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Sample records for inherited virus responsible

  1. Epigenetic inheritance and plasticity: The responsive germline.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eva

    2013-04-01

    Developmental plasticity, the capacity of a single genotype to give rise to different phenotypes, affects evolutionary dynamics by influencing the rate and direction of phenotypic change. It is based on regulatory changes in gene expression and gene products, which are partially controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. Plasticity involves not just epigenetic changes in somatic cells and tissues; it can also involve changes in germline cells. Germline epigenetic plasticity increases evolvability, the capacity to generate heritable, selectable, phenotypic variations, including variations that lead to novel functions. I discuss studies that show that some complex adaptive responses to new challenges are mediated by germline epigenetic processes, which can be transmitted over variable number of generations, and argue that the heritable variations that are generated epigenetically have an impact on both small-scale and large-scale aspects of evolution. First, I review some recent ecological studies and models that show that germline (gametic) epigenetic inheritance can lead to cumulative micro-evolutionary changes that are rapid and semi-directional. I suggest that "priming" and "epigenetic learning" may be of special importance in generating heritable, fine-tuned adaptive responses in populations. Second, I consider work showing how genomic and environmental stresses can also lead to epigenome repatterning, and produce changes that are saltational.

  2. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of altered stress responses.

    PubMed

    Crews, David; Gillette, Ross; Scarpino, Samuel V; Manikkam, Mohan; Savenkova, Marina I; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-06-01

    Ancestral environmental exposures have previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and influence all aspects of an individual's life history. In addition, proximate life events such as chronic stress have documented effects on the development of physiological, neural, and behavioral phenotypes in adulthood. We used a systems biology approach to investigate in male rats the interaction of the ancestral modifications carried transgenerationally in the germ line and the proximate modifications involving chronic restraint stress during adolescence. We find that a single exposure to a common-use fungicide (vinclozolin) three generations removed alters the physiology, behavior, metabolic activity, and transcriptome in discrete brain nuclei in descendant males, causing them to respond differently to chronic restraint stress. This alteration of baseline brain development promotes a change in neural genomic activity that correlates with changes in physiology and behavior, revealing the interaction of genetics, environment, and epigenetic transgenerational inheritance in the shaping of the adult phenotype. This is an important demonstration in an animal that ancestral exposure to an environmental compound modifies how descendants of these progenitor individuals perceive and respond to a stress challenge experienced during their own life history.

  3. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    PubMed

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  4. An inherited virus influences the coexistence of parasitoid species through behaviour manipulation.

    PubMed

    Patot, Sabine; Allemand, Roland; Fleury, Frédéric; Varaldi, Julien

    2012-06-01

    The potential role of pathogens or parasites in maintaining species coexistence is well documented. However, the impact of vertically transmitted symbionts, that can markedly modify their host's biology, is largely unknown. Some females of the Drosophila parasitoid Leptopilina boulardi are infected with an inherited virus (LbFV). The virus forces females to lay supernumerary eggs in already parasitised hosts, thus allowing its horizontal transmission. Using two independent experimental procedures, we found that LbFV impacts inter-specific competition between L. boulardi and the related L. heterotoma. While L. boulardi rapidly outcompetes L. heterotoma in the absence of the virus, L. heterotoma was able to maintain or even to eliminate L. boulardi in the presence of LbFV. By forcing females to superparasitise, LbFV induced egg wastage in L. boulardi thus explaining its impact on the competition outcome. We conclude that this symbiont whose transmission is L. boulardi-density-dependant may affect the coexistence of Leptopilina species. PMID:22487404

  5. Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus among Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Rahimnia, Ramin; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Malekpour, Seyed Amir; Marzban, Mona; Keshvari, Maryam; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2016-01-01

    The high rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among transfusion related risk groups such as patients with inherited bleeding disorders highlighting the investigation on prevalent subtypes and their epidemic history among this group. In this study, 166 new HCV NS5B sequences isolated from patients with inherited bleeding disorders together with 29 sequences related to hemophiliacs obtained from a previous study on diversity of HCV in Iran were analyzed. The most prevalent subtype was 1a (65%), followed by 3a (18.7%),1b (14.5%),4(1.2%) and 2k (0.6%). Subtypes 1a and 3a showed exponential expansion during the 20th century. Whereas expansion of 3a started around 20 years earlier than 1a among the study patients, the epidemic growth of 1a revealed a delay of about 10 years compared with that found for this subtype in developed countries. Our results supported the view that the spread of 3a reached the plateau 10 years prior to the screening of blood donors for HCV. Rather, 1a reached the plateau when screening program was implemented. The differences observed in the epidemic behavior of HCV-1a and 3a may be associated with different transmission routes of two subtypes. Indeed, expansion of 1a was more commonly linked to blood transfusion, while 3a was more strongly associated to drug use and specially IDU after 1960. Our findings also showed HCV transmission through blood products has effectively been controlled from late 1990s. In conclusion, the implementation of strategies such as standard surveillance programs and subsiding antiviral treatments seems to be essential to both prevent new HCV infections and to decline the current and future HCV disease among Iranian patients with inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:27611688

  6. Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus among Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in Iran.

    PubMed

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Rahimnia, Ramin; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Malekpour, Seyed Amir; Marzban, Mona; Keshvari, Maryam; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2016-01-01

    The high rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among transfusion related risk groups such as patients with inherited bleeding disorders highlighting the investigation on prevalent subtypes and their epidemic history among this group. In this study, 166 new HCV NS5B sequences isolated from patients with inherited bleeding disorders together with 29 sequences related to hemophiliacs obtained from a previous study on diversity of HCV in Iran were analyzed. The most prevalent subtype was 1a (65%), followed by 3a (18.7%),1b (14.5%),4(1.2%) and 2k (0.6%). Subtypes 1a and 3a showed exponential expansion during the 20th century. Whereas expansion of 3a started around 20 years earlier than 1a among the study patients, the epidemic growth of 1a revealed a delay of about 10 years compared with that found for this subtype in developed countries. Our results supported the view that the spread of 3a reached the plateau 10 years prior to the screening of blood donors for HCV. Rather, 1a reached the plateau when screening program was implemented. The differences observed in the epidemic behavior of HCV-1a and 3a may be associated with different transmission routes of two subtypes. Indeed, expansion of 1a was more commonly linked to blood transfusion, while 3a was more strongly associated to drug use and specially IDU after 1960. Our findings also showed HCV transmission through blood products has effectively been controlled from late 1990s. In conclusion, the implementation of strategies such as standard surveillance programs and subsiding antiviral treatments seems to be essential to both prevent new HCV infections and to decline the current and future HCV disease among Iranian patients with inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:27611688

  7. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-04-10

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV.

  8. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-01-01

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV. PMID:23661433

  9. Inheritance of abnormal expression of SOS-like response in xeroderma pigmentosum and hereditary cancer-prone syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, P J; Houweling, A; Cornelissen-Steijger, D M; Arwert, F; Menko, F H; Pinedo, H M; Terleth, C; van der Eb, A J

    1996-06-01

    The time course of induction of SOS-like stress responses such as enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis (EM) has been investigated in UV-C-irradiated skin fibroblasts from a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) family, using herpes simplex virus type 1 as a probe. Similar ER studies were performed in a Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) family and in a family with a high incidence of breast, ovarian, and colon cancer. In two XP (complementation group B) patients, with a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years, only induction of EM was observed, whereas ER was absent (XPER-). The ER- phenotype was inherited from the father, whereas cells from the mother exhibited normal expression of ER and EM. This suggests that the absence of ER is a hereditary trait that is not correlated with a repair-deficient phenotype. Abnormally high levels of ER were observed in UV-C-exposed skin fibroblasts from rive LFS patients. The inheritance of the ER response was studied in one LFS family. High levels of ER were observed only in cells derived from affected individuals carrying one mutated p53 allele, whereas cells from unaffected family members, carrying two wild-type p53 alleles, exhibited normal ER levels. This result shows that abnormally high levels of ER positively correlate with the occurrence of cancer in affected individuals from a LFS family. Interestingly, abnormally high levels of ER were observed in cells from afflicted as well as from unafflicted members of a family with a high incidence of breast, ovarian, colon, and stomach cancer. This suggests that these latter individuals have inherited a mutated, putative predisposing gene, resulting in abnormal expression of ER, but that cancer had not yet developed. The results indicate that the ER response can possibly be used as a prognostic marker to identify carriers in various hereditary cancer-prone syndromes at an early age. PMID:8653707

  10. Inherited adaptation of genome-rewired cells in response to a challenging environment

    PubMed Central

    David, Lior; Stolovicki, Elad; Haziz, Efrat; Braun, Erez

    2010-01-01

    Despite their evolutionary significance, little is known about the adaptation dynamics of genomically rewired cells in evolution. We have confronted yeast cells carrying a rewired regulatory circuit with a severe and unforeseen challenge. The essential HIS3 gene from the histidine biosynthesis pathway was placed under the exclusive regulation of the galactose utilization system. Glucose containing medium strongly represses the GAL genes including HIS3 and these rewired cells are required to operate this essential gene. We show here that although there were no adapted cells prior to the encounter with glucose, a large fraction of cells adapted to grow in this medium and this adaptation was stably inherited. The adaptation relied on individual cells that switched into an adapted state and, thus, the adaptation was due to a response of many individual cells to the change in environment and not due to selection of rare advantageous phenotypes. The adaptation of numerous individual cells by heritable phenotypic switching in response to a challenge extends the common evolutionary framework and attests to the adaptive potential of regulatory circuits. PMID:20811567

  11. Hepatitis Delta virus genotype 8 infection in Northeast Brazil: inheritance from African slaves?

    PubMed

    Barros, L M F; Gomes-Gouvêa, M S; Pinho, J R R; Alvarado-Mora, M V; Dos Santos, A; Mendes-Corrêa, M C J; Caldas, A J M; Sousa, M T; Santos, M D C; Ferreira, A S P

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) is endemic worldwide, but its prevalence varies in different geographical areas. While in the Brazilian Amazon, HDV is known to be endemic and to represent a significant public health problem, few studies have assessed its prevalence in other regions in the country. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of HDV among HBsAg chronic carriers from Maranhão state, a region located in the Northeast of Brazil. Among 133 patients, 5 had anti-HD, of whom 3 had HDV RNA. HDV genotypes were characterized by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences from the HDAg coding region. HDV-3 was identified in one patient who lives in Maranhão, but was born in Amazonas state (Western Amazon basin). Phylogenetic analysis shows that this HDV-3 sequence grouped with other HDV-3 sequences isolated in this state, which suggests that the patient probably contracted HDV infection there. Surprisingly, the other two patients were infected with HDV-8, an African genotype. These patients were born and have always lived in Urbano Santos, a rural county of Maranhão state, moreover they had never been to Africa and denied any contact with people from that continent. This is the first description of the HDV-8 in non-native African populations. This genotype may have been introduced to Brazil through the slaves brought to the country from the West Africa regions during the 16-18th centuries. Our results indicate that the need of clinical and epidemiological studies to investigate the presence of this infection in other areas in Brazil.

  12. Reduction in maternal Polycomb levels contributes to transgenerational inheritance of a response to toxic stress in flies

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shay; Snir, Orli; Mizrachi, Eran; Galili, Matana; Zaltsman, Inbal; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Transgenerational persistence of parental responses to environmental stimuli has been reported in various organisms, but the underlying mechanisms remain underexplored. In one of these reported examples, we have shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic leads to non-Mendelian inheritance of ectopic induction of certain developmental genes. Here we investigate if this inheritance involves changes in mRNA composition within the early, maternal-stage offspring embryos of exposed flies. Exposure to G418 in F1 modified the maternal RNA levels of many genes in their early (F2) embryos. This includes reduction of maternal Polycomb group genes which persisted in the following generation of embryos (F3). To investigate the functional meaning of this reduction, we compared genetically normal embryos of Polycomb mutant females to normal embryos of normal females. Analysis with two different alleles of Polycomb, Pc1 and Pc3, revealed that maternal reduction in Polycomb gene dosage has a positive influence on the inheritance of induced expression. Together, this shows that exposure to G418 stress reduces the maternal levels of Polycomb in the offspring embryos and this reduction contributes to the inheritance of induced expression. PMID:24535443

  13. Inherited behaviors, BDNF expression and response to treatment in a novel multifactorial rat model for depression.

    PubMed

    Gersner, Roman; Gal, Ram; Levit, Ofir; Moshe, Hagar; Zangen, Abraham

    2014-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common and devastating mental illness behaviorally characterized by various symptoms, including reduced motivation, anhedonia and psychomotor retardation. Although the etiology of MDD is still obscure, a genetic predisposition appears to play an important role. Here we used, for the first time, a multifactorial selective breeding procedure to generate a distinct 'depressed' rat line (DRL); our selection was based upon mobility in the forced swim test, sucrose preference and home-cage locomotion, three widely used tests associated with core characteristics of MDD. Other behavioral effects of the selection process, as well as changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the response to three antidepressant treatments, were also examined. We show that decreased mobility in the forced swim test and decreased sucrose preference (two directly selected traits), as well as decreased exploration in the open field test (an indirectly selected trait), are hereditary components in DRL rats. In addition, lower BDNF levels are observed in the dorsal hippocampus of DRL rats, complying with the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression. Finally, electroconvulsive shocks (ECS) but not pharmacological treatment normalizes both the depressive-like behavioral impairments and the BDNF-related molecular alterations in DRL rats, highlighting the need for robust treatment when the disease is inherited and not necessarily triggered by salient chronic stress. We therefore provide a novel multifactorial genetic rat model for depression-related behaviors. The model can be used to further study the etiology of the disease and suggest molecular correlates and possible treatments for the disease. PMID:24513109

  14. Antigen-specific immune responses in cattle with inherited beta2-integrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Bernadina, W E; Wentink, G H

    1997-08-01

    The significance of beta2-integrins for the generation of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo was studied employing the bovine model of beta2-integrin deficiency. To that end four cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and healthy age-matched controls were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) and rabies virus (RV) vaccines three times in monthly intervals. In addition, two animals with BLAD and three controls received a fourth vaccination 8 months after the start of the study. Proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to the antigens TT and RV as well as specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were determined in intervals for up to 10 months after primary vaccination. Proliferative responses of PBMC to TT and RV were substantially lower in cattle with BLAD than in controls, although PBMC from cattle with BLAD were shown to have the capacity to proliferate in the response to the mitogen concanavalin A. Occurrence of antigen-specific IgG titers was delayed and they were considerably lower in cattle with BLAD compared to controls. Finally, treatment of TT- and RV-stimulated PBMC from an immunized control with different concentrations of the anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody R15.7 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation to almost 100%. The results of the present study show that beta2-integrin deficiency leads to delayedand severely impaired immune responsiveness in vivo. The observations that antibody production, although considerably delayed and impaired, does occur and that apparently class-switching takes place in BLAD indicate T-cell reactivity in vivo. PMID:9343338

  15. Immune Responses and Lassa Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Pannetier, Delphine; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and immune responses induced in patients. We discuss here the roles of the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems in Lassa virus infection and in the control of viral replication and pathogenesis. PMID:23202504

  16. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-11-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex-conferred resistance to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease is inherited as a dominant trait in B10 congenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Patick, A K; Pease, L R; David, C S; Rodriguez, M

    1990-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus into susceptible strains of mice produces chronic demyelinating disease in the central nervous system characterized by persistent viral infection. Immunogenetic data suggest that genes from both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci are important in determining susceptibility or resistance to demyelination. The role of the MHC in determining resistance or susceptibility to disease can be interpreted either as the presence of antigen-presenting molecules that confer resistance to viral infection or as the ability of MHC products to contribute to pathogenesis by acting as viral receptors or by mediating immune attack against virally infected cells. These alternatives can be distinguished by determining whether the contribution of the MHC to resistance is inherited as a recessive or dominant trait. Congenic mice with different MHC haplotypes on identical B10 backgrounds were crossed and quantitatively analyzed for demyelination, infectious virus, and local virus antigen production. F1 hybrid progeny derived from resistant B10 (H-2b), B10.D2 (H-2d), or B10.K (H-2k) and susceptible B10.R111 (H-2r), B10.M (H-2f), or B10.BR (H-2k) parental mice exhibited no or minimal demyelination, indicating that on a B10 background, resistance is inherited as a dominant trait. Although infectious virus, as measured by viral plaque assay, was cleared inefficiently from the central nervous systems of resistant F1 hybrid progeny mice, we found a direct correlation between local viral antigen production and demyelination. These data are consistent with our hypothesis that the immunological basis for resistance is determined by efficient presentation of the viral antigen to the immune system, resulting in local virus clearance and absence of subsequent demyelination. Images PMID:2214025

  18. [Inherited thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-02-01

    Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a genetically determined predisposition to develop thromboembolic complications. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors include antithrombin deficiency, protein C and protein S deficiencies, activated protein C resistance due to Leiden factor V mutation, inherited hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombin G20210A variant, dysfibrinogenemia and elevated factor VIII levels. In this review we briefly analyze, from an epidemiologic, clinic and diagnostic point of view, the main inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Finally, we discuss the synergism between genetic and acquired prothrombotic risk factors in some conditions such as pregnancy and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. MiR-204 is responsible for inherited retinal dystrophy associated with ocular coloboma

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Ivan; Hadfield, Kristen D.; Barbato, Sara; Carrella, Sabrina; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Bhat, Rajeshwari S.; Carissimo, Annamaria; Karali, Marianthi; Porter, Louise F.; Urquhart, Jill; Hateley, Sofie; O’Sullivan, James; Manson, Forbes D. C.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Banfi, Sandro; Black, Graeme C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular developmental disorders, including the group classified as microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) and inherited retinal dystrophies, collectively represent leading causes of hereditary blindness. Characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the separate groups share many common genetic causes, in particular relating to pathways controlling retinal and retinal pigment epithelial maintenance. To understand these shared pathways and delineate the overlap between these groups, we investigated the genetic cause of an autosomal dominantly inherited condition of retinal dystrophy and bilateral coloboma, present in varying degrees in a large, five-generation family. By linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified a previously undescribed heterozygous mutation, n.37C > T, in the seed region of microRNA-204 (miR-204), which segregates with the disease in all affected individuals. We demonstrated that this mutation determines significant alterations of miR-204 targeting capabilities via in vitro assays, including transcriptome analysis. In vivo injection, in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), of the mutated miR-204 caused a phenotype consistent with that observed in the family, including photoreceptor alterations with reduced numbers of both cones and rods as a result of increased apoptosis, thereby confirming the pathogenic effect of the n.37C > T mutation. Finally, knockdown assays in medaka fish demonstrated that miR-204 is necessary for normal photoreceptor function. Overall, these data highlight the importance of miR-204 in the regulation of ocular development and maintenance and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of its contribution to eye disease, likely through a gain-of-function mechanism. PMID:26056285

  20. Inheritance and molecular mapping of an allele providing resistance to Cowpea mild mottle virus-like symptoms in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damage to soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] from Cowpea mild mottle virus-like (CPMMV-L) symptoms (family: Betaflexiviridae, genus: Carlavirus) has been of increasing concern in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Soybean cultivars and lines differing in their reaction to the virus have been ...

  1. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  2. Immune responses of infants to infection with respiratory viruses and live attenuated respiratory virus candidate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Crowe, J E

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the parainfluenza viruses (PIV), and the influenza viruses cause severe lower respiratory tract diseases in infants and children throughout the world. Experimental live attenuated vaccines for each of these viruses are being developed for intranasal administration in the first weeks or months of life. A variety of promising RSV, PIV-3, and influenza virus vaccine strains have been developed by classical biological methods, evaluated extensively in preclinical and clinical studies, and shown to be attenuated and genetically stable. The ongoing clinical evaluation of these vaccine candidates, coupled with recent major advances in the ability to develop genetically engineered viruses with specified mutations, may allow the rapid development of respiratory virus strains that possess ideal levels of replicative capacity and genetic stability in vivo. A major remaining obstacle to successful immunization of infants against respiratory virus associated disease may be the relatively poor immune response of very young infants to primary virus infection. This paper reviews the immune correlates of protection against disease caused by these viruses, immune responses of infants to naturally-acquired infection, and immune responses of infants to experimental infection with candidate vaccine viruses. PMID:9711783

  3. Inhibitors of the interferon response enhance virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Claire E; Randall, Richard E; Adamson, Catherine S

    2014-01-01

    Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN) response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells) that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1) significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i) loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints) or (ii) mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza Virus), traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps) and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV). In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications including

  4. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  5. Correlation between Virus Replication and Antibody Responses in Macaques following Infection with Pandemic Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Gerrit; Dekking, Liesbeth; Mortier, Daniëlla; Nieuwenhuis, Ivonne G.; van Heteren, Melanie; Kuipers, Harmjan; Remarque, Edmond J.; Radošević, Katarina; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infection of nonhuman primates is a well-established animal model for studying pathogenesis and for evaluating prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies. However, usually a standard dose is used for the infection, and there is no information on the relation between challenge dose and virus replication or the induction of immune responses. Such information is also very scarce for humans and largely confined to evaluation of attenuated virus strains. Here, we have compared the effect of a commonly used dose (4 × 106 50% tissue culture infective doses) versus a 100-fold-higher dose, administered by intrabronchial installation, to two groups of 6 cynomolgus macaques. Animals infected with the high virus dose showed more fever and had higher peak levels of gamma interferon in the blood. However, virus replication in the trachea was not significantly different between the groups, although in 2 out of 6 animals from the high-dose group it was present at higher levels and for a longer duration. The virus-specific antibody response was not significantly different between the groups. However, antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, virus neutralization, and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers correlated with cumulative virus production in the trachea. In conclusion, using influenza virus infection in cynomolgus macaques as a model, we demonstrated a relationship between the level of virus production upon infection and induction of functional antibody responses against the virus. IMPORTANCE There is only very limited information on the effect of virus inoculation dose on the level of virus production and the induction of adaptive immune responses in humans or nonhuman primates. We found only a marginal and variable effect of virus dose on virus production in the trachea but a significant effect on body temperature. The induction of functional antibody responses, including virus neutralization titer, hemagglutination inhibition

  6. Multilevel selection 1: Quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection.

    PubMed

    Bijma, Piter; Muir, William M; Van Arendonk, Johan A M

    2007-01-01

    Interaction among individuals is universal, both in animals and in plants, and substantially affects evolution of natural populations and responses to artificial selection in agriculture. Although quantitative genetics has successfully been applied to many traits, it does not provide a general theory accounting for interaction among individuals and selection acting on multiple levels. Consequently, current quantitative genetic theory fails to explain why some traits do not respond to selection among individuals, but respond greatly to selection among groups. Understanding the full impacts of heritable interactions on the outcomes of selection requires a quantitative genetic framework including all levels of selection and relatedness. Here we present such a framework and provide expressions for the response to selection. Results show that interaction among individuals may create substantial heritable variation, which is hidden to classical analyses. Selection acting on higher levels of organization captures this hidden variation and therefore always yields positive response, whereas individual selection may yield response in the opposite direction. Our work provides testable predictions of response to multilevel selection and reduces to classical theory in the absence of interaction. Statistical methodology provided elsewhere enables empirical application of our work to both natural and domestic populations.

  7. Multilevel selection 1: Quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection.

    PubMed

    Bijma, Piter; Muir, William M; Van Arendonk, Johan A M

    2007-01-01

    Interaction among individuals is universal, both in animals and in plants, and substantially affects evolution of natural populations and responses to artificial selection in agriculture. Although quantitative genetics has successfully been applied to many traits, it does not provide a general theory accounting for interaction among individuals and selection acting on multiple levels. Consequently, current quantitative genetic theory fails to explain why some traits do not respond to selection among individuals, but respond greatly to selection among groups. Understanding the full impacts of heritable interactions on the outcomes of selection requires a quantitative genetic framework including all levels of selection and relatedness. Here we present such a framework and provide expressions for the response to selection. Results show that interaction among individuals may create substantial heritable variation, which is hidden to classical analyses. Selection acting on higher levels of organization captures this hidden variation and therefore always yields positive response, whereas individual selection may yield response in the opposite direction. Our work provides testable predictions of response to multilevel selection and reduces to classical theory in the absence of interaction. Statistical methodology provided elsewhere enables empirical application of our work to both natural and domestic populations. PMID:17110494

  8. [Diagnosis of inherited thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Baccini, V; Alessi, M C

    2016-02-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are rare, heterogenous and probably under-diagnosed because often classified as autoimmune thrombocytopenia. About 20 genes were described responsible for these thrombocytopenias. Precise diagnosis is necessary because the prognosis is different and some of them can evolve into hemopathies. First of all, it is important to gather a body of evidence to orientate towards an inherited cause: presence of the thrombocytopenia since childhood and of other family cases is a strong argument. Secondly, it is difficult to target the genetic investigations that settle the precise diagnosis. Genetic variants responsible for inherited thrombocytopenias affect different stage during megakaryocytopoiesis and cause thrombocytopenias with distinct characteristics. Presence of extra-hematological features, platelets' size measurement and evaluation of bone marrow megakaryocyte morphology when it is possible allow a primary orientation. We propose a diagnostic approach considering extra-hematological features, mode of inheritance, morphology, molecular and functional platelets' studies and bone marrow megakaryocyte morphology in order to better target genetic study. Nevertheless, despite this approach, some inherited thrombocytopenias remain still unexplained and could benefit from new methods of new generation sequencing in the future. PMID:26617290

  9. Theiler's virus infection induces a specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Pena Rossi, C; McAllister, A; Fiette, L; Brahic, M

    1991-12-01

    Theiler's virus, a murine picornavirus, persists in the central nervous system of susceptible mouse strains and causes chronic inflammation and primary demyelination. One of the current hypotheses is that demyelination is, at least in part, mediated by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). However, it is generally assumed that picornaviruses do not induce CTL. In point of fact, their existence has only been demonstrated for Coxsackievirus B-3. To determine whether Theiler's virus induces a CTL response, we generated a murine mastocytoma cell line stably transfected with the coding region of the genome of Theiler's virus strain DA. Using these cells as targets we showed that infected DBA/2 mice, a susceptible strain, produce cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The cytotoxic activity was Theiler's-virus specific. It was for the most part mediated by CD8+ T lymphocytes and H-2 restricted. This is the first demonstration that a specific CTL response is generated during Theiler's virus infection.

  10. Minireview: transgenerational inheritance of the stress response: a new frontier in stress research.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Stephen G; Phillips, David I W

    2010-01-01

    It is well established in animal models that the prenatal environment can have a major impact on stress axis function throughout life. These changes can predispose to various metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurobiological pathophysiologies. Emerging evidence indicates that the same programming effects occur in humans. It is now becoming clear that the pathophysiological effects are not confined to the first-generation offspring and that there is transgenerational memory of fetal experience that can extend across multiple generations. The complex mechanisms by which transgenerational transmission of stress responsiveness occur are rapidly becoming a focus of investigation. Understanding these fundamental biological processes will allow for development of intervention strategies that prevent or reverse adverse programming of the stress response.

  11. Multilevel Selection 2: Estimating the Genetic Parameters Determining Inheritance and Response to Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bijma, Piter; Muir, William M.; Ellen, Esther D.; Wolf, Jason B.; Van Arendonk, Johan A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions among individuals are universal, both in animals and in plants and in natural as well as domestic populations. Understanding the consequences of these interactions for the evolution of populations by either natural or artificial selection requires knowledge of the heritable components underlying them. Here we present statistical methodology to estimate the genetic parameters determining response to multilevel selection of traits affected by interactions among individuals in general populations. We apply these methods to obtain estimates of genetic parameters for survival days in a population of layer chickens with high mortality due to pecking behavior. We find that heritable variation is threefold greater than that obtained from classical analyses, meaning that two-thirds of the full heritable variation is hidden to classical analysis due to social interactions. As a consequence, predicted responses to multilevel selection applied to this population are threefold greater than classical predictions. This work, combined with the quantitative genetic theory for response to multilevel selection presented in an accompanying article in this issue, enables the design of selection programs to effectively reduce competitive interactions in livestock and plants and the prediction of the effects of social interactions on evolution in natural populations undergoing multilevel selection. PMID:17110493

  12. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  13. Innate immune response during herpes simplex virus encephalitis and development of immunomodulatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses. These viruses have the ability to establish a lifelong latency in sensory ganglia and to invade and replicate in the CNS. Apart from relatively benign mucosal infections, HSV is responsible for severe illnesses including HSV encephalitis (HSE). HSE is the most common cause of sporadic, potentially fatal viral encephalitis in Western countries. If left untreated, the mortality rate associated with HSE is approximately 70%. Despite antiviral therapy, the mortality is still higher than 30%, and almost 60% of surviving individuals develop neurological sequelae. It is suggested that direct virus-related and indirect immune-mediated mechanisms contribute to the damages occurring in the CNS during HSE. In this manuscript, we describe the innate immune response to HSV, the development of HSE in mice knock-out for proteins of the innate immune system as well as inherited deficiencies in key components of the signaling pathways involved in the production of type I interferon that could predispose individuals to develop HSE. Finally, we review several immunomodulatory strategies aimed at modulating the innate immune response at a critical time after infection that were evaluated in mouse models and could be combined with antiviral therapy to improve the prognosis of HSE. In conclusion, the cerebral innate immune response that develops during HSE is a "double-edged sword" as it is critical to control viral replication in the brain early after infection, but, if left uncontrolled, may also result in an exaggerated inflammatory response that could be detrimental to the host.

  14. Activated immune response in an inherited leukodystrophy disease caused by the loss of oligodendrocyte gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Wasseff, Sameh K; Scherer, Steven S

    2015-10-01

    Oligodendrocyte:oligodendrocyte (O:O) gap junction (GJ) coupling is a widespread and essential feature of the CNS, and is mediated by connexin47 (Cx47) and Cx32. Loss of function mutations affecting Cx47 results in a severe leukodystrophy, Pelizeus-Merzbacher-like disease (also known as Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy 2), which can be reproduced in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Here we report the gene expression profile of the cerebellum--an affected brain region--in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Of the 43,174 mRNA probes examined, we find decreased expression of 23 probes (corresponding to 23 genes) and increased expression of 545 probes (corresponding to 348 genes). Many of the genes with reduced expression map to oligodendrocytes, and two of them (Fa2h and Ugt8a) are involved in the synthesis of myelin lipids. Many of the genes with increased expression map to lymphocytes and microglia, and involved in leukotrienes/prostaglandins synthesis and chemokines/cytokines interactions and signaling pathways. In accord, immunostaining showed T- and B-cells in the cerebella of mutant mice as well as activated microglia and astrocytes. Thus, in addition to the loss of GJ coupling, there is a prominent immune response in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32.

  15. Activated Immune Response in an Inherited Leukodystrophy Disease Caused by the Loss of Oligodendrocyte Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wasseff, Sameh K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte:oligodendrocyte (O:O) gap junction (GJ) coupling is a widespread and essential feature of the CNS, and is mediated by connexin47 (Cx47) and Cx32. Loss of function mutations affecting Cx47 results in a severe leukodystrophy, Pelizeus-Merzbacher-like disease (also known as Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy 2), which can be reproduced in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Here we report the gene expression profile of the cerebellum – an affected brain region – in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Of the 43,174 mRNA probes examined, we find decreased expression of 23 probes (corresponding to 23 genes) and increased expression of 545 probes (corresponding to 348 genes). Many of the genes with reduced expression map to oligodendrocytes, and two of them (Fa2h and Ugt8a) are involved in the synthesis of myelin lipids. Many of the genes with increased expression map to microglia and lymphocytes, and to leukotriene/prostaglandin synthesis and chemokine/cytokine pathways. In accord, immunostaining showed activated microglia and astrocytes, as well as T- and B-cells in the cerebella of mutant mice. Thus, in addition to the loss of GJ coupling, there is a prominent immune response in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. PMID:26051537

  16. High type I error and misrepresentations in search for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: response to Guerrero-Bosagna.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khursheed; Tran, Diana A; Li, Arthur X; Warden, Charles; Bai, Angela Y; Singh, Purnima; Madaj, Zach B; Winn, Mary E; Wu, Xiwei; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Szabó, Piroska E

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, we described our efforts in search for evidence supporting epigenetic transgenerational inheritance caused by endocrine disrupter chemicals. One aspect of our study was to compare genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the vinclozolin-exposed fetal male germ cells (n = 3) to control samples (n = 3), their counterparts in the next, unexposed, generation (n = 3 + 3) and also in adult spermatozoa (n = 2 + 2) in both generations. We reported finding zero common hits in the intersection of these four comparisons. In our interpretation, this result did not support the notion that DNA methylation provides a mechanism for a vinclozolin-induced transgenerational male infertility phenotype. In response to criticism by Guerrero-Bosagna regarding our statistical power in the above study, here we provide power calculations to clarify the statistical power of our study and to show the validity of our conclusions. We also explain here how our data is misinterpreted in the commentary by Guerrero-Bosagna by leaving out important data points from consideration.Please see related Correspondence article: xxx (13059_2016_982) and related Research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-015-0619-z. PMID:27411809

  17. Expression and inheritance of hypersensitive resistance to rice hoja blanca virus mediated by the viral nucleocapsid protein gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Z; Lozano, I; Tabares, E; Fory, L; Domínguez, J; Cuervo, M; Calvert, L

    2003-04-01

    Rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) is a major virus disease of economic importance affecting rice in northern South America, Central America and the Caribbean. This is the first report of transgenic resistance to RHBV and the transformation of an indica rice variety from Latin America. Rice transformed with the RHBV nucleocapsid protein ( N) gene had a significant reduction in disease development. Several reactions were observed that ranged from susceptible to completely resistant plants (immunity). The resistant reactions were characterized by the production of local lesions like a hypersensitive reaction or a recovery phenotype with the emergence of symptom-less new leaves. These transgenic RHBV-resistant rice lines expressed the N gene RNA at low levels that were below the detection limit by Northern blots and only resolved by RT-PCR. The nucleocapsid protein could not be detected in any of the transgenic plants either by Western or ELISA tests. These results suggest that the resistance encoded by the N gene in these plants appears to be mediated by RNA. When challenged with RHBV, the resistant transgenic lines showed a significant increased performance for important agronomic traits including the number of tillers, the number of grains per plant and the yield as compared to the susceptible control. Furthermore, upon inoculation some of the most-resistant transgenic lines showed agronomic traits similar to the uninoculated non-transgenic Cica 8 control. Using both agronomic traits and disease severity as criteria, several of the most-resistant lines were followed through the R(4) generation and demonstrated that the N gene and RHBV resistance was inherited in a stable manner. These transgenic rice lines could become a new genetic resource in developing RHBV-resistant cultivars. PMID:12671749

  18. Unfolded protein response in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus of clinical importance. The virus establishes a chronic infection and can progress from chronic hepatitis, steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of viral persistence and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has emerged to be a major contributing factor in many human diseases. It is also evident that viruses interact with the host UPR in many different ways and the outcome could be pro-viral, anti-viral or pathogenic, depending on the particular type of infection. Here we present evidence for the elicitation of chronic ER stress in HCV infection. We analyze the UPR signaling pathways involved in HCV infection, the various levels of UPR regulation by different viral proteins and finally, we propose several mechanisms by which the virus provokes the UPR. PMID:24904547

  19. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  20. Protective and Pathogenic Responses to Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kristin M.; Heise, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arbovirus responsible for causing epidemic outbreaks of human disease characterized by painful and often debilitating arthralgia. Recently CHIKV has moved into the Caribbean and the Americas resulting in massive outbreaks in naïve human populations. Given the importance of CHIKV as an emerging disease, a significant amount of effort has gone into interpreting the virus-host interactions that contribute to protection or virus-induced pathology following CHIKV infection, with the long term goal of using this information to develop new therapies or safe and effective anti-CHIKV vaccines. This work has made it clear that numerous distinct host responses are involved in the response to CHIKV infection, where some aspects of the host innate and adaptive immune response protect from or limit virus-induced disease, while other pathways actually exacerbate the virus-induced disease process. This review will discuss mechanisms that have been identified as playing a role in the host response to CHIKV infection and illustrate the importance of carefully evaluating these responses to determine whether they play a protective or pathologic role during CHIKV infection. PMID:26366337

  1. Recombinant measles viruses expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins induced virus-specific CTL responses in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-07-31

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of serious lower respiratory tract illnesses in infants. Natural infections with RSV provide limited protection against reinfection because of inefficient immunological responses that do not induce long-term memory. RSV natural infection has been shown to induce unbalanced immune response. The effective clearance of RSV is known to require the induction of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response, which involves the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). In our previous study, recombinant AIK-C measles vaccine strains MVAIK/RSV/F and MVAIK/RSV/G were developed, which expressed the RSV fusion (F) protein or glycoprotein (G). These recombinant viruses elicited antibody responses against RSV in cotton rats, and no infectious virus was recovered, but small amounts of infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed in the lungs following RSV challenge. In the present study, recombinant AIK-C measles vaccine strains MVAIK/RSV/M2-1 and MVAIK/RSV/NP were developed, expressing RSV M2-1 or Nucleoprotein (NP), respectively. These viruses exhibited temperature-sensitivity (ts), which was derived from AIK-C, and expressed respective RSV antigens. The intramuscular inoculation of cotton rats with the recombinant measles virus led to the induction of CD8(+) IFN-γ(+) cells. No infectious virus was recovered from a lung homogenate following the challenge. A Histological examination of the lungs revealed a significant reduction in inflammatory reactions without alveolar damage. These results support the recombinant measles viruses being effective vaccine candidates against RSV that induce RSV-specific CTL responses with or without the development of an antibody response.

  2. Rapid and massive virus-specific plasmablast responses during acute dengue virus infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Wrammert, Jens; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S; Perng, Guey C; Polsrila, Korakot; Chandele, Anmol; Kwissa, Marcin; Pulendran, Bali; Wilson, Patrick C; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Yoksan, Sutee; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Ahmed, Rafi

    2012-03-01

    Humoral immune responses are thought to play a major role in dengue virus-induced immunopathology; however, little is known about the plasmablasts producing these antibodies during an ongoing infection. Herein we present an analysis of plasmablast responses in patients with acute dengue virus infection. We found very potent plasmablast responses that often increased more than 1,000-fold over the baseline levels in healthy volunteers. In many patients, these responses made up as much 30% of the peripheral lymphocyte population. These responses were largely dengue virus specific and almost entirely made up of IgG-secreting cells, and plasmablasts reached very high numbers at a time after fever onset that generally coincided with the window where the most serious dengue virus-induced pathology is observed. The presence of these large, rapid, and virus-specific plasmablast responses raises the question as to whether these cells might have a role in dengue immunopathology during the ongoing infection. These findings clearly illustrate the need for a detailed understanding of the repertoire and specificity of the antibodies that these plasmablasts produce.

  3. Interferon-λ in the Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaccetti, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 500 million people worldwide are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV), and are therefore at an increased risk for developing fatal liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The intracellular antiviral responses induced by interferon (IFN)-α/-β and/or IFN-γ play critical roles in the pathogenesis of HBV and HCV infection, and the function of IFN-λ in the host immune response to these viruses is beginning to be revealed. A better understanding of how IFN-λ influences HBV or HCV persistence is not only important for understanding the mechanisms of chronic virus infection, but also may lead to new approaches for improved antiviral therapies. PMID:20645875

  4. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  5. DpiA binding to the replication origin of Escherichia coli plasmids and chromosomes destabilizes plasmid inheritance and induces the bacterial SOS response.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christine; Ingmer, Hanne; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Skarstad, Kirsten; Cohen, Stanley N

    2003-10-01

    The dpiA and dpiB genes of Escherichia coli, which are orthologs of genes that regulate citrate uptake and utilization in Klebsiella pneumoniae, comprise a two-component signal transduction system that can modulate the replication of and destabilize the inheritance of pSC101 and certain other plasmids. Here we show that perturbed replication and inheritance result from binding of the effector protein DpiA to A+T-rich replication origin sequences that resemble those in the K. pneumoniae promoter region targeted by the DpiA ortholog, CitB. Consistent with its ability to bind to A+T-rich origin sequences, overproduction of DpiA induced the SOS response in E. coli, suggesting that chromosomal DNA replication is affected. Bacteria that overexpressed DpiA showed an increased amount of DNA per cell and increased cell size-both also characteristic of the SOS response. Concurrent overexpression of the DNA replication initiation protein, DnaA, or the DNA helicase, DnaB-both of which act at A+T-rich replication origin sequences in the E. coli chromosome and DpiA-targeted plasmids-reversed SOS induction as well as plasmid destabilization by DpiA. Our finding that physical and functional interactions between DpiA and sites of replication initiation modulate DNA replication and plasmid inheritance suggests a mechanism by which environmental stimuli transmitted by these gene products can regulate chromosomal and plasmid dynamics.

  6. Sensing Viruses by Mechanical Tension of DNA in Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The rapid worldwide spread of severe viral infections, often involving novel mutations of viruses, poses major challenges to our health-care systems. This means that tools that can efficiently and specifically diagnose viruses are much needed. To be relevant for broad applications in local health-care centers, such tools should be relatively cheap and easy to use. In this paper, we discuss the biophysical potential for the macroscopic detection of viruses based on the induction of a mechanical stress in a bundle of prestretched DNA molecules upon binding of viruses to the DNA. We show that the affinity of the DNA to the charged virus surface induces a local melting of the double helix into two single-stranded DNA. This process effects a mechanical stress along the DNA chains leading to an overall contraction of the DNA. Our results suggest that when such DNA bundles are incorporated in a supporting matrix such as a responsive hydrogel, the presence of viruses may indeed lead to a significant, macroscopic mechanical deformation of the matrix. We discuss the biophysical basis for this effect and characterize the physical properties of the associated DNA melting transition. In particular, we reveal several scaling relations between the relevant physical parameters of the system. We promote this DNA-based assay as a possible tool for efficient and specific virus screening.

  7. GMCSF-armed vaccinia virus induces an antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Suvi; Ahonen, Marko; Diaconu, Iulia; Kipar, Anja; Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-03-01

    Oncolytic Western Reserve strain vaccinia virus selective for epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mutations and tumor-associated hypermetabolism was armed with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) and a tdTomato fluorophore. As the assessment of immunological responses to human transgenes is challenging in the most commonly used animal models, we used immunocompetent Syrian golden hamsters, known to be sensitive to human GMCSF and semipermissive to vaccinia virus. Efficacy was initially tested in vitro on various human and hamster cell lines and oncolytic potency of transgene-carrying viruses was similar to unarmed virus. The hGMCSF-encoding virus was able to completely eradicate subcutaneous pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and to fully protect the animals from subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor. Induction of specific antitumor immunity was also shown by ex vivo co-culture experiments with hamster splenocytes. In addition, histological examination revealed increased infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in GMCSF-virus-treated tumors. These findings help clarify the mechanism of action of GMCSF-armed vaccinia viruses undergoing clinical trials.

  8. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino; Targher, Giovanni; Zaffanello, Marco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2008-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders are a rare, but probably underdiagnosed, cause of symptomatic bleeding. They are characterized by abnormalities of platelet number (inherited thrombocytopenias), function (inherited disorders of platelet function) or both. This review briefly discusses the inherited platelet disorders with respect to molecular defects, diagnostic evaluation and treatment strategies.

  9. Responses of volunteers to inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R.; Potter, C. W.; Massey, P. M.; Duerden, B. I.; Martin, J.; Bevan, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    Three different types of bivalent influenza virus vaccine, a whole virus, an aqueous-surface-antigen vaccine and an adsorbed-surface-antigen vaccine were tested at three dosage levels in volunteers primed with respect to only one of the haemagglutinin antigens present in the vaccines. The local and systemic reactions to all three vaccine types were mild in nature and, following first immunization, the aqueous-surface-antigen vaccine was the least reactogenic. The serum haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody response to the A/Victoria/75 component of the vaccines to which the volunteer population was primed, was greatest following immunization with the aqueous-surface-antigen vaccine; the greatest antibody response to the A/New Jersey/76 component of the vaccines was observed following immunization with whole virus vaccine. PMID:7007488

  10. Reservoir Host Immune Responses to Emerging Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, Judith N.; Ahmed, Rafi; Barreiro, Luis B.; Daszak, Peter; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Feinberg, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic viruses, such as HIV, Ebola virus, coronaviruses, influenza A viruses, hantaviruses, or henipaviruses, can result in profound pathology in humans. In contrast, populations of the reservoir hosts of zoonotic pathogens often appear to tolerate these infections with little evidence of disease. Why are viruses more dangerous in one species than another? Immunological studies investigating quantitative and qualitative differences in the host-virus equilibrium in animal reservoirs will be key to answering this question, informing new approaches for treating and preventing zoonotic diseases. Integrating an understanding of host immune responses with epidemiological, ecological, and evolutionary insights into viral emergence will shed light on mechanisms that minimize fitness costs associated with viral infection, facilitate transmission to other hosts, and underlie the association of specific reservoir hosts with multiple emerging viruses. Reservoir host studies provide a rich opportunity for elucidating fundamental immunological processes and their underlying genetic basis, in the context of distinct physiological and metabolic constraints that contribute to host resistance and disease tolerance. PMID:25533784

  11. Innate immune responses in raccoons after raccoon rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Sribalachandran, Hariharan; Rosatte, Rick; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Kyle, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Zoonotic wildlife diseases pose significant health risks not only to their primary vectors but also to humans and domestic animals. Rabies is a lethal encephalitis caused by rabies virus (RV). This RNA virus can infect a range of terrestrial mammals but each viral variant persists in a particular reservoir host. Active management of these host vectors is needed to minimize the negative impacts of this disease, and an understanding of the immune response to RV infection aids strategies for host vaccination. Current knowledge of immune responses to RV infection comes primarily from rodent models in which an innate immune response triggers activation of several genes and signalling pathways. It is unclear, however, how well rodent models represent the immune response of natural hosts. This study investigates the innate immune response of a primary host, the raccoon, to a peripheral challenge using the raccoon rabies virus (RRV). The extent and temporal course of this response during RRV infection was analysed using genes predicted to be upregulated during infection (IFNs; IFN regulatory factors; IL-6; Toll like receptor-3; TNF receptor). We found that RRV activated components of the innate immune system, with changes in levels of transcripts correlated with presence of viral RNA. Our results suggest that natural reservoirs of rabies may not mimic the immune response triggered in rodent models, highlighting the need for further studies of infection in primary hosts.

  12. Dynamics of virus shedding and antibody responses in influenza A virus-infected feral swine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hailiang; Cunningham, Fred L; Harris, Jillian; Xu, Yifei; Long, Li-Ping; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Baroch, John A; Fioranelli, Paul; Lutman, Mark W; Li, Tao; Pedersen, Kerri; Schmit, Brandon S; Cooley, Jim; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Given their free-ranging habits, feral swine could serve as reservoirs or spatially dynamic 'mixing vessels' for influenza A virus (IAV). To better understand virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics in the context of IAV surveillance amongst feral swine, we used IAV of feral swine origin to perform infection experiments. The virus was highly infectious and transmissible in feral swine, and virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics were similar to those in domestic swine. In the virus-inoculated and sentinel groups, virus shedding lasted ≤ 6 and ≤ 9 days, respectively. Antibody titres in inoculated swine peaked at 1 : 840 on day 11 post-inoculation (p.i.), remained there until 21 days p.i. and dropped to < 1 : 220 at 42 days p.i. Genomic sequencing identified changes in wildtype (WT) viruses and isolates from sentinel swine, most notably an amino acid divergence in nucleoprotein position 473. Using data from cell culture as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of a matrix gene-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method using nasal swab samples for detection of IAV in feral swine were 78.9 and 78.1 %, respectively. Using data from haemagglutination inhibition assays as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of an ELISA for detection of IAV-specific antibody were 95.4 and 95.0 %, respectively. Serological surveillance from 2009 to 2014 showed that ∼7.58 % of feral swine in the USA were positive for IAV. Our findings confirm the susceptibility of IAV infection and the high transmission ability of IAV amongst feral swine, and also suggest the need for continued surveillance of IAVs in feral swine populations. PMID:26297148

  13. Dynamics of virus shedding and antibody responses in influenza A virus-infected feral swine

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hailiang; Cunningham, Fred L.; Harris, Jillian; Xu, Yifei; Long, Li-Ping; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Baroch, John A.; Fioranelli, Paul; Lutman, Mark W.; Li, Tao; Pedersen, Kerri; Schmit, Brandon S.; Cooley, Jim; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G.; DeLiberto, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Given their free-ranging habits, feral swine could serve as reservoirs or spatially dynamic ‘mixing vessels’ for influenza A virus (IAV). To better understand virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics in the context of IAV surveillance amongst feral swine, we used IAV of feral swine origin to perform infection experiments. The virus was highly infectious and transmissible in feral swine, and virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics were similar to those in domestic swine. In the virus-inoculated and sentinel groups, virus shedding lasted ≤ 6 and ≤ 9 days, respectively. Antibody titres in inoculated swine peaked at 1 : 840 on day 11 post-inoculation (p.i.), remained there until 21 days p.i. and dropped to < 1 : 220 at 42 days p.i. Genomic sequencing identified changes in wildtype (WT) viruses and isolates from sentinel swine, most notably an amino acid divergence in nucleoprotein position 473. Using data from cell culture as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of a matrix gene-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method using nasal swab samples for detection of IAV in feral swine were 78.9 and 78.1 %, respectively. Using data from haemagglutination inhibition assays as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of an ELISA for detection of IAV-specific antibody were 95.4 and 95.0 %, respectively. Serological surveillance from 2009 to 2014 showed that ∼7.58 % of feral swine in the USA were positive for IAV. Our findings confirm the susceptibility of IAV infection and the high transmission ability of IAV amongst feral swine, and also suggest the need for continued surveillance of IAVs in feral swine populations. PMID:26297148

  14. Humoral Immune Response to Primary Rubella Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kim M.; Di Camillo, Carlie; Doughty, Larissa; Dax, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    An assay capable of distinguishing between the immune response generated by recent exposure to rubella virus and the immune response existing as a result of past exposure or immunization is required for the diagnosis of primary rubella virus infection, especially in pregnant women. Avidity assays, which are based on the premise that chaotropic agents can be used to selectively dissociate the low-avidity antibodies generated early in the course of infection, have become routinely used in an effort to accomplish this. We have thoroughly investigated the immunological basis of an avidity assay using a viral lysate-based assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a peptide analogue of the putative immunodominant region of the E1 glycoprotein (E1208-239). The relative affinities of the antibodies directed against E1208-239 were measured by surface plasmon resonance and were found to correlate well with the avidity index calculated from the ELISA results. We found that the immune response generated during primary rubella virus infection consists of an initial low-affinity peak of immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactivity followed by transient peaks of low-avidity IgG3 and IgA reactivity. The predominant response is an IgG1 response which increases in concentration and affinity progressively over the course of infection. Incubation with the chaotropic agent used in the avidity assay abolished the detection of the early low-affinity peaks of IgM, IgA, and IgG3 reactivity while leaving the high-affinity IgG1 response relatively unaffected. The present study supported the premise that avidity assays based on appropriate antigens can be useful to confirm primary rubella virus infection. PMID:16522781

  15. Virus-like nanostructures for tuning immune response

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Rashad; Cinar, Goksu; Gunduz, Nuray; Goktas, Melis; Kayhan, Handan; Tohumeken, Sehmus; Topal, Ahmet E.; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Delibasi, Tuncay; Dana, Aykutlu; Ide, Semra; Tekinay, Ayse B.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic vaccines utilize viral signatures to trigger immune responses. Although the immune responses raised against the biochemical signatures of viruses are well characterized, the mechanism of how they affect immune response in the context of physical signatures is not well studied. In this work, we investigated the ability of zero- and one-dimensional self-assembled peptide nanostructures carrying unmethylated CpG motifs (signature of viral DNA) for tuning immune response. These nanostructures represent the two most common viral shapes, spheres and rods. The nanofibrous structures were found to direct immune response towards Th1 phenotype, which is responsible for acting against intracellular pathogens such as viruses, to a greater extent than nanospheres and CpG ODN alone. In addition, nanofibers exhibited enhanced uptake into dendritic cells compared to nanospheres or the ODN itself. The chemical stability of the ODN against nuclease-mediated degradation was also observed to be enhanced when complexed with the peptide nanostructures. In vivo studies showed that nanofibers promoted antigen-specific IgG production over 10-fold better than CpG ODN alone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the modulation of the nature of an immune response through the shape of the carrier system. PMID:26577983

  16. Virus-like nanostructures for tuning immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammadov, Rashad; Cinar, Goksu; Gunduz, Nuray; Goktas, Melis; Kayhan, Handan; Tohumeken, Sehmus; Topal, Ahmet E.; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Delibasi, Tuncay; Dana, Aykutlu; Ide, Semra; Tekinay, Ayse B.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic vaccines utilize viral signatures to trigger immune responses. Although the immune responses raised against the biochemical signatures of viruses are well characterized, the mechanism of how they affect immune response in the context of physical signatures is not well studied. In this work, we investigated the ability of zero- and one-dimensional self-assembled peptide nanostructures carrying unmethylated CpG motifs (signature of viral DNA) for tuning immune response. These nanostructures represent the two most common viral shapes, spheres and rods. The nanofibrous structures were found to direct immune response towards Th1 phenotype, which is responsible for acting against intracellular pathogens such as viruses, to a greater extent than nanospheres and CpG ODN alone. In addition, nanofibers exhibited enhanced uptake into dendritic cells compared to nanospheres or the ODN itself. The chemical stability of the ODN against nuclease-mediated degradation was also observed to be enhanced when complexed with the peptide nanostructures. In vivo studies showed that nanofibers promoted antigen-specific IgG production over 10-fold better than CpG ODN alone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the modulation of the nature of an immune response through the shape of the carrier system.

  17. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  18. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  19. Host response to papilloma virus in focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Tamayo Pérez, R; Pazbueso, H R

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of the lesions of four FEH patients disclosed changes in the nuclei interpreted as a premature disintegration of the nucleoli and the presence of papilloma-like viruses. Changes in ribosome number and distribution, glycogen content and formation of vesicles within the cytoplasm of FEH keratinocytes were observed and compared with normal epithelia. The observed cell changes were explained as specific host response due to HPV-13.

  20. Müller Glia Activation in Response to Inherited Retinal Degeneration Is Highly Varied and Disease-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amanda C.; West, Emma L.; Smith, Alexander J.; Ali, Robin R.; Pearson, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite different aetiologies, most inherited retinal disorders culminate in photoreceptor loss, which induces concomitant changes in the neural retina, one of the most striking being reactive gliosis by Müller cells. It is typically assumed that photoreceptor loss leads to an upregulation of glial fibrilliary acidic protein (Gfap) and other intermediate filament proteins, together with other gliosis-related changes, including loss of integrity of the outer limiting membrane (OLM) and deposition of proteoglycans. However, this is based on a mix of both injury-induced and genetic causes of photoreceptor loss. There are very few longitudinal studies of gliosis in the retina and none comparing these changes across models over time. Here, we present a comprehensive spatiotemporal assessment of features of gliosis in the degenerating murine retina that involves Müller glia. Specifically, we assessed Gfap, vimentin and chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) levels and outer limiting membrane (OLM) integrity over time in four murine models of inherited photoreceptor degeneration that encompass a range of disease severities (Crb1rd8/rd8, Prph2+/Δ307, Rho-/-, Pde6brd1/rd1). These features underwent very different changes, depending upon the disease-causing mutation, and that these changes are not correlated with disease severity. Intermediate filament expression did indeed increase with disease progression in Crb1rd8/rd8 and Prph2+/Δ307, but decreased in the Prph2+/Δ307 and Pde6brd1/rd1 models. CSPG deposition usually, but not always, followed the trends in intermediate filament expression. The OLM adherens junctions underwent significant remodelling in all models, but with differences in the composition of the resulting junctions; in Rho-/- mice, the adherens junctions maintained the typical rod-Müller glia interactions, while in the Pde6brd1/rd1 model they formed predominantly between Müller cells in late stage of degeneration. Together, these results show that

  1. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts.

  2. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  3. Epigenetic inheritance: a contributor to species differentiation?

    PubMed

    Boffelli, Dario; Martin, David I K

    2012-10-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules.

  4. Epigenetic Inheritance: A Contributor to Species Differentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Boffelli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules. PMID:22966965

  5. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  6. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  7. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  8. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations.

  9. Immune responses of ducks infected with duck Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yao; Li, Rong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Jinzhou; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2015-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) can cause serious disease in ducks, characterized by reduced egg production. Although the virus has been isolated and detection methods developed, the host immune responses to DTMUV infection are unclear. Therefore, we systematically examined the expression of immune-related genes and the viral distribution in DTMUV-infected ducks, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results show that DTMUV replicates quickly in many tissues early in infection, with the highest viral titers in the spleen 1 day after infection. Rig-1, Mda5, and Tlr3 are involved in the host immune response to DTMUV, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (Il-1β, -2, -6, Cxcl8) and antiviral proteins (Mx, Oas, etc.) are also upregulated early in infection. The expression of Il-6 increased most significantly in the tissues tested. The upregulation of Mhc-I was observed in the brain and spleen, but the expression of Mhc-II was upregulated in the brain and downregulated in the spleen. The expression of the interferons was also upregulated to different degrees in the spleen but that of the brain was various. Our study suggests that DTMUV replicates rapidly in various tissues and that the host immune responses are activated early in infection. However, the overexpression of cytokines may damage the host. These results extend our understanding of the immune responses of ducks to DTMUV infection, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of DTMUV attributable to host factors.

  10. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  11. Evasion of Influenza A Viruses from Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    van de Sandt, Carolien E.; Kreijtz, Joost H. C. M.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2012-01-01

    The influenza A virus is one of the leading causes of respiratory tract infections in humans. Upon infection with an influenza A virus, both innate and adaptive immune responses are induced. Here we discuss various strategies used by influenza A viruses to evade innate immune responses and recognition by components of the humoral and cellular immune response, which consequently may result in reduced clearing of the virus and virus-infected cells. Finally, we discuss how the current knowledge about immune evasion can be used to improve influenza A vaccination strategies. PMID:23170167

  12. Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease?[OA

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G.

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogens using elaborate networks of genetic interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense. In addition, plants also induce hypersensitive and systemic acquired resistance responses, which together limit the virus to infected cells and impart resistance to the noninfected tissues. Molecular processes such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA methylation are also critical to antiviral defenses. Here, we provide a summary and update of advances in plant antiviral immune responses, beyond RNA silencing mechanisms—advances that went relatively unnoticed in the realm of RNA silencing and nonviral immune responses. We also document the rise of Brachypodium and Setaria species as model grasses to study antiviral responses in Poaceae, aspects that have been relatively understudied, despite grasses being the primary source of our calories, as well as animal feed, forage, recreation, and biofuel needs in the 21st century. Finally, we outline critical gaps, future prospects, and considerations central to studying plant antiviral immunity. To promote an integrated model of plant immunity, we discuss analogous viral and nonviral immune concepts and propose working definitions of viral effectors, effector-triggered immunity, and viral pathogen-triggered immunity. PMID:23709626

  13. Immune surveillance and response to JC virus infection and PML

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Sarah; Gordon, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the established etiological agent of the debilitating and often fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Most healthy individuals have been infected with JCV and generate an immune response to the virus, yet remain persistently infected at subclinical levels. The onset of PML is rare in the general population, but has become an increasing concern in immunocompromised patients, where reactivation of JCV leads to uncontrolled replication in the CNS. Understanding viral persistence and the normal immune response to JCV provides insight into the circumstances which could lead to viral resurgence. Further, clues on the potential mechanisms of reactivation may be gleaned from the crosstalk among JCV and HIV-1, as well as the impact of monoclonal antibody therapies used for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, on the development of PML. In this review, we will discuss what is known about viral persistence and the immune response to JCV replication in immunocompromised individuals to elucidate the deficiencies in viral containment that permit viral reactivation and spread. PMID:24297501

  14. Host Immune Status and Response to Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Krain, Lisa J.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available. PMID:24396140

  15. Host immune status and response to hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Krain, Lisa J; Nelson, Kenrad E; Labrique, Alain B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available.

  16. Inherited thrombophilia: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a genetically determined predisposition to develop thromboembolic complications. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors include antithrombin deficiency, protein C and protein S deficiencies, activated protein C resistance due to factor V Leiden mutation, inherited hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombin G20210A variant, dys- and hyperfibrinogenemia and elevated factor VIII levels. In this review we briefly analyze, from an epidemiologic, laboratory and clinical point of view, the main inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Finally, we discuss the synergism between genetic and acquired prothrombotic risk factors in some conditions such as pregnancy and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Immune response and virus population composition: HIV as a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Almogy, Gal; Cohen, Netta; Stöcker, Sabine; Stone, Lewi

    2002-01-01

    Based on the current understanding of the immune response, we present what we believe to be a new model of intrahost virus dynamics. The model takes into account the relationship between virus replication rate and the level of antigen displayed by infected cells, and shows how the cell-directed immune response controls both virus load and virus replication rate. In contrast to conventional wisdom, it shows that the predominant virus variant does not necessarily have the highest replication rate. A strong immune response produces a selective advantage for latent viruses, whereas a deteriorating immune response invites in viruses of higher replication rates. The model is analysed in light of the well-studied HIV/AIDS disease progression, and shows how a wide range of major, seemingly unrelated issues in the study of HIV may be accounted for in a simple and unified manner. PMID:11958712

  18. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Terence P; Nel, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses-including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature-are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host's response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment. PMID:27548204

  19. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Terence P; Nel, Louis H

    2016-08-19

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses-including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature-are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host's response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment.

  20. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  1. Strategies to alleviate original antigenic sin responses to influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Davis, William G.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Jacob, Joshy

    2012-01-01

    Original antigenic sin is a phenomenon wherein sequential exposure to closely related influenza virus variants reduces antibody (Ab) response to novel antigenic determinants in the second strain and, consequently, impairs the development of immune memory. This could pose a risk to the development of immune memory in persons previously infected with or vaccinated against influenza. Here, we explored strategies to overcome original antigenic sin responses in mice sequentially exposed to two closely related hemagglutinin 1 neuraminidase 1 (H1N1) influenza strains A/PR/8/34 and A/FM/1/47. We found that dendritic cell–activating adjuvants [Bordetella pertussis toxin (PT) or CpG ODN or a squalene-based oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE)], upon administration during the second viral exposure, completely protected mice from a lethal challenge and enhanced neutralizing-Ab titers against the second virus. Interestingly, PT and NE adjuvants when administered during the first immunization even prevented original antigenic sin in subsequent immunization without any adjuvants. As an alternative to using adjuvants, we also found that repeated immunization with the second viral strain relieved the effects of original antigenic sin. Taken together, our studies provide at least three ways of overcoming original antigenic sin. PMID:22869731

  2. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  3. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population. PMID:26104333

  4. Inherited resistance to N- and B-tropic murine leukemia viruses in vitro: titration patterns in strains SIM and SIM.R congenic at the Fv-1 locus.

    PubMed

    Schuh, V; Blackstein, M E; Axelrad, A A

    1976-05-01

    We have investigated the titration patterns of murine leukemia viruses on mouse embryo cultures derived from a pair of congenic strains differing at the Fv-1 locus. XC plaque and infectious center assays carried out with N- and B-tropic viruses on both SIM (Fv-1nn) and SIM.R(Fv-1bb) host cells yielded results that were best approximated by Poisson one-hit curves. Titration curves of N-tropic virus by direct XC plaque assay were linear and parallel on the different hosts, with titers 1.8 to 2.7 log10 lower on SIM.R and on (SIM X SIM.R)F1 than on SIM cells; similar linear and parallel curves were found for B-tropic virus, with titers 1.4 to 2.0 log10 lower on SIM and (SIM XSIM-R)F1 than on SIM-R cells. In the infectious center assays, the proportion of infected cells was linearly related to multiplicity of infection on both permissive (N- on SIM and B- on SIM.R) restrictive (B- on SIM and N- on SIM.R) genotypes at multiplicities of infection below 0.5; the line relating the variables was about 1 log10 lower in the restrictive than in the permissive situations. At multiplicities of infection where the proportion of infected cells reached a plateau, differences between the results on permissive and restrictive genotypes were considerably reduced. This appeared to be due to the action of non-Fv-1 factors in permissive host. We conclude that the major action of the restrictive allele at the Fv-1 locus in this system is to reduce the probability of successful murine leukemia virus infection without a change in hitness.

  5. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Terence P.; Nel, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses—including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature—are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host’s response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment. PMID:27548204

  6. Competitive seedlings and inherited traits: a test of rapid evolution of Elymus multisetus (big squirreltail) in response to cheatgrass invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Courtney L J; Leger, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Widespread invasion by Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) in the Intermountain West has drastically altered native plant communities. We investigated whether Elymus multisetus (big squirreltail) is evolving in response to invasion and what traits contribute to increased performance. Seedlings from invaded areas exhibited significantly greater tolerance to B. tectorum competition and a greater ability to suppress B. tectorum biomass than seedlings from adjacent uninvaded areas. To identify potentially adaptive traits, we examined which phenological and phenotypic traits were correlated with seedling performance within the uninvaded area, determined their genetic variation by measuring sibling resemblance, and asked whether trait distribution had shifted in invaded areas. Increased tolerance to competition was correlated with early seedling root to shoot ratio, root fork number, and fine root length. Root forks differed among families, but none of these traits differed significantly across invasion status. Additionally, we surveyed more broadly for traits that varied between invaded and uninvaded areas. Elymus multisetus plants collected from invaded areas were smaller, allocated more biomass to roots, and produced a higher percentage of fine roots than plants from uninvaded areas. The ability of native populations to evolve in response to invasion has significant implications for the management and restoration of B. tectorum-invaded communities. PMID:25567997

  7. The mammalian response to virus infection is independent of small RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Simone; Langlois, Ryan A.; Schmid, Sonja; Varble, Andrew; Shim, Jaehee V.; Sachs, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary A successful cellular response to virus infection is essential for evolutionary survival. In plants, arthropods, and nematodes, cellular antiviral defenses rely on RNA interference (RNAi). Interestingly, the mammalian response to virus is predominantly orchestrated through interferon (IFN)-mediated induction of antiviral proteins. Despite the potency of the IFN system, it remains unclear whether mammals also have the capacity to employ antiviral RNAi. Here we investigate this by disabling either IFN, small RNA function or both activities in the context of virus infection. We find that loss of small RNAs in the context of an in vivo RNA virus infection lowers titers due to reduced transcriptional repression of the host antiviral response. In contrast, enabling a virus with the capacity to inhibit the IFN system results in increased titers. Taken together, we conclude that small RNA silencing is not a physiological contributor to the IFN-mediated cellular response to virus infection. PMID:24953656

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus: the virus, the disease and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Ogra, Pearay L

    2004-01-01

    RSV is the primary cause of hospitalisation in the first year of life for children in most parts of the world, and nearly 100% of children in the USA are infected with the virus by 2 to 3 years of age. The agent is an enveloped RNA virus with a non-segmented single-stranded negative-sense genome. The viral genome encodes 8 structural and 2 non-structural proteins. Important structural proteins include the fusion (F) protein and the attachment (G) protein which are essential for viral penetration and attachment to the host cells. Both proteins are important in development of immune responses. The virus is estimated to cause 3000 to 4000 deaths annually. Primary infections are as a rule symptomatic. The spectrum of clinical manifestations ranges from mild upper tract illness, infection in middle ear which progresses to acute otitis media, croup, to apnoea in premature infants, pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Premature babies born at 30-35 weeks of gestation, infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease, HIV-infected subjects, and patients on intensive immunosuppressive therapy especially after bone marrow transplant are considered to be at risk for increased mortality and morbidity during RSV infection. The virus does not normally replicate outside of the bronchopulmonary tree and the infection is exquisitely restricted to the respiratory mucosa. However, development of extrapulmonary disease has been observed in certain T and B cell immunodeficiency states. The association of RSV with asthma and reversible reactive airway disease in early childhood has attracted significant attention. Recurrent wheezing for up to 5 to 7 years of age and established airway disease has been observed in a significant number of children with a strong family history of allergy, after primary infection or reinfection with RSV. Immune response to primary infection is relatively small but on reinfection, a significant booster effect with sustained immunologic reactivity is observed in serum

  9. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  10. Ebola virus disease surveillance and response preparedness in northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Adokiya, Martin N.; Awoonor-Williams, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has been described as unprecedented in terms of morbidity, mortality, and geographical extension. It also revealed many weaknesses and inadequacies for disease surveillance and response systems in Africa due to underqualified staff, cultural beliefs, and lack of trust for the formal health care sector. In 2014, Ghana had high risk of importation of EVD cases. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the EVD surveillance and response system in northern Ghana. Design This was an observational study conducted among 47 health workers (district directors, medical, disease control, and laboratory officers) in all 13 districts of the Upper East Region representing public, mission, and private health services. A semi-structured questionnaire with focus on core and support functions (e.g. detection, confirmation) was administered to the informants. Their responses were recorded according to specific themes. In addition, 34 weekly Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response reports (August 2014 to March 2015) were collated from each district. Results In 2014 and 2015, a total of 10 suspected Ebola cases were clinically diagnosed from four districts. Out of the suspected cases, eight died and the cause of death was unexplained. All the 10 suspected cases were reported, none was confirmed. The informants had knowledge on EVD surveillance and data reporting. However, there were gaps such as delayed reporting, low quality protective equipment (e.g. gloves, aprons), inadequate staff, and lack of laboratory capacity. The majority (38/47) of the respondents were not satisfied with EVD surveillance system and response preparedness due to lack of infrared thermometers, ineffective screening, and lack of isolation centres. Conclusion EVD surveillance and response preparedness is insufficient and the epidemic is a wake-up call for early detection and response preparedness. Ebola surveillance remains a neglected public

  11. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  12. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  13. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  14. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  15. Autogenous immunity to endogenous RNA tumor virus: humoral immune response to virus envelope antigens.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Ihle, J N; Lee, J C

    1976-02-01

    Autogenous immune sera from several strains of mice have been examined for type-, group-, or interspecies-specific reactivities against leukemia virus envelope antigens and virus-induced cell surface proteins. The natural antibody of these test sera react with gp69/71, gp43, and p15 structural components on murine leukemia viruses including AKR, Friend, Rauscher, Moloney, and xenotropic BALB:virus-2. Furthermore, comparable radioimmune titration curves are obtained when these viruses are used in radioimmune precipitation assays. Competition experiments, however, suggest that natural immune sera are predominantly type specific and only weakly cross-react with the Rauscher or Friend virus. Natural immune sera react with the virion envelope but not with the virus-induced cell surface antigen. With respect to the biological activity of autogenous immune sera, there appears to be an inconsistency between the spectrum of virus-precipitating antibody and virus-neutralizing antibody. Although normal mouse serum readily neutralizes xenotropic viruses (BALB:virus-2), only weak neutralization of the ecotropic viruses can be achieved in vitro. Although there is a lack of direct evidence to indicate that autogenous immunity to murine leukemia virus is involved in the control of virus-mediated neoplasia, several empirical correlations point in this direction.

  16. Polyreactive antibodies in adaptive immune responses to viruses.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Hugo; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2012-05-01

    B cells express immunoglobulins on their surface where they serve as antigen receptors. When secreted as antibodies, the same molecules are key elements of the humoral immune response against pathogens such as viruses. Although most antibodies are restricted to binding a specific antigen, some are polyreactive and have the ability to bind to several different ligands, usually with low affinity. Highly polyreactive antibodies are removed from the repertoire during B-cell development by physiologic tolerance mechanisms including deletion and receptor editing. However, a low level of antibody polyreactivity is tolerated and can confer additional binding properties to pathogen-specific antibodies. For example, high-affinity human antibodies to HIV are frequently polyreactive. Here we review the evidence suggesting that in the case of some pathogens like HIV, polyreactivity may confer a selective advantage to pathogen-specific antibodies.

  17. The innate and adaptive immune response to avian influenza virus infections and vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against viruses is mediated by the early innate immune responses and later on by the adaptive immune responses. The early innate immunity is designed to contain and limit virus replication in the host, primarily through cytokine and interferon production. Most all cells are cap...

  18. Characterisation of virus-specific peripheral blood cell cytokine responses following vaccination or infection with classical swine fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Graham, Simon P; Everett, Helen E; Johns, Helen L; Haines, Felicity J; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Wright, Ian K; Drew, Trevor; Crooke, Helen R

    2010-04-21

    Existing live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines provide a rapid onset of complete protection but pose problems in discriminating infected amongst vaccinated animals. With a view to providing additional information on the cellular mechanisms that may contribute to protection, which in turn may aid the development of the next generation of CSFV vaccines, we explored the kinetics of the cytokine responses from peripheral blood cells of pigs vaccinated with an attenuated C-strain vaccine strain and/or infected with a recent CSFV isolate. Peripheral blood cells were isolated over the course of vaccination/infection and stimulated in vitro with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Virus-specific responses of peripheral blood cells isolated from C-strain vaccinated pigs were dominated by the production of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma production in response to the C-strain virus was first detected in vaccinates 9 days post-vaccination and was sustained over the period of observation. In contrast, cells from challenge control animals did not secrete IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Supernatants from UK2000/7.1 infected animals contained significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from day 8 post-infection and these cytokines were present in both virus and mock stimulated cultures. The results suggest that the C-strain virus is a potent inducer of a type-1 T cell response, which may play a role in the protection afforded by such vaccines, whereas the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses observed in cultures from infected pigs may reflect a pathological pro-inflammatory cascade initiated in vivo following the replication and spread of CSFV.

  19. Law & psychiatry: Murder, inheritance, and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, Azgad; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2011-07-01

    Should a murderer be allowed to inherit the victim's estate? The question dates from biblical times, but most jurisdictions today have statutes in place that bar inheritance by convicted murderers. However, a special problem arises when the killer has a severe mental illness and has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Should such people, who have not been convicted of a crime, be permitted to collect their inheritance? Jurisdictions vary in their responses, with the rules reflecting a mix of practical and moral considerations influenced by different perspectives about what determines the behavior of persons with mental illness.

  20. Model of influenza A virus infection: dynamics of viral antagonism and innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Fribourg, M; Hartmann, B; Schmolke, M; Marjanovic, N; Albrecht, R A; García-Sastre, A; Sealfon, S C; Jayaprakash, C; Hayot, F

    2014-06-21

    Viral antagonism of host responses is an essential component of virus pathogenicity. The study of the interplay between immune response and viral antagonism is challenging due to the involvement of many processes acting at multiple time scales. Here we develop an ordinary differential equation model to investigate the early, experimentally measured, responses of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to infection by two H1N1 influenza A viruses of different clinical outcomes: pandemic A/California/4/2009 and seasonal A/New Caledonia/20/1999. Our results reveal how the strength of virus antagonism, and the time scale over which it acts to thwart the innate immune response, differs significantly between the two viruses, as is made clear by their impact on the temporal behavior of a number of measured genes. The model thus sheds light on the mechanisms that underlie the variability of innate immune responses to different H1N1 viruses.

  1. Hantaan virus triggers TLR4-dependent innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Nan, Xue-Ping; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Dong-Qiang; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Ping-Zhong; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2012-10-01

    The innate immune response induced by Hantavirus is responsible for endothelial cell dysfunction and viral pathogenicity. Recent studies demonstrate that TLR4 expression is upregulated and mediates the secretion of several cytokines in Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells. To examine viral interactions with host endothelial cells and characterize the innate antiviral responses associated with Toll-like receptors, we selected TLR4 as the target molecule to investigate anti-hantavirus immunity. TLR4 mRNA-silenced EVC-304 (EVC-304 TLR4-) cells and EVC-304 cells were used to investigate signaling molecules downstream of TLR4. The expression of the adaptor protein TRIF was higher in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells than in EVC-304 TLR4- cells. However, there was no apparent difference in the expression of MyD88 in either cell line. The transcription factors for NF-κB and IRF-3 were translocated from the cytoplasm into the nucleus in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells, but not in HTNV-infected EVC-304 TLR4- cells. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 may play an important role in the antiviral immunity of the host against HTNV infection through an MyD88-independent signaling pathway.

  2. Evaluation of the Adaptive Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Cory J; Weiss, Kayla A; Stoley, Megan E; Varga, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the adaptive immune response is critical to the advancement of our basic knowledge and understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The cellular composition in the lung following RSV infection is often evaluated using flow cytometry. However, a limitation of this approach has been the inability to readily distinguish cells that are within the lung parenchyma from cells that remain in the pulmonary blood vessels. Herein, we detail a procedure to evaluate the adaptive immune response via flow cytometric analysis that incorporates an in vivo intravascular staining technique. This technique allows for discrimination of immune cells in the lung tissue from cells that remain in the pulmonary vasculature following perfusion. Therefore at any given time point following an RSV infection, the leukocytic populations in the lung parenchyma can be quantified and phenotypically assessed with high resolution. While we focus on the T lymphocyte response in the lung, this technique can be readily adapted to examine various leukocytic cell types in the lung following RSV infection. PMID:27464699

  3. Reactive astrogliosis in response to hemorrhagic fever virus: microarray profile of Junin virus-infected human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arenavirus Junin is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Limited information is available concerning the pathogenesis of this human disease, especially the pathogenesis of acute and late neurological symptoms. Methods In our study we present for the first time cDNA microarray profile of human astrocytes infected with the virulent strain of Junin virus. Transcriptional profiling was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytokine/chemokine/growth factor assay. Results We demonstrated the impact of virus infection on immune/inflammatory response/interferon signaling and apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic response and amplification with time of pro-inflammatory cascade of human astrocytes suggested neurodegenerative dysfunctional reactive astrogliosis in response to Junin virus infection. Conclusion Our results suggest potential pathogenic role of astroglial cells in the development of neurological symptoms and late neurological syndrome during Argentine hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25015256

  4. Vaccine-Induced Antibody Responses Prevent the Induction of Interferon Type I Responses Upon a Homotypic Live Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Chan, J; Babb, R; David, S C; McColl, S R; Alsharifi, M

    2016-03-01

    During acute viral infections, innate immunity provides essential protective measures to minimize virus dissemination and regulate adaptive immunity. This helps to successfully eliminate the pathogen and establish long-term memory. Here, we investigated the effect of vaccine-induced antibody responses on the induction of IFN-I responses and the associated lymphocyte activation using influenza A virus vaccination and challenge models. Mice were vaccinated with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus (γ-FLU) and challenged three weeks later with live virus. Our data show a significant reduction in IFN-I responses and lymphocyte activation following a homotypic virus challenge. We confirmed the role of vaccine-induced antibody responses in the observed impairment of IFN-I and the associated lymphocyte activation using adoptive transfer of immune sera and the administration of sera-treated viruses prior to challenge. Overall, we addressed a fundamental concept in immunology and provided experimental data illustrating the inhibition of IFN-I responses in vaccinated animals upon a homotypic virus challenge. PMID:26715418

  5. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  6. Inflammatory responses in Ebola virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    BAIZE, S; LEROY, E M; GEORGES, A J; GEORGES-COURBOT, M-C; CAPRON, M; BEDJABAGA, I; LANSOUD-SOUKATE, J; MAVOUNGOU, E

    2002-01-01

    Ebola virus subtype Zaire (Ebo-Z) induces acute haemorrhagic fever and a 60–80% mortality rate in humans. Inflammatory responses were monitored in victims and survivors of Ebo-Z haemorrhagic fever during two recent outbreaks in Gabon. Survivors were characterized by a transient release in plasma of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β early in the disease, followed by circulation of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and soluble receptors for TNFα (sTNF-R) and IL-6 (sIL-6R) towards the end of the symptomatic phase and after recovery. Fatal infection was associated with moderate levels of TNFα and IL-6, and high levels of IL-10, IL-1RA and sTNF-R, in the days before death, while IL-1β was not detected and MIP-1α and MIP-1β concentrations were similar to those of endemic controls. Simultaneous massive activation of monocytes/macrophages, the main target of Ebo-Z, was suggested in fatal infection by elevated neopterin levels. Thus, presence of IL-1β and of elevated concentrations of IL-6 in plasma during the symptomatic phase can be used as markers of non-fatal infection, while release of IL-10 and of high levels of neopterin and IL-1RA in plasma as soon as a few days after the disease onset is indicative of a fatal outcome. In conclusion, recovery from Ebo-Z infection is associated with early and well-regulated inflammatory responses, which may be crucial in controlling viral replication and inducing specific immunity. In contrast, defective inflammatory responses and massive monocyte/macrophage activation were associated with fatal outcome. PMID:11982604

  7. Invariant NKT Cell Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Human

    PubMed Central

    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Chan-in, Wilawan; Opasawaschai, Anunya; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue viral infection is a global health threat without vaccine or specific treatment. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). While adaptive immune responses were found to be detrimental in the dengue pathogenesis, the roles of earlier innate events remain largely uninvestigated. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells represent innate-like T cells that could dictate subsequent adaptive response but their role in human dengue virus infection is not known. We hypothesized that iNKT cells play a role in human dengue infection. Methods Blood samples from a well-characterized cohort of children with DF, DHF, in comparison to non-dengue febrile illness (OFI) and healthy controls at various time points were studied. iNKT cells activation were analyzed by the expression of CD69 by flow cytometry. Their cytokine production was then analyzed after α-GalCer stimulation. Further, the CD1d expression on monocytes, and CD69 expression on conventional T cells were measured. Results iNKT cells were activated during acute dengue infection. The level of iNKT cell activation associates with the disease severity. Furthermore, these iNKT cells had altered functional response to subsequent ex vivo stimulation with α-GalCer. Moreover, during acute dengue infection, monocytic CD1d expression was also upregulated and conventional T cells also became activated. Conclusion iNKT cells might play an early and critical role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue viral infection in human. Targeting iNKT cells and CD1d serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for severe dengue infection in the future. PMID:24945350

  8. Role of Active and Inactive Cytotoxic Immune Response in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Toro Zapata, Hernan Dario; Caicedo Casso, Angelica Graciela; Bichara, Derdei; Lee, Sunmi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mathematical models can be helpful to understand the complex dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection within a host. Most of work has studied the interactions of host responses and virus in the presence of active cytotoxic immune cells, which decay to zero when there is no virus. However, recent research highlights that cytotoxic immune cells can be inactive but never be depleted. Methods We propose a mathematical model to investigate the human immunodeficiency virus dynamics in the presence of both active and inactive cytotoxic immune cells within a host. We explore the impact of the immune responses on the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection under different disease stages. Results Standard mathematical and numerical analyses are presented for this new model. Specifically, the basic reproduction number is computed and local and global stability analyses are discussed. Conclusion Our results can give helpful insights when designing more effective drug schedules in the presence of active and inactive immune responses. PMID:24955306

  9. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  10. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals. PMID:25764477

  11. Mathematical models of immune effector responses to viral infections: Virus control versus the development of pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews mathematical models which have investigated the importance of lytic and non-lytic immune responses for the control of viral infections. Lytic immune responses fight the virus by killing infected cells, while non-lytic immune responses fight the virus by inhibiting viral replication while leaving the infected cell alive. The models suggest which types or combinations of immune responses are required to resolve infections which vary in their characteristics, such as the rate of viral replication and the rate of virus-induced target cell death. This framework is then applied to persistent infections and viral evolution. It is investigated how viral evolution and antigenic escape can influence the relative balance of lytic and non-lytic responses over time, and how this might correlate with the transition from an asymptomatic infection to pathology. This is discussed in the specific context of hepatitis C virus infection.

  12. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  13. Reduced innate immune response, apoptosis, and virus release in cells cured of respiratory syncytial virus persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Cristina; Melero, José A; Martínez, Isidoro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that cell clones isolated at different passages from a culture of HEp-2 cells infected persistently with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) were cured of the virus. Further studies on one of these clones (31C1) are reported here, showing that 31C1 cells can still be infected by HRSV but release low amounts of virus to the culture supernatant, develop smaller and less numerous syncytia than the original HEp-2 cells, and display only a weak innate immune response to the infection. Accordingly, uninfected 31C1 cells, but not clones derived from uninfected HEp-2 cells, express low levels of TLR3 and RIG-I. In addition, 31C1 cells are partly resistant to apoptosis. These results indicate that persistent infection of HEp-2 cells by HRSV has selected cell variants, with changes affecting cell survival, virus growth and the innate immune response that may be valuable for studies of virus-cell interaction. PMID:21093006

  14. Epigenetic inheritance of centromeres.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, S; Furuyama, T

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically maintained; however, the mechanism that underlies centromere inheritance is unknown. Centromere identity and inheritance require the assembly of nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant in place of canonical H3. Work from our laboratory has led to the proposal that epigenetic inheritance of centromeres evolved as adaptations of CenH3 and other centromere proteins to resist drive of selfish centromeres during female meiosis. Our molecular studies have revealed that the Drosophila CenH3 nucleosome is equivalent to half of the canonical H3 nucleosome and induces positive supercoils, as opposed to the negative supercoils induced by an H3 nucleosome. CenH3 likewise induces positive supercoils in functional yeast centromeres in vivo. The right-handed wrapping of DNA around the histone core implied by positive supercoiling indicates that centromeric nucleosomes are unlikely to be octameric and that the exposed surfaces holding the nucleosome together would be available for kinetochore protein recruitment. The mutual incompatibility of nucleosomes with opposite topologies could explain how centromeres are efficiently maintained as unique loci on chromosomes. We propose that the opposite wrapping of DNA around a half-nucleosome core particle facilitates a mode of inheritance that does not depend on DNA sequence, DNA modification or protein conformation.

  15. Short Communication: CXCL12 rs1029153 Polymorphism Is Associated with the Sustained Virological Response in HIV/Hepatitis C Virus-Coinfected Patients on Hepatitis C Virus Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Tenor, Daniel; Jiménez-Sousa, María A; Rallón, Norma; Berenguer, Juan; Soriano, Vicente; Aldámiz-Echevarria, Teresa; García-Álvarez, Mónica; Diez, Cristina; Fernández-Rodríguez, Amanda; Benito, Jose Miguel; Resino, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    The immune response against HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection partly depends on chemokine-mediated recruitment of specific T cells. CXCL12 polymorphisms have been associated with AIDS progression and survival, but there are no data related to HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether CXCL12 polymorphisms are related so as to achieve sustained virological response (SVR) after HCV therapy with pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin (pegIFN-α/ribavirin) in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. We carried out a retrospective study in 319 naive patients who started HCV treatment. The CXCL12 (rs266093, rs1029153, and rs1801157) and IL28B (rs12980275) polymorphisms were genotyped by using the GoldenGate assay. Genetic data were analyzed under an additive inheritance model. The overall rates of the SVR were 54.9% (175/319) and 41.5% (90/217) in GT1/4 patients and 83.2% (84/101) in GT2/3 patients. Patients with a favorable CXCL12 rs1029153 T allele had higher SVR rates than patients with the rs1029153 CC genotype (44% CC, 49% CT, and 61.3% TT; p = 0.025). No significant results for the rs266093 and rs1801157 polymorphisms were found. Patients harboring the favorable rs1029153 T allele had significantly increased odds of achieving SVR [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.55; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.01; 2.40; p = 0.047]. Moreover, no significant association was found when the study population was stratified by HCV genotype (data not shown), possibly due to the low number of patients in each group. In conclusion, in this study we found that the favorable CXCL12 rs1029153 T allele seems to be related so as to achieve an SVR in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients on pegIFN-α/ribavirin therapy. PMID:26499461

  16. Attenuated rabies virus activates, while pathogenic rabies virus evades, the host innate immune responses in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi W; Sarmento, Luciana; Wang, Yuhuan; Li, Xia-qing; Dhingra, Vikas; Tseggai, Tesfai; Jiang, Baoming; Fu, Zhen F

    2005-10-01

    Rabies virus (RV) induces encephalomyelitis in humans and animals. However, the pathogenic mechanism of rabies is not fully understood. To investigate the host responses to RV infection, we examined and compared the pathology, particularly the inflammatory responses, and the gene expression profiles in the brains of mice infected with wild-type (wt) virus silver-haired bat RV (SHBRV) or laboratory-adapted virus B2C, using a mouse genomic array (Affymetrix). Extensive inflammatory responses were observed in animals infected with the attenuated RV, but little or no inflammatory responses were found in mice infected with wt RV. Furthermore, attenuated RV induced the expression of the genes involved in the innate immune and antiviral responses, especially those related to the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) signaling pathways and inflammatory chemokines. For the IFN-alpha/beta signaling pathways, many of the interferon regulatory genes, such as the signal transduction activation transducers and interferon regulatory factors, as well as the effector genes, for example, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and myxovirus proteins, are highly induced in mice infected with attenuated RV. However, many of these genes were not up-regulated in mice infected with wt SHBRV. The data obtained by microarray analysis were confirmed by real-time PCR. Together, these data suggest that attenuated RV activates, while pathogenic RV evades, the host innate immune and antiviral responses.

  17. Response of ponies to adjuvanted EHV-1 whole virus vaccine and challenge with virus of the homologous strain.

    PubMed

    Dolby, C A; Hannant, D; Mumford, J A

    1995-01-01

    Five yearling ponies were vaccinated with inactivated Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) in Freund's complete adjuvant as a double emulsion and revaccinated 6 weeks later with EHV-1 in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. These ponies and three age-matched controls were challenged intra-nasally after a further 6 weeks with homologous live virus and monitored clinically, biologically and serologically. After challenge, clinical signs were mild in both groups. No cell-associated viraemias were detected in vaccinated ponies. Vaccination induced high levels of complement-fixing (CF) and virus-neutralizing (VN) antibody, and elicited a response to all major viral glycoproteins as shown by western blot analysis.

  18. An Unbiased Genetic Screen Reveals the Polygenic Nature of the Influenza Virus Anti-Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cidoncha, Maite; Killip, Marian J.; Oliveros, Juan C.; Asensio, Víctor J.; Fernández, Yolanda; Bengoechea, José A.; Randall, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses counteract the cellular innate immune response at several steps, including blocking RIG I-dependent activation of interferon (IFN) transcription, interferon (IFN)-dependent upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), and the activity of various ISG products; the multifunctional NS1 protein is responsible for most of these activities. To determine the importance of other viral genes in the interplay between the virus and the host IFN response, we characterized populations and selected mutants of wild-type viruses selected by passage through non-IFN-responsive cells. We reasoned that, by allowing replication to occur in the absence of the selection pressure exerted by IFN, the virus could mutate at positions that would normally be restricted and could thus find new optimal sequence solutions. Deep sequencing of selected virus populations and individual virus mutants indicated that nonsynonymous mutations occurred at many phylogenetically conserved positions in nearly all virus genes. Most individual mutants selected for further characterization induced IFN and ISGs and were unable to counteract the effects of exogenous IFN, yet only one contained a mutation in NS1. The relevance of these mutations for the virus phenotype was verified by reverse genetics. Of note, several virus mutants expressing intact NS1 proteins exhibited alterations in the M1/M2 proteins and accumulated large amounts of deleted genomic RNAs but nonetheless replicated to high titers. This suggests that the overproduction of IFN inducers by these viruses can override NS1-mediated IFN modulation. Altogether, the results suggest that influenza viruses replicating in IFN-competent cells have tuned their complete genomes to evade the cellular innate immune system and that serial replication in non-IFN-responsive cells allows the virus to relax from these constraints and find a new genome consensus within its sequence space. IMPORTANCE In natural virus infections, the

  19. Deletion of the vaccinia virus F13L gene results in a highly attenuated virus that mounts a protective immune response against subsequent vaccinia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Inge; Yang, Guang; Hruby, Dennis; Jordan, Robert; Neyts, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus F13L encodes the envelope protein p37, which is the target of the anti-pox virus drug ST-246 (Yang et al., 2005) and that is required for production of extracellular vaccinia virus. The F13L (p37)-deleted (and ST-246 resistant) vaccinia virus recombinant (Vac-ΔF13L) produced smaller plaques than the wild-type vaccinia (Western Reserve vaccinia). In addition, Vac-ΔF13L proved, when inoculated either intravenously or intracutaneously in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient (athymic nude or SCID) mice, to be severely attenuated. Intravenous or intracutaneous inoculation of immunocompetent mice with the ΔF13L virus efficiently protected against a subsequent intravenous, intracutaneous or intranasal challenge with vaccinia WR (Western Reserve). This was corroborated by the observation that Vac-ΔF13L induced a humoral immune response against vaccinia following either intravenous or intracutaneous challenge. In conclusion, F13L-deleted vaccinia virus may have the potential to be developed as a smallpox vaccine.

  20. Impaired antiviral response of adenovirus-transformed cell lines supports virus replication.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Mandy; Breitwieser, Theresa; Lipps, Christoph; Wirth, Dagmar; Jordan, Ingo; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the innate immune response represents one of the most important cellular mechanisms to limit virus replication and spread in cell culture. Here, we examined the effect of adenoviral gene expression on the antiviral response in adenovirus-transformed cell lines; HEK293, HEK293SF and AGE1.HN. We demonstrate that the expression of the early region protein 1A in these cell lines impairs their ability to activate antiviral genes by the IFN pathway. This property may help in the isolation of newly emerging viruses and the propagation of interferon-sensitive virus strains.

  1. Ebola Virus Disease: Ethics and Emergency Medical Response Policy.

    PubMed

    Jecker, Nancy S; Dudzinski, Denise M; Diekema, Douglas S; Tonelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Caring for patients affected with Ebola virus disease (EVD) while simultaneously preventing EVD transmission represents a central ethical challenge of the EVD epidemic. To address this challenge, we propose a model policy for resuscitation and emergent procedure policy of patients with EVD and set forth ethical principles that lend support to this policy. The policy and principles we propose bear relevance beyond the EVD epidemic, offering guidance for the care of patients with other highly contagious, virulent, and lethal diseases. The policy establishes (1) a limited code status for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD. Limited code status means that a code blue will not be called for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD at any stage of the disease; however, properly protected providers (those already in full protective equipment) may initiate resuscitative efforts if, in their clinical assessment, these efforts are likely to benefit the patient. The policy also requires that (2) resuscitation not be attempted for patients with advanced EVD, as resuscitation would be medically futile; (3) providers caring for or having contact with patients with confirmed or suspected EVD be properly protected and trained; (4) the treating team identify and treat in advance likely causes of cardiac and respiratory arrest to minimize the need for emergency response; (5) patients with EVD and their proxies be involved in care discussions; and (6) care team and provider discretion guide the care of patients with EVD. We discuss ethical issues involving medical futility and the duty to avoid harm and propose a utilitarian-based principle of triage to address resource scarcity in the emergency setting. PMID:25855946

  2. Ebola Virus Disease: Ethics and Emergency Medical Response Policy.

    PubMed

    Jecker, Nancy S; Dudzinski, Denise M; Diekema, Douglas S; Tonelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Caring for patients affected with Ebola virus disease (EVD) while simultaneously preventing EVD transmission represents a central ethical challenge of the EVD epidemic. To address this challenge, we propose a model policy for resuscitation and emergent procedure policy of patients with EVD and set forth ethical principles that lend support to this policy. The policy and principles we propose bear relevance beyond the EVD epidemic, offering guidance for the care of patients with other highly contagious, virulent, and lethal diseases. The policy establishes (1) a limited code status for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD. Limited code status means that a code blue will not be called for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD at any stage of the disease; however, properly protected providers (those already in full protective equipment) may initiate resuscitative efforts if, in their clinical assessment, these efforts are likely to benefit the patient. The policy also requires that (2) resuscitation not be attempted for patients with advanced EVD, as resuscitation would be medically futile; (3) providers caring for or having contact with patients with confirmed or suspected EVD be properly protected and trained; (4) the treating team identify and treat in advance likely causes of cardiac and respiratory arrest to minimize the need for emergency response; (5) patients with EVD and their proxies be involved in care discussions; and (6) care team and provider discretion guide the care of patients with EVD. We discuss ethical issues involving medical futility and the duty to avoid harm and propose a utilitarian-based principle of triage to address resource scarcity in the emergency setting.

  3. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  4. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  5. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity.

  6. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  7. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  8. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  9. Chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus as a candidate dengue vaccine: quantitation of the dengue virus-specific CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    van Der Most, R G; Murali-Krishna, K; Ahmed, R; Strauss, J H

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against DEN-2 virus challenge, indicating that protection was mediated by the DEN-2 virus prM- and E-specific immune responses. YF/DEN vaccine-primed CD8 T cells expanded and were efficiently recruited into the central nervous systems of DEN-2 virus challenged mice. At 5 days after challenge, 3 to 4% of CD8 T cells in the spleen were specific for the prM and E proteins, and 34% of CD8 T cells in the central nervous system recognized these proteins. Depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells, or both, strongly reduced the protective efficacy of the YF/DEN virus, stressing the key role of the antiviral T-cell response.

  10. West Nile virus infection and serologic response among persons previously vaccinated against yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B W; Kosoy, O; Martin, D A; Noga, A J; Russell, B J; Johnson, A A; Petersen, L R

    2005-01-01

    It is hypothesized that previous heterologous flaviviral exposure may modulate clinical illness among persons infected with West Nile virus (WNV). Little is known about the serological response in such persons. In summer 2003, a WNV outbreak occurred in Colorado, the location of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases (DVBID). DVBID employees, most previously vaccinated with yellow fever virus (YFV) or Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccines, were studied to determine whether previous vaccination affected symptom development among those subsequently infected with WNV during the outbreak, as well as their serological response. Serum samples collected in December 2003 and previously banked samples were tested using the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) against WNV, Saint Louis encephalitis virus, dengue- 4 virus, JEV, and YFV. Specimens shown to have WNV antibody by PRNT were tested by IgM and IgG enzymelinked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Ten (9%) of 113 serosurvey participants had WNV neutralizing antibody titers in December 2003. PRNT titers from previous specimens showed that one of the ten had seroconverted to WNV before 2003. Of the remaining nine participants, seven reported illness in the summer of 2003, two of which were unvaccinated and five previously vaccinated. In the December 2003 specimens, five persons previously unvaccinated or vaccinated only against YFV had a fourfold or greater neutralizing titer with WNV than with other flaviviruses, whereas no persons previously vaccinated against JEV or JEV and YFV showed a similar difference in neutralizing titers. Eight of nine persons infected in 2003 had negative or indeterminate WNV MAC-ELISA results in the December 2003 sample; the ninth person was vaccinated against YFV one month previously, and was also YFV positive by MAC-ELISA. We conclude that previous flaviviral vaccination does not markedly affect the development of WNV fever and

  11. Demonstration of Aleutian disease virus-specific lymphocyte response in mink with progressive Aleutian disease: comparison of sapphire and pastel mink infected with different virus strains.

    PubMed

    Race, R E; Bloom, M E; Coe, J E

    1983-09-01

    Lymphocyte blastogenesis was used to study the antiviral lymphocyte response of sapphire (Aleutian) and pastel (nonAleutian) mink inoculated with Pullman or Utah 1 Aleutian disease virus (ADV). Both mink genotypes developed a virus-specific response when inoculated with Utah 1 ADV. In contrast, after inoculation of Pullman ADV, sapphire mink had a positive virus-specific response, whereas pastel mink did not. Response occurred late after infection (8 wk) and correlated with the development of progressive Aleutian disease (AD). The response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and concanavalin A (Con A) was also determined. Most mink of either genotype, inoculated with either virus strain, maintained an anti-KLH response during disease. Most mink also responded to Con A, although some exhibited suppressed Con A response late in the disease course. These results indicated that mink develop an anti-ADV lymphocyte response during progressive AD and are not immunosuppressed with regard to other antigens or mitogens.

  12. Epigenetic inheritance in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Mariusz; Landweber, Laura F

    2009-12-01

    2009 marks not only the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth but also publication of the first scientific evolutionary theory, Lamarck's Philosophie Zoologique. While Lamarck embraced the notion of the inheritance of acquired characters, he did not invent it (Burkhardt, 1984). New phenomena discovered recently offer molecular pathways for the transmission of several acquired characters. Ciliates have long provided model systems to study phenomena that bypass traditional modes of inheritance. RNA, normally thought of as a conduit in gene expression, displays a novel mode of action in ciliated protozoa. For example, maternal RNA templates provide both an organizing guide for DNA rearrangements in Oxytricha and a template that can transmit spontaneous mutations that may arise during somatic growth to the next generation, providing two such mechanisms of so-called Lamarckian inheritance. This suggests that the somatic ciliate genome is really an 'epigenome', formed through templates and signals arising from the previous generation. This review will discuss these new biological roles for RNA, including non-coding 'template' RNA molecules. The evolutionary consequences of viable mechanisms in ciliates to transmit acquired characters may create an additional store of heritable variation that contributes to the cosmopolitan success of this diverse lineage of microbial eukaryotes.

  13. Quantifying the Early Immune Response and Adaptive Immune Response Kinetics in Mice Infected with Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongyu; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Zand, Martin S.; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Mosmann, Tim R.; Perelson, Alan S.; Wu, Hulin; Topham, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza A virus (IAV) continues to be a public health threat. However, we lack a detailed and quantitative understanding of the immune response kinetics to IAV infection and which biological parameters most strongly influence infection outcomes. To address these issues, we use modeling approaches combined with experimental data to quantitatively investigate the innate and adaptive immune responses to primary IAV infection. Mathematical models were developed to describe the dynamic interactions between target (epithelial) cells, influenza virus, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and virus-specific IgG and IgM. IAV and immune kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting models to a large data set obtained from primary H3N2 IAV infection of 340 mice. Prior to a detectable virus-specific immune response (before day 5), the estimated half-life of infected epithelial cells is ∼1.2 days, and the half-life of free infectious IAV is ∼4 h. During the adaptive immune response (after day 5), the average half-life of infected epithelial cells is ∼0.5 days, and the average half-life of free infectious virus is ∼1.8 min. During the adaptive phase, model fitting confirms that CD8+ CTLs are crucial for limiting infected cells, while virus-specific IgM regulates free IAV levels. This may imply that CD4 T cells and class-switched IgG antibodies are more relevant for generating IAV-specific memory and preventing future infection via a more rapid secondary immune response. Also, simulation studies were performed to understand the relative contributions of biological parameters to IAV clearance. This study provides a basis to better understand and predict influenza virus immunity. PMID:20410284

  14. Divergent selection in a maize population for germination at low temperature in controlled environment: study of the direct response, of the trait inheritance and of correlated responses in the field.

    PubMed

    Frascaroli, Elisabetta; Landi, Pierangelo

    2013-03-01

    Improving cold tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) is an important breeding objective, allowing early sowings which result in many agronomic advantages. Using as source the F(2) population of B73 × IABO78 single cross, we previously conducted four cycles of divergent recurrent selection for high (H) and low (L) cold tolerance level, evaluated as the difference (DG) between germination at 9.5 °C and at 25 °C in the germinator. Then, we pursued the divergent selection in inbreeding from S(1) to S(4). This research was conducted to study (1) the direct response to selection (by testing ten S(4) L and ten S(4) H lines), (2) the trait inheritance (in a complete diallel scheme involving four L and four H lines), (3) the associated responses for cold tolerance in the field (at early and delayed sowings) and (4) the responses for other traits, by testing the ten L and the ten H lines at usual sowing. Selection was effective, leading to appreciable and symmetric responses for DG. Variation among crosses was mainly due to additive effects and the ability to predict hybrid DG based on parental lines DG was appreciable. Associated responses for cold tolerance traits in the field were noticeable, though the relationship between DG and these traits was not outstanding. High tolerance was also associated with early flowering, short plants, less leaves, low kernel moisture, red and thin cob, and flint kernels. These divergently selected lines can represent valuable materials for undertaking basic studies and breeding works concerning cold tolerance. PMID:23178876

  15. Immunological, Viral, Environmental, and Individual Factors Modulating Lung Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bottau, Paolo; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a worldwide pathogen agent responsible for frequent respiratory tract infections that may become severe and potentially lethal in high risk infants and adults. Several studies have been performed to investigate the immune response that determines the clinical course of the infection. In the present paper, we review the literature on viral, environmental, and host factors influencing virus response; the mechanisms of the immune response; and the action of nonimmunological factors. These mechanisms have often been studied in animal models and in the present review we also summarize the main findings obtained from animal models as well as the limits of each of these models. Understanding the lung response involved in the pathogenesis of these respiratory infections could be useful in improving the preventive strategies against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26064963

  16. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance after SCNT.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is under dual genetic control and requires extensive interaction between biparentally inherited nuclear genes and maternally inherited mitochondrial genes. Standard SCNT procedures deprive an oocytes' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the corresponding maternal nuclear DNA and require it to interact with an entirely foreign nucleus that is again interacting with foreign somatic mitochondria. As a result, most SCNT embryos, -fetuses, and -offspring carry somatic cell mtDNA in addition to recipient oocyte mtDNA, a condition termed heteroplasmy. It is thus evident that somatic cell mtDNA can escape the selective mechanism that targets and eliminates intraspecific sperm mitochondria in the fertilized oocyte to maintain homoplasmy. However, the factors responsible for the large intra- and interindividual differences in heteroplasmy level remain elusive. Furthermore, heteroplasmy is probably confounded with mtDNA recombination. Considering the essential roles of mitochondria in cellular metabolism, cell signalling, and programmed cell death, future experiments will need to assess the true extent and impact of unorthodox mtDNA transmission on various aspects of SCNT success.

  17. An African horse sickness virus serotype 4 recombinant canarypox virus vaccine elicits specific cell-mediated immune responses in horses.

    PubMed

    El Garch, H; Crafford, J E; Amouyal, P; Durand, P Y; Edlund Toulemonde, C; Lemaitre, L; Cozette, V; Guthrie, A; Minke, J M

    2012-09-15

    A recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing synthetic genes encoding outer capsid proteins, VP2 and VP5, of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) serotype 4 (ALVAC(®)-AHSV4) has been demonstrated to fully protect horses against homologous challenge with virulent field virus. Guthrie et al. (2009) detected weak and variable titres of neutralizing antibody (ranging from <10 to 40) 8 weeks after vaccination leading us to hypothesize that there could be a participation of cell mediated immunity (CMI) in protection against AHSV4. The present study aimed at characterizing the CMI induced by the experimental ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccine. Six horses received two vaccinations twenty-eight days apart and three horses remained unvaccinated. The detection of VP2/VP5 specific IFN-γ responses was assessed by enzyme linked immune spot (ELISpot) assay and clearly demonstrated that all ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinated horses developed significant IFN-γ production compared to unvaccinated horses. More detailed immune responses obtained by flow cytometry demonstrated that ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinations induced immune cells, mainly CD8(+) T cells, able to recognize multiple T-epitopes through all VP2 and only the N-terminus sequence of VP5. Neither VP2 nor VP5 specific IFN-γ responses were detected in unvaccinated horses. Overall, our data demonstrated that an experimental recombinant canarypox based vaccine induced significant CMI specific for both VP2 and VP5 proteins of AHSV4.

  18. Immune responses of poultry to newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) remains a constant threat to poultry producers worldwide, in spite of the availability and global employment of ND vaccinations since the 1950s. Strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) belong to the order Mononegavirales, family Paramyxoviridae, and genus Avulavirus, are cont...

  19. A Case of Chikungunya Virus Induced Arthralgia Responsive to Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Redel, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging infectious disease that has started circulating throughout the Americas and Caribbean. It can lead to persistent arthralgia lasting months to years. Treatment has been symptomatic with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. This case report describes a trial of colchicine for chikungunya arthralgia in 1 patient. PMID:27419183

  20. Antibody responses after repeated influenza A virus immunizations among schoolchildren in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, N.; Hiratsuka, M.; Arikawa, J.; Odagiri, T.; Ishida, N.

    1981-01-01

    Antibody responses to influenza virus immunizations were examined among junior high school students. The students received two doses of a commercial split-product vaccine containing influenza A H1N1 during a 2-year period following the first appearance of H1N1 virus in the winter of 1977-78. In haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests, the students who had been infected with H1N1 virus in 1977-78 showed a better response and wider cross-reactivity to the drift strain than the students who had not experienced earlier H1N1 influenza infection. Neuraminidase-inhibition (NAI) antibody titres after immunization depended upon a history of natural infection with H1N1 virus, since students not previously infected showed no significant NAI antibody rise after immunization. PMID:7310122

  1. Cell-mediated immune responses of lambs to challenge with bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A K; Woldehiwet, Z

    1995-01-01

    The lamb is a good model to study the pathogenesis and immune responses to infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as lambs experimentally infected with bovine or human RSV may develop overt clinical disease. In the present study the development of cellular cytotoxic responses was studied in splenic, pulmonary and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from lambs after primary and secondary infection with bovine RSV. Infection with bovine RSV was followed by the appearance of cytotoxic cells in the peripheral blood, the spleen and lung lavage fluids. These effector cells lysed virus-infected targets in a self-restricted manner. Depletion techniques revealed that cytotoxic activity was largely due to OvCD8+ cells. When effector cells obtained from primed lambs were stimulated with inactivated bovine RSV or with virus-infected cells in vitro, virus-specific cytotoxicity was significantly increased. PMID:7544251

  2. Immune Responses Against Classical Swine Fever Virus: Between Ignorance and Lunacy.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus infection of pigs causes disease courses from life-threatening to asymptomatic, depending on the virulence of the virus strain and the immunocompetence of the host. The virus targets immune cells, which are central in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses such as macrophages and conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Here, we review current knowledge and concepts aiming to explain the immunopathogenesis of the disease at both the host and the cellular level. We propose that the interferon type I system and in particular the interaction of the virus with plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages is crucial to understand elements governing the induction of protective rather than pathogenic immune responses. The review also concludes that despite the knowledge available many aspects of classical swine fever immunopathogenesis are still puzzling. PMID:26664939

  3. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Altered Nasal Responses to Live Attenuated Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Noah, Terry L.; Zhou, Haibo; Monaco, Jane; Horvath, Katie; Herbst, Margaret; Jaspers, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence links tobacco smoke and increased risk for influenza in humans, but the specific host defense pathways involved are unclear. Objective We developed a model to examine influenza-induced innate immune responses in humans and test the hypothesis that exposure to cigarette smoke alters nasal inflammatory and antiviral responses to live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV). Methods This was an observational cohort study comparing nasal mucosal responses to LAIV among young adult active smokers (n = 17), nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS; n = 20), and unexposed controls (n = 23). Virus RNA and inflammatory factors were measured in nasal lavage fluids (NLF) serially after LAIV inoculation. For key end points, peak and total (area under curve) responses were compared among groups. Results Compared with controls, NLF interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to LAIV (peak and total) were suppressed in smokers. Virus RNA in NLF cells was significantly increased in smokers, as were interferon-inducible protein 10:virus ratios. Responses in SHS-exposed subjects were generally intermediate between controls and smokers. We observed significant associations between urine cotinine and NLF IL-6 responses (negative correlation) or virus RNA in NLF cells (positive correlation) for all subjects combined. Conclusions Nasal inoculation with LAIV results in measurable inflammatory and antiviral responses in human volunteers, thus providing a model for investigating environmental effects on influenza infections in humans. Exposure to cigarette smoke was associated with suppression of specific nasal inflammatory and antiviral responses, as well as increased virus quantity, after nasal inoculation with LAIV. These data suggest mechanisms for increased susceptibility to influenza infection among persons exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:20920950

  4. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Boris M.; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A.; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. IMPORTANCE Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. PMID:26223639

  5. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: how important is it?

    PubMed

    Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kelly, William G; Kelly, Bill; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Pembrey, Marcus; Lindquist, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Much attention has been given to the idea of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, but fundamental questions remain regarding how much takes place and the impact that this might have on organisms. We asked five leading researchers in this area--working on a range of model organisms and in human disease--for their views on these topics. Their responses highlight the mixture of excitement and caution that surrounds transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and the wide gulf between species in terms of our knowledge of the mechanisms that may be involved.

  6. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species.

  7. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of responses to infectious salmon anemia virus infection in macrophage-like cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an important pathogen for salmonid aquaculture, however little is known about protective and pathological host responses to infection. We have investigated intracellular responses during cytopathic ISAV infection in the macrophage-l...

  9. Induction and evasion of type I interferon responses by influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses are a major cause of respiratory disease in humans. In addition, influenza A viruses continuously re-emerge from animal reservoirs into humans causing human pandemics every 10–50 years of unpredictable severity. Among the first lines of defense against influenza virus infection, the type I interferon (IFN) response plays a major role. In the last 10 years, there have been major advances in understanding how cells recognize being infected by influenza viruses, leading to secretion of type I IFN, and on the effector mechanisms by how IFN exerts its antiviral activity. In addition, we also now know that influenza virus uses multiple mechanisms to attenuate the type I IFN response, allowing for successful infection of their hosts. This review highlights some of these findings and illustrates future research avenues that might lead to new vaccines and antivirals based on the further understanding of the mechanisms of induction and evasion of type I IFN responses by influenza viruses. PMID:22027189

  10. RIG-I Mediates an Antiviral Response to Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Jessica R.; Patel, Jenish R.; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Zivcec, Marko; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the cytoplasm, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) senses the RNA genomes of several RNA viruses. RIG-I binds to viral RNA, eliciting an antiviral response via the cellular adaptor MAVS. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a negative-sense RNA virus with a 5′-monophosphorylated genome, is a highly pathogenic zoonotic agent with significant public health implications. We found that, during CCHFV infection, RIG-I mediated a type I interferon (IFN) response via MAVS. Interfering with RIG-I signaling reduced IFN production and IFN-stimulated gene expression and increased viral replication. Immunostimulatory RNA was isolated from CCHFV-infected cells and from virion preparations, and RIG-I coimmunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates isolated immunostimulatory CCHFV RNA. This report serves as the first description of a pattern recognition receptor for CCHFV and highlights a critical signaling pathway in the antiviral response to CCHFV. IMPORTANCE CCHFV is a tick-borne virus with a significant public health impact. In order for cells to respond to virus infection, they must recognize the virus as foreign and initiate antiviral signaling. To date, the receptors involved in immune recognition of CCHFV are not known. Here, we investigate and identify RIG-I as a receptor involved in initiating an antiviral response to CCHFV. This receptor initially was not expected to play a role in CCHFV recognition because of characteristics of the viral genome. These findings are important in understanding the antiviral response to CCHFV and support continued investigation into the spectrum of potential viruses recognized by RIG-I. PMID:26223644

  11. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.; Weisse, C.S.; Reynolds, C.P.; Bowles, C.A.; Baum, A. )

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable.

  12. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, W; Weisse, C S; Reynolds, C P; Bowles, C A; Baum, A

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable. PMID:2555149

  13. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Suzanne N.; Tang, Wan-yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease. PMID:25792089

  14. Elusive inheritance: Transgenerational effects and epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Martos, Suzanne N; Tang, Wan-Yee; Wang, Zhibin

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants and nucleosome positioning, and noncoding RNAs regulate cell-, tissue-, and developmental stage-specific gene expression by influencing chromatin structure and modulating interactions between proteins and DNA. Epigenetic marks are mitotically inherited in somatic cells and may be altered in response to internal and external stimuli. The idea that environment-induced epigenetic changes in mammals could be inherited through the germline, independent of genetic mechanisms, has stimulated much debate. Many experimental models have been designed to interrogate the possibility of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and provide insight into how environmental exposures influence phenotypes over multiple generations in the absence of any apparent genetic mutation. Unexpected molecular evidence has forced us to reevaluate not only our understanding of the plasticity and heritability of epigenetic factors, but of the stability of the genome as well. Recent reviews have described the difference between transgenerational and intergenerational effects; the two major epigenetic reprogramming events in the mammalian lifecycle; these two events making transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of environment-induced perturbations rare, if at all possible, in mammals; and mechanisms of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in non-mammalian eukaryotic organisms. This paper briefly introduces these topics and mainly focuses on (1) transgenerational phenotypes and epigenetic effects in mammals, (2) environment-induced intergenerational epigenetic effects, and (3) the inherent difficulties in establishing a role for epigenetic inheritance in human environmental disease.

  15. Importance of rabies virus nucleoprotein in viral evasion of interferon response in the brain.

    PubMed

    Masatani, Tatsunori; Ito, Naoto; Ito, Yuki; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Abe, Masako; Yamaoka, Satoko; Okadera, Kota; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    By using a cultured neuroblastoma cell line, the present authors recently showed that the N protein of virulent rabies virus fixed strain Nishigahara (Ni), but not that of the attenuated derivative Ni-CE, mediates evasion of induction of type I interferon (IFN). In this study, to determine whether Ni N protein indeed fulfills this function in vivo, the abilities to suppress IFN responses in the mouse brain of Ni-CE and the virulent chimeric virus CE(NiN), which has the N gene from Ni in the genetic background of Ni-CE, were compared. It was demonstrated that CE(NiN) propagates and spreads more efficiently than does Ni-CE in the brain and that IFN response in brains infected with CE(NiN) is weaker than in those infected with Ni-CE. It was also shown that amino acids at positions 273 and 394 in the N protein, which are known as pathogenic determinants, affect the ability of the viruses to suppress IFN response in the brain. These findings strongly suggest that, in the brain, rabies virus N protein plays important roles in evasion of innate immune responses and thereby in efficient propagation and spread of virus leading to lethal outcomes of infection.

  16. Does the Mode of Plastid Inheritance Influence Plastid Genome Architecture?

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Kate; Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Plastid genomes show an impressive array of sizes and compactnesses, but the forces responsible for this variation are unknown. It has been argued that species with small effective genetic population sizes are less efficient at purging excess DNA from their genomes than those with large effective population sizes. If true, one may expect the primary mode of plastid inheritance to influence plastid DNA (ptDNA) architecture. All else being equal, biparentally inherited ptDNAs should have a two-fold greater effective population size than those that are uniparentally inherited, and thus should also be more compact. Here, we explore the relationship between plastid inheritance pattern and ptDNA architecture, and consider the role of phylogeny in shaping our observations. Contrary to our expectations, we found no significant difference in plastid genome size or compactness between ptDNAs that are biparentally inherited relative to those that are uniparentally inherited. However, we also found that there was significant phylogenetic signal for the trait of mode of plastid inheritance. We also found that paternally inherited ptDNAs are significantly smaller (n = 19, p = 0.000001) than those that are maternally, uniparentally (when isogamous), or biparentally inherited. Potential explanations for this observation are discussed. PMID:23029453

  17. Does the mode of plastid inheritance influence plastid genome architecture?

    PubMed

    Crosby, Kate; Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Plastid genomes show an impressive array of sizes and compactnesses, but the forces responsible for this variation are unknown. It has been argued that species with small effective genetic population sizes are less efficient at purging excess DNA from their genomes than those with large effective population sizes. If true, one may expect the primary mode of plastid inheritance to influence plastid DNA (ptDNA) architecture. All else being equal, biparentally inherited ptDNAs should have a two-fold greater effective population size than those that are uniparentally inherited, and thus should also be more compact. Here, we explore the relationship between plastid inheritance pattern and ptDNA architecture, and consider the role of phylogeny in shaping our observations. Contrary to our expectations, we found no significant difference in plastid genome size or compactness between ptDNAs that are biparentally inherited relative to those that are uniparentally inherited. However, we also found that there was significant phylogenetic signal for the trait of mode of plastid inheritance. We also found that paternally inherited ptDNAs are significantly smaller (n = 19, p = 0.000001) than those that are maternally, uniparentally (when isogamous), or biparentally inherited. Potential explanations for this observation are discussed.

  18. Polymeric hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A nanocapsules induce intrahepatic antigen-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Michael; Piradashvili, Keti; Pietrzak-Nguyen, Anette; Pretsch, Leah; Kuhn, Gabor; Strand, Susanne; Knuf, Markus; Zepp, Fred; Wurm, Frederik R; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Gehring, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Targeting antigen combined with adjuvants to hepatic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is essential for the induction of intrahepatic T cellular immunity controlling and resolving viral infections of the liver. Intravenous injection of antigen-loaded nanoparticles is a promising approach for the delivery of antigens to liver APCs. Accordingly, polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) synthesized exclusively of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) and the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adsorbed to the nanocapsule surface were developed. Aim of the present study was the evaluation of the in vitro and in vivo behavior of MPLA-functionalized NS5A-NCs regarding the interaction with liver dendritic cells (DCs) and the potential to induce intrahepatic immune responses in a mouse model. Maturation of DCs was significantly increased by application of NS5A+MPLA-NCs compared to non-functionalized NS5A-NCs promoting a vigorous expression of CD40, CD80, CD86 and a strong secretion of the Th1-related cytokine IL-12. NS5A-NCs were preferentially deposited in DCs and Kupffer cells residing in the liver after intravenous administration. Immunization with NS5A-NCs induced intrahepatic antigen-specific CD4(+) T cellular immune responses determined by the secretion of IFNγ and IL-2. Furthermore, supplementation with MPLA induced significant levels of NS5A-specific antibodies. The application of polymeric nanocapsules synthesized exclusively out of antigen avoids the risk of unintended side effects caused by additional carrier substances. Functionalization with adjuvants like MPLA and the efficient targeting to liver-resident APCs inherits the potential for application of antigen nanocapsules in further vaccination approaches against pathogens affecting the liver. PMID:27614817

  19. Comparative analysis of poxvirus orthologues of the vaccinia virus E3 protein: modulation of protein kinase R activity, cytokine responses, and virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Arsenio, Janilyn; Hammett, Craig; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Deschambault, Yvon; Beausoleil, Nicole; Babiuk, Shawn; Cao, Jingxin

    2011-12-01

    Poxviruses are important human and animal pathogens that have evolved elaborate strategies for antagonizing host innate and adaptive immunity. The E3 protein of vaccinia virus, the prototypic member of the orthopoxviruses, functions as an inhibitor of innate immune signaling and is essential for vaccinia virus replication in vivo and in many human cell culture systems. However, the function of orthologues of E3 expressed by poxviruses of other genera with different host specificity remains largely unknown. In the present study, we characterized the E3 orthologues from sheeppox virus, yaba monkey tumor virus, swinepox virus, and myxoma virus for their ability to modulate protein kinase R (PKR) function, cytokine responses and virus pathogenicity. We found that the E3 orthologues of myxoma virus and swinepox virus could suppress PKR activation and interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activities and restore the host range function of E3 in HeLa cells. In contrast, the E3 orthologues from sheeppox virus and yaba monkey tumor virus were unable to inhibit PKR activation. While the sheeppox orthologue was unable to restore the host range function of E3, the yaba monkey tumor virus orthologue partially restored E3-deficient vaccinia virus replication in HeLa cells, correlated with its ability to suppress IFN-induced antiviral activities. Moreover, poxvirus E3 orthologues show varying ability to inhibit the induction of antiviral and proinflammatory cytokines. Despite these in vitro results, none of the E3 orthologues tested was capable of restoring pathogenicity to E3-deficient vaccinia virus in vivo.

  20. Optineurin Negatively Regulates the Induction of IFNβ in Response to RNA Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mankouri, Jamel; Fragkoudis, Rennos; Richards, Kathryn H.; Wetherill, Laura F.; Harris, Mark; Kohl, Alain; Elliott, Richard M.; Macdonald, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The innate immune response provides a critical defense against microbial infections, including viruses. These are recognised by pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and RIG-I like helicases (RLHs). Detection of virus triggers signalling cascades that induce transcription of type I interferons including IFNβ, which are pivotal for the initiation of an anti-viral state. Despite the essential role of IFNβ in the anti-viral response, there is an incomplete understanding of the negative regulation of IFNβ induction. Here we provide evidence that expression of the Nemo-related protein, optineurin (NRP/FIP2), has a role in the inhibition of virus-triggered IFNβ induction. Over-expression of optineurin inhibited Sendai-virus (SeV) and dsRNA triggered induction of IFNβ, whereas depletion of optineurin with siRNA promoted virus-induced IFNβ production and decreased RNA virus replication. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies identified optineurin in a protein complex containing the antiviral protein kinase TBK1 and the ubiquitin ligase TRAF3. Furthermore, mutagenesis studies determined that binding of ubiquitin was essential for both the correct sub-cellular localisation and the inhibitory function of optineurin. This work identifies optineurin as a critical regulator of antiviral signalling and potential target for future antiviral therapy. PMID:20174559

  1. Immune and antibody responses to an isolated capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, H L; Moore, D M; McKercher, P D; Polatnick, J

    1975-12-01

    The purified capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus type A12 strain 119 emulsified with incomplete Freund's adjuvant were studied in swine and guinea pigs. Swine inoculated on days 0, 28, and 60 with 100-mug doses of VP3 were protected by day 82 against exposure to infected swine. Serums from animals inoculated with VP3 contained viral precipitating and neutralizing antibodies, but such serums recognized fewer viral antigenic determinants than did antiviral serums. Capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 did not produce detectable antiviral antibody in guinea pigs, and antiviral antibody responses in swine to a mixture of VP1, VP2, and VP3 were lower than the responses to VP3 alone. However, when swine were inoculated with VP1, VP2, and VP3 separately at different body sites, no interference with the response to VP3 was observed. Vaccine containing VP3 isolated from acetylethylenimine-treated virus appeared less protective for swine than vaccine containing VP3 from nontreated virus. Trypsinized virus, which contains the cleaved peptides VP3a and VP3b rather than intact VP3, produced approximately the same levels of antiviral antibody responses in guinea pigs as did virus. Conversely, an isolated mixture of VP3a and VP3b did not produce detectable antiviral antibody responses in guinea pigs. The VP3a-VP3b mixture did, however, sensitize guinea pigs to elicit such responses following reinoculation with a marginally effective dose of trypsinized virus. PMID:171309

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Membrane Proteins of Vero Cells: Exploration of Potential Proteins Responsible for Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:24286161

  3. Novel Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Induces Impaired Interferon Responses in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arilahti, Veera; Mäkelä, Sanna M.; Tynell, Janne; Julkunen, Ilkka; Österlund, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9) virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN) responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced “cytokine storm” seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs. PMID:24804732

  4. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  5. Drosophila melanogaster mounts a unique immune response to the Rhabdovirus sigma virus.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C W; McGraw, E A; Ammar, E-D; Dietzgen, R G; Hogenhout, S A

    2008-05-01

    Rhabdoviruses are important pathogens of humans, livestock, and plants that are often vectored by insects. Rhabdovirus particles have a characteristic bullet shape with a lipid envelope and surface-exposed transmembrane glycoproteins. Sigma virus (SIGMAV) is a member of the Rhabdoviridae and is a naturally occurring disease agent of Drosophila melanogaster. The infection is maintained in Drosophila populations through vertical transmission via germ cells. We report here the nature of the Drosophila innate immune response to SIGMAV infection as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of differentially expressed genes identified by microarray analysis. We have also compared and contrasted the immune response of the host with respect to two nonenveloped viruses, Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Drosophila X virus (DXV). We determined that SIGMAV infection upregulates expression of the peptidoglycan receptor protein genes PGRP-SB1 and PGRP-SD and the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes Diptericin-A, Attacin-A, Attacin-B, Cecropin-A1, and Drosocin. SIGMAV infection did not induce PGRP-SA and the AMP genes Drosomycin-B, Metchnikowin, and Defensin that are upregulated in DCV and/or DXV infections. Expression levels of the Toll and Imd signaling cascade genes are not significantly altered by SIGMAV infection. These results highlight shared and unique aspects of the Drosophila immune response to the three viruses and may shed light on the nature of the interaction with the host and the evolution of these associations.

  6. Proteomic analysis of host responses in HepG2 cells during dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga; Rungrojcharoenkit, Kamonthip; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Noisakran, Sansanee; Chen, Shui-Tein; Malasit, Prida; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2007-12-01

    Dengue virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. However, its pathogenic mechanisms and pathophysiology are still poorly understood. We performed proteomic analysis to evaluate early host responses (as indicated by altered proteins) in human target cells during dengue virus infection. HepG2 cells were infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DEN-2) at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0. Quantitative analyses of DEN-2 infection and cell death at 12, 24, and 48 h postinfection showed that the MOI of 1.0 with 24 h postinfection duration was the optimal condition to evaluate early host responses, as this condition provided the high %Infection ( approximately 80%), while %Cell death ( approximately 20%) was comparable to that of the mock-control cells. Proteins derived from the mock-control and DEN-2-infected cells were resolved by 2-D PAGE ( n = 5 gels for each group) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby stain. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 differentially expressed proteins, which were successfully identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Most of these altered proteins were the key factors involved in transcription and translation processes. Further functional study on these altered proteins may lead to better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses to dengue virus infection, and also to the identification of new therapeutic targets for dengue virus infection.

  7. Stable and long-lasting immune response in horses after DNA vaccination against equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Giese, M; Bahr, U; Jakob, N J; Kehm, R; Handermann, M; Müller, H; Vahlenkamp, T H; Spiess, C; Schneider, T H; Schusse, G; Darai, G

    2002-10-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of the equine viral arteritis. It is a small RNA virus with a linear, non-segmented plus RNA genome. EAV is a member of the Arteriviridae family that includes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRSSV), simian haemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) and lactate dehydrogenase virus (LDV). The viral transmission is via respiratory and reproductive routes. Clinical signs in horses vary, and severe infection can lead to abortions in pregnant mares or neonatal foal death. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of the immune response in horses after immunization with a DNA vaccine harbouring and expressing EAV Open Reading Frames (ORF) 2, 5, and 7, in combination with equine interleukin 2 (eqIL2). Three boosters followed the basic immunization in two-week intervals. Each immunization was a combination of gene gun and intramuscular injection. All horses developed a high titer of neutralizing antibodies after basic immunization within 2 weeks. Remarkably, this immune response was found to be independent of the age of animals. The youngest horse was six-years old, and the oldest twenty-two years old. A remarkable difference in the immune response between the young and old were not observed. The duration of immunity was investigated during a period of one year. After 12 months, neutralizing antibodies were still detectable in all the vaccinated horses.

  8. Host Genetic Background Strongly Influences the Response to Influenza A Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Barkha; Błażejewska, Paulina; Heßmann, Manuela; Bruder, Dunja; Geffers, Robert; Mauel, Susanne; Gruber, Achim D.; Schughart, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The genetic make-up of the host has a major influence on its response to combat pathogens. For influenza A virus, several single gene mutations have been described which contribute to survival, the immune response and clearance of the pathogen by the host organism. Here, we have studied the influence of the genetic background to influenza A H1N1 (PR8) and H7N7 (SC35M) viruses. The seven inbred laboratory strains of mice analyzed exhibited different weight loss kinetics and survival rates after infection with PR8. Two strains in particular, DBA/2J and A/J, showed very high susceptibility to viral infections compared to all other strains. The LD50 to the influenza virus PR8 in DBA/2J mice was more than 1000-fold lower than in C57BL/6J mice. High susceptibility in DBA/2J mice was also observed after infection with influenza strain SC35M. In addition, infected DBA/2J mice showed a higher viral load in their lungs, elevated expression of cytokines and chemokines, and a more severe and extended lung pathology compared to infected C57BL/6J mice. These findings indicate a major contribution of the genetic background of the host to influenza A virus infections. The overall response in highly susceptible DBA/2J mice resembled the pathology described for infections with the highly virulent influenza H1N1-1918 and newly emerged H5N1 viruses. PMID:19293935

  9. The ectromelia virus SPI-2 protein causes lethal mousepox by preventing NK cell responses.

    PubMed

    Melo-Silva, Carolina R; Tscharke, David C; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Wong, Yik Chun; Buller, R Mark; Müllbacher, Arno; Regner, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) is a natural pathogen of mice that causes mousepox, and many of its genes have been implicated in the modulation of host immune responses. Serine protease inhibitor 2 (SPI-2) is one of these putative ECTV host response modifier proteins. SPI-2 is conserved across orthopoxviruses, but results defining its mechanism of action and in vivo function are lacking or contradictory. We studied the role of SPI-2 in mousepox by deleting the SPI-2 gene or its serine protease inhibitor reactive site. We found that SPI-2 does not affect viral replication or cell-intrinsic apoptosis pathways, since mutant viruses replicate in vitro as efficiently as wild-type virus. However, in the absence of SPI-2 protein, ECTV is attenuated in mousepox-susceptible mice, resulting in lower viral loads in the liver, decreased spleen pathology, and substantially improved host survival. This attenuation correlates with more effective immune responses in the absence of SPI-2, including an earlier serum gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response, raised serum interleukin 18 (IL-18), increased numbers of granzyme B(+) CD8(+) T cells, and, most notably, increased numbers and activation of NK cells. Both virus attenuation and the improved immune responses associated with SPI-2 deletion from ECTV are lost when mice are depleted of NK cells. Consequently, SPI-2 renders mousepox lethal in susceptible strains by preventing protective NK cell defenses.

  10. Hepatitis C virus-specific cellular immune responses in individuals with no evidence of infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T cell responses in HCV-uninfected, presumably unexposed, subjects could be due to an underestimation of the frequency of spontaneously resolving infections, as most acute HCV infections are clinically silent. To address this hypothesis, HCV-specific cellular immune responses were characterized, in individuals negative for an HCV PCR assay and humoral response, with (n = 32) or without (n = 33) risk of exposure to HCV. Uninfected volunteers (n = 20) with a chronically HCV-infected partner were included as positive controls for potential exposure to HCV and HCV infection, respectively. HCV-specific T cell responses in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were studied ex vivo by ELISPOT and CFSE-based proliferation assays using panels of HCV Core and NS3-derived peptides. A pool of unrelated peptides was used as a negative control, and a peptide mix of human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Bar virus and Influenza virus as a positive control. Overall, 20% of presumably HCV-uninfected subject tested had detectable T-cell responses to the virus, a rate much higher than previous estimates of HCV prevalence in developed countries. This result would be consistent with unapparent primary HCV infections that either cleared spontaneously or remained undetected by conventional serological assays. PMID:22455516

  11. Immunological headgear: antiviral immune responses protect against neuroinvasive West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2008-07-01

    With the emergence of epidemic strains of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America, there has been a surge in new research and knowledge regarding the peripheral immune responses that prevent neuroinvasion, the routes of WNV entry into the central nervous system (CNS) and the critical CNS immune responses that promote viral clearance and recovery at this anatomic site. WNV infection induces archetypal antiviral immune responses that, in most cases, lead to elimination of the virus with relatively few immunopathological consequences. Here, we present our current understanding of the innate and adaptive immune responses that limit dissemination to the CNS from WNV infection and the antiviral immune responses within the CNS that intervene when they fail.

  12. Simian immunodeficiency virus-specific CD8+ lymphocyte response in acutely infected rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, Y; Reimann, K A; Lord, C I; Miller, M D; Letvin, N L

    1993-01-01

    To assess the possible role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in containing the spread of human immunodeficiency virus in acutely infected individuals, the temporal evolution of the virus-specific CD8+ lymphocyte response was defined in simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys. A brief period of SIVmac plasma antigenemia was seen 9 to 16 days following intravenous infection with SIVmac, ending as the absolute number of CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) increased. In a prospective assessment of the ability of CD8+ lymphocytes of these monkeys to suppress SIVmac replication in autologous PBLs, inhibitory activity was detected as early as 4 days, with a more pronounced effect 12 to 16 days following infection. SIVmac Gag- and Nef-specific CD8+ effector cell activities were demonstrable in PBLs of animals by 2 weeks following virus inoculation. In fact, SIVmac-specific CTL precursors were documented in the PBLs of rhesus monkeys 4 to 6 days after SIVmac infection. These studies indicate that AIDS virus-specific CD8+ CTLs are present in PBLs within days of infection and may play an important role in containing the early spread of virus. PMID:8437240

  13. Dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine induces protective immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, K; Porter, K R; Kochel, T J; Ewing, D; Simmons, M; Phillips, I; Murphy, G S; Weiss, W R; Hayes, C G

    2000-07-01

    A candidate DNA vaccine expressing dengue virus type 1 pre-membrane and envelope proteins was used to immunize rhesus macaques. Monkeys were immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) or intradermally (i.d.) by three or four 1 mg doses of vaccine, respectively. Monkeys that were inoculated i.m. seroconverted more quickly and had higher antibody levels than those that were inoculated i.d. The sera exhibited virus-neutralizing activity, which declined over time. Four of the eight i.m.-inoculated monkeys were protected completely from developing viraemia when challenged 4 months after the last dose with homologous dengue virus. The other four monkeys had reduced viraemia compared with the control immunized monkeys. The i.d. -inoculated monkeys showed no reduction in viraemia when challenged with the virus. All vaccinated monkeys showed an anamnestic antibody response, indicating that they had established immunological memory. Vaccine-induced antibody had an avidity index similar to that of antibody induced by virus infection; however, no clear correlation was apparent between antibody avidity and virus neutralization titres.

  14. Proteins of duck influenza virus responsible for acquisition of pathogenicity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Soda, Kosuke; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Influenza virus rgVac1sub-P0 (H5N1) (rgVac1-P0), in which a pair of dibasic amino acid residues was introduced at the cleavage site of the HA of a reassortant of H5N2 and H7N1 viruses of duck origin, was low pathogenic in chickens. Vac1sub-P3 (H5N1) (Vac1-P3) was selected as a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus by 3 consecutive passages in chickens from low pathogenic strain rgVac1-P0. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the virus proteins and experimental infection of chickens with a series of recombinant viruses demonstrated that in addition to the HA, each of the PA, NP, M1, and M2 of Vac1-P3 are responsible for the acquisition of pathogenicity in chickens. These 4 proteins of Vac1-P3 synergistically contributed to efficient virus replication in chickens.

  15. The inheritance of centromere identity.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Yohei; Kitagawa, Risa; Kitagawa, Katsumi

    2016-07-01

    CENP-A (Centromere protein A) is a histone H3 variant that epigenetically determines the centromere position, but the mechanism of its centromere inheritance is obscure. We propose that CENP-A ubiquitylation, which is inherited through dimerization between rounds of cell division, is a candidate for the epigenetic mark of centromere identity. PMID:27652331

  16. Coinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates the B Cell Response to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Amaya I.; Strauman, Maura C.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Whittle, James R. R.; Williams, Katie L.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.; Caton, Andrew J.; Hensley, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogen-specific antibodies (Abs) protect against respiratory infection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae and are the basis of effective vaccines. Sequential or overlapping coinfections with both pathogens are common, yet the impact of coinfection on the generation and maintenance of Ab responses is largely unknown. We report here that the B cell response to IAV is altered in mice coinfected with IAV and S. pneumoniae and that this response differs, depending on the order of pathogen exposure. In mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV, the initial virus-specific germinal center (GC) B cell response is significantly enhanced in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph node and spleen, and there is an increase in CD4+ T follicular helper (TFH) cell numbers. In contrast, secondary S. pneumoniae infection exaggerates early antiviral antibody-secreting cell formation, and at later times, levels of GCs, TFH cells, and antiviral serum IgG are elevated. Mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV do not maintain the initially robust GC response in secondary lymphoid organs and exhibit reduced antiviral serum IgG with diminished virus neutralization activity a month after infection. Our data suggest that the history of pathogen exposures can critically affect the generation of protective antiviral Abs and may partially explain the differential susceptibility to and disease outcomes from IAV infection in humans. IMPORTANCE Respiratory tract coinfections, specifically those involving influenza A viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae, remain a top global health burden. We sought to determine how S. pneumoniae coinfection modulates the B cell immune response to influenza virus since antibodies are key mediators of protection. PMID:25100838

  17. Epigenetic inheritance of proteostasis and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheryl; Casanueva, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence shows that the genome is not as static as once thought and that gene expression can be reversibly modulated by the environment. In some cases, these changes can be transmitted to the next generation even if the environment has reverted. Such transgenerational epigenetic inheritance requires that information be stored in the germline in response to exogenous stressors. One of the most elusive questions in the field of epigenetic inheritance is the identity of such inherited factor(s). Answering this question would allow us to understand how the environment can shape human populations for multiple generations and may help to explain the rapid rise in obesity and neurodegenerative diseases in modern society. It will also provide clues on how we might be able to reprogramme the epigenome to prevent transmission of detrimental phenotypes and identify individuals who might be at increased risk of disease. In this article, we aim to review recent developments in this field, focusing on research conducted mostly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and mice, that link environmental modulators with the transgenerational inheritance of phenotypes that affect protein-folding homoeostasis and ageing. PMID:27744335

  18. Sex differences in the recognition of and innate antiviral responses to Seoul virus in Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Michele F; Bajic, Vladimir B; Klein, Sabra L

    2008-05-01

    Among rodents that carry hantaviruses, more males are infected than females. Male rats also have elevated copies of Seoul virus RNA and reduced transcription of immune-related genes in the lungs than females. To further characterize sex differences in antiviral defenses and whether these differences are mediated by gonadal hormones, we examined viral RNA in the lungs, virus shedding in saliva, and antiviral defenses among male and female rats that were intact, gonadectomized neonatally, or gonadectomized in adulthood. Following inoculation with Seoul virus, high amounts viral RNA persisted longer in lungs from intact males than intact females. Removal of the gonads in males reduced the amount of viral RNA to levels comparable with intact females at 40 days post-inoculation (p.i.). Intact males shed more virus in saliva than intact females 15 days p.i.; removal of the gonads during either the neonatal period or in adulthood increased virus shedding in females and decreased virus shedding in males. Induction of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs; Tlr7 and Rig-I), expression of antiviral genes (Myd88, Visa, Jun, Irf7, Ifnbeta, Ifnar1, Jak2, Stat3, and Mx2), and production of Mx protein was elevated in the lungs of intact females compared with intact males. Gonadectomy had more robust effects on the induction of PRRs than on downstream IFNbeta or Mx2 expression. Putative androgen and estrogen response elements are present in the promoters of several of these antiviral genes, suggesting the propensity for sex steroids to directly affect dimorphic antiviral responses against Seoul virus infection.

  19. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) BVDV induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent ...

  20. Responses of Varroa-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to Deformed wing virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The negative impact of Deformedwing virus (DWV) on European honey bees Apis mellifera is magnified by Varroa destructor parasitism. This study compared the responses of two Varroa-resistant honey bee stocks, pure Russian honey bees (RHB) and out-crossed Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees, Pol-line (POL)...

  1. Identification of the IFN-β response in H3N2 canine influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Wang, Lifang; Zheng, Yun; Zhou, Pei; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) circulate continuously in the dog population, providing opportunities for exposure to humans and other species. Although the dog genome has been sequenced, innate immunity in dogs is not well characterized, which limits the understanding of H3N2 canine influenza virus pathogenesis. Equally, how this virus evades the canine host innate immune response to successfully establish infection remains unclear. To analyse the IFN-β response to CIV infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, the canine IFN-β promoter sequence and its positive regulatory domain motifs were first cloned and identified using a luciferase reporter system. Next, we found that infection with the CIV strain GD/12 blocked the IFN-β response primarily by inhibiting the NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signalling pathways. Expression of GD/12 non-structural protein 1 alone was sufficient to inhibit Sendai virus-induced NF-κB and IRF3 activation by suppressing p65 and IRF3 phosphorylation, suggesting the important role of this protein in the CIV-mediated inhibition of the IFN-β response. These results suggest that inhibition of the IFN-β signalling pathway may have played a role in CIV establishment and spread in dog populations. PMID:26490006

  2. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine were evaluated and compared. Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each. Pigs were va...

  3. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine. Methods: Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each....

  4. Identification of the IFN-β response in H3N2 canine influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Wang, Lifang; Zheng, Yun; Zhou, Pei; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) circulate continuously in the dog population, providing opportunities for exposure to humans and other species. Although the dog genome has been sequenced, innate immunity in dogs is not well characterized, which limits the understanding of H3N2 canine influenza virus pathogenesis. Equally, how this virus evades the canine host innate immune response to successfully establish infection remains unclear. To analyse the IFN-β response to CIV infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, the canine IFN-β promoter sequence and its positive regulatory domain motifs were first cloned and identified using a luciferase reporter system. Next, we found that infection with the CIV strain GD/12 blocked the IFN-β response primarily by inhibiting the NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signalling pathways. Expression of GD/12 non-structural protein 1 alone was sufficient to inhibit Sendai virus-induced NF-κB and IRF3 activation by suppressing p65 and IRF3 phosphorylation, suggesting the important role of this protein in the CIV-mediated inhibition of the IFN-β response. These results suggest that inhibition of the IFN-β signalling pathway may have played a role in CIV establishment and spread in dog populations.

  5. Physiological responses of hard red winter wheat to infection by wheat streak mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) causes significant yield loss in hard red winter wheat in the U.S. Southern High Plains. Despite the prevalence of this pathogen, little is known about the physiological response of wheat to WSMV infection. A 2-year study was initiated to (i) investigate the effect o...

  6. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus.

  7. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus. PMID:27242166

  8. Interferon lambda induces antiviral response to herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lopušná, K; Režuchová, I; Kabát, P; Kúdelová, M

    2014-01-01

    Lambda interferons (IFN-λ) are known to induce potent antiviral response in a wide variety of target cells. They activate the same intracellular signalling pathways and have similar biological activities as IFN-α/β, including antiviral activity, but signal via distinct receptor complex, which is expressed in a cell- and species-specific manner. IFN-λ was reported to induce in vitro marked antiviral activity against various RNA viruses, but corresponding data on DNA viruses are sparse. Therefore we examined the IFN-λ1 induced antiviral activity against two strains of herpes simplex virus 1, a highly pathogenic ANGpath and moderately pathogenic KOS. The antiviral response was determined in vitro in Vero cells, known as deficient in production of type I IFNs and in Vero E6 cells, responding to viral infection with abundant IFN-λ production, although deficient in production of type I IFNs. The results showed that IFN-λ1 induced in Vero cells higher antiviral activity against ANGpath strain than against KOS strain. In Vero E6 cells endogenous IFN-λ induced higher antiviral activity against ANGpath strain than against KOS strain, but because of the virus induction of IFN-λ expression the antiviral activity was detected later. The observed differences between the IFN-λ1-induced antiviral activities against viral strains of various pathogenicity suggest that virus attributes may play role in the antiviral state of cells induced by IFN-λ. PMID:25518713

  9. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Induces Apoptosis through the Unfolded Protein Response Activation of EGR1

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Lundberg, Lindsay; Swales, Danielle; Waybright, Nicole; Pinkham, Chelsea; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a previously weaponized arthropod-borne virus responsible for causing acute and fatal encephalitis in animal and human hosts. The increased circulation and spread in the Americas of VEEV and other encephalitic arboviruses, such as eastern equine encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, underscore the need for research aimed at characterizing the pathogenesis of viral encephalomyelitis for the development of novel medical countermeasures. The host-pathogen dynamics of VEEV Trinidad donkey-infected human astrocytoma U87MG cells were determined by carrying out RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of poly(A) and mRNAs. To identify the critical alterations that take place in the host transcriptome following VEEV infection, samples were collected at 4, 8, and 16 h postinfection and RNA-Seq data were acquired using an Ion Torrent PGM platform. Differential expression of interferon response, stress response factors, and components of the unfolded protein response (UPR) was observed. The protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR was activated, as the expression of both activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CHOP (DDIT3), critical regulators of the pathway, was altered after infection. Expression of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) was induced in a PERK-dependent manner. EGR1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated lower susceptibility to VEEV-induced cell death than isogenic wild-type MEFs, indicating that EGR1 modulates proapoptotic pathways following VEEV infection. The influence of EGR1 is of great importance, as neuronal damage can lead to long-term sequelae in individuals who have survived VEEV infection. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses represent a group of clinically relevant viruses transmitted by mosquitoes to humans. In severe cases, viral spread targets neuronal tissue, resulting in significant and life-threatening inflammation dependent on a combination

  10. Lamprey VLRB response to influenza virus supports universal rules of immunogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Altman, Meghan O; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Herrin, Brantley R

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are a crown jewel of jawed vertebrate evolution. Through recombination and mutation of small numbers of genes, Igs can specifically recognize a vast variety of natural and man-made organic molecules. Jawless vertebrates evolved a parallel system of humoral immunity, which recognizes antigens not with Ig, but with a structurally unrelated receptor called the variable lymphocyte receptor B (VLRB). We exploited the convergent evolution of Ig and VLRB antibodies (Abs) to investigate if intrinsic chemical features of foreign proteins determine their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Surprisingly, we find lamprey VLRB and mouse Ig responses to influenza A virus are extremely similar. Each focuses ~80% of the response on hemagglutinin (HA), mainly through recognition of the major antigenic sites in the HA globular head domain. Our findings predict basic conservation of Ab responses to protein antigens, strongly supporting the use of animal models for understanding human Ab responses to viruses and protein immunogens. PMID:26252514

  11. Lamprey VLRB response to influenza virus supports universal rules of immunogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Altman, Meghan O; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Herrin, Brantley R

    2015-08-07

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are a crown jewel of jawed vertebrate evolution. Through recombination and mutation of small numbers of genes, Igs can specifically recognize a vast variety of natural and man-made organic molecules. Jawless vertebrates evolved a parallel system of humoral immunity, which recognizes antigens not with Ig, but with a structurally unrelated receptor called the variable lymphocyte receptor B (VLRB). We exploited the convergent evolution of Ig and VLRB antibodies (Abs) to investigate if intrinsic chemical features of foreign proteins determine their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Surprisingly, we find lamprey VLRB and mouse Ig responses to influenza A virus are extremely similar. Each focuses ~80% of the response on hemagglutinin (HA), mainly through recognition of the major antigenic sites in the HA globular head domain. Our findings predict basic conservation of Ab responses to protein antigens, strongly supporting the use of animal models for understanding human Ab responses to viruses and protein immunogens.

  12. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Leslie L; Perelson, Alan

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  13. Exploiting virus stealth technology for xenotransplantation: reduced human T cell responses to porcine cells expressing herpes simplex virus ICP47.

    PubMed

    Crew, Mark D; Phanavanh, Bounleut

    2003-01-01

    Direct recognition of porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins by human T cells is well documented. Eliminating donor (porcine) MHC proteins may therefore be beneficial in pig-to-human xenotransplants. To this end, we have attempted to exploit viral stealth mechanisms to eliminate pig MHC class I cell-surface expression. PK(15) (pig kidney) cells stably transfected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP47 gene [PK(15)-ICP47 cells] exhibited a dramatic reduction of MHC class I cell-surface expression when compared with untransfected PK(15) cells. To test the effect of down-regulation of porcine MHC class I on human cellular immune responses, a human CD8+ enriched T cell line (anti-PK15 T cells) with reactivity towards PK(15) cells was derived by repeated stimulation of human T cells with PK(15) cells stably transfected with the costimulatory molecule B7.1 [PK(15)-B7.1 cells]. Anti-PK15 T cells efficiently lyzed PK(15) cells but not PK(15)-ICP47 (class I negative) cells. Consistent with effector function, anti-PK15 T cells showed a robust proliferative response to PK(15)-B7.1 cells but did not proliferate at all to PK(15)-B7.1 cells which also expressed HSV ICP47. These results suggest that virus stealth technology can be exploited for xenotransplantation.

  14. Treating the Host Response to Ebola Virus Disease with Generic Statins and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers.

    PubMed

    Fedson, David S; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Rordam, Ole Martin; Opal, Steven M

    2015-06-23

    Treatments targeting the Ebola virus may eventually be shown to work, but they will not have an impact on overall Ebola mortality in West Africa. Endothelial dysfunction is responsible for the fluid and electrolyte imbalances seen in Ebola patients. Because inexpensive generic statins and angiotensin receptor blockers restore endothelial barrier integrity, they can be used to treat the host response in these patients. In Sierra Leone, approximately 100 Ebola patients were treated with this combination, and reports indicate that survival was greatly improved.

  15. Transcriptome Profiling of the Virus-Induced Innate Immune Response in Pteropus vampyrus and Its Attenuation by Nipah Virus Interferon Antagonist Functions

    PubMed Central

    Glennon, Nicole B.; Jabado, Omar; Lo, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bats are important reservoirs for several viruses, many of which cause lethal infections in humans but have reduced pathogenicity in bats. As the innate immune response is critical for controlling viruses, the nature of this response in bats and how it may differ from that in other mammals are of great interest. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing (mRNA-seq), we profiled the transcriptional response of Pteropus vampyrus bat kidney (PVK) cells to Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus known to elicit a strong innate immune response in mammalian cells. The Pteropus genus is a known reservoir of Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). Analysis of the 200 to 300 regulated genes showed that genes for interferon (IFN) and antiviral pathways are highly upregulated in NDV-infected PVK cells, including genes for beta IFN, RIG-I, MDA5, ISG15, and IRF1. NDV-infected cells also upregulated several genes not previously characterized to be antiviral, such as RND1, SERTAD1, CHAC1, and MORC3. In fact, we show that MORC3 is induced by both IFN and NDV infection in PVK cells but is not induced by either stimulus in human A549 cells. In contrast to NDV infection, HeV and NiV infection of PVK cells failed to induce these innate immune response genes. Likewise, an attenuated response was observed in PVK cells infected with recombinant NDVs expressing the NiV IFN antagonist proteins V and W. This study provides the first global profile of a robust virus-induced innate immune response in bats and indicates that henipavirus IFN antagonist mechanisms are likely active in bat cells. IMPORTANCE Bats are the reservoir host for many highly pathogenic human viruses, including henipaviruses, lyssaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and filoviruses, and many other viruses have also been isolated from bats. Viral infections are reportedly asymptomatic or heavily attenuated in bat populations. Despite their ecological importance to viral

  16. Immune response of mice to non-adapted avian influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Stropkovská, A; Mikušková, T; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-12-01

    Human infections with avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) without or with clinical symptoms of disease were recently reported from several continents, mainly in high risk groups of people, who came into the contact with infected domestic birds or poultry. It was shown that avian IAVs are able to infect humans directly without previous adaptation, however, their ability to replicate and to cause a disease in this new host can differ. No spread of these avian IAVs among humans has been documented until now, except for one case described in Netherlands in the February of 2003 in people directly involved in handling IAV (H7N7)-infected poultry. The aim of our work was to examine whether a low pathogenic avian IAV can induce a virus-specific immune response of biological relevancy, in spite of its restricted replication in mammals. As a model we used a low pathogenic virus A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) (A/Duck), which replicated well in MDCK cells and produced plaques on cell monolayers, but was unable to replicate productively in mouse lungs. We examined how the immune system of mice responds to the intranasal application of this non-adapted avian virus. Though we did not prove the infectious virus in lungs of mice following A/Duck application even after its multiple passaging in mice, we detected virus-specific vRNA till day 8 post infection. Moreover, we detected virus-specific mRNA and de novo synthesized viral nucleoprotein (NP) and membrane protein (M1) in lungs of mice on day 2 and 4 after exposure to A/Duck. Virus-specific antibodies in sera of these mice were detectable by ELISA already after a single intranasal dose of A/Duck virus. Not only antibodies specific to the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) were induced, but also antibodies specific to the NP and M1 of IAV were detected by Western blot and their titers increased after the second exposure of mice to this virus. Importantly, antibodies neutralizing virus A/Duck were proved in mouse

  17. Immune response of mice to non-adapted avian influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Stropkovská, A; Mikušková, T; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-12-01

    Human infections with avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) without or with clinical symptoms of disease were recently reported from several continents, mainly in high risk groups of people, who came into the contact with infected domestic birds or poultry. It was shown that avian IAVs are able to infect humans directly without previous adaptation, however, their ability to replicate and to cause a disease in this new host can differ. No spread of these avian IAVs among humans has been documented until now, except for one case described in Netherlands in the February of 2003 in people directly involved in handling IAV (H7N7)-infected poultry. The aim of our work was to examine whether a low pathogenic avian IAV can induce a virus-specific immune response of biological relevancy, in spite of its restricted replication in mammals. As a model we used a low pathogenic virus A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) (A/Duck), which replicated well in MDCK cells and produced plaques on cell monolayers, but was unable to replicate productively in mouse lungs. We examined how the immune system of mice responds to the intranasal application of this non-adapted avian virus. Though we did not prove the infectious virus in lungs of mice following A/Duck application even after its multiple passaging in mice, we detected virus-specific vRNA till day 8 post infection. Moreover, we detected virus-specific mRNA and de novo synthesized viral nucleoprotein (NP) and membrane protein (M1) in lungs of mice on day 2 and 4 after exposure to A/Duck. Virus-specific antibodies in sera of these mice were detectable by ELISA already after a single intranasal dose of A/Duck virus. Not only antibodies specific to the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) were induced, but also antibodies specific to the NP and M1 of IAV were detected by Western blot and their titers increased after the second exposure of mice to this virus. Importantly, antibodies neutralizing virus A/Duck were proved in mouse

  18. Host Immune Response to Mosquito-Transmitted Chikungunya Virus Differs from That Elicited by Needle Inoculated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Saravanan; Higgs, Stephen; Ziegler, Sarah; Vanlandingham, Dana; Tesh, Robert; Wikel, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne diseases are a worldwide public health threat. Mosquitoes transmit viruses or parasites during feeding, along with salivary proteins that modulate host responses to facilitate both blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Understanding these earliest events in mosquito transmission of arboviruses by mosquitoes is essential for development and assessment of rational vaccine and treatment strategies. In this report, we compared host immune responses to chikungunya virus (CHIKV) transmission by (1) mosquito bite, or (2) by needle inoculation. Methods and Findings Differential cytokine expression was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, at sites of uninfected mosquito bites, CHIKV-infected mosquito bites, and needle-inoculated CHIKV. Both uninfected and CHIKV infected mosquitoes polarized host cytokine response to a TH2 profile. Compared to uninfected mosquito bites, expression of IL-4 induced by CHIKV-infected mosquitoes were 150 fold and 527.1 fold higher at 3 hours post feeding (hpf) and 6 hpf, respectively. A significant suppression of TH1 cytokines and TLR-3 was also observed. These significant differences may result from variation in the composition of uninfected and CHIKV-infected mosquito saliva. Needle injected CHIKV induced a robust interferon-γ, no detectable IL-4, and a significant up-regulation of TLR-3. Conclusions This report describes the first analysis of cutaneous cytokines in mice bitten by CHIKV–infected mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate contrasting immune activation in the response to CHIKV infection by mosquito bite or needle inoculation. The significant role of mosquito saliva in these earliest events of CHIKV transmission and infection are highlighted. PMID:20711354

  19. Emerging role of lipid droplets in Aedes aegypti immune response against bacteria and Dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Ana Beatriz Ferreira; Alves, Liliane Rosa; Nascimento Silva, Maria Clara L.; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Liechocki, Sally; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Sorgine, Marcos H. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that modulate immune and inflammatory responses through the production of lipid mediators. In insects, it is unknown whether LDs play any role during the development of immune responses. We show that Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells – an immune responsive cell lineage – accumulates LDs when challenged with Enterobacter cloacae, Sindbis, and Dengue viruses. Microarray analysis of Aag2 challenged with E.cloacae or infected with Dengue virus revealed high transcripts levels of genes associated with lipid storage and LDs biogenesis, correlating with the increased LDs numbers in those conditions. Similarly, in mosquitoes, LDs accumulate in midgut cells in response to Serratia marcescens and Sindbis virus or when the native microbiota proliferates, following a blood meal. Also, constitutive activation of Toll and IMD pathways by knocking-down their respective negative modulators (Cactus and Caspar) increases LDs numbers in the midgut. Our results show for the first time an infection-induced LDs accumulation in response to both bacterial and viral infections in Ae. Aegypti, and we propose a role for LDs in mosquito immunity. These findings open new venues for further studies in insect immune responses associated with lipid metabolism. PMID:26887863

  20. Emerging role of lipid droplets in Aedes aegypti immune response against bacteria and Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Ana Beatriz Ferreira; Alves, Liliane Rosa; Silva, Maria Clara L Nascimento; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Liechocki, Sally; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Sorgine, Marcos H Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that modulate immune and inflammatory responses through the production of lipid mediators. In insects, it is unknown whether LDs play any role during the development of immune responses. We show that Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells - an immune responsive cell lineage - accumulates LDs when challenged with Enterobacter cloacae, Sindbis, and Dengue viruses. Microarray analysis of Aag2 challenged with E.cloacae or infected with Dengue virus revealed high transcripts levels of genes associated with lipid storage and LDs biogenesis, correlating with the increased LDs numbers in those conditions. Similarly, in mosquitoes, LDs accumulate in midgut cells in response to Serratia marcescens and Sindbis virus or when the native microbiota proliferates, following a blood meal. Also, constitutive activation of Toll and IMD pathways by knocking-down their respective negative modulators (Cactus and Caspar) increases LDs numbers in the midgut. Our results show for the first time an infection-induced LDs accumulation in response to both bacterial and viral infections in Ae. Aegypti, and we propose a role for LDs in mosquito immunity. These findings open new venues for further studies in insect immune responses associated with lipid metabolism. PMID:26887863

  1. Evasion of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses by Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, Mirco; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Host organisms have developed sophisticated antiviral responses in order to defeat emerging influenza A viruses (IAV). At the same time IAV have evolved immune evasion strategies. The immune system of mammals provides several lines of defense to neutralize invading pathogens or limit their replication. Here, we summarize the mammalian innate and adaptive immune mechanisms involved in host defense against viral infection and review strategies by which IAV avoid, circumvent or subvert these mechanisms. We highlight well-characterized, as well as recently described features of this intriguing virus-host molecular battle. PMID:20482552

  2. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  3. The B-cell response to foot-and-mouth-disease virus in cattle following vaccination and live-virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clare F J; Carr, B Veronica; Singanallur, Nagendrakumar B; Morris, Jacqueline; Gubbins, Simon; Hudelet, Pascal; Ilott, Martin; Charreyre, Catherine; Vosloo, Wilna; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-09-01

    Antibodies play a pivotal role against viral infection, and maintenance of protection is dependent on plasma and memory B-cells. Understanding antigen-specific B-cell responses in cattle is essential to inform future vaccine design. We have previously defined T-cell-dependent and -independent B-cell responses in cattle, as a prelude to investigating foot-and-mouth-disease-virus (FMDV)-specific B-cell responses. In this study, we have used an FMDV O-serotype vaccination (O1-Manisa or O SKR) and live-virus challenge (FMDV O SKR) to investigate the homologous and heterologous B-cell response in cattle following both vaccination and live-virus challenge. The FMDV O-serotype vaccines were able to induce a cross-reactive plasma-cell response, specific for both O1-Manisa and O SKR, post-vaccination. Post-FMDV O SKR live-virus challenge, the heterologous O1-Manisa vaccination provided cross-protection against O SKR challenge and cross-reactive O SKR-specific plasma cells were induced. However, vaccination and live-virus challenge were not able to induce a detectable FMDV O-serotype-specific memory B-cell response in any of the cattle. The aim of new FMDV vaccines should be to induce memory responses and increased duration of immunity in cattle. PMID:27260141

  4. The B-cell response to foot-and-mouth-disease virus in cattle following vaccination and live-virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clare F J; Carr, B Veronica; Singanallur, Nagendrakumar B; Morris, Jacqueline; Gubbins, Simon; Hudelet, Pascal; Ilott, Martin; Charreyre, Catherine; Vosloo, Wilna; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-09-01

    Antibodies play a pivotal role against viral infection, and maintenance of protection is dependent on plasma and memory B-cells. Understanding antigen-specific B-cell responses in cattle is essential to inform future vaccine design. We have previously defined T-cell-dependent and -independent B-cell responses in cattle, as a prelude to investigating foot-and-mouth-disease-virus (FMDV)-specific B-cell responses. In this study, we have used an FMDV O-serotype vaccination (O1-Manisa or O SKR) and live-virus challenge (FMDV O SKR) to investigate the homologous and heterologous B-cell response in cattle following both vaccination and live-virus challenge. The FMDV O-serotype vaccines were able to induce a cross-reactive plasma-cell response, specific for both O1-Manisa and O SKR, post-vaccination. Post-FMDV O SKR live-virus challenge, the heterologous O1-Manisa vaccination provided cross-protection against O SKR challenge and cross-reactive O SKR-specific plasma cells were induced. However, vaccination and live-virus challenge were not able to induce a detectable FMDV O-serotype-specific memory B-cell response in any of the cattle. The aim of new FMDV vaccines should be to induce memory responses and increased duration of immunity in cattle.

  5. Role of the humoral immune response in resistance to Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, C P; Cash, E; Aubert, C; Coutinho, A

    1991-01-01

    Theiler's virus, a murine picornavirus, persists in the central nervous system of susceptible strains of mice, causing chronic inflammation and demyelination in the white matter of the spinal cord. Resistant strains, however, clear the virus and do not develop late disease. In this study, we compared the characteristics of T and B lymphocytes in C57BL/6 (resistant) and SJL/J (susceptible) mice 1 week after intracerebral infection. We detected a marked increase of the number of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-secreting cells in the spleens of C57BL/6 detected a marked increase of the number of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-secreting cells in the spleens of C57BL/6 mice (but not in those of SJL/J mice), which correlated with higher levels of serum IgM antiviral antibodies. The role of the humoral response in virus clearance and resistance was demonstrated by a marked decrease in the number of infected spinal cord cells in SJL/J mice after passive transfer of serum from infected C57BL/6 donors. The B-cell response was found to be partly T cell independent. These results suggest an important role of the early humoral immune response in resistance to Theiler's virus-induced disease. Images PMID:1645797

  6. Recombinant rabies virus expressing IFNα1 enhanced immune responses resulting in its attenuation and stronger immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Tian, Qin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xianfeng; Luo, Jun; Mo, Weiyu; Peng, Jiaojiao; Niu, Xuefeng; Luo, Yongwen; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have shown that type 1 interferons (IFNs) exert multiple biological effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we investigated the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing canine interferon α1 (rHEP-CaIFNα1). It was shown that Kun Ming (KM) mice that received a single intramuscular immunization with rHEP-CaIFNα1 had an earlier increase and a higher level of virus-neutralizing antibody titers compared with immunization of the parent HEP-Flury. A challenge experiment further confirmed that more mice that were immunized with rHEP-CaIFNα1 survived compared with mice immunized with the parent virus. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that rHEP-CaIFNα1 induced a stronger innate immune response, especially the type 1 IFN response. Flow cytometry was conducted to show that rHEP-CaIFNα1 recruited more activated B cells in lymph nodes and CD8 T cells in the peripheral blood, which is beneficial to achieve virus clearance in the early infective stage. PMID:25310498

  7. Drosophila S virus, a hereditary reolike virus, probable agent of the morphological S character in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed Central

    Louis, C; Lopez-Ferber, M; Comendador, M; Plus, N; Kuhl, G; Baker, S

    1988-01-01

    Isometric reolike virions were found in all the examined Drosophila simulans flies from two strains (SimES-st and Israel-st) presenting the S phenotype, a maternally inherited morphological trait (abnormalities of bristles). Normal flies of both strains appeared virus-free. Virions were found in the cytoplasm of male and female gonads and epidermal cells, including the bristle-forming cells, which appeared disorganized. Steps of virogenesis were described. A positive correlation was demonstrated between expressivity of the S phenotype and degree of viral infection. This hereditary reolike virus seems to be responsible for the S character of D. simulans and was named DSV (Drosophila S virus). Images PMID:3346947

  8. Rabies virus glycoprotein is an important determinant for the induction of innate immune responses and the pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Hualei; Mahmood, Fazal; Fu, Zhen F

    2013-03-23

    Our previous studies have suggested that street and fixed rabies viruses (RABVs) induce diseases in the mouse model via different mechanisms. In the present study, attempts were made to determine if it is the glycoprotein (G) that is responsible for the observed differences in the pathogenic mechanisms. To this end, an infectious clone from fixed virus B2c was established and used as a backbone for exchange of the G from street viruses. The rate of viral replication, expression of viral proteins, and the induction of innate immune responses were compared in cells or in mice infected with each of the viruses. Furthermore, the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the CNS and the enhancement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were also compared. It was found that fixed viruses induced stronger innate immune responses (expression of chemokines, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and enhancement of BBB permeability) than street RABV or recombinant viruses expressing the G from street RABVs. Fixed viruses induce disease via an immune-mediated pathogenic mechanism while street viruses or recombinant viruses expressing the G from street RABVs induce diseases via a mechanism other than immune-mediated pathogenesis. Therefore, RABV G is an important determinant for the induction of innate immune responses and consequently the pathogenic mechanisms.

  9. Characterization of host immune responses in Ebola virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2014-06-01

    Ebola causes highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans with no licensed countermeasures. Its virulence can be attributed to several immunoevasion mechanisms: an early inhibition of innate immunity started by the downregulation of type I interferon, epitope masking and subversion of the adaptive humoural immunity by secreting a truncated form of the viral glycoprotein. Deficiencies in specific and non-specific antiviral responses result in unrestricted viral replication and dissemination in the host, causing death typically within 10 days after the appearance of symptoms. This review summarizes the host immune response to Ebola infection, and highlights the short- and long-term immune responses crucial for protection, which holds implications for the design of future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:24742338

  10. Characterization of host immune responses in Ebola virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2014-06-01

    Ebola causes highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans with no licensed countermeasures. Its virulence can be attributed to several immunoevasion mechanisms: an early inhibition of innate immunity started by the downregulation of type I interferon, epitope masking and subversion of the adaptive humoural immunity by secreting a truncated form of the viral glycoprotein. Deficiencies in specific and non-specific antiviral responses result in unrestricted viral replication and dissemination in the host, causing death typically within 10 days after the appearance of symptoms. This review summarizes the host immune response to Ebola infection, and highlights the short- and long-term immune responses crucial for protection, which holds implications for the design of future vaccines and therapeutics.

  11. Primary antibody responses of herons to experimental infection with Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses.

    PubMed

    Boyle, D B; Marshall, I D; Dickerman, R W

    1983-12-01

    Antibody responses of rufous night herons (Nycticorax caledonicus) and little egrets (Egretta garzetta) following infection with Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses were determined. Haemagglutinin-inhibiting antibodies were first detected on day 5 or 6 after inoculation and increased rapidly, reaching maximum titres of 320 to 2560 between 10 and 20 days after inoculation. Titres declined 20-320 between 60 and 120 days after inoculation, then tended to remain stationary. Titres were 2- to 8-fold higher to infecting virus than heterologous virus. Neutralizing antibody development paralleled that of HI antibodies with titres maintained at a higher level for longer periods; however, they did eventually decline to low levels. Following MVE virus infection IgM (19S), HI antibodies were 80-100% of HI antibodies detectable on day 6 or 7 after inoculation and declined rapidly, becoming undetectable by 20 days after inoculation. With Kunjin virus infections, IgM HI antibodies represented 90-100% of HI antibodies detectable on day 6 or 7 after inoculation. Significant levels of IgM HI antibodies were still detectable 20 days after inoculation (5-30% of total HI antibodies) and, in some birds, even at 27 days after inoculation (up to 10%), IgG (7S) HI antibodies were low or undetectable on day 6 or 7 after inoculation, then increased rapidly with rapidly rising HI antibody titres. The specificity of IgM and IgG antibodies and unfractionated sera was determined by testing against Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile virus haemagglutinating antigens. It was possible to determine with which virus a bird had been infected from the pattern of cross-reaction with these antigens. These results should provide a rational basis for the interpretation of serological results from naturally infected birds.

  12. Infection with Usutu Virus Induces an Autophagic Response in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is an African mosquito-borne flavivirus closely related to West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus, which host range includes mainly mosquitoes and birds, although infections in humans have been also documented, thus warning about USUV as a potential health threat. Circulation of USUV in Africa was documented more than 50 years ago, but it was not until the last decade that it emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and some human severe cases. Since autophagy is a cellular pathway that can play important roles on different aspects of viral infections and pathogenesis, the possible implication of this pathway in USUV infection has been examined using Vero cells and two viral strains of different origin. USUV infection induced the unfolded protein response, revealed by the splicing of Xbp-1 mRNA. Infection with USUV also stimulated the autophagic process, which was demonstrated by an increase in the cytoplasmic aggregation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), a marker of autophagosome formation. In addition to this, an increase in the lipidated form of LC3, that is associated with autophagosome formation, was noticed following infection. Pharmacological modulation of the autophagic pathway with the inductor of autophagy rapamycin resulted in an increase in virus yield. On the other hand, treatment with 3-methyladenine or wortmannin, two distinct inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases involved in autophagy, resulted in a decrease in virus yield. These results indicate that USUV virus infection upregulates the cellular autophagic pathway and that drugs that target this pathway can modulate the infection of this virus, thus identifying a potential druggable pathway in USUV-infection. PMID:24205422

  13. Infection with Usutu virus induces an autophagic response in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is an African mosquito-borne flavivirus closely related to West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus, which host range includes mainly mosquitoes and birds, although infections in humans have been also documented, thus warning about USUV as a potential health threat. Circulation of USUV in Africa was documented more than 50 years ago, but it was not until the last decade that it emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and some human severe cases. Since autophagy is a cellular pathway that can play important roles on different aspects of viral infections and pathogenesis, the possible implication of this pathway in USUV infection has been examined using Vero cells and two viral strains of different origin. USUV infection induced the unfolded protein response, revealed by the splicing of Xbp-1 mRNA. Infection with USUV also stimulated the autophagic process, which was demonstrated by an increase in the cytoplasmic aggregation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), a marker of autophagosome formation. In addition to this, an increase in the lipidated form of LC3, that is associated with autophagosome formation, was noticed following infection. Pharmacological modulation of the autophagic pathway with the inductor of autophagy rapamycin resulted in an increase in virus yield. On the other hand, treatment with 3-methyladenine or wortmannin, two distinct inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases involved in autophagy, resulted in a decrease in virus yield. These results indicate that USUV virus infection upregulates the cellular autophagic pathway and that drugs that target this pathway can modulate the infection of this virus, thus identifying a potential druggable pathway in USUV-infection.

  14. Specific proliferative T cell responses and antibodies elicited by vaccination with simian immunodeficiency virus Nef do not confer protection against virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Wade-Evans, A M; Stott, J; Hanke, T; Stebbings, R; Berry, N; Lines, J; Sangster, R; Silvera, P; Walker, B; MacManus, S; Davis, G; Cowie, J; Arnold, C; Hull, R; Almond, N

    2001-11-01

    The efficacy of immunizing with a combination of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Nef vaccines was evaluated. Four vaccinates received three intradermal immunizations with recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed SIV Nef, followed by three intramuscular immunizations with rDNA also expressing SIV Nef. Finally, the four vaccinates received two subcutaneous boosts with recombinant SIV Nef protein. This immunization protocol elicited anti-Nef antibodies in all of the vaccinates as well as specific proliferative responses. However, specific cytotoxic T cell responses were not detected before virus challenge. All vaccinates were challenged intravenously with 10 MID(50) of SIVmacJ5 along with four controls. All eight subjects became infected after SIV challenge and there were no group-specific differences in virus load as measured by virus titration and vRNA analysis. The results of this study support indirectly the report from Gallimore and colleagues (Nat Med 1995;1:1667) suggesting that CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses are required for Nef-based vaccines to restrict SIV infection. If Nef-based vaccines are to be beneficial in controlling infection with immunodeficiency viruses, then it will be necessary to develop more effective immunization protocols that elicit potent CD8(+) cell responses reproducibly.

  15. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, a Plant Virus Associated with Specific Immune Responses, Fever, Abdominal Pains, and Pruritus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Richet, Hervé; Desnues, Christelle; Balique, Fanny; Moal, Valérie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Berbis, Philippe; Lecoq, Hervé; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Berland, Yvon; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, metagenomic studies have identified viable Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a plant virus, in the stool of healthy subjects. However, its source and role as pathogen have not been determined. Methods and Findings 21 commercialized food products containing peppers, 357 stool samples from 304 adults and 208 stool samples from 137 children were tested for PMMoV using real-time PCR, sequencing, and electron microscopy. Anti-PMMoV IgM antibody testing was concurrently performed. A case-control study tested the association of biological and clinical symptoms with the presence of PMMoV in the stool. Twelve (57%) food products were positive for PMMoV RNA sequencing. Stool samples from twenty-two (7.2%) adults and one child (0.7%) were positive for PMMoV by real-time PCR. Positive cases were significantly more likely to have been sampled in Dermatology Units (p<10−6), to be seropositive for anti-PMMoV IgM antibodies (p = 0.026) and to be patients who exhibited fever, abdominal pains, and pruritus (p = 0.045, 0.038 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a local source of PMMoV and linked the presence of PMMoV RNA in stool with a specific immune response and clinical symptoms. Although clinical symptoms may be imputable to another cofactor, including spicy food, our data suggest the possibility of a direct or indirect pathogenic role of plant viruses in humans. PMID:20386604

  16. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  17. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J triggers caspase-1-mediated inflammatory response in chick livers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-lan; Shan, Wen-jie; Jia, Li-juan; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Jin-jing; Wu, Ya-rong; Xu, Fa-zhi; Li, Jin-nian

    2016-04-01

    Many pathogens trigger caspase-1-mediated innate immune responses. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) causes serious immunosuppression and diverse tumors in chicks. The caspase-1 inflammasome mechanism of response to ALV-J invading remains unclear. Here we investigated the expression of caspase-1, the inflammasome adaptor NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 in response to ALV-J infection in the liver of chick. We found caspase-1 mRNA expression was elevated at 5 dpi and peaked at 7 dpi in ALV-J infected animals. Corresponding to this, the expressions of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were significantly increased at 5 or 7 dpi. In addition, caspase-1 protein expression and inflammatory cell infiltration were induced after virus infection. These results indicated that ALV-J infection could trigger the caspase-1- mediated inflammatory response in chicks. Thus, an understanding of the inflammatory responses can provide a better insight into the pathogenicity of ALV-J and a possible anti-virus target for ALV-J infection.

  18. Interferon Response Factors 3 and 7 Protect against Chikungunya Virus Hemorrhagic Fever and Shock

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Penny A.; Wilson, Jane; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Babarit, Candice; Le, Thuy T.; Anraku, Itaru; Kumagai, Yutaro; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections can produce severe disease and mortality. Here we show that CHIKV infection of adult mice deficient in interferon response factors 3 and 7 (IRF3/7−/−) is lethal. Mortality was associated with undetectable levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in serum, ∼50- and ∼10-fold increases in levels of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), respectively, increased virus replication, edema, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fever followed by hypothermia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, and raised hematocrits. These features are consistent with hemorrhagic shock and were also evident in infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice. In situ hybridization suggested CHIKV infection of endothelium, fibroblasts, skeletal muscle, mononuclear cells, chondrocytes, and keratinocytes in IRF3/7−/− mice; all but the latter two stained positive in wild-type mice. Vaccination protected IRF3/7−/− mice, suggesting that defective antibody responses were not responsible for mortality. IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways were primarily responsible for IFN-α/β induction, with IRF7 being upregulated >100-fold in infected wild-type mice. These studies suggest that inadequate IFN-α/β responses following virus infection can be sufficient to induce hemorrhagic fever and shock, a finding with implications for understanding severe CHIKV disease and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. PMID:22761364

  19. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell’s gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Results Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus

  20. Robust Research and Rapid Response: The Plum Pox Virus Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Theodore R.; Bridger, Jeffrey C.; Travis, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Universities are frequently criticized for being unresponsive to the needs of their stakeholders. In response to this perception, many institutions of higher learning have taken steps to become more productively engaged with the people, organizations, and communities they serve. In this article, we analyze the process of engagement by focusing on…

  1. Involvement of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) MKK6 in response to potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Ana; Coll, Anna; Dobnik, David; Baebler, Spela; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have crucial roles in the regulation of plant development and in plant responses to stress. Plant recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or pathogen-derived effector proteins has been shown to trigger activation of several MAPKs. This then controls defence responses, including synthesis and/or signalling of defence hormones and activation of defence related genes. The MAPK cascade genes are highly complex and interconnected, and thus the precise signalling mechanisms in specific plant-pathogen interactions are still not known. Here we investigated the MAPK signalling network involved in immune responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Potato virus Y, an important potato pathogen worldwide. Sequence analysis was performed to identify the complete MAPK kinase (MKK) family in potato, and to identify those regulated in the hypersensitive resistance response to Potato virus Y infection. Arabidopsis has 10 MKK family members, of which we identified five in potato and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), and eight in Nicotiana benthamiana. Among these, StMKK6 is the most strongly regulated gene in response to Potato virus Y. The salicylic acid treatment revealed that StMKK6 is regulated by the hormone that is in agreement with the salicylic acid-regulated domains found in the StMKK6 promoter. The involvement of StMKK6 in potato defence response was confirmed by localisation studies, where StMKK6 accumulated strongly only in Potato-virus-Y-infected plants, and predominantly in the cell nucleus. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, we identified three StMKK6 targets downstream in the MAPK cascade: StMAPK4_2, StMAPK6 and StMAPK13. These data together provide further insight into the StMKK6 signalling module and its involvement in plant defence.

  2. Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Differentially Affects the Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Response and Mitochondrial Apoptosis Mediated by RIG-I/MAVS

    PubMed Central

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens maintained by noncytolytic persistent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts. Despite high levels of viral replication, persistently infected carrier hosts show only mildly elevated levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) has been identified as a potent IFN-I antagonist capable of blocking activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via the retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. Another important mechanism of host innate antiviral defense is represented by virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis via RIG-I/MAVS and IRF3. In the present study, we investigated the ability of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to interfere with RIG-I/MAVS-dependent apoptosis. We found that LCMV does not induce apoptosis at any time during infection. While LCMV efficiently blocked induction of IFN-I via RIG-I/MAVS in response to superinfection with cytopathic RNA viruses, virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis remained fully active in LCMV-infected cells. Notably, in LCMV-infected cells, RIG-I was dispensable for virus-induced apoptosis via MAVS. Our study reveals that LCMV infection efficiently suppresses induction of IFN-I but does not interfere with the cell's ability to undergo virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis as a strategy of innate antiviral defense. The RIG-I independence of mitochondrial apoptosis in LCMV-infected cells provides the first evidence that arenaviruses can reshape apoptotic signaling according to their needs. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that are maintained in their rodent hosts by persistent infection. Persistent virus is able to subvert the cellular interferon response, a powerful branch of the innate antiviral defense. Here, we investigated the ability of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to

  3. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth.

  4. Inherited disorders of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-08-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as a physiological response to blood vessel injury and bleeding, which entails a co-ordinated process involving the blood vessel, platelets, and blood clotting proteins (i.e. coagulation factors). Hemostasis can be divided into primary and secondary components. The former rapidly initiates after endothelial damage and is characterized by vascular contraction, platelet adhesion, and formation of a soft aggregate plug. The latter is initiated following the release of tissue factor and involves a complex sequence of events known as the blood coagulation cascade, encompassing serial steps where each coagulation factor activates another in a chain reaction that culminates in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Patients carrying abnormalities of the coagulation cascade (i.e. deficiencies of coagulation factors) have an increased bleeding tendency, where the clinical severity is mostly dependent upon the type and the plasma level of the factor affected. These disorders also impose a heavy medical and economic burden on individual patients and society in general. The aim of this article is to provide a general overview on the pathophysiology, clinics, diagnostics, and therapy of inherited disorders of coagulation factors.

  5. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth. PMID:27491196

  6. Analysis of Antiviral Response in Human Epithelial Cells Infected with Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Devhare, Pradip B.; Chatterjee, Subhashis N.; Arankalle, Vidya A.; Lole, Kavita S.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of enterically transmitted acute hepatitis in developing nations and occurs in sporadic and epidemic forms. The disease may become severe with high mortality (20%) among pregnant women. Due to lack of efficient cell culture system and small animal model, early molecular events of HEV infection are not yet known. In the present study, human lung epithelial cells, A549, were infected with HEV to monitor expression levels of genes/proteins in antiviral pathways. Both live and UV inactivated virus elicited robust induction of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and RANTES within 12 h of infection. Cells exposed to soluble capsid protein showed no induction suggesting the capsid structure and not the protein being detected as the pathogen pattern by cells. A delayed up-regulation of type I interferon genes only by the live virus at 48 h post HEV infection indicated the need of virus replication. However, absence of secreted interferons till 96 h suggested possible involvement of post-transcriptional regulation of type I IFN expression. HEV infected cells showed activation of both NF-κB and IRF3 transcription factors when seen at protein levels; however, reporter gene assays showed predominant expression via NF-κB promoter as compared to IRF3 promoter. Knockdown experiments done using siRNAs showed involvement of MyD88 and TRIF adaptors in generating antiviral response thus indicating role of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR3 in sensing viral molecules. MAVS knockdown surprisingly enhanced only proinflammatory cytokines and not type I IFNs. This suggested that HEV not only down-regulates RIG-I helicase like receptor mediated IFN induction but also employs MAVS in curtailing host inflammatory response. Our findings uncover an early cellular response in HEV infection and associated molecular mechanisms suggesting the potential role of inflammatory response triggered by HEV infection in host immune response and

  7. T-lymphocyte responses in guinea pigs vaccinated with foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bartels, T; Schäfer, H; Liebermann, H; Burger, R; Beyer, J

    1994-03-01

    The guinea pig provides an alternative experimental model for analysis of the immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The cellular immune response against FMDV in this experimental animal is unknown and was analyzed by in vivo and in vitro studies. In guinea pigs immunized with an FMDV A5 vaccine, a marked change in T-lymphocyte count appeared. For analyzing which functional T-cell compartment was affected, immunofluorescence studies, using monoclonal antibodies directed against differentiation antigens on guinea pig lymphoid cells, were performed. The proliferating T-cells were predominantly CD4-positive and, therefore, helper cells. T-cells from these animals were re-stimulated in vitro with homologous inactivated virus. The antigen-specific proliferative response of the T-cells in vitro was measured using the thymidine incorporation assay. A proliferative response to FMDV was observed that depended on the dose of the antigen. High concentration of virus had an inhibitory effect on T-cell proliferation. These data indicate that the guinea pig is a useful model for analysis of T-cell mediated mechanisms in the pathogenesis and immunity of foot-and-mouth disease. PMID:7909182

  8. Inheritance of immune responsiveness, life span, and disease incidence in interline crosses of mice selected for high or low multispecific antibody production.

    PubMed

    Covelli, V; Mouton, D; Di Majo, V; Bouthillier, Y; Bangrazi, C; Mevel, J C; Rebessi, S; Doria, G; Biozzi, G

    1989-02-15

    High (H) and low (L) antibody responder lines of mice separated by selective breeding present a maximal interline difference in antibody (Ab) response to Ag of different specificities (general genetic regulation). The analysis of SRBC agglutinin response in H line, L line, F1 hybrids, F2, and backcross segregants demonstrates that Ab responsiveness is a polygenic trait regulated by the additive interaction of 5 to 7 independent loci, with an incomplete dominance (44% +/- 7%) of the high response character, and a 30% +/- 10% impact of the environmental factors. The life span of H, L, F1, F2, and backcross populations is correlated positively with 2-ME-resistant agglutinin response (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001) and negatively with 2-ME-sensitive agglutinin response (r = 0.95, p = 0.01) (interpopulation correlation). Similar correlations are also observed in individuals of the various populations, especially in F1 x L backcross, in which the largest phenotypic variance is found. The positive correlation between Ab responsiveness and life span was confirmed by ELISA titration for distinct IgG isotypes (intrapopulation correlation). Malignant lymphomas and chronic nephritis were the two most common diseases observed. The age-adjusted incidence of such diseases, which is largely affected by environmental factors, accounts for the longer life span of H, as compared with L, mouse populations. The longevity of the 30% or less survivors, chiefly determined by the rate of physiologic aging, is a polygenic character regulated by the cumulative interaction of 3 to 7 independent loci, with a complete dominance of the long life trait and an impact of the environmental factors of about 60%. Thus we have grounds for regarding general Ab responsiveness and life span as polygenic traits regulated by a small number of identical or closely linked gene loci, and immune responsiveness as a defense mechanism against neoplastic and inflammatory diseases.

  9. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  10. Transcription analysis on response of swine lung to H1N1 swine influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a mild, highly contagious, respiratory disease, swine influenza always damages the innate immune systems, and increases susceptibility to secondary infections which results in considerable morbidity and mortality in pigs. Nevertheless, the systematical host response of pigs to swine influenza virus infection remains largely unknown. To explore it, a time-course gene expression profiling was performed for comprehensive analysis of the global host response induced by H1N1 swine influenza virus in pigs. Results At the early stage of H1N1 swine virus infection, pigs were suffering mild respiratory symptoms and pathological changes. A total of 268 porcine genes showing differential expression (DE) after inoculation were identified to compare with the controls on day 3 post infection (PID) (Fold change ≥ 2, p < 0.05). The DE genes were involved in many vital functional classes, mainly including signal transduction, immune response, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and cell-cell signalling. Noticeably, the genes associated with immune and inflammatory response showed highly overexpressed. Through the pathway analysis, the significant pathways mainly concerned with Cell adhesion molecules, Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, suggesting that the host took different strategies to activate these pathways so as to prevent virus infections at the early stage. However, on PID 7, the predominant function classes of DE genes included signal transduction, metabolism, transcription, development and transport. Furthermore, the most significant pathways switched to PPAR signaling pathway and complement and coagulation cascades, showing that the host might start to repair excessive tissue damage by anti-inflammatory functions. These results on PID 7 demonstrated beneficial turnover for host to prevent excessive inflammatory damage and recover the normal state by activating these clusters of genes

  11. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  12. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Cellular Stress Responses: Impact on Replication and Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Ortiz, Sandra L.; Zamorano Cuervo, Natalia; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised adults. Despite decades of research, a complete integrated picture of RSV-host interaction is still missing. Several cellular responses to stress are involved in the host-response to many virus infections. The endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function leads to activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) to restore homeostasis. Formation of cytoplasmic stress granules containing translationally stalled mRNAs is a means to control protein translation. Production of reactive oxygen species is balanced by an antioxidant response to prevent oxidative stress and the resulting damages. In recent years, ongoing research has started to unveil specific regulatory interactions of RSV with these host cellular stress responses. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms evolved by RSV to induce, subvert or manipulate the ER stress, the stress granule and oxidative stress responses. We summarize the evidence linking these stress responses with the regulation of RSV replication and the associated pathogenesis. PMID:27187445

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Cellular Stress Responses: Impact on Replication and Physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Ortiz, Sandra L; Zamorano Cuervo, Natalia; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised adults. Despite decades of research, a complete integrated picture of RSV-host interaction is still missing. Several cellular responses to stress are involved in the host-response to many virus infections. The endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function leads to activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) to restore homeostasis. Formation of cytoplasmic stress granules containing translationally stalled mRNAs is a means to control protein translation. Production of reactive oxygen species is balanced by an antioxidant response to prevent oxidative stress and the resulting damages. In recent years, ongoing research has started to unveil specific regulatory interactions of RSV with these host cellular stress responses. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms evolved by RSV to induce, subvert or manipulate the ER stress, the stress granule and oxidative stress responses. We summarize the evidence linking these stress responses with the regulation of RSV replication and the associated pathogenesis. PMID:27187445

  15. Interferon Lambda Alleles Predict Innate Antiviral Immune Responses and Hepatitis C Virus Permissiveness

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Timothy; Imanaka, Naoko; Marukian, Svetlana; Dorner, Marcus; Liu, Peng; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can result in viral chronicity or clearance. Although host genetics and particularly genetic variation in the interferon lambda (IFNL) locus are associated with spontaneous HCV clearance and treatment success, the mechanisms guiding these clinical outcomes remain unknown. Using a laser capture microdissection-driven unbiased systems virology approach, we isolated and transcriptionally profiled HCV-infected and adjacent primary human hepatocytes (PHH) approaching single cell resolution. An innate antiviral immune signature dominated the transcriptional response, but differed in magnitude and diversity between HCV-infected and adjacent cells. Molecular signatures associated with more effective antiviral control were determined by comparing donors with high and low infection frequencies. Cells from donors with clinically unfavorable IFNL genotypes were infected at a greater frequency and exhibited dampened antiviral and cell death responses. These data suggest that early virus-host interactions, particularly host genetics and induction of innate immunity, critically determine the outcome of HCV infection. PMID:24528865

  16. Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Host responses that drive pathogenesis are likely to be targets for prevention or therapy. Host responses to Lassa or its related arenaviruses have been monitored in cell culture, in animal models of hemorrhagic fever, in Lassa-infected nonhuman primates and, to a limited extent, in infected human beings. Here, we describe results from those studies and discuss potential targets for reducing virus replication and mitigating disease. PMID:25844088

  17. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L; Compans, Richard W; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-10-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed "antigenic subversion." To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection.

  18. Induction and Antagonism of Antiviral Responses in Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Pediatric Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Villenave, Rémi; Broadbent, Lindsay; Douglas, Isobel; Lyons, Jeremy D.; Coyle, Peter V.; Teng, Michael N.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Heaney, Liam G.; Shields, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Airway epithelium is the primary target of many respiratory viruses. However, virus induction and antagonism of host responses by human airway epithelium remains poorly understood. To address this, we developed a model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection based on well-differentiated pediatric primary bronchial epithelial cell cultures (WD-PBECs) that mimics hallmarks of RSV disease in infants. RSV is the most important respiratory viral pathogen in young infants worldwide. We found that RSV induces a potent antiviral state in WD-PBECs that was mediated in part by secreted factors, including interferon lambda 1 (IFN-λ1)/interleukin-29 (IL-29). In contrast, type I IFNs were not detected following RSV infection of WD-PBECs. IFN responses in RSV-infected WD-PBECs reflected those in lower airway samples from RSV-hospitalized infants. In view of the prominence of IL-29, we determined whether recombinant IL-29 treatment of WD-PBECs before or after infection abrogated RSV replication. Interestingly, IL-29 demonstrated prophylactic, but not therapeutic, potential against RSV. The absence of therapeutic potential reflected effective RSV antagonism of IFN-mediated antiviral responses in infected cells. Our data are consistent with RSV nonstructural proteins 1 and/or 2 perturbing the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, with concomitant reduced expression of antiviral effector molecules, such as MxA/B. Antagonism of Jak-STAT signaling was restricted to RSV-infected cells in WD-PBEC cultures. Importantly, our study provides the rationale to further explore IL-29 as a novel RSV prophylactic. IMPORTANCE Most respiratory viruses target airway epithelium for infection and replication, which is central to causing disease. However, for most human viruses we have a poor understanding of their interactions with human airway epithelium. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral pathogen of young infants. To help understand RSV interactions with pediatric

  19. Culicoides Midge Bites Modulate the Host Response and Impact on Bluetongue Virus Infection in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pages, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Viarouge, Cyril; Lorca-Oro, Cristina; Jouneau, Luc; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes, David; Pujols, Joan; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV) induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses. PMID:24421899

  20. Culicoides midge bites modulate the host response and impact on bluetongue virus infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pages, Nonito; Bréard, Emmanuel; Urien, Céline; Talavera, Sandra; Viarouge, Cyril; Lorca-Oro, Cristina; Jouneau, Luc; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes, David; Pujols, Joan; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV) induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses.

  1. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive virus replication and spread during a clinically silent latent period of 10–14 days. The first appearance of the disease is a 2–3 day prodrome of fever, runny nose, cough, and conjunctivitis that is followed by a characteristic maculopapular rash that spreads from the face and trunk to the extremities. The rash is a manifestation of the MeV-specific type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell adaptive immune response with lymphocyte infiltration into tissue sites of MeV replication and coincides with clearance of infectious virus. However, clearance of viral RNA from blood and tissues occurs over weeks to months after resolution of the rash and is associated with a period of immunosuppression. However, during viral RNA clearance, MeV-specific antibody also matures in type and avidity and T cell functions evolve from type 1 to type 2 and 17 responses that promote B cell development. Recovery is associated with sustained levels of neutralizing antibody and life-long protective immunity. PMID:27754341

  2. Experimental animal model for analyzing immunobiological responses following vaccination with formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Akihito; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV) vaccine was developed in the 1960s. However, this vaccine does not prevent infection in RSV-naïve recipients and has the paradoxical effect of increasing the severity of RSV illness following natural infection, which has been a major obstacle to developing RSV vaccines. Several experimental animal models for determining the cause of the severe symptoms in FI-RSV recipients have been developed. In the present study, cotton rats immunized with FI-RSV were challenged with RSV and histopathological findings and recovery of infectious virus were studied. Copy numbers of mRNA of Th1 and Th2 cytokines were measured in lung tissues to gain better understanding of their immune responses. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and prominent interstitial pneumonitis were observed in the FI-RSV group, as was induction of mRNA of Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and RANTES. Rats immunized with recombinant measles virus expressing the RSV F protein (MVAIK/RSV/F) and those treated with anti-RSV mAb (palivizumab) showed very mild interstitial pneumonitis. Amounts of mRNA of IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-4 were higher in the MVAIK/RSV/F group. Administration of palivizumab before RSV challenge decreased the severity of interstitial pneumonitis in the FI-RSV group. FI-RSV induced skewed Th2 responses, resulting in severe inflammatory responses. PMID:26865035

  3. Kinetics of Immune Responses in Deer Mice Experimentally Infected with Sin Nombre Virus

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Retamar, Mariana; Feinstein, Shira; Prescott, Joseph; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Podell, Brendan; Peters, Staci; Ye, Chunyan; Black, William C.; Hjelle, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Deer mice are the principal reservoir hosts of Sin Nombre virus, the etiologic agent of most hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome cases in North America. Infection of deer mice results in persistence without conspicuous pathology, and most, if not all, infected mice remain infected for life, with periods of viral shedding. The kinetics of viral load, histopathology, virus distribution, and immune gene expression in deer mice were examined. Viral antigen was detected as early as 5 days postinfection and peaked on day 15 in the lungs, hearts, kidneys, and livers. Viral RNA levels varied substantially but peaked on day 15 in the lungs and heart, and antinucleocapsid IgG antibodies appeared in some animals on day 10, but a strong neutralizing antibody response failed to develop during the 20-day experiment. No clinical signs of disease were observed in any of the infected deer mice. Most genes were repressed on day 2, suggesting a typical early downregulation of gene expression often observed in viral infections. Several chemokine and cytokine genes were elevated, and markers of a T cell response occurred but then declined days later. Splenic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) expression was elevated early in infection, declined, and then was elevated again late in infection. Together, these data suggest that a subtle immune response that fails to clear the virus occurs in deer mice. PMID:22787210

  4. A dsRNA-binding protein of a complex invertebrate DNA virus suppresses the Drosophila RNAi response

    PubMed Central

    Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; van Cleef, Koen W.R.; Venselaar, Hanka; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate RNA viruses are targets of the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, which limits virus infection by degrading viral RNA substrates. Several insect RNA viruses encode suppressor proteins to counteract this antiviral response. We recently demonstrated that the dsDNA virus Invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (IIV-6) induces an RNAi response in Drosophila. Here, we show that RNAi is suppressed in IIV-6-infected cells and we mapped RNAi suppressor activity to the viral protein 340R. Using biochemical assays, we reveal that 340R binds long dsRNA and prevents Dicer-2-mediated processing of long dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We demonstrate that 340R additionally binds siRNAs and inhibits siRNA loading into the RNA-induced silencing complex. Finally, we show that 340R is able to rescue a Flock House virus replicon that lacks its viral suppressor of RNAi. Together, our findings indicate that, in analogy to RNA viruses, DNA viruses antagonize the antiviral RNAi response. PMID:25274730

  5. Hepatitis C virus strategies to evade the specific-T cell response: a possible mission favoring its persistence.

    PubMed

    Quarleri, Jorge Fabián; Oubiña, José Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small, enveloped RNA virus. The number of HCV-infected individuals worldwide is estimated to be approximately 200 million. The vast majority of HCV infections persist, with up to 80% of all cases leading to chronic hepatitis associated with liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The interaction between HCV and the host have a pivotal role in viral fitness, persistence, pathogenicity, and disease progression. The control of HCV infection requires both effective innate and adaptive immune responses. The HCV clearance during acute infection is associated with an early induction of the innate and a delayed initiation of the adaptive immune responses. However, in the vast majority of acute HCV infections, these responses are overcome and the virus persistence almost inexorably occurs. Recently, several host- and virus-related mechanisms responsible for the failure of both the innate and the adaptive immune responses have been recognized. Among the latter, the wide range of escape mutations to evade the specific-T-and B-cell responses as well as the T cell anergy and the CD8+ T cell exhaustion together with the interference with its function after prolonged virus exposure hold a pivotal role. Other HCV strategies include the modification or manipulation of molecules playing key roles in the induction of the interferon response and its induced effector proteins. In this review, we attempt to gain insights on the main T cell immune evasion strategies used by the virus in order to favor its persistence. PMID:26626636

  6. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Michelle P; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-09-08

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4(+) T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses.

  7. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Michelle P.; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4+ T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses. PMID:27604323

  8. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Michelle P; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4(+) T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses. PMID:27604323

  9. Induction of antibody responses in the common mucosal immune system by respiratory syncytical virus immunostimulating complexes.

    PubMed

    Hu, K F; Ekström, J; Merza, M; Lövgren-Bengtsson, K; Morein, B

    1999-05-01

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) containing envelope proteins of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were explored as a mucosal delivery system for the capacity of inducing a common mucosal antibody response. Two intranasal (i.n.) administrations of BALB/c mice with ISCOMs induced potent serum IgG, and strong IgA responses to RSV locally in the lungs and the upper respiratory, and remotely in the genital and the intestinal tracts. Virtually no measurable IgA response was found in these mucosal organs after two subcutaneous (s.c.) immunizations. Virus neutralizing (VN) antibodies were detected in serum and in all of the mucosal organ extracts after both s.c. and i.n. immunizations indicating that the neutralizing epitopes were preserved after both mucosal and parenteral modes of administration. While the mucosal IgA response appears to be of mucosal origin, the IgG antibodies to RSV detected in the mucosal organs were likely of serum origin. However, the mucosal VN antibodies correlated with the IgG rather than the IgA levels. An enhanced IgA response to gp120 in various mucosal organs was recorded after i.n. immunization with gp120 incorporated in RSV ISCOMs, indicating a role of RSV envelope proteins in enhancing and targeting mucosal responses to passenger antigens. PMID:10363675

  10. Synthetic generation of influenza vaccine viruses for rapid response to pandemics.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Philip R; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Gibson, Daniel G; Wentworth, David E; Stockwell, Timothy B; Algire, Mikkel A; Alperovich, Nina; Barro, Mario; Brown, David M; Craig, Stewart; Dattilo, Brian M; Denisova, Evgeniya A; De Souza, Ivna; Eickmann, Markus; Dugan, Vivien G; Ferrari, Annette; Gomila, Raul C; Han, Liqun; Judge, Casey; Mane, Sarthak; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Merryman, Chuck; Palladino, Giuseppe; Palmer, Gene A; Spencer, Terika; Strecker, Thomas; Trusheim, Heidi; Uhlendorff, Jennifer; Wen, Yingxia; Yee, Anthony C; Zaveri, Jayshree; Zhou, Bin; Becker, Stephan; Donabedian, Armen; Mason, Peter W; Glass, John I; Rappuoli, Rino; Venter, J Craig

    2013-05-15

    During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, vaccines for the virus became available in large quantities only after human infections peaked. To accelerate vaccine availability for future pandemics, we developed a synthetic approach that very rapidly generated vaccine viruses from sequence data. Beginning with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences, we combined an enzymatic, cell-free gene assembly technique with enzymatic error correction to allow rapid, accurate gene synthesis. We then used these synthetic HA and NA genes to transfect Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were qualified for vaccine manufacture with viral RNA expression constructs encoding HA and NA and plasmid DNAs encoding viral backbone genes. Viruses for use in vaccines were rescued from these MDCK cells. We performed this rescue with improved vaccine virus backbones, increasing the yield of the essential vaccine antigen, HA. Generation of synthetic vaccine seeds, together with more efficient vaccine release assays, would accelerate responses to influenza pandemics through a system of instantaneous electronic data exchange followed by real-time, geographically dispersed vaccine production. PMID:23677594

  11. Synthetic generation of influenza vaccine viruses for rapid response to pandemics.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Philip R; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Gibson, Daniel G; Wentworth, David E; Stockwell, Timothy B; Algire, Mikkel A; Alperovich, Nina; Barro, Mario; Brown, David M; Craig, Stewart; Dattilo, Brian M; Denisova, Evgeniya A; De Souza, Ivna; Eickmann, Markus; Dugan, Vivien G; Ferrari, Annette; Gomila, Raul C; Han, Liqun; Judge, Casey; Mane, Sarthak; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Merryman, Chuck; Palladino, Giuseppe; Palmer, Gene A; Spencer, Terika; Strecker, Thomas; Trusheim, Heidi; Uhlendorff, Jennifer; Wen, Yingxia; Yee, Anthony C; Zaveri, Jayshree; Zhou, Bin; Becker, Stephan; Donabedian, Armen; Mason, Peter W; Glass, John I; Rappuoli, Rino; Venter, J Craig

    2013-05-15

    During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, vaccines for the virus became available in large quantities only after human infections peaked. To accelerate vaccine availability for future pandemics, we developed a synthetic approach that very rapidly generated vaccine viruses from sequence data. Beginning with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences, we combined an enzymatic, cell-free gene assembly technique with enzymatic error correction to allow rapid, accurate gene synthesis. We then used these synthetic HA and NA genes to transfect Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were qualified for vaccine manufacture with viral RNA expression constructs encoding HA and NA and plasmid DNAs encoding viral backbone genes. Viruses for use in vaccines were rescued from these MDCK cells. We performed this rescue with improved vaccine virus backbones, increasing the yield of the essential vaccine antigen, HA. Generation of synthetic vaccine seeds, together with more efficient vaccine release assays, would accelerate responses to influenza pandemics through a system of instantaneous electronic data exchange followed by real-time, geographically dispersed vaccine production.

  12. Regulation of virus-induced inflammatory response by Dunaliella salina alga extract in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Chen, Yi-Chen; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Yang, Deng-Jye; Chen, Shih-Yin; Chang, Tien-Jye; Chang, Yuan-Yen

    2014-09-01

    Previous reports have suggested that many constituents within various algal samples are able to attenuate LPS-induced inflammatory effects. To date no report has been published on the regulation of virus-induced inflammatory response of Dunaliella salina carotenoid extract. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effect of D. salina carotenoid extract on pseudorabies virus (PRV)-infected RAW 264.7 macrophages was investigated. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of D. salina carotenoid extract on PRV-infected RAW 264.7 cells by measuring cell viability, cytotoxicity, production of inflammatory mediators such as NO, iNOS, COX-2, pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-virus replication by plaque assay. We found down-regulation of the expression of the iNOS, COX-2 and pro-inflammatory genes IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Although there was no effect on viral replication, there were tendencies toward lower virus titer and tendencies toward higher cell survival. Most importantly, we found that inhibition of TLR9, PI3K and Akt phosphorylation plays a crucial role in the extract-mediated NF-κB regulation by modulating IKK-IκB signaling in PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results indicate that D. salina carotenoid extracts inhibited inflammation by inhibition of NF-κB activation by TLR9 dependent via PI3K/Akt inactivation.

  13. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  14. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.; Miller, William B.

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  15. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-07-08

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state.

  16. Drosophila melanogaster does not exhibit a behavioural fever response when infected with Drosophila C virus.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Pieter A; White, Craig R; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Behavioural fever is a widely conserved response to infection. The host increases body temperature (Tb) by altering their preferred temperature (Tp), generating a fever and delaying or avoiding pathogen-induced mortality. This response is not ubiquitous in insects, however, although few studies have investigated this response to viral infection. Here, we examined the change in Tp of Drosophila in response to virus infection using a thermal gradient. No difference in Tp was observed. We suggest that the lack of behavioural fever could be due to the increased energy cost of maintaining a higher Tb whilst the immune response is active. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assay for changes in Tp of infected Drosophila.

  17. Early growth response-1 protein is induced by JC virus infection and binds and regulates the JC virus promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Romagnoli, Luca; Sariyer, Ilker K.; Tung, Jacqueline; Feliciano, Mariha; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Del Valle, Luis; Ferrante, Pasquale; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut; White, Martyn K.

    2008-06-05

    JC virus (JCV) is a human polyomavirus that can emerge from a latent state to cause the cytolytic destruction of oligodendrocytes in the brain resulting in the fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Previous studies described a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element in the JCV non-coding control region (NCCR) that is involved in the response of JCV to cytokines. This consists of a 23 base pair GGA/C rich sequence (GRS) near the replication origin (5112 to + 4) that contains potential binding sites for Sp1 and Egr-1. Gel shift analysis showed that Egr-1, but not Sp1, bound to GRS. Evidence is presented that the GRS gel shift seen on cellular stimulation is due to Egr-1. Thus, TPA-induced GRS gel shift could be blocked by antibody to Egr-1. Further, the TPA-induced GRS DNA/protein complex was isolated and found to contain Egr-1 by Western blot. No other Egr-1 sites were found in the JCV NCCR. Functionally, Egr-1 was found to stimulate transcription of JCV late promoter but not early promoter reporter constructs. Mutation of the Egr-1 site abrogated Egr-1 binding and virus with the mutated Egr-1 site showed markedly reduced VP1 expression and DNA replication. Infection of primary astrocytes by wild-type JCV induced Egr-1 nuclear expression that was maximal at 5-10 days post-infection. Finally, upregulation of Egr-1 was detected in PML by immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that Egr-1 induction may be important in the life cycle of JCV and PML pathogenesis.

  18. The role of B cells in the immune response to pestivirus (classical Swine Fever virus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Trevejo, J L; Pedrera, M; Raya, A I; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2006-07-01

    Pigs inoculated with the Alfort 187 isolate of classical swine fever (CSF) virus were used to study the immunological mechanisms associated with the humoral immune response in the disease. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the B-cell population (lambda light chain [C-lambda]-positive, immunoglobulins [Ig]-M-positive, and IgG-positive were demonstrated in the spleen, thymus and ileocaecal lymph node. Blood and serum samples were used to examine changes in leucocytes, albumin/globulin ratios and specific antibodies against CSF virus titration. Despite the lymphoid depletion shown by infected animals, an increase in B cells and potentially immunoglobulin-producing C-lambda+ plasma cells was observed in the lymphoid organs from the onset of disease. The increase in C-lambda+ B cells was matched by a parallel increase in IgM+ cells, which attained peak values from 7 days post-inoculation (dpi), while IgG+ cells increased from 11 dpi onwards. The enhanced biosynthetic capacity of these cells may have been linked to the initiation of a humoral response to CSF virus, and to the progressive decline in the albumin/globulin ratios of inoculated animals. Activation, proliferation and differentiation of B cells coincided with the presence of viral antigen, and with an intense phagocytic and biosynthetic activity of monocytes-macrophages and T lymphocytes. The previously reported increase of cytokine (TNFalpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6) production by monocytes-macrophages, and the release of IL-2, IL-4 and IFNgamma by T lymphocytes, may play a role in the initiation of the humoral immune response in CSF. These changes may have influenced the late appearance of virus-specific antibodies in the study, as well as the progressive increase of immunoglobulins.

  19. Treating the Host Response to Ebola Virus Disease with Generic Statins and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Rordam, Ole Martin; Opal, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatments targeting the Ebola virus may eventually be shown to work, but they will not have an impact on overall Ebola mortality in West Africa. Endothelial dysfunction is responsible for the fluid and electrolyte imbalances seen in Ebola patients. Because inexpensive generic statins and angiotensin receptor blockers restore endothelial barrier integrity, they can be used to treat the host response in these patients. In Sierra Leone, approximately 100 Ebola patients were treated with this combination, and reports indicate that survival was greatly improved. PMID:26106080

  20. Rhopalosiphum padi (Hemiptera: Aphididae) responses to volatile cues from Barley yellow dwarf virus-infected wheat.

    PubMed

    Medina-Ortega, Karla J; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Ngumbi, Esther; Jiménez-Martínez, Edgardo S; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2009-06-01

    In choice bioassays, Rhopalosiphum padi L. nonviruliferous apterae preferentially locate near volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-infected wheat plants compared with VOCs from noninfected plants. However, the specific VOCs responsible for R. padi responses are unknown. It is unclear also if R. padi responses to BYDV-infected wheat are caused by arrestment or attraction. Additionally, the responses of viruliferous apterae and nonviruliferous alate to BYDV-infected wheat have not been examined. R. padi responses were studied through emigration, immigration, and settling laboratory bioassays using BYDV-infected and noninfected wheat plants. Two wheat genotypes, virus-susceptible Lambert and virus-resistant Lambert-derived transgenic 103.1J expressing the BYDV-PAV coat protein gene, were evaluated. In a settling bioassay, alates preferentially settled on noninfected 103.1J. Responses of viruliferous and nonviruliferous R. padi to virus-infected, noninfected, and sham-inoculated (exposed to nonviruliferous aphids) Lambert and 103.1J were examined in separate bioassays. A paper leaf model served as a control. Immigration by viruliferous apterae was significantly lower toward the paper leaf model, but no significant differences were observed among plant treatments. Nonviruliferous apterae exhibited no significant differences in emigration among treatments, suggesting no arrestment occurred. Nonviruliferous apterae significantly preferred to immigrate toward BYDV-infected Lambert. Immigration toward the paper leaf model was significantly lower compared with plant treatments. Responses of R. padi to VOCs were tested by applying compounds to paper leaf models at concentrations designed to mimic those present in headspace of wheat plants. Nonviruliferous apterae immigrated in significantly greater numbers toward paper leaf models individually treated with nonanal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, decanal, caryophyllene, and undecane than

  1. Enveloped virus but not bacteria block IL-13 responses in human cord blood T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Svensson, A; Nordström, I; Rudin, A; Bergström, T; Eriksson, K

    2012-04-01

    Infections that occur early in life may have a beneficial effect on the immune system and thereby reduce the risk of allergen sensitization and/or allergic disease. It is not yet clear to what extent specific virus and/or bacteria can mediate this effect. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of virus and bacteria in CD4(+) T cell-derived cytokine production in newborns. We compared the effects of five bacteria (Staphlococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium bifidus) and seven virus (adenovirus, coronavirus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, influenza virus, morbillivirus and poliovirus) on the Th1/Th2 cytokine production in mixed lymphocyte reactions using CD4(+) T cells from cord blood cocultured with allogenic myeloid or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. When comparing the baseline cytokine production prior to microbial stimulation, we observed that cord plasmacytoid DC were stronger inducers of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) compared with cord myeloid DC and to adult DC. When adding microbes to these cultures, bacteria and virus differed in two major respects; Firstly, all enveloped viruses, but none of the bacteria, blocked Th2 (IL-13) production by cord CD4(+) cells. Secondly, all Gram-positive bacteria, but none of the virus, induced IL-12p40 responses, but the IL-12p40 responses did not affect Th1 cytokine production (IFN-γ). Instead, Th1 responses were correlated with the capacity to induce IFN-α secretion, which in cord cells were induced by S. aureus and influenza virus alone. These data imply that enveloped virus can deviate Th2 responses in human cord T cells.

  2. Dissection of the Antibody Response against Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins in Naturally Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen-Yu; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce de Leon, Manuel; Lou, Huan; Wald, Anna; Krummenacher, Claude; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the extent of the polyclonal antibody (PAb) repertoire elicited by herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins during natural infection and how these antibodies affect virus neutralization. Here, we examined IgGs from 10 HSV-seropositive individuals originally classified as high or low virus shedders. All PAbs neutralized virus to various extents. We determined which HSV entry glycoproteins these PAbs were directed against: glycoproteins gB, gD, and gC were recognized by all sera, but fewer sera reacted against gH/gL. We previously characterized multiple mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mapped those with high neutralizing activity to the crystal structures of gD, gB, and gH/gL. We used a biosensor competition assay to determine whether there were corresponding human antibodies to those epitopes. All 10 samples had neutralizing IgGs to gD epitopes, but there were variations in which epitopes were seen in individual samples. Surprisingly, only three samples contained neutralizing IgGs to gB epitopes. To further dissect the nature of these IgGs, we developed a method to select out gD- and gB-specific IgGs from four representative sera via affinity chromatography, allowing us to determine the contribution of antibodies against each glycoprotein to the overall neutralization capacity of the serum. In two cases, gD and gB accounted for all of the neutralizing activity against HSV-2, with a modest amount of HSV-1 neutralization directed against gC. In the other two samples, the dominant response was to gD. IMPORTANCE Antibodies targeting functional epitopes on HSV entry glycoproteins mediate HSV neutralization. Virus-neutralizing epitopes have been defined and characterized using murine monoclonal antibodies. However, it is largely unknown whether these same epitopes are targeted by the humoral response to HSV infection in humans. We have shown that during natural infection, virus-neutralizing antibodies are principally

  3. Evaluation of Humoral Response and Protective Efficacy of an Inactivated Vaccine Against Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Goats.

    PubMed

    Cosseddu, G M; Polci, A; Pinoni, C; Capobianco Dondona, A; Iapaolo, F; Orsini, G; Izzo, F; Bortone, G; Ronchi, F G; Di Ventura, M; El Harrak, M; Monaco, F

    2016-10-01

    Four goats were inoculated with an inactivated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) vaccine. Three unvaccinated goats were kept as controls. After 36 days, the four goats were revaccinated. The immune response was monitored by virus neutralization test showing that two doses of the vaccine were able to stimulate strong immune response in all the vaccinated animals. The vaccinated goat and the controls were challenged with virulent PPRV intranasally. After PPRV challenge, the three control goats showed fever, viremia and virus excretion through mucosal surfaces, whereas the vaccinated goats were fully protected against PPRV infection and replication. PMID:25594237

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes response dynamics after prime-boost vaccine regimens with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 canarypox and pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Arp, J; Rovinski, B; Sambhara, S; Tartaglia, J; Dekaban, G

    1999-01-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may represent significant immune mechanisms in the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and, therefore, CTL induction may be a fundamental goal in the development of an efficacious acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine. In the current study, prime-boost protocols were used to investigate the potential of noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pseudovirions (HIV PSV) in enhancing HIV-specific CTL responses in Balb/c mice primed with the recombinant canarypox vector, vCP205, encoding HIV-1 gp120 (MN strain) in addition to Gag/Protease (HIB strain). The prime-boost immunization regimens were administered intramuscularly and involved injections of vCP205 followed by boosts with HIV PSV. Previous vaccination strategies solely involving vCP205 had induced good cellular immune responses in uninfected human volunteers, despite some limitations. The use of genetically engineered HIV PSV was a logical step in the evaluation of whole noninfectious virus or inactivated virus vaccine strategies, particularly as a potential boosting agent for vCP205-primed recipients. Based on this current study, HIV PSV appeared to have the capability to effectively induce and boost cell-mediated HIV-1-specific responses. In order to observe the immune effects of HIV PSV in a prime-boost immunization strategy, both HIV vaccine immunogens required careful titration in vivo. This suggests that careful consideration should be given to the optimization of immunization protocols destined for human use.

  5. Tomato Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Fusarium Wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant–pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses. PMID:24804963

  6. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  7. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  8. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease. PMID:25601643

  9. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease.

  10. Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?

    PubMed

    Misiak, Rana Tawil; Wegienka, Ganesa; Zoratti, Edward

    2010-09-01

    A family history of an allergic condition is a well-accepted risk factor for the development of an allergic condition in an individual, particularly for allergic disorders such as asthma, eczema, and allergic rhinitis. However, the question of whether specific allergen sensitization is inherited requires a complicated answer, as environmental exposure plays an important role in the development of allergen-specific IgE. This article summarizes the findings of recent studies in the literature regarding what is known about the inheritance of specific allergens. Overall, properly collected and analyzed data appear to both support and refute the hypothesis that specific allergen sensitization is inherited, even when attempting to account for the complexities of varying study methodologies and the evaluation of diverse populations and communities. PMID:20574668

  11. Structural basis for suppression of a host antiviral response by influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Ma, Li-Chung; Xiao, Rong; Radvansky, Brian; Aramini, James; Zhao, Li; Marklund, Jesper; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Twu, Karen Y.; Arnold, Eddy; Krug, Robert M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics and high mortality pandemics. A major function of the viral NS1A protein, a virulence factor, is the inhibition of the production of IFN-β mRNA and other antiviral mRNAs. The NS1A protein of the human influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) virus inhibits the production of these antiviral mRNAs by binding the cellular 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), which is required for the 3′ end processing of all cellular pre-mRNAs. Here we report the 1.95-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between the second and third zinc finger domain (F2F3) of CPSF30 and the C-terminal domain of the Ud NS1A protein. The complex is a tetramer, in which each of two F2F3 molecules wraps around two NS1A effector domains that interact with each other head-to-head. This structure identifies a CPSF30 binding pocket on NS1A comprised of amino acid residues that are highly conserved among human influenza A viruses. Single amino acid changes within this binding pocket eliminate CPSF30 binding, and a recombinant Ud virus expressing an NS1A protein with such a substitution is attenuated and does not inhibit IFN-β pre-mRNA processing. This binding pocket is a potential target for antiviral drug development. The crystal structure also reveals that two amino acids outside of this pocket, F103 and M106, which are highly conserved (>99%) among influenza A viruses isolated from humans, participate in key hydrophobic interactions with F2F3 that stabilize the complex. PMID:18725644

  12. Structural Basis for Suppression of a Host Antiviral Response by Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Das,K.; Ma, L.; Xiao, R.; Radvansky, B.; Aramini, J.; Zhao, L.; Marklund, J.; Kuo, R.; Twu, K.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics and high mortality pandemics. A major function of the viral NS1A protein, a virulence factor, is the inhibition of the production of IFN-{beta}{beta} mRNA and other antiviral mRNAs. The NS1A protein of the human influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) virus inhibits the production of these antiviral mRNAs by binding the cellular 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), which is required for the 3' end processing of all cellular pre-mRNAs. Here we report the 1.95- Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between the second and third zinc finger domain (F2F3) of CPSF30 and the C-terminal domain of the Ud NS1A protein. The complex is a tetramer, in which each of two F2F3 molecules wraps around two NS1A effector domains that interact with each other head-to-head. This structure identifies a CPSF30 binding pocket on NS1A comprised of amino acid residues that are highly conserved among human influenza A viruses. Single amino acid changes within this binding pocket eliminate CPSF30 binding, and a recombinant Ud virus expressing an NS1A protein with such a substitution is attenuated and does not inhibit IFN-{beta} pre-mRNA processing. This binding pocket is a potential target for antiviral drug development. The crystal structure also reveals that two amino acids outside of this pocket, F103 and M106, which are highly conserved (>99%) among influenza A viruses isolated from humans, participate in key hydrophobic interactions with F2F3 that stabilize the complex.

  13. A Proinflammatory Role for Interleukin-22 in the Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Cobleigh, Melissa A.; Lian, Jian-Qi; Huang, Chang-Xing; Booth, Carmen J.; Bai, Xue-Fan; Robek, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS T-helper (Th)17 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-22 have immunomodulatory and protective properties in the liver and other tissues. IL-22 induces expression of proinflammatory genes, but is also mitogenic and anti-apoptotic in hepatocytes. Therefore, it could have multiple functions in the immune response to hepatitis B virus (HBV). METHODS We examined the role of IL-22 in regulating liver inflammation in HBV transgenic mice and measured levels of IL-22 in HBV-infected patients. RESULTS In HBV transgenic mice, injection of a single dose of IL-22 increased hepatic expression of proinflammatory genes, but did not directly inhibit virus replication. When splenocytes from HBV-immunized mice were transferred into HBV transgenic mice, the severity of the subsequent liver damage was ameliorated by neutralization of IL-22. In this model, IL-22 depletion did not affect interferon-γ–mediated noncytopathic inhibition of virus replication initiated by HBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, but it significantly inhibited recruitment of antigen–non-specific inflammatory cells into the liver. In patients with acute HBV infections, the percentage of Th17 cells in peripheral blood and concentration of IL-22 in serum were significantly increased. CONCLUSION IL-22 appears to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response following recognition of HBV by T cells in the liver. These findings might be relevant to the development of cytokine-based therapies for patients with HBV infection. PMID:21708106

  14. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian; Barth, Emanuel; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Carmelo, Victor A. O.; Collatz, Maximilian; Doose, Gero; Eggenhofer, Florian; Ewald, Jan; Fallmann, Jörg; Feldhahn, Lasse M.; Fricke, Markus; Gebauer, Juliane; Gruber, Andreas J.; Hufsky, Franziska; Indrischek, Henrike; Kanton, Sabina; Linde, Jörg; Mostajo, Nelly; Ochsenreiter, Roman; Riege, Konstantin; Rivarola-Duarte, Lorena; Sahyoun, Abdullah H.; Saunders, Sita J.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogel, Bertram; Wehner, Stefanie; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Grosse, Ivo; Hofacker, Ivo; Hoffmann, Steve; Kaleta, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F.; Becker, Stephan; Marz, Manja

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections. PMID:27713552

  15. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  16. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process. PMID:26906695

  17. Antibodies with 'Original Antigenic Sin' Properties Are Valuable Components of Secondary Immune Responses to Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Susanne L; Hensley, Scott E

    2016-08-01

    Human antibodies (Abs) elicited by influenza viruses often bind with a high affinity to past influenza virus strains, but paradoxically, do not bind to the viral strain actually eliciting the response. This phenomena is called 'original antigenic sin' (OAS) since this can occur at the expense of generating new de novo Abs. Here, we characterized the specificity and functionality of Abs elicited in mice that were sequentially exposed to two antigenically distinct H1N1 influenza virus strains. Many Abs elicited under these conditions had an OAS phenotype, in that they bound strongly to the viral strain used for the first exposure and very weakly to the viral strain used for the second exposure. We found that OAS and non-OAS Abs target the same general region of the influenza hemagglutinin protein and that B cells expressing these two types of Abs can be clonally-related. Surprisingly, although OAS Abs bound with very low affinities, some were able to effectively protect against an antigenically drifted viral strain following passive transfer in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that OAS Abs share some level of cross-reactivity between priming and recall viral strains and that B cells producing these Abs can be protective when recalled into secondary immune responses. PMID:27537358

  18. Translating innate response into long-lasting antibody response by the intrinsic antigen-adjuvant properties of papaya mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Ramírez, Elizabeth; Pérez-Flores, Rebeca; Majeau, Nathalie; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ramírez-Saldaña, Maricela; Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Becker, Ingeborg; Isibasi, Armando; Leclerc, Denis; López-Macías, Constantino

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the properties of a molecule involved in the efficient activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to long-lasting immunity is crucial for vaccine and adjuvant development. Here we show that the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is recognized by the immune system as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and as an antigen in mice (Pamptigen). A single immunization of PapMV without added adjuvant efficiently induced both cellular and specific long-lasting antibody responses. PapMV also efficiently activated innate immune responses, as shown by the induction of lipid raft aggregation, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages, and long-lasting adjuvant effects upon the specific antibody responses to model antigens. PapMV mixed with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) outer membrane protein C increased its protective capacity against challenge with S. typhi, revealing the intrinsic adjuvant properties of PapMV in the induction of immunity. Antigen-presenting cells loaded with PapMV efficiently induced antibody responses in vivo, which may link the innate and adaptive responses observed. PapMV recognition as a Pamptigen might be translated into long-lasting antibody responses and protection observed. These properties could be used in the development of new vaccine platforms. PMID:18070030

  19. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Fernández, Yolanda; Falcón, Ana; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK) as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection. PMID:27094326

  20. Virus-like particles as antigenic nanomaterials for inducing protective immune responses in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Patterson, Dustin P; Douglas, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    The lung is a major entry point for many of the most detrimental pathogens to human health. The onslaught of pathogens encountered by the lung is counteracted by protective immune responses that are generated locally, which can be stimulated through vaccine strategies to prevent pathogen infections. Here, we discuss the use of virus-like particles (VLPs), nonpathogen derivatives of viruses or protein cage structures, to construct new vaccines exploiting the lung as a site for immunostimulation. VLPs are unique in their ability to be engineered with near molecular level detail and knowledge of their composition and structure. A summary of research in developing VLP-based vaccines for the lung is presented that suggests promising results for future vaccine development. PMID:25325241

  1. Identification of a glucocorticoid-responsive element in Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, S R; Summers, W C

    1990-01-01

    Immortalization of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is complex and poorly understood. However, some evidence suggests that glucocorticoids influence this process. We identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in the BamHI C fragment of EBV which we call ES-1. In glucocorticoid-treated cells, ES-1 enhanced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter, as well as the EBV Bam-C promoter, from which several latent viral gene products are transcribed. By Northern blot analysis, glucocorticoid treatment enhanced transcription from the Bam-C promoter in Jijoye cells, a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line. In addition, the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor bound specifically to the ES-1 region. These glucocorticoid effects on the Bam-C promoter region may provide some insight into the process of EBV immortalization. Images PMID:2157866

  2. Hepatitis C virus evasion of adaptive immune responses: a model for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kelly P; Cox, Andrea L

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately 20% [corrected] of those acutely infected clear the infection, whereas the remaining 80% [corrected] progress to chronic infection. Hepatitis C thus provides a model in which successful and unsuccessful responses can be compared to better understand the human response to viral infection. Our laboratory studies the strategies by which HCV evades the adaptive immune response. This review describes the impact of viral mutation on T cell recognition, the role of cell surface inhibitory receptors in recognition of HCV, and the development of antibodies that neutralize HCV infection. Understanding what constitutes an effective immune response in the control of HCV may enable the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for HCV and other chronic viral infections.

  3. The host response and molecular pathogenesis associated with respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Oshansky, Christine M; Zhang, Wenliang; Moore, Elizabeth; Tripp, Ralph A

    2009-01-01

    Since the isolation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in 1956, its significance as an important human pathogen in infants, the elderly and the immunocompromised has been established. Many important mechanisms contributing to RSV infection, replication and disease pathogenesis have been uncovered; however, there is still insufficient knowledge in these and related areas, which must be addressed to facilitate the development of safe and effective vaccines and therapeutic treatments. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RSV infection, particularly the host-cell response and transcription profiles to RSV infection, is required to advance disease intervention strategies. Substantial information is accumulating regarding how RSV proteins modulate molecular signaling and regulation of cytokine and chemokine responses to infection, molecular signals regulating programmed cell death, and innate and adaptive immune responses to infection. This review discusses RSV manipulation of the host response to infection and related disease pathogenesis. PMID:19327115

  4. Pulmonary eosinophils and their role in immunopathologic responses to formalin-inactivated pneumonia virus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Qiu, Zhijun; Phipps, Simon; Foster, Paul S.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced disease is the term used to describe the aberrant Th2 skewed responses to naturally-acquired human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infection observed in individuals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated viral antigens. Here we explore this paradigm with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a pathogen that faithfully reproduces features of severe hRSV infection in a rodent host. We demonstrate that PVM infection in mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from PVM-infected cells (PVM Ags) yields Th2-skewed hypersensitivity, analogous to that observed in response to hRSV. Specifically, we detect elevated levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of PVM-infected mice that were vaccinated with PVM Ags, but not among mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from uninfected cells (Ctrl Ags). Interestingly, infection in PVM Ag-vaccinated mice was associated with a ~10-fold reduction in lung virus titer and protection against weight loss when compared to infected mice vaccinated with Ctrl Ags, despite the absence of serum neutralizing antibodies. Given recent findings documenting a role for eosinophils in promoting clearance of hRSV in vivo, we explored the role of eosinophils in altering the pathogenesis of disease with eosinophil-deficient mice. We found that eosinophil deficiency had no impact on virus titer in PVM Ags-vaccinated mice, nor on weight loss or levels of CCL11 (eotaxin-1), interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, or IL-13 in BAL fluid. However, levels of both IL-4 and CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α) in BAL fluid were markedly diminished in PVM Ag-vaccinated, PVM-infected eosinophil-deficient mice when compared to wild type controls (246 words). PMID:19542471

  5. Evaluation of long-term antibody responses to two inactivated bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) vaccines.

    PubMed

    González, Ana M; Arnaiz, Ignacio; Yus, Eduardo; Eiras, Carmen; Sanjuán, María; Diéguez, Francisco J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the serological response of heifers after vaccination with two inactivated bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) vaccines by means of various ELISA tests. Three dairy farms were selected from the Galicia region of Spain. In each herd, a batch of heifers to be vaccinated for the first time was selected and followed for 15 months. Heifers from farm 1 (n=25) were vaccinated with Vaccine A, whereas heifers from farm 2 (n=16) were vaccinated with Vaccine B. Heifers from farm 3 (n=17), where no BVDV vaccines were used, acted as controls. Blood samples were analyzed periodically for BVDV antibodies, using five commercial ELISAs, based on BVDV p80 antigen or whole virus. At the end of the study, none of the animals vaccinated with Vaccine A seroconverted according to p80 antibody status, whereas up to 80% tested positive by ELISA against whole virus antigen. For the animals vaccinated with Vaccine B, 2/16 animals seroconverted according to p80 antibody ELISAs, whereas all had seroconverted according to the ELISA against whole virus antigen. In most cases, based on the use of ELISAs to detect specific antibodies against the p80 protein, at 15 months post-vaccination with inactivated BVDV vaccines the responses did not seem to interfere with detection of antibody to BVDV infection. However, the finding of a small proportion of vaccinated animals seropositive against BVDV p80 antigen suggests that antibodies that interfere with diagnosis of BVDV infection within the herd could exist, even when using p80 ELISAs.

  6. Innate immunity to dengue virus infection and subversion of antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Green, Angela M; Beatty, P Robert; Hadjilaou, Alexandros; Harris, Eva

    2014-03-20

    Dengue is a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-DENV4) are spread primarily by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, whose geographic range continues to expand. Humans are the only host for epidemic strains of DENV, and the virus has developed sophisticated mechanisms to evade human innate immune responses. The host cell's first line of defense begins with an intracellular signaling cascade resulting in production of interferon α/β (IFN-α/β), which promotes intracellular antiviral responses and helps initiates the adaptive response during the course of DENV infection. In response, DENV has developed numerous ways to subvert these intracellular antiviral responses and directly inhibit cellular signaling cascades. Specifically, DENV manipulates the unfolded protein response and autophagy to counter cellular stress and delay apoptosis. The DENV non-structural protein NS4B and subgenomic flavivirus RNA interfere with the RNA interference pathway by inhibiting the RNase Dicer. During heterotypic secondary DENV infection, subneutralizing antibodies can enable viral uptake through Fcγ receptors and down-regulate signaling cascades initiated via the pattern recognition receptors TLR-3 and MDA5/RIG-I, thus reducing the antiviral state of the cell. The DENV NS2B/3 protein cleaves human STING/MITA, interfering with induction of IFN-α/β. Finally, DENV NS2A, NS4A, and NS4B complex together to block STAT1 phosphorylation, while NS5 binds and promotes degradation of human STAT2, thus preventing formation of the STAT1/STAT2 heterodimer and its transcriptional induction of interferon stimulating genes. Here, we discuss the host innate immune response to DENV and the mechanisms of immune evasion that DENV has developed to manipulate cellular antiviral responses. PMID:24316047

  7. Visualizing the beta interferon response in mice during infection with influenza A viruses expressing or lacking nonstructural protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kallfass, Carsten; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Staeheli, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The innate host defense against influenza virus is largely dependent on the type I interferon (IFN) system. However, surprisingly little is known about the cellular source of IFN in the infected lung. To clarify this question, we employed a reporter mouse that contains the firefly luciferase gene in place of the IFN-β-coding region. IFN-β-producing cells were identified either by simultaneous immunostaining of lungs for luciferase and cellular markers or by generating conditional reporter mice that express luciferase exclusively in defined cell types. Two different strains of influenza A virus were employed that either do or do not code for nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), which strongly suppresses innate immune responses of infected cells. We found that epithelial cells and lung macrophages, which represent the prime host cells for influenza viruses, showed vigorous IFN-β responses which, however, were severely reduced and delayed if the infecting virus was able to produce NS1. Interestingly, CD11c(+) cell populations that were either expressing or lacking macrophage markers produced the bulk of IFN-β at 48 h after infection with wild-type influenza A virus. Our results demonstrate that the virus-encoded IFN-antagonistic factor NS1 disarms specifically epithelial cells and lung macrophages, which otherwise would serve as main mediators of the early response against infection by influenza virus.

  8. Early clearance of Chikungunya virus in children is associated with a strong innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Simarmata, Diane; Ng, David Chun Ern; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry; Her, Zhisheng; Chow, Angela; Leo, Yee-Sin; Cardosa, Jane; Perera, David; Ooi, Mong H; Ng, Lisa F P

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) is a global infectious disease which can affect a wide range of age groups. The pathological and immunological response upon Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection have been reported over the last few years. However, the clinical profile and immune response upon CHIKV infection in children remain largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the clinical and immunological response, focusing on the cytokine/chemokine profile in a CHIKV-infected pediatric cohort from Sarawak, Malaysia. Unique immune mediators triggered upon CHIKV infection were identified through meta-analysis of the immune signatures between this pediatric group and cohorts from previous outbreaks. The data generated from this study revealed that a broad spectrum of cytokines/chemokines is up-regulated in a sub-group of virus-infected children stratified according to their viremic status during hospitalization. Furthermore, different immune mediator profiles (the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth and other factors) were observed between children and adults. This study gives an important insight to understand the immune response of CHIKV infection in children and would aid in the development of better prognostics and clinical management for children. PMID:27180811

  9. Early clearance of Chikungunya virus in children is associated with a strong innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Simarmata, Diane; Ng, David Chun Ern; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry; Her, Zhisheng; Chow, Angela; Leo, Yee-Sin; Cardosa, Jane; Perera, David; Ooi, Mong H.; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) is a global infectious disease which can affect a wide range of age groups. The pathological and immunological response upon Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection have been reported over the last few years. However, the clinical profile and immune response upon CHIKV infection in children remain largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the clinical and immunological response, focusing on the cytokine/chemokine profile in a CHIKV-infected pediatric cohort from Sarawak, Malaysia. Unique immune mediators triggered upon CHIKV infection were identified through meta-analysis of the immune signatures between this pediatric group and cohorts from previous outbreaks. The data generated from this study revealed that a broad spectrum of cytokines/chemokines is up-regulated in a sub-group of virus-infected children stratified according to their viremic status during hospitalization. Furthermore, different immune mediator profiles (the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth and other factors) were observed between children and adults. This study gives an important insight to understand the immune response of CHIKV infection in children and would aid in the development of better prognostics and clinical management for children. PMID:27180811

  10. Lamprey VLRB response to influenza virus supports universal rules of immunogenicity and antigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Meghan O; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Herrin, Brantley R

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are a crown jewel of jawed vertebrate evolution. Through recombination and mutation of small numbers of genes, Igs can specifically recognize a vast variety of natural and man-made organic molecules. Jawless vertebrates evolved a parallel system of humoral immunity, which recognizes antigens not with Ig, but with a structurally unrelated receptor called the variable lymphocyte receptor B (VLRB). We exploited the convergent evolution of Ig and VLRB antibodies (Abs) to investigate if intrinsic chemical features of foreign proteins determine their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Surprisingly, we find lamprey VLRB and mouse Ig responses to influenza A virus are extremely similar. Each focuses ∼80% of the response on hemagglutinin (HA), mainly through recognition of the major antigenic sites in the HA globular head domain. Our findings predict basic conservation of Ab responses to protein antigens, strongly supporting the use of animal models for understanding human Ab responses to viruses and protein immunogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07467.001 PMID:26252514

  11. Humoral and cellular immune responses to matrix protein of measles virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S; McFarland, H F; Mingioli, E S; Sever, J L; McFarlin, D E

    1988-01-01

    The immune response to matrix (M) protein of measles virus was examined in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls. Antibodies specific for M and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in 11 serum and 8 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with SSPE were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by using affinity-purified measles virus proteins. Geometric mean anti-NC antibody titers were higher in the serum (6.58 +/- 0.98 [mean +/- standard deviation]) and CSF (4.38 +/- 0.74) of SSPE patients compared with controls. Anti-M antibodies were present in the serum and CSF of all SSPE samples tested but in titers lower than those of anti-NC antibodies. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 3.35 +/- 0.53 in sera from patients with SSPE compared with 3.05 +/- 0.66 in sera from patients with other neurological diseases and 3.12 +/- 0.74 in sera from healthy individuals. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 2.59 +/- 0.86 in the CSF of eight patients with SSPE compared with a mean less than 1.00 for patients with other neurological disease (controls). Intrathecal synthesis of anti-M or anti-NC antibodies was established in four patients with SSPE. The cellular immune responses to M, F, HA, and NC proteins were examined in four of the patients with SSPE by lymphoproliferation and were not significantly different from those in five healthy controls. The results demonstrate humoral and cellular immune responses to M protein in patients with SSPE and indicate that it is unlikely that a defect in the immune response to this virus component accounts for the disease process in the patients studied. Images PMID:3373575

  12. Fast responses of bacterial membranes to virus adsorption: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, M E; Bayer, M H

    1981-01-01

    After collision with their host cells, virus particles may remain mobile on cell surfaces until they become attached at firm binding sites. We propose that a virion will arrive within a typical median time at such a site, generating a membrane signal such as an increased membrane fluorescence in cells labeled with the voltage-sensitive dyes 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (Mg-salt) (ANS), N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPA), or 3,3'-dipentyl-2,2'-oxacarbocyanine (di-O-C5[3]). We found that the time span between virus adsorption and fluorescence response varies widely among phages and also depends on bacterial strain, metabolic state, and type of dye. di-O-C5[3]-labeled cells react within 1 sec to uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Cells labeled with ANS and NPA react to CCCP in 4-6 sec. Bacteriophages T4, T5, chi, and BF23, added to ANS-labeled cells, change the fluorescence in 9-15 sec. T-even ghosts cause a response at identical times. Baseplate-defective phage mutant T412- and isolated adsorption organelles of smaller viruses fail to cause an effect. di-O-C5[3]-labeled cells respond to T4 at a multiplicity of infection greater than or equal to 40 within 1 sec. A longer time (8 sec) is required at lower multiplicities. The receptor-degrading phages epsilon 15, epsilon 34, c 341, and K29 need the longest time (1 min for ANS) to cause a fluorescence increase. We suggest that the delayed fluorescence response is concomitant with the surface "walk" of the virion, which is terminated at an injection site. T4 tail sheath contraction coincides with the onset of the membrane fluorescence response. PMID:7029540

  13. Enhanced production of human influenza virus in PBS-12SF cells with a reduced interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Yepes, Monica; Sporer, Kelly RB; Carter, Jenna L; Colvin, Christopher J; Coussens, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most important infectious diseases in humans. The best way to prevent severe illness caused by influenza infection is vaccination. Cell culture-derived influenza vaccines are being considered in addition to the widely used egg-based system in order to support the increasing seasonal demand and to be prepared in case of a pandemic. Cell culture based systems offer increased safety, capacity, and flexibility with reduced downstream processing relative to embryonated eggs. We have previously reported a chick embryo cell line, termed PBS-12SF, that supports replication of human and avian influenza A viruses to high titers (>107 PFU/ml) without the need for exogenous proteases or serum proteins. Viral infections in cells are limited by the Interferon (IFN) response typified by production of type I IFNs that bind to the IFNα/β receptor and activate an antiviral state. In this study, we investigated how neutralizing the interferon (IFN) response in PBS-12SF cells, via shRNA-mediated knock-down of IFNAR1 mRNA expression, affects influenza virus production. We were successful in knocking down ∼90% of IFNAR1 protein expression by this method, resulting in a significant decrease in the response to recombinant chIFNα stimulation in PBS-12SF cells as shown by a reduction in expression of interferon-responsive genes when compared to control cells. Additionally; IFNAR1-knock-down cells displayed enhanced viral HA production and released more virus into cell culture supernatants than parental PBS-12SF cells. PMID:26090991

  14. [Immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle: effect of vaccination].

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Sigal, L; Mundo, S; Ramayo, L; Jar, A M; Gómez, G; Fontanals, A; Mazzuca, G O

    1989-01-01

    Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) is one of the most feared animal virus and vaccination still has to be used in many countries. In previous reports, using a murine model, we studied the cellular basis of immune responses against FMDV and were able to show that they are atypical. In cattle, although complete protection may be attained after only one dose of killed virus vaccine, very little is known about protection against FMDV, except for antibody responses, but practically nothing concerning the cellular basis of their immune response. Moreover, since neutralizing titers do not always correlate with protection, the potency of vaccines in controlled by viral challenge. Our aim is to study cellular immune responses against FMDV, and to search for a correlate to protection. As a first step, 55 virgin cattle from a non endemic area (Patagonia) were divided into three groups: C: non immunized controls; HS: immunized with saponine containing vaccine; and EO: with oil emulsified vaccine. After vaccination, they were carried to an endemic area (Buenos Aires), where they were challenged with live FMDV. Animals were bled immediately before and 7 days after challenge, and their white blood cells and lymphocyte subpopulations were counted. All animals showed a marked neutropenia and eosinophilia, significantly higher in HS than in EO and C groups; both parameters were significantly better in the 2nd assay. Total lymphocyte counts were normal. Lymphocyte subpopulations were assessed by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies: their proportions were normal and did not change during illness in group C. Several factors could have induced the observed eosinophilia and neutropenia: parasites, stress, saponine, others.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2562135

  15. Dengue virus-specific human CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses in a recipient of an experimental live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine: bulk culture proliferation, clonal analysis, and precursor frequency determination.

    PubMed Central

    Green, S; Kurane, I; Edelman, R; Tacket, C O; Eckels, K H; Vaughn, D W; Hoke, C H; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses 4 months after immunization of a volunteer with an experimental live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine (DEN-1 45AZ5). We examined bulk culture proliferation to noninfectious antigens, determined the precursor frequency of specific CD4+ T cells by limiting dilution, and established and analyzed CD4+ T-cell clones. Bulk culture proliferation was predominantly dengue virus type 1 specific with a lesser degree of cross-reactive responses to other dengue virus serotypes, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus. Precursor frequency determination by limiting dilution in the presence of noninfectious dengue virus antigens revealed a frequency of antigen-reactive cells of 1 in 1,686 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for dengue virus type 1, 1 in 9,870 PBMC for dengue virus type 3, 1 in 14,053 PBMC for dengue virus type 2, and 1 in 17,690 PBMC for dengue virus type 4. Seventeen CD4+ T-cell clones were then established by using infectious dengue virus type 1 as antigen. Two patterns of dengue virus specificity were found in these clones. Thirteen clones were dengue virus type 1 specific, and four clones recognized both dengue virus types 1 and 3. Analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restriction revealed that five clones are HLA-DRw52 restricted, one clone is HLA-DP3 restricted, and one clone is HLA-DP4 restricted. These results indicate that in this individual, the CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses to immunization with live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine are predominantly serotype specific and suggest that a multivalent vaccine may be necessary to elicit strong serotype-cross-reactive CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses in such individuals. PMID:8371350

  16. Virus binding to a plasma membrane receptor triggers interleukin-1 alpha-mediated proinflammatory macrophage response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Nelson C; Miao, Edward A; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Aderem, Alan; Flavell, Richard A; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2009-07-17

    The recognition of viral components by host pattern-recognition receptors triggers the induction of the antiviral innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and NLRP3 inflammasome were shown to be the principal specific sensors of viral double-stranded DNA. Here we present evidence that macrophages in vivo activated an innate immune response to a double-stranded DNA virus, adenovirus (Ad), independently of TLR9 or NLRP3 inflammasome. In response to Ad, macrophage-derived IL-1 alpha triggered IL-1RI-dependent production of a defined set of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The IL-1 alpha-mediated response required a selective interaction of virus arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs with macrophage beta(3) integrins. Thus, these data identify IL-1 alpha-IL-1RI as a key pathway allowing for the activation of proinflammatory responses to the virus, independently of its genomic nucleic acid recognition.

  17. Transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Mus musculus to Sus scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment.

  18. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  19. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series. PMID:27432685

  20. Host-dependent type 1 cytokine responses driven by inactivated viruses may fail to default in the absence of IL-12 or IFN-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Marel C; Horzinek, Marian C; Haagmans, Bart L; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2004-04-01

    Replicating viruses generally induce type 1 immune responses, with high interferon (IFN)-gamma levels and antibodies of the IgG2a isotype. In the present study we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of non-replicating virions to induce comparable immune responses in the notable absence of any adjuvant. Injection of inactivated pseudorabies virus, an alphaherpesvirus, by various routes into mice resulted in the generation of T helper (Th) 1 type immune response. Co-delivery of inactivated pseudorabies herpesvirus (iPRV) with protein redirected IgG1-dominated tetanus toxoid-specific responses towards an IgG1/IgG2a balanced response. Also inactivated preparations of viruses from the paramyxo- (Newcastle disease virus), rhabdo- (rabies virus), corona- (infectious bronchitis virus) and reovirus (avian reovirus) families led to IgG2a antibody responses; however, the genetic background of the host did result in considerable variation. Because disrupted virions also induced type 1 immune responses, we conclude that structural elements of virions inherently contribute to IFN-gamma-dependent isotype switching by inactivated viruses. Strikingly, immunizations in gene-disrupted mice showed that a functional IFN-alpha/beta, IFN-gamma or interleukin (IL)-12 pathway was not required for the generation of a polarized Th1 type immune response initiated by inactivated virus particles. These findings have a bearing on the understanding of immune responsiveness to virus structures and the design of vaccines containing virus components. PMID:15039522

  1. The response of ducks to V4 Newcastle disease virus and its transmission to contact ducks and domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Bouzari, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Experimental infection of Muscovy ducks with V4 strain of Newcastle disease virus was undertaken to determine the response of the ducks to the virus and the possibility of virus transmission to ducks and chickens in village like conditions. Twelve ducks were randomly and equally divided into three groups of control, inoculated and in-contact. Additionally, the chickens were placed into two groups of four animals each, namely in-contact and control. The inoculated and in-contact ducks and in-contact chickens were kept together. The eye drop route was used for inoculation and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies were measured for assessment of antibody response and cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were used for detection of the virus. The primary antibody response of inoculated ducks was very high and rapid (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 5.75 ± 0.50). The in-contact ducks showed antibody response with the same pattern but lower titers than the inoculated ducks (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 3.25 ± 1.70). The in-contact chickens showed a slight increase of HI antibody (geometric mean titers [Log base 2] of up to 2.25 ± 1.25) while the control chickens did not show any increase. The antibody response indicated the transmission of the virus to contact ducks and chickens. A single isolation of virus confirmed the ability of ducks to excrete the virus. It was concluded that the V4 strain of Newcastle disease virus was highly antigenic for ducks, and ducks can transmit it to other ducks and also in-contact chickens.

  2. Virulent Newcastle disease virus elicits a strong innate immune response in chickens.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Susta, Leonardo; Cornax, Ingrid; Brown, Corrie C; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Suarez, David L; King, Daniel J; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2011-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. There is limited knowledge about the avian immune response to infection with virulent NDVs, and how this response may contribute to disease. In this study, pathogenesis and the transcriptional host response of chickens to a virulent NDV strain that rapidly causes 100% mortality was characterized. Using microarrays, a strong transcriptional host response was observed in spleens at early times after infection with the induction of groups of genes involved in innate antiviral and pro-inflammatory responses. There were multiple genes induced at 48 h post-infection including: type I and II interferons (IFNs), several cytokines and chemokines, IFN effectors and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The increased transcription of nitric oxide synthase was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for iNOS in spleens and measured levels of nitric oxide in serum. In vitro experiments showed strong induction of the key host response genes, alpha IFN, beta interferon, and interleukin 1β and interleukin 6, in splenic leukocytes at 6 h post-infection in comparison to a non-virulent NDV. The robust host response to virulent NDV, in conjunction with severe pathological damage observed, is somewhat surprising considering that all NDV encode a gene, V, which functions as a suppressor of class I IFNs. Taken together, these results suggest that the host response itself may contribute to the pathogenesis of this highly virulent strain in chickens.

  3. Multiple specificities in the murine CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell response to dengue virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1996-01-01

    The target epitopes, serotype specificity, and cytolytic function of dengue virus-specific T cells may influence their theoretical roles in protection against secondary infection as well as the immunopathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. To study these factors in an experimental system, we isolated dengue virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones from dengue-2 virus-immunized BALB/c mice. The T-cell response to dengue virus in this mouse strain was heterogeneous; we identified at least five different CD4+ phenotypes and six different CD8+ phenotypes. Individual T-cell clones recognized epitopes on the dengue virus pre-M, E, NSl/NS2A, and NS3 proteins and were restricted by the I-Ad, I-Ed, Ld, and Kd antigens. Both serotype-specific and serotype-cross-reactive clones were isolated in the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets; among CD8+ clones, those that recognized the dengue virus structural proteins were serotype specific whereas those that recognized the nonstructural proteins were serotype cross-reactive. All of the CD8+ and one of five CD4+ clones lysed dengue virus-infected target cells. Using synthetic peptides, we identified an Ld-restricted epitope on the E protein (residues 331 to 339, SPCKIPFEI) and a Kd-restricted epitope on the NS3 protein (residues 296 to 310, ARGYISTRVEM GEAA). These data parallel previous findings of studies using human dengue virus-specific T-cell clones. This experimental mouse system may be useful for studying the role of the virus serotype and HLA haplotype on T-cell responses after primary dengue virus infection. PMID:8794288

  4. Experimental infection with bovine ephemeral fever virus and analysis of its antibody response cattle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, F Y; Chen, Q W; Li, Z; Gong, X W; Wang, J D; Yin, H

    2016-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease that occurs throughout mainland China. LS11 obtained in the 2011 BEF epidemic was a wild strain, and its virulence and antibody response have never been studied in China. Therefore, the issues were investigated in this work. Experimental cattle were intravenously infected with different doses of BEF virus, and some non-infected cattle were simultaneously monitored. Blood and serum samples were collected from all animals over the course of our study. Infected cattle were challenged for a second time with BEF virus to determine protective period of the antibodies. BEF virus was detected in blood samples from infected cattle, but not in monitored cattle. The neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against BEFV were easier to be detected and persisted for longer periods in cattle infected with higher doses of BEFV than in those infected with lower doses. When the titer of nAbs was equal to 5 or 6, re-infected cattle still could mount a challenge against BEFV. However, after 3 or 6months, when nAbs were no longer apparent, re-infected cattle displayed typical symptoms of BEF. Our findings indicated that vaccination should be performed once the titer of nAb decreased to 5 or 6.

  5. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. PMID:25613718

  6. Peripheral Leukocyte Migration in Ferrets in Response to Infection with Seasonal Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; York, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand inflammation associated with influenza virus infection, we measured cell trafficking, via flow cytometry, to various tissues in the ferret model following infection with an A(H3N2) human seasonal influenza virus (A/Perth/16/2009). Changes in immune cells were observed in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and spleen, as well as lymph nodes associated with the site of infection or distant from the respiratory system. Nevertheless clinical symptoms were mild, with circulating leukocytes exhibiting rapid, dynamic, and profound changes in response to infection. Each of the biological compartments examined responded differently to influenza infection. Two days after infection, when infected ferrets showed peak fever, a marked, transient lymphopenia and granulocytosis were apparent in all infected animals. Both draining and distal lymph nodes demonstrated significant accumulation of T cells, B cells, and granulocytes at days 2 and 5 post-infection. CD8+ T cells significantly increased in spleen at days 2 and 5 post-infection; CD4+ T cells, B cells and granulocytes significantly increased at day 5. We interpret our findings as showing that lymphocytes exit the peripheral blood and differentially home to lymph nodes and tissues based on cell type and proximity to the site of infection. Monitoring leukocyte homing and trafficking will aid in providing a more detailed view of the inflammatory impact of influenza virus infection. PMID:27315117

  7. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening.

  8. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia.

  9. Complex Spatial Responses to Cucumber Mosaic Virus Infection in Susceptible Cucurbita pepo Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Havelda, Zoltan; Maule, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus infection of its susceptible host Cucurbita pepo results in a program of biochemical changes after virus infection. Applying a spatial analysis to expanding infected lesions, we investigated the relationship between the changes in enzyme activity and gene expression. Patterns of altered expression were seen that could not be detected by RNA gel blot analysis. For all the host genes studied, there was a downregulation (shutoff) of expression within the lesion. In addition, two distinct types of upregulation were observed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (NADP-ME) showed induction in apparently uninfected cells ahead of the infection. This response was more localized than the upregulation exhibited by catalase expression, which occurred throughout the uninfected regions of the tissue. The experiments showed that virus infection induced immediate and subsequent changes in gene expression by the host and that the infection has the potential to give advance signaling of the imminent infection. PMID:11041891

  10. Peripheral Leukocyte Migration in Ferrets in Response to Infection with Seasonal Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Music, Nedzad; Reber, Adrian J; Kim, Jin Hyang; York, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand inflammation associated with influenza virus infection, we measured cell trafficking, via flow cytometry, to various tissues in the ferret model following infection with an A(H3N2) human seasonal influenza virus (A/Perth/16/2009). Changes in immune cells were observed in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and spleen, as well as lymph nodes associated with the site of infection or distant from the respiratory system. Nevertheless clinical symptoms were mild, with circulating leukocytes exhibiting rapid, dynamic, and profound changes in response to infection. Each of the biological compartments examined responded differently to influenza infection. Two days after infection, when infected ferrets showed peak fever, a marked, transient lymphopenia and granulocytosis were apparent in all infected animals. Both draining and distal lymph nodes demonstrated significant accumulation of T cells, B cells, and granulocytes at days 2 and 5 post-infection. CD8+ T cells significantly increased in spleen at days 2 and 5 post-infection; CD4+ T cells, B cells and granulocytes significantly increased at day 5. We interpret our findings as showing that lymphocytes exit the peripheral blood and differentially home to lymph nodes and tissues based on cell type and proximity to the site of infection. Monitoring leukocyte homing and trafficking will aid in providing a more detailed view of the inflammatory impact of influenza virus infection. PMID:27315117

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  12. Transmitted Virus Fitness and Host T Cell Responses Collectively Define Divergent Infection Outcomes in Two HIV-1 Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of T cell

  13. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; et al

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/foundermore » (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of

  14. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a

  15. Induction of systemic immune responses to measles virus synthetic peptides administered intranasally.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, L J; Partidos, C D; Vohra, P; Steward, M W

    1995-11-01

    A systemic antibody response was induced when a chimeric peptide containing two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope and one copy of a B-cell epitope (TTB) from the fusion protein of measles virus (MV) was administered to mice intranasally without adjuvant. A higher antibody titre was produced when the peptide was administered intranasally with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as an adjuvant and these antibodies crossreacted with the MV. Furthermore, splenocytes from intranasally immunized mice proliferated in vitro in the presence of the TTB peptide. The immune response following intranasal immunization with the peptide was influenced by the MHC haplotype of the strain of mice used. Thus CBA and BALB/c mice were high responders whereas C57BL/6 mice were low responders. Although peptide administered intranasally with CTB to CBA mice induced an immune response, no significant protection was observed against intra-cranial challenge with canine distemper virus which is antigenically related to MV. PMID:8578832

  16. Regional and seasonal response of a West Nile virus vector to climate change.

    PubMed

    Morin, Cory W; Comrie, Andrew C

    2013-09-24

    Climate change will affect the abundance and seasonality of West Nile virus (WNV) vectors, altering the risk of virus transmission to humans. Using downscaled general circulation model output, we calculate a WNV vector's response to climate change across the southern United States using process-based modeling. In the eastern United States, Culex quinquefasciatus response to projected climate change displays a latitudinal and elevational gradient. Projected summer population depressions as a result of increased immature mortality and habitat drying are most severe in the south and almost absent further north; extended spring and fall survival is ubiquitous. Much of California also exhibits a bimodal pattern. Projected onset of mosquito season is delayed in the southwestern United States because of extremely dry and hot spring and summers; however, increased temperature and late summer and fall rains extend the mosquito season. These results are unique in being a broad-scale calculation of the projected impacts of climate change on a WNV vector. The results show that, despite projected widespread future warming, the future seasonal response of C. quinquefasciatus populations across the southern United States will not be homogeneous, and will depend on specific combinations of local and regional conditions.

  17. Dynamics of Responses in Compatible Potato - Potato virus Y Interaction Are Modulated by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Baebler, Špela; Stare, Katja; Kovač, Maja; Blejec, Andrej; Prezelj, Nina; Stare, Tjaša; Kogovšek, Polona; Pompe-Novak, Maruša; Rosahl, Sabine; Ravnikar, Maja; Gruden, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of the potato – Potato virus Y (PVY) compatible interaction in relation to salicylic acid - controlled pathways we performed experiments using non-transgenic potato cv. Désirée, transgenic NahG-Désirée, cv. Igor and PVYNTN, the most aggressive strain of PVY. The importance of salicylic acid in viral multiplication and symptom development was confirmed by pronounced symptom development in NahG-Désirée, depleted in salicylic acid, and reversion of the effect after spraying with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (a salicylic acid - analogue). We have employed quantitative PCR for monitoring virus multiplication, as well as plant responses through expression of selected marker genes of photosynthetic activity, carbohydrate metabolism and the defence response. Viral multiplication was the slowest in inoculated potato of cv. Désirée, the only asymptomatic genotype in the study. The intensity of defence-related gene expression was much stronger in both sensitive genotypes (NahG-Désirée and cv. Igor) at the site of inoculation than in asymptomatic plants (cv. Désirée). Photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism gene expression differed between the symptomatic and asymptomatic phenotypes. The differential gene expression pattern of the two sensitive genotypes indicates that the outcome of the interaction does not rely simply on one regulatory component, but similar phenotypical features can result from distinct responses at the molecular level. PMID:22194976

  18. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E; Pham, Christine T N

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  19. Human Antibody Responses to Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Xi; Ren, Lili; Yu, Xuelian; Chen, Lijuan; Zhou, Hongli; Gao, Xin; Teng, Zheng; Li, Jianguo; Hu, Jiayu; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Xia; Zhu, Yiyi; Wang, Quanyi; Pang, Xinghuo; Jin, Qi; Wu, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding host antibody response is crucial for predicting disease severity and for vaccine development. We investigated antibody responses against influenza A(H7N9) virus in 48 serum samples from 21 patients, including paired samples from 15 patients. IgG against subtype H7 and neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) were not detected in acute-phase samples, but ELISA geometric mean titers increased in convalescent-phase samples; NAb titers were 20–80 (geometric mean titer 40). Avidity to IgG against subtype H7 was significantly lower than that against H1 and H3. IgG against H3 was boosted after infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus, and its level in acute-phase samples correlated with that against H7 in convalescent-phase samples. A correlation was also found between hemagglutinin inhibition and NAb titers and between hemagglutinin inhibition and IgG titers against H7. Because of the relatively weak protective antibody response to influenza A(H7N9), multiple vaccinations might be needed to achieve protective immunity. PMID:24447423

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade.

  1. Modelling the Innate Immune Response against Avian Influenza Virus in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, T. J.; Fischer, E. A. J.; Jansen, C. A.; Rebel, J. M. J.; Spekreijse, D.; Vervelde, L.; Backer, J. A.; de Jong, M. C. M.; Koets, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α, -β and -γ, lung (i.e. pulmonary) cells and Natural Killer cells. We use recent results from experimentally infected chickens to validate some of the model predictions. The model includes an initial exponential increase of the viral load, which we show to be consistent with experimental data. Using this exponential growth model we show that the duration until a given viral load is reached in experiments with different inoculation doses is consistent with a model assuming a linear relationship between initial viral load and inoculation dose. Subsequent to the exponential-growth phase, the model results show a decline in viral load caused by both target-cell limitation as well as the innate immune response. The model results suggest that the temporal viral load pattern in the lungs displayed in experimental data cannot be explained by target-cell limitation alone. For biologically plausible parameter values the model is able to qualitatively match to data on viral load in chicken lungs up until approximately 4 days post infection. Comparison of model predictions with data on CD107-mediated degranulation of Natural Killer cells yields some discrepancy also for earlier days post infection. PMID:27328069

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  3. Inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary disorders of the peripheral nerves constitute a group of frequently encountered neurological diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is genetically heterogeneous and characterized by demyelination with moderately to severely reduced nerve conduction velocities, absent muscle stretch reflexes and onion bulb formation. Genetic loci for CMT1 map to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), and another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1 B result from point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1 C is unknown. Mutations in the early growth response 2 gene (EGR2) are also associated with demyelinating neuropathy. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q, and 11q. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is characterized by normal or mildly reduced nerve conduction velocity with decreased amplitude and axonal loss without hypertrophic features. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1 p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the Po gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced

  4. Characterization of the Localized Immune Response in the Respiratory Tract of Ferrets following Infection with Influenza A and B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carolan, Louise A.; Rockman, Steve; Borg, Kathryn; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Reading, Patrick; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The burden of infection with seasonal influenza viruses is significant. Each year is typically characterized by the dominance of one (sub)type or lineage of influenza A or B virus, respectively. The incidence of disease varies annually, and while this may be attributed to a particular virus strain or subtype, the impacts of prior immunity, population differences, and variations in clinical assessment are also important. To improve our understanding of the impacts of seasonal influenza viruses, we directly compared clinical symptoms, virus shedding, and expression of cytokines, chemokines, and immune mediators in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of ferrets infected with contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), or influenza B virus. Gene expression in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) was also assessed. Clinical symptoms were minimal. Overall cytokine/chemokine profiles in the URT were consistent in pattern and magnitude between animals infected with influenza A and B viruses, and peak expression levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFN-β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs correlated with peak levels of viral shedding. MCP1 and IFN-γ were expressed after the virus peak. Granzymes A and B and IL-10 reached peak expression as the virus was cleared and seroconversion was detected. Cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the LRT following A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection reflected the observations seen for the URT but was delayed 2 or 3 days, as was virus replication. These data indicate that disease severities and localized immune responses following infection with seasonal influenza A and B viruses are similar, suggesting that other factors are likely to modulate the incidence and impact of seasonal influenza. IMPORTANCE Both influenza A and B viruses cocirculate in the human population, and annual influenza seasons are typically dominated by an influenza A virus subtype or an influenza B virus lineage

  5. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  6. HLA-linked genetic control of the specicity of human cytotoxic T-cell responses to influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S; Biddison, W E

    1979-03-01

    We have investigated elements of the genetic control of human in vitro cytotoxic T-cell responses to influenza virus-infected autologous cells by studies of a large family. The pattern of virus-immune cytotoxicity among siblings demonstrated T-cell recognition of influenza virus predominantly (greater than 90%) in association with determinants which are coded by genes linked to HLA (P less than 0.0002). Many family members consistently generated cytotoxic activity against influenza predominantly in association with antigens coded by genes of only one of their HLA haplotypes. Such haplotype preferences were consistent among HLA-identical siblings, indicating that the specificity of the T-cell response to influenza virus in association with HLA-A and -B antigens is controlled by genes linked to HLA.

  7. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  8. Genetic determinants responsible for acquisition of dengue type 2 virus mouse neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Bray, M; Men, R; Tokimatsu, I; Lai, C J

    1998-02-01

    Studies conducted some 50 years ago showed that serial intracerebral passage of dengue viruses in mice selected for neurovirulent mutants that also exhibited significant attenuation for humans. We investigated the genetic basis of mouse neurovirulence of dengue virus because it might be directly or indirectly associated with attenuation for humans. Analysis of the sequence in the C-PreM-E-NS1 region of the parental dengue type 2 virus (DEN2) New Guinea C (NGC) strain and its mouse-adapted, neurovirulent mutant revealed that 10 nucleotide changes occurred during serial passage in mice. Seven of these changes resulted in amino acid substitutions, i.e., Leu55-Phe and Arg57-Lys in PreM, Glu71-Asp, Glu126-Lys, Phe402-Ile, and Thr454-Ile in E, and Arg105-Gln in NS1. The sequence of C was fully conserved between the parental and mutant DEN2. We constructed intertypic chimeric dengue viruses that contained the PreM-E genes or only the NS1 gene of neurovirulent DEN2 NGC substituting for the corresponding genes of DEN4. The DEN2 (PreM-E)/DEN4 chimera was neurovirulent for mice, whereas DEN2 (NS1)/DEN4 was not. The mutations present in the neurovirulent DEN2 PreM-E genes were then substituted singly or in combination into the sequence of the nonneurovirulent, parental DEN2. Intracerebral titration of the various mutant chimeras so produced identified two amino acid changes, namely, Glu71-Asp and Glu126-Lys, in DEN2 E as being responsible for mouse neurovirulence. The conservative amino acid change of Gu71-Asp probably had a minor effect, if any. The Glu126-Lys substitution in DEN2 E, representing a change from a negatively charged amino acid to a positively charged amino acid, most likely plays an important role in conferring mouse neurovirulence.

  9. A Bioinformatics Method for the Design of Live Attenuated Virus Vaccine Utilizing Host MicroRNA Response Elements.

    PubMed

    Wichadakul, Duangdao

    2016-01-01

    The host microRNA machinery has been employed to control viral replication. To improve safety for live attenuated virus vaccines, the binding sites of the host microRNAs, so-called microRNA response elements (MREs), were incorporated into the virus sequences. These MREs were typically designed for a specific host microRNA and virus sequence with the effectiveness evaluated by experimental trials. Here, we describe a computational flow that can be used to simultaneously design and prioritize the effective MREs in large-scale.

  10. A response adaptive randomization platform trial for efficient evaluation of Ebola virus treatments: A model for pandemic response.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Petzold, Elizabeth A; Dull, Peter; Thielman, Nathan M; Cunningham, Coleen K; Corey, G Ralph; McClain, Micah T; Hoover, David L; Russell, James; Griffiss, J McLeod; Woods, Christopher W

    2016-02-01

    The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa is the largest ever recorded. Numerous treatment alternatives for Ebola have been considered, including widely available repurposed drugs, but initiation of enrollment into clinical trials has been limited. The proposed trial is an adaptive platform design. Multiple agents and combinations will be investigated simultaneously. Additionally, new agents may enter the trial as they become available, and failing agents may be removed. In order to accommodate the many possible agents and combinations, a critical feature of this design is the use of response adaptive randomization to assign treatment regimens. As the trial progresses, the randomization ratio evolves to favor the arms that are performing better, making the design also suitable for all-cause pandemic preparedness planning. The study was approved by US and Sierra Leone ethics committees, and reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration. Additionally, data management, drug supply lines, and local sites were prepared. However, in response to the declining epidemic seen in February 2015, the trial was not initiated. Sierra Leone remains ready to rapidly activate the protocol as an emergency response trial in the event of a resurgence of Ebola. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02380625.) In summary, we have designed a single controlled trial capable of efficiently identifying highly effective or failing regimens among a rapidly evolving list of proposed therapeutic alternatives for Ebola virus disease and to treat the patients within the trial effectively based on accruing data. Provision of these regimens, if found safe and effective, would have a major impact on future epidemics by providing effective treatment options. PMID:26768569

  11. A response adaptive randomization platform trial for efficient evaluation of Ebola virus treatments: A model for pandemic response.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Petzold, Elizabeth A; Dull, Peter; Thielman, Nathan M; Cunningham, Coleen K; Corey, G Ralph; McClain, Micah T; Hoover, David L; Russell, James; Griffiss, J McLeod; Woods, Christopher W

    2016-02-01

    The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa is the largest ever recorded. Numerous treatment alternatives for Ebola have been considered, including widely available repurposed drugs, but initiation of enrollment into clinical trials has been limited. The proposed trial is an adaptive platform design. Multiple agents and combinations will be investigated simultaneously. Additionally, new agents may enter the trial as they become available, and failing agents may be removed. In order to accommodate the many possible agents and combinations, a critical feature of this design is the use of response adaptive randomization to assign treatment regimens. As the trial progresses, the randomization ratio evolves to favor the arms that are performing better, making the design also suitable for all-cause pandemic preparedness planning. The study was approved by US and Sierra Leone ethics committees, and reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration. Additionally, data management, drug supply lines, and local sites were prepared. However, in response to the declining epidemic seen in February 2015, the trial was not initiated. Sierra Leone remains ready to rapidly activate the protocol as an emergency response trial in the event of a resurgence of Ebola. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02380625.) In summary, we have designed a single controlled trial capable of efficiently identifying highly effective or failing regimens among a rapidly evolving list of proposed therapeutic alternatives for Ebola virus disease and to treat the patients within the trial effectively based on accruing data. Provision of these regimens, if found safe and effective, would have a major impact on future epidemics by providing effective treatment options.

  12. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  13. A comparison of the immune responses of dogs exposed to canine distemper virus (CDV) — Differences between vaccinated and wild-type virus exposed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Danielle; Bender, Scott; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific immune response was measured in different dog populations. Three groups of vaccinated or wild-type virus exposed dogs were tested: dogs with a known vaccination history, dogs without a known vaccination history (shelter dogs), and dogs with potential exposure to wild-type CDV. The use of a T-cell proliferation assay demonstrated a detectable CDV-specific T-cell response from both spleen and blood lymphocytes of dogs. Qualitatively, antibody assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assay] predicted the presence of a T-cell response well, although quantitatively neither antibody assays nor the T-cell assay correlated well with each other. An interesting finding from our study was that half of the dogs in shelters were not vaccinated (potentially posing a public veterinary health problem) and that antibody levels in dogs living in an environment with endemic CDV were lower than in vaccinated animals. PMID:20885846

  14. Analysis of T Cell Responses during Active Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation in Human Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Steain, Megan; Sutherland, Jeremy P.; Rodriguez, Michael; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Slobedman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes latency within the sensory ganglia and can reactivate to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had active herpes zoster. Ganglia innervating the site of the cutaneous herpes zoster rash showed evidence of necrosis, secondary to vasculitis, or localized hemorrhage. Despite this, there was limited evidence of VZV antigen expression, although a large inflammatory infiltrate was observed. Characterization of the infiltrating T cells showed a large number of infiltrating CD4+ T cells and cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Many of the infiltrating T cells were closely associated with neurons within the reactivated ganglia, yet there was little evidence of T cell-induced neuronal apoptosis. Notably, an upregulation in the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II molecules was observed on satellite glial cells, implying these cells play an active role in directing the immune response during herpes zoster. This is the first detailed characterization of the interaction between T cells and neuronal cells within ganglia obtained from patients suffering herpes zoster at the time of death and provides evidence that CD4+ and cytolytic CD8+ T cell responses play an important role in controlling VZV replication in ganglia during active herpes zoster. IMPORTANCE VZV is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes a life-long dormant infection within the sensory ganglia and can reawaken to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had

  15. Analysis of transcriptional responses of chickens infected with different Newcastle disease virus isolates using paraffin embedded samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional response of several cytokines in the spleen of chicken naturally infected by Newcastle Disease velogenic viscerotropic viruses was compared to the responses of atypical velogenic, velogenic neurotropic, and mesogenic strains during the first five days after infection. The ribonuc...

  16. Inhibition of host innate immune responses and pathogenicity of recombinant Newcastle disease viruses expressing NS1 genes of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K

    2010-08-01

    The NS1 protein has been associated with the virulence of influenza A viruses. To evaluate the role of the NS1 protein in pathogenicity of pandemic H5N1 avian influenza and H1N1 2009 influenza viruses, recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (rNDVs) expressing NS1 proteins were generated. Expression of the NS1 proteins resulted in inhibition of host innate immune responses (beta interferon and protein kinase R production). In addition, the NS1 proteins were localized predominantly in the nucleus of virus-infected cells. Consequently, expression of the NS1 protein contributed to an increase in pathogenicity of rNDV in chickens. In particular, mutational analysis of H5N1 NS1 protein indicated that both the RNA-binding and effector domains affect virus pathogenicity synergistically. Our study also demonstrated that expression of H1N1/09 NS1 resulted in enhanced replication of rNDV in human cells, indicating that function of the NS1 proteins can be host-species-specific.

  17. Pathophysiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): early changes in blood and aspects of the immune Response after Injection of IHN Virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Smith, Lynnwood

    1974-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were injected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus and various hematological and blood chemical changes were monitored over 9 days. The packed cell volume, hemoglobin, red blood cell count, and plasma bicarbonate were significantly depressed by day 4. Plasma chloride, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, and blood cell types did not change during the 9 days. Furthermore, plasma  LDH isozyme was significantly increased by the fourth day, and fish infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas salmonicida, and redmouth bacterium did not show specific LDH isozyme alterations. Acid-base alterations occurred at 10 C but not at 18 C. The acid-base imbalance and elevation of the  LDH isozyme were consistently associated with the early development of the disease.The immune response after injection of IHN virus was determined and protection from disease was tested by passive immunization. Actively immunized fish developed IHN-neutralizing antibodies within 54 days after injection of virus, and the antibodies were protective when juvenile fish were passively immunized and experimentally challenged with IHN virus.

  18. NLRC5 interacts with RIG-I to induce a robust antiviral response against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Singh, Neetu; Kumar, Amrita; Neerincx, Andreas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Cao, Weiping; Davis, William G; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; Lin, Rongtuan; Kufer, Thomas A; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2015-03-01

    The NLR protein, NLRC5 is an important regulator of MHC class I gene expression, however, the role of NLRC5 in other innate immune responses is less well defined. In the present study, we report that NLRC5 binds RIG-I and that this interaction is critical for robust antiviral responses against influenza virus. Overexpression of NLRC5 in the human lung epithelial cell line, A549, and normal human bronchial epithelial cells resulted in impaired replication of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (PR8) and enhanced IFN-β expression. Influenza virus leads to induction of IFN-β that drives RIG-I and NLRC5 expression in host cells. Our results suggest that NLRC5 extends and stabilizes influenza virus induced RIG-I expression and delays expression of the viral inhibitor protein NS1. We show that NS1 binds to NLRC5 to suppress its function. Interaction domain mapping revealed that NLRC5 interacts with RIG-I via its N-terminal death domain and that NLRC5 enhanced antiviral activity in an leucine-rich repeat domain independent manner. Taken together, our findings identify a novel role for NLRC5 in RIG-I-mediated antiviral host responses against influenza virus infection, distinguished from the role of NLRC5 in MHC class I gene regulation.

  19. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi) they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi). In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA) and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT) were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA) after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days), higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2) and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7–14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection. PMID:22515169

  20. Telomere length and heredity: Indications of paternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Nordfjäll, Katarina; Larefalk, Asa; Lindgren, Petter; Holmberg, Dan; Roos, Göran

    2005-11-01

    Cellular telomere length is linked to replicative life span. Telomere repeats are lost in peripheral blood cells in vivo by age, and women show less telomere attrition than men. Previous reports have indicated that telomere length and chromosome-specific telomere-length patterns partly are inherited. The mode of heredity has not been clarified, but a link to the X chromosome was recently suggested. We analyzed peripheral mononuclear cells from 49 unrelated families for telomere length using a real-time PCR method. Short-term cultured Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts from the same individuals (n = 130) were analyzed for ability to maintain telomere length and possible gender-linked inheritance. A statistically significant association between telomere lengths comparing father-son (P = 0.011, n = 20) and father-daughter (P = 0.005, n = 22) pairs was found. However, no correlation was observed between mother-daughter (P = 0.463, n = 23) or mother-son (P = 0.577, n = 18). The father-offspring correlation was highly significant (P < 0.0001), in contrast to mother-offspring (P = 0.361). Epstein-Barr virus cultures demonstrated in most cases telomere preservation inversely related to initial mononuclear cell telomere length with short telomeres displaying the most pronounced elongation. Telomere length is inherited, and evidence for a father-to-offspring heritage of this trait was obtained, whereas in vitro telomere length maintenance was found to be dependent on the initial telomere length.

  1. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  2. Amino Acid Variation in HLA Class II Proteins Is a Major Determinant of Humoral Response to Common Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Christian; Begemann, Martin; McLaren, Paul J.; Bartha, István; Michel, Angelika; Klose, Beate; Schmitt, Corinna; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Schulz, Thomas F.; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Fellay, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude of the human antibody response to viral antigens is highly variable. To explore the human genetic contribution to this variability, we performed genome-wide association studies of the immunoglobulin G response to 14 pathogenic viruses in 2,363 immunocompetent adults. Significant associations were observed in the major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6 for influenza A virus, Epstein-Barr virus, JC polyomavirus, and Merkel cell polyomavirus. Using local imputation and fine mapping, we identified specific amino acid residues in human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II proteins as the most probable causal variants underlying these association signals. Common HLA-DRβ1 haplotypes showed virus-specific patterns of humoral-response regulation. We observed an overlap between variants affecting the humoral response to influenza A and EBV and variants previously associated with autoimmune diseases related to these viruses. The results of this study emphasize the central and pathogen-specific role of HLA class II variation in the modulation of humoral immune response to viral antigens in humans. PMID:26456283

  3. Rapid Development of gp120-Focused Neutralizing B Cell Responses during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Joshua D.; Himes, Jonathon E.; Armand, Lawrence; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Martinez, David R.; Colvin, Lisa; Beck, Krista; Overman, R. Glenn; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial phases of acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may be critical for development of effective envelope (Env)-specific antibodies capable of impeding the establishment of the latent pool of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, preventing virus-induced immune hyperactivation to limit disease progression and blocking vertical virus transmission. However, the initial systemic HIV-1 Env-specific antibody response targets gp41 epitopes and fails to control acute-phase viremia. African-origin, natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts do not typically progress to AIDS and rarely postnatally transmit virus to their infants, despite high milk viral loads. Conversely, SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs), Asian-origin nonnatural SIV hosts, sustain pathogenic SIV infections and exhibit higher rates of postnatal virus transmission. In this study, of acute SIV infection, we compared the initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses of AGMs and RMs in order to probe potential factors influencing the lack of disease progression observed in AGMs. AGMs developed higher-magnitude plasma gp120-specific IgA and IgG responses than RMs, whereas RMs developed more robust gp140-directed IgG responses. These gp120-focused antibody responses were accompanied by rapid autologous neutralizing responses during acute SIV infection in AGMs compared to RMs. Moreover, acute SIV infection elicited a higher number of circulating Env-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood of AGMs than in the blood of RMs. These findings indicate that AGMs have initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses to SIV infection distinct from those of a nonnatural SIV host, resulting in more functional SIV-specific humoral responses, which may be involved in impairing pathogenic disease progression and minimizing postnatal transmission. IMPORTANCE Due to the worldwide prevalence of HIV-1 infections, development of a vaccine to prevent infection or limit the viral reservoir

  4. Prime-boost immunization schedules based on influenza virus and vaccinia virus vectors potentiate cellular immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus Env protein systemically and in the genitorectal draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, M Magdalena; Nájera, José Luis; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Guerra, Susana; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Esteban, Mariano

    2003-06-01

    Vaccines that elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses should be the choice to control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. We have previously shown that prime-boost immunizations with influenza virus Env and vaccinia virus (VV) WR Env recombinants induced an enhanced systemic CD8(+) T-cell response against HIV-1 Env antigen. In this report, we analyzed in BALB/c mice after priming with influenza virus Env the ability of two VV recombinants expressing HIV-1 Env B (VV WR Env and the highly attenuated modified VV Ankara [MVA] Env) to boost cellular immune responses in the spleen and in the lymph nodes draining the genital and rectal tracts. Groups of mice were primed by the intranasal route with 10(4) PFU of influenza virus Env and boosted 14 days later by the intraperitoneal or intranasal route with 10(7) PFU of MVA Env or VV WR Env, while the control group received two immunizations with influenza virus Env. We found that the combined immunization (Flu/VV) increased more than 60 times the number of gamma interferon-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to the Flu/Flu scheme. Significantly, boosting with MVA Env by the intraperitoneal route induced a response 1.25 or 2.5 times (spleen or genital lymph nodes) higher with respect to that found after the boost with VV WR Env. Mice with an enhanced CD8(+) T-cell response also had an increased Th1/Th2 ratio, evaluated by the cytokine pattern secreted following in vitro restimulation with gp160 protein and by the specific immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)/IgG1 ratio in serum. By the intranasal route recombinant WR Env booster gave a more efficient immune response (10 and 1.3 times in spleen and genital lymph nodes, respectively) than recombinant MVA Env. However, the scheme influenza virus Env/MVA Env increased four times the response in the spleen, giving a low but significant response in the genital lymph nodes compared with a single intranasal immunization with MVA Env. These results demonstrate that the combination

  5. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  6. T cell responses in coinfection with Onchocerca volvulus and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sentongo, E; Rubaale, T; Büttner, D W; Brattig, N W

    1998-09-01

    Onchocerca volvulus and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are two immunocompromising infectious agents of major public health concern in Uganda. To examine the effect of coinfection with O. volvulus and HIV on cellular immune responses, lymphocyte proliferative responses and cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from persons infected with O. volvulus with and without HIV type 1 infection were compared. Proliferation of PBMC to PHA and tuberculin (PPD) in coinfection was less (P = 0.08, P < 0.01) than in O. volvulus infection. O. volvulus extract stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in microfilaria-negative and HIV-negative O. volvulus infection while only an inconspicuous response was observed in microfilaria-negative coinfection. After stimulation of PBMC with PPD, the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5-demonstrated in O. volvulus infection-were reduced in coinfection with HIV (P < 0.01). While both groups failed to produce IFN-gamma in response to O. volvulus extract, only O. volvulus infected persons generated pronounced IL-5 and low IL-4 levels (0.01 > P = 0.02). The cellular immune responses in coinfection suggested an HIV-related lack of specific reactivity to O. volvulus antigen and impairment of IL-4 and IL-5 production in addition to the lack of IFN-gamma response on antigenic stimulation. PMID:9767610

  7. Virus growth and antibody responses following respiratory tract infection of ferrets and mice with WT and P/V mutants of the paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Gerald A.; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2008-01-01

    P/V gene substitutions convert the non-cytopathic paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5 (SV5), which is a poor inducer of host cell responses in human tissue culture cells, into a mutant (P/V-CPI–) that induces high levels of apoptosis, interferon (IFN)-beta, and proinflammatory cytokines. However, the effect of SV5-P/V gene mutations on virus growth and adaptive immune responses in animals has not been determined. Here, we used two distinct animal model systems to test the hypothesis that SV5-P/V mutants which are more potent activators of innate responses in tissue culture will also elicit higher antiviral antibody responses. In mouse cells, in vitro studies identified a panel of SV5-P/V mutants that ranged in their ability to limit IFN responses. Intranasal infection of mice with these WT and P/V mutant viruses elicited equivalent anti-SV5 IgG responses at all doses tested, and viral titers recovered from the respiratory tract were indistinguishable. In primary cultures of ferret lung fibroblasts, WT rSV5 and P/V-CPI– viruses had phenotypes similar to those established in human cell lines, including differential induction of IFN secretion, IFN signaling and apoptosis. Intranasal infection of ferrets with a low dose of WT rSV5 elicited ~500 fold higher anti-SV5 serum IgG responses compared to the P/V-CPI– mutant, and this correlated with overall higher viral titers for the WT virus in tracheal tissues. There was a dose-dependent increase in antibody response to infection of ferrets with P/V-CPI–, but not with WT rSV5. Together our data indicate that WT rSV5 and P/V mutants can elicit distinct innate and adaptive immunity phenotypes in the ferret animal model system, but not in the mouse system. We present a model for the effect of P/V gene substitutions on SV5 growth and immune responses in vivo. PMID:18456301

  8. Absence of intrafamilial transmission of hepatitis C in patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Dasani, H; Jackson, H; Jones, J A; Howlett, J

    1997-07-01

    Hepatitis 'C' virus (HCV) infection has caused significant anxiety in patients with inherited bleeding disorders. A significant number of patients with HCV have developed chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The exact risk of heterosexual and contact transmission is unclear at the moment. A test for antibody to hepatitis 'C' was offered, after counselling, to spouses and family members of 118 known hepatitis 'C' antibody positive patients with inherited bleeding disorders. Two hundred and fifteen family members were tested, 73 partners and 142 household contacts; all were found negative for hepatitis 'C'. Our experience confirms the low risk of heterosexual and contact transmission of hepatitis 'C' virus. PMID:27214805

  9. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D’Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells. PMID:27258263

  10. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    PubMed

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  11. Genomic analysis of the host response to nervous necrosis virus in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) brain.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Kileng, Øyvind; Skugor, Stanko; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Afanasyev, Sergey; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Sommer, Ann-Inger; Jensen, Ingvill

    2013-07-01

    Genome sequencing combined with transcriptome profiling promotes exploration of defence against pathogens and discovery of immune genes. Based on sequences from the recently released genome of Atlantic cod, a genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray (ACIQ-1) was designed and used for analyses of gene expression in the brain during infection with nervous necrosis virus (NNV). A challenge experiment with NNV was performed with Atlantic cod juveniles and brain samples from virus infected and uninfected fish were used for microarray analysis. Expression of virus induced genes increased at 5 days post challenge and persisted at stable level to the last sampling at 25 days post challenge. A large fraction of the up-regulated genes (546 features) were known or expected to have immune functions and most of these have not previously been characterized in Atlantic cod. Transcriptomic changes induced by the virus involved strong activation of genes associated with interferon and tumour necrosis factor related responses and acute inflammation. Up-regulation of genes involved in adaptive immunity suggested a rapid recruitment of B and T lymphocytes to the NNV infected brain. QPCR analyses of 15 candidate genes of innate immunity showed rapid induction by poly(I:C) in Atlantic cod larvae cells suggesting an antiviral role. Earliest and greatest expression changes after poly I:C stimulation was observed for interferon regulatory factors IRF4 and IRF7. Comparative studies between teleost species provided new knowledge about the evolution of innate antiviral immunity in fish. A number of genes is present or responds to viruses only in fish. Innate immunity of Atlantic cod is characterized by selective expansion of several medium-sized multigene families with ribose binding domains. An interesting finding was the high representation of three large gene families among the early antiviral genes, including tripartite motif proteins (TRIM) and proteins with PRY-SPRY and NACHT domains. The

  12. Comprehensive Mapping of Common Immunodominant Epitopes in the West Nile Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Recognized by Avian Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A.; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24) were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Duck Plague Virus (DPV) and Goose Parvovirus (GPV) antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and subunit vaccines

  13. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  14. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles Encoding Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surface Glycoproteins Induce Protective Mucosal Responses in Mice and Cotton Rats▿

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Lee, Sujin; Utley, Thomas J.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Collier, Martha L.; Davis, Nancy L.; Johnston, Robert E.; Crowe, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen that causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. There are no licensed RSV vaccines to date. To prevent RSV infection, immune responses in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts are required. Previously, immunization with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) demonstrated effectiveness in inducing mucosal protection against various pathogens. In this study, we developed VRPs encoding RSV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs, when administered intranasally, induced surface glycoprotein-specific virus neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. In addition, fusion protein-encoding VRPs induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting T cells in the lungs and spleen, as measured by reaction with an H-2Kd-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope. In animals vaccinated with F protein VRPs, challenge virus replication was reduced below the level of detection in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal RSV challenge, while in those vaccinated with G protein VRPs, challenge virus was detected in the upper but not the lower respiratory tract. Close examination of histopathology of the lungs of vaccinated animals following RSV challenge revealed no enhanced inflammation. Immunization with VRPs induced balanced Th1/Th2 immune responses, as measured by the cytokine profile in the lungs and antibody isotype of the humoral immune response. These results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding RSV proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for RSV. PMID:17928349

  15. Dendritic cells in hepatitis C virus infection: Key players in the IFNL3-genotype response

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Kate S; George, Jacob; Booth, David; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms, in the vicinity of the interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) gene have been identified as the strongest predictor of spontaneous and treatment induced clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Since then, increasing evidence has implicated the innate immune response in mediating the IFNL3 genotype effect. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key to the host immune response in HCV infection and their vital role in the IFNL3 genotype effect is emerging. Reports have identified subclasses of DCs, particularly myeloid DC2s and potentially plasmacytoid DCs as the major producers of IFNL3 in the setting of HCV infection. Given the complexities of dendritic cell biology and the conflicting current available data, this review aims to summarize what is currently known regarding the role of dendritic cells in HCV infection and to place it into context of what is know about lambda interferons and dendritic cells in general. PMID:25548481

  16. Of Mice and Men: Protective and Pathogenic Immune Responses to West Nile virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Trobaugh, Derek

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, first emerged in the Western Hemisphere in 1999. Although the majority of infections are asymptomatic, WNV causes significant morbidity and mortality in a minority of individuals who develop neuroinvasive disease, in particular the elderly and immunocompromised. Research in animal models has demonstrated interactions between WNV and the innate and adaptive immune system, some of which protect the host and others which are deleterious. Studies of disease pathogenesis in humans are less numerous, largely due to the complexities of WNV epidemiology. Human studies that have been done support the notion that innate and adaptive immune responses are delicately balanced and may help or harm the host. Further human investigations are needed to characterize beneficial responses to WNV with the goal of such research leading to therapeutics and effective vaccines in order to control this emerging viral disease. PMID:26120511

  17. Ethnicity and difference in dengue virus-specific memory T cell responses in Cuban individuals.

    PubMed

    de la C Sierra, Beatriz; García, Gissell; Pérez, Ana B; Morier, Luis; Alvarez, Mayling; Kourí, Gustavo; Guzmán, María G

    2006-01-01

    The different risk factors associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis needs yet additional clarification. The exceptional epidemiological circumstances in Cuba allow their evaluation in a well-defined situation. In the present study the memory T cell response of 80 Cuban donors previously infected with dengue-1 and dengue-2 during the 1977 and 1981 epidemics, and belonging to different ethnic groups, was examined. White people showed, in contrast to black people, stronger and remarkably cross-reactive dengue virus-specific memory CD4(+) T lymphocyte proliferation and interferon-gamma release. The observed variation in T cell response according to ethnicity could be related to the immunopathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and may partially explain the epidemiological evidence that black individuals are at lower risk for the most severe dengue clinical course compared with white individuals.

  18. NK Cell Responses to Human Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Pakalniene, Jolita; Lunemann, Sebastian; Enqvist, Monika; Dailidyte, Laura; Schaffer, Marie; Lindquist, Lars; Mickiene, Aukse; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Gredmark-Russ, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a flavivirus that is transferred to humans by infected ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis, a severe infection of the CNS with a high risk for long-lasting sequelae. Currently, no treatment exists for the disease. Understanding the cellular immune response to this infection is important to gain further understanding into the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of the disease. NK cells are known to participate in the control of viral infections. We performed a longitudinal analysis of the human NK cell response to TBEV infection in a cohort of infected individuals from the onset of severe clinical symptoms to the convalescence phase. NK cell activation, as measured by expression of Ki67, was apparent at the time of hospitalization. By 3 wk after hospitalization, it decreased to levels seen in healthy controls. Concomitant with the increase in NK cell activation, augmented levels of IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF were detected in patient plasma. This TBEV-induced NK cell activation was restricted predominantly to differentiated CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cells. Functionally, CD56(dim) NK cells responded poorly to target cells at the time of hospitalization, but they recovered functional capacity to control levels during the convalescent phase. In contrast, the responsiveness of NK cells to cytokine stimulation remained intact throughout the disease. These findings demonstrate that NK cells respond to TBEV infection with characteristics that are distinct from those of other human viral infections and provide insights into the NK cell response to clinical TBEV infection. PMID:27543616

  19. Dimerization Controls Marburg Virus VP24-dependent Modulation of Host Antioxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Britney; Li, Jing; Adhikari, Jagat; Edwards, Megan R; Zhang, Hao; Schwarz, Toni; Leung, Daisy W; Basler, Christopher F; Gross, Michael L; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2016-08-28

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the Filoviridae family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV), causes lethal hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates that have exceeded 50% in some outbreaks. Within an infected cell, there are numerous host-viral interactions that contribute to the outcome of infection. Recent studies identified MARV protein 24 (mVP24) as a modulator of the host antioxidative responses, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometry studies, we show that mVP24 is a dimer in solution that directly binds to the Kelch domain of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) to regulate nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). This interaction between Keap1 and mVP24 occurs through the Kelch interaction loop (K-Loop) of mVP24 leading to upregulation of antioxidant response element transcription, which is distinct from other Kelch binders that regulate Nrf2 activity. N-terminal truncations disrupt mVP24 dimerization, allowing monomeric mVP24 to bind Kelch with higher affinity and stimulate higher antioxidative stress response element (ARE) reporter activity. Mass spectrometry-based mapping of the interface revealed overlapping binding sites on Kelch for mVP24 and the Nrf2 proteins. Substitution of conserved cysteines, C209 and C210, to alanine in the mVP24 K-Loop abrogates Kelch binding and ARE activation. Our studies identify a shift in the monomer-dimer equilibrium of MARV VP24, driven by its interaction with Keap1 Kelch domain, as a critical determinant that modulates host responses to pathogenic Marburg viral infections. PMID:27497688

  20. Genome-wide association study of antibody response to Newcastle disease virus in chicken

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the first outbreak in Indonesia in 1926, Newcastle disease has become one of the most common and contagious bird diseases throughout the world. To date, enhancing host antibody response by vaccination remains the most efficient strategy to control outbreaks of Newcastle disease. Antibody response plays an important role in host resistance to Newcastle disease, and selection for antibody response can effectively improve disease resistance in chickens. However, the molecular basis of the variation in antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is not clear. The aim of this study was to detect genes modulating antibody response to NDV by a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in chickens. Results To identify genes or chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to NDV after immunization, a GWAS was performed using 39,833 SNP markers in a chicken F2 resource population derived from a cross between two broiler lines that differed in their resistance. Two SNP effects reached 5% Bonferroni genome-wide significance (P<1.26×10-6). These two SNPs, rs15354805 and rs15355555, were both on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 1 and spanned approximately 600 Kb, from 100.4 Mb to 101.0 Mb. Rs15354805 is in intron 7 of the chicken Roundabout, axon guidance receptor, homolog 2 (ROBO2) gene, and rs15355555 is located about 243 Kb upstream of ROBO2. Rs15354805 explained 5% of the phenotypic variation in antibody response to NDV, post immunization, in chickens. Rs15355555 had a similar effect as rs15354805 because of its linkage disequilibrium with rs15354805 (r2=0.98). Conclusion The region at about 100 Mb from the proximal end of chicken chromosome 1, including the ROBO1 and ROBO2 genes, has a strong effect on the antibody response to the NDV in chickens. This study paves the way for further research on the host immune response to NDV. PMID:23663563

  1. Antibody responses of red wolves to canine distemper virus and canine parvovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Harrenstien, L A; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C; Lucash, C F; Kania, S A; Potgieter, L N

    1997-07-01

    Twenty captive red wolves (Canis rufus), including 16 intended for release into Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Cades Cove, Tennessee (USA), and four housed at Knoxville Zoological Gardens, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, were evaluated for immunologic response to vaccination between June 1994 and April 1995. Wolves were vaccinated with modified-live (MLV) canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus type-2 (CPV2). Sera were collected, and immunofluorescent staining was performed for determination of immunoglobulin titers (CDV IgM, CDV IgG, and CPV2 IgG). A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed for validation purposes, to confirm the reactivity of our standard diagnostic reagents with red wolf serum. All wolves produced a measurable antibody response to CDV and CPV2 vaccination. Titers against CDV and CPV2 varied widely among individual wolves, but between-litter differences in mean titers were not significant. No consistent response between the degree of response to CDV versus CPV2 vaccination was observed in individual wolves. No differences were seen between IgG responses of pups vaccinated with univalent vaccines given concurrently or during alternating weeks. Pups had an IgG response to CDV and CPV2 vaccination as early as 9 wk of age. Mean post-vaccination IgG titers against CDV were at or above the level normally measured in vaccinated domestic dogs. Mean post-vaccination IgG titers against CPV2 were below the level normally measured in domestic dogs. Adult previously-vaccinated wolves had measurable CDV and CPV2 IgG titers more than 1 yr after vaccination, but did not have significant IgG titer increases after revaccination. We conclude that red wolves are capable of producing an antibody response after vaccination with commercial canine products but that their response to CPV2 vaccination was minimal. This response can be assayed using tests developed for domestic dogs.

  2. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  3. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus delays apoptotic responses via activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Li, Hung Sing; Cheung, Man Chun; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Yuen, Kit M.; Mok, Chris K. P.; Nicholls, John M.; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Chan, Michael C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus continues to pose pandemic threat, but there is a lack of understanding of its pathogenesis. We compared the apoptotic responses triggered by HPAI H5N1 and low pathogenic H1N1 viruses using physiologically relevant respiratory epithelial cells. We demonstrated that H5N1 viruses delayed apoptosis in primary human bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) compared to H1N1 virus. Both caspase-8 and -9 were activated by H5N1 and H1N1 viruses in AECs, while H5N1 differentially up-regulated TRAIL. H5N1-induced apoptosis was reduced by TRAIL receptor silencing. More importantly, STAT3 knock-down increased apoptosis by H5N1 infection suggesting that H5N1 virus delays apoptosis through activation of STAT3. Taken together, we demonstrate that STAT3 is involved in H5N1-delayed apoptosis compared to H1N1. Since delay in apoptosis prolongs the duration of virus replication and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TRAIL from H5N1-infected cells, which contribute to orchestrate cytokine storm and tissue damage, our results suggest that STAT3 may play a previously unsuspected role in H5N1 pathogenesis. PMID:27344974

  4. Chemical Induction of Unfolded Protein Response Enhances Cancer Cell Killing through Lytic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vibhu; Suomalainen, Maarit; Pennauer, Mirjam; Yakimovich, Artur; Andriasyan, Vardan; Hemmi, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer cells are susceptible to oncolytic viruses, albeit variably. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are widely used oncolytic agents that have been engineered to produce progeny within the tumor and elicit bystander effects. We searched for host factors enhancing bystander effects and conducted a targeted RNA interference screen against guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of small GTPases. We show that the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is readily inducible in aggressive tumor cells, enhances melanoma or epithelial cancer cell killing upon HAdV infection. UPR was triggered by knockdown of Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF-1) or the GBF-1 inhibitor golgicide A (GCA) and stimulated HAdV infection. GBF-1 is a GEF for ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi apparatus and intra-Golgi apparatus membrane transport. Cells treated with GCA enhanced HAdV-induced cytopathic effects in epithelial and melanoma cancer cells but not normal cells, if the drug was applied several hours prior to HAdV inoculation. This was shown by real-time label-free impedance measurements using the xCELLigence system. GCA-treated cells contained fewer incoming HAdVs than control cells, but GCA treatment boosted HAdV titers and spreading in cancer cells. GCA enhanced viral gene expression or transgene expression from the cytomegalovirus promoter of B- or C-species HAdVs but did not enhance viral early region 1A (E1A) expression in uninfected cell lines or cells transfected with plasmid reporter DNA. The UPR-enhanced cell killing required the nuclease activity of the UPR sensor inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), which alleviate ER stress. The collective results show that chemical UPR induction and viruses boost tumor cell killing by enhancing oncolytic viral efficacy. IMPORTANCE Cancer is difficult to combat. A wide range of oncolytic viruses show promise for

  5. Response of Mammalian Macrophages to Challenge with the Chlorovirus Acanthocystis turfacea Chlorella Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Agarkova, Irina V.; Zhou, You; Yolken, Robert H.; Van Etten, James L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It was recently reported that 44% of the oropharyngeal samples from the healthy humans in a study cohort had DNA sequences similar to that of the chlorovirus ATCV-1 (Acanthocystis turfacea chlorella virus 1, family Phycodnaviridae) and that these study subjects had decreases in visual processing and visual motor speed compared with individuals in whom no virus was detected. Moreover, mice inoculated orally with ATCV-1 developed immune responses to ATCV-1 proteins and had decreases in certain cognitive domains. Because heightened interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), and ERK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation from macrophages are linked to cognitive impairments, we evaluated cellular responses and viral PFU counts in murine RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages after exposure to ATCV-1 in vitro for up to 72 h after a virus challenge. Approximately 8% of the ATCV-1 inoculum was associated with macrophages after 1 h, and the percentage increased 2- to 3-fold over 72 h. Immunoblot assays with rabbit anti-ATCV-1 antibody detected a 55-kDa protein consistent with the viral capsid protein from 1 to 72 h and increasing de novo synthesis of a previously unidentified 17-kDa protein beginning at 24 h. Emergence of the 17-kDa protein did not occur and persistence of the 55-kDa protein declined over time when cells were exposed to heat-inactivated ATCV-1. Moreover, starting at 24 h, RAW264.7 cells exhibited cytopathic effects, annexin V staining, and cleaved caspase 3. Activation of ERK MAP kinases occurred in these cells by 30 min postchallenge, which preceded the expression of IL-6 and NO. Therefore, ATCV-1 persistence in and induction of inflammatory factors by these macrophages may contribute to declines in the cognitive abilities of mice and humans. IMPORTANCE Virus infections that persist in and stimulate inflammatory factors in macrophages contribute to pathologies in humans. A previous study showed that DNA sequences homologous to the

  6. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  7. Genomic survey of early responses to viruses in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Schiøtz, Berit Lyng; Torgersen, Jacob; Afanasyev, Sergey; Iliev, Dimitar; Jørgensen, Jorunn; Takle, Harald; Jørgensen, Sven Martin

    2011-10-01

    Viral diseases are one of the main problems and risk factors in aquaculture. At present diseases are diagnosed by detection of pathogens and clinical symptoms. Identification of genes involved in early responses to viruses is important for better knowledge of antiviral defence and development of diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to search for gene markers common for viral infections in Atlantic salmon based on microarray analyses of a wide range of samples. Gene expression profiles from fish and cell cultures infected with different viruses and treated with the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I:C) were compared in order to identify virus responsive genes (VRG). The list of VRG defined in this study contained 117 genes with known or unidentified functions. Several genes, including the most highly ranked one (receptor transporting protein), had not been previously reported to be involved in antiviral defence. VRG were characterized by a rapid induction and low tissue specificity, and their expression levels were related to the viral load. Immunofluorescence analyses of proteins encoded by VRG in cardiac tissue of salmon with the viral disease cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) revealed a common expression pattern. In head kidney leukocytes VRG showed comparable or equal responses to CpG and poly(I:C), which mimic respectively bacterial DNA and viral RNA. Most VRG showed highly correlated expression with interferon-a (IFNa). Sequence comparison of salmon VRG with those from other species gave an understanding of the evolution of these genes, which showed a remarkably rapid sequence divergence in comparison with the entire proteome. VRG emerged both before and after separation of teleosts and tetrapods, and among genes found exclusively in fish species there were members of several multigene families: tripartite motif proteins, gig1- and gig2-like proteins. Several VRG, including genes with unknown functions and orthologs to mammalian RNA helicase RIG-I and

  8. Negative regulation of the antiviral response by grouper LGP2 against fish viruses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yepin; Huang, Youhua; Yang, Ying; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2), a member of RIG-I like receptor (RLR) family, plays crucial roles in modulating cellular antiviral response during viral infection. However, the detailed roles of LGP2 in different virus infection were controversial up to now. Here, we cloned a LGP2 gene from orange-spotted grouper (EcLGP2) and investigated its roles in response to grouper virus infection. EcLGP2 encoded a 678-aa protein which shared 83% identity to sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicas). Amino acid alignment showed that EcLGP2 contained three conserved domains, including a DEAD/DEAH box helicase domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain of RIG-I. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcLGP2 could be predominantly detected in kidney, gill, fin, spleen and skin. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcLGP2 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the intracellular distribution of EcLGP2 was altered at the late stage of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection, but remained unchanged during red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection. Moreover, overexpression of EcLGP2 in vitro significantly enhanced the viral replication of SGIV and RGNNV, evidenced by the acceleration of CPE occurrence and the up-regulation of the viral gene transcription or protein synthesis. Further studies indicated that overexpression of EcLGP2 decreased the expression level of interferon related molecules or effectors, including IRF3, IRF7, ISG15, IFP35, MXI, MXII, and MDA5, suggesting that the negative feedback of interferon immune response by EcLGP2 might contribute to the enhancement of RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines, including IL-8 and TNFα were significantly decreased, but that of IL-6 was increased by the ectopic expression of EcLGP2. Thus, our results will contribute greatly to understanding the roles of fish LGP2 in innate immune response during

  9. Negative regulation of the antiviral response by grouper LGP2 against fish viruses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yepin; Huang, Youhua; Yang, Ying; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2), a member of RIG-I like receptor (RLR) family, plays crucial roles in modulating cellular antiviral response during viral infection. However, the detailed roles of LGP2 in different virus infection were controversial up to now. Here, we cloned a LGP2 gene from orange-spotted grouper (EcLGP2) and investigated its roles in response to grouper virus infection. EcLGP2 encoded a 678-aa protein which shared 83% identity to sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicas). Amino acid alignment showed that EcLGP2 contained three conserved domains, including a DEAD/DEAH box helicase domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain of RIG-I. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcLGP2 could be predominantly detected in kidney, gill, fin, spleen and skin. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcLGP2 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the intracellular distribution of EcLGP2 was altered at the late stage of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection, but remained unchanged during red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection. Moreover, overexpression of EcLGP2 in vitro significantly enhanced the viral replication of SGIV and RGNNV, evidenced by the acceleration of CPE occurrence and the up-regulation of the viral gene transcription or protein synthesis. Further studies indicated that overexpression of EcLGP2 decreased the expression level of interferon related molecules or effectors, including IRF3, IRF7, ISG15, IFP35, MXI, MXII, and MDA5, suggesting that the negative feedback of interferon immune response by EcLGP2 might contribute to the enhancement of RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines, including IL-8 and TNFα were significantly decreased, but that of IL-6 was increased by the ectopic expression of EcLGP2. Thus, our results will contribute greatly to understanding the roles of fish LGP2 in innate immune response during

  10. Cell mediated innate responses of cattle and swine are diverse during foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection: a unique landscape of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Toka, Felix N; Golde, William T

    2013-05-01

    Pathogens in general and pathogenic viruses in particular have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to escape the immune response of mammalian species. Viruses that cause acute disease tend to bear characteristics that make them very contagious, as survival does not derive from chronicity of infection, but spread of disease throughout the herd. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious viruses known. Upon infection of susceptible species, cloven-hoofed animals, the virus proliferates rapidly and causes a vesicular disease within 2-4 days. Disease symptoms resolve by 10 days to 2 weeks and in most cases, virus can no longer be detected. Periods of fever and viremia are usually brief, 1-3 days. In vivo control of virus infection and clearance of the virus during and following acute infection is of particular interest. The interaction of this virus with cells mediating the early, innate immune response has been analyzed in a number of recent studies. In most reports, the virus has a distinct inhibitory effect on the response of cells early in infection. Here we review these new data and discuss the dynamics of the interaction of virus with different cell types mediating the immune response to infection. PMID:23727070

  11. A novel rabies virus lipopeptide provides a better protection by improving the magnitude of DCs activation and T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Jingbo; Yang, Yan; Khan, Inamullah; Dong, Yue; Zhu, Naishuo

    2016-08-01

    Besides rabies virus neutralizing antibody, non-neutralizing antibody to internal vital proteins, interferon, and possibly cell-mediated immunity also have a critical role in preventing the infection by rabies virus (RV). We identified novel CTL and Th epitopes which could induce lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ, IL-4 production, and designed linear and branched lipopeptides with these selected CTL and Th epitopes. Compared to linear construct, branched lipopeptides, especially Lipo C, stimulate stronger phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs, as well as more efficient CD8(+) T cell responses, evaluating by using FACS, G333-341 tetramer staining and specific CTL assay. Lipo C could also assist rabies vaccine to induce an instant rabies virus neutralizing antibody production, and better protection against rabies virus challenge at early stage. These data reveal that Lipo C could be a promising component for developing novel rabies vaccines. PMID:27182006

  12. Digenic Inheritance in Cystinuria Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Meritxell; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Vilches, Clara; Salido, Eduardo; Prat, Esther; López de Heredia, Miguel; Palacín, Manuel; Nunes, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cystinuria is an aminoaciduria caused by mutations in the genes that encode the two subunits of the amino acid transport system b0,+, responsible for the renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids. The clinical symptoms of cystinuria relate to nephrolithiasis, due to the precipitation of cystine in urine. Mutations in SLC3A1, which codes for the heavy subunit rBAT, cause cystinuria type A, whereas mutations in SLC7A9, which encodes the light subunit b0,+AT, cause cystinuria type B. By crossing Slc3a1-/- with Slc7a9-/- mice we generated a type AB cystinuria mouse model to test digenic inheritance of cystinuria. The 9 genotypes obtained have been analyzed at early (2- and 5-months) and late stage (8-months) of the disease. Monitoring the lithiasic phenotype by X-ray, urine amino acid content analysis and protein expression studies have shown that double heterozygous mice (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/-) present lower expression of system b0,+ and higher hyperexcretion of cystine than single heterozygotes (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/+ and Slc7a9+/+Slc3a1+/-) and give rise to lithiasis in 4% of the mice, demonstrating that cystinuria has a digenic inheritance in this mouse model. Moreover in this study it has been demonstrated a genotype/phenotype correlation in type AB cystinuria mouse model providing new insights for further molecular and genetic studies of cystinuria patients. PMID:26359869

  13. Combined Alphavirus Replicon Particle Vaccine Induces Durable and Cross-Protective Immune Responses against Equine Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Pamela J.; Bakken, Russell R.; Barth, James F.; Lind, Cathleen M.; da Silva, Luis; Hart, Mary Kate; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Dudek, Jeanne; Owens, Gary; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Parker, Michael D.; Smith, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    surface proteins of all three viruses. In this report we demonstrate in both mice and macaques that this combined vaccine is safe, generates a strong immune response, and protects against aerosol challenge with the viruses that cause Venezuelan equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis. PMID:25122801

  14. Antibody responses to defined epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded transactivator protein among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, R; Dillner, J; De Paoli, P

    1996-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded replication activator (ZEBRA) is a key mediator of reactivation from latency to the viral productive cycle. In the present study, the serum antibody responses against three defined ZEBRA epitopes (designated ZEBRA-1, -19, and -22) were determined for 50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 100 matched healthy control subjects. The anti-ZEBRA responses were more commonly found among HIV-seropositive patients than among healthy controls for all the three ZEBRA epitopes tested (P < 0.0003, P < 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison of ZEBRA antibody levels with the degree of immunodeficiency (CD4 cell counts), CDC grouping, and HIV p24 antigen positivity showed little association, suggesting that induction of ZEBRA antibodies is an early event after HIV infection. PMID:8705686

  15. Seoul virus enhances regulatory and reduces proinflammatory responses in male Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Judith D; Klein, Sabra L

    2008-07-01

    Zoonotic pathogens, including hantaviruses, are maintained in the environment by causing persistent infection in the absence of disease in their reservoir hosts. Spillover of hantaviruses to humans can cause severe disease that is mediated by excessive proinflammatory responses. The mechanisms mediating hantaviral persistence in rodent reservoirs remain largely unknown. Male Norway rats were inoculated with their species-specific hantavirus, Seoul virus (SEOV), and viral RNA, cytokine, and chemokine responses were evaluated in spleen and lung tissue. More viral RNA was detectable in the lungs than spleen, with copies of SEOV peaking 15-30 days post-inoculation (p.i.) and persisting for 60 days p.i. In the lungs, the expression and production of proinflammatory mediators (i.e., IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, CCL5, CCL2, CX3CL1, CXCL10, VCAM, VEGF, and NOS2) remained at or below baseline throughout SEOV infection; whereas, regulatory factors, including TGF-beta and FoxP3 were elevated. Conversely, in the spleen, proinflammatory responses were induced while regulatory responses remained unchanged during infection. To determine whether reduced proinflammatory responses mediate hantavirus persistence in the lungs, male rats were administered rIL-1beta or vehicle for 30 days during SEOV infection. SEOV persistence and shedding were not affected by IL-1beta treatment. Proinflammatory responses were elevated in rIL-1beta-treated rats, but remained within physiological levels, suggesting that supra-physiological concentrations may be necessary for viral clearance at the cost of causing disease. Elevated regulatory responses may suppress excessively high proinflammatory responses at a site of elevated SEOV replication to contribute to viral persistence and prevent proinflammatory-mediated disease in reservoir hosts.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides alter early immune response to influenza A virus infection in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    LeMessurier, Kim S; Lin, Yanyan; McCullers, Jonathan A; Samarasinghe, Amali E

    2016-09-01

    Influenza is a disease of the respiratory system caused by single stranded RNA viruses with varying genotypes. Immunopathogenesis to influenza viruses differs based on virus strain, dose, and mouse strain used in laboratory models. Although effective mucosal immune defenses are important in early host defense against influenza, information on the kinetics of these immune defense mechanisms during the course of influenza infection is limited. We investigated changes to antimicrobial peptides and primary innate immune cells at early time points after infection and compared these variables between two prominent H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV) strains, A/CA/04/2009 and A/PR/08/1934 in C57BL/6 mice. Alveolar and parenchymal macrophage ratios were altered after IAV infection and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages was induced after IAV infection. Genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, β-defensin (Defb4), bactericidal-permeability increasing protein (Bpifa1), and cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (Camp), were differentially regulated after IAV infection and the kinetics of Defb4 expression differed in response to each virus strain. Beta-defensin reduced infectivity of A/CA/04/2009 virus but not A/PR/08/1934. Beta defensins also changed the innate immune cell profile wherein mice pre-treated with β-defensin had increased alveolar macrophages and CD103(+) dendritic cells, and reduced CD11b(+) dendritic cells and neutrophils. In addition to highlighting that immune responses may vary based on influenza virus strain used, our data suggest an important role for antimicrobial peptides in host defense against influenza virus. PMID:27531368

  17. Antimicrobial peptides alter early immune response to influenza A virus infection in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    LeMessurier, Kim S; Lin, Yanyan; McCullers, Jonathan A; Samarasinghe, Amali E

    2016-09-01

    Influenza is a disease of the respiratory system caused by single stranded RNA viruses with varying genotypes. Immunopathogenesis to influenza viruses differs based on virus strain, dose, and mouse strain used in laboratory models. Although effective mucosal immune defenses are important in early host defense against influenza, information on the kinetics of these immune defense mechanisms during the course of influenza infection is limited. We investigated changes to antimicrobial peptides and primary innate immune cells at early time points after infection and compared these variables between two prominent H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV) strains, A/CA/04/2009 and A/PR/08/1934 in C57BL/6 mice. Alveolar and parenchymal macrophage ratios were altered after IAV infection and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages was induced after IAV infection. Genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, β-defensin (Defb4), bactericidal-permeability increasing protein (Bpifa1), and cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (Camp), were differentially regulated after IAV infection and the kinetics of Defb4 expression differed in response to each virus strain. Beta-defensin reduced infectivity of A/CA/04/2009 virus but not A/PR/08/1934. Beta defensins also changed the innate immune cell profile wherein mice pre-treated with β-defensin had increased alveolar macrophages and CD103(+) dendritic cells, and reduced CD11b(+) dendritic cells and neutrophils. In addition to highlighting that immune responses may vary based on influenza virus strain used, our data suggest an important role for antimicrobial peptides in host defense against influenza virus.

  18. Metro Atlanta responds to West Nile virus: a coordinated public health response.

    PubMed

    Willis, Juanette

    2005-01-01

    Three and a half million people live in metropolitan Atlanta, in multiple counties with varying population bases, resources, issues and separate boards of health. Historically, public health issues have been managed within each county, with very little sharing of information among counties. The 1999 West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak in the Northeast caused public health officials in Atlanta to recognize the potential for the disease to spread to Georgia and the need to develop a coordinated, multi-jurisdictional response plan. This plan would need to address a new disease with little scientific data to predict how it might behave in a new environment and would also require closely coordinated communication among the local/state public health entities and elected officials. In early 2000, staff from the five health districts in the metro Atlanta area and the state health department voluntarily convened the Metro Atlanta Surveillance Task Force (MASTF) to create the Metro Atlanta West Nile Virus Response Plan. This plan utilizes a coordinated effort encompassing public education, surveillance, and mosquito control. With this plan in place, when the first human case of WNV was detected in Atlanta, the public heard consistent health messages about preventive measures to lower their risk of illness and the metro counties were able to carry out a successful uniform approach to mosquito control. This plan has received recognition by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) as a 2004 Model Practice, demonstrating exemplary and replicable qualities in response to a local public health need. Since the early days of the emergence of WNV in the metro Atlanta area, MASTF has continued to be a viable, evolving entity, managing and anticipating health issues. The MASTF plan is a successful effort to develop consistent policies and procedures for disease surveillance in a heavily populated area with multiple local health departments. PMID:15822839

  19. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Leland J.; Im, KyungAh; Borg, Brian; Yang, Huiying; Liang, T. Jake

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-α-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30%–80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained viral response (SVR) to therapy for chronic HCV infection. We observed the IL-6 T-T-G-G-G-G-C-A-G-A haplotype to be associated with a lower risk of achieving SVR among Caucasian Americans (CAs) (RR=0.80; 95%C.I.: 0.66– 0.98; p=0.0261). Using a sliding window approach, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.79; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0081), as was the rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G)-rs2069830-(C) haplotype (RR=0.78; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0065) among CAs. Overall, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was independently associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.78; 95% C.I.: 0.62–1.0; p=0.0489) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings further illustrate the complexity of IL-6 genetic regulation and the potential importance of haplotypes on IL-6 expression. Our findings provide additional support for the potential importance of genetic variation in the IL-6 gene and the response to HCV therapy. PMID:19387461

  20. Incorporating inheritance into models for understanding ventilatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Strohl, K P; Subramanian, S; Han, F; Principe, K; Dick, T E

    2001-01-01

    Ventilation and its components (frequency and tidal volume) appear to be determined to a significant extent by inheritance. Gene manipulation, gene identification, and functional genomics now offer powerful tools to identify the strength and mode of inheritance for ventilatory behavior under steady-state and non-steady-state conditions, in health and in disease. Conscious integration of genetic principles into existing explanatory models may increase the likelihood of detecting traits that correlate with protein systems responsible for the structures and the functional components of respiration.

  1. The effect of dietary bovine colostrum on respiratory syncytial virus infection and immune responses following the infection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei Ling; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of respiratory tract infection among young children because of immature T cell immunity of them against hRSV. CD8 T cells play a pivotal role in clearing hRSV and preventing subsequent infection. We examined the effects of dietary bovine colostrum on virus infection and CD8 T cell responses following hRSV infection in the mouse model. Mice received bovine colostrum for 14 days prior to hRSV challenge, and lung indexes (severity of symptom) and lung virus titers were analyzed. In addition, the activation of CD8 T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) of mice receiving bovine colostrum were compared with those in the BALFs of mice receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or ribavirin, post virus challenge. The severity of infection and lung virus titers were reduced in the mice receiving bovine colostrum, compared to those receiving PBS. Moreover CD8 T cell responses were selectively enhanced in the former. Our results suggest that dietary bovine colostrum exerts the effects to inhibit hRSV and ameliorate the symptom by hRSV infection, and enhances the CD8 T cell response during the hRSV infection. PMID:26310306

  2. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R.; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activation onto a heterologous reporter gene. Importantly, expression of the essential immediate early viral transactivator ICP4 and the essential DNA replication protein ICP8, that are adjacent to p53RE-S and p53RE-L, are repressed in a p53-dependent manner. Taken together, this study identifies two novel functional p53RE in the HSV-1 genome and suggests a complex mechanism of viral gene regulation by p53 which may determine progression of the lytic viral replication cycle or the establishment of latency. PMID:25010269

  3. An isoelectric focusing overlay study of the humoral immune response in Theiler's virus demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Roos, R P; Nalefski, E A; Nitayaphan, S; Variakojis, R; Singh, K K

    1987-01-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) bands are a frequent feature of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). In multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal IgG bands are a potential clue to the pathogenesis of the disease; however, their particular antigenic target is unknown. We sought to characterize the IgG response in an experimental CNS persistent demyelinating infection by isoelectric focusing (IEF) studies of serum and CSF from mice infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). Following IEF, we used a new technique in order to identify TMEV-specific antibodies; focused immunoglobulins were blotted onto nitrocellulose paper which was then overlaid with radiolabeled virus. Autoradiograms showed that most of the TMEV antibody was locally synthesized within the CNS since CSF, but not serum, TMEV antibody had an anodal distribution. CSF IEF TMEV antibody spectrotypes were very similar, presumably because the CSFs were collected from the same inbred mouse strain. CSF TMEV antibody displayed less restricted heterogeneity than the very restricted cathodal CSF oligoclonal IgG bands seen in MS. The new IEF immunoblotting antigen overlay technique will be a powerful detection system to probe for the antigenic target against which MS CSF IgG may be directed.

  4. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  5. Interferon response in normal and Aleutian disease virus-infected mink.

    PubMed

    Wiedbrauk, D L; Hadlow, W J; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1986-08-01

    Studies were done to determine whether differences in interferon production are responsible for the resistance of pastel mink to Aleutian disease. The abilities of normal pastel and sapphire mink to produce interferon when inoculated with either Newcastle disease virus or a synthetic polyribonucleotide, poly (I):poly (C), were identical, even to the production of a novel, acid-labile interferon. The resistance of pastel mink to Aleutian disease did not correlate with interferon production, because neither sapphire nor pastel mink produced detectable amounts of interferon when infected with either the Pullman strain of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) or the highly virulent Utah I strain. Sapphire mink infected with the Pullman strain responded normally to poly (I):poly (C) early in the course of the disease, but interferon production was impaired late, when the mink were hypergammaglobulinemic and had renal, vascular, and hepatic lesions. These data suggest that ADV Pullman neither stimulates nor interferes with interferon production in infected mink and may represent a mechanism whereby ADV can more readily establish infection.

  6. Immunological responses to envelope glycoprotein 120 from subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Gilljam, G; Svensson, A; Ekström, A; Wahren, B

    1999-07-01

    The outer envelope glycoprotein (gp120) from subtypes A-E of HIV-1 was purified using a specific high mannose-binding lectin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. All isolates were grown in peripheral blood lymphocyte cells in order to avoid selection in cell lines. A comparison of the reactivities of the envelope proteins was made using sera from patients infected with the different subtypes. In this study, the B and C subtype envelope glycoproteins showed the strongest immunological reactivity, when reacted with sera from patients infected with the same subtype of virus. On the other hand, sera of patients infected with subtype A or C virus had the strongest and broadest reactivities, to envelope glycoproteins of many subtypes. The purified gp120 proteins from all five subtypes stimulated mononuclear cells from HIV-1 (subtype B)-infected patients, indicating conserved T cell-activating epitopes. The immunological reactivities indicate that strong antigenicity does not always predict the broadest immunogenicity of an envelope glycoprotein. Glycoprotein 120 from foreign subtypes may serve to induce strong cross-reactive immune responses.

  7. Domain- and nucleotide-specific Rev response element regulation of feline immunodeficiency virus production

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Huisman, Willem; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Phillips, Tom R.; Power, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Computational analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA sequences indicated that common FIV strains contain a rev response element (RRE) defined by a long unbranched hairpin with 6 stem-loop sub-domains, termed stem-loop A (SLA). To examine the role of the RNA secondary structure of the RRE, mutational analyses were performed in both an infectious FIV molecular clone and a FIV CAT-RRE reporter system. These studies disclosed that the stems within SLA (SA1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of the RRE were critical but SA6 was not essential for FIV replication and CAT expression. These studies also revealed that the secondary structure rather than an antisense protein (ASP) mediates virus expression and replication in vitro. In addition, a single synonymous mutation within the FIV-RRE, SA3/45, reduced viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 expression after transfection but in addition also showed a marked reduction in viral expression and production following infection. PMID:20570310

  8. Human and rodent humoral immune responses to Andes virus structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Galeno, Héctor; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-04-10

    In the present work we identified B-cell epitopes recognized by sera of humans and rodents naturally infected with Andes virus, a hantavirus present in Chile and Argentina. Analysis of patient and rodent sera with overlapping peptides revealed 21 human and rodent epitopes on the three structural proteins. Whereas in the nucleoprotein the region comprising aa 248-260 was shown to be the key determinant of human sera, the major antigenic site of rodent antibody reactivity is located at aa 326-338. In G1, the main epitope recognized by human sera was mapped to aa 14-26, while rodent antibodies bound predominantly to aa 599-611. In contrast, humans and mice had strong responses to three regions in G2 (aa 691-703, aa 918-930, aa 955-967), of which the last two are associated with neutralization of Hantaan virus. This insight affords important information for the development of immunotherapies for the acute phase of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome.

  9. Vaccinia virus protein K7 is a virulence factor that alters the acute immune response to infection.

    PubMed

    Benfield, Camilla T O; Ren, Hongwei; Lucas, Stuart J; Bahsoun, Basma; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2013-07-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes many proteins that antagonize the innate immune system including a family of intracellular proteins with a B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2-like structure. One of these Bcl-2 proteins called K7 binds Toll-like receptor-adaptor proteins and the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 and thereby inhibits the activation of NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 3. However, the contribution of K7 to virus virulence is not known. Here a VACV lacking the K7R gene (vΔK7) was constructed and compared with control viruses that included a plaque purified wt (vK7), a revertant with the K7R gene reinserted (vK7-rev) and a frame-shifted virus in which the translational initiation codon was mutated to prevent K7 protein expression (vK7-fs). Data presented show that loss of K7 does not affect virus replication in cell culture or in vivo; however, viruses lacking the K7 protein were less virulent than controls in murine intradermal (i.d.) and intranasal (i.n.) infection models and there was an altered acute immune response to infection. In the i.d. model, vΔK7 induced smaller lesions than controls, and after i.n. infection vΔK7 induced a reduced weight loss and signs of illness, and more rapid clearance of virus from infected tissue. Concomitantly, the intrapulmonary innate immune response to infection with vΔK7 showed increased infiltration of NK cells and CD8⁺ T-cells, enhanced MHC class II expression by macrophages, and enhanced cytolysis of target cells by NK cells and VACV-specific CD8⁺ T-cells. Thus protein K7 is a virulence factor that affects the acute immune response to infection.

  10. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Suryawanshi, Amol; Tundup, Smanla; Perez, Jasmine T.; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV) RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC) activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN), as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 –MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains. PMID:27438481

  11. Increased cell-mediated immune responses in patients with recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 meningitis.

    PubMed

    Franzen-Röhl, Elisabeth; Schepis, Danika; Lagrelius, Maria; Franck, Kristina; Jones, Petra; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke; Bergström, Tomas; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Kärre, Klas; Berg, Louise; Gaines, Hans

    2011-04-01

    The clinical picture of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection includes genital blisters and less frequently meningitis, and some individuals suffer from recurrent episodes of these manifestations. We hypothesized that adaptive and/or innate immune functional deficiencies may be a major contributing factor in susceptibility to recurrent HSV-2 meningitis. Ten patients with recurrent HSV-2 meningitis were studied during clinical remission. For comparison, 10 patients with recurrent genital HSV infections as well as 21 HSV-seropositive and 19 HSV-seronegative healthy blood donors were included. HSV-specific T cell blasting and cytokine secretion were evaluated in whole blood cultures. HSV-2-induced NK cell gamma interferon production, dendritic cell Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression, and TLR agonist-induced alpha interferon secretion were analyzed. Patients with recurrent HSV-2 meningitis had elevated T cell blasting and Th1 and Th2 cytokine production in response to HSV antigens compared to those of patients with recurrent genital infections. A somewhat increased NK cell response, increased dendritic cell expression of TLR3 and -9, and increased TLR-induced alpha interferon responses were also noted. Contrary to our expectation, recurrent HSV-2 meningitis patients have increased HSV-specific adaptive and innate immune responses, raising the possibility of immune-mediated pathology in the development of recurrent HSV2 meningitis.

  12. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  13. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Jamie L.; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reported that the binding of a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A1*002, to the inhibitory receptor Mamu-KIR3DL05 is stabilized by certain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) peptides, but not by others. Here we investigated the functional implications of these interactions by testing SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 for the ability to modulate Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cell responses. Twenty-eight of 75 SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 suppressed the cytolytic activity of primary Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells, including three immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitopes previously shown to stabilize Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. Substitutions at C-terminal positions changed inhibitory peptides into disinhibitory peptides, and vice versa, without altering binding to Mamu-A1*002. The functional effects of these peptide variants on NK cell responses also corresponded to their effects on Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. In assays with mixtures of inhibitory and disinhibitory peptides, low concentrations of inhibitory peptides dominated to suppress NK cell responses. Consistent with the inhibition of Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells by viral epitopes presented by Mamu-A1*002, SIV replication was significantly higher in Mamu-A1*002+ CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells than with Mamu-KIR3DL05- NK cells. These results demonstrate that viral peptides can differentially affect NK cell responses by modulating MHC class I interactions with inhibitory KIRs, and provide a mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses may evade NK cell responses. PMID:26333068

  14. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reported that the binding of a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A1*002, to the inhibitory receptor Mamu-KIR3DL05 is stabilized by certain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) peptides, but not by others. Here we investigated the functional implications of these interactions by testing SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 for the ability to modulate Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cell responses. Twenty-eight of 75 SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 suppressed the cytolytic activity of primary Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells, including three immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitopes previously shown to stabilize Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. Substitutions at C-terminal positions changed inhibitory peptides into disinhibitory peptides, and vice versa, without altering binding to Mamu-A1*002. The functional effects of these peptide variants on NK cell responses also corresponded to their effects on Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. In assays with mixtures of inhibitory and disinhibitory peptides, low concentrations of inhibitory peptides dominated to suppress NK cell responses. Consistent with the inhibition of Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells by viral epitopes presented by Mamu-A1*002, SIV replication was significantly higher in Mamu-A1*002+ CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells than with Mamu-KIR3DL05- NK cells. These results demonstrate that viral peptides can differentially affect NK cell responses by modulating MHC class I interactions with inhibitory KIRs, and provide a mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses may evade NK cell responses.

  15. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  16. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D. A.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto subduction about 4Ga, evident in geochemical analysis from ancient cratons, to global tectonics by 3-2.7Ga, suggests that plates and plate boundaries spread globally over a 1Gyr period. We hypothesize that when sufficient lithospheric damage, which promotes shear-localization and long-lived weak zones, combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of plate boundaries and eventually fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We demonstrate this process with an idealized model of pressure-driven flow (wherein a low pressure zone is equivalent to downwelling suction or slab pull) in a lithosphere that self-weakens according to a mylonitic-type polycrystalline grain-damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. v.202-203, pp27-55, 2012). In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, four successive orthogonal rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damage zones that are inherited to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even as flow is only driven by subduction. For Venus' hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which is compatible with observations. After plates are developed, continued changes in driving forces combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor and micro plates.

  17. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  18. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  19. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  20. Inherited disorders of bilirubin clearance.

    PubMed

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-03-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective (i) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, (ii) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g., Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), (iii) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or (iv) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  1. Suppression of NS3 and MP Is Important for the Stable Inheritance of RNAi-Mediated Rice Stripe Virus (RSV) Resistance Obtained by Targeting the Fully Complementary RSV-CP Gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyang-Mi; Choi, Man-Soo; Kwak, Do-Yeon; Lee, Bong-Choon; Lee, Jong-Hee; Kim, Myeong-Ki; Kim, Yeon-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Bum; Park, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yul-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) is a viral disease that seriously impacts rice production in East Asia, most notably in Korea, China, and Japan. Highly RSV-resistant transgenic japonica rice plants were generated using a dsRNAi construct designed to silence the entire sequence region of the RSV-CP gene. Transgenic rice plants were inoculated with a population of viruliferous insects, small brown planthoppers (SBPH), and their resistance was evaluated using ELISA and an infection rate assay. A correlation between the expression of the RSV-CP homologous small RNAs and the RSV resistance of the transgenic rice lines was discovered. These plants were also analyzed by comparing the expression pattern of invading viral genes, small RNA production and the stable transmission of the RSV resistance trait to the T3 generation. Furthermore, the agronomic trait was stably transmitted to the T4 generation of transgenic plants. PMID:22134721

  2. Immune response to herpes simplex virus infections: virus-specific antibodies in sera from patients with recurrent facial infections.

    PubMed

    Zweerink, H J; Stanton, L W

    1981-02-01

    Radioimmunoprecipitation assays were used to identify antibodies against a number of herpes simplex virus type 1-specific antigens in serum samples from individuals with recurrent facial herpes virus infections and from seropositive individuals without recurrent infections. Individuals with recurrent infections contributed three sequential serum samples each: immediately after the appearance of lesions, 3 weeks later, and 3 months later. Antibodies against at least 18 viral polypeptides were present in all positive sera: these included antibodies against the major nucleocapsid polypeptide (approximate molecular weight, 150,000) and against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 115,000 to 130,000. No significant differences were observed between the serum samples in regard to their virus-specific antibody composition. The high-molecular-weight glycopolypeptides were partially purified and used in quantitative titration experiments. All sera tested were equally reactive with this material. It was concluded that under the experimental conditions an individual's susceptibility to recurrent herpetic infections could not be correlated with quantitative or qualitative changes in the levels of virus-specific antibodies.

  3. Immune Responses of Dairy Cattle to Parainfluenza-3 Virus in Intranasal Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis-Parainfluenza-3 Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A.L.; Morrill, J.L.; Bostwick, J.L.; Ridley, R.K.; Fryer, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty dairy heifers were vaccinated at three to six months of age with an intranasal infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-parainfluenza-3 vaccine. Eighteen additional heifers were tested prior to vaccination and again three to four weeks after vaccination. Neither cell-mediated nor humoral immunity was significantly raised to parainfluenza-3 virus in either group of cattle. PMID:6290012

  4. Differences in the lymphoproliferative response of cattle and sheep to bovine leucosis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dimmock, C K; Rogers, R J; Chung, Y S; McKenzie, A R; Waugh, P D

    1986-04-01

    Lymphoblastic leukaemia, preceded by a significantly increasing percentage of prolymphocytes in peripheral blood smears for from 12 to 68 weeks before death was a feature of sheep which developed lymphosarcoma following inoculation with the Australian strain of bovine leucosis virus (BLV). Lymphocytosis and/or the appearance of immature cells were a reliable predictor of tumour formation in sheep, but not in cattle. There was a terminal lymphoblastic leukaemia in only 43 of 84 cattle with lymphosarcoma. Differences in the morphological appearance and glycogen content of the leukaemic lymphoblasts of sheep and cattle were observed. In spite of these differences the high frequency of lymphocytosis and lymphosarcoma in experimentally infected sheep suggests that they could be a useful model for studying the pathological and immunological responses to BLV infection. PMID:3012856

  5. U.S. response to a report of infectious salmon anemia virus in Western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Kevin H; Gustafson, Lori; Warg, Janet; Whaley, Janet; Purcell, Maureen K.; Rolland, Jill B.; Winton, James R.; Snekvik, Kevin; Meyers, Theodore; Stewart, Bruce; Kerwin, John; Blair, Marilyn; Bader, Joel; Evered, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Federal, state, and tribal fishery managers, as well as the general public and their elected representatives in the United States, were concerned when infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) was suspected for the first time in free-ranging Pacific Salmon collected from the coastal areas of British Columbia, Canada. This article documents how national and regional fishery managers and fish health specialists of the U.S. worked together and planned and implemented actions in response to the reported finding of ISAV in British Columbia. To date, the reports by Simon Fraser University remain unconfirmed and preliminary results from collaborative U.S. surveillance indicate that there is no evidence of ISAV in U.S. populations of free-ranging or marine-farmed salmonids on the west coast of North America.

  6. Previously infected and recovered chimpanzees exhibit rapid responses that control hepatitis C virus replication upon rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Major, Marian E; Mihalik, Kathleen; Puig, Montserrat; Rehermann, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Michelina; Rice, Charles M; Feinstone, Stephen M

    2002-07-01

    Responses in three chimpanzees were compared following challenge with a clonal hepatitis C virus (HCV) contained in plasma from an animal that had received infectious RNA transcripts. Two of the chimpanzees (Ch1552 and ChX0186) had recovered from a previous infection with HCV, while the third (Ch1605) was a naïve animal. All animals were challenged by reverse titration with decreasing dilutions of plasma and became serum RNA positive following challenge. Ch1605 displayed a typical disease profile for a chimpanzee. We observed increasing levels of serum RNA from week 1 postinoculation (p.i.), reaching a peak of 10(6) copies/ml at week 9 p.i., and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations and seroconversion to HCV antibodies at week 10 p.i. In contrast, both Ch1552 and ChX0186 exhibited much shorter periods of viremia (4 weeks), low serum RNA levels (peak, 10(3) copies/ml), and minimal ALT elevations. A comparison of intrahepatic cytokine levels in Ch1552 and Ch1605 showed greater and earlier gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha responses in the previously infected animal, responses that were 30-fold greater than baseline responses at week 4 p.i. for IFN-gamma in Ch1552 compared to 12-fold in Ch1605 at week 10 p.i. These data indicate (i) that clonal HCV generated from an infectious RNA transcript will lead to a typical HCV infection in naïve chimpanzees, (ii) that there are memory immune responses in recovered chimpanzees that control HCV infection upon rechallenge, and (iii) that these responses seem to be T-cell mediated, as none of the animals had detectable antibody against the HCV envelope glycoproteins. These observations have encouraging implications for the development of a vaccine for HCV.

  7. Previously Infected and Recovered Chimpanzees Exhibit Rapid Responses That Control Hepatitis C Virus Replication upon Rechallenge

    PubMed Central

    Major, Marian E.; Mihalik, Kathleen; Puig, Montserrat; Rehermann, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Michelina; Rice, Charles M.; Feinstone, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    Responses in three chimpanzees were compared following challenge with a clonal hepatitis C virus (HCV) contained in plasma from an animal that had received infectious RNA transcripts. Two of the chimpanzees (Ch1552 and ChX0186) had recovered from a previous infection with HCV, while the third (Ch1605) was a naïve animal. All animals were challenged by reverse titration with decreasing dilutions of plasma and became serum RNA positive following challenge. Ch1605 displayed a typical disease profile for a chimpanzee. We observed increasing levels of serum RNA from week 1 postinoculation (p.i.), reaching a peak of 106 copies/ml at week 9 p.i., and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations and seroconversion to HCV antibodies at week 10 p.i. In contrast, both Ch1552 and ChX0186 exhibited much shorter periods of viremia (4 weeks), low serum RNA levels (peak, 103 copies/ml), and minimal ALT elevations. A comparison of intrahepatic cytokine levels in Ch1552 and Ch1605 showed greater and earlier gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha responses in the previously infected animal, responses that were 30-fold greater than baseline responses at week 4 p.i. for IFN-γ in Ch1552 compared to 12-fold in Ch1605 at week 10 p.i. These data indicate (i) that clonal HCV generated from an infectious RNA transcript will lead to a typical HCV infection in naïve chimpanzees, (ii) that there are memory immune responses in recovered chimpanzees that control HCV infection upon rechallenge, and (iii) that these responses seem to be T-cell mediated, as none of the animals had detectable antibody against the HCV envelope glycoproteins. These observations have encouraging implications for the development of a vaccine for HCV. PMID:12050371

  8. Transcriptional response of Mexican axolotls to Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Jennifer D; Storfer, Andrew; Page, Robert B; Beachy, Christopher K; Voss, S Randal

    2008-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the immunological responses of amphibians to pathogens that are causing global population declines. We used a custom microarray gene chip to characterize gene expression responses of axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to an emerging viral pathogen, Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Result At 0, 24, 72, and 144 hours post-infection, spleen and lung samples were removed for estimation of host mRNA abundance and viral load. A total of 158 up-regulated and 105 down-regulated genes were identified across all time points using statistical and fold level criteria. The presumptive functions of these genes suggest a robust innate immune and antiviral gene expression response is initiated by A. mexicanum as early as 24 hours after ATV infection. At 24 hours, we observed transcript abundance changes for genes that are associated with phagocytosis and cytokine signaling, complement, and other general immune and defense responses. By 144 hours, we observed gene expression changes indicating host-mediated cell death, inflammation, and cytotoxicity. Conclusion Although A. mexicanum appears to mount a robust innate immune response, we did not observe gene expression changes indicative of lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen, which is associated with clearance of Frog 3 iridovirus in adult Xenopus. We speculate that ATV may be especially lethal to A. mexicanum and related tiger salamanders because they lack proliferative lymphocyte responses that are needed to clear highly virulent iridoviruses. Genes identified from this study provide important new resources to investigate ATV disease pathology and host-pathogen dynamics in natural populations. PMID:18937860

  9. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  10. Effect of Broccoli Sprouts on Nasal Response to Live Attenuated Influenza Virus in Smokers: A Randomized, Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Noah, Terry L.; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Haibo; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Müller, Loretta; Bauer, Rebecca N.; Meyer, Megan; Murphy, Paula C.; Jones, Shannon; Letang, Blanche; Robinette, Carole; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Background Smokers have increased susceptibility and altered innate host defense responses to influenza virus infection. Broccoli sprouts are a source of the Nrf2 activating agentsulforaphane, and short term ingestion of broccoli sprout homogenates (BSH) has been shown to reduce nasal inflammatory responses to oxidant pollutants. Objectives Assess the effects of BSH on nasal cytokines, virus replication, and Nrf2-dependent enzyme expression in smokers and nonsmokers. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effects of BSH on serially sampled nasal lavage fluid (NLF) cytokines, viral sequence quantity, and Nrf2-dependent enzyme expression in NLF cells and biopsied epithelium. Healthy young adult smokers and nonsmokers ingested BSH or placebo (alfalfa sprout homogenate) for 4 days, designated Days -1, 0, 1, 2. On Day 0 they received standard vaccine dose of live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) intranasally. Nasal lavage fluids and nasal biopsies were collected serially to assess response to LAIV. Results In area under curve analyses, post-LAIV IL-6 responses (P = 0.03) and influenza sequences (P = 0.01) were significantly reduced in NLF from BSH-treated smokers, whileNAD(P)H: quinoneoxidoreductasein NLF cells was significantly increased. In nonsmokers, a similar trend for reduction in virus quantity with BSH did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions In smokers, short term ingestion of broccoli sprout homogenates appears to significantly reduce some virus-induced markers of inflammation, as well as reducing virus quantity. Nutritional antioxidant interventions have promise as a safe, low-cost strategy for reducing influenza risk among smokers and other at risk populations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01269723 PMID:24910991

  11. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  12. Function analysis of fish Tollip gene in response to virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Xu, Meng; Chen, Xiuli; Zhang, Ping; Li, Pingfei; Wei, Shina; Yan, Yang; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-12-01

    Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) is one of the important regulatory proteins of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. In previous studies, a Tollip sequence of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was identified and the signal transduction functions of Tollip were studied. However, the response of Tollip to virus infection has not been characterized from grouper. In the present paper, the Tollip homolog (EtTollip) from grouper (Epinephelus tauvina) was cloned and its immune response to Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) was investigated. EtTollip shares significant similarities to other mammalian Tollips, which contain a centrally localized protein kinase C conserved region 2 (C2) domain and a C-terminal CUE domain. After challenging with SGIV, the expression levels of EtTollip were altered in the spleen and head kidney of grouper. EtTollip mainly aggregated in the cytoplasm in a condensed state and was also distributed on the membranes of GS cells. EtTollip significantly inhibited the activities of NF-κB and IFN-β luciferase reporter when transfected into grouper spleen (GS) cells. SGIV can increase the activities of NF-κB and IFN-β luciferase reporter, especially to IFN-β. When transfected EtTollip with EcMyd88, the activity of NF-κB was increased, while transfected EtTollip with EcIRF3, the activity of IFN-β was significantly increased. Over-expressed EtTollip inhibited the transcription of SGIV genes significantly in GS cells, and silencing of EtTollip with siRNA led to increase of SGIV genes loads. Taken together, the results provide new insights in to the importance of Tollip as evolutionarily conserved molecule for grouper innate immunity against virus infection.

  13. Role of Transcription Factor HAT1 in Modulating Arabidopsis thaliana Response to Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-Juan; Deng, Xing-Guang; Han, Xue-Ying; Tan, Wen-Rong; Zhu, Li-Jun; Xi, De-Hui; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana homeodomain-leucine zipper protein 1 (HAT1) belongs to the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family class II that plays important roles in plant growth and development as a transcription factor. To elucidate further the role of HD-Zip II transcription factors in plant defense, the A. thaliana hat1, hat1hat3 and hat1hat2hat3 mutants and HAT1 overexpression plants (HAT1OX) were challenged with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). HAT1OX displayed more susceptibility, while loss-of-function mutants of HAT1 exhibited less susceptibility to CMV infection. HAT1 and its close homologs HAT2 and HAT3 function redundantly, as the triple mutant hat1hat2hat3 displayed increased virus resistance compared with the hat1 and hat1hat3 mutants. Furthermore, the induction of the antioxidant system (the activities and expression of enzymatic antioxidants) and the expression of defense-associated genes were down-regulated in HAT1OX but up-regulated in hat1hat2hat3 when compared with Col-0 after CMV infection. Further evidence showed that the involvement of HAT1 in the anti-CMV defense response might be dependent on salicylic acid (SA) but not jasmonic acid (JA). The SA level or expression of SA synthesis-related genes was decreased in HAT1OX but increased in hat1hat2hat3 compared with Col-0 after CMV infection, but there were little difference in JA level or JA synthesis-related gene expression among HAT1OX or defective plants. In addition, HAT1 expression is dependent on SA accumulation. Taken together, our study indicated that HAT1 negatively regulates plant defense responses to CMV. PMID:27328697

  14. Enhancing Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses with Heteroclitic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu Oyemade; Grant, Michael David

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T cells play a critical role in containing HIV replication and delaying disease progression. However, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells become progressively more “exhausted” as chronic HIV infection proceeds. Symptoms of T cell exhaustion range from expression of inhibitory receptors and selective loss of cytokine production capacity through reduced proliferative potential, impaired differentiation into effector cells and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. While effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) durably reduces HIV viremia to undetectable levels, this alone does not restore the full pluripotency of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. In a number of studies, a subset of peptide epitope variants categorized as heteroclitic, restimulated more potent cellular immune responses in vitro than did the native, immunizing peptides themselves. This property of heteroclitic peptides has been exploited in experimental cancer and chronic viral infection models to promote clearance of transformed cells and persistent viruses. In this review, we consider the possibility that heteroclitic peptides could improve the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines as part of HIV immunotherapy or eradication strategies. We review literature on heteroclitic peptides and illustrate their potential to beneficially modulate the nature of HIV-specific T cell responses toward those found in the small minority of HIV-infected, aviremic cART-naïve persons termed elite controllers or long-term non-progressors. Our review suggests that the efficacy of HIV vaccines could be improved by identification, testing, and incorporation of heteroclitic variants of native HIV peptide epitopes. PMID:26257743

  15. Interferon Type I Receptor-Deficient Mice have Altered Disease Symptoms in Response to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, Tim R.; Majde, Jeannine A.; Bohnet, Stewart G.; Krueger, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of type I interferons (IFNs) in mediation of acute viral symptoms (fever, somnolence, anorexia, etc.) is unknown. To determine the role of type I IFN in selected symptom development, body temperature and sleep responses to a marginally lethal dose of X-31 influenza virus were examined in mice with a targeted mutation of the IFN receptor type I (IFN-RI knockouts) and compared to wild-type 129 SvEv control mice. Mice were monitored for 48 hr to determine baseline temperature and sleep profiles prior to infection, and then for 9 days following infection. Hypothermic responses to virus were perceptible beginning at 64 hr post-infection (PI) and were more marked in KO mice until 108 hr, when hypothermia became more exaggerated in wild-type controls. Temperatures of wild-type mice continued to decline through day 9 while temperatures in IFN-RI KO mice stabilized. Time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) increased in KO mice when hypothermia was marked and then returned to baseline levels, while NREMS continued to increase in wild-type mice through day 9. Other sleep parameters [time spent in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), relative NREMS EEG slow wave activity, NREMS EEG power density] were all reduced in wild-type mice compared to KOs from days 3 to 8 while REMS low frequency EEG power density increased in wild-type relative to KOs. In conclusion, our results indicate that the presence of functional type I IFN slightly ameliorates disease symptoms early in the X-31 infection while exacerbating disease symptoms later in the infection. PMID:17098395

  16. Localisation of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during Solanum tuberosum cv. Rywal hypersensitive response to Potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Otulak, Katarzyna; Garbaczewska, Grazyna

    2010-06-01

    The reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was detected cytochemically in Solanum tuberosum cv. Rywal tissues as a hypersensitive response (HR) 24 and 48 h after a Potato virus Y (PVY) infection. Hydrogen peroxide was detected in vivo by its reaction with 3.3-diaminobenzidine, producing a reddish-brown staining in contact with H(2)O(2). Hydrogen peroxide was detected in the necrotic area of the epidermal and mesophyll cells 24 and 48 h after the PVY infection. Highly localised accumulations of H(2)O(2) were found within xylem tracheary elements, and this was much more intensive than in non-infected leaves. Hydrogen peroxide was detected cytochemically in HR also by its reaction with cerium chloride, producing electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. Inoculation with PVY(NTN) and also PVY(N) Wi induced a rapid hypersensitive response during which highly localised accumulations of H(2)O(2) was detected in plant cell walls. The most intensive accumulation was present in the bordering cell walls of necrotic mesophyll cells and the adjacent non-necrotic mesophyll cells. Intensive electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxide were found along ER cistrenae and chloroplast envelopes connected with PVY particles. The precipitates of hydrogen peroxide were detected in the nuclear envelope and along tracheary elements, especially when virus particles were present inside. The intensive accumulation of H(2)O(2) at the early stages of potato-PVY interaction is consistent with its role as an antimicrobial agent and for this reason it has been regarded as a signalling molecule.

  17. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence

  18. Digenic inheritance in medical genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2013-01-01

    Digenic inheritance (DI) is the simplest form of inheritance for genetically complex diseases. By contrast with the thousands of reports that mutations in single genes cause human diseases, there are only dozens of human disease phenotypes with evidence for DI in some pedigrees. The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has made it simpler to identify monogenic disease causes and could similarly simplify proving DI because one can simultaneously find mutations in two genes in the same sample. However, through 2012, I could find only one example of human DI in which HTS was used; in that example, HTS found only the second of the two genes. To explore the gap between expectation and reality, I tried to collect all examples of human DI with a narrow definition and characterise them according to the types of evidence collected, and whether there has been replication. Two strong trends are that knowledge of candidate genes and knowledge of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have been helpful in most published examples of human DI. By contrast, the positional method of genetic linkage analysis, has been mostly unsuccessful in identifying genes underlying human DI. Based on the empirical data, I suggest that combining HTS with growing networks of established PPIs may expedite future discoveries of human DI and strengthen the evidence for them. PMID:23785127

  19. Mast Cells and Influenza A Virus: Association with Allergic Responses and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amy C.; Temple, Rachel M.; Obar, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations, and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied; yet, the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology. PMID:26042121

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of Prunus domestica undergoing hypersensitive response to plum pox virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rodamilans, Bernardo; San León, David; Mühlberger, Louisa; Candresse, Thierry; Neumüller, Michael; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) infects Prunus trees around the globe, posing serious fruit production problems and causing severe economic losses. One variety of Prunus domestica, named 'Jojo', develops a hypersensitive response to viral infection. Here we compared infected and non-infected samples using next-generation RNA sequencing to characterize the genetic complexity of the viral population in infected samples and to identify genes involved in development of the resistance response. Analysis of viral reads from the infected samples allowed reconstruction of a PPV-D consensus sequence. De novo reconstruction showed a second viral isolate of the PPV-Rec strain. RNA-seq analysis of PPV-infected 'Jojo' trees identified 2,234 and 786 unigenes that were significantly up- or downregulated, respectively (false discovery rate; FDR≤0.01). Expression of genes associated with defense was generally enhanced, while expression of those related to photosynthesis was repressed. Of the total of 3,020 differentially expressed unigenes, 154 were characterized as potential resistance genes, 10 of which were included in the NBS-LRR type. Given their possible role in plant defense, we selected 75 additional unigenes as candidates for further study. The combination of next-generation sequencing and a Prunus variety that develops a hypersensitive response to PPV infection provided an opportunity to study the factors involved in this plant defense mechanism. Transcriptomic analysis presented an overview of the changes that occur during PPV infection as a whole, and identified candidates suitable for further functional characterization.

  1. Asparagine Endopeptidase Controls Anti-Influenza Virus Immune Responses through TLR7 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Maschalidi, Sophia; Hässler, Signe; Blanc, Fany; Sepulveda, Fernando E.; Tohme, Mira; Chignard, Michel; van Endert, Peter; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Descamps, Delphyne; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed by dendritic cells recognize nucleic acids derived from pathogens and play an important role in the immune responses against the influenza virus (IAV), a single-stranded RNA sensed by different receptors including TLR7. However, the importance of TLR7 processing in the development of anti-viral immune responses is not known. Here we report that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) deficient mice are unable to generate a strong anti-IAV response, as demonstrated by reduced inflammation, cross presentation of cell-associated antigens and priming of CD8+ T cells following TLR7-dependent pulmonary infection induced by IAV. Moreover, AEP deficient lung epithelial- or myeloid-cells exhibit impaired TLR7 signaling due to defective processing of this receptor. Indeed, TLR7 requires a proteolytic cleavage by AEP to generate a C-terminal fragment competent for signaling. Thus, AEP activity is critical for TLR7 processing, opening new possibilities for the treatment of influenza and TLR7-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:22916010

  2. Asparagine endopeptidase controls anti-influenza virus immune responses through TLR7 activation.

    PubMed

    Maschalidi, Sophia; Hässler, Signe; Blanc, Fany; Sepulveda, Fernando E; Tohme, Mira; Chignard, Michel; van Endert, Peter; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Descamps, Delphyne; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed by dendritic cells recognize nucleic acids derived from pathogens and play an important role in the immune responses against the influenza virus (IAV), a single-stranded RNA sensed by different receptors including TLR7. However, the importance of TLR7 processing in the development of anti-viral immune responses is not known. Here we report that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) deficient mice are unable to generate a strong anti-IAV response, as demonstrated by reduced inflammation, cross presentation of cell-associated antigens and priming of CD8(+) T cells following TLR7-dependent pulmonary infection induced by IAV. Moreover, AEP deficient lung epithelial- or myeloid-cells exhibit impaired TLR7 signaling due to defective processing of this receptor. Indeed, TLR7 requires a proteolytic cleavage by AEP to generate a C-terminal fragment competent for signaling. Thus, AEP activity is critical for TLR7 processing, opening new possibilities for the treatment of influenza and TLR7-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:22916010

  3. Invariant NKT Cells Regulate the CD8 T Cell Response during Theiler's Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45 000 iNKT cells for 1 250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18-/- mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  4. Differential Regulation of Interferon Responses by Ebola and Marburg Virus VP35 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Megan R; Liu, Gai; Mire, Chad E; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Luthra, Priya; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S; Leung, Daisy W; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Geisbert, Thomas W; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F

    2016-02-23

    Suppression of innate immune responses during filoviral infection contributes to disease severity. Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses each encode a VP35 protein that suppresses RIG-I-like receptor signaling and interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production by several mechanisms, including direct binding to double stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we demonstrate that in cell culture, MARV infection results in a greater upregulation of IFN responses as compared to EBOV infection. This correlates with differences in the efficiencies by which EBOV and MARV VP35s antagonize RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, structural and biochemical studies suggest that differential recognition of RNA elements by the respective VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) rather than affinity for RNA by the respective VP35s is critical for this observation. Our studies reveal functional differences in EBOV versus MARV VP35 RNA binding that result in unexpected differences in the host response to deadly viral pathogens. PMID:26876165

  5. JNJ872 inhibits influenza A virus replication without altering cellular antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Gaelings, Lana; Söderholm, Sandra; Belanov, Sergei; Nandania, Jatin; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Anders, Simon; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kainov, Denis E

    2016-09-01

    JNJ-63623872 (formally known as VX-787; referred to here as JNJ872) is an orally bioavailable compound, which is in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of influenza A virus (IAV) infections. Here we show that JNJ872 inhibits at nanomolar concentrations the transcription of viral RNA in IAV-infected human macrophages by targeting a highly conserved site on the cap-snatching domain of influenza polymerase basic 2 protein (PB2). Furthermore, even lower concentrations of JNJ872 protected macrophages from IAV-mediated death when given in combination with 100 nM gemcitabine, which also attenuated transcription and replication of viral RNA. Importantly, treating human macrophages with JNJ872 allowed expression of many immune-related and other genes, involved in antiviral responses, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase 3A (NT5C3A). Moreover, our targeted metabolomics analysis indicate that treatment with JNJ782 did not interfere with metabolic responses to infection, which further supported our transcriptomics results. Thus, VX-737 alone or in combination with other drugs could be beneficial for treating IAV infected patients, because it would allow the development of antiviral responses and, thereby, protect individuals from current and future infections with closely related IAV strains. PMID:27451344

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinoma and Specific Features of the Accompanying Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Junhun; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is one of the four subtypes of gastric carcinoma (GC), as defined by the novel classification recently proposed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. EBVaGC has several clinicopathological features such as longer survival and higher frequency of lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) and carcinoma with Crohn's disease-like lymphoid reaction that distinguish it from EBV-negative GC. The intensity and pattern of host cellular immune response in GC have been found to significantly correlate with the prognosis of patients with GC, suggesting that immune reaction and tumor microenvironment have critical roles in the progression of GC, and in particular, EBVaGC. Here, we reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying prominent immune reactions in patients with EBVaGC. In EBVaGC, deregulation of the expression of immune response-related genes promotes marked intra- or peritumoral immune cell infiltration. The expression of programmed death receptor-ligand 1 is known to be increased in EBVaGC, and therefore, it has been proposed as a favorable prognostic factor for patients with EBVaGC, albeit some data supporting this claim are controversial. Overall, the underlying mechanisms and clinical significance of the host cellular immune response in patients with EBVaGC have not been thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, further research is necessary to better understand the role of tumor microenvironment in EBVaGC. PMID:27104020

  7. Dengue Virus Control of Type I IFN Responses: A History of Manipulation and Control

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Ramirez, Jorge Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The arthropod-borne diseases caused by dengue virus (DENV) are a major and emerging problem of public health worldwide. Infection with DENV causes a series of clinical manifestations ranging from mild flu syndrome to severe diseases that include hemorrhage and shock. It has been demonstrated that the innate immune response plays a key role in DENV pathogenesis. However, in recent years, it was shown that DENV evades the innate immune response by blocking type I interferon (IFN-I). It has been demonstrated that DENV can inhibit both the production and the signaling of IFN-I. The viral proteins, NS2A and NS3, inhibit IFN-I production by degrading cellular signaling molecules. In addition, the viral proteins, NS2A, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5, can inhibit IFN-I signaling by blocking the phosphorylation of the STAT1 and STAT2 molecules. Finally, NS5 mediates the degradation of STAT2 using the proteasome machinery. In this study, we briefly review the most recent insights regarding the IFN-I response to DENV infection and its implication for pathogenesis. PMID:25629430

  8. Differential regulation of interferon responses by Ebola and Marburg virus VP35 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Megan R.; Liu, Gai; Mire, Chad E.; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Luthra, Priya; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Suppression of innate immune responses during filoviral infection contributes to disease severity. Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses each encode a VP35 protein that suppresses RIG-I-like receptor signaling and interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production by several mechanisms, including direct binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we demonstrate that in cell culture MARV infection results in a greater upregulation of IFN responses as compared to EBOV infection. This correlates with differences in the efficiencies by which EBOV and MARV VP35s antagonize RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, structural and biochemical studies suggest that differential recognition of RNA elements by the respective VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) rather than affinity for RNA by the respective VP35s is critical for this observation. Our results reveal functional differences in EBOV versus MARV VP35 RNA binding result in unexpected differences in the host response to deadly viral pathogens. PMID:26876165

  9. Unique Type I Interferon Responses Determine the Functional Fate of Migratory Lung Dendritic Cells during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moltedo, Bruno; Li, Wenjing; Yount, Jacob S.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Migratory lung dendritic cells (DCs) transport viral antigen from the lungs to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) during influenza virus infection to initiate the adaptive immune response. Two major migratory DC subsets, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhigh DCs participate in this function and it is not clear if these antigen presenting cell (APC) populations become directly infected and if so whether their activity is influenced by the infection. In these experiments we show that both subpopulations can become infected and migrate to the draining MLN but a difference in their response to type I interferon (I-IFN) signaling dictates the capacity of the virus to replicate. CD103+ DCs allow the virus to replicate to significantly higher levels than do the CD11bhigh DCs, and they release infectious virus in the MLNs and when cultured ex-vivo. Virus replication in CD11bhigh DCs is inhibited by I-IFNs, since ablation of the I-IFN receptor (IFNAR) signaling permits virus to replicate vigorously and productively in this subset. Interestingly, CD103+ DCs are less sensitive to I-IFNs upregulating interferon-induced genes to a lesser extent than CD11bhigh DCs. The attenuated IFNAR signaling by CD103+ DCs correlates with their described superior antigen presentation capacity for naïve CD8+ T cells when compared to CD11bhigh DCs. Indeed ablation of IFNAR signaling equalizes the competency of the antigen presenting function for the two subpopulations. Thus, antigen presentation by lung DCs is proportional to virus replication and this is tightly constrained by I-IFN. The “interferon-resistant” CD103+ DCs may have evolved to ensure the presentation of viral antigens to T cells in I-IFN rich environments. Conversely, this trait may be exploitable by viral pathogens as a mechanism for systemic dissemination. PMID:22072965

  10. Type III interferon gene expression in response to influenza virus infection in chicken and duck embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zou, Tingting; Hu, Xiaotong; Jin, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) comprise a group of newly identified antiviral cytokines that are functionally similar to type I IFNs and elicit first-line antiviral responses. Recently, type III IFNs were identified in several species; however, little information is available about type III IFNs in ducks. We compared the expression of type III IFNs and their receptor in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) and duck embryonic fibroblasts (DEFs) in response to influenza virus infection. The results showed that the expression of type III IFNs was upregulated in both DEFs and CEFs following infection with H1N1 influenza virus or treatment with poly (I:C), and expression levels were significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs (IL-28Rα) was also upregulated following infection with H1N1 virus or treatment with poly (I:C) and was significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs occurred from 8 hpi and remained at similar levels until 36 hpi in CEFs, but the expression level was elevated from 36 hpi in DEFs. These findings revealed the existence of distinct expression patterns for type III IFNs in chickens and ducks in response to influenza virus infection. The provided data are fundamentally useful in furthering our understanding of type III IFNs and innate antiviral responses in different species.

  11. Laboratory evaluation of the response of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus uninfected and infected with dengue virus to deet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory studies were conducted to compare the response of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) adults, uninfected and infected with four serotypes of dengue virus, to a repellent containing 5% deet. The results showed that mosquitoes infected with the four serotypes of dengue respond i...

  12. Type III interferon gene expression in response to influenza virus infection in chicken and duck embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zou, Tingting; Hu, Xiaotong; Jin, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) comprise a group of newly identified antiviral cytokines that are functionally similar to type I IFNs and elicit first-line antiviral responses. Recently, type III IFNs were identified in several species; however, little information is available about type III IFNs in ducks. We compared the expression of type III IFNs and their receptor in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) and duck embryonic fibroblasts (DEFs) in response to influenza virus infection. The results showed that the expression of type III IFNs was upregulated in both DEFs and CEFs following infection with H1N1 influenza virus or treatment with poly (I:C), and expression levels were significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs (IL-28Rα) was also upregulated following infection with H1N1 virus or treatment with poly (I:C) and was significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs occurred from 8 hpi and remained at similar levels until 36 hpi in CEFs, but the expression level was elevated from 36 hpi in DEFs. These findings revealed the existence of distinct expression patterns for type III IFNs in chickens and ducks in response to influenza virus infection. The provided data are fundamentally useful in furthering our understanding of type III IFNs and innate antiviral responses in different species. PMID:26598110

  13. Immune responses of orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, against virus-like particles of betanodavirus produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Xiong; Jin, Bao-Lei; Xu, Yu; Huang, Li-Jie; Huang, Run-Qing; Zhang, Yong; Kwang, Jimmy; He, Jian-Guo; Xie, Jun-Feng

    2014-01-15

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a serious disease of cultured marine fish worldwide. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the good novel vaccine candidates to control this disease. Until now, betanodavirus vaccine studies mainly focused on the humoral immune response and mortality after virus challenge. However, little is known about the activation of genes responsible for cellular and innate immunity by vaccines. In the present study, VLPs of orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) were produced in prokaryotes and their ability to enter Asian sea bass cells was the same as native virus, suggesting that they possess a similar structure to OGNNV. VLPs immunogenicity was then determined by intramuscularly vaccinating Epinephelus coioides at different concentrations (1.5 or 15 μg g(-1) fish body weight, FBW) and immunizing frequencies (administration once, twice and thrice). A single vaccination with the dosage of 1.5 μg g(-1) FBW is enough to provoke high titer antibodies (average 3 fold higher than that of negative control) with strong neutralizing antibody titer as early as 1 week post immunization. Furthermore, quantitative PCR analysis revealed that eleven genes associated with humoral, cellular and innate immunities were up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head kidney at 12h post immunization, correlating with the early antibody response. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VLP vaccination induced humoral immune responses and activated genes associated with cellular and innate immunity against betanodavirus infection in orange-spotted grouper.

  14. Comparison of the Immune Response Between a Pair of NCP and CP Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) Type 1 Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a major pathogen of cattle causing severe respiratory and reproductive disease. BVDV vaccines remain an important part of the control strategy. Previous work has described higher antibody responses in animals infected with a noncytopathic (NCP) BVDV when ...

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Induces Autophagy as a Prosurvival Mechanism to Alleviate Hepatic ER-Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Srikanta; Chava, Srinivas; Aydin, Yucel; Chandra, Partha K.; Ferraris, Pauline; Chen, Weina; Balart, Luis A.; Wu, Tong; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently leads to chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms by which HCV infection leads to chronic liver disease and HCC are not well understood. The infection cycle of HCV is initiated by the attachment and entry of virus particles into a hepatocyte. Replication of the HCV genome inside hepatocytes leads to accumulation of large amounts of viral proteins and RNA replication intermediates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in production of thousands of new virus particles. HCV-infected hepatocytes mount a substantial stress response. How the infected hepatocyte integrates the viral-induced stress response with chronic infection is unknown. The unfolded protein response (UPR), an ER-associated cellular transcriptional response, is activated in HCV infected hepatocytes. Over the past several years, research performed by a number of laboratories, including ours, has shown that HCV induced UPR robustly activates autophagy to sustain viral replication in the infected hepatocyte. Induction of the cellular autophagy response is required to improve survival of infected cells by inhibition of cellular apoptosis. The autophagy response also inhibits the cellular innate antiviral program that usually inhibits HCV replication. In this review, we discuss the physiological implications of the HCV-induced chronic ER-stress response in the liver disease progression. PMID:27223299

  16. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  17. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Rao, Srinivas S; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S

    2016-03-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity.

  18. CD40 ligand and tdTomato-armed vaccinia virus for induction of antitumor immune response and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, S; Ahonen, M; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Karttunen, Å; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A; Cerullo, V

    2014-02-01

    Oncolytic vaccinia virus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy. Oncolysis releases tumor antigens and provides co-stimulatory danger signals. However, arming the virus can improve efficacy further. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) can induce apoptosis of tumor cells and it also triggers several immune mechanisms. One of these is a T-helper type 1 (Th1) response that leads to activation of cytotoxic T-cells and reduction of immune suppression. Therefore, we constructed an oncolytic vaccinia virus expressing hCD40L (vvdd-hCD40L-tdTomato), which in addition features a cDNA expressing the tdTomato fluorochrome for detection of virus, potentially important for biosafety evaluation. We show effective expression of functional CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. In a xenograft model of bladder carcinoma sensitive to CD40L treatment, we show that growth of tumors was significantly inhibited by the oncolysis and apoptosis following both intravenous and intratumoral administration. In a CD40-negative model, CD40L expression did not add potency to vaccinia oncolysis. Tumors treated with vvdd-mCD40L-tdtomato showed enhanced efficacy in a syngenic mouse model and induced recruitment of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes at the tumor site. In summary, oncolytic vaccinia virus coding for CD40L mediates multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis and induction of Th1 type T-cell responses.

  19. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van de Pol, Denise P I; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  20. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  1. Human papilloma virus vaccination induces strong human papilloma virus specific cell-mediated immune responses in HIV-infected adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rainone, Veronica; Giacomet, Vania; Penagini, Francesca; Fabiano, Valentina; Calascibetta, Francesca; Mameli, Chiara; Pisanelli, Stefania; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2015-03-27

    The ability of a quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV)-16/18/6/11 virus-like particles vaccine (Gardasil) to elicit HPV-specific cell-mediated immune responses was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected young adults. Results showed that, after three doses of vaccine, central memory and effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, as well as HPV-specific interleukin (IL)2(+)/CD4(+), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+))/CD4(+), IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes and Perforin and Granzyme B secreting CD8(+) T lymphocytes were significantly increased. Notably, results obtained in HIV-infected patients were comparable to those seen in HIV-uninfected age-matched healthy controls.

  2. Early Immune Responses in Rainbow Trout Liver upon Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections. PMID:25338079

  3. Proinflammatory cytokine responses correspond with subjective side effects after influenza virus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Lisa M.; Porter, Kyle; Karlsson, Erik; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Background Though typically mild, side effects to the influenza virus vaccine are common and may contribute to negative perceptions including the belief that the vaccine can cause the flu. However, the extent to which subjective symptoms correspond with biological response indicators is poorly understood. Methods This study examined associations among subjective side effects (soreness at the site of injection and illness-like symptoms), serum proinflammatory cytokines and body temperature a baseline, 1, 2, and 3 days following receipt of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) in a sample of 56 women 18–40 years in age. Results In relation to local reactions, women reporting being very sore at the injection site at 1 day post-vaccination exhibited greater increases in serum TNF-α and MIF in the days following vaccination compared to those with no or mild soreness. In addition, higher basal body temperature was observed in this group compared to other groups (98.7°F versus 98.0°–98.1°). In relation to systemic reactions, women endorsing illness-like symptoms (headache, fatigue, nausea, sore throat, dizziness, achiness, or mild fever) exhibited marginally higher IL-6 at baseline (p = .055) and greater increases in serum MIF at 2 days post-vaccination than those reporting no systemic symptoms. Associations of systemic symptoms with inflammatory responses were not accounted for by concomitant local reactions. As expected, antibody responses to the vaccine were highly similar in women regardless of local or systemic symptoms. Conclusions These results are consistent with the notion that subjective reports of local and systemic reactions following vaccination may be predicted by and correspond with biological indicators of inflammatory status, but are not meaningful predictors of antibody responses. To improve adherence to vaccine recommendations, clinicians should provide assurance that such symptoms may be related to normal mild inflammatory responses to

  4. A novel baseline hepatitis B virus sequencing-based strategy for predicting adefovir antiviral response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Shan, Xuefeng; Huang, Yao; Deng, Haijun; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Chen, Juan; Tang, Ni; Shan, You-Lan; Guo, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ailong

    2015-07-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is used as first-line monotherapy or rescue therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. In this study, we sought to identify nucleotide changes in the reverse transcriptase (RT) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) at baseline and explore their predictive value for ADV antiviral response. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) was utilized to determine HBV genetic variability within the RT region at baseline and during a 48-week ADV therapy. According to the viral load at the end of ADV treatment, all patients were classified into responders (HBV DNA level reduction of ⩾ 3 log 10 IU/mL) and suboptimal responders (HBV DNA level reduction of <3 log 10 IU/mL). Based on UDPS data at baseline, we identified 11 nucleotide substitutions whose combination frequency was significantly associated with the antiviral response among 36 CHB patients in the study group. However, the baseline distribution and frequency of rt181 and rt236 substitutions known to confer ADV resistance was a poor predictor for the antiviral response. Compared with baseline serum HBeAg, HBV-DNA and ALT levels, the baseline HBV sequence-based model showed higher predictive accuracy for ADV response. In an independent cohort of 31 validation patients with CHB, the sequence-based model provided greater predictive potency than the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT and the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT/sequence combinations. Taken together, we confirm the presence of ADV resistance variants in treatment-naïve patients and firstly unravel the predictive value of the baseline mutations in the HBV RT region for ADV antiviral response.

  5. Genotype 1 hepatitis C virus envelope features that determine antiviral response assessed through optimal covariance networks.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Moenne-Loccoz, Rémy; Velay, Aurélie; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Gut, Jean-Pierre; Fofana, Isabel; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Baumert, Thomas F; Schvoerer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    The poor response to the combined antiviral therapy of pegylated alfa-interferon and ribavarin for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be linked to mutations in the viral envelope gene E1E2 (env), which can result in escape from the immune response and higher efficacy of viral entry. Mutations that result in failure of therapy most likely require compensatory mutations to achieve sufficient change in envelope structure and function. Compensatory mutations were investigated by determining positions in the E1E2 gene where amino acids (aa) covaried across groups of individuals. We assessed networks of covarying positions in E1E2 sequences that differentiated sustained virological response (SVR) from non-response (NR) in 43 genotype 1a (17 SVR), and 49 genotype 1b (25 SVR) chronically HCV-infected individuals. Binary integer programming over covariance networks was used to extract aa combinations that differed between response groups. Genotype 1a E1E2 sequences exhibited higher degrees of covariance and clustered into 3 main groups while 1b sequences exhibited no clustering. Between 5 and 9 aa pairs were required to separate SVR from NR in each genotype. aa in hypervariable region 1 were 6 times more likely than chance to occur in the optimal networks. The pair 531-626 (EI) appeared frequently in the optimal networks and was present in 6 of 9 NR in one of the 1a clusters. The most frequent pairs representing SVR were 431-481 (EE), 500-522 (QA) in 1a, and 407-434 (AQ) in 1b. Optimal networks based on covarying aa pairs in HCV envelope can indicate features that are associated with failure or success to antiviral therapy. PMID:23840641

  6. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  7. Host Immune and Apoptotic Responses to Avian Influenza Virus H9N2 in Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zheng; Harper, Richart; Anunciacion, Jerome; Yang, Zengqi; Gao, Wei; Qu, Bingqian; Guan, Yi; Cardona, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    The avian influenza virus H9N2 subtype has circulated in wild birds, is prevalent in domestic poultry, and has successfully crossed the species boundary to infect humans. Phylogenetic analyses showed that viruses of this subtype appear to have contributed to the generation of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Little is known about the host responses to H9N2 viruses in human airway respiratory epithelium, the primary portal for viral infection. Using an apically differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) culture, we examined host immune responses to infection by an avian H9N2 virus, in comparison with a human H9N2 isolate. We found that IFN-β was the prominent antiviral component, whereas interferon gamma-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-5 and TNF-α may be critical in proinflammatory responses to H9N2 viruses. In contrast, proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-8, and even IL-6 may only play a minor role in pathogenicity. Apparently Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-7, and melanoma differentiation–associated gene 5 (MDA-5) contributed to the innate immunity against the H9N2 viruses, and MDA-5 was important in the induction of IFN-β. We showed that the avian H9N2 virus induced apoptosis through the mitochondria/cytochrome c–mediated intrinsic pathway, in addition to the caspase 8–mediated extrinsic pathway, as evidenced by the cytosolic presence of active caspase 9 and cytochrome c, independent of truncated BH3 interacting domain death agonist (Bid) activation. Further, we demonstrated that FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), an apoptotic dual regulator, and the p53-dependent Bcl-2 family members, Bax and Bcl-xs, appeared to be involved in the regulation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, respectively. The findings in this study will further our understanding of host defense mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium. PMID:20118223

  8. Class II-restricted T cell responses in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease. II. Survey of host immune responses and central nervous system virus titers in inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Clatch, R J; Lipton, H L; Miller, S D

    1987-11-01

    Previous studies using mouse strains with limited genetic differences and H-2 haplotypes demonstrated that susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease strongly correlated with chronically high levels of TMEV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), but not with TMEV-specific T cell proliferation (Tprlf), serum antibody responses, or with CNS virus titers. To determine if this correlation would be supported by analysis of these parameters in a more thorough genetic survey, ten inbred mouse strains, representing a wide variety of genetic backgrounds and H-2 haplotypes, were inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) with the BeAn strain of TMEV. Significant TMEV-specific DTH was observed in all highly susceptible strains, but was not detectable in intermediate and resistant strains. TMEV-specific serum antibody titers also appeared to correlate with susceptibility to demyelinating disease, however even resistant strains had high antibody responses. Significant differences in CNS TMEV titers existed between strains, but did not correlate with disease susceptibility. DTH and Tprlf responses were observed in 3/4 resistant strains following peripheral immunization with UV-inactivated TMEV indicating that most resistant strains are genetically capable of mounting virus-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. The data extends our knowledge of host immune responses and virus titers in many different inbred mouse strains persistently infected with TMEV, supports the hypothesis that the demyelination in highly susceptible mice involves a TMEV-specific DTH response, and suggests that the genetic ability to mount specific DTH responses is necessary, but not sufficient for development of the demyelinating disease.

  9. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  10. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection. PMID:27627069

  11. Autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody responses following initial seroconversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, C; Fleury, H J; Pellegrin, I; Kirn, A; Aubertin, A M

    1997-01-01

    In the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, patients develop a strong and persistent immune response characterized by the production of HIV-specific antibodies. The aim of our study was to analyze the appearance of autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibodies in the sera of HIV-infected individuals. For this purpose, primary strains have been isolated from 18 HIV-1-infected subjects prior to seroconversion (in one case) or within 1 to 8 months after seroconversion. Sera, collected at the same time as the virus was isolated and at various times after isolation, have been analyzed for their ability to neutralize the autologous primary strains isolated early after infection, heterologous primary isolates, and cell-line adapted strains. Our neutralization assay, which combines serial dilutions of virus and serial dilutions of sera, is based on the determination of the serum dilution at which a fixed reduction in virus titer (90%) occurs. We have shown that (i) we could not detect autologous neutralizing antibodies in sera collected at the same time as we isolated viruses; (ii) we detected neutralizing antibodies against the autologous strains about 1 year after seroconversion, occasionally after 8 months, but sera were not always available to exclude the presence of neutralizing antibodies at earlier times; (iii) after 1 year, the neutralization response was highly specific to virus present during the early phase of HIV infection; and (iv) heterologous neutralization of primary isolates was detected later (after about 2 years). These results reveal the enormous diversity of neutralization determinants on primary isolates as well as a temporal evolution of the humoral response generating cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9094648

  12. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  13. Matrilineal inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Tschirren, Barbara; Ziegler, Ann-Kathrin; Pick, Joel L; Okuliarová, Monika; Zeman, Michal; Giraudeau, Mathieu

    2016-09-14

    Sex-linkage is predicted to evolve in response to sex-specific or sexually antagonistic selection. In line with this prediction, most sex-linked genes are associated with reproduction in the respective sex. In addition to traits directly involved in fertility and fecundity, mediators of maternal effects may be predisposed to evolve sex-linkage, because they indirectly affect female fitness through their effect on offspring phenotype. Here, we test for sex-linked inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects in oviparous species, the transfer of maternally derived testosterone to the eggs. Consistent with maternal inheritance, we found that in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) granddaughters resemble their maternal (but not their paternal) grandmother in yolk testosterone deposition. This pattern of resemblance was not due to non-genetic priming effects of testosterone exposure during prenatal development, as an experimental manipulation of yolk testosterone levels did not affect the females' testosterone transfer to their own eggs later in life. Instead, W chromosome and/or mitochondrial variation may underlie the observed matrilineal inheritance pattern. Ultimately, the inheritance of mediators of maternal effects along the maternal line will allow for a fast and direct response to female-specific selection, thereby affecting the dynamics of evolutionary processes mediated by maternal effects. PMID:27629040

  14. Matrilineal inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Tschirren, Barbara; Ziegler, Ann-Kathrin; Pick, Joel L; Okuliarová, Monika; Zeman, Michal; Giraudeau, Mathieu

    2016-09-14

    Sex-linkage is predicted to evolve in response to sex-specific or sexually antagonistic selection. In line with this prediction, most sex-linked genes are associated with reproduction in the respective sex. In addition to traits directly involved in fertility and fecundity, mediators of maternal effects may be predisposed to evolve sex-linkage, because they indirectly affect female fitness through their effect on offspring phenotype. Here, we test for sex-linked inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects in oviparous species, the transfer of maternally derived testosterone to the eggs. Consistent with maternal inheritance, we found that in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) granddaughters resemble their maternal (but not their paternal) grandmother in yolk testosterone deposition. This pattern of resemblance was not due to non-genetic priming effects of testosterone exposure during prenatal development, as an experimental manipulation of yolk testosterone levels did not affect the females' testosterone transfer to their own eggs later in life. Instead, W chromosome and/or mitochondrial variation may underlie the observed matrilineal inheritance pattern. Ultimately, the inheritance of mediators of maternal effects along the maternal line will allow for a fast and direct response to female-specific selection, thereby affecting the dynamics of evolutionary processes mediated by maternal effects.

  15. Demographics, epidemiology, and inheritance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) will affect 48,960 persons in the United States and will result in 40,560 deaths in 2015, according to the American Cancer Society. On a global basis, at least 337,000 persons will be diagnosed with PC. The incidence of PC has increased slightly in the United States, though worldwide cases are likely to increase substantially due to the influence of cigarette smoking, rising obesity and type II diabetes. The development of PC is related to a state of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Well-established environmental and personal risk factors for PC include advancing age, cigarette smoking, second-hand tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, inherited familial cancer syndromes, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, chronic pancreatitis, dietary factors, and diabetes. Other identified associations are human immunodeficiency virus infection, ABO blood group polymorphisms, hepatitis B virus, and Helicobacter pylori.

  16. Demographics, epidemiology, and inheritance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) will affect 48,960 persons in the United States and will result in 40,560 deaths in 2015, according to the American Cancer Society. On a global basis, at least 337,000 persons will be diagnosed with PC. The incidence of PC has increased slightly in the United States, though worldwide cases are likely to increase substantially due to the influence of cigarette smoking, rising obesity and type II diabetes. The development of PC is related to a state of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Well-established environmental and personal risk factors for PC include advancing age, cigarette smoking, second-hand tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, inherited familial cancer syndromes, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, chronic pancreatitis, dietary factors, and diabetes. Other identified associations are human immunodeficiency virus infection, ABO blood group polymorphisms, hepatitis B virus, and Helicobacter pylori. PMID:25726048

  17. Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) regulates hypersensitive response and defense response upon Tobacco mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Un; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Gil-Je; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate biotic, abiotic, and developmental processes. In terms of plant defense, WRKY factors have important roles as positive and negative regulators via transcriptional regulation or protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the characterization of the gene encoding Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) isolated from microarray analysis in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-P(0)-inoculated hot pepper plants. CaWRKYd belongs to the WRKY IIa group, a very small clade in the WRKY subfamily, and WRKY IIa group has positive/negative regulatory roles in Arabidopsis and rice. CaWRKYd transcripts were induced by various plant defense-related hormone treatments and TMV-P(0) inoculation. Silencing of CaWRKYd affected TMV-P(0)-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) cell death and accumulation of TMV-P(0) coat protein in local and systemic leaves. Furthermore, expression of some pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and HR-related genes was reduced in the CaWRKYd-silenced plants compared with TRV2 vector control plants upon TMV-P(0) inoculation. CaWRKYd was confirmed to bind to the W-box. Thus CaWRKYd is a newly identified Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor that appears to be involved in TMV-P(0)-mediated HR cell death by regulating downstream gene expression.

  18. Age-Dependent Myeloid Dendritic Cell Responses Mediate Resistance to La Crosse Virus-Induced Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Katherine G.; Woods, Tyson A.; Winkler, Clayton W.; Carmody, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT La Crosse virus (LACV) is the major cause of pediatric viral encephalitis in the United States; however, the mechanisms responsible for age-related susceptibility in the pediatric population are not well understood. Our current studies in a mouse model of LACV infection indicated that differences in myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) responses between weanling and adult mice accounted for susceptibility to LACV-induced neurological disease. We found that type I interferon (IFN) responses were significantly stronger in adult than in weanling mice. Production of these IFNs required both endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Surprisingly, IFN expression was not dependent on plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) but rather was dependent on mDCs, which were found in greater number and induced stronger IFN responses in adults than in weanlings. Inhibition of these IFN responses in adults resulted in susceptibility to LACV-induced neurological disease, whereas postinfection treatment with type I IFN provided protection in young mice. These studies provide a definitive mechanism for age-related susceptibility to LACV encephalitis, where mDCs in young mice are insufficiently activated to control peripheral virus replication, thereby allowing virus to persist and eventually cause central nervous system (CNS) disease. IMPORTANCE La Crosse virus (LACV) is the primary cause of pediatric viral encephalitis in the United States. Although the virus infects both adults and children, over 80% of the reported neurological disease cases are in children. To understand why LACV causes neurological disease primarily in young animals, we used a mouse model where weanling mice, but not adult mice, develop neurological disease following virus infection. We found that an early immune response cell type, myeloid dendritic cells, was critical for protection in adult animals and that these cells were reduced in young animals. Activation of these cells during

  19. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways.