropathies. According to the primary site of damage, a distinction is made between demyelinating and axonal forms (CMT1 and 2, respectively, when inherited as an autosomal dominant trait). Leucine-rich repeat and sterile alpha motif-containing protein 1 (LRSAM1) is a ubiquitin-protein ligase with a role in sorting internalised cell-surface receptor proteins. So far, mutations in the LRSAM1 gene have been shown to cause axonal CMT in three different families and can confer either dominant or recessive transmission of the disease. Case presentation We have identified a novel mutation in LRSAM1 in a small family with dominant axonal CMT. Electrophysiological studies show evidence of a sensory axonal neuropathy and are interesting in so far as giant motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) are present on needle electromyography (EMG), while motor nerve conduction studies including compound motor action potential (CMAP) amplitudes are completely normal. The underlying mutation c.2046+1G >T results in the loss of a splice donor site and the inclusion of 63 additional base pairs of intronic DNA into the aberrantly spliced transcript. This disrupts the catalytically active RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain of LRSAM1. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, beyond the typical length-dependent degeneration of motor axons, damage of cell bodies in the anterior horn might play a role in LRSAM1-associated neuropathies. Moreover, in conjunction with other data in the literature, our results support a model, by which disruption of the C-terminal RING domain confers dominant negative properties to LRSAM1. PMID:24894446

  12. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  13. Scabies: a ubiquitous neglected skin disease.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Ulrich R; Currie, Bart J; Jäger, Gerold; Lupi, Omar; Schwartz, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    Scabies has been a scourge among human beings for thousands of years. Its worldwide occurrence with epidemics during war, famine, and overcrowding is responsible for an estimated 300 million people currently infested. Scabies refers to the various skin lesions produced by female mites, and their eggs and scybala that are deposited in the epidermis, leading to delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. Recent immunological findings such as cross-reactivity with house dust mite allergens and an altered T-helper-1/T-helper-2 pattern contribute to a better understanding of the pathomechanism. Furthermore, progress in molecular biology and cloning of relevant antigens could enable the development of a diagnostic ELISA system and candidate vaccines in the near future. Typical and atypical clinical presentations with pruritus as a hallmark of scabies occur in young, pregnant, immunocompromised, and elderly patients and include bullous and crusted (Norwegian) manifestations as well as those masked by steroid use (scabies incognito). This article reviews scabies management strategies in developed countries and resource-poor communities as well as typical complications, including the emergence of resistance and drug-related adverse events. Other problems such as post-scabies eczema and reinfestation, and newer treatments such as ivermectin are also discussed.

  14. Psychological factors in skin diseases: stress and skin: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress (PS) has long been related to many common skin diseases and conditions, thought to be the cause of their onset or aggravation. Although clinical experience is often in concordance with this notion, apparently scientific proof can sometimes be challenging rather than straight forward. Although many data have been published, it appears that not enough good statistical evidence exists to support them. The difficulty in validating beyond a doubt the stress-skin interactions has rendered some skepticism among physicians. The gap between clinical expertise and problematic clinical research data has led scientists to bypass the need to tackle the question directly by searching the evidence in basic science.

  15. The nature and consequence of Karl Marx's skin disease.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    2008-01-01

    From an analysis of the original correspondence, it has been possible to establish that Karl Marx's incapacitating skin disease was hidradenitis suppurativa, not 'boils' as was universally assumed at the time and since; the psychological effect of this illness on the man and his work appears to have been considerable.

  16. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  17. Plastics derived endocrine disruptors (BPA, DEHP and DBP) induce epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of obesity, reproductive disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Environmental compounds are known to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in subsequent generations (F1-F3) following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study was designed to determine if a mixture of plastic derived endocrine disruptor compounds bisphenol-A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) at two different doses promoted epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and associated DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to either the "plastics" or "lower dose plastics" mixture during embryonic days 8 to 14 of gonadal sex determination and the incidence of adult onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. There were significant increases in the incidence of total disease/abnormalities in F1 and F3 generation male and female animals from plastics lineages. Pubertal abnormalities, testis disease, obesity, and ovarian disease (primary ovarian insufficiency and polycystic ovaries) were increased in the F3 generation animals. Kidney and prostate disease were only observed in the direct fetally exposed F1 generation plastic lineage animals. Analysis of the plastics lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome previously identified 197 differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) in gene promoters, termed epimutations. A number of these transgenerational DMR form a unique direct connection gene network and have previously been shown to correlate with the pathologies identified. Observations demonstrate that a mixture of plastic derived compounds, BPA and phthalates, can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease. The sperm DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and/or ancestral environmental exposures.

  18. Tropical Skin Diseases in Children: A Review- Part I.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Kovarik, Carrie L; Pope, Elena; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Because of travel and migration patterns, tropical skin diseases are now seen all around the world, not just in tropical or developing countries. Nutrition, housing, and environmental factors play an important role in these infectious diseases, so when they appear out of their normal environments, their classic presentation may vary. Tropical diseases can also present differently in childhood, making their recognition, diagnosis, and management a clinical challenge. Health care providers in developed countries need to be familiar with tropical skin diseases and be able to diagnose them in returning travelers or immigrants in order to optimize care. This article aims to review the epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of some of the most common tropical dermatologic conditions in children.

  19. Multidimensional two-photon imaging of diseased skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Massi, D.; Lotti, T.; Pavone, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    We used combined two photon intrinsic fluorescence (TPE), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and multispectral two photon emission detection (MTPE) to investigate different kinds of human cutaneous ex-vivo skin lesions. Morphological and spectroscopic analyses allowed to characterize both healthy and pathological skin samples, including tumors, as well as to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue, in a good agreement with common routine histology. In particular, we examined tissue samples from normal and pathological scar tissue (keloid), and skin tumors, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and malignant melanoma (MM). By using combined TPE-SHG microscopy we investigated morphological features of different skin regions, as BCC, tumor-stroma interface, healthy dermis, fibroblastic proliferation, and keloids. The SHG to autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID) score was used to characterize each region, finding differences between BCC, healthy skin, tumor-stroma interface, keloids, and fibroblastic proliferation. Further comparative analysis of healthy skin and neoplastic samples was performed using FLIM. In particular, BCC showed a blue-shifted fluorescence emission, a higher absorption at 800 nm excitation wavelength, and a slightly longer mean fluorescence lifetime. MM showed a lifetime distribution similar to the corresponding melanocytic nevus (MN) lifetime distribution for the slow lifetime component, and different for the fast lifetime component.

  20. Tropical Skin Diseases in Children: A Review-Part II.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Kovarik, Carrie L; Pope, Elena; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Tropical skin diseases are infectious conditions influenced by factors such as nutrition, housing, and the environment. Migration patterns have caused these conditions to be seen all around the world, not only in developing countries. Many of these diseases have a different presentation in childhood, which changes the diagnostic approach and management options. In this article, we review some of the most common tropical mycobacterial, protozoan, parasitic, and viral dermatologic conditions in children, including their epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects.

  1. Toll-like receptors in skin infections and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuping; Gallo, Richard L

    2008-09-01

    The skin is the ultimate example of the function of innate immunity, it alerts the host of danger by many systems including sensing pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) through Toll-like receptors and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), yet normally provides defense without inflammation. The skin responds rapidly to invading microbes by producing antimicrobial peptides or other antimicrobial intermediates before cytokine release results in inflammation. To achieve maximal immune responses for clearing invading microbes, the activation of select PRRs in skin then initiates and shapes adaptive immune responses through the activation of dendritic cells and recruitment of T cell subsets. Importantly, cross-talk between TLRs can influence this system in several ways including augmenting or suppressing the immune response. As a consequence of their pivotal role, TLR responses need to be tightly controlled by associated negative regulators or negative feedback loops to prevent detrimental effects from TLRs overactivation. This review focuses on describing the involvement of TLRs in the development of skin infections and inflammatory diseases, and highlights the potential application of TLR agonists or antagonists in these skin diseases.

  2. UCB Transplant of Inherited Metabolic Diseases With Administration of Intrathecal UCB Derived Oligodendrocyte-Like Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Batten Disease; Mucopolysaccharidosis II; Leukodystrophy, Globoid Cell; Leukodystrophy, Metachromatic; Neimann Pick Disease; Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease; Sandhoff Disease; Tay-Sachs Disease; Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn

  3. Old diseases and contemporary crisis. Inherited blood disorders in the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Beaudevin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This contribution draws on ethnographic research conducted in Oman on inherited blood disorders (IBD). By interpreting results from population genomics studies that trace mutation processes over centuries of human activities, lay-representations of IBD often consider them historical evidence. The perceived spread of IBD in Oman may thus provide unusual historical depth in a country where past conflicts have been erased from historiography and representations of time are politically prescribed. Through the notions of crisis and diversification, this contribution shows how IBD's chronicity challenges the healthcare system and became a national issue, politically labelled as urgent. The paper casts light on several aspects of contemporary Omani society: it first addresses the dynamics of disease taxonomies - although biomedically described in the early twentieth century, IBD were not individualized within local nosologies until the 1970s. Secondly, it shows how biomedical knowledge about IBD led to diversification within the healthcare system, through the introduction of clinical genetics, genomics, and community genetics. Thirdly, it attempts to broach modalities of the biopower exerted by the Omani regime over its citizens: IBD are targeted by various public health measures that jeopardize patients' autonomy by aiming to control their bodies through their matrimonial behaviour. In addition, two aspects of the intersections between Omani social hierarchy and IBD are noteworthy: the creation of a patients' association that constitutes a potential disturbance of the social order; and the way IBD mutations traced by genomics are considered direct historical documents that challenge representations of the recently crafted 'Omanity' in a context of regional concern regarding national identities' durability.

  4. A Population-Based Genomic Study of Inherited Metabolic Diseases Detected Through Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Seungman; Lee, Eunhee; Park, Jong-Ho; Park, June-Hee; Park, Hyung-Doo; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Background A newborn screening (NBS) program has been utilized to detect asymptomatic newborns with inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs). There have been some bottlenecks such as false-positives and imprecision in the current NBS tests. To overcome these issues, we developed a multigene panel for IMD testing and investigated the utility of our integrated screening model in a routine NBS environment. We also evaluated the genetic epidemiologic characteristics of IMDs in a Korean population. Methods In total, 269 dried blood spots with positive results from current NBS tests were collected from 120,700 consecutive newborns. We screened 97 genes related to NBS in Korea and detected IMDs, using an integrated screening model based on biochemical tests and next-generation sequencing (NGS) called NewbornSeq. Haplotype analysis was conducted to detect founder effects. Results The overall positive rate of IMDs was 20%. We identified 10 additional newborns with preventable IMDs that would not have been detected prior to the implementation of our NGS-based platform NewbornSeq. The incidence of IMDs was approximately 1 in 2,235 births. Haplotype analysis demonstrated founder effects in p.Y138X in DUOXA2, p.R885Q in DUOX2, p.Y439C in PCCB, p.R285Pfs*2 in SLC25A13, and p.R224Q in GALT. Conclusions Through a population-based study in the NBS environment, we highlight the screening and epidemiological implications of NGS. The integrated screening model will effectively contribute to public health by enabling faster and more accurate IMD detection through NBS. This study suggested founder mutations as an explanation for recurrent IMD-causing mutations in the Korean population. PMID:27578510

  5. Autoimmune and infectious skin diseases that target desmogleins

    PubMed Central

    AMAGAI, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions of epithelial cells that contain two major transmembrane components, the desmogleins (Dsg) and desmocollins (Dsc), which are cadherin-type cell–cell adhesion molecules and are anchored to intermediate filaments of keratin through interactions with plakoglobin and desmoplakin. Desmosomes play an important role in maintaining the proper structure and barrier function of the epidermis and mucous epithelia. Four Dsg isoforms have been identified to date, Dsg1–Dsg4, and are involved in several skin and heart diseases. Dsg1 and Dsg3 are the two major Dsg isoforms in the skin and mucous membranes, and are targeted by IgG autoantibodies in pemphigus, an autoimmune disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Dsg1 is also targeted by exfoliative toxin (ET) released by Staphylococcus aureus in the infectious skin diseases bullous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS). ET is a unique serine protease that shows lock and key specificity to Dsg1. Dsg2 is expressed in all tissues possessing desmosomes, including simple epithelia and myocardia, and mutations in this gene are responsible for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia. Dsg4 plays an important adhesive role mainly in hair follicles, and Dsg4 mutations cause abnormal hair development. Recently, an active disease model for pemphigus was generated by a unique approach using autoantigen-deficient mice that do not acquire tolerance against the defective autoantigen. Adoptive transfer of Dsg3−/− lymphocytes into mice expressing Dsg3 induces stable anti-Dsg3 IgG production with development of the pemphigus phenotype. This mouse model is a valuable tool with which to investigate immunological mechanisms of harmful IgG autoantibody production in pemphigus. Further investigation of desmoglein molecules will continue to provide insight into the unsolved pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases and aid in the development of novel therapeutic

  6. Clinicopathologic analysis of IgG4-related skin disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuharu; Takeuchi, Mai; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Ohno, Kyotaro; Iwaki, Noriko; Orita, Yorihisa; Goto, Naoe; Hida, Akira I; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Asano, Naoko; Ito, Toshihiro; Hanakawa, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized systemic syndrome characterized by mass-forming lesions with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, increase in the number of IgG4(+) cells in affected tissues and elevation of serum IgG4 levels. In 2009, we were the first to report skin lesions in patients with IgG4-related disease, but no large case series has been reported and clinicopathological findings remain unclear. To clarify these features, we herein report 10 patients (9 men and 1 woman; median age, 64 years; age range, 46-81 years) with IgG4-related skin disease. All patients had erythematous and itchy plaques or subcutaneous nodules on the skin of the head and neck, particularly in the periauricular, cheek, and mandible regions, except for one patient, whose forearm and waist skin were affected. In addition, eight patients had extracutaneous lesions: these were found on the lymph nodes in six patients, the lacrimal glands in three patients, the parotid glands in three patients, and the kidney in one patient. Histologically examined extracutaneous lesions were consistent with IgG4-related disease; five of six lymph node lesions showed progressively transformed germinal centers-type IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. Cases of IgG4-related skin disease were classified into two histological patterns: those exhibiting a nodular dermatitis pattern and those with a subcutaneous nodule pattern. The infiltrate was rich in plasma cells, small lymphocytes, and eosinophils; the majority of the plasma cells were IgG4(+). The IgG4(+) cell count was 49-396 per high-power field (mean±s.d., 172±129), with an IgG4(+)/IgG(+) cell ratio ranging from 62 to 92%. Serum IgG4 levels were elevated in all examined patients. In conclusion, patients with IgG4-related skin disease had uniform clinicopathology. Lesions were frequently present on the skin of the periauricular, cheek, and mandible regions, and were frequently accompanied by IgG4-related lymphadenopathy.

  7. Trends in mortality from skin diseases in the United States: skin infectious diseases are claiming more lives.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2016-07-15

    BackgroundAlthough there has been some excellent work published on the mortality from non-neoplastic skin disease In the United States, further analysis of trends is limited.MethodsData from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for mortality abstracted from Death Certificates was obtained from the WONDER (wide-ranging online data for epidemiologic research) system from 1999 to 2014. Categorical variables were analyzed with Excel 2013 data analysis software using Chi-squared tests whereas regression was performed for trends.ResultsCrude death rates were highest in the South, especially in Mississippi and Louisiana. This work also confirmed that Blacks or African Americans had higher risk of death from skin disease, whereas Hispanic or Latinos had lower risk. Overall mortality from non-neoplastic diseases is increasing over time and significant increases in mortality from infectious and papulosquamous diseases were observed, whereas there appears to be decreasing mortality from dermatitis and miscellaneous skin disorders (ICD-10-CM L80-90).ConclusionsMortality is increasing from non-neoplastic diseases, especially infectious and papulosquamous diseases. Demographic factors such age race and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity also confer differential risk.

  8. 77 FR 63844 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grants in Musculoskeletal Diseases (R03... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  9. 77 FR 28397 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, P30 Rheumatic Diseases Core Center Review. Date: June 13... Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  10. Numerical identity: the creation of tri-parental embryos to correct inherited mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    Inherited mitochondrial disorders affect between 1 in 5000 to 1 in 8000 people. These are a heterogeneous group of maternally-inherited disorders, with an array of outcomes such as heart and liver failure, defects in energy metabolism, blindness, deafness, loss of motor skills and premature death. Recently the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority provided advice to the UK Government to permit the use of enucleated donated oocytes with normal (wild-type) mitochondria (a currently prohibited IVF technique) to be used as recipients of nuclear DNA from intending mothers to overcome transmission of mitochondrial disorders. In this short communication we present the basis for this radical new IVF technology, and discuss the implications for its use both in the context of treating a group of inherited disorders and the current New Zealand IVF legislation.

  11. Management of "refractory" skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    Skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus can be subdivided into two broad categories-those lesions that, when biopsied, demonstrate an interface dermatitis and those that do not demonstrate an interface dermatitis. The skin lesions that are represented by the interface dermatitis include discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE), and acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Many patients with these cutaneous lesions can be managed with "standard" therapies, including sunscreens, protective clothing and behavioral alteration, and topical corticosteroids with or without an oral antimalarial agent. These standard therapies are often not used appropriately, resulting in a situation in which the patient is felt to have refractory disease. This chapter discusses these therapies and defines what is meant by refractory disease and how the author approaches these patients.

  12. Treatment of early diffuse systemic sclerosis skin disease.

    PubMed

    Frech, Tracy M; Shanmugam, Victoria K; Shah, Ami A; Assassi, Shervin; Gordon, Jessica K; Hant, Faye N; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Steen, Virginia; Khanna, Dinesh; Kayser, Cristiane; Domsic, Robyn T

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse systemic sclerosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. The Prospective Registry of Early Systemic Sclerosis (PRESS), a multicentre incident cohort study of patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, has the goal of advancing the understanding of disease pathogenesis and identifying novel biomarkers. In this review, PRESS investigators discuss the evidence pertaining to the more commonly used treatments for early diffuse SSc skin disease including methotrexate, mycophenolate, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and intravenous immunoglobulin. This review highlights the unmet need for effective treatment in early diffuse SSc as well as its more rigorous study. Nonetheless, the PRESS investigators aim to decrease intra- and inter-institutional variability in prescribing in order to improve the understanding of the clinical course of early diffuse SSc skin disease.

  13. Skin diseases among elderly inhabitants of Bialystok, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, Mateusz; Krajewska-Kulak, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to assess the most frequent skin diseases in people over 60 years old among residents of a public nursing home and students of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok. Subjects and methods The study was carried out from April to June 2015 in Bialystok, in two groups: 100 residents of a public nursing home and 100 participants of the University of the Third Age, aged over 60 years, using a method of diagnostic survey with the authors’ anonymous questionnaire. Results A total of 30.5% of respondents (n=61) had been treated due to skin diseases, most frequently for 6–10 years (26.2%). Fungal infection, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis were the most frequent dermatological diseases among the study elderly. The sites affected most frequently with these diseases were upper and lower extremities and the face. A majority of the examined (63.9%) visited a dermatologist, but only when it was necessary. Conclusion Skin diseases constitute a significant health problem among seniors. The elderly should be educated about healthy lifestyle, preventing the development of fungal infections. It is necessary to encourage seniors to visit dermatologists, seeking professional advice. PMID:26677319

  14. Skin microbiota: a source of disease or defence?

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, A. L.; Nizet, V.; Gallo, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Microbes found on the skin are usually regarded as pathogens, potential pathogens or innocuous symbiotic organisms. Advances in microbiology and immunology are revising our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of microbial virulence and the specific events involved in the host–microbe interaction. Current data contradict some historical classifications of cutaneous microbiota and suggest that these organisms may protect the host, defining them not as simple symbiotic microbes but rather as mutualistic. This review will summarize current information on bacterial skin flora including Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Propioni-bacterium, Streptococcus and Pseudomonas. Specifically, the review will discuss our current understanding of the cutaneous microbiota as well as shifting paradigms in the interpretation of the roles microbes play in skin health and disease. PMID:18275522

  15. A short history of phototherapy, vitamin D and skin disease.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Paul; Scragg, Robert

    2017-03-16

    The earliest record between sun exposure and skin disease goes back five millennia to the ancient Egyptians. The modern scientific era of medical light therapy and skin diseases started in 1877 when Downs and Blunt reported that exposure to light inhibited fungal growth in test tubes. Continuing research generated a growing medical interest in the potential the effects of light to treat and cure skin diseases considered as parasitic. This culminated in the awarding of the 1903 Nobel Prize in Medicine to Niels Finsen for his pioneering work showing that light could successfully treat cutaneous mycobacterium tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris), a disfiguring disorder common at the time. Cod liver oil was used as a folk remedy to treat rickets prior to 1789 in Manchester, UK and sunlight was published as the cure for this disease in 1921. The work by Hess and Weinstock in 1925 showed that food irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light prevented rickets in rats, which paved the way for the discovery of vitamin D. The range of skin diseases treated by light therapy increased in the following years, to the point where a 1932 review by the American Medical Association on the use of UV therapy in dermatology listed 34 skin conditions for which UV radiation may be useful. This period coincided with the development of sanatoria in Europe and North America which used heliotherapy for the treatment of tuberculosis. UV therapy and vitamin D continued to be used successfully for the treatment of tuberculosis up to the 1950s when it was superseded by more effective antibiotics. Modern phototherapy developed in the 1980s with the discovery of the action spectrum for psoriasis leading to the development of narrow band UVB. Subsequently a biological mechanism by which UV light and vitamin D treated tuberculosis was identified in 2006. This involves activation of human macrophages via toll-like receptors to upregulate the vitamin D receptor gene resulting in induction of the antimicrobial

  16. Something Old, Something New: Using Family History and Genetic Testing to Diagnose and Manage Athletes with Inherited Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Matthew J; Battle, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    A primary objective of the preparticipation physical examination is to identify athletes at increased risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Review of an athlete's family history may identify those at risk for SCA. Genetic testing for inherited cardiovascular disease has emerged as a valuable addition to the repertoire of cardiologists facing the decision of clearing athletes with concerning clinical signs and/or family histories. Genetic testing may lead to various outcomes for an athlete including: reassurance, diagnosis in those with borderline clinical features, finding disease predisposition prior to the onset of clinical signs (ie, genotype-positive/phenotype-negative), or continued uncertainty.

  17. 78 FR 66029 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Skin Diseases Amended; Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee, October 15, 2013, 8:00...

  18. 77 FR 14407 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, March...

  19. 77 FR 9671 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  20. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  1. 78 FR 76634 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  2. 77 FR 67824 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, November...

  3. 75 FR 63492 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  4. The New Human Genetics: A Cell Bank Helps Researchers Fight Inherited Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Maya

    Research in human genetics is now expanding rapidly, leading to increasingly precise ways of preventing or treating some of the 2,000 or more inherited disorders that afflict human beings. At the same time, it has produced a wealth of new ideas and techniques which are laying the groundwork for new medical science for the 21st century. Recent work…

  5. Work-related skin disease in the plastics industry.

    PubMed

    Socie, E M; Gromen, K D; Migliozzi, A A; Geidenberger, C A

    1997-05-01

    In a survey of a representative sample of workers taken at each of four different plastics manufacturers, 122 completed self-administered questionnaires were obtained. Twenty-six respondents (21.3%) met the case definition for having a work-related skin disorder during the preceding year. Sixteen (61.5%) cases indicated that their skin problems were present for 11 or more days, and 50% reported that their normal daily activities were at least somewhat affected. Risk of disease was elevated for workers who reported skin contact with formaldehyde (OR = 3.30; 95% CI = 1.02-10.69) or with polyvinyl-chlorides (PVCs) or their precursors (OR = 4.08; CI = 1.19-14.06), used barrier creams (OR = 4.51; CI = 1.22-16.68), were female (OR = 5.42; CI = 0.97-30.22), were 35 or younger (OR = 4.65; CI = 1.53-14.19), and for each use of hand cleaner at work (OR = 1.22; CI = 1.05-1.41). These findings should be considered when designing programs to reduce the incidence of skin disease among workers in the plastics industry.

  6. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations.

  7. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  8. Benign skin disease with pustules in the newborn*

    PubMed Central

    Reginatto, Flávia Pereira; Villa, Damie De; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal period comprises the first four weeks of life. It is a period of adaptation where the skin often presents several changes: transient lesions, resulting from a physiological response, others as a consequence of transient diseases and some as markers of severe disorders. The presence of pustules in the skin of the newborn is always a reason for the family and for the assisting doctor to be worried, since the newborn is especially vulnerable to bacterial, viral or fungal infection. However, the majority of neonatal skin pustules is not infectious, comprising the benign neonatal pustulosis. Benign neonatal pustuloses are a group of clinical disease characterized by pustular eruptions in which a contagious agent is not responsible for its etiology. The most common ones are erythema toxicum neonatorum, the transient neonatal pustular melanosis and the benign cephalic pustulosis. These dermatoses are usually benign, asymptomatic and self-limited. It is important that the dermatologist and the neonatologist can identify benign and transient lesions, those caused by genodermatoses, and especially differentiate between neonates with systemic involvement from those with benign skin lesions, avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and worries. PMID:27192509

  9. Three-parent in vitro fertilization: gene replacement for the prevention of inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Amato, Paula; Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nuclear genetic material between oocytes and embryos offers a novel reproductive option for the prevention of inherited mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been recognized as a significant cause of a number of serious multiorgan diseases. Tissues with a high metabolic demand, such as brain, heart, muscle, and central nervous system, are often affected. Mitochondrial disease can be due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial function. There is no curative treatment for patients with mitochondrial disease. Given the lack of treatments and the limitations of prenatal and preimplantation diagnosis, attention has focused on prevention of transmission of mitochondrial disease through germline gene replacement therapy. Because mitochondrial DNA is strictly maternally inherited, two approaches have been proposed. In the first, the nuclear genome from the pronuclear stage zygote of an affected woman is transferred to an enucleated donor zygote. A second technique involves transfer of the metaphase II spindle from the unfertilized oocyte of an affected woman to an enucleated donor oocyte. Our group recently reported successful spindle transfer between human oocytes, resulting in blastocyst development and embryonic stem cell derivation, with very low levels of heteroplasmy. In this review we summarize these novel assisted reproductive techniques and their use to prevent transmission of mitochondrial disorders. The promises and challenges are discussed, focusing on their potential clinical application.

  10. Measurement of the area of involvement in skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roening, Juha; Kontinen, Jukka

    1996-10-01

    The ability to assess the severity of dermatoses by measuring the area of involvement is important in both clinical practice and research, but it has been shown that physicians, nurses and other groups are unable to do this accurately. A common practice in current use is the 'rule of nine' method, but wide variations have been found between observers' estimates. The purpose of this work was to test and demonstrate the feasibility of a computer vision technique for measuring the area of involvement in skin diseases by developing a system for psoriasis area assessment form slides, which can be operated in an image processing environment. The exact percentage of the slide area involved varied from 1 percent to 59 percent, thus providing realistic material for the system. The system proved sufficiently accurate, and the techniques evidently have a potential for inclusion as parts of a more accurate and rapid method for area measurement in the case of skin diseases.

  11. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grants Research Review. Date: October 13, 2011... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  12. 78 FR 18357 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Loan Repayment Program Review. Date: April 15... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  13. 77 FR 4051 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Osteoarthritis Initiative. Date: February 14, 2012... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard,...

  14. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  15. 76 FR 77544 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: January 31,...

  16. 77 FR 60447 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  17. 78 FR 66021 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Mentored Career Development, Institutional Research... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact...

  18. 77 FR 59937 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  19. 76 FR 61722 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  20. 77 FR 32651 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Program Project Grant Review. Date: June 13, 2012. Time... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  1. 78 FR 9933 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies To Large Clinical Projects Grant... Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  2. 76 FR 14035 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training and Pathways to..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  3. 76 FR 1187 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 1,...

  4. 78 FR 17679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Clinical Trial Outcome Development. Date: March 29... Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-594-4953,...

  5. 75 FR 70679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials Review. Date: December 2, 2010. Time: 8..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  6. 76 FR 6806 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies Grant Review. Date: February 22, 2011... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  7. 77 FR 12605 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee....

  8. 78 FR 29144 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Large Clinical Projects Grant... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite...

  9. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  10. 75 FR 6046 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies. Date: February 16, 2010... of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special...

  11. 78 FR 32261 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  12. 77 FR 16246 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  13. 75 FR 14173 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Research Funding Opportunities. Date... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, 6701 Democracy Blvd, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  14. 76 FR 24892 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trial Pilot Grant Review. Date: May 12, 2011..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  15. 78 FR 21617 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard,...

  16. 78 FR 64509 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  17. 78 FR 25753 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 4,...

  18. 77 FR 61011 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  19. 77 FR 47653 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  20. 75 FR 48979 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  1. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  2. 75 FR 34752 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project Grant Review. Date: July 2, 2010. Time... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical...

  3. 76 FR 31968 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Large Ongoing Clinical Projects..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, Bethesda,...

  4. 78 FR 38065 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  5. 77 FR 26301 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 5,...

  6. 75 FR 27352 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  7. 76 FR 13649 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal And Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Program Project Grant Review. Date: March 24, 2011. Time... Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, MSC 4872, Bethesda,...

  8. 78 FR 7790 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  9. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  10. 78 FR 47327 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  11. 77 FR 20646 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project Grant Review. Date: April 25, 2012. Time..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  12. 77 FR 18253 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Review. Date: April 9, 2012. Time: 2 p.m..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  13. 77 FR 75181 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 5,...

  14. 75 FR 54897 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Muscle Physiology Review. Date: September 15, 2010. Time... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  15. 78 FR 36789 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03... Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  16. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-02-06

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  17. 78 FR 13364 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-02-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS BIRT grant review. Date: March 19-20, 2013. Time..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Plaza, Suite 800, Bethesda,...

  18. 78 FR 58320 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-09-23

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  19. 75 FR 28260 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 15,...

  20. 78 FR 70312 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-25

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Innovation Research on Rare Musculoskeletal, Rheumatic and Skin Diseases. Date: December 16, 2013. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda:...

  1. 75 FR 6676 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  2. 78 FR 20118 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-04-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  3. 77 FR 38847 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grant Research Review (R03). Date: July 18, 2012...,Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 824, MSC...

  4. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-09-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  5. 75 FR 63496 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 8, 2010. Jennifer...

  6. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  7. 77 FR 35416 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel; Program..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  8. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Building Interdisciplinary Research Team Review... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  9. 75 FR 67989 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 28, 2010....

  10. 76 FR 28440 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  11. 76 FR 51044 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  12. 77 FR 27470 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group;Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee....

  13. 76 FR 24896 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 14,...

  14. Skin symptoms as diagnostic clue for autoinflammatory diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Alvaro; Torres, Barbara; Peruzzo, Juliano; Mota, Alberto; Eyerich, Kilian; Ring, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are immune-mediated diseases with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and absence of detectable autoantibodies. They course with recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation and fever is the most common symptom. Cutaneous manifestations are prevalent and important to diagnosis and early treatment of the syndromes. The purpose of this review is to emphasize to dermatologists the skin symptoms present in these syndromes in order to provide their early diagnosis. PMID:28225960

  15. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  16. An unusual case of granulomatous slack skin disease with necrobiosis.

    PubMed

    Benton, Emma Clare; Morris, Stephen L; Robson, Alistair; Whittaker, Sean J

    2008-10-01

    Granulomatous slack skin disease (GSS) is a very rare form of T-cell lymphoma, with only 52 cases reported in the literature. In the recent World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus classification GSS is considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. We describe a patient with GSS and histologic evidence of necrobiosis, which has not been previously reported.

  17. Neutralising antibodies to lumpy skin disease virus in African wildlife.

    PubMed

    Hedger, R S; Hamblin, C

    1983-01-01

    A total of 3445 sera from 44 different wild species collected between 1963 and 1982 in 11 African countries south of the Sahara, were examined for neutralising antibodies to Lumpy Skin Diseases (LSD) Virus (prototype Neethling). Antibodies were demonstrated in six species but were of low prevalence. It was concluded from the generally negative results, that wildlife in Africa probably does not play a very important part in he perpetuation and spread of LSD Virus.

  18. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease*

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; de Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity. PMID:25387503

  19. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença de; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity.

  20. Serum Biochemistry of Lumpy Skin Disease Virus-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Oğuzhan; Doğan, Müge; İnce, Ömer Barış

    2016-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease is an economically important poxvirus disease of cattle. Vaccination is the main method of control but sporadic outbreaks have been reported in Turkey. This study was carried out to determine the changes in serum biochemical values of cattle naturally infected with lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). For this study, blood samples in EDTA, serum samples, and nodular skin lesions were obtained from clinically infected animals (n = 15) whereas blood samples in EDTA and serum samples were collected from healthy animals (n = 15). A quantitative real-time PCR method was used to detect Capripoxvirus (CaPV) DNA in clinical samples. A real-time PCR high-resolution melt assay was performed to genotype CaPVs. Serum cardiac, hepatic, and renal damage markers and lipid metabolism products were measured by autoanalyzer. LSDV nucleic acid was detected in all samples which were obtained from clinically infected cattle. The results of serum biochemical analysis showed that aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and creatinine concentrations were markedly increased in serum from infected animals. However, there were no significant differences in the other biochemical parameters evaluated. The results of the current study suggest that liver and kidney failures occur during LSDV infection. These findings may help in developing effective treatment strategies in LSDV infection. PMID:27294125

  1. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 12 inherited retinal disease probands of Uyghur ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Tajiguli, Abulikemu; Xu, Mingchu; Fu, Qing; Yiming, Rouzimaimaiti; Wang, Keqing; Li, Yumei; Eblimit, Aiden; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2016-02-09

    Inherited retinal disease (IRD) is a category of genetic disorders affecting retina. Understanding the molecular basis of IRD is vital for clinical and genetic classification of patients. Uyghur people is an isolated ethnic group mainly residing in northwestern China with genetic admixture from Europeans and East Asians. The genetic etiology of IRD in this specific population still remains unknown. Here, by next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in over 200 known retinal disease genes in a cohort of 12 unrelated Uyghur IRD probands. Out of the 12 probands, six are solved with high confidence, two with low confidence, while the remaining four are unsolved. We identified known disease-causing alleles in this cohort that suggest ancient Uyghur migration and also discovered eight novel disease-associated variants. Our results showed NGS-based mutation screening as a reliable approach for molecular diagnosis. In addition, this approach can also be applied to reveal the genetic history of a specific ethnic group.

  2. Evidence of intrauterine transmission of lumpy skin disease virus.

    PubMed

    Rouby, Sherin; Aboulsoud, Emad

    2016-03-01

    The current study describes the clinical, histopathological, molecular and serological diagnosis of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in a premature 1-day old calf that has been delivered from a cow that exhibited signs of LSD during the seventh month of pregnancy. The calf showed generalized skin lesions accompanied with signs of immaturity and died 36 h after birth. Postmortem and histopathological examinations revealed the involvement of multiple tissues. The presence of Neethling virus DNA in tissues was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Results of ELISA and serum neutralization test (SNT) confirmed that the calf had developed precolostral serum antibodies to LSD virus indicating in utero virus transmission. All tested sera collected from animals located in the same area were serologically positive, indicating exposure to LSD virus.

  3. [Skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Clarissa Morais Busatto; Gussão, Bruna Calvi; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffá

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world is facing an escalate in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Databases containing information about patients in end stage renal disease (ESRD), especially in the United States, were the sources of initial information about it. Brazil has the third largest population on dialysis in the world, and there are about 680 dialysis centers, spread across all units of the federation in the present, providing treatment to an estimated population of almost 90,000 patients. Cutaneous involvement in the chronic renal failure is characterized by a number of manifestations, which may be related to three processes: the primary renal disease, the uremic state, or the therapeutic measures used in their handling. The skin changes in these two classes of patients, dialysis and transplant recipients, have been the subject of several studies. n recent years, however, great progress has been achieved in these two therapeutic modalities, which may have changed not only the type of the dermatologic disorders associated with these two conditions, but also their intensity or frequency. This article aims to yield an update as to the topic skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients.

  4. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Borate, Bhavesh; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2009-09-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on and clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  5. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-04-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on the clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  6. An Excess of Risk-Increasing Low-Frequency Variants Can Be a Signal of Polygenic Inheritance in Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yingleong; Lim, Elaine T.; Sandholm, Niina; Wang, Sophie R.; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Ripke, Stephan; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Salem, Rany M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    In most complex diseases, much of the heritability remains unaccounted for by common variants. It has been postulated that lower-frequency variants contribute to the remaining heritability. Here, we describe a method to test for polygenic inheritance from lower-frequency variants by using GWAS summary association statistics. We explored scenarios with many causal low-frequency variants and showed that there is more power to detect risk variants than to detect protective variants, resulting in an increase in the ratio of detected risk to protective variants (R/P ratio). Such an excess can also occur if risk variants are present and kept at lower frequencies because of negative selection. The R/P ratio can be falsely elevated because of reasons unrelated to polygenic inheritance, such as uneven sample sizes or asymmetric population stratification, so precautions to correct for these confounders are essential. We tested our method on published GWAS results and observed a strong signal in some diseases (schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes) but not others. We also explored the shared genetic component in overlapping phenotypes related to inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]) and diabetic nephropathy (macroalbuminuria and end-stage renal disease [ESRD]). Although the signal was still present when both CD and UC were jointly analyzed, the signal was lost when macroalbuminuria and ESRD were jointly analyzed, suggesting that these phenotypes should best be studied separately. Thus, our method may also help guide the design of future genetic studies of various traits and diseases. PMID:24607388

  7. 77 FR 51544 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. Date... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  8. 77 FR 1702 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the... Inflammation Branch and the Laboratory of Skin Biology. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31,...

  9. 76 FR 9031 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the... Branch and the Laboratory of Skin Biology. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31...

  10. 75 FR 29770 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  11. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Centers. Date... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  12. Internet resources cataloguing inherited disorders in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Crook, Alice; Sargan, David R

    2011-08-01

    Up-to-date annotated catalogues of known inherited disorders in dogs are freely available on the Internet, providing vital information to existing and prospective dog owners, dog breeders, veterinarians, geneticists and others interested in the occurrence and control of inherited disorders. These resources are the Canine Inherited Disorders Database (CIDD), Inherited Diseases in Dogs (IDID) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) the latter associated with Listing of Inherited Disorders in Animals (LIDA). The history and features of these resources are summarised.

  13. The Malassezia Genus in Skin and Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    Summary: In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  14. Autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Part 1: Clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Kneisel, Andrea; Hertl, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases are characterized by autoantibodies against adhesion molecules of the skin. Pemphigus is a disorder with an intraepidermal loss of adhesion and is characterized by fragile blisters and erosions. Pemphigus vulgaris often shows extensive lesions of the oral mucosa, while pemphigus foliaceus is commonly restricted to cutaneous involvement with puff pastry-like scale formation. Paraneoplastic pemphigus is obligatorily associated with malignancies and often presents as hemorrhagic stomatitis with multiforme-like exanthems. IgA pemphigus typically presents with pustules and annular plaques but not with mucosal involvement. The clinical spectrum of the pemphigoids includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo- like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a "cluster of jewels"-like pattern in childhood and is more heterogeneous in adulthood. Classical epidermolysis bullosa acquisita shows extensive skin fragility. Dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and manifests clinically with severe itching and papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The intention of the review is to demonstrate the heterogeneous clinical spectrum of autoimmune bullous disorders.

  15. The Malassezia genus in skin and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, Georgios; Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. Evidence of major genes for resistance to bacterial cold-water disease in rainbow trout using mixed inheritance multiple-threshold models and Bayesian segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture, and in 2005, a rainbow trout breeding program was initiated at the NCCCWA to select for increased disease survival. The main objectives of this study were to determine the mode of inheritance of di...

  17. Evidence for major gene inheritance of Alzheimer disease in families of patients with and without Apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Auerbach, S.A.; Farrer, L.A.

    1996-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is the single most important determinant to the common form of Alzheimer disease (AD) yet identified. Several studies show that family history of AD is not entirely accounted for by APOE genotype. Also, there is evidence for an interaction between APOE genotype and gender. We carried out a complex segregation analysis in 636 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands in the Multi-Institutional Research in Alzheimer Genetic Epidemiology study in order to derive models of disease transmission which account for the influences of APOE genotype of the proband and gender. In the total group of families, models postulating sporadic occurrence, no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, and Mendelian inheritance were rejected. Transmission of AD in families of probands with at least one {epsilon}4 allele best fit a dominant model. Moreover, single gene inheritance best explained clustering of the disorder in families of probands lacking E4, but a more complex genetic model or multiple genetic models may ultimately account for risk in this group of families. Our results also suggest that susceptibility to AD differs between men and women regardless of the proband`s APOE status. Assuming a dominant model, AD appears to be completely penetrant in women, whereas only 62%-65% of men with predisposing genotypes develop AD. However, parameter estimates from the arbitrary major gene model suggests that AD is expressed dominantly in women and additively in men. These observations, taken together with epidemiologic data, are consistent with the hypothesis of an interaction between genes and other biological factors affecting disease susceptibility. 76 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  19. Chemokines and cytokines network in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory skin diseases: atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and skin mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nedoszytko, Bogusław; Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Roszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Nowicki, Roman J

    2014-05-01

    Chemokines are signaling peptides which regulate cell trafficking and provide control of the tissue-specific cell homing. In the skin, chemokines are secreted both by the resident cells such as keratinocytes, melanocytes, fibroblasts, dendritic cells and mast cells, as well as by infiltrated cells - lymphocytes, eosinophils, and monocytes. Chemokines, together with cytokines, participate in induction and maintenance of inflammation in the skin and regulate the composition of the cellular infiltrates. Inflammation within the skin is a feature shared by atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, two of the most common dermatoses. Accumulation of activated mast cells in the affected skin is seen both in atopic dermatitis and in psoriasis. This paper presents a concise overview of the current knowledge on the role chemokines have in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and mastocytosis, a disease caused directly by the accumulation and activation of mast cells in the skin.

  20. Radiation therapy for Bowen's disease of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas VanderSpek, Lauren A. . E-mail: lauren.vanderspek@lrcc.on.ca; Pond, Gregory R.; Wells, Woodrow; Tsang, Richard W.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome in the radiation therapy (RT) of squamous carcinoma in situ of the skin (Bowen's disease). We focused on the local control rate and the toxicity according to the biologically effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 44 patients with Bowen's disease treated at Princess Margaret Hospital from April 1985 to November 2000. RT was the primary treatment for 32 patients, whereas 12 received RT for residual disease after local ablative therapy. Lesions were located as follows: scalp, 9 patients (20%); face, 12 (27%); trunk, 6 (14%), extremity, 12 (27%), perianal, 3 (7%), and penis, 2 (5%). Orthovoltage X-rays were used in the majority (39 of 44, 89%). There was no standard fractionation regimen: some physicians prescribed high doses, as for invasive skin cancer, whereas others prescribed lower doses because of the noninvasive nature of the disease, a sensitive anatomic location (e.g., extremity), or large treatment area. Because of the variations in fractionation regimens, BED was used as a common metric for biologic effect in the comparison of different regimens and analyzed for correlation with recurrence and toxicity. Local control was defined as the lack of persistent or recurrent disease at the treated site for the follow-up period. Grade 4 toxicity was defined as necrosis (cartilage/bone damage) and/or ulceration for a duration of >3 months. Results: The mean patient age was 67.7 years, and the male/female ratio was 29:15. The median pretreatment lesion size was 2.65 cm{sup 2} (range, 0.07-34.56 cm{sup 2}). Complete remission was achieved in 42 patients, with follow-up unavailable for the remaining 2 patients. Subsequently, 3 patients experienced recurrences at 0.2, 1.1, and 1-1.5 years after complete remission. One recurrence was Bowen's disease (local); the others were squamous cell carcinoma (one local, one marginal). Four patients experienced a new squamous lesion at a distant

  1. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  2. Occupational skin diseases: options for multidisciplinary networking in preventive medicine

    PubMed Central

    John, Swen Malte

    2008-01-01

    Occupational dermatoses (OD) have topped the list of occupational diseases in Germany for years. Presently, approximately 16,000 new OD cases are officially reported to public statutory employers’ liability insurance bodies, each year. The disease burden is high not only for individuals but also for society as a whole. Estimated annual economic costs in Germany due to sick-leave and lack of productivity due to OD are more than 1.5 billion euros. Thus, in recent years, various pilot initiatives aiming to improve prevention of occupational skin diseases (of various degrees of severity) have been developed and recently evaluated in Osnabrück. These activities have been funded by statutory employers’ liability insurance schemes. Concepts underpinning these initiatives include multidisciplinary skin protection teaching programs for various high-risk professions, which turned out to be pivotal for the success of these projects. A corollary of this work is a nationwide multi-step intervention approach currently implemented by the public statutory insurance system. This approach offers quick preventive help for all levels of severity of OD. These nation-wide activities are accompanied by a national Prevention Campaign: Skin 2007/2008 (Figure 1 (Fig. 1)), which focuses mainly on primary prevention. Despite the high prevalence of OD and its poor prognosis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying individual susceptibility to develop chronic irritant dermatitis. Skin irritation tests are thus far of only limited value. Presently, our institution, in collaboration with Amsterdam universities, focuses on immunogenetic risk factors potentially involved in individual susceptibility to OD in order to improve pre-employment counseling and predictive skin testing. For early secondary prevention, the so-called dermatologist’s procedure was recently up-dated in order to provide more rapid dermatological consultation. Additionally, combined outpatient

  3. Localization of the defect in skin diseases analyzed in the human skin graft-nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Briggaman, R A

    1980-01-01

    Human skin can be grown away from its donor for prolonged periods as grafts on congenitally athymic "nude" mice. This system has been used to analyze the defect in several skin diseases, specifically to localize the site of the defect to the skin itself or to the epidermal or dermal components of the skin. In order to validate the use of the nude mouse human skin graft system in the analysis of skin defects, we have demonstrated that a systemic metabolic defect which involves the skin, namely essential fatty acid deficiency, can be differentiated from a defect residing primarily in the skin itself. Skin-marker systems have been developed for use with the nude mouse-human skin graft model to document the identity of human skin grafts and epidermal and dermal components of the grafts after prolonged periods of growth on the nude athymic mice. Y-body, a small fluorescent segment of the Y-chromosome seen in interphase cells, is used as a sex marker and serves to distinguish sex differences between the graft and the mouse recipient or between skin components of the graft. The ABH "blood-group" antigens are present on differentiated epidermal cell surfaces and identify the grafted epidermis according to the blood groups of the donor. In previous studies, lamellar ichthyosis was shown to be well maintained after prolonged periods of growth on nude athymic mice, indicating that the defect in this disease resides in the skin itself. Recombinant grafts composed of normal and lamellar ichthyosis epidermis and dermis further localize the defect to lamellar ichthyosis epidermis. Psoriasis is well maintained on the nude mouse-skin graft model. The epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferative epidermal cell kinetics of psoriasis are manifested in the grafts of active psoriasis maintained for prolonged periods on the nude mice, but the inflammatory component of psoriasis is absent. Recombinant graft studies utilizing normal and psoriatic epidermis and dermis demonstrate psoriasis

  4. Skin diseases of rodents and small exotic mammals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, C; Mori, M

    2001-05-01

    Small exotic mammals and rodents are becoming popular pets in the United States. Like most other exotics, the popularity of these animals has vastly preceded the accumulation of practical husbandry and veterinary information available about them. Several dermatologic conditions have been described in most rodents and small exotic mammals; however, the practitioner can assume that more exist that have not yet been diagnosed or documented. It is not unreasonable to assume that rodents and small exotic mammals could be affected by many of the same dermatologic conditions well described in other animals. Veterinarians are encouraged always to apply the same diagnostic protocols used to work up skin problems in dogs and cats when presented with an exotic pet with a dermatologic disease.

  5. Observations on the epidemiology of lumpy skin disease in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Davies, F G

    1982-02-01

    Lumpy skin disease virus strains isolated in Kenya over a period of some 20 years have proved to be serologically identical. They were indistinguishable by indirect fluorescent antibody and serum neutralization test from the South African Neethling and West African serotypes. These two serological methods proved of value in studying the antibody responses to infection. While epizootic spread of LSD has occurred in Kenya, most cases are of a sporadic nature and are thought to be the result of accidental contacts with a maintenance cycle. There is evidence of antibody to LSD in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in those areas where LSD is considered to be enzootic in Kenya, and also in small numbers of domestic cattle. No buffalo or bovine sera contained antibody to cowpox virus. An area enzootic for LSD is proposed and it is suggested that the maintenance cycle involves the buffalo. No antibody was found in the other wild ruminant species examined.

  6. Soil Correlates and Mortality from Giraffe Skin Disease in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bond, Monica L; Strauss, Megan K L; Lee, Derek E

    2016-10-01

    Giraffe skin disease (GSD) is a disorder of undetermined etiology that causes lesions on the forelimbs of Masai giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi) in Tanzania, East Africa. We examined soil correlates of prevalence of GSD from 951 giraffe in 14 sites in Tanzania, and estimated mortality using 3 yr of longitudinal mark-recapture data from 382 giraffe with and without GSD lesions, in Tarangire National Park (TNP). Spatial variation in GSD prevalence was best explained by soil fertility, measured as cation exchange capacity. We found no mortality effect of GSD on adult giraffe in TNP. Based on our findings, GSD is unlikely to warrant immediate veterinary intervention, but continued monitoring is recommended to ensure early detection if GSD-afflicted animals begin to show signs of increased mortality or other adverse effects.

  7. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing healthcare resources. Purpose Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods 304 migrant and seasonal Latino farmworkers in North Carolina were enrolled in a longitudinal study of skin disease and healthcare utilization over a single agricultural season. Self-reported and dermatologist-diagnosed skin condition data were collected at baseline and at up to four follow-up assessments. Medical visit rates were compared to national norms. Findings Self-reported skin problems and diagnosed skin disease were common among farmworkers. However, only 34 health care visits were reported across the entire agricultural season, and none of the visits were for skin diseases. Nevertheless, self-treatment for skin conditions was common, including use of non-prescription preparations (63%), prescription products (9%), and home remedies (6%). General medical office visits were reported in 3.2% of the assessments, corresponding to 1.6 office visits per person year. Conclusions The migrant farmworker population consists largely of young men who make little use of clinic services. Skin conditions are very common among these workers, but use of medical services for these conditions is not common. Instead, farmworkers rely primarily on self-treatment. Clinic-based studies of farmworker skin conditions will not account for most injury or disease in this population and have the potential for biased estimates. PMID:19166568

  8. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-02-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases.

  9. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Joseph C; Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Songstad, Allison E; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-02-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance: Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person's cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed.

  10. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Joseph C.; Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; Songstad, Allison E.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person’s cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed. PMID:26683869

  11. Feasibility and outcomes of ajmaline provocation testing for Brugada syndrome in children in a specialist paediatric inherited cardiovascular diseases centre

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Merlin Ranald; Day, Thomas George; Bartsota, Margarita; Mead-Regan, Sarah; Bryant, Rory; Mangat, Jasveer; Abrams, Dominic; Lowe, Martin; Kaski, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited arrhythmia syndrome that causes sudden cardiac death in the young. The class Ia antiarrhythmic ajmaline can be used to provoke the diagnostic ECG pattern. Its use has been established in adults, but little data exist on the ajmaline provocation test in children. This study aims to determine the safety and feasibility of ajmaline provocation testing in a large paediatric cohort in a specialist paediatric inherited cardiac diseases centre. Methods 98 consecutive ajmaline tests were performed in 95 children between September 2004 and July 2012 for family history of BrS (n=46 (48%)); family history of unexplained sudden cardiac death (n=39 (41%); symptoms with suspicious ECG abnormalities (n=9 (10%)). Three patients were retested with age, due to the possibility of age-related penetrance. ECG parameters were measured at baseline and during maximal ajmaline effect. Results The mean patient age was 12.55 years, 43% were female. Nineteen patients (20%) had a positive ajmaline test. There were no arrhythmias or adverse events during testing. Ajmaline provoked significant prolongation of the PR, QRS and QTc in all patients. Mean follow-up was 3.62 years with no adverse outcomes reported in any patients with BrS. There were no predictors of a positive ajmaline provocation test on multivariable analysis. One patient who tested negative at 12 years of age, subsequently tested positive at 15 years of age. Conclusions Ajmaline testing appears safe and feasible in children when performed in an appropriate setting by an experienced team. Test positivity may change with age in individuals, suggesting that the test should be repeated in the late teenage years or early adulthood. PMID:25332787

  12. Functional imaging of inherited retinal disease with a commercial optical coherence tomography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, T.; Hoyng, C. B.; Klevering, B. J.; Cense, B.

    2011-06-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are blinding diseases affecting visual acuity mostly at young age. Intrinsic optical signals (IOS) on optical coherence tomography (OCT) may give topographical information on injure of retinal function in these patients. We demonstrate light response of the healthy and diseased human retina by IOS on a commercially available spectral-domain OCT. Significant IOS could be measured in the healthy retina and in unchanged retinal sectors of the RD patients. Main responses were located in the outer retina (photoreceptors) and the nerve fiber layer. In affected areas of RD eyes IOS were significantly reduced or even absent. Functional OCT imaging was able to give information about retinal function in RD patients on a micrometer scale. These results could be of value for refined disease analysis and control of upcoming gene therapy studies.

  13. Biomedical genetics of the inherited metabolic diseases: the GM2-gangliosidoses.

    PubMed

    Kolodny, E H

    1984-03-01

    Many of the known gene defects result in inborn errors of metabolism that produce irreversible damage to the central nervous system. A variety of new clinical, morphologic, biochemical, and genetic techniques are being used to characterize these disorders more precisely. At the Shriver Center, the different genotypes of GM2-gangliosidosis are distinguished according to the ability of cells in culture to metabolize radioactively-labeled GM2-ganglioside. Large-scale screening for carriers of the trait for Tay-Sachs disease, the most common of the GM2-gangliosidoses, has dramatically reduced the incidence of this disease. Current efforts to isolate the genes for the alpha and beta chains of hexosaminidase A will lay the groundwork for better understanding of the molecular defects in these diseases and offers hope for a possible treatment.

  14. Beyond spaghetti and meatballs: skin diseases associated with the Malassezia yeasts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Nikki A

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia are common lipid-dependent fungi that grow on the sebaceous areas of human skin, including the face, scalp, and upper trunk. Although Malassezia are a part of the normal human skin flora, they may also cause or exacerbate several skin diseases, including tinea versicolor, Pityrosporum folliculitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Topical antifungals are the mainstay of treating Malassezia-related diseases. Chronic prophylaxis is often required to prevent recurrences.

  15. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  16. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  17. 76 FR 40385 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Studies to Large Ongoing Clinical Projects... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  18. 76 FR 65737 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials Grant Review. Date: November 21, 2011... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  19. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing health care resources. Purpose: Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods: Three hundred and four migrant…

  20. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel. Clinical Trials Planning Pilot and Research. Date: July...D, Chief, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  1. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in Known Retinal Disease Genes in 33 out of 68 Israeli Families with Inherited Retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Shevah, Elia; Kimchi, Adva; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Khateb, Samer; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Lazar, Csilla H.; Blumenfeld, Anat; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Hemo, Yitzhak; Pe’er, Jacob; Averbuch, Eduard; Sagi, Michal; Boleda, Alexis; Gieser, Linn; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Falik-Zaccai, Tzipora; Alimi-Kasem, Ola; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Chowers, Itay; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) is a powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in the human genome. The goal of this study was to delineate the genetic defects in patients with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) using WES. WES was performed on 90 patient DNA samples from 68 families and 226 known genes for IRDs were analyzed. Sanger sequencing was used to validate potential pathogenic variants that were also subjected to segregation analysis in families. Thirty-three causative mutations (19 novel and 14 known) in 25 genes were identified in 33 of the 68 families. The vast majority of mutations (30 out of 33) have not been reported in the Israeli and the Palestinian populations. Nine out of the 33 mutations were detected in additional families from the same ethnic population, suggesting a founder effect. In two families, identified phenotypes were different from the previously reported clinical findings associated with the causative gene. This is the largest genetic analysis of IRDs in the Israeli and Palestinian populations to date. We also demonstrate that WES is a powerful tool for rapid analysis of known disease genes in large patient cohorts. PMID:26306921

  2. Molecular and Bioenergetic Differences between Cells with African versus European Inherited Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups: Implications for Population Susceptibility to Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, M. Cristina; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres del Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis P.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The geographic origins of populations can be identified by their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. This study compared human cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which are cell lines with identical nuclei but mitochondria from different individuals with mtDNA from either the H haplogroup or L haplogroup backgrounds. The most common European haplogroup is H while individuals of maternal African origin are of the L haplogroup. Despite lower mtDNA copy numbers, L cybrids had higher expression levels for nine mtDNA-encoded respiratory complex genes, decreased ATP turnover rates and lower levels of ROS production, parameters which are consistent with more efficient oxidative phosphorylation. Surprisingly, GeneChip arrays showed that the L and H cybrids had major differences in expression of genes of the canonical complement system (5 genes), dermatan/chondroitin sulfate biosynthesis (5 genes) and CCR3 signaling (9 genes). Quantitative nuclear gene expression studies confirmed that L cybrids had (a) lower expression levels of complement pathway and innate immunity genes and (b) increased levels of inflammation-related signaling genes, which are critical in human diseases. Our data support the hypothesis that mtDNA haplogroups representing populations from different geographic origins may play a role in differential susceptibilities to diseases. PMID:24200652

  3. Emotional reactions to predictive testing in Alzheimer's disease and other inherited dementias.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José L; Pintor, Luis; Peri, Josep M; Lleó, Alberto; Oliva, Rafael; Marcos, Teodor; Blesa, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the reasons and emotional responses of healthy descendants after counseling for presenilin mutations in early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD), tau mutations in familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and prion mutations in fatal familial insomnia (FFI). A multidisciplinary protocol following Huntington's disease counseling guidelines and a post-test follow-up program were developed to counsel healthy descendants of affected families. The psychological consequences, anxiety levels, and depression status were assessed through validated scales before and after disclosing the information. Nine people from three different families, one with EOFAD, another with FTD, and the other with FFI came for counseling. Their main reason for testing was to initiate early treatment in the future. Disclosing the information decreased anxiety in two carriers, increased it temporarily in one, and had no effect in another. All noncarriers felt relieved. Overall, after a mean of 30 months of follow-up, no negative psychological reactions were observed. All participants positively valued the program. Although preliminary, our observations suggest that predictive testing in EOFAD, FTD, and FFI is safe and may be of benefit when performed with a delicate approach under strict pretest counseling protocols and post-test follow-up programs. The emotional reactions were similar, although the diseases, their phenotype, and mutation characteristics were different.

  4. [Inheritance and disease in the pig: possibilities of use for breeding].

    PubMed

    Vögeli; Bertschinger; Bürgi; Neuenschwander

    2014-06-01

    Single-locus disorders in domesticated animals were among the first Mendelian traits to be documented, and to be included in early linkage maps. The use of linkage maps and comparative genomics has been essential to the identification of the causative genes for disorders. A DNA marker for selection of resistance to F18+ E. coli in the pig is available since several years. The use of this marker decreases mortality due to post-weaning diarrhoea and/or oedema disease. For more than 100 disorders the molecular lesion has been identified and hence for which a DNA test is available. However, for most diseases such as Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) and Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases (PCVAD), resistance is a complex and polygenic trait. Novel technologies such as gene microarrays and advanced bioinformatics are being used to analyse health data. Lagging behind, however, is availability of large DNA data sets from pedigreed populations with accurately measured health phenotypes that are needed to identify associations between markers and health traits. As the pig genome is sequenced to a great extent and ten thousands of markers can be analysed at a reasonable price, genomic selection for health traits is possible.

  5. Inheritance of coronary artery disease in men: an analysis of the role of the Y chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Charchar, Fadi J; Bloomer, Lisa DS; Barnes, Timothy A; Cowley, Mark J; Nelson, Christopher P; Wang, Yanzhong; Denniff, Matthew; Debiec, Radoslaw; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Nankervis, Scott; Dominiczak, Anna F; Bani-Mustafa, Ahmed; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Erdmann, Jeanette; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Hengstenberg, Christian; Packard, Chris; Schunkert, Heribert; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ford, Ian; Goodall, Alison H; Jobling, Mark A; Samani, Nilesh J; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background A sexual dimorphism exists in the incidence and prevalence of coronary artery disease—men are more commonly affected than are age-matched women. We explored the role of the Y chromosome in coronary artery disease in the context of this sexual inequity. Methods We genotyped 11 markers of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome in 3233 biologically unrelated British men from three cohorts: the British Heart Foundation Family Heart Study (BHF-FHS), West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), and Cardiogenics Study. On the basis of this information, each Y chromosome was tracked back into one of 13 ancient lineages defined as haplogroups. We then examined associations between common Y chromosome haplogroups and the risk of coronary artery disease in cross-sectional BHF-FHS and prospective WOSCOPS. Finally, we undertook functional analysis of Y chromosome effects on monocyte and macrophage transcriptome in British men from the Cardiogenics Study. Findings Of nine haplogroups identified, two (R1b1b2 and I) accounted for roughly 90% of the Y chromosome variants among British men. Carriers of haplogroup I had about a 50% higher age-adjusted risk of coronary artery disease than did men with other Y chromosome lineages in BHF-FHS (odds ratio 1·75, 95% CI 1·20–2·54, p=0·004), WOSCOPS (1·45, 1·08–1·95, p=0·012), and joint analysis of both populations (1·56, 1·24–1·97, p=0·0002). The association between haplogroup I and increased risk of coronary artery disease was independent of traditional cardiovascular and socioeconomic risk factors. Analysis of macrophage transcriptome in the Cardiogenics Study revealed that 19 molecular pathways showing strong differential expression between men with haplogroup I and other lineages of the Y chromosome were interconnected by common genes related to inflammation and immunity, and that some of them have a strong relevance to atherosclerosis. Interpretation The human Y chromosome is

  6. iPS cell modeling of Best disease: insights into the pathophysiology of an inherited macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchira; Shen, Wei; Kuai, David; Martin, Jessica M; Guo, Xiangrong; Smith, Molly A; Perez, Enio T; Phillips, M Joseph; Simonett, Joseph M; Wallace, Kyle A; Verhoeven, Amelia D; Capowski, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Yin, Yingnan; Halbach, Patrick J; Fishman, Gerald A; Wright, Lynda S; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Gamm, David M

    2013-02-01

    Best disease (BD) is an inherited degenerative disease of the human macula that results in progressive and irreversible central vision loss. It is caused by mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) gene BESTROPHIN1 (BEST1), which, through mechanism(s) that remain unclear, lead to the accumulation of subretinal fluid and autofluorescent waste products from shed photoreceptor outer segments (POSs). We employed human iPS cell (hiPSC) technology to generate RPE from BD patients and unaffected siblings in order to examine the cellular and molecular processes underlying this disease. Consistent with the clinical phenotype of BD, RPE from mutant hiPSCs displayed disrupted fluid flux and increased accrual of autofluorescent material after long-term POS feeding when compared with hiPSC-RPE from unaffected siblings. On a molecular level, RHODOPSIN degradation after POS feeding was delayed in BD hiPSC-RPE relative to unaffected sibling hiPSC-RPE, directly implicating impaired POS handling in the pathophysiology of the disease. In addition, stimulated calcium responses differed between BD and normal sibling hiPSC-RPE, as did oxidative stress levels after chronic POS feeding. Subcellular localization, fractionation and co-immunoprecipitation experiments in hiPSC-RPE and human prenatal RPE further linked BEST1 to the regulation and release of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Since calcium signaling and oxidative stress are critical regulators of fluid flow and protein degradation, these findings likely contribute to the clinical picture of BD. In a larger context, this report demonstrates the potential to use patient-specific hiPSCs to model and study maculopathies, an important class of blinding disorders in humans.

  7. A study of skin diseases in dogs and cats. III. III. Microflora of the skin of dogs with chronic eczema.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, S; Krogh, H V

    1978-01-01

    The microflora of the skin was studied in 10 dogs with chronic eczema without clinical signs of secondary infection (Table I). The skin surface was swabbed at 7 different sites, making a total of 70 swabs, 25 of which were taken from visibly inflamed areas and 45 from apparently unaffected skin (Table II). Staph. aureus, Staph. epidermidis, micrococci, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, and Acinetobacter spp. were found consistently. Ten different Gram-negative bacteria, 3 different Gram-positive bacteria, and 2 yeasts were found to occur sporadically (Table III). Compared to a group of 10 healthy dogs a more prolific growth of aerobic microorganisms, a greater number of sites carrying Staph. aureus, and a higher recovery of Gram-negative transients were found in dogs with eczema (Table IV--VII). Within the group of dogs with eczema the growth of Staph. aureus was significantly heavier from eczematous skin areas than from clinically normal skin (Table VIII). In dogs with non-infective dermatitides the colonization of the skin by potentially pathogenic microorganisms may have to be considered in the clinical handling of these diseases.

  8. Potential mesenchymal stem cell therapy for skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Hamada, Takahiro; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-haematopoietic cells that reside in most tissues including adult bone marrow. MSCs have recently been extensively studied and used for clinical therapies, including skin wound healing. However, there are still many questions to be answered. In the viewpoint entitled 'Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in skin: why and what for?', Dr. Khosrotehrani provided a comprehensive overview for MSC properties and current progresses on clinical applications for various skin conditions. This viewpoint is therefore very helpful for both dermatologists and basic skin researchers to understand stem cells researches.

  9. Seminal transmission of lumpy skin disease virus in heifers.

    PubMed

    Annandale, C H; Holm, D E; Ebersohn, K; Venter, E H

    2014-10-01

    It is known that lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) can be shed in bull semen following infection and also that artificial insemination (AI) poses a biosecurity risk. However, it is not known whether the use of LSDV infected semen in AI poses a biosecurity risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LSDV, transmitted through semen, can infect cows and their embryos. Two controlled trials were performed simultaneously. Eleven young beef heifers, naïve to LSDV, were synchronized using an OvSynch protocol and inseminated on Day 0 with fresh semen spiked with a field strain of LSDV on day 0. Six of the heifers were superovulated on Day 1 using pregnant mare serum gonadotropin, and embryos were flushed from these heifers on Day 6. Blood and serum samples were collected from Day 4 until Day 27 to determine the presence of LSDV by PCR and virus isolation, and the presence of antibodies against LSDV by SNT. The first clinical signs of LSD were noticed on Day 10, followed by severe generalized LSD in three heifers and mild LSD in two more heifers. Two heifers were humanely euthanized due to severe unresponsive stranguria. LSDV was detected by PCR, virus isolation or electron microscopy in blood, embryos and organs of experimentally infected animals; and eight heifers had seroconverted by Day 27. Two control animals were not affected. This is the first report of experimental seminal transmission of LSDV in cattle.

  10. Skin diseases in workers at a perfume factory.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the causes of skin diseases in one-third of the staff of a perfume factory, in which 10 different perfume sprays were being manufactured. Site inspection, dermatological examination and patch testing of all 26 persons at risk with 4 perfume oils and 30 ingredients of them. The results showed 6 bottlers were found suffering from allergic contact dermatitis, 2 from irritant contact dermatitis, 12 workers showed different strong reactions to various fragrances. The main causes of allergic contact dermatitis were 2 perfume oils (12 cases) and their ingredients geraniol (12 cases), benzaldehyde(9), cinnamic aldehyde (6), linalool, neroli oil, terpenes of lemon oil and orange oil (4 each). Nobody was tested positive to balsam of Peru. Job changes for office workers, packers or printers to other rooms, where they had no longer contact with fragrances, led to a settling. To conclude, automation and replacement of glass bottles by cartridges from non-fragile materials and using gloves may minimize the risk.

  11. Anticipation in Huntington's disease is inherited through the male line but may originate in the female.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, R M; Frith, C D; Crow, T J; Conneally, P M

    1988-01-01

    Data from the US National Huntington's Disease Roster have been analysed in terms of the difference in age of onset (AO) between affected parents and affected offspring, that is, in terms of 'anticipation'. While mean AO in offspring of affected mothers did not differ greatly from AO in their mothers, the distribution of AO in the offspring of affected fathers falls into two groups, the larger group showing an AO only slightly younger than their affected fathers and a small group whose AO was, on average, 24 years younger than their affected fathers. Analysis of the grandparental origin of the Huntington allele suggests that while propensity to anticipation is heritable for a number of generations through the male line, it originates at the time of differentiation of the germ line of a male who acquires the Huntington allele from his mother. It is suggested that major anticipation indicates an epigenetic change in methylation of the nucleic acid of the genome, which is imposed in the course of the 'genomic imprinting', that is, in the mechanism by which the parental origin of alleles is indicated. PMID:2972838

  12. Inheritance of black sigatoka disease resistance in plantain-banana (Musa spp.) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R; Vuylsteke, D

    1994-10-01

    Black sigatoka (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet), an airborne fungal leaf-spot disease, is a major constraint to plantain and banana (Musa spp.) production world-wide. Gaining further knowledge of the genetics of host-plant resistance will enhance the development of resistant cultivars, which is considered to be the most appropriate means to achieve stable production. Genetic analysis was conducted on 101 euploid (2x, 3x and 4x) progenies, obtained from crossing two susceptible triploid plantain cultivars with the resistant wild diploid banana 'Calcutta 4'. Segregating progenies, and a susceptible reference plantain cultivar, were evaluated over 2 consecutive years. Three distinct levels of host response to black sigatoka were defined as follows: susceptible (< 8 leaves without spots), less susceptible (8-10) and partially resistant (> 10). Segregation ratios for resistance at the 2x level fitted a genetic model having one major recessive resistance allele (bs 1) and two independent alleles with additive effects (bsr 2 and bsr 3). A similar model explains the results at the 4x level assuming that the favourable resistance alleles have a dosage effect when four copies of them are present in their respective loci (bs i (4) ). The proposed model was further validated by segregation data of S 1 progenies. Mechanisms of black sigatoka resistance are discussed in relation to the genetic model.

  13. Conveying a probabilistic genetic test result to families with an inherited heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    The evolution of genetic testing in the past few years has been astounding. In a matter of only a few years, we now have comprehensive gene tests comprising vast panels of "cardiac" genes, whole exome sequencing (the entire coding region) and even whole genome sequencing (the entire genome). Making the call as to whether a DNA variant is causative or benign is difficult and the focus of intense research efforts. In most cases, the final answer will not be a simple yes/no outcome but rather a graded continuum of pathogenicity. This allows classification of variants in a more probabilistic way. How we convey this to a patient is the challenge, and certainly shines a spotlight on the important skills of the cardiac genetic counselor. This is an exciting step forward, but the overwhelming complexity of the information generated from these tests means our current practices of conveying genetic information to the family must be carefully considered. Despite the challenges, a genetic diagnosis in a family has great benefit both in reassuring unaffected family members and removing the need for lifetime clinical surveillance. The multidisciplinary specialized clinic model, incorporating genetic counselors, cardiologists and geneticists, provides the ideal framework for ensuring the best possible care for genetic heart disease families.

  14. Activated Immune Response in an Inherited Leukodystrophy Disease Caused by the Loss of Oligodendrocyte Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wasseff, Sameh K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte:oligodendrocyte (O:O) gap junction (GJ) coupling is a widespread and essential feature of the CNS, and is mediated by connexin47 (Cx47) and Cx32. Loss of function mutations affecting Cx47 results in a severe leukodystrophy, Pelizeus-Merzbacher-like disease (also known as Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy 2), which can be reproduced in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Here we report the gene expression profile of the cerebellum – an affected brain region – in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Of the 43,174 mRNA probes examined, we find decreased expression of 23 probes (corresponding to 23 genes) and increased expression of 545 probes (corresponding to 348 genes). Many of the genes with reduced expression map to oligodendrocytes, and two of them (Fa2h and Ugt8a) are involved in the synthesis of myelin lipids. Many of the genes with increased expression map to microglia and lymphocytes, and to leukotriene/prostaglandin synthesis and chemokine/cytokine pathways. In accord, immunostaining showed activated microglia and astrocytes, as well as T- and B-cells in the cerebella of mutant mice. Thus, in addition to the loss of GJ coupling, there is a prominent immune response in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. PMID:26051537

  15. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy.

  16. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are critical environmental exposures that influence health and can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and abnormal physiology. Advances in 2015 included analyses of the effects of endocrine disruptors on human disease, further examples of endocrine disruptors promoting transgenerational behavioural effects, insights into effects of endocrine disruptors on epigenetic programming of primordial germ cells and the finding that endocrine disruptors can transgenerationally promote genetic mutations. PMID:26585656

  17. Current approaches to the management of early active diffuse scleroderma skin disease.

    PubMed

    Nihtyanova, Svetlana I; Denton, Christopher P

    2008-02-01

    Skin sclerosis is a clinical hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and provides a means to classify and evaluate patients. In the diffuse cutaneous subset, skin involvement is often extensive and warrants direct therapy. Currently, broad spectrum immunosuppressive strategies are used, but more targeted specific approaches are now emerging. This article reviews the evidence for efficacy of current treatment approaches and future developments for managing skin disease in early diffuse cutaneous SSc.

  18. Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) family: Phylogeny, structure-function, tissue distribution, and associated inherited diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hanukoglu, Israel; Hanukoglu, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is composed of three homologous subunits and allows the flow of Na+ ions across high resistance epithelia, maintaining body salt and water homeostasis. ENaC dependent reabsorption of Na+ in the kidney tubules regulates extracellular fluid (ECF) volume and blood pressure by modulating osmolarity. In multi-ciliated cells, ENaC is located in cilia and plays an essential role in the regulation of epithelial surface liquid volume necessary for cilial transport of mucus and gametes in the respiratory and reproductive tracts respectively. The subunits that form ENaC (named as alpha, beta, gamma and delta, encoded by genes SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G, and SCNN1D) are members of the ENaC/Degenerin superfamily. The earliest appearance of ENaC orthologs is in the genomes of the most ancient vertebrate taxon, Cyclostomata (jawless vertebrates) including lampreys, followed by earliest representatives of Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates) including cartilaginous sharks. Among Euteleostomi (bony vertebrates), Actinopterygii (ray finned-fishes) branch has lost ENaC genes. Yet, most animals in the Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) branch including Tetrapoda, amphibians and amniotes (lizards, crocodiles, birds, and mammals), have four ENaC paralogs. We compared the sequences of ENaC orthologs from 20 species and established criteria for the identification of ENaC orthologs and paralogs, and their distinction from other members of the ENaC/Degenerin superfamily, especially ASIC family. Differences between ENaCs and ASICs are summarized in view of their physiological functions and tissue distributions. Structural motifs that are conserved throughout vertebrate ENaCs are highlighted. We also present a comparative overview of the genotype-phenotype relationships in inherited diseases associated with ENaC mutations, including multisystem pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1B), Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis-like disease and essential hypertension. PMID:26772908

  19. Novel Functions of the Anticoagulant Activated Protein C in Maintaining Skin Barrier Integrity to Impact on Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meilang; Jackson, Christopher John

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost skin layer and provides the first line of defence against the external environment. Keratinocytes are the most predominant cells in the epidermis and play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. When the barrier is disrupted any of a number of diseases, such as chronic wounds, psoriasis, pemphigus, atopic dermatitis or toxic epidermal necrolysis, can take hold. Activated protein C (APC) or its precursor, protein C, is abundantly expressed by skin epidermal keratinocytes and stimulates their proliferation and migration, and inhibits apoptosis and inflammation, leading to a healing phenotype. Importantly, APC also increases the barrier function of keratinocytes by promoting expression and cell-cell contact redistribution of tight junction proteins. These cytoprotective properties of APC on epidermal keratinocytes place it as an exciting new therapy for skin disorders associated with the disruption of barrier function and inflammation.

  20. Ethnomedicinal plants used in the treatment of skin diseases in Hyderabad Karnataka region, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Policepatel, Shivakumar Singh; Manikrao, Vidyasagar Gunagambhire

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document traditional medicinal plants knowledge used in treating skin diseases at Hyderabad Karnataka Region. Methods The information on the use of medicinal plants in the treatment of skin diseases was gathered from traditional herbal healers and other villagers through interviews. Results A total of 60 plants species belonging to 57 genera and 34 families were found useful and herewith described them along with the method of drug preparation, mode of administration, probable dosage and duration of treatment. Several new findings on the traditional rural practices were reported. Conclusions The present study revealed that the Hyderabad Karnataka rural people is primarily dependent on medicinal plants for treating skin diseases.

  1. Skin Diseases in Laboratory Mice: Approaches to Drug Target Identification and Efficacy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; King, Lloyd E.; Pratt, C. Herbert

    2017-01-01

    A large variety of mouse models for human skin, hair, and nail diseases are readily available from investigators and vendors worldwide. Mouse skin is a simple organ to observe lesions and their response to therapy, but identifying and monitoring the progress of treatments of mouse skin diseases can still be challenging. This chapter provides an overview on how to use the laboratory mouse as a preclinical tool to evaluate efficacy of new compounds or test potential new uses for compounds approved for use for treating an unrelated disease. Basic approaches to handling mice, applying compounds, and quantifying effects of the treatment are presented. PMID:27150092

  2. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  3. Relationship of skin autofluorescence to cardiovascular disease in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Hodaka; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are significantly increased in end-stage renal disease patients and it has been suggested that AGE accumulation is related to the progression of cardiovascular disease. An autofluorescence reader non-invasively assesses AGE accumulation using skin autofluorescence under ultraviolet light. Skin autofluorescence has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether skin autofluorescence in Japanese hemodialysis patients is related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. In this cross-sectional study, patients on maintenance hemodialysis (N = 128; 59 men, 69 women) were included. AGE accumulation was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Associations between skin autofluorescence, cardiovascular disease, and other parameters were studied. Skin autofluorescence correlated with age (r = 0.32, P < 0.01), diabetes (r = 0.21, P = 0.02), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (r = 0.23, P = 0.02), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (r = 0.20, P = 0.03), and plasma pentosidine (r = 0.20, P = 0.03). Each parameter was compared in patients with and without cardiovascular disease; the gender distribution, age, carotid IMT, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hsCRP, and skin autofluorescence were significantly related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified carotid IMT (OR 6.76), hsCRP (OR 1.41), and skin autofluorescence (OR 2.29) as significant factors for the presence of cardiovascular disease. Increased skin autofluorescence was related to the presence of cardiovascular disease in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis patients, and therefore an autofluorescence reader might have the potential to be a useful assessment of cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  4. Sex differences in the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases in Olmsted County, Minnesota, United States, and a comparison with other rates published worldwide.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2016-09-01

    Many skin and skin-related diseases affect the sexes unequally, with attendant implications for public health and resource allocation. To evaluate better the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases affecting males vs. females, we reviewed published population-based epidemiology studies of skin disorders performed utilizing Rochester Epidemiology Project data. Females had a higher incidence of the following diseases: connective tissue diseases (scleroderma, morphea, dermatomyositis, primary Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus [not in all studies]), pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, condyloma acuminatum, hidradenitis suppurativa, herpes zoster (except in children), erythromelalgia, venous stasis syndrome, and venous ulcers. Males had a higher incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, basal cell carcinoma (exception, females aged ≤40 years), squamous cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna. Incidence rates were equal in males and females for cutaneous malignant melanoma (exception, higher in females aged 18-39 years), lower-extremity cellulitis, cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, Behçet disease, delusional infestation, alopecia areata, and bullous pemphigoid. Many of the population-based sex-specific incidence rates of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project are strikingly different from those estimated elsewhere. In general, females are more commonly affected by skin and skin-related diseases. The reasons for this imbalance remain to be determined and are likely multifactorial.

  5. Autoimmune bullous diseases with skin and eye involvement: Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and pemphigus paraneoplastica.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Karen C; Leung, Theresa G; Moradi, Ahmadreza; Thorne, Jennifer E; Fine, Jo-David

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that mostly affect the skin and mucous membranes. Occasionally, other organ systems may be involved, depending on the unique pathophysiology of each disease. Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus are distinct entities, but all have the potential to have cutaneous and ocular involvement. Awareness and early recognition of ocular involvement in these diseases is important given the increased risk for vision loss and blindness with delay in management. Several skin diseases may be associated with involvement of the external eye. The most common autoimmune diseases are cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus.

  6. The association of the skin microbiota with health, immunity and disease.

    PubMed

    Egert, Markus; Simmering, Rainer; Riedel, Christian U

    2017-04-05

    The human skin is densely colonized by a highly diverse microbiota comprising all three domains of life. Long believed to represent mainly a source of infection, the human skin microbiota is nowadays well accepted as an important driver of human (skin) health and well-being. This microbiota is influenced by many host and environmental factors and interacts closely with the skin immune system. Although cause and effect are usually difficult to discriminate, changes in the skin microbiota clearly play a role in the pathobiology of many types of skin disease and cosmetic disorders. Consequently, treatment and prevention strategies have to respect this role, rendering pre- and probiotic and even transplantation therapies an additional option to the use of antibiotics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Skin Cancer: Epidemiology, Disease Burden, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Apalla, Zoe; Nashan, Dorothée; Weller, Richard B; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Skin cancer, including both melanoma and non-melanoma, is the most common type of malignancy in the Caucasian population. Firstly, we review the evidence for the observed increase in the incidence of skin cancer over recent decades, and investigate whether this is a true increase or an artefact of greater screening and over-diagnosis. Prevention strategies are also discussed. Secondly, we discuss the complexities and challenges encountered when diagnosing and developing treatment strategies for skin cancer. Key case studies are presented that highlight the practic challenges of choosing the most appropriate treatment for patients with skin cancer. Thirdly, we consider the potential risks and benefits of increased sun exposure. However, this is discussed in terms of the possibility that the avoidance of sun exposure in order to reduce the risk of skin cancer may be less important than the reduction in all-cause mortality as a result of the potential benefits of increased exposure to the sun. Finally, we consider common questions on human papillomavirus infection.

  8. Staphylokinase promotes the establishment of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections while decreasing disease severity.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Karlsson, Maria; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Wanzhong; Bremell, Tomas; Josefsson, Elisabet; Jin, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Skin infections are frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus and can lead to a fatal sepsis. The microbial mechanisms controlling the initiation and progression from mild skin infection to a severe disseminated infection remain poorly understood. Using a combination of clinical data and in vitro and ex vivo assays, we show that staphylokinase, secreted by S. aureus, promoted the establishment of skin infections in humans and increased bacterial penetration through skin barriers by activating plasminogen. However, when infection was established, the interaction between staphylokinase and plasminogen did not promote systemic dissemination but induced the opening and draining of abscesses and decreased disease severity in neutropenic mice. Also, increased staphylokinase production was associated with noninvasive S. aureus infections in patients. Our results point out the dual roles of staphylokinase in S. aureus skin infections as promoting the establishment of infections while decreasing disease severity.

  9. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy (News) Health Tip: Use Caution When Applying Hair Dye Additional ... Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Skin diseases ...

  10. Sequence analysis of attachment gene of lumpy skin disease and sheep poxviruses.

    PubMed

    El-Kenawy, A A; El-Tholoth, M S

    2010-12-01

    In Egypt, protection of cattle against lumpy skin disease (LSD) was carried out using a sheep poxvirus (Kenyan strain) vaccination strategy. In the present study 15 skin nodules from LSD suspected cows and 5 scab samples from sheep pox (SP) suspected sheep were collected. Hyperimmune rabbit sera to Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV)/Ismailyia88 strain and sheep pox virus (SPV)/ Kenyan vaccinal strain were prepared. The causative agent in the collected samples was identified using immunoflourescence (IF) and immunoperoxidase techniques. Of the 15 skin nodules suspected of LSD, 10 showed a positive reaction and 3 out of 5 skin scabs suspected of sheeppox were found to be positive. An antigenic correlation between field skin isolate of LSDV, tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain, field skin isolate of SPV and SPV/Kenyan vaccinal strain was studied using prepared hyperimmune sera. Also, nucleotide sequence of the PCR amplified attachment gene fragments of field skin isolate of LSDV, tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain, field skin isolate of SPV and SPV /Kenyan vaccinal strain were compared. The results revealed that the four used viruses were antigenically identical. Sequence analysis indicated that field skin LSDV isolate is more related to tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain than to vaccinal SPV/ Kenyan strain and the skin isolate of SPV is more closely related to field skin isolate of LSDV than to SPV/Kenyan vaccinal strain. Thus, further study should be applied on the advantage of a LSD vaccine prepared from LSDV in protection of cattle against LSD compared to the commonly used sheep pox vaccine.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune Response in the Skin of Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus, a highly cell-associated oncogenic 'alpha-herpesvirus, is the causative agent of a T cell lymphoma and neuropathic disease called Marek’s disease. The skin is the only anatomical site where infectious enveloped cell-free virions are produced and shed into the environment. Stud...

  12. Targeting adenosine receptors to prevent inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine mediates its effects through activation of a family of four G-protein-coupled receptors, named A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 . This nucleoside plays an important role in immunity and inflammation, and the A2A adenosine receptor subtype has a key role in the inhibition of inflammatory processes besides promoting wound healing. In this issue of Experimental Dermatology, Arasa et al. show that the topical application of a selective A2A agonist, CGS 21680, to mouse skin reduced epidermal hyperplasia as well as skin inflammation, similarly to topical corticoids, without side effects like skin atrophy. Rigorously following up this work is important for the development of novel treatment strategies for chronic hyperproliferative inflammatory dermatoses, such as targeting the A2A adenosine receptor family.

  13. IgG4-related skin manifestations in patients with IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tetsuya; Oka, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hideki; Hatakeyama, Mayumi; Kanki, Haruhisa; Kunisada, Makoto; Tsuji, Goh; Morinobu, Akio; Kumagai, Shunichi; Azumi, Atsushi; Negi, Akira; Nishigori, Chikako

    2013-04-01

    We describe two cases of IgG4-related disease associated with skin manifestations with IgG4-positive plasma cells. The first patient was a 52-year-old woman with a 3-year history of IgG4-related sialadenitis who presented with pruritic, indurated erythematous lesions on the auricle, postauricular and submandibular regions and neck. A skin biopsy showed infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the subcutaneous tissue. The second patient was a 53-year-old woman with IgG4-related lesions in the ocular adnexal tissues and nasal cavity who presented with pruritic, indurated erythema on the cheek and submandibular region. Histopathological examination of a skin biopsy revealed a dense, patchy infiltrate comprised of lymphocytes, IgG4-positive plasma cells and eosinophils around blood vessels and sweat glands in the entire dermis and subcutis. The skin lesions in these cases were considered to be skin manifestations of IgG4-related disease. The findings of these two cases together with the three reported cases of IgG4-related disease with skin manifestations in the literature suggest that IgG4-related skin lesions may appear on the scalp, face, neck, auricle and postauricular regions during the course of IgG4-related disease.

  14. Single stem cell gene therapy for genetic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Blanpain, Cédric

    2015-04-01

    Stem cell gene therapy followed by transplantation into damaged regions of the skin has been successfully used to treat genetic skin blistering disorder. Usually, many stem cells are virally transduced to obtain a sufficient number of genetically corrected cells required for successful transplantation, as genetic insertion in every stem cell cannot be precisely defined. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Droz-Georget Lathion et al developed a new strategy for ex vivo single cell gene therapy that allows extensive genomic and functional characterization of the genetically repaired individual cells before they can be used in clinical settings.

  15. Inheritance and testicular cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P. W.; Harland, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Statistical analysis of published data on the age of onset of germ cell tumours of the testis and of the prevalence of bilateral disease in familial and general cases suggest the following: 1. Patients with bilateral disease carry the same genetic predisposition as familial cases. 2. Males with the hereditary predisposition develop none, unilateral or bilateral tumours in the proportions 55%, 38% and 7% respectively. 3. One-third of all testis cancer patients are genetically predisposed to the disease. 4. The 2.2% risk to brothers of cases as reported elsewhere can be accounted for by the homozygous (recessive) inheritance of a single predisposing gene. PMID:7841065

  16. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes.

  17. Quantification of lumpy skin disease virus following experimental infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Babiuk, S; Bowden, T R; Parkyn, G; Dalman, B; Manning, L; Neufeld, J; Embury-Hyatt, C; Copps, J; Boyle, D B

    2008-09-01

    Lumpy skin disease along with sheep pox and goatpox are the most serious poxvirus diseases of livestock, and are caused by viruses that belong to the genus Capripoxvirus within the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae, family Poxviridae. To facilitate the study of lumpy skin disease pathogenesis, we inoculated eight 4- to 6-month-old Holstein calves intravenously with lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) and collected samples over a period of 42 days for analysis by virus isolation, real-time PCR and light microscopy. Following inoculation, cattle developed fever and skin nodules, with the extent of infection varying between animals. Skin nodules remained visible until the end of the experiment on day post-inoculation (DPI) 42. Viremia measured by real-time PCR and virus isolation was not observed in all animals but was detectable between 6 and 15 DPI. Low levels of viral shedding were observed in oral and nasal secretions between 12 and 18 DPI. Several tissues were assessed for the presence of virus at DPI 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 42 by virus isolation and real-time PCR. Virus was consistently detected by real-time PCR and virus isolation at high levels in skin nodules indicating LSDV has a tropism for skin. In contrast, relatively few lesions were observed systemically. Viral DNA was detected by real-time PCR in skin lesions collected on DPI 42. Cattle developing anti-capripoxvirus antibodies starting at DPI 21 was detected by serum neutralization. The disease in this study varied from mild with few secondary skin nodules to generalized infection of varying severity, and was characterized by morbidity with no mortality.

  18. Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Liu, Chih-Hao; Lei, Ling; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Hicks, M. John; Larin, Kirill V.; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc has a rare morbidity (276 cases per million adults in the United States), but has a 10-year survival rate of 55%. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is assessed by palpation on 17 sites on the body. However, the mRSS assessed score is subjective and may be influenced by the experience of the rheumatologists. In addition, the inherent elasticity of skin may bias the mRSS assessment in the early stage of SSc, such as oedematous. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, the OCE technique is applied to assess the mechanical properties of skin in both control and bleomycin (BLM) induced SSc-like disease noninvasively. Young's modulus of the BLM-SSc skin was found be significantly higher than that of normal skin, in both the in vivo and in vitro studies (p<0.05). Thus, OCE is able to differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin using mechanical contrast. It is a promising new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc in a rapid, unbiased, and noninvasive manner.

  19. [Nosology of inflammatory diseases: lessons learned from the auto-inflammatory syndromes--a focus on skin manifestations].

    PubMed

    Lipsker, Dan; Ramot, Yuval; Ingber, Arieh

    2012-10-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases were first described more than 10 years ago as inherited disorders, characterized by recurrent flares of inflammation due to an abnormality in the innate immune system. The understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of these disorders, and especially the fact that they are mediated by IL-1 secretion by stimulated monocytes/macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management. IL-1 inhibitors are especially effective, and indeed, a brief and complete response to IL-1 inhibition is probably one of the best signs of auto-inflammation. Cutaneous manifestations are frequent in the monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes, and a careful analysis of those findings reveals that they are almost always the consequence of neutrophilic skin infiltration. The neutrophilic dermatoses are, therefore, the cutaneous manifestations of those disorders. Even when the neutrophilic dermatoses occur outside the setting of genetically determined auto-inflammatory disorders, they probably also result from auto-inflammatory mechanisms. The distinction between auto-inflammation and autoimmunity is essential for the proper treatment of the patients. Auto-inflammation will almost always respond to IL-1 inhibition, while immunospressors will not be beneficial. The aim of the current paper is to review these two sub-groups of inflammatory diseases, focusing on their cutaneous manifestations, and highlighting the connection between these syndromes and inflammation in general.

  20. Penetration of normal, damaged and diseased skin--an in vitro study on dendritic core-multishell nanotransporters.

    PubMed

    Alnasif, Nesrin; Zoschke, Christian; Fleige, Emanuel; Brodwolf, Robert; Boreham, Alexander; Rühl, Eckart; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Merk, Hans-Friedrich; Hennies, Hans Christian; Alexiev, Ulrike; Haag, Rainer; Küchler, Sarah; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2014-07-10

    A growing intended or accidental exposure to nanoparticles asks for the elucidation of potential toxicity linked to the penetration of normal and lesional skin. We studied the skin penetration of dye-tagged dendritic core-multishell (CMS) nanotransporters and of Nile red loaded CMS nanotransporters using fluorescence microscopy. Normal and stripped human skin ex vivo as well as normal reconstructed human skin and in vitro skin disease models served as test platforms. Nile red was delivered rapidly into the viable epidermis and dermis of normal skin, whereas the highly flexible CMS nanotransporters remained solely in the stratum corneum after 6h but penetrated into deeper skin layers after 24h exposure. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy proved a stable dye-tag and revealed striking nanotransporter-skin interactions. The viable layers of stripped skin were penetrated more efficiently by dye-tagged CMS nanotransporters and the cargo compared to normal skin. Normal reconstructed human skin reflected the penetration of Nile red and CMS nanotransporters in human skin and both, the non-hyperkeratotic non-melanoma skin cancer and hyperkeratotic peeling skin disease models come along with altered absorption in the skin diseases.

  1. [Aeroallergens, skin tests and allergic diseases in 1091 patients].

    PubMed

    Enríquez Palomec, O; Hernández Chávez, L; Sarrazola Sanjuan, D M; Segura Méndez, N H; Hernández Colín, D D; Martínez-Cairo, S

    1997-01-01

    To know the frequency of positively of several skin tests, data cards from patients, of the Allergy and Clinic Immunology Service of the Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI (Mexico City), between January, 1989 and March, 1995, were reviewed. Aqueous extracts manufactures by our laboratory were applied, in a dilution of 1:1000 weight-volume. 1091 from 5,651 skin tests patients were positive. Asthma and rhinitis were diagnosed in 492, allergic rhinitis in 289, allergic asthma in 111, and other diagnosis in 199 cases. The most frequent inhalable aeroallergens were house dust and perennial Dermatophagoides p and f1 with predominance in the rainy season, followed by pollens from Fraxinus a. Quercus a and Capriola, with predominance in the rainy season. The most frequent fungi were Candida and Fusarium, with predominance in the dry season.

  2. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography of patients with skin diseases.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-07-01

    We report on the first clinical study based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy. 47 patients with a variety of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art OCT systems for dermatology including multibeam swept source OCT, (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph, and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT images reflect modifications of the intratissue refractive index whereas MPT is based on nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second harmonic generation. A stack of cross-sectional OCT "wide field" images with a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm(2) gave fast information on the depth and the volume of the lesion. Multiphoton tomography provided 0.36 x 0.36 mm(2) horizontal/diagonal optical sections within seconds of a particular region of interest with superior submicron resolution down to a tissue depth of 200 mum. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases as well as for the evaluation of the efficiency of treatments.

  3. Coronary heart disease risk factors in men with light and dark skin in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Costas, R; Garcia-Palmieri, M R; Sorlie, P; Hertzmark, E

    1981-01-01

    The association of skin color with coronary heart disease risk factors was studied in 4,000 urban Puerto Rican men. Skin color on the inner upper arm was classified according to the von Luschan color tiles. Using this grading, men were separated into two groups of light or dark skin color. The dark group had a lower socioeconomic status (SES) based on income, education, and occupation. Dark men had slightly higher mean systolic blood pressures (SBP) and lower mean serum cholesterol levels than the light, but the relative weights and cigarette smoking habits of both groups were similar. After controlling for the differences in SES, skin color showed a small but statistically significant association with SBP. Whether this association with skin color represents genetic or environmental influences on SBP could not be determined from this study. PMID:7235099

  4. The signaling involved in autophagy machinery in keratinocytes and therapeutic approaches for skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is responsible for the lysosomal degradation of proteins, organelles, microorganisms and exogenous particles. Epidermis primarily consists of keratinocytes which functions as an extremely important barrier. Investigation on autophagy in keratinocytes has been continuously renewing, but is not so systematic due to the complexity of the autophagy machinery. Here we reviewed recent studies on the autophagy in keratinocyte with a focus on interplay between autophagy machinery and keratinocytes biology, and novel autophagy regulators identified in keratinocytes. In this review, we discussed the roles of autophagy in apoptosis, differentiation, immune response, survival and melanin metabolism, trying to reveal the possible involvement of autophagy in skin aging, skin disorders and skin color formation. Since autophagy routinely plays a double-edged sword role in various conditions, its functions in skin homeostasis and potential application as a therapeutic target for skin diseases remains to be clarified. Furthermore, more investigations are needed on optimizing designed strategies to inhibit or enhance autophagy for clinical efficacy. PMID:27191982

  5. Hepatitic inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, May; Crawford, James M

    2006-01-01

    Primary metabolic disorders are a disparate group of diseases that may or may not be accompanied by hepatic manifestations. Those with liver involvement may show a range of histopathologic changes. Proper histologic diagnosis requires correlation with clinical and laboratory data, including evaluation for mutations either via serum protein electrophoresis or through formal genetic analysis. This article is a review of the three most common inherited metabolic disorders which may present with a hepatitic pattern. In alpha1-antitrypsin disorder, there is a broad range of clinical presentations, age at presentation, and histological features ranging from "neonatal hepatitis" to a chronic progressive hepatitis in later childhood and adulthood. Hence, this disorder must be in the differential diagnosis of liver disease of the very young, and in older children and adults, with or without coexistent overt pulmonary symptoms. In Wilson disease, presentation tends to be in older childhood or the adult, with a progressive chronic hepatitis. Cystic fibrosis may feature a characteristic obstructive biliary syndrome, coexisting with the many extrahepatic manifestations of this debilitating disease. Lastly, the progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) syndromes are given as examples of inherited metabolic conditions in which relentlessly progressive cholestatic liver disease eventuates over years in end-stage cholestatic liver disease with cirrhosis. Distinguishing features include absence of elevated serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) in PFIC-1 and PFIC-2, and elevated GGT in PFIC-3. However, molecular studies are required for a confident diagnosis of the rare PFIC syndromes.

  6. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hannen, Rosalind F.; Michael, Anthony E.; Jaulim, Adil; Bhogal, Ranjit; Burrin, Jacky M.; Philpott, Michael P.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  7. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  8. Modelling skin disease: lessons from the worlds of mathematics, physics and computer science.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Theoretical biology is a field that attempts to understand the complex phenomena of life in terms of mathematical and physical principles. Likewise, theoretical medicine employs mathematical arguments and models as a methodology in approaching the complexities of human disease. Naturally, these concepts can be applied to dermatology. There are many possible methods available in the theoretical investigation of skin disease. A number of examples are presented briefly. These include the mathematical modelling of pattern formation in congenital naevi and erythema gyratum repens, an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of genetic networks in autoimmunity, and computer simulations of early melanoma growth. To conclude, an analogy is drawn between the behaviour of well-known physical processes, such as earthquakes, and the spatio-temporal evolution of skin disease. Creating models in skin disease can lead to predictions that can be investigated experimentally or by observation and offer the prospect of unexpected or important insights into pathogenesis.

  9. A case study of infant physiologic response to skin-to-skin contact following surgery for complex congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tondi M.; Ludington-Hoe, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants with complex congenital heart disease requiring surgical intervention within the first days or weeks of life may be the most seriously ill infants needing intensive nursing and medical care immediately after birth. Skin to skin contact (SSC) is well-accepted and practiced as a positive therapeutic intervention in premature infants, but is not routinely offered to infants in cardiac intensive care units. Physiologic effects of SSC in the congenital heart disease population must be examined before recommending incorporation of SSC into standard care routines. Objective The purpose of this case study was to describe the physiologic response to a single session of SSC in an 18-day-old infant with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Methods Repeated measures of heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and temperature were recorded 30 minutes prior to SSC, during SSC (including interruptions for bottle and breast feedings), and 10 minutes after SSC was completed. Results All physiologic parameters were clinically acceptable throughout the 135-minute observation. Conclusion This case study provides beginning evidence that SSC is safe in full-term infants following surgery for complex congenital heart disease. Further research with a larger sample is needed to examine effects of SSC on infant physiology before surgery and earlier in the postoperative time period as well as on additional outcomes such as length of stay, maternal-infant interaction, and neurodevelopment. PMID:25325374

  10. Roles of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) on Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Houh, Youn Kyung; Kim, Kyung Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known as a hemoglobin synthesis factor which also regulates cell survival under conditions of stress. In addition, previous studies have revealed the effects of Erdr1 on cancer progression and its negative correlation with interleukin (IL)-18, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Based on this evidence, the therapeutic effects of Erdr1 have been demonstrated in several inflammatory skin diseases such as malignant skin cancer, psoriasis, and rosacea. This article reviews the roles of Erdr1 in skin inflammation, suggesting that Erdr1 is a potential therapeutic molecule on inflammatory disorders. PMID:27941650

  11. Ionic liquids as antimicrobials, solvents, and prodrugs for treating skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrewsky, Michael A.

    The skin is the largest organ in the body. It provides a compliant interface for needle-free drug delivery, while avoiding major degradative pathways associated with the GI tract. These can result in improved patient compliance and sustained and controlled release compared to other standard delivery methods such as intravenous injection, subcutaneous injection, and oral delivery. Concurrently, for the treatment of skin related diseases (e.g. bacterial infection, skin cancer, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, etc.) cutaneous application provides targeted delivery to the disease site, allowing the use of more potent therapeutics with fewer systemic side effects. Unfortunately, the outer layer of the skin -- the stratum corneum (SC) -- presents a significant barrier to most foreign material. This is particularly true for large hydrophilic molecules (>500Da), which must partition through tortuous lipid channels in the SC to penetrate deep tissue layers where the majority of skin-related diseases reside. Interestingly, over the last few decades ionic liquids (ILs) have emerged as a burgeoning class of designer solvents. ILs have been proven beneficial for use in industrial processing, catalysis, pharmaceuticals, and electrochemistry to name a few. The ability to modulate either the cation or anion individually presents an advantageous framework for tuning secondary characteristics without sacrificing the primary function of the IL. Here we report the use of novel ILs for cutaneous drug delivery. Specifically, we demonstrate their potential as potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobials, as solvents for topical delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, and as prodrugs to either reduce the dose-dependent toxicity of drugs that cause skin irritation or enhance delivery of macromolecules into skin and cells. Thus, our results clearly demonstrate ILs holds promise as a transformative platform for treating skin disease.

  12. Analysis of Published Criteria for Clinically Inactive Disease in a Large Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Shows That Skin Disease Is Underestimated

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Beverley; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Arnold, Katie; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Armon, Kate; Briggs, Vanja; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Watts, Joanna; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; McGovern, Ann; Riley, Phil; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Southwood, Taunton; Thomas, Beverley; Amin, Tania; Burton, Deborah; Jackson, Gillian; Van Rooyen, Vanessa; Wood, Mark; Wyatt, Sue; Browne, Michael; Davidson, Joyce; Ferguson, Sue; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Waxman, Liz; Foster, Helen; Friswell, Mark; Jandial, Sharmila; Qiao, Lisa; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Stevenson, Vicky; Swift, Alison; Wade, Debbie; Watson, Stuart; Crate, Lindsay; Frost, Anna; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Venning, Helen; Warrier, Kishore; Almeida, Beverley; Arnold, Katie; Beard, Laura; Brown, Virginia; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Enayat, Elli; Glackin, Yvonne; Halkon, Elizabeth; Hasson, Nathan; Juggins, Audrey; Kassoumeri, Laura; Lunt, Sian; Maillard, Sue; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa; Simou, Stephanie; Smith, Sally; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Leach, Sam; Lee, Helen; Smith, Helen; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Wilkinson, Nick; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) recently published criteria for classification of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) as having clinically inactive disease. The criteria require that at least 3 of 4 conditions be met, i.e., creatine kinase level ≤150 units/liter, Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score ≥48, Manual Muscle Testing in 8 muscles score ≥78, and physician's global assessment of overall disease activity (PGA) ≤0.2. The present study was undertaken to test these criteria in a UK cohort of patients with juvenile DM. Methods We assessed 1,114 patient visits for the 4 items in the PRINTO criteria for clinically inactive disease. Each visit was analyzed to determine whether skin disease was present. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) for juvenile DM was determined in 59 patients. Results At 307 of the 1,114 visits, clinically inactive disease was achieved based on the 3 muscle criteria (but with a PGA of >0.2); rash was present at 65.8% of these visits and nailfold capillary abnormalities at 35.2%. When PGA ≤0.2 was one of the 3 criteria that were met, the frequency of skin signs was significantly lower (rash in 23.1% and nailfold capillary abnormalities in 8.7%). If PGA was considered an essential criterion for clinically inactive disease (P‐CID), patients with active skin disease were less likely to be categorized as having clinically inactive disease (a median DAS skin score of 0 [of a possible maximum of 9] in visits where the PGA was ≤0.2, versus a median DAS skin score of 4 in patients meeting the 3 muscle criteria [with a PGA of >0.2]; P < 0.001). Use of the P‐CID led to improvements in the positive predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio (85.4% and 11.0, respectively, compared to 72.9% and 5.1 with the current criteria). Conclusion There was a high frequency of skin disease among patients with juvenile DM who did not meet the PGA criterion for inactive disease but met

  13. Altered manifestations of skin disease at sites affected by neurological deficit

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, E.; Lerner, E.A.; Elmariah, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the nervous system to inflammation in general and inflammatory skin disease in particular has been underappreciated. It is now apparent that the conventional clinical manifestations of many inflammatory skin diseases require an intact neural component. We reviewed the literature and identified 23 cases of alterations in the appearance or distribution of skin disorders in patients with acquired central or peripheral neural damage or dysfunction. In 19 cases, near or complete resolution of pre-existing skin lesions occurred in areas directly or indirectly supplied by a subsequently injured nervous system. Exacerbation or new onset of skin lesions occurred in only 4 cases. The neural deficits described included damage within the peripheral or central nervous system resulting in pure sensory, pure motor, or combined sensory and motor deficits. These cases highlight the importance of neural innervation and neurogenic inflammation in the development of inflammatory skin disease and prompt further examination of the use of neural blockade as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses. PMID:25132518

  14. Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations: Many Skin Clue to Unfold Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Caproni, Marzia; Bonciolini, Veronica; D'Errico, Antonietta; Antiga, Emiliano; Fabbri, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of intestinal diseases are increasingly reported both in the adult and in the children, and this association cannot longer be considered a simple random. Besides the well-known association between celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), considered as the cutaneous manifestation of gluten-dependent enteropathy, is more frequently reported also the association with other mucocutaneous diseases. Among these there are both autoimmune, allergic, and inflammatory diseases, but also a more heterogeneous group called miscellaneous. The knowledge about pathogenic, epidemiological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of CD is increasing in recent years as well as those about DH, but some aspects still remain to be defined, in particular the possible pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the association between both CD and DH and CD and other immunological skin diseases. The aim of this paper is to describe the skin diseases frequently associated with CD, distinguishing them from those which have a relationship probably just coincidental. PMID:22693492

  15. Patterns of venous reflux and obstruction in patients with skin damage due to chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Patel, Parag J; Tiongson, Jay E; Pryor, Landon; Leon, Luis R; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K

    2007-01-01

    Identified were characteristics of individuals with skin damage related to chronic venous disease. Patients with chronic venous disease (n = 164) were evaluated with duplex ultrasound imaging and were placed in classes 4, 5, and 6 according to the CEAP classification. Their findings were compared with 100 class 2 controls. The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis was higher in the study group (23.7%) versus controls (5.1%; P < .0001), as was the prevalence of deep, perforator, and combined patterns of disease (P < .0001, P < .0007, and P < .0001). The mean duration of disease in controls 2 was shorter compared with the study group (P = .0019). The prevalence of reflux and obstruction within the study group was higher than in controls (P = .0021). Skin changes accurately reflect severity of chronic venous disease. Superficial and perforator vein reflux is the major cause of disease.

  16. Skin Globotriaosylceramide 3 Load Is Increased in Men with Advanced Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Schröter, Nils; Kafke, Waldemar; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background The X-chromosomally linked life-limiting Fabry disease (FD) is associated with deposits of the sphingolipid globotriaosylceramide 3 (Gb3) in various tissues. Skin is easily accessible and may be used as an additional diagnostic and follow-up medium. Our aims were to visualize skin Gb3 deposits in FD patients applying immunofluorescence and to determine if cutaneous Gb3 load correlates with disease severity. Methods At our Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy we enrolled 84 patients with FD and 27 healthy controls. All subjects underwent 5-mm skin punch biopsy at the lateral lower leg and the back. Skin samples were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD77 (i.e. Gb3). Cutaneous Gb3 deposition was quantified in a blinded manner and correlated to clinical data. Results We found that Gb3 load was higher in distal skin of male FD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Men (p<0.01) and women (p<0.05) with a classic FD phenotype had higher distal skin Gb3 load than healthy controls. Men with advanced disease as reflected by impaired renal function, and men and women with small fiber neuropathy had more Gb3 deposits in distal skin samples than males with normal renal function (p<0.05) and without small fiber neuropathy. Gb3 deposits were not different between patients with and without enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusions Immunofluorescence on minimally invasive skin punch biopsies may be useful as a tool for assessment and follow-up in FD patients. PMID:27851774

  17. Role of the liver X receptors in skin physiology: Putative pharmacological targets in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Zangbéwendé Guy; Fouache, Allan; Trousson, Amalia; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2017-03-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that have been shown to regulate various physiological functions such as lipid metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis. Concordant reports have elicited the possibility to target them to cure many human diseases including arteriosclerosis, cancer, arthritis, and diabetes. The high relevance of modulating LXR activities to treat numerous skin diseases, mainly those with exacerbated inflammation processes, contrasts with the lack of approved therapeutic use. This review makes an assessment to sum up the findings regarding the physiological roles of LXRs in skin and help progress towards the therapeutic and safe management of their activities. It focuses on the possible pharmacological targeting of LXRs to cure or prevent selected skin diseases.

  18. Role of cultural factors in the biopsychosocial model of psychosomatic skin diseases: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Prabhu, Smitha

    2013-01-01

    Cultural factors can influence the experience and presentation of diseases, including psychosomatic diseases. Psychosomatic dermatology refers to skin diseases in which psychogenic causes, consequences, or concomitant circumstances have an essential and therapeutically important influence. Indian culture is one of the oldest and most diverse, and encompasses the various traditions and beliefs of people all over the vast Indian subcontinent. This paper discusses how cultural factors can influence the clinical course of some dermatologic problems and reviews the cultural dimension of some common skin conditions in India, including vitiligo, facial hypermelanosis, acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and leprosy. The paper illustrates some examples of the contributions of a patient's cultural values, beliefs, and practices to the biopsychosocial model of psychosomatic skin disorders.

  19. Mechanical transmission of lumpy skin disease virus by Rhipicephalus appendiculatus male ticks.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, E S M; Lubinga, J C; Stoltsz, W H; Troskie, M; Carpenter, S T; Coetzer, J A W; Venter, E H; Oura, C A L

    2013-02-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an economically important, acute or sub-acute, viral disease of cattle that occurs across Africa and in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to investigate if lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) can be transmitted mechanically by African brown ear ticks (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus Neum.). Laboratory-bred R. appendiculatus males were fed on experimentally infected viraemic 'donor' cattle. Partially fed male ticks were then transferred to feed on an uninfected 'recipient' cow. The recipient animal became viraemic, showed mild clinical signs of LSD and seroconverted. Additionally, R. appendiculatus males were found to transmit LSDV through feeding on skin lacking visible lesions, demonstrating that viraemic animals without lesions at the feeding site of ticks may be a source of infection. This is the first time that transmission of poxviruses by a tick species has been demonstrated and the importance of this mode of transmission in the spread of LSDV in endemic settings is discussed.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases: Clinical Potential and Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Soon Won; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory skin disorders that cause serious deterioration of the quality of life have become one of the major public concerns. Despite their significance, there is no fundamental cure to date. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess unique immunomodulatory properties which make them a promising tool for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. Our recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown that MSCs can be successfully used for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), one of the major inflammatory skin diseases. This observation along with similar reports from other groups revealed the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of MSCs in inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, it has been proposed that cell priming or gene transduction can be novel strategies for the development of next-generation high-efficacy MSCs for treating inflammatory skin diseases. We discuss here existing evidence that demonstrates the regulatory properties of MSCs on immune responses under inflammatory conditions. PMID:28125063

  1. Helicobacter pylori-induced premature senescence of extragastric cells may contribute to chronic skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori, one of the most frequently observed bacterium in the human intestinal flora, has been widely studied since Marshall and Warren documented a link between the presence of H. pylori in the gastrointestinal tract and gastritis and gastric ulcers. Interestingly, H. pylori has also been found in several other epithelial tissues, including the eyes, ears, nose and skin that may have direct or indirect effects on host physiology and may contribute to extragastric diseases, e.g. chronic skin diseases. More recently, it has been shown that H. pylori cytotoxin CagA expression induces cellular senescence of human gastric nonpolarized epithelial cells that may lead to gastrointestinal disorders and systemic inflammation. Here, we hypothesize that also chronic skin diseases may be promoted by stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) of skin cells, namely fibroblasts and keratinocytes, stimulated with H. pylori cytotoxins. Future studies involving cell culture models and clinical specimens are needed to verify the involvement of H. pylori in SIPS-based chronic skin diseases.

  2. Adults with X-linked agammaglobulinemia: impact of disease on daily lives, quality of life, educational and socioeconomic status, knowledge of inheritance, and reproductive attitudes.

    PubMed

    Winkelstein, Jerry A; Conley, Mary Ellen; James, Cynthia; Howard, Vanessa; Boyle, John

    2008-09-01

    Since many children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) can now be expected to reach adulthood, knowledge of the status of adults with XLA would be of importance to the patients, their families, and the physicians caring for these patients. We performed the current study in adults with XLA to examine the impact of XLA on their daily lives and quality of life, their educational and socioeconomic status, their knowledge of the inheritance of their disorder, and their reproductive attitudes. Physicians who had entered adult patients with XLA in a national registry were asked to pass on a survey instrument to their patients. The patients then filled out the survey instrument and returned it directly to the investigators. Adults with XLA were hospitalized more frequently and missed more work and/or school than did the general United States population. However, their quality of life was comparable to that of the general United States population. They achieved a higher level of education and had a higher income than did the general United States population. Their knowledge of the inheritance of their disease was excellent. Sixty percent of them would not exercise any reproductive planning options as a result of their disease. The results of the current study suggest that although the disease impacts the daily lives of adults with XLA, they still become productive members of society and excel in many areas.

  3. Prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives.

  4. The peeling skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levy, S B; Goldsmith, L A

    1982-11-01

    A unique form of congenital ichthyosis in two unrelated patients is described and characterized histologically by separation of the epidermis between the stratum corneum and the stratum granulosum. The clinical history, genetics, serially performed skin biopsies, and biochemical studies are reviewed. This form of ichthyosis is different from previously described entities. Lifelong peeling of the general body epidermis, pruritus, short stature, easily removed anagen hairs, and the ability to easily mechanically separate stratum corneum from the rest of the epidermis characterize the syndrome. In two families with this disorder, autosomal recessive inheritance is suggested. A low plasma tryptophan level as present in two patients with this disease. This inherited disorder of the epidermis was first described in 1924 before the genetics and histology of ichthyosis were extensively studied and is a distinct genetic and clinical entity to be considered in unusual cases of ichthyosis.

  5. Comparing Cutaneous Research Funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases with 2010 Global Burden of Disease Results

    PubMed Central

    Karimkhani, Chante; Boyers, Lindsay N.; Margolis, David J.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Hay, Roderick J.; Williams, Hywel C.; Naldi, Luigi; Coffeng, Luc E.; Weinstock, Martin A.; Dunnick, Cory A.; Pederson, Hannah; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Disease burden data helps guide research prioritization. Objective To determine the extent to which grants issued by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) reflect disease burden, measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 project. Design Two investigators independently assessed 15 skin conditions studied by GBD 2010 in the NIAMS database for grants issued in 2013. The 15 skin diseases were matched to their respective DALYs from GBD 2010. Setting The United States NIAMS database and GBD 2010 skin condition disability data. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Relationship of NIAMS grant database topic funding with percent total GBD 2010 DALY and DALY rank for 15 skin conditions. Results During fiscal year 2013, 1,443 NIAMS grants were issued at a total value of $424 million. Of these grants, 17.7% covered skin topics. Of the total skin disease funding, 82% (91 grants) were categorized as “general cutaneous research.” Psoriasis, leprosy, and “other skin and subcutaneous diseases” (ie; immunobullous disorders, vitiligo, and hidradenitis suppurativa) were over-represented when funding was compared with disability. Conversely, cellulitis, decubitus ulcer, urticaria, acne vulgaris, viral skin diseases, fungal skin diseases, scabies, and melanoma were under-represented. Conditions for which disability and funding appeared well-matched were dermatitis, squamous and basal cell carcinoma, pruritus, bacterial skin diseases, and alopecia areata. Conclusions and Relevance Degree of representation in NIAMS is partly correlated with DALY metrics. Grant funding was well-matched with disability metrics for five of the 15 studied skin diseases, while two skin diseases were over-represented and seven were under-represented. Global burden estimates provide increasingly transparent and important information for investigating and prioritizing national research funding allocations

  6. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  7. Inherited prion disease A117V is not simply a proteinopathy but produces prions transmissible to transgenic mice expressing homologous prion protein.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Smidak, Michelle; Tomlinson, Andrew; Grimshaw, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Powell, Caroline; Brandner, Sebastian; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2013-01-01

    Prions are infectious agents causing fatal neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. In humans, these have sporadic, acquired and inherited aetiologies. The inherited prion diseases are caused by one of over 30 coding mutations in the human prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP) and many of these generate infectious prions as evidenced by their experimental transmissibility by inoculation to laboratory animals. However, some, and in particular an extensively studied type of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) caused by a PRNP A117V mutation, are thought not to generate infectious prions and instead constitute prion proteinopathies with a quite distinct pathogenetic mechanism. Multiple attempts to transmit A117V GSS have been unsuccessful and typical protease-resistant PrP (PrP(Sc)), pathognomonic of prion disease, is not detected in brain. Pathogenesis is instead attributed to production of an aberrant topological form of PrP, C-terminal transmembrane PrP ((Ctm)PrP). Barriers to transmission of prion strains from one species to another appear to relate to structural compatibility of PrP in host and inoculum and we have therefore produced transgenic mice expressing human 117V PrP. We found that brain tissue from GSS A117V patients did transmit disease to these mice and both the neuropathological features of prion disease and presence of PrP(Sc) was demonstrated in the brains of recipient transgenic mice. This PrP(Sc) rapidly degraded during laboratory analysis, suggesting that the difficulty in its detection in patients with GSS A117V could relate to post-mortem proteolysis. We conclude that GSS A117V is indeed a prion disease although the relative contributions of (Ctm)PrP and prion propagation in neurodegeneration and their pathogenetic interaction remains to be established.

  8. Dermatology and skin disease in the American Civil War.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Thomas G

    2008-02-01

    The Civil War happened at the end of the medical dark ages or, conversely, at the beginning of the modern medical era. The story of how physicians and nurses of the time approached a number of cutaneous diseases of importance in the military context is related. Entities discussed include the army itch/camp itch phenomenon, sexually transmitted diseases, scurvy and nutritional disorders, smallpox and spurious vaccination, and hospital gangrene.

  9. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  10. Clinical combination of multiphoton tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging for evaluation of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Speicher, M.; Koehler, M. J.; Scharenberg, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.

    2010-02-01

    For the first time, high frequency ultrasound imaging, multiphoton tomography, and dermoscopy were combined in a clinical study. Different dermatoses such as benign and malign skin cancers, connective tissue diseases, inflammatory skin diseases and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art and highly sophisticated ultrasound systems for dermatology, (ii) the femtosecond-laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color imaging of the skin surface with a magnification up to 70x. Ultrasound images are generated from reflections of the emitted ultrasound signal, based on inhomogeneities of the tissue. These echoes are converted to electrical signals. Depending on the ultrasound frequency the penetration depth varies from about 1 mm to 16 mm in dermatological application. The 100-MHz-ultrasound system provided an axial resolution down to 16 μm and a lateral resolution down to 32 μm. In contrast to the wide-field ultrasound images, multiphoton tomography provided horizontal optical sections of 0.36×0.36 mm2 down to 200 μm tissue depth with submicron resolution. The autofluorescence of mitochondrial coenzymes, melanin, and elastin as well as the secondharmonic- generation signal of the collagen network were imaged. The combination of ultrasound and multiphoton tomography provides a novel opportunity for diagnostics of skin disorders.

  11. [Six cases of occupational skin diseases caused by cement: considerations from the aspect of occupational dermatology].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Nishio, D; Tokui, N

    2001-06-01

    Cement, in particular Portland cement, is now widely used in the field of civil engineering and the construction industry. High alkalinity of wet cement and its tiny content of water-soluble chromate can cause occupational skin diseases. In this paper, we report four cases of contact dermatitis by cement and two cases of cement burn. The occupation of the patients included two plasterers, a truck driver, a manufacturer of cement ware and two construction workers. Skin of the hands and fingers of the cement dermatitis cases was dry and fissured, and had hyperkeratotic papules and erythemas or acute exudative eczematous lesions. In one of these cases, the eczematous lesions spread to the face, extremities and trunk. All cases resulted in a positive patch testing for sodium dichromate. The cement burn cases developed severe necrotic ulcers on the leg and/or foot following prolonged contact with wet cement inside their boots. Patch testing was negative for chromate. A field trip to a construction worksite showed that method of working as well as worker's clothing at present could not thoroughly protect the skin. Therefore we concluded that better protective clothing and gloves should be used and that working conditions be improved. Most skin diseases caused by cement occur among workers at small-scale enterprises. Therefore it is desirable that regional occupational health centers, which were established to promote the health care system for workers at small-scale enterprises, take prompt measures to avoid the skin diseases.

  12. [Value of adjuvant basic therapy in chronic recurrent skin diseases. Neurodermatitis atopica/psoriasis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Schöpf, E; Mueller, J M; Ostermann, T

    1995-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis vulgaris belong to the most common diseases in dermatology. Since these chronical diseases progress over years and decades, they may lead to restrictions in private and professional life as well as to psychological stress of concerned patients. Therefore, a lasting, stabilising, stage-adjusted topical treatment is necessary. Main component of this treatment in a complete therapeutical concept consists in an adjuvant basic therapy with oil baths and with emollients containing urea or no drug additives at all. Thus the vehicle itself is therapeutically effective. Altered structure and function of the skin measured by increased transepidermal water loss, dysfunction of skin lipid barrier, augmented skin permeability and skin roughness can be improved. Due to this treatment clinical symptoms can be diminished and relapses can be avoided. Corticosteroids and other specific medications can be reduced by using basic therapeutics with little side effects. This means economical benefit as well. So far adjuvant basic treatment is an essential part in the therapy of chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  13. Immunofluorescence Patterns in Selected Dermatoses, Including Blistering Skin Diseases Utilizing Multiple Fluorochromes

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Calle-Isaza, Juliana; Howard, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders represent a heterogeneous group of dermatoses whose diagnosis is made based on clinical history, histologic features, and immunopathologic features. The most commonly used techniques for the diagnosis of these diseases are direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF), including salt-split processing. NaCl split skin is used to determine the level of blister formation, and the localization of autoantibodies relative to the split. Classically, immunofluorescence has been performed with one fluorochrome in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Aims: To compare DIF and IIF of the skin, using a single fluorochrome versus multiple fluorochromes. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 autoimmune skin disease cases using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) alone, in comparison to multiple fluorochromes (with or without DNA counterstaining). Results: The use of multiple fluorochromes helped to simultaneously visualize reactivity in multiple skin areas, in contrast to using FITC alone. Conclusions: Using multiple fluorochromes allows simultaneous labeling of two or more antigens within the same cell/or tissue section, assists in colocalization of unknown antigens with known molecules, and helps in ruling out “background” staining. PMID:26605203

  14. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  15. Inherited abnormalities of skeletal development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K G; Piripi, S A; Dittmer, K E

    2008-09-01

    Inherited diseases of the skeleton are reported less often in sheep than in most other domestic animal species but are likely to occur more frequently than the veterinary literature would suggest. Although most are lethal or semi-lethal, the gene frequency for some of these diseases has reached surprisingly high levels in defined populations, presumably due either to the founder effect or the presence of a selective advantage of heterozygous individuals. This article reviews the clinical characteristics, pathology, mode of inheritance and molecular basis of skeletal diseases known to have a genetic aetiology in sheep. Inherited skeletal diseases of sheep are potential models for studying the treatment of similar diseases in humans.

  16. Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Scleroderma (Systemic Sclerosis , SSc) is a chronic, incurable autoimmune disease associated with high morbidity and mortality primarily due to SSc-lung...utilizing the biospecimens and longitudinal clinical data in the GENISOS cohort to perform an analysis combining data from multiple areas to develop...19, 2014 in Boston. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis , GENISOS (Genes versus Environment in Scleroderma Outcome Study

  17. 77 FR 64814 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... rheumatoid arthritis and skin diseases. Date: November 16, 2012. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis...

  18. The Occurrence and Prevalence of Giraffe Skin Disease in Protected Areas of Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lee, Derek E; Bond, Monica L

    2016-07-01

    Giraffe skin disease (GSD) is a disorder of undetermined etiology that causes lesions on the forelimbs of Masai giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi). We estimated occurrence and prevalence of GSD in six wildlife conservation areas of Tanzania. The disjunct spatial pattern of occurrence implies that environmental factors may influence GSD.

  19. Loss of serum response factor in keratinocytes results in hyperproliferative skin disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, Heidi; von Tobel, Lukas; Schäfer, Matthias; Alberti, Siegfried; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mauch, Cornelia; Hohl, Daniel; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Bloch, Wilhelm; Nordheim, Alfred; Werner, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) plays a crucial role in the development of several organs. However, its role in the skin has not been explored. Here, we show that keratinocytes in normal human and mouse skin expressed high levels of SRF but that SRF expression was strongly downregulated in the hyperproliferative epidermis of wounded and psoriatic skin. Keratinocyte-specific deletion within the mouse SRF locus during embryonic development caused edema and skin blistering, and all animals died in utero. Postnatal loss of mouse SRF in keratinocytes resulted in the development of psoriasis-like skin lesions. These lesions were characterized by inflammation, hyperproliferation, and abnormal differentiation of keratinocytes as well as by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Ultrastructural analysis revealed markedly reduced cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts and loss of cell compaction in all epidermal layers. siRNA-mediated knockdown of SRF in primary human keratinocytes revealed that the cytoskeletal abnormalities and adhesion defects were a direct consequence of the loss of SRF. In contrast, the hyperproliferation observed in vivo was an indirect effect that was most likely a consequence of the inflammation. These results reveal that loss of SRF disrupts epidermal homeostasis and strongly suggest its involvement in the pathogenesis of hyperproliferative skin diseases, including psoriasis. PMID:19307725

  20. Immune-mediated inflammatory reactions and tumors as skin side effects of inflammatory bowel disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Borghi, Alessandro; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Crosti, Carlo; Cugno, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    All drugs currently used for treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD - including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) have the potential to induce skin lesions ranging from mild eruptions to more serious and widespread clinical presentations. The number of cutaneous adverse reactions due to IBD therapies is progressively increasing and the most frequently involved drugs are thiopurines and biologics like tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists. The main drug-induced cutaneous manifestations are non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), notably basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, and viral skin infections for thiopurines and psoriasiform, eczematoid and lichenoid eruptions as well as skin infections and cutaneous lupus erythematosus for biologics. Cutaneous manifestations should be promptly recognized and correctly diagnosed in order to quickly establish an adequate therapy. The main treatment for NMSC is surgical excision whereas the management of immune-mediated inflammatory skin reactions varies from topical therapy for mild presentations to the shift to another drug alone or in combination with corticosteroids for extensive eruptions.

  1. Near-infrared Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging for Early Detection of Sour Skin Disease in Vidalia Sweet Onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sour skin is a major onion disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia). It not only causes substantial economic loss from diseased onions but also could lead to pulmonary infection in humans. It is critical to prevent onions infected by sour skin from entering storage rooms or ...

  2. [Kaleidoscopic overview of palmo-plantar papulosquamous skin disease].

    PubMed

    Devillers, C; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns-Lê, T; Piérard, G E

    2010-01-01

    A pruritic vesicular, pustular or squamous eruption confined to the lateral aspect of fingers or toes corresponds to the overall pattern of dysidrosis. Such a clinical pattern is defined by its peculiar topography. It is encountered in diseases resulting from various etiologies. Thus, conceptually, dysidrosis is a common clinical aspect shared by diverse disorders related to different etiologies and pathomechanisms. The dermatopathological assessment and the patch test procedure shed some light on this nosological diversity. Allergic contact dermatitis, irritation dermatitis, mycids, alterations of acrosyringia, and drug or food reactions are eventually involved in this process. However, most cases of dysidrotic dermatoses do not disclose their origins and they remain idiopathic.

  3. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Fumihiko . E-mail: fumihiko@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) {approx}10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL {approx}30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients.

  4. Fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of equine skin disease and the epidemiology of equine skin cytology submissions in a western Canadian diagnostic laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zachar, Erin K.; Burgess, Hilary J.; Wobeser, Bruce K.

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is commonly used to diagnose skin disease in companion animals, but its use in horses appears to be infrequent. Equine veterinarians in western Canada were surveyed to determine their opinions about FNA and 15 years of diagnostic submissions were used to compare the perceived to actual value of FNA in the diagnosis of skin disease in horses. Practitioners viewed FNA as quick, easy, economical, and minimally invasive. However, most veterinarians rarely chose to use FNA due to a perception that sample quality and diagnostic yield were poor and there was a narrow range of diseases the technique could diagnose. Analysis of the FNA cytology samples from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory showed a wide variety of equine skin disease conditions, but the frequency of non-diagnostic results was significantly higher in equine submissions compared to those from dogs and cats. PMID:27247463

  5. The role of filaggrin in the skin barrier and disease development.

    PubMed

    Armengot-Carbo, M; Hernández-Martín, Á; Torrelo, A

    2015-03-01

    Filaggrin is a structural protein that is fundamental in the development and maintenance of the skin barrier. The function of filaggrin and its involvement in various cutaneous and extracutaneous disorders has been the subject of considerable research in recent years. Mutations in FLG, the gene that encodes filaggrin, have been shown to cause ichthyosis vulgaris, increase the risk of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases, and exacerbate certain conditions. The present article reviews the current knowledge on the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier, FLG mutations, and the consequences of filaggrin deficiency.

  6. Low Level Light Could Work on Skin Inflammatory Disease: A Case Report on Refractory Acrodermatitis Continua

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mira; Na, Se Young; Cho, Soyun

    2011-01-01

    Low level laser or light treatment on the various clinical condition is getting considerable attention now. However, there has been no report about the clinical effect of low level polarized polychromatic noncoherent light (LPPL) on the inflammatory skin disease. We experienced a case of acrodermatitis continua in a pregnant woman refractory to any conventional treatment including the most potent topical steroid. She was successfully treated with LPPL. LPPL could be a possible treatment modality producing substantial clinical result in inflammatory skin condition without any side-effect. PMID:21394319

  7. Panel-based Genetic Diagnostic Testing for Inherited Eye Diseases is Highly Accurate and Reproducible and More Sensitive for Variant Detection Than Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; Sousa, Maria E.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoë D.; Taub, Daniel G.; Janessian, Maria; Wang, Dan Yi; Au, Elizabeth D.; Sims, Katherine B.; Sweetser, David A.; Fulton, Anne B.; Liu, Qin; Wiggs, Janey L.; Gai, Xiaowu; Pierce, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods are being adopted broadly for genetic diagnostic testing, but the performance characteristics of these techniques have not been fully defined with regard to test accuracy and reproducibility. Methods We developed a targeted enrichment and NGS approach for genetic diagnostic testing of patients with inherited eye disorders, including inherited retinal degenerations, optic atrophy and glaucoma. In preparation for providing this Genetic Eye Disease (GEDi) test on a CLIA-certified basis, we performed experiments to measure the sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility as well as the clinical sensitivity of the test. Results The GEDi test is highly reproducible and accurate, with sensitivity and specificity for single nucleotide variant detection of 97.9% and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity for variant detection was notably better than the 88.3% achieved by whole exome sequencing (WES) using the same metrics, due to better coverage of targeted genes in the GEDi test compared to commercially available exome capture sets. Prospective testing of 192 patients with IRDs indicated that the clinical sensitivity of the GEDi test is high, with a diagnostic rate of 51%. Conclusion The data suggest that based on quantified performance metrics, selective targeted enrichment is preferable to WES for genetic diagnostic testing. PMID:25412400

  8. What is new in the histogenesis of granulomatous skin diseases?

    PubMed

    Asai, Jun

    2017-03-01

    A granuloma is a form of inflammation, which predominantly consists of macrophages. It typically develops when the immune system attempts to enclose substances that are usually insoluble and cannot be eliminated to prevent the spread of these substances to the other body compartments. According to the source of the substances, granulomatous diseases can be divided into two groups: infectious and non-infectious. The mechanisms of infectious granuloma formation have been widely investigated because of its easy reproducibility in experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro. On the contrary, mechanisms of non-infectious granuloma formation have not been well investigated because of the difficulty to reproduce this formation in experimental models. In this article, we review our recent understanding of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of granuloma formation, confirmed from studies of infectious granulomas, and we present potential hypotheses of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of non-infectious granulomas based on clinical investigations.

  9. Why do people buy dogs with potential welfare problems related to extreme conformation and inherited disease? A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Sandøe, P; Kondrup, S V; Bennett, P C; Forkman, B; Meyer, I; Proschowsky, H F; Serpell, J A; Lund, T B

    2017-01-01

    A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to re-procure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog's personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems.

  10. Why do people buy dogs with potential welfare problems related to extreme conformation and inherited disease? A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Kondrup, S. V.; Bennett, P. C.; Forkman, B.; Meyer, I; Proschowsky, H. F.; Serpell, J. A.; Lund, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to re-procure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog’s personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems. PMID:28234931

  11. Recurrent atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome post kidney transplant due to a CD46 mutation in the setting of SMARCAL1-mediated inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel; Mallett, Andrew J; Patel, Chirag; Francis, Ross S; Johnson, David W; Mudge, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    Disorders in the regulation of the alternate complement pathway often result in complement-mediated damage to the microvascular endothelium and can be associated with both glomerulonephritis and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Inherited defects in complement regulatory genes or autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins are predictive of the severity of the disease and the risk of recurrence post kidney transplantation. Heterozygous mutations in CD46, which codes for a transmembrane cofactor glycoprotein membrane cofactor protein, usually have a lower incidence of end-stage kidney disease and decreased risk of recurrent disease post transplant, as wild-type membrane cofactor protein is present in the transplanted kidney. However, some patients with CD46 mutations have a second variant in other complement regulatory genes increasing the severity of disease. The following case report illustrates the course of a young adult patient with end-stage kidney disease initially ascribed to seronegative systemic lupus erythematosus, who presented with biopsy-proven thrombotic microangiopathy following kidney transplantation. It highlights the complexity associated with disorders of complement regulation and the need for a high index of suspicion and genetic testing in patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy post-transplant.

  12. Skin in health and diseases in ṛgveda saṃhiṭa: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amiya Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Ṛgveda is the oldest religious book of the Aryans. It picturises the early lives of the Aryans. We get mention of various diseases in this Veda. Skin - both in health and diseases had caught attention of the Vedic sages. Skin was not merely an organ of attraction and look but its colour was important socially. Mentions of various diseases like leprosy, guinea worm, jaundice etc., are interesting. Mention of different disorders of the nails and hair are also there, though in a very primitive and mystic form. Management strategy was consisted of herbs, amulates, chanting of mantras, touching the body, uses of water and sunrays etc. This may be presumed that this Veda founded the base for the Āyurveda of the later period.

  13. Skin in Health and Diseases in Ṛgveda Saṃhiṭa: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Amiya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Ṛgveda is the oldest religious book of the Aryans. It picturises the early lives of the Aryans. We get mention of various diseases in this Veda. Skin - both in health and diseases had caught attention of the Vedic sages. Skin was not merely an organ of attraction and look but its colour was important socially. Mentions of various diseases like leprosy, guinea worm, jaundice etc., are interesting. Mention of different disorders of the nails and hair are also there, though in a very primitive and mystic form. Management strategy was consisted of herbs, amulates, chanting of mantras, touching the body, uses of water and sunrays etc. This may be presumed that this Veda founded the base for the Āyurveda of the later period. PMID:24249889

  14. Stressed skin?--a molecular psychosomatic update on stress-causes and effects in dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J

    2016-03-01

    A pathogenetically relevant link between stress, in terms of psychosocial stress, and disease was first described in the 1970s, when it was proven that viral diseases of mucous membranes (such as rhinovirus and Coxsackie virus infections) develop faster and more severe after stress exposure. Since then, there has been an annual increase in the number of publications which investigate this relationship and break it down to the molecular level. Nevertheless, the evidences for the impact of psychosocial stress on chronic inflammatory skin diseases and skin tumors are hardly known. In the present review, we outline current insights into epidemiology, psychoneuroimmunology, and molecular psychosomatics which demonstrate the manifold disease-relevant interactions between the endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. The focus is on stress-induced shifts in immune balance in exemplary disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and malignant melanoma. The objective of this article is to convey basic psychosomatic knowledge with respect to etiology, symptomatology, and therapeutic options for chronic skin diseases. Particular attention is directed towards the underlying molecular relationships, both from a somatic to mental as well as a mental to somatic perspective.

  15. [Skin diseases in human immunodeficiency virus positive children from Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Muñoz M, Paula; Gómez H, Oríetta; Luzoro V, Amaranta

    2008-08-01

    Children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may develop severe, refractory mucocutaneous manifestations that may be the initiating symptom of HIV infection. In this study we examined the skin of all HIV positive children receiving medical care in the public health care system in Santiago, Chile. We detected mucocutaneous manifestations in 37/66 (56%) children from 7 months to 12 years of age. The most commonly encountered dermatologic manifestations were of infectious origin, mostly fungal (7.5%) and viral (7.5%) infections. With the increase in pediatric HIV patients worldwide, it is important to recognize skin manifestations of HIV positive children. This is the first published series of skin diseases in HIV positive children in Chile.

  16. The neuroimmune connection interferes with tissue regeneration and chronic inflammatory disease in the skin.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Klapp, Burghard F; Kruse, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Research over the past decades has revealed close interactions between the nervous and immune systems that regulate peripheral inflammation and link psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease. Besides activation of the sympathetic and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, stress leads to increased neurotrophin and neuropeptide production in organs at the self-environment interface. The scope of this short review is to discuss key functions of these stress mediators in the skin, an exemplary stress-targeted and stress-sensitive organ. We will focus on the skin's response to acute and chronic stress in tissue regeneration and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, psoriasis, and skin cancer to illustrate the impact of local stress-induced neuroimmune interaction on chronic inflammation.

  17. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  18. Case of immunoglobulin G4-related skin disease: possible immunoglobulin G4-related skin disease cases in cutaneous pseudolymphoma only by immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yohei; Mizoguchi, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Beni; Kuroda, Makoto; Yagami, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2013-12-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized disease characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels, tissue infiltration rich in IgG4(+) plasma cells. We report on a case which was first considered as pseudolymphoma from the histopathological analysis, but finally diagnosed as IgG4-related skin lesions. As the morphological features of cutaneous involvement of IgG4-RD are consistent with those of cutaneous pseudolymphoma, we tried immunostaining past potential cases of IgG4-RD. Thirty-two skin specimens (15 men and 17 women; mean age, 53 years) diagnosed as having pseudolymphoma were retrieved from the archives to conduct hematoxylin-eosin, IgG and IgG4 staining. Out of the 32 cases of cutaneous pseudolymphoma, germinal center formation was seen in 22 cases, and moderate-severe fibrosis was seen in seven cases. Eleven cases showed more than 10 IgG4(+) plasma cell infiltration/high-power field, and among these 11 cases, seven cases (22%) showed A ratio of IgG4(+)/IgG(+) cells of more than 40%. Thus, out of the 32 cases of cutaneous pseudolymphomas, two cases (6.3%) satisfied IgG4-RD histopathological diagnostic criteria. As clinical presentations and histopathological features of skin involvement of IgG4-RD are analogous to cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma, careful identification is required through systemic examination, serum IgG4 measurement and other means.

  19. α-Synuclein inclusions in the skin of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E; Rentería-Palomo, Ana Arely; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Héctor Gerardo; Valdés-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Fuentes-Ahumada, Cornelia; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Soto-Domínguez, Adolfo; Santoyo, Martha E; Rodriguez-Moreno, José Ildefonso; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence in the brain of α-synuclein containing Lewy neurites, or bodies, is the histological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery of α-synuclein aggregates in nerve endings of the heart, digestive tract, and skin has lent support to the concept of PD as a systemic disease. Our goals were, first, to demonstrate the presence of α-synuclein inclusions in the skin and, second, to detect quantitative differences between patients with PD and atypical parkinsonism (AP). Methods Skin biopsies were taken from 67 patients and 20 controls. The biopsies underwent immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) testing for α-synuclein, whereupon its presence was quantified as the percentage of positive cells. Patients were divided into those with PD and those with AP. AP patients included AP with neurodegenerative disease (proteinopathies) and secondary AP. Results Sixty-seven patients (34 with PD) and 20 controls were recruited. In the PD group, α-synuclein was detected in 58% of the cells in the spinous cell layer (SCL), 62% in the pilosebaceous unit (PSU), and 58% in the eccrine glands (EG). The AP-proteinopathies group showed 7%, 7%, and 0% expression of α-synuclein, respectively. No expression was found in the skin of the control group. Conclusions The expression of α-synuclein in the skin was relatively high in the PD group, scarce in AP, and null for the individuals in the control group. While these findings require further confirmation, this minimally invasive technique may aid in the improvement of the accuracy of PD diagnoses. PMID:25356418

  20. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  1. [Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin. Four case reports].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos; Cuesta-Mejías, Teresa C; Ochoa-Ochoa, Concepción; Valenzuela-Espinosa, Alfonso; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia

    2003-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman Disease, presents with bilateral painless cervical adenomegaly, fever, and several hematologic abnormalities. Skin is the extranodal site most frequently affected. We described four additional cases of SHML limited to the skin, emphasizing possible confusion with other dermatoses. Clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical aspects of four patients with cutaneous SHLM, three diagnosed in the ABC Medical Center in Mexico City and the other at the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital of Havana, Cuba, are reviewed. Three males and one female, 48, 35, 42, and 55 years of age, presented with chronic asymptomatic dermal nodules, papules, or plaques on trunk, extremities, and face. Skin biopsies showed dense infiltrates of foamy histiocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells; histiocytes presented with prominent emperipolesis and intense S100 and CD68 immunostain. The four cases reported here had histiocytic benign proliferative disorder corresponding with cutaneous SHML: Emperipolesis suggested the diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for S100 protein in macrophages. Cutaneous lesions of SHML are easily recognized when they are found in the classical clinical picture, but as purely skin disease could be confused with other dermatoses.

  2. Evaluation of different diagnostic methods for diagnosis of Lumpy skin disease in cows.

    PubMed

    Awad, Walid S; Ibrahim, Adel K; Mahran, Khaled; Fararh, Khaled M; Abdel Moniem, Mervet I

    2010-04-01

    Viral isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), dot blot hybridization (DBH), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) were used for the diagnosis of lumpy skin disease in clinically infected, fevered, and apparently normal dairy cows. Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) was isolated from skin biopsies and blood samples collected from clinically infected cows in percentages of 72% and 20%, respectively. The virus recovered from blood samples collected from fevered cows in percentage of 33.3%. Both PCR and DBH detected viral DNA in 100% of skin biopsies collected from clinically infected cows whereas the detection rates in blood samples collected from clinically infected animals were 100% and 84% using PCR and DBH, respectively. Viral DNA was detected in blood samples collected from fevered cows using PCR and DBH in percentages of 77.8% and 66.6%, respectively. Only 19.1% of blood samples collected from in-contact cows was positive for both of PCR and DBH. Detection rates of antibodies against LSDV using iELISA in serum samples collected from clinically infected and fevered cows were 56% and 11.1%, respectively, whereas all in-contact cows had no antibodies against the virus.

  3. The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bíró, Tamás; Tóth, Balázs I.; Haskó, György; Paus, Ralf; Pacher, Pál

    2009-01-01

    The newly discovered endocannabinoid system (ECS; comprising the endogenous lipid mediators endocannabinoids present in virtually all tissues, their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, biosynthetic pathways and metabolizing enzymes) has been implicated in multiple regulatory functions both in health and disease. Recent studies have intriguingly suggested the existence of a functional ECS in the skin and implicated it in various biological processes (e.g. proliferation, growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cytokine, mediator or hormone production of various cell types of the skin and appendages, such as the hair follicle and sebaceous gland). It seems that the main physiological function of the cutaneous ECS is to constitutively control the proper and well-balanced proliferation, differentiation and survival, as well as immune competence and/or tolerance, of skin cells. The disruption of this delicate balance might facilitate the development of multiple pathological conditions and diseases of the skin (e.g. acne, seborrhea, allergic dermatitis, itch and pain, psoriasis, hair growth disorders, systemic sclerosis and cancer). PMID:19608284

  4. Skin as a route of exposure and sensitization in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tinkle, Sally S; Antonini, James M; Rich, Brenda A; Roberts, Jenny R; Salmen, Rebecca; DePree, Karyn; Adkins, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is an occupational lung disease that begins as a cell-mediated immune response to beryllium. Although respiratory and engineering controls have significantly decreased occupational beryllium exposures over the last decade, the rate of beryllium sensitization has not declined. We hypothesized that skin exposure to beryllium particles would provide an alternative route for sensitization to this metal. We employed optical scanning laser confocal microscopy and size-selected fluorospheres to demonstrate that 0.5- and 1.0- micro m particles, in conjunction with motion, as at the wrist, penetrate the stratum corneum of human skin and reach the epidermis and, occasionally, the dermis. The cutaneous immune response to chemical sensitizers is initiated in the skin, matures in the local lymph node (LN), and releases hapten-specific T cells into the peripheral blood. Topical application of beryllium to C3H mice generated beryllium-specific sensitization that was documented by peripheral blood and LN beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests (BeLPT) and by changes in LN T-cell activation markers, increased expression of CD44, and decreased CD62L. In a sensitization-challenge treatment paradigm, epicutaneous beryllium increased murine ear thickness following chemical challenge. These data are consistent with development of a hapten-specific, cell-mediated immune response following topical application of beryllium and suggest a mechanistic link between the persistent rate of beryllium worker sensitization and skin exposure to fine and ultrafine beryllium particles. PMID:12842774

  5. Genetic and phenotypic variations of inherited retinal diseases in dogs: the power of within- and across-breed studies.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-01

    Considerable clinical and molecular variations have been known in retinal blinding diseases in man and also in dogs. Different forms of retinal diseases occur in specific breed(s) caused by mutations segregating within each isolated breeding population. While molecular studies to find genes and mutations underlying retinal diseases in dogs have benefited largely from the phenotypic and genetic uniformity within a breed, within- and across-breed variations have often played a key role in elucidating the molecular basis. The increasing knowledge of phenotypic, allelic, and genetic heterogeneities in canine retinal degeneration has shown that the overall picture is rather more complicated than initially thought. Over the past 20 years, various approaches have been developed and tested to search for genes and mutations underlying genetic traits in dogs, depending on the availability of genetic tools and sample resources. Candidate gene, linkage analysis, and genome-wide association studies have so far identified 24 mutations in 18 genes underlying retinal diseases in at least 58 dog breeds. Many of these genes have been associated with retinal diseases in humans, thus providing opportunities to study the role in pathogenesis and in normal vision. Application in therapeutic interventions such as gene therapy has proven successful initially in a naturally occurring dog model followed by trials in human patients. Other genes whose human homologs have not been associated with retinal diseases are potential candidates to explain equivalent human diseases and contribute to the understanding of their function in vision.

  6. Genetic and phenotypic variations of inherited retinal diseases in dogs: the power of within- and across-breed studies

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable clinical and molecular variations have been known in retinal blinding diseases in man and also in dogs. Different forms of retinal diseases occur in specific breed(s) caused by mutations segregating within each isolated breeding population. While molecular studies to find genes and mutations underlying retinal diseases in dogs have benefited largely from the phenotypic and genetic uniformity within a breed, within- and across-breed variations have often played a key role in elucidating the molecular basis. The increasing knowledge of phenotypic, allelic, and genetic heterogeneities in canine retinal degeneration has shown that the overall picture is rather more complicated than initially thought. Over the past 20 years, various approaches have been developed and tested to search for genes and mutations underlying genetic traits in dogs, depending on the availability of genetic tools and sample resources. Candidate gene, linkage analysis, and genome-wide association studies have so far identified 24 mutations in 18 genes underlying retinal diseases in at least 58 dog breeds. Many of these genes have been associated with retinal diseases in humans, thus providing opportunities to study the role in pathogenesis and in normal vision. Application in therapeutic interventions such as gene therapy has proven successful initially in a naturally occurring dog model followed by trials in human patients. Other genes whose human homologs have not been associated with retinal diseases are potential candidates to explain equivalent human diseases and contribute to the understanding of their function in vision. PMID:22065099

  7. Mitochondrial inheritance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Basse, Christoph W

    2010-12-01

    Faithful inheritance of mitochondria is essential for growth and development. Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria is a common phenomenon in sexual eukaryotes and has been reported for numerous fungal species. Uniparental inheritance is a genetically regulated process, aimed to gain a homoplasmic state within cells, and this is often associated with selective elimination of one parental mitochondria population. This review will focus on recent developments in our understanding of common and specified regulatory circuits of selective mitochondrial inheritance during sexual development. It further refers to the influence of mitochondrial fusion on generation of recombinant mitochondrial DNA molecules. The latter aspect appears rather exciting in the context of intron homing and could bring a new twist to the debate on the significance of uniparental inheritance. The emergence of genome-wide studies offers new perspectives to address potential relationships between uniparental inheritance, vegetative inheritance and last but not least cellular scavenging systems to dispose of disintegrated organelles.

  8. The mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc in inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Fivenson, David P

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide (niacinamide), a physiologically active form of niacin (nicotinic acid), in combination with zinc is being assessed in clinical studies for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as acne vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. The basis for these investigations is the variety of potential mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc, including an anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, lymphocytic transformation, mast cell degranulation, bacteriostatic effect against Propionibacterium acnes, inhibition of vasoactive amines, preservation of intracellular coenzyme homeostasis, and decreased sebum production. Other possible mechanisms involve suppression of vascular permeability and inflammatory cell accumulation, as well as protection against DNA damage. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases and discuss the role, mechanisms of action, and safety of nicotinamide and zinc as therapeutic options for these disorders.

  9. Attempted mechanical transmission of lumpy skin disease virus by biting insects.

    PubMed

    Chihota, C M; Rennie, L F; Kitching, R P; Mellor, P S

    2003-09-01

    The mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae), the stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae) and the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were allowed to feed on either lumpy skin disease (LSD) infected animals or through a membrane on a bloodmeal containing lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). These arthropods were then allowed to refeed on susceptible cattle at various intervals after the infective feed. Virus was detected in the insects by polymerase chain reaction immediately after feeding and at sufficiently high titre to enable transmission to occur. However, no transmission of virus from infected to susceptible animals by An. stephensi, S. calcitrans, C. nubeculosus and Cx. quinquefasciatus was observed.

  10. Spread rate of lumpy skin disease in the Balkans, 2015-2016.

    PubMed

    Mercier, A; Arsevska, E; Bournez, L; Bronner, A; Calavas, D; Cauchard, J; Falala, S; Caufour, P; Tisseuil, C; Lefrançois, T; Lancelot, R

    2017-02-26

    After its introduction in Turkey in November 2013 and subsequent spread in this country, lumpy skin disease (LSD) was first reported in the western Turkey in May 2015. It was observed in cattle in Greece and reported to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) in August 2015. From May 2015 to August 2016, 1,092 outbreaks of lumpy skin disease were reported in cattle from western Turkey and eight Balkan countries: Greece, Bulgaria, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, Kosovo, and Albania. During this period, the median LSD spread rate was 7.3 km/week. The frequency of outbreaks was highly seasonal, with little or no transmission reported during the winter. Also, the skewed distribution of spread rates suggested two distinct underlying epidemiological processes, associating local and distant spread possibly related to vectors and cattle trade movements, respectively.

  11. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2015-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  12. Investigation of photothermolysis therapy of human skin diseases using optical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Galla, S.; Popov, A. P.; Bykov, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.; Cenian, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as neurofibroma (Recklinghausen disease) or hemangiomas can be efficiently treated using photothermolysis from laser irradiation. We have utilized a developed 975 nm fiber diode laser as a low-cost alternative over common Nd:YAG lasers. This paper describes the investigations of interaction of 975 nm diode laser radiation-pulses with optical skin phantoms which were designed and manufactured in our laboratory. Such phantoms match the scattering and absorption coefficients of real human skin. Spatial and temporal temperature evolutions during laser irradiation with various laser settings (pulsed and CW mode), were recorded by an IR camera. Subsequent analysis yielded optimum choice of parameters for laser therapy of coetaneous lesions.

  13. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions. PMID:27828642

  14. Patterns of skin disease in a sample of the federal prison population: a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, Geneviève; McEvoy, Alana; Walker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dermatology in vulnerable populations is under-researched. Our objective was to analyze the most commonly referred skin diseases affecting the Correctional Service Canada inmates in Ontario. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional, retrospective chart review of inmate patients seen from 2008 until 2013 was performed. Two groups of patients were included in the analysis: those assessed in-person, and those evaluated by e-consult. Results: In the in-person patient group, the 3 most common diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and other superficial mycoses. For the e-consult group, the 3 most frequent diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and rosacea. There was a clear bias toward more inmates being seen in-person where the service was provided (Collins Bay Institution) than from other correctional institutions in Eastern Ontario. Interpretation: Most of the skin diseases that affected the incarcerated population studied were common afflictions, similar to those affecting the general population, which is in agreement with other studies. Future studies investigating skin diseases in male and female inmates across Canada would bestow more generalizable data. PMID:27398381

  15. Genetic background of skin barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Stawczyk-Macieja, Marta; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Rębała, Krzysztof; Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota

    2015-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease. It is known to be a complex condition with multifactorial mode of inheritance, however the associations between particular pathogenic pathways remain unclear. A novel report on the pathogenesis of psoriasis has recently included the genetic determination of the skin barrier dysfunction. In this paper, we focus on specific genetic variants associated with formation of the epidermal barrier and their role in the complex pathogenesis of the disease.

  16. Mixed connective tissue disease characterized by speckled epidermal nuclear IgG deposition in normal skin.

    PubMed

    Bentley-Phillips, C B; Geake, T M

    1980-05-01

    Four African female patients are described, who presented with the features of systemic sclerosis. Overlapping features of lupus erythematosus or dermatomyositis were present in three cases but were not prominent. Direct immunofluorescence of uninvolved skin revealed a particulate (or speckled) epidermal nuclear staining, with specificity for IgG. In view of the reported association between this finding and mixed connective tissue disease, these patients were treated with corticosteroids and marked improvment occurred in all cases. The usefulness of this investigation in making the distinction between systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease and in indicating a potentially effective form of therapy is discussed.

  17. The emotional impact of chronic and disabling skin disease: a psychoanalytic perspective.

    PubMed

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    2005-10-01

    This article discusses some major early factors that influence the evolving psychologic development, which in turn helps determine the emotional impact that chronic or disabling skin disease may have on patients' lives. If the emotional environment, encompassed by the infant-caretaker relationship, is less than optimal, the stability of the body image may be compromised, self-esteem diminished, and affect less well handled and the somatic expression of emotional content may ensue. Each of these is important in dermatology, as is the nature of the disease and the capacity of families and of society to adapt. Psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and acne are used as examples.

  18. [Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia and skin diseases. I. Seborrhoeic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Buchvald, D

    2010-08-01

    Recent technological advances have revived the interest in Malassezia yeasts and their clinical role, which has long been a matter of controversy because of their fastidious nature in vitro and relative difficulty in isolation, cultivation and identification. Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia form a part of normal microbial flora of healthy human (and animal) skin, but they also have been associated with several dermatological diseases, like seborrhoeic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Our understanding of the interactions between Malassezia and the host might provide new opportunities to better control these often chronically relapsing diseases.

  19. Camurati-Engelmann disease in a family from Croatian Island: an old bone scan confirmed pattern of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja; Korsić, Mirko; Potocki, Kristina; Horvatić, Gordana Herceg; Orlić, Zeljka Crncević

    2014-06-01

    34-year old patient had history of muscular wasting, easy fatigability, pain in extremities and waddling gait since age of four. During the time, neuromuscular disease was suspected, but not confirmed. Elevated bone alkaline phosphatase as well as other bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, procollagen, telopeptide) indicated further skeletal evaluation. Symmetrical enhanced uptake on technetium methylene diphosphonate [99mTc]MPD bone scintigraphy at diaphyses of longitudinal bones and scull matched cortical thickening of long bones and sclerosis of the scull seen at radiograms. Those findings pointed to Camurati-Engelmann disease misdiagnosed for the long time. This rare genetic autosomal dominant disorder was retrospectively diagnosed in asymptomatic father too on the basis of bone scans done long time ago. Old family member scans confirmed heredity pattern of the disease.

  20. The Loss and Gain of Functional Amino Acid Residues Is a Common Mechanism Causing Human Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Pejaver, Vikas; Pagel, Kymberleigh A.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Mooney, Sean D.; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the precise molecular events altered by disease-causing genetic variants represents a major challenge in translational bioinformatics. To this end, many studies have investigated the structural and functional impact of amino acid substitutions. Most of these studies were however limited in scope to either individual molecular functions or were concerned with functional effects (e.g. deleterious vs. neutral) without specifically considering possible molecular alterations. The recent growth of structural, molecular and genetic data presents an opportunity for more comprehensive studies to consider the structural environment of a residue of interest, to hypothesize specific molecular effects of sequence variants and to statistically associate these effects with genetic disease. In this study, we analyzed data sets of disease-causing and putatively neutral human variants mapped to protein 3D structures as part of a systematic study of the loss and gain of various types of functional attribute potentially underlying pathogenic molecular alterations. We first propose a formal model to assess probabilistically function-impacting variants. We then develop an array of structure-based functional residue predictors, evaluate their performance, and use them to quantify the impact of disease-causing amino acid substitutions on catalytic activity, metal binding, macromolecular binding, ligand binding, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. We show that our methodology generates actionable biological hypotheses for up to 41% of disease-causing genetic variants mapped to protein structures suggesting that it can be reliably used to guide experimental validation. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of disease-causing human variants mapping to protein structures are function-altering both in the presence and absence of stability disruption. PMID:27564311

  1. Puffy Skin Disease Is an Emerging Transmissible Condition in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Irene; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; van Aerle, Ronny; Paley, Richard K.; Peeler, Edmund J.; Green, Matthew; Rimmer, Georgina S. E.; Savage, Jacqueline; Joiner, Claire L.; Bayley, Amanda E.; Mewett, Jason; Hulland, Jonathan; Feist, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of puffy skin disease (PSD) to rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum was tested in the laboratory by conducting co-habitation challenges with puffy skin (PS)-affected fish (Trojans) collected from the field. Two separate challenges were conducted using Trojans sourced from two different sites and diploid (first trial) or triploid (second trial) naïve fish. PSD-specific clinical signs were observed in both groups of naïve fish, with 66% of the fish sampled during the challenges showing signs of varying severity. The first clinical features of PSD were presented as white oval skin patches on one or both flanks 15–21 days post-challenge (dpc). The extent of the lesions ranged from 10 to 90% of the body surface, depending on the severity of the lesion. Both the severity and number of affected fish increased during the challenge. Macroscopically, oedema of the skin and multifocal petechial haemorrhaging were observed towards the end of the trials. Abnormal fish behaviour consisting of “flashing” and excessive mucous production was noted from 15 dpc onwards. Fish with severe PSD lesions also displayed inappetence and associated emaciation. Rodlet cells were observed in 41% of the fresh skin scrapes analysed from the second trial. Histologically epidermal oedema was observed in 31% of the naive fish showing gross pathology, with additional 12% displaying epidermal hyperplasia, mostly observed at the end of the challenge. Other concomitant features of the PSD lesions in challenged fish were epithelial erosion and sloughing, and occasionally mild or focal inflammation. No consistent pathology of internal organs was observed. The parasites Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Ichthyobodo necator were observed in skin samples of a proportion of naïve challenged fish and in Trojans but not in control fish. The presence of these and other known fish pathogens in the skin of PSD-fish was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing analysis. In summary, we

  2. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-09-25

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects.

  3. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects. PMID:26404243

  4. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease.

  5. The effect of climate change on skin disease in North America.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Shetlar, David; Norton, Scott A; Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-01-01

    Global temperatures continue to rise, reaching new records almost every year this decade. Although the causes are debated, climate change is a reality. Consequences of climate change include melting of the arctic ice cap, rising of sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, and increased severe weather events. This article updates dermatologists about the effects of climate change on the epidemiology and geographic ranges of selected skin diseases in North America. Although globalization, travel, and trade are also important to changing disease and vector patterns, climate change creates favorable habitats and expanded access to immunologically naïve hosts. Endemic North American illnesses such as Lyme disease, leishmaniasis, and dimorphic fungal infections have recently expanded the geographic areas of risk. As temperatures increase, epidemic viral diseases such as hand-foot-and-mouth disease may develop transmission seasons that are longer and more intense. Chikungunya and dengue are now reported within the southern United States, with Zika on the horizon. Cutaneous injuries from aquatic and marine organisms that have expanding habitats and longer durations of peak activity include jellyfish envenomation, cercarial dermatitis, and seabather eruption, among others. Skin cancer rates may also be affected indirectly by changes in temperature and associated behaviors.

  6. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy.

    PubMed

    Passantino, Annamaria; Masucci, Marisa

    2016-05-01

    Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition), history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies), and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc.) can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired). Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases.

  7. The Th17 Pathway and Inflammatory Diseases of the Intestines, Lungs and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Casey T.; Elson, Charles O.; Fouser, Lynette A.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The recent emergence of a new CD4+ T cell subset, Th17, has transformed our understanding of the pathogenetic basis of an increasing number of chronic immune-mediated diseases. Particularly in tissues that interface with the microbial environment — such as the intestinal and respiratory tracts, and skin — where most of the Th17 cells present in the body reside, dysregulated immunity to self, or the extended “self,” the diverse microbiota that normally colonize these tissues, can result in chronic inflammatory disease. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the biology of the Th17 pathway and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) implicating this immune pathway in human disease that are providing new insights into disease mechanisms in these and other tissues. PMID:23157335

  8. Cell and Gene Therapy for Genetic Diseases: Inherited Disorders Affecting the Lung and Those Mimicking Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS. PMID:22642257

  9. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.

  11. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2007.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2008-06-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects that were reported primarily in the Journal in 2007. Advances in diagnosis include possible biomarkers for anaphylaxis, improved understanding of the relevance of food-specific serum IgE tests, identification of possibly discriminatory T-cell responses for drug allergy, and an elucidation of irritant responses for vaccine allergy diagnostic skin tests. Mechanistic studies are discerning T-cell and cytokine responses central to eosinophilic gastroenteropathies and food allergy, including the identification of multiple potential therapeutic targets. Regarding treatment, clinical studies of oral immunotherapy and allergen vaccination strategies show promise, whereas several clinical studies raise questions about whether oral allergen avoidance reduces atopic risks and whether probiotics can prevent or treat atopic disease. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), particularly as it relates to allergen sensitization and eczema severity. Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to have viral and bacterial infections. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported, including use of sublingual immunotherapy, anti-IgE, and a kallikrein inhibitor.

  12. Epigenetic inheritance: Uncontested?

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Reinberg, Danny

    2011-01-01

    “Epigenetics” is currently defined as “the inheritance of variation (-genetics) above and beyond (epi-) changes in the DNA sequence”. Despite the fact that histones are believed to carry important epigenetic information, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the inheritance of histone-based epigenetic information, including histone modifications and histone variants. Here we review recent progress and discuss potential models for the mitotic inheritance of histone modifications-based epigenetic information. PMID:21321606

  13. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Passantino, Annamaria; Masucci, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition), history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies), and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc.) can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired). Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases. PMID:27284217

  14. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    PubMed

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared.

  15. Alu-mediated large deletion of the CDSN gene as a cause of peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Wada, T; Matsuda, Y; Muraoka, M; Toma, T; Takehara, K; Fujimoto, M; Yachie, A

    2014-10-01

    Peeling skin disease (PSD) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder caused by mutations in CDSN and is characterized by superficial peeling of the upper epidermis. Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a major component of corneodesmosomes that plays an important role in maintaining epidermis integrity. Herein, we report a patient with PSD caused by a novel homozygous large deletion in the 6p21.3 region encompassing the CDSN gene, which abrogates CDSN expression. Several genes including C6orf15, PSORS1C1, PSORS1C2, CCHCR1, and TCF19 were also deleted, however, the patient showed only clinical features typical of PSD. The deletion size was 59.1 kb. Analysis of the sequence surrounding the breakpoint showed that both telomeric and centromeric breakpoints existed within Alu-S sequences that were oriented in opposite directions. These results suggest an Alu-mediated recombination event as the mechanism underlying the deletion in our patient.

  16. Photochemical model of photodynamic therapy applied to skin diseases by a topical photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Fernández-Fernández, L. A.; López-Escobar, M.; Buelta-Carrillo, L.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides a non-invasive, efficient and safe treatment for skin diseases with good cosmetic results. These characteristics make this technique more advantageous than radiotherapy or chemotherapy, which present limitations in a big number of lesions, are painful in many cases and produce non-satisfactory cosmetic results. We present the clinical results obtained at present by this optical technique and a photochemical model of the PDT process applied to the skin by means of a topical photosensitizer, in order to find the optimal PDT parameters. Optical propagation inside the tissue is calculated by means of the three dimensional Beer-Lambert law, due to its facility to be integrated in the differential equations system used to model the photochemical processes involved. With this information it is possible to obtain an initial estimation about the optimal drug dose and the optical power required.

  17. Lumpy skin disease of cattle: an emerging problem in the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Tageldin, Mohamed Hassan; Wallace, David Brian; Gerdes, Gertruida Hermanna; Putterill, John Fraser; Greyling, Roelf Rudolph; Phosiwa, Maanda Noaxe; Al Busaidy, Rashied Mohammed; Al Ismaaily, Sultan Issa

    2014-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a highly infectious disease of cattle caused by a virus belonging to the Capripoxvirus genus of the family Poxviridae. The purpose of this study is to place on record the first confirmation of LSD in the Sultanate. The disease was diagnosed and confirmed using polymerase chain reaction, histopathology, transmission electron microscopy and serum neutralization testing. The epizootic occurred in 2009 involving a large number of animals and covering a wide area including Nezwa, Alqabel, Sohar, Saham and Burimi. Morbidity and mortality rates of 29.7 and 26.3 %, and 13.6 and 15.4 % were observed at Nezwa and Sohar, respectively. The clinical signs were much more severe in Holstein-Friesian cattle compared to indigenous breeds and were characterized by multiple skin nodules covering the neck, back, perineum, tail, limbs and genital organs. Affected animals also exhibited lameness, emaciation and cessation of milk production. Oedema of limbs and brisket, and superficial lymph node enlargement were highly prominent. It is not known from where the virus originated, or how it spread to the Sultanate. The disease has become endemic in the country and is liable to extend to other Gulf Cooperation Council Countries and cause a pandemic. It is of major concern to the Omani dairy industry. Due to the widespread presence of screw worm, serious economic losses can follow outbreaks.

  18. The role of connexins in ear and skin physiology - functional insights from disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Nicholson, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Defects in several different connexins have been associated with several different diseases. The most common of these is deafness, where a few mutations in connexin (Cx) 26 have been found to contribute to over 50% of the incidence of non-syndromic deafness in different human populations. Other mutations in Cx26 or Cx30 have also been associated with various skin phenotypes linked to deafness (palmoplanta keratoderma, Bart-Pumphrey syndrome, Vohwinkel syndrome, keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome, etc.). The large array of disease mutants offers unique opportunities to gain insights into the underlying function of gap junction proteins and their channels in the normal and pathogenic physiologies of the cochlea and epidermis. This review focuses on those mutants where the impact on channel function has been assessed, and correlated with the disease phenotype, or organ function in knock-out mouse models. These approaches have provided evidence supporting a role of gap junctions and hemichannels in K(+) removal and recycling in the ear, as well as possible roles for nutrient passage, in the cochlea. In contrast, increases in hemichannel opening leading to increased cell death, were associated with several keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome skin disease/hearing mutants. In addition to providing clues for therapeutic strategies, these findings allow us to better understand the specific functions of connexin channels that are important for normal tissue function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions.

  19. Serum levels of heavy metals in childhood eczema and skin diseases: friends or foes.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam-Lun E; Wang, Shuxin Susan; Hung, Emily C W; Lam, Hugh S; Lui, Heike H K; Chow, Chung-Mo; Ching, Gary K W; Fok, Tai-Fai; Ng, Pak-Cheung; Leung, Ting-Fan

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of eczema has been increasing in developed countries. Environmental and hygiene factors have been incriminated. Although air and food pollution with heavy metals have been considered as possible culprits, these factors have never been investigated in Hong Kong. To evaluate if quality of life and eczema severity are associated with abnormal serum levels of six common heavy metals, namely, cadmium, lead, mercury, selenium, copper and zinc. Serum or whole blood was taken for measurement of six heavy metals from patients referred to the pediatric dermatology clinic. Eczema severity (SCORAD and NESS) and quality of life (CDLQI) were recorded. A total of 110 patients with eczema and 41 patients with miscellaneous skin conditions were recruited. Serum levels of the six heavy metals were generally within the upper limits of local reference ranges. Zinc levels were below the lower reference limit of 9.4 mum in 66 patients with eczema (60%) and 22 non-eczema patients (53%). Forty-four patients with eczema (40%) and 24 (58%) in non-eczema group had low copper levels. In eczema patients, lead levels were generally within normal limits but their levels were positively correlated with poor quality of life (CDLQI: r = 0.22 and p < 0.05), disease severity (objective SCORAD: r = 0.33 and p < 0.005; NESS: 0.20, p < 0.05), eosinophil count and log-transformed IgE. Copper/zinc ratio also correlated with NESS and CDLQI and was generally higher than non-eczema skin diseases. Our findings help reassure parents that levels of heavy metals generally do not exceed the local reference ranges for toxicity. However, lead levels have significant correlations with disease severity, quality of life and atopy. Low zinc and copper levels are commonly found in pediatric skin diseases and their significance needs to be determined.

  20. Activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid and other eosinophil-related inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Tedeschi, A; Berti, E; Fanoni, D; Crosti, C; Cugno, M

    2011-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a skin disease caused by autoantibodies to hemidesmosomal proteins BP180 and BP230, with eosinophils participating in blister formation. Tissue factor (TF), the initiator of coagulation, is embodied within the eosinophil granules and exposed upon activation. We evaluated the coagulation activation in patients with BP (63), chronic urticaria (CU; 20), atopic dermatitis (AD; 14), cutaneous drug reactions (CDRs; six), psoriasis (20), dermatitis herpetiformis (DH; four) and primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL; five), and in 40 healthy controls. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer (coagulation markers) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in all plasma samples and BP blister fluid. Skin TF expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the patients and 20 controls. F1+2 and d-dimer levels were higher in BP plasma than in control plasma (P = 0·0001 for both), and dramatically high in blister fluid; both correlated positively with disease severity, esinophil counts and anti-BP180 antibodies (P = 0·006–0·0001). Plasma F1+2 and d-dimer levels were higher in the CU, AD and CDR patients than in controls (P = 0·0001 for all), but normal in the psoriasis, DH and CTCL patients. Skin TF was expressed in the BP (P = 0·0001), CU (P = 0·0001), AD (P = 0·001) and CDR patients (P = 0·01), but not in the psoriasis, DH or CTCL patients. Co-localization confocal microscopy studies confirmed eosinophils as the source of TF in 10 BP patients. The coagulation cascade is activated in BP and other eosinophil-mediated skin disorders, but not in non-eosinophil driven conditions. This hypercoagulability may contribute to inflammation, tissue damage and, possibly, thrombotic risk. PMID:21488867

  1. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  2. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  3. Parasitic skin diseases: health care-seeking in a slum in north-east Brazil.

    PubMed

    Heukelbach, Jörg; van Haeff, Evelien; Rump, Babette; Wilcke, Thomas; Moura, Rômulo César Sabóia; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2003-04-01

    Ectoparasitic diseases are endemic in many poor communities in north-east Brazil, and heavy infestation is frequent. We conducted two studies to assess disease perception and health care seeking behaviour in relation to parasitic skin diseases and to determine their public health importance. The first study comprised a representative cross-sectional survey of the population of a slum in north-east Brazil. Inhabitants were examined for the presence of scabies, tungiasis, pediculosis and cutaneous larva migrans (CLM). The second study assessed health care seeking behaviour related to these ectoparasitic diseases of patients attending a Primary Health Care Centre (PHCC) adjacent to the slum. Point prevalence rates in the community were: head lice 43.3% (95% CI: 40.5-46.3), tungiasis 33.6% (95% CI: 30.9-36.4), scabies 8.8% (95% CI: 7.3-10.6) and CLM 3.1% (95% CI: 2.2-4.3). Point prevalence rates of patients attending the PHCC were: head lice 38.2% (95% CI: 32.6-44.1), tungiasis 19.1% (95% CI: 14.7-24.1), scabies 18.8% (95% CI: 14.4-23.7) and CLM 2.1% (95% CI: 0.8-4.5). Only 28 of 54 patients with scabies, three of 55 patients with tungiasis, four of six patients with CLM and zero of 110 patients with head lice sought medical assistance. The physicians of the PHCC only diagnosed a parasitic skin disease when it was pointed out by the patient himself. In all cases patients were correctly informed about the ectoparasites they carried. The results show that tungiasis and pediculosis, and to a lesser extent scabies and CLM, are hyperendemic but neglected by both population and physicians, and that prevalence rates of tungiasis and scabies at the PHCC do not reflect the true prevalence of these diseases in the community.

  4. Evidence of transstadial and mechanical transmission of lumpy skin disease virus by Amblyomma hebraeum ticks.

    PubMed

    Lubinga, J C; Tuppurainen, E S M; Mahlare, R; Coetzer, J A W; Stoltsz, W H; Venter, E H

    2015-04-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an economically important disease caused by LSD virus (LSDV), a Capripoxvirus, characterized by fever and circumscribed skin lesions. It is suspected to be transmitted mechanically by biting flies. To assess the vector potential of Amblyomma hebraeum in transmission of LSDV, mechanical/intrastadial and transstadial modes of transmission of the virus by this tick species were investigated. Two cattle were artificially infected as sources (donors) of infection to ticks. Ticks were infected as either nymphs or adults. Male A. hebraeum ticks were partially fed on donor animals and transferred to recipient animals to test for mechanical/intrastadial transmission. Nymphal A. hebraeum were fed to repletion on donor animals. The emergent adult ticks were placed on recipient animals to test for transstadial transmission of the virus. Successful transmission of LSDV infection was determined in recipient animals by monitoring development of clinical signs, testing of blood for the presence of LSDV by real-time PCR, virus isolation and the serum neutralization test. This report provides further evidence of mechanical/intrastadial and, for the first time, transstadial transmission of LSDV by A. hebraeum. These findings implicate A. hebraeum as a possible maintenance host in the epidemiology of the disease.

  5. A longitudinal application of three health behaviour models in the context of skin protection behaviour in individuals with occupational skin disease.

    PubMed

    Matterne, Uwe; Diepgen, Thomas L; Weisshaar, Elke

    2011-09-01

    Occupational skin disease (OSD) is common, associated with poor prognosis and poses a significant burden to the individual and society. We applied the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the prototype-willingness model (PWM) and the health action process approach (HAPA) to the prediction and explanation of occupationally relevant skin protection behaviour in individuals with OSD. We used a longitudinal design. In this study, 150 individuals participating in a 3-week inpatient tertiary prevention programme completed measures assessing the constructs of the TPB, PWM and HAPA at admission (T 0), discharge (T 1) and once the individual had returned to work and worked for 4 consecutive weeks (T 2) (n = 117). Intention was measured at T 0 and skin protection behaviour at T 2. Path analysis was used to assess the longitudinal associations of the models' constructs with intention and skin protection behaviour. TPB as well as PWM variables accounted for 30% of variance in behaviour, HAPA variables for 33%. While not all predictions were confirmed by the data, all three models are able to inform us about the formation of skin protection intention and behaviour in individuals with OSD. The findings are discussed in light of future interventions and research.

  6. RP1L1 variants are associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa and occult macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Alice E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Mackay, Donna S; Wright, Genevieve A; Waseem, Naushin H; Michaelides, Michel; Holder, Graham E; Robson, Anthony G; Moore, Anthony T; Plagnol, Vincent; Webster, Andrew R

    2013-03-01

    In one consanguineous family with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a condition characterized by progressive visual loss due to retinal degeneration, homozygosity mapping, and candidate gene sequencing suggested a novel locus. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshifting mutation, c.601delG, p.Lys203Argfs*28, in RP1L1 encoding RP 1-like1, a photoreceptor-specific protein. A screen of a further 285 unrelated individuals with autosomal recessive RP identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense variant, c.1637G>C, p.Ser546Thr, in RP1L1. A distinct retinal disorder, occult macular dystrophy (OCMD) solely affects the central retinal cone photoreceptors and has previously been reported to be associated with variants in the same gene. The association between mutations in RP1L1 and the disorder OCMD was explored by screening a cohort of 28 unrelated individuals with the condition; 10 were found to harbor rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.5% in the 1,000 genomes dataset) heterozygous RP1L1 missense variants. Analysis of family members revealed many unaffected relatives harboring the same variant. Linkage analysis excluded the possibility of a recessive mode of inheritance, and sequencing of RP1, a photoreceptor protein that interacts with RP1L1, excluded a digenic mechanism involving this gene. These findings imply an important and diverse role for RP1L1 in human retinal physiology and disease.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Subjective Memory Complaints Assessed with a Single Item in Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Disease: Results of the DIAN Study

    PubMed Central

    Laske, Christoph; Sohrabi, Hamid R.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Müller, Stephan; Koehler, Niklas K.; Gräber, Susanne; Förster, Stefan; Drzezga, Alexander; Mueller-Sarnowski, Felix; Danek, Adrian; Jucker, Mathias; Bateman, Randall J.; Buckles, Virginia; Saykin, Andrew J.; Martins, Ralph N.; Morris, John C.; Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We examined the diagnostic value of subjective memory complaints (SMCs) assessed with a single item in a large cross-sectional cohort consisting of families with autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participating in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN). Methods. The baseline sample of 183 mutation carriers (MCs) and 117 noncarriers (NCs) was divided according to Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale into preclinical (CDR 0; MCs: n = 107; NCs: n = 109), early symptomatic (CDR 0.5; MCs: n = 48; NCs: n = 8), and dementia stage (CDR ≥ 1; MCs: n = 28; NCs: n = 0). These groups were subdivided by the presence or absence of SMCs. Results. At CDR 0, SMCs were present in 12.1% of MCs and 9.2% of NCs (P = 0.6). At CDR 0.5, SMCs were present in 66.7% of MCs and 62.5% of NCs (P = 1.0). At CDR ≥ 1, SMCs were present in 96.4% of MCs. SMCs in MCs were significantly associated with CDR, logical memory scores, Geriatric Depression Scale, education, and estimated years to onset. Conclusions. The present study shows that SMCs assessed by a single-item scale have no diagnostic value to identify preclinical ADAD in asymptomatic individuals. These results demonstrate the need of further improvement of SMC measures that should be examined in large clinical trials. PMID:25922840

  8. Mathematical modeling of temperature mapping over skin surface and its implementation in thermal disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2004-09-01

    In non-invasive thermal diagnostics, accurate correlations between the thermal image on skin surface and interior human pathophysiology are often desired, which require general solutions for the bioheat equation. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was implemented to solve the transient three-dimensional bio-heat transfer problem with non-linear boundary conditions (simultaneously with convection, radiation and evaporation) and space-dependent thermal physiological parameters. Detailed computations indicated that the thermal states of biological bodies, reflecting physiological conditions, could be correlated to the temperature or heat flux mapping recorded at the skin surface. The effect of the skin emissivity and humidity, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air, the metabolic rate and blood perfusion rate in the tumor, and the tumor size and number on the sensitivity of thermography are comprehensively investigated. Moreover, several thermal criteria for disease diagnostic were proposed based on statistical principles. Implementations of this study for the clinical thermal diagnostics are discussed.

  9. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified.

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD.

  11. The allergy and immunology specialist: what is the role in the treatment of skin disease?

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Ernest N

    2004-10-01

    The practice of medicine transcends our neat borders of demarcation between the myriad of medical specialties and medical disciplines. There are no two specialties in which this clinical interface is more blurred than the clinical interface between allergy and dermatology. With a background in both dermatology and allergy, I address where the specialty of allergy/ immunology is heading, as we navigate the coastal waters separating my two primary disciplines. I also discuss the tools traditionally used only in dermatology, which are now being used increasing by a vanguard of allergists to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic skin disease.

  12. Interleukin-17 inhibitors. A new era in treatment of psoriasis and other skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wasilewska, Agnieszka; Winiarska, Marta; Olszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease caused by the excessive secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Available therapeutic options include biologic drugs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and interleukin 12/23 (IL-12/23) inhibitors. The recent discovery of IL-17, which contributes to development of psoriasis, opened new possibilities for further treatment modalities. Currently, one anti-IL17 biological agent is approved for the treatment – a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A (secukinumab). Further clinical trials, including a humanized IgG4 specific for IL-17 (ixekizumab) and a fully human antibody that targets the IL-17 receptor A (brodalumab). PMID:27605893

  13. A review of nicotinamide: treatment of skin diseases and potential side effects.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Heidi M

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinamide, also known as niacinamide, is the amide form of vitamin B3. It is a precursor of essential coenzymes for numerous reactions in the body including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Nicotinic acid, also known as niacin, is converted into nicotinamide in the body. The use of topical nicotinamide in the treatment of acne vulgaris; melasma; atopic dermatitis; rosacea; and oral nicotinamide in preventing nonmelanoma skin cancer is discussed. The possible side effects and consequences of excessive nicotinamide exposure are reviewed, including suggestions nicotinamide might have a role in the development of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and liver damage.

  14. Single capripoxvirus recombinant vaccine for the protection of cattle against rinderpest and lumpy skin disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, C H; Barrett, T; Evans, S A; Kitching, R P; Gershon, P D; Bostock, C; Black, D N

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant capripoxvirus has been constructed containing a full-length cDNA of the fusion protein gene of rinderpest virus. The gene was inserted in the thymidine kinase gene of the capripox genome under the control of the vaccinia virus major late promoter p11 together with the Escherichia coli gpt gene in the opposite orientation under the control of the vaccinia early/late promoter p7.5. A vaccine prepared from this recombinant virus protected cattle against clinical rinderpest after a lethal challenge with a virulent virus isolate. In addition, the vaccine protected the cattle against lumpy skin disease.

  15. Phenotypic transition of microglia into astrocyte-like cells associated with disease onset in a model of inherited ALS

    PubMed Central

    Trias, Emiliano; Díaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Isasi, Eugenia; Drechsel, Derek A.; Lopez, Nathan; Bradford, C. Samuel; Ireton, Kyle E.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Barbeito, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Microglia and reactive astrocytes accumulate in the spinal cord of rats expressing the Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked SOD1 G93A mutation. We previously reported that the rapid progression of paralysis in ALS rats is associated with the appearance of proliferative astrocyte-like cells that surround motor neurons. These cells, designated as Aberrant Astrocytes (AbA cells) because of their atypical astrocytic phenotype, exhibit high toxicity to motor neurons. However, the cellular origin of AbA cells remains unknown. Because AbA cells are labeled with the proliferation marker Ki67, we analyzed the phenotypic makers of proliferating glial cells that surround motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. The number of Ki67 +AbA cells sharply increased in symptomatic rats, displaying large cell bodies with processes embracing motor neurons. Most were co-labeled with astrocytic marker GFAP concurrently with the microglial markers Iba1 and CD163. Cultures of spinal cord prepared from symptomatic SOD1 G93A rats yielded large numbers of microglia expressing Iba1, CD11b, and CD68. Cells sorted for CD11b expression by flow cytometry transformed into AbA cells within two weeks. During these two weeks, the expression of microglial markers largely disappeared, while GFAP and S100β expression increased. The phenotypic transition to AbA cells was stimulated by forskolin. These findings provide evidence for a subpopulation of proliferating microglial cells in SOD1 G93A rats that undergo a phenotypic transition into AbA cells after onset of paralysis that may promote the fulminant disease progression. These cells could be a therapeutic target for slowing paralysis progression in ALS. PMID:24399933

  16. Skin disorders in Parkinson’s disease: potential biomarkers and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ravn, Astrid-Helene; Thyssen, Jacob P; Egeberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by a symptom triad comprising resting tremor, rigidity, and akinesia. In addition, non-motor symptoms of PD are well recognized and often precede the overt motor manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations as markers of PD have long been discussed, and cumulative evidence shows an increased prevalence of certain dermatological disorders in PD. Seborrheic dermatitis is considered to occur as a premotor feature of PD referable to dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. Also, an increased risk of melanoma has been observed in PD. Light hair color is a known risk factor for melanoma, and interestingly the risk of PD is found to be significantly higher in individuals with light hair color and particularly with red hair. Furthermore, several studies have reported a high prevalence of PD in patients with bullous pemphigoid. Moreover, a 2-fold increase in risk of new-onset PD has been observed in patients with rosacea. Besides the association between PD and various dermatological disorders, the skin may be useful in the diagnosis of PD. Early PD pathology is found not only in the brain but also in extra-neuronal tissues. Thus, the protein α-synuclein, which is genetically associated with PD, is present not only in the CNS but also in the skin. Hence, higher values of α-synuclein have been observed in the skin of patients with PD. Furthermore, an increased risk of PD has been found in the Cys/Cys genotype, which is associated with red hair color. In this review, we summarize the current evidence of the association between PD and dermatological disorders, the cutaneous adverse effects of neurological medications, and describe the potential of skin protein expression and biomarkers in identification of risk and diagnosis of PD. PMID:28331352

  17. Association between tuberculin skin test result and clinical presentation of tuberculosis disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tuberculin skin test (TST) is used to test for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and support the diagnosis of active TB. However, little is known about the relationship between the TST result and the clinical presentation of TB disease. Methods We analyzed US TB surveillance data, 1993–2010, and used multinomial logistic regression to calculate the association between TST result (0–4 mm [negative], 5–9 mm, 10–14 mm, and ≥ 15 mm) and clinical presentation of disease (miliary, combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary, extrapulmonary only, non-cavitary pulmonary, and cavitary pulmonary). For persons with pulmonary disease, multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of having acid-fast bacilli (AFB) positive sputum. Results There were 64,238 persons with culture-confirmed TB included in the analysis, which was stratified by HIV status and birthplace (US- vs. foreign-born). Persons with a TST ≥ 15 mm were less likely to have miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease, but more likely to have cavitary pulmonary disease than non-cavitary pulmonary disease. Persons with non-cavitary pulmonary disease with a negative TST were significantly more likely to have AFB positive sputum. Conclusions Clinical presentation of TB disease differed according to TST result and persons with a negative TST were more likely to have disseminated disease (i.e., miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary). Further study of the TST result may improve our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in TB disease. PMID:24093965

  18. Temporal shifts in the skin microbiome associated with disease flares and treatment in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heidi H; Oh, Julia; Deming, Clay; Conlan, Sean; Grice, Elizabeth A; Beatson, Melony A; Nomicos, Effie; Polley, Eric C; Komarow, Hirsh D; Murray, Patrick R; Turner, Maria L; Segre, Julia A

    2012-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has long been associated with Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization or infection and is typically managed with regimens that include antimicrobial therapies. However, the role of microbial communities in the pathogenesis of AD is incompletely characterized. To assess the relationship between skin microbiota and disease progression, 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial gene sequencing was performed on DNA obtained directly from serial skin sampling of children with AD. The composition of bacterial communities was analyzed during AD disease states to identify characteristics associated with AD flares and improvement post-treatment. We found that microbial community structures at sites of disease predilection were dramatically different in AD patients compared with controls. Microbial diversity during AD flares was dependent on the presence or absence of recent AD treatments, with even intermittent treatment linked to greater bacterial diversity than no recent treatment. Treatment-associated changes in skin bacterial diversity suggest that AD treatments diversify skin bacteria preceding improvements in disease activity. In AD, the proportion of Staphylococcus sequences, particularly S. aureus, was greater during disease flares than at baseline or post-treatment, and correlated with worsened disease severity. Representation of the skin commensal S. epidermidis also significantly increased during flares. Increases in Streptococcus, Propionibacterium, and Corynebacterium species were observed following therapy. These findings reveal linkages between microbial communities and inflammatory diseases such as AD, and demonstrate that as compared with culture-based studies, higher resolution examination of microbiota associated with human disease provides novel insights into global shifts of bacteria relevant to disease progression and treatment.

  19. Immunological, hematological, biochemical, and histopathological studies on cows naturally infected with lumpy skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Neamat-Allah, Ahmed N. F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an infectious viral disease of cattle caused by LSD virus (LSDV) of the family Poxviridae characterized by skin nodules covering all parts of the body. There are many aspects of LSD remaining unknown, thus immunological, hematological, and biochemical parameters were estimated. Materials and Methods: During an outbreak of LSD in Sharkia governorate from Egypt, 211 cows aging (2-4 years) were examined clinically for the presence of LSD lesions during the period from July to November 2014. A total of 134 cows from those showed lesions suspected to be LSD. Results: Recorded clinical signs were pyrexia with the development of skin nodules of varying sizes which ranged from a few to several hundred sometimes coalesced together. Enlargements of the peripheral lymph nodes. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were noticed in the histopathological examination. Immunological studies revealed a significant decrease of lymphocyte transformation rate, phagocytic % and killing % which was marked within 2 weeks postinfection. LSD resulted in non-significant in hemogram in 1st-2nd day post-infection while a macrocytic hypochromic anemia within 10-14th days post-infection. Leucopenia and lymphopenia were recorded 1st-2nd day post-infection while at 10-14th showed granulocytic leucocytosis. Biochemical analysis revealed hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperglobulinemia especially gamma globulins. There were a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase activities, creatinine level, blood urea nitrogen and creatine phosphokinase Conclusion: LSDV infected cows in early stages revealed leucopenia. Immunosuppressive effect was pronounced later. In late stage revealed hemolytic anemia, leucocytosis and increase of serum CK, which could aid in diagnosis. Disturbance in liver and kidney function tests have been occurred. PMID:27047209

  20. Demonstration of lumpy skin disease virus infection in Amblyomma hebraeum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lubinga, Jimmy C; Clift, Sarah J; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M; Stoltsz, Wilhem H; Babiuk, Shawn; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-03-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is caused by lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), a member of the genus Capripoxvirus. Transmission of the virus has been associated with haematophagous insects such as Stomoxys calcitrans as well as Aedes and Culex species of mosquitoes. Recent studies have reported the transmission of the virus by Amblyomma hebraeum, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, and Rhipicephalus decoloratus ticks and the presence of LSDV in saliva of A. hebraeum and R. appendiculatus ticks. The aim of this study was to determine which tick organs become infected by LSDV following intrastadial infection and transstadial persistence of the virus in A. hebraeum and R. appendiculatus ticks. Nymphal and adult ticks were orally infected by feeding them on LSDV-infected cattle. Partially fed adult ticks were processed for testing while nymphs were fed to repletion and allowed to moult to adults before being processed for testing. The infection in tick organs was determined by testing for the presence of the viral antigen using monoclonal antibodies with immunohistochemical staining. The viral antigen was detected in salivary glands, haemocytes, synganglia, ovaries, testes, fat bodies, and midgut. Since the virus was shown to be able to cross the midgut wall and infect various tick organs, this may indicate potential for biological development and transmission of LSDV in ticks. This study strengthens the previously reported evidence of the occurrence of LSDV in tick saliva.