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Sample records for inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation

  1. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the

  2. Favipiravir inhibits acetaminophen sulfate formation but minimally affects systemic pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanli; Harmatz, Jerold S; Epstein, Carol R; Nakagawa, Yukako; Kurosaki, Chie; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Kadota, Takumi; Giesing, Dennis; Court, Michael H; Greenblatt, David J

    2015-01-01

    Aims The antiviral agent favipiravir is likely to be co-prescribed with acetaminophen (paracetamol). The present study evaluated the possiblility of a pharmacokinetic interaction between favipiravir and acetaminophen, in vitro and in vivo. Methods The effect of favipivir on the transformation of acetaminophen to its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites was studied using a pooled human hepatic S9 fraction in vitro. The effect of acute and extended adminstration of favipiravir on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and metabolites was evaluated in human volunteers. Results Favipiravir inhibited the in vitro formation of acetaminophen sulfate, but not acetaminophen glucuronide. In human volunteers, both acute (1 day) and extended (6 days) administration of favipiravir slightly but significantly increased (by about 20 %) systemic exposure to acetaminophen (total AUC), whereas Cmax was not significantly changed. AUC for acetaminophen glucuronide was increased by 23 to 35 % above control by favipiravir, while AUC for acetaminophen sulfate was reduced by about 20 % compared to control. Urinary excretion of acetaminophen sulfate was likewise reduced to 44 to 65 % of control values during favipiravir co-administration, while excretion of acetaminophen glucuronide increased to 17 to 32 % above control. Conclusion Favipiravir inhibits acetaminophen sulfate formation in vitro and in vivo. However the increase in systemic exposure to acetaminophen due to favipiravir co-administration, though statistically significant, is small in magnitude and unlikely to be of clinical importance. PMID:25808818

  3. Simplified analysis of acetaminophen glucuronide for quantifying gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis using deuterated water.

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Kahl, S; Carvalho, F; Barosa, C; Roden, M

    2015-06-15

    Measurement of acetaminophen glucuronide (AG) (2)H enrichment from deuterated water ((2)H2O) by (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of its monoacetone glucose (MAG) derivative provides estimation of gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic contributions to endogenous glucose production (EGP). However, AG derivatization to MAG is laborious and unsuitable for high-throughput studies. An alternative derivative, 5-O-acetyl monoacetone glucuronolactone (MAGLA), was tested. Eleven healthy subjects ingested (2)H2O to 0.5% body water enrichment and 500 mg of acetaminophen. Plasma glucose and urinary glucuronide positional (2)H enrichments were measured by (2)H NMR spectroscopy of MAG and MAGLA, respectively. A Bland-Altman analysis indicated agreement at the 95% confidence level between glucose and glucuronide estimates.

  4. Effect of galactosamine-induced hepatic UDP-glucuronic acid depletion on acetaminophen elimination in rats. Dispositional differences between hepatically and extrahepatically formed glucuronides of acetaminophen and other chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Z; Madhu, C; Goon, D; Klaassen, C D

    1988-01-01

    Galactosamine (GAL) markedly depletes hepatic UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GA) whereas extrahepatic UDP-GA is minimally affected. This suggests that GAL predominantly inhibits hepatic glucuronidation. Therefore, the effect of GAL-induced hepatic UDP-GA depletion was examined in bile duct-cannulated rats to determine the role of hepatic glucuronidation in the disposition of acetaminophen (AA). GAL markedly altered the fate of AA-glucuronide but had little or no effect upon other AA metabolites. GAL decreased the biliary excretion of AA-glucuronide up to 92%, whereas reductions in blood levels and urinary excretion of AA-glucuronide did not exceed 50%. This suggests that AA-glucuronide excreted in bile is predominantly of hepatic origin whereas AA-glucuronide found in blood and urine is derived from both hepatic and extrahepatic tissues. Data in the present and previous studies [Gregus, Watkins, Thompson, Klaassen: J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 225, 256, (1983)] indicate that GAL greatly reduced the biliary excretion of AA- and valproic acid-glucuronide whereas the biliary excretion of the glucuronides of phenolphthalein, iopanoic acid, bilirubin, and diethylstilbestrol was only partially decreased. This difference appears to be largely due to differential contributions by the liver and extrahepatic tissues in the glucuronidation of various compounds as well as the availability of glucuronides formed in extrahepatic tissues for biliary excretion. Specifically, the extrahepatically formed glucuronide conjugates of AA and valproic acid are not readily available for biliary excretion whereas the glucuronides of the other compounds are readily excreted into bile.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Transcriptome association analysis identifies miR-375 as a major determinant of variable acetaminophen glucuronidation by human liver.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Ioannis; Freytsis, Marina; Court, Michael H

    2016-10-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in many countries including the United States. Hepatic glucuronidation by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A subfamily enzymes is the major route of acetaminophen elimination. Reduced glucuronidation may predispose some individuals to acetaminophen-induced ALF, but mechanisms underlying reduced glucuronidation are poorly understood. We hypothesized that specific microRNAs (miRNAs) may reduce UGT1A activity by direct effects on the UGT1A 3'-UTR shared by all UGT1A enzyme transcripts, or by indirect effects on transcription factors regulating UGT1A expression. We performed an unbiased miRNA whole transcriptome association analysis using a bank of human livers with known acetaminophen glucuronidation activities. Of 754 miRNAs evaluated, 9 miRNAs were identified that were significantly overexpressed (p<0.05; >2-fold) in livers with low acetaminophen glucuronidation activities compared with those with high activities. miR-375 showed the highest difference (>10-fold), and was chosen for further mechanistic validation. We demonstrated using in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays that miR-375 has a unique functional binding site in the 3'-UTR of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) gene. Furthermore overexpression of miR-375 in LS180 cells demonstrated significant repression of endogenous AhR protein (by 40%) and mRNA (by 10%), as well as enzyme activity and/or mRNA of AhR regulated enzymes including UGT1A1, UGT1A6, and CYP1A2, without affecting UGT2B7, which is not regulated by AhR. Thus miR-375 is identified as a novel repressor of UGT1A-mediated hepatic acetaminophen glucuronidation through reduced AhR expression, which could predispose some individuals to increased risk for acetaminophen-induced ALF. PMID:27531059

  6. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  7. An in vitro approach to estimate putative inhibition of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine glucuronidation.

    PubMed

    Oechsler, Stephanie; Skopp, Gisela

    2010-05-01

    An in vitro inhibition study was performed to investigate potential drug-drug interactions on glucuronidation of buprenorphine (BUP) and norbuprenorphine (NBUP), which represents the major elimination pathway of the drug using cDNA-expressed uridine 5'-diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs). Following identification of major UGT enzymes for BUP and NBUP glucuronidation, substrates were incubated with drugs (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, lamotrigine, oxazepam, and temazepam), which are extensively cleared by glucuronidation as well as are often used during maintenance treatment. To evaluate the inhibitory potential, the half maximal inhibitor concentration (IC(50)), the inhibition constant (K (i)), and the inhibitor concentration (K (I)) that yield half the maximum rate of inactivation and the enzyme inactivation rate constant (k (inact)) were determined, if appropriate. Amitriptyline and temazepam are inhibitors of NBUP glucuronidation (UGT1A3, HLMs), whereas BUP glucuronidation was affected by amitriptyline (HLMs), oxazepam, and temazepam (UGT2B7). Additionally, BUP inhibits NBUP glucuronidation (UGT1A1, 1A3, HLMs) and vice versa (UGT1A3). A decrease in the metabolic clearance of NBUP may increase the risk of adverse effects such as respiratory depression. Further investigations are needed to evaluate whether inhibition of BUP and NBUP glucuronidation contributes to adverse events. PMID:20111869

  8. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and ... acetaminophen to a child who has a sore throat that is severe or does not go away, ...

  9. Decrease of plasma and urinary oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen after consumption of watercress by human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Mohr, S N; Yang, C S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the consumption of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), a cruciferous vegetable, on acetaminophen metabolism, the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its metabolites were studied in a crossover trial of human volunteers. A single oral dose of acetaminophen (1 gm) was given 10 hours after ingestion of watercress homogenates (50 gm). In comparison with acetaminophen only, the ingestion of watercress resulted in a significant reduction in the area under the plasma cysteine acetaminophen (Cys-acetaminophen) concentration-time curve and in the peak plasma Cys-acetaminophen concentration by 28% +/- 3% and by 21% +/- 4% (mean +/- SE; n = 7; p < 0.005), respectively. Correspondingly, the Cys-acetaminophen formation rate constant and Cys-acetaminophen formation fraction were decreased by 55% +/- 9% and 52% +/- 7% (p < 0.01), respectively. Consistent with the results obtained from the plasma, the total urinary excretion of Cys-acetaminophen in 24 hours was also reduced. A decrease of mercapturate acetaminophen, a Cys-acetaminophen metabolite, was also shown in the plasma and urine samples. However, the plasma pharmacokinetic processes and the urinary excretions of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were not altered significantly by the watercress treatment. These results suggest that the consumption of watercress causes a decrease in the levels of oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen, probably due to inhibition of oxidative metabolism of this drug.

  10. Inhibition of acetaminophen activation by ethanol and acetaldehyde in liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chifumi Sato; Jian Liu; Happei Miyakawa; Toshihiko Nouchi; Yujiro Tanaka; Masakatsu Uchihara; Fumiaki Marumo Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. )

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity are controversial. The authors studied the effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde, and oxidative metabolite of ethanol, on NADHP-dependent acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production in liver microsomes. Ethanol at concentrations as low as 2mM prevented the conjugate production noncompetitively. Acetaldehyde also inhibited acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production at concentrations as low as 0.1 mM that is comparable with those observed in vivo after social drinking. Acetaldehyde may be involved in ethanol-induced inhibition of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

  11. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: studies on the mechanism of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Jollow, D.J.

    1986-03-30

    Inhibition of the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite was investigated as a possible mechanism for cysteamine protection against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Studies in isolated hamster hepatocytes indicated that cysteamine competitively inhibited the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system as represented by formation of the acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate. However, cysteamine was not a potent inhibitor of glutathione conjugate formation (Ki = 1.17 mM). Cysteamine also weakly inhibited the glucuronidation of acetaminophen (Ki = 2.44 mM). In vivo studies were in agreement with the results obtained in isolated hepatocytes; cysteamine moderately inhibited both glucuronidation and the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of acetaminophen mercapturate. The overall elimination rate constant (beta) for acetaminophen was correspondingly decreased. Since cysteamine decreased both beta and the apparent rate constant for mercapturate formation (K'MA), the proportion of the dose of acetaminophen which is converted to the toxic metabolite (K'MA/beta) was not significantly decreased in the presence of cysteamine. Apparently, cysteamine does inhibit the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite, but this effect is not sufficient to explain antidotal protection.

  12. Acetaminophen and meloxicam inhibit platelet aggregation and coagulation in blood samples from humans.

    PubMed

    Martini, Angela K; Rodriguez, Cassandra M; Cap, Andrew P; Martini, Wenjun Z; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (Ace) and meloxicam (Mel) are the two types of analgesic and antipyretic medications. This study investigated the dose responses of acetaminophen and meloxicam on platelet aggregation and coagulation function in human blood samples. Blood samples were collected from six healthy humans and processed to make platelet-adjusted (100 × 10 cells/μl) blood samples. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Q-PAP, 100 mg/ml) was added at the doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 214 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Similarly, meloxicam (Metacam, 5 mg/ml) was added at doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 2.85 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Fifteen minutes after the addition of acetaminophen and/or meloxicam, platelet aggregation was stimulated with collagen (2 μg/ml) or arachidonic acid (0.5 mmol/l) and assessed using a Chrono-Log 700 aggregometer. Coagulation function was assessed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and using Rotem thrombelastogram. A robust inhibition by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam was observed in arachidonic acid-stimulated platelet aggregation starting at 1 × dose. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was inhibited by ACE starting at 1 × (78 ± 10% of control), and by meloxicam starting at 4 × (72 ± 5% of control, both P < 0.05). The inhibitions by acetaminophen and meloxicam combined were similar to those by acetaminophen or meloxicam. aPTT was prolonged by meloxicam starting at 4 ×. No changes were observed in PT or any of Rotem measurements by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam. Acetaminophen and meloxicam compromised platelet aggregation and aPTT. Further effort is warranted to characterize the effects of acetaminophen and meloxicam on bleeding in vivo.

  13. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  14. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gábor; Szarka, András; Lotz, Gábor; Dóczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Lívius; Kiss, András; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Sümegi, Balázs; Mandl, József

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  15. Involvement of the inhibition of intestinal glucuronidation in enhancing the oral bioavailability of resveratrol by labrasol containing nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Man; Yang, Fei-Fei; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pan, Rui-Le; Chang, Qi; Liu, Xin-Min; Liao, Yong-Hong

    2015-04-01

    Nanoemulsions have been developed for the oral delivery of poorly bioavailable phenolic compounds that are sensitive to intestinal glucuronidation. However, little is known about the contribution of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) inhibitory excipients in nanoemulsions toward the inhibition of intestinal glucuronidation and the consequent enhanced bioavailability. In this study, Labrasol but not poloxamer 188 (F68) was found to inhibit the glucuronidation of resveratrol (RES), a model phenolic compound, in an inhibition assay with rat microsomes. Subsequently, two nanoemulsions, Lab-N and F68-N, were prepared with similar particle size distribution, zeta potentials, and entrapment efficiency by coemulsifying with Labrasol or F68, respectively. Although Lab-N exhibited inferior or comparable profiles of in vitro release, cellular uptake in Caco-2 cells, and lymphatic transport in rats to F68-N, the in vitro absorption study with everted sacs suggested that Labrasol containing formulations significantly and dose-dependently increased the transport of RES relative to free RES or F68-N by decreasing the amount of permeated metabolite, RES-3-glucuronide (RES-G). The in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments indicated that Lab-N exhibited increments in the maximum plasma concentration and the bioavailability of RES by 1098% and 560%, respectively, and significant decreases in those of RES-G, compared to F68-N. The overall results demonstrated that the improved oral bioavailability of RES by Lab-N was mainly attributable to the inhibition of intestinal glucuronidation by the presence of UGT inhibitory excipient. PMID:25723098

  16. Inhibition of lung cancer cell growth by quercetin glucuronides via G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Hung; Hsia, Te-Chun; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Chou, Chi-Chung; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2006-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in many developed countries, including Taiwan. Quercetin, a widely distributed bioflavonoid, is well known to induce growth inhibition in a variety of human cancer cells. Quercetin glucuronides are the main circulating metabolites after dietary supplements with quercetin in humans. However, there is little information available as to how quercetin glucuronides affect human cancer cells. We investigated the effects of quercetin glucuronides in a human lung cancer cell line NCI-H209. We checked the cell viability, cell cycle checkpoint proteins, pro- and antiapoptotic proteins, caspase-3 activity, and gene expression by flow cytometry and Western blot. The viability of cells decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed a significant increase of the proportion of cells in G2/M phase and subG0/G1 phase (corresponding to apoptotic cells). Moreover, quercetin glucuronides increased the expressions of cyclin B, Cdc25c-ser-216-p, and Wee1 proteins, indicating the G2/M arrest. We also demonstrated a concurrent decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and activation of caspase-3, and subsequently, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, quercetin glucuronide-induced apoptosis was totally blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone. Taken together, we demonstrated that quercetin glucuronides inhibited proliferation through G2/M arrest of the cell cycle and induced apoptosis via caspase-3 cascade in the human lung cancer cell line NCI-H209. Delineation of the biological effects of specific major quercetin metabolites on chemotherapeutic potential or chemoprevention of human cancers warrants further investigation. PMID:16280456

  17. Acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-catalyzed lipid peroxidation and attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Boutaud, Olivier; Moore, Kevin P.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Harry, David; Howie, Alexander J.; Wang, Shuhe; Carney, Clare K.; Masterson, Tina S.; Amin, Taneem; Wright, David W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Oates, John A.; Roberts, L. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, once released from cells can cause severe oxidative damage as a consequence of heme redox cycling between ferric and ferryl states that generates radical species that induce lipid peroxidation. We demonstrate in vitro that acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-induced lipid peroxidation by reducing ferryl heme to its ferric state and quenching globin radicals. Severe muscle injury (rhabdomyolysis) is accompanied by the release of myoglobin that becomes deposited in the kidney, causing renal injury. We previously showed in a rat model of rhabdomyolysis that redox cycling between ferric and ferryl myoglobin yields radical species that cause severe oxidative damage to the kidney. In this model, acetaminophen at therapeutic plasma concentrations significantly decreased oxidant injury in the kidney, improved renal function, and reduced renal damage. These findings also provide a hypothesis for potential therapeutic applications for acetaminophen in diseases involving hemoprotein-mediated oxidative injury. PMID:20133658

  18. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by acetaminophen: Assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Pin; Liao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ting-Lun; Lee, Shou-Lun; Liu, Jong-Kang; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-11-01

    Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used over-the-counter analgesic, antipyretic medications. Use of acetaminophen and alcohol are commonly associated. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen might affect bioavailability of ethanol by inhibiting gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, potential inhibitions by acetaminophen of first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol, catalyzed by the human ADH family and by relevant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, remain undefined. ADH and ALDH both exhibit racially distinct allozymes and tissue-specific distribution of isozymes, and are principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. In this study, we investigated acetaminophen inhibition of ethanol oxidation with recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and inhibition of acetaldehyde oxidation with recombinant human ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. The investigations were done at near physiological pH 7.5 and with a cytoplasmic coenzyme concentration of 0.5 mM NAD(+). Acetaminophen acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH enzymes, with the slope inhibition constants (Kis) ranging from 0.90 mM (ADH2) to 20 mM (ADH1A), and the intercept inhibition constants (Kii) ranging from 1.4 mM (ADH1C allozymes) to 19 mM (ADH1A). Acetaminophen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition for ALDH2 (Kis = 3.0 mM and Kii = 2.2 mM), but competitive inhibition for ALDH1A1 (Kis = 0.96 mM). The metabolic interactions between acetaminophen and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic to subtoxic plasma levels of acetaminophen (i.e., 0.2-0.5 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μm) in target tissues, acetaminophen could inhibit ADH1C allozymes (12-26%) and ADH2 (14-28%) in the liver and small intestine, ADH4 (15-31%) in the stomach, and ALDH1A1 (16-33%) and ALDH2 (8.3-19%) in all 3 tissues. The

  19. Spironolactone and canrenone inhibit UGT2B7-catalyzed human liver and kidney microsomal aldosterone 18beta-glucuronidation: a potential drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Knights, Kathleen M; Bowalgaha, Kushari; Miners, John O

    2010-07-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of aldosterone (ALDO) are observed in patients treated with spironolactone. Because ALDO is eliminated via UGT2B7-catalyzed 18beta-glucuronidation, this study aimed to determine whether spironolactone and its primary metabolites, canrenone and canrenoic acid, inhibit ALDO 18beta-glucuronidation by recombinant UGT2B7 and by human liver (HLM) and human kidney cortical (HKCM) microsomes. Initial experiments characterized the effects of all three compounds on 4-methylumbelliferone and ALDO glucuronidation by recombinant human UGT2B7. IC(50) values for spironolactone and canrenone ranged from 26 to 50 microM, whereas canrenoic acid was a weak inhibitor. Inhibitor constant (K(i)) values for spironolactone and canrenone inhibition of ALDO 18beta-glucuronidation were subsequently determined with HLM, HKCM, and UGT2B7 as the enzyme sources. Spironolactone and canrenone were competitive inhibitors of ALDO 18beta-glucuronidation by HLM, HKCM, and UGT2B7. Mean (+/-) K(i) values for spironolactone were 52 +/- 22 (HLM) and 34 +/- 4 microM (HKCM), and mean (+/-) K(i) values for canrenone were 41 +/- 19 (HLM) and 23 +/- 2 microM (HKCM). K(i) values for spironolactone and canrenone inhibition of ALDO 18beta-glucuronidation by recombinant UGT2B7 were 23 and 11 microM, respectively. "Actual" K(i) values for spironolactone and canrenone inhibition of ALDO 18beta-glucuronidation, which take into account the role of endogenous microsomal inhibitors, are predicted to be 3 to 5 and 2 to 4 microM, respectively. The data indicate that the elevated ALDO concentrations observed in patients treated with spironolactone may be due, at least in part, to a pharmacokinetic interaction, and spironolactone and canrenone should be considered to be potential inhibitors of the UGT2B7-mediated metabolic clearance of drugs in both liver and kidney. PMID:20304966

  20. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention.

  1. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gufford, Brandon T.; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G.; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4′- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27–66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2–8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19–73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65–120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20–310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product–drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. PMID:26070840

  2. Synergistic effect of NADH on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in liver microsomes and its inhibition by cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chifumi; Marumo, Fumiaki )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of NADH and cyanide on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in rat and mouse liver microsomes were studied. In both rat and mouse microsomes, NADPH-dependent acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production was synergistically enhanced by the addition of NADH, whereas NADH alone did not initiate this reaction. The data suggest that the second electron in this reaction may be transferred from NADH. The present findings are different from a previous report in a reconstituted system that NADH decreases covalent binding of acetaminophen to proteins. This reaction was inhibited by low concentrations of sodium cyanide. The role of the cyanide sensitive factor in this reaction in liver microsomes remains to be further clarified.

  3. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by URB597 attenuates the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen in the mouse elevated plus-maze test.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; El-Wakeil, Ahmed F; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H

    2012-08-01

    Acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug. It is metabolized into N-arachidonoylphenolamine (AM404), which inhibits the reuptake of anandamide. In view of the role of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we tested its anxiolytic-like effect by observing the behavior of mice using the elevated plus-maze test. The results indicated that acetaminophen [100 and 200 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] exerted an anxiolytic-like effect that was represented by higher percentage open-arm time, percentage open-arm entries, and total number of head dips compared with the vehicle control (P<0.05). Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase, an enzyme involved in the cerebral metabolism of acetaminophen into AM404, using URB597 (0.07 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effect of acetaminophen. Remarkably, the selected doses of rimonabant or URB597 did not themselves induce any anxiolytic-like effect. Furthermore, the selected doses of acetaminophen (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) did not significantly alter the locomotor activity of mice in the open-field test. In conclusion, these findings confirmed that acetaminophen shows an anxiolytic-like effect in mice that involves, at least in part, AM404-mediated accumulation of anandamide in the brain and consequent activation of cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

  4. The thermal potentiation of acetaminophen-inhibited PMN oxidative metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, E A; al-Tuwaijri, A S

    1996-08-01

    The effect of high temperatures (39, 41, and 43 degrees C) on acetaminophen (AM-) induced inhibition of the oxidative respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in vitro has been examined. Whole blood or isolated human PMNs were exposed to various temperatures in vitro in the presence or absence of AM for 0-90 min. Phagocyte membrane-bound NADPH oxidase was studied using the luminol chemiluminescence (CL) response and the superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C. The NADPH oxidase was stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The results showed that high temperatures (39-43 degrees C) potentiate the AM inhibitory effect on CL peak response of phagocytes in a temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore, the inhibition of superoxide (O2-) production induced by AM was potentiated by incubating the cells at 39 or 43 degrees C at different time intervals. These studies suggest that high temperatures significantly potentiate the AM inhibitory effect on oxidative metabolism of PMNs in vitro. These actions of AM may influence the outcome in patients with infectious febrile conditions. PMID:8866041

  5. The B-RafV600E inhibitor dabrafenib selectively inhibits RIP3 and alleviates acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, J-X; Feng, J-M; Wang, Y; Li, X-H; Chen, X-X; Su, Y; Shen, Y-Y; Chen, Y; Xiong, B; Yang, C-H; Ding, J; Miao, Z-H

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP)3 is a critical regulator of necroptosis and has been demonstrated to be associated with various diseases, suggesting that its inhibitors are promising in the clinic. However, there have been few RIP3 inhibitors reported as yet. B-RafV600E inhibitors are an important anticancer drug class for metastatic melanoma therapy. In this study, we found that 6 B-Raf inhibitors could inhibit RIP3 enzymatic activity in vitro. Among them, dabrafenib showed the most potent inhibition on RIP3, which was achieved by its ATP-competitive binding to the enzyme. Dabrafenib displayed highly selective inhibition on RIP3 over RIP1, RIP2 and RIP5. Moreover, only dabrafenib rescued cells from RIP3-mediated necroptosis induced by the necroptosis-induced combinations, that is, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand or Fas ligand plus Smac mimetic and the caspase inhibitor z-VAD. Dabrafenib decreased the RIP3-mediated Ser358 phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) and disrupted the interaction between RIP3 and MLKL. Notably, RIP3 inhibition of dabrafenib appeared to be independent of its B-Raf inhibition. Dabrafenib was further revealed to prevent acetaminophen-induced necrosis in normal human hepatocytes, which is considered to be mediated by RIP3. In acetaminophen-overdosed mouse models, dabrafenib was found to apparently ease the acetaminophen-caused liver damage. The results indicate that the anticancer B-RafV600E inhibitor dabrafenib is a RIP3 inhibitor, which could serve as a sharp tool for probing the RIP3 biology and as a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for RIP3-involved necroptosis-related diseases such as acetaminophen-induced liver damage. PMID:24901049

  6. Anti-cytochrome P450 IIE1 (anti IIE1) and dimethyl sulfoxide inhibit acetaminophen and dimethylnitrosamine oxidation similarly

    SciTech Connect

    Jaw, S.; Jeffery, E.H. ); Roberts, D.W. )

    1991-03-11

    To evaluate specificity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the authors compared anti IIE1 and DMSO inhibition of P450 oxidations. Hepatic microsomes from control and acetone-induced female Swiss-Webster mice were preincubated with polyclonal anti IIE1 or IgG for 20 min at 4C before addition of an NADPH-generating system, DMSO or buffer, and substrate (Ethylmorphine, EM; dimethylnitrosamine, DMN; or acetaminophen, AP; 1 mM final concentration). After 20 min at 37C, the incubations were terminated by adding 20% trichloroacetic acid or methanol. Formaldehyde was determined by the Nash method when using EM or DMN as substrate. AP-glutathione conjugate was determined by HPLC when using AP as substrate. Anti IIE1 and DMSO did not inhibit EM demethylation in control or acetone microsomes. However, DMSO inhibited DMN demethylation by 26% and 64% in control and 30% and 75% in acetone microsomes. Anti IIE1 inhibited DMN demethylation by 44% and 24% in control and acetone microsomes, respectively. DMSO inhibited AP metabolism by 31% and 56% and anti IIE1 inhibited AP metabolism by 33%, in control microsomes. The inhibitions of DMN and AP metabolism by anti IIE1 and DMSO were only additive at submaximal inhibitor concentrations and confirm that DMSO specifically inhibits IIE1 activity.

  7. In vitro inhibition of UDP glucuronosyltransferases by atazanavir and other HIV protease inhibitors and the relationship of this property to in vivo bilirubin glucuronidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglu; Chando, Theodore J; Everett, Donald W; Patten, Christopher J; Dehal, Shangara S; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2005-11-01

    Several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, including atazanavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir, were tested for their potential to inhibit uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. Experiments were performed with human cDNA-expressed enzymes (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B7) as well as human liver microsomes. All of the protease inhibitors tested were inhibitors of UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A4 with IC(50) values that ranged from 2 to 87 microM. The IC50 values found for all compounds for UGT1A6, 1A9, and 2B7 were >100 microM. The inhibition (IC50) of UGT1A1 was similar when tested against the human cDNA-expressed enzyme or human liver microsomes for atazanavir, indinavir, and saquinavir (2.4, 87, and 7.3 microM versus 2.5, 68, and 5.0 microM, respectively). By analysis of the double-reciprocal plots of bilirubin glucuronidation activities at different bilirubin concentrations in the presence of fixed concentrations of inhibitors, the UGT1A1 inhibition by atazanavir and indinavir was demonstrated to follow a linear mixed-type inhibition mechanism (Ki = 1.9 and 47.9 microM, respectively). These results suggest that a direct inhibition of UGT1A1-mediated bilirubin glucuronidation may provide a mechanism for the reversible hyperbilirubinemia associated with administration of atazanavir as well as indinavir. In vitro-in vivo scaling with [I]/Ki predicts that atazanavir and indinavir are more likely to induce hyperbilirubinemia than other HIV protease inhibitors studied when a free Cmax drug concentration was used. Our current study provides a unique example of in vitro-in vivo correlation for an endogenous UGT-mediated metabolic pathway. PMID:16118329

  8. Mycophenolic acid glucuronide is transported by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and this transport is not inhibited by cyclosporine, tacrolimus or sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag G; Ogasawara, Ken; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2013-03-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of MRP2 to the efflux of mycophenolic acid (MPA), and its phenyl glucuronide (MPAG) and acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) metabolites, using Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells stably transfected with human MRP2 gene (MDCKII/MRP2 cells). 2. Compared to parental MDCKII cells, MPAG was significantly translocated from basolateral (BL) to apical (AP) side in MDCKII/MRP2 cells, indicating MPAG is a substrate for MRP2. AcMPAG is highly translocated from BL to AP side in both cells, suggesting that AcMPAG is actively secreted possibly through an efflux transporter other than MRP2. Appreciable translocation of MPA was not observed in MDCKII/MRP2 cells. 3. Furthermore, using MRP2-expressing Sf9 membrane vesicles, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value for MRP2-mediated MPAG transport was calculated at 224.2 ± 42.7 µM. In the vesicle system, cyclosporine, tacrolimus and sirolimus did not inhibit the uptake of MPAG via MRP2. 4. These findings indicate that only MPAG not MPA and AcMPAG is a substrate for MRP2 and that the interaction between MPAG and concomitantly administered immunosuppressive agents does not occur at MRP2 level. PMID:22934787

  9. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  10. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration.

  11. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  12. Bazhen Decoction Protects against Acetaminophen Induced Acute Liver Injury by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Apoptosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Erqun; Fu, Juanli; Xia, Xiaomin; Su, Chuanyang; Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bazhen decoction is a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal decoction, but the scientific validation of its therapeutic potential is lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate corresponding anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis activities of Bazhen decoction, using acetaminophen-treated mice as a model system. A total of 48 mice were divided into four groups. Group I, negative control, treated with vehicle only. Group II, fed with 500 mg/kg/day Bazhen decoction for 10 continuous days. Group III, received a single dose of 900 mg/kg acetaminophen. Group IV, fed with 500 mg/kg/day Bazhen decoction for 10 continuous days and a single dose of 900 mg/kg acetaminophen 30 min before last Bazhen decoction administration. Bazhen decoction administration significantly decrease acetaminophen-induced serum ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, TNF-α, IL-1β, ROS, TBARS and protein carbonyl group levels, as well as GSH depletion and loss of MMP. Bazhen decoction restore SOD, CAT, GR and GPx activities and depress the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, NF-κB, IL-1β and IL-6, respectively. Moreover, Bazhen decoction down-regulate acetaminophen-induced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9. These results suggest the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis properties of Bazhen decoction towards acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. PMID:25222049

  13. Nitric oxide releasing acetaminophen (nitroacetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Moore, P K; Marshall, M

    2003-05-01

    The nitric oxide releasing derivative of acetaminophen (nitroacetaminophen) exhibits potent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity in a variety of animal models. On a mol for mol basis nitroacetaminophen is some 3-20 times more potent than acetaminophen. Nitroacetaminophen exhibits little or no hepatotoxicity following administration in rat or mouse and indeed protects against the hepatotoxic activity of acetaminophen. Nitroacetaminophen does not affect blood pressure or heart rate of anaesthetised rats but has similar potency to acetaminophen as an anti-pyretic agent. The enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity of nitroacetaminophen and the reduced hepatotoxicity in these animal models is likely to be secondary to the slow release of nitric oxide from the molecule. As yet the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying these actions of nitroacetaminophen are not clear. Evidence for inhibition of cytokine-directed formation of pro-inflammatory molecule production (e.g. COX-2, iNOS) by an effect on the NF-kappaB transduction system and/or nitrosylation (and thence inhibition) of caspase enzyme activity has been reported. Data described in this review indicate that the profile of pharmacological activity of nitroacetaminophen and acetaminophen are markedly different. The possibility that nitroacetaminophen could be an attractive alternative to acetaminophen in the clinic is discussed. PMID:12846444

  14. Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 Regulates the Hepatobiliary Excretion and Plasma Exposure of Thienorphine and Its Glucuronide Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Lei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Wei-Bin; Yuan, Mei; Gong, Ze-Hui; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Thienorphine (TNP) is a novel partial opioid agonist that has completed phase II clinical evaluation as a promising drug candidate for the treatment of opioid dependence. Previous studies have shown that TNP and its glucuronide conjugate (TNP-G) undergo significant bile excretion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of efflux transporters in regulating biliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. An ATPase assay suggested that TNP and TNP-G were substrates of P-gp and MRP2, respectively. The in vitro data from rat hepatocytes showed that bile excretion of TNP and TNP-G was regulated by the P-gp and MRP2 modulators. The accumulation of TNP and TNP-G in HepG2 cells significantly increased by the treatment of mdr1a or MRP2 siRNA for P-gp or MRP2 modulation. In intact rats, the bile excretion, and pharmacokinetic profiles of TNP and TNP-G were remarkably changed with tariquidar and probenecid pretreatment, respectively. Tariquidar increased the Cmax and AUC0-t and decreased MRT and T1/2 of TNP, whereas probenecid decreased the plasma exposure of TNP-G and increased its T1/2. Knockdown P-gp and MRP2 function using siRNA significantly increased the plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G and reduced their mean retention time in mice. These results indicated the important roles of P-gp and MRP2 in hepatobiliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. Inhibition of the efflux transporters may affect the pharmacokinetics of TNP and result in a drug-drug interaction between TNP and the concomitant transporter inhibitor or inducer in clinic. PMID:27555820

  15. Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 Regulates the Hepatobiliary Excretion and Plasma Exposure of Thienorphine and Its Glucuronide Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Lei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Wei-Bin; Yuan, Mei; Gong, Ze-Hui; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Thienorphine (TNP) is a novel partial opioid agonist that has completed phase II clinical evaluation as a promising drug candidate for the treatment of opioid dependence. Previous studies have shown that TNP and its glucuronide conjugate (TNP-G) undergo significant bile excretion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of efflux transporters in regulating biliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. An ATPase assay suggested that TNP and TNP-G were substrates of P-gp and MRP2, respectively. The in vitro data from rat hepatocytes showed that bile excretion of TNP and TNP-G was regulated by the P-gp and MRP2 modulators. The accumulation of TNP and TNP-G in HepG2 cells significantly increased by the treatment of mdr1a or MRP2 siRNA for P-gp or MRP2 modulation. In intact rats, the bile excretion, and pharmacokinetic profiles of TNP and TNP-G were remarkably changed with tariquidar and probenecid pretreatment, respectively. Tariquidar increased the Cmax and AUC0-t and decreased MRT and T1/2 of TNP, whereas probenecid decreased the plasma exposure of TNP-G and increased its T1/2. Knockdown P-gp and MRP2 function using siRNA significantly increased the plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G and reduced their mean retention time in mice. These results indicated the important roles of P-gp and MRP2 in hepatobiliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. Inhibition of the efflux transporters may affect the pharmacokinetics of TNP and result in a drug-drug interaction between TNP and the concomitant transporter inhibitor or inducer in clinic. PMID:27555820

  16. Chitosan and blueberry treatment induces arginase activity and inhibits nitric oxide production during acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Eda; Uslu, Sema; Burukoglu, Dilek; Musmul, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Liver diseases have become a major problem of the worldwide. More than 50% of all cases of liver failure can be attributed to drugs. Among these, acetaminophen is the most common cause. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the the hepatoprotective effects of blueberry and chitosan on tissue arginase activity, ornithine and nitric oxide levels during the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Acetaminophen (250 mg/kg body weight per day), blueberry (60 mg/kg body weight per day) and, chitosan (200 mg/kg body weight per day) were administered to the rats by oral gavage during the experimental period. Results: Blueberry and chitosan significantly decreased liver arginase activity and ornithine levelsand and increased nitric oxide levels. Glutathione levels were remarkably increased by chitosan and blueberry treatments. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that blueberry and chitosan effectively protected against the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. The hepatoprotective effect afforded by blueberry and chitosan can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24991095

  17. Conjugation position of quercetin glucuronides and effect on biological activity.

    PubMed

    Day, A J; Bao, Y; Morgan, M R; Williamson, G

    2000-12-15

    Quercetin glycosides are common dietary antioxidants. In general, however, potential biological effects of the circulating plasma metabolites (e.g., glucuronide conjugates) have not been measured. We have determined the rate of glucuronidation of quercetin at each position on the polyphenol ring by human liver cell-free extracts containing UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. The apparent affinity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase followed the order 4'- > 3'- > 7- > 3, although the apparent maximum rate of formation was for the 7-position. The 5-position did not appear to be a site for conjugation. After isolation of individual glucuronides, the inhibition of xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase were assessed. The K(i) for the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by quercetin glucuronides followed the order 4'- > 3'- > 7- > 3-, with quercetin-4'-glucuronide a particularly potent inhibitor (K(i) = 0. 25 microM). The glucuronides, with the exception of quercetin-3-glucuronide, were also inhibitors of lipoxygenase. Quercetin glucuronides are metabolites of quercetin in humans, and these compounds can retain some biological activity depending on conjugation position at expected plasma concentrations. PMID:11118813

  18. Exacerbation of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by the Anthelmentic Drug Fenbendazole

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8–12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole. PMID

  19. Exacerbation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by the anthelmentic drug fenbendazole.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carol R; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2012-02-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8-12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole.

  20. The treatment of acetaminophen poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, L.F.; Critchley, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acetaminophen has become a very popular over-the-counter analgesic in some countries and as a result it is used increasingly as an agent for self-poisoning. Without treatment only a minority of patients develop severe liver damage and 1 to 2% die in hepatic failure. Until Mitchell and his colleagues discovered the biochemical mechanisms of toxicity in 1973 there was no effective treatment. They showed that the metabolic activation of acetaminophen resulted in the formation of a reactive arylating intermediate, and that hepatic reduced glutathione played an essential protective role by preferential conjugation and inactivation of the metabolite. Early treatment with sulphydryl compounds and glutathione precursors has been dramatically effective in preventing liver damage, renal failure, and death following acetaminophen overdosage. It seems likely that these agents act primarily by stimulating glutathione synthesis. Inhibition of the metabolic activation of acetaminophen is another potential therapeutic approach that has not yet been put to the test clinically. The clinical management of acetaminophen poisoning has been transformed and it is particularly gratifying to have effective treatment based on a well established biochemical mechanism of toxicity. It is likely that effective treatment will be developed for toxicity caused through similar mechanisms by other agents.

  1. The effect of moderate hemodilution with fluosol-DA or normal saline on acetaminophen disposition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, R P; White, L G

    1990-02-15

    Hemodilution with 40 ml/kg of Fluosol or saline reduced the acetaminophen Vd and the acetaminophen sulfate ClM at 48 or 72 h, respectively. Fluosol hemodilution increased the acetaminophen renal excretion at 24 and 72 h. But at 48 h, Fluosol hemodilution either inhibited the renal secretion of acetaminophen or enhanced its reabsorption.

  2. Aconitum carmichaelii protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via B-cell lymphoma-2 protein-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ki Mo; Choi, Songie; Oh, Dal-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported the clinical profile of processed Aconitum carmichaelii (AC, Aconibal(®)), which included inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activity in healthy male adults. CYP2E1 is recognized as the enzyme that initiates the cascade of events leading to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. However, no studies have characterized its role in APAP-induced hepatic injury. Here, we investigated the protective effects of AC on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction. AC (5-500 μg/mL) significantly inhibited APAP-induced reduction of glutathione. In addition, AC decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein levels (% change 46.63) in mitochondria. Moreover, it increased Bcl-2 (% change 55.39) and cytochrome C levels (% change 38.33) in mitochondria, measured using immunofluorescence or a commercial kit. Furthermore, cell membrane integrity was preserved and nuclear fragmentation inhibited by AC. These results demonstrate that AC protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced toxicity by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26895385

  3. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange.

  4. Benzyl alcohol protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes but causes mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death at higher doses.

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; McGill, Mitchell R; Xie, Yuchao; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is a serious public health problem in western countries. Current treatment options for APAP poisoning are limited and novel therapeutic intervention strategies are needed. A recent publication suggested that benzyl alcohol (BA) protects against APAP hepatotoxicity and could serve as a promising antidote for APAP poisoning. To assess the protective mechanisms of BA, C56Bl/6J mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP and/or 270 mg/kg BA. APAP alone caused extensive liver injury at 6 h and 24 h post-APAP. This injury was attenuated by BA co-treatment. Assessment of protein adduct formation demonstrated that BA inhibits APAP metabolic activation. In support of this, in vitro experiments also showed that BA dose-dependently inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. Correlating with the hepatoprotection of BA, APAP-induced oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were reduced. Similar results were obtained in primary mouse hepatocytes. Interestingly, BA alone caused mitochondrial membrane potential loss and cell toxicity at high doses, and its protective effect could not be reproduced in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). We conclude that BA protects against APAP hepatotoxicity mainly by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice. Considering its toxic effect and the loss of protection in PHH, BA is not a clinically useful treatment option for APAP overdose patient. PMID:26522885

  5. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Seah, Quee Ming; Tan, Rachel C.H.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Beerheide, Walter; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-11-15

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 {mu}M) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction.

  6. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  7. Hepato-protective effects of six schisandra lignans on acetaminophen-induced liver injury are partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-04-25

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra fructus is widely-used traditional Chinese medicine which possesses hepato-protective potential. Schisandrin A (SinA), Schisandrin B (SinB), Schisandrin C (SinC), Schisandrol A (SolA), Schisandrol B (SolB), and Schisantherin A (SthA) are the major bioactive lignans. Most recently, we found SolB exerts significant hepato-protection against APAP-induced liver injury. In this study, the protective effects of the other five schisandra lignans against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice were investigated and compared with that of SolB. The results of morphological and biochemical assessment clearly demonstrated significant protective effects of SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB, and SthA against APAP-induced liver injury. Among these schisandra lignans, SinC and SolB exerted the strongest hepato-protective effects against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Six lignans pretreatment before APAP dosing could prevent the depletions of total liver glutathione (GSH) and mitochondrial GSH caused by APAP. Additionally, the lignans treatment inhibited the enzymatic activities of three CYP450 isoforms (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A11) related to APAP bioactivation, and further decreased the formation of APAP toxic intermediate N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) in mouse microsomal incubation system. This study demonstrated that SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB and SthA exhibited significant protective actions toward APAP-induced liver injury, which was partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation.

  8. Hydroxyapatite crystallization in the presence of acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangood, A.; Malkaj, P.; Dalas, E.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of acetaminophen; a widely used analgesic and fever reducing medicine; in supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphate was investigated under plethostatic conditions, at 37 °C, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 7.40. The rates of crystal growth measured in the presence of acetaminophen 1.654×10 -4 mol dm -3 to 6.616×10 -4 mol dm -3 were reduced by 43% to 79%, respectively. The inhibition effect on the crystal growth rate may be explained through adsorption onto the active growth sites. Kinetic analysis suggested Langmuir-type adsorption of acetaminophen on the HAP surface with a affinity value of 2.4×10 -4 dm 3 mol -1, for the substrate in the concentration range investigated. The electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that in the presence of acetaminophen the charge of the acetaminophen covered HAP particles was shifted to more negative values as compared to bare HAP. In the presence of acetaminophen no changes observed in the HAP overgrown morphology or in the apparent order of crystallization.

  9. [Tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablets].

    PubMed

    Yokotsuka, Shoko; Kato, Jitsu

    2013-07-01

    Tramadol/acetaminophen fixed-dose combination tablets (Tramse) combine tramadol, a centrally acting week opioid analgesic, with low-dose acetaminophen. The action of tramadol may be described as a weak agonist at the mu-opioid receptor, inhibition of serotonin reuptake, and inhibition of noradrenaline reuptake. The second component in these tablets, acetaminophen mainly appears to act through central mechanism. Chronic pain may be broadly classified into nociceptive, neuropathic and mixed. Tramset may exert additive or synergic benefits in treating the multiple mechanism of pain. Clinical studies have revealed its efficacy and safety for a variety of pain condition such as chronic low back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It is expected that Tramset is going to induce pain relief and to improve disturbance of daily life in patients with intractable chronic pain. However overuse of Tramset may induce severe adverse effects such as addiction, abuse and hepatotoxicity. Therefore clinician should continuously assess pain intensity, activity of daily life, mode of its consumption, and adverse effects after prescription. PMID:23905401

  10. The effect of aging on acetaminophen pharmacokinetics, toxicity and Nrf2 in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Cogger, Victoria C; McKenzie, Catriona; Le Couteur, David G; Jones, Brett E; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the effect of aging on hepatic pharmacokinetics and the degree of hepatotoxicity following a toxic dose of acetaminophen. Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were treated with 800 mg/kg acetaminophen (young n = 8, old n = 5) or saline (young n = 9, old n = 9). Serum measurements showed old rats treated with acetaminophen had significantly lower serum alanine aminotransferase and higher acetaminophen and acetaminophen glucuronide levels and creatinine, compared with acetaminophen treated young rats (p < .05). Immunoblotting and activity assays showed old saline-treated rats had twofold lower cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and threefold higher NAD(P)H quinone oxireductase 1 protein expression and activity than young saline-treated rats (p < .05), although Nrf2, glutathione cysteine ligase-modulatory subunit, glutathione cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit, and cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expressions were unchanged. Primary hepatocytes isolated from young rats treated with 10 mM acetaminophen had lower survival than those from old rats (52.4% ± 5.8%, young; 83.6% ± 1.7%, old, p < .05). The pharmacokinetic changes described may decrease susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity but may increase risk of nephrotoxicity in old age.

  11. Effect of diethyl ether on the biliary excretion of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Siegers, C P; Klaassen, C D

    1984-10-01

    The biliary and renal excretion of acetaminophen and its metabolites over 8 hr was determined in rats exposed to diethyl ether by inhalation for 1 hr. Additional rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg ip) while control animals were conscious throughout the experiment (surgery was performed under hexobarbital narcosis: 150 mg/kg ip; 30-min duration). The concentration of UDP-glucuronic acid was decreased 80% in livers from ether-anesthetized rats but was not reduced in urethane-treated animals when compared to that in control rats. The concentration of reduced glutathione was not affected by either urethane or diethyl ether. Basal bile flow was not altered by the anesthetic agents. Bile flow rate after acetaminophen injection (100 mg/kg iv) was increased slightly over basal levels for 2 hr in hexobarbital-treated control rats, was unaltered in urethane-anesthetized animals, and was decreased throughout the 8-hr experiment in rats exposed to diethyl ether for 1 hr. In control and urethane-anesthetized animals, approximately 30-35% of the total acetaminophen dose (100 mg/kg iv) was excreted into bile in 8 hr, while only 16% was excreted in rats anesthetized with diethyl ether. Urinary elimination (60-70% of the dose) was not altered by exposure to ether. Separation of metabolites by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that ether decreased the biliary elimination of unchanged acetaminophen and its glucuronide, sulfate, and glutathione conjugates by 47, 40, 49, and 73%, respectively, as compared to control rats. Excretion of unchanged acetaminophen and the glutathione conjugate into bile was depressed in urethane-anesthetized animals by 45 and 66%, respectively, whereas elimination of the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates was increased by 27 and 50%, respectively. These results indicate that biliary excretion is influenced by the anesthetic agent and that diethyl ether depresses conjugation with sulfate and glutathione as well as glucuronic

  12. Acetaminophen and Codeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen and codeine comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 6 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen and codeine exactly as directed.Codeine can be ...

  13. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Conclusions Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats. PMID:26543508

  14. Autism and Phthalate Metabolite Glucuronidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, T. Peter; Schluter, Margaret D.; Steer, Robert A.; Ming, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals may precipitate autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in genetically susceptible children. Differences in the efficiency of the glucuronidation process may substantially modulate substrate concentrations and effects. To determine whether the efficiency of this pathway is compromised in children with ASD, we measured…

  15. Effects of kale ingestion on pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Izumi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Kohji; Takayanagi, Risa; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Kale is a cruciferous vegetable (Brassicaceae) that contains a large amount of health-promoting phytochemicals. The chronic ingestion of cabbage of the same family is known to accelerate conjugating acetaminophen (AA) and decrease the plasma AA level. Therefore, we examined to clarify the effects of kale on the pharmacokinetics of AA, its glucuronide (AA-G) and sulfate (AA-S). AA was orally administered to rats pre-treated with kale or cabbage (2000 mg/kg/day) for one week. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein, and the concentrations of AA, AA-G and AA-S were determined. In results, kale ingestion induced an increase in the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and a decrease in the clearance of AA, whereas cabbage had almost no influence. In addition, there were significant differences in the AUC of AA-G between the control and kale groups. mRNA expression levels of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, the enzymes involved in glucuronidation, in the kale group were significantly higher than those in the control group. In conclusion, kale ingestion increased the plasma concentrations of both AA and AA-G. The results suggest that kale ingestion accelerates the glucuronidation of AA, but an increase of plasma AA levels has a different cause than the cause of glucuronidation.

  16. Simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and five acetaminophen metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: Method validation and application to a neonatal pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; van den Anker, John N; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-12-15

    Drug metabolism plays a key role in acetaminophen (paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of acetaminophen metabolites provides critical information about factors influencing susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical and experimental settings. The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) methods for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, acetaminophen-glucuronide, acetaminophen-sulfate, acetaminophen-glutathione, acetaminophen-cysteine, and acetaminophen-N-acetylcysteine in small volumes of human plasma and urine. In the reported procedures, acetaminophen-d4 and acetaminophen-d3-sulfate were utilized as internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma (10μL) by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Human urine (10μL) was prepared by fortification with IS followed only by sample dilution. Calibration concentration ranges were tailored to literature values for each analyte in each biological matrix. Prepared samples from plasma and urine were analyzed under the same HPLC-ESI-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was achieved through use of an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a 20-min run time per injected sample. The analytes could be accurately and precisely quantified over 2.0-3.5 orders of magnitude. Across both matrices, mean intra- and inter-assay accuracies ranged from 85% to 112%, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision did not exceed 15%. Validation experiments included tests for specificity, recovery and ionization efficiency, inter-individual variability in matrix effects, stock solution stability, and sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw, and post-preparative). The utility and suitability of the reported procedures were illustrated by analysis of pharmacokinetic samples

  17. Simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and five acetaminophen metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: Method validation and application to a neonatal pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; van den Anker, John N; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-12-15

    Drug metabolism plays a key role in acetaminophen (paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of acetaminophen metabolites provides critical information about factors influencing susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical and experimental settings. The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) methods for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, acetaminophen-glucuronide, acetaminophen-sulfate, acetaminophen-glutathione, acetaminophen-cysteine, and acetaminophen-N-acetylcysteine in small volumes of human plasma and urine. In the reported procedures, acetaminophen-d4 and acetaminophen-d3-sulfate were utilized as internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma (10μL) by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Human urine (10μL) was prepared by fortification with IS followed only by sample dilution. Calibration concentration ranges were tailored to literature values for each analyte in each biological matrix. Prepared samples from plasma and urine were analyzed under the same HPLC-ESI-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was achieved through use of an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a 20-min run time per injected sample. The analytes could be accurately and precisely quantified over 2.0-3.5 orders of magnitude. Across both matrices, mean intra- and inter-assay accuracies ranged from 85% to 112%, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision did not exceed 15%. Validation experiments included tests for specificity, recovery and ionization efficiency, inter-individual variability in matrix effects, stock solution stability, and sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw, and post-preparative). The utility and suitability of the reported procedures were illustrated by analysis of pharmacokinetic samples

  18. Antagonism of acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular destruction by trifluoperazine in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H

    1990-08-01

    The effect of trifluoperazine, a specific calmodulin inhibitor, on hepatocellular destruction induced by acetaminophen was investigated in mice. Trifluoperazine 30 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally 30 min. or 0 min. before acetaminophen blocked hepatocellular destruction induced by the hepatotoxin, as evidenced by the determination of plasma GPT activity. Trifluoperazine also completely inhibited an increase of calcium contents in liver induced by acetaminophen administration. Furthermore, the increase of hepatic phosphorylase a activity induced by acetaminophen administration was completely abolished by pretreatment with trifluoperazine. However, hepatic glutathione depletion induced by acetaminophen was not prevented by pretreatment with trifluoperazine. Trifluoperazine administration caused a marked decrease in the body temperature of acetaminophen-treated animals. However, when the trifluoperazine-treated acetaminophen-poisoned animals were kept normothermic, the preventive effects were abolished. These findings suggest that this protective effect may be mediated by the trifluoperazine blockade of the deleterious effects of calcium accumulation in liver or the trifluoperazine decreasing effects on body temperature.

  19. Hydroxytyrosol glucuronides protect renal tubular epithelial cells against H(2)O(2) induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Monica; Incani, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Atzeri, Angela; Loru, Debora; Cabboi, Barbara; Paola Melis, M; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Assunta Dessì, M

    2011-09-30

    Hydroxytyrosol (2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol; HT), the most active ortho-diphenolic compound, present either in free or esterified form in extravirgin olive oil, is extensively metabolized in vivo mainly to O-methylated, O-sulfated and glucuronide metabolites. We investigated the capacity of three glucuronide metabolites of HT, 3'-O-β-d-glucuronide and 4'-O-β-d-glucuronide derivatives and 2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol-1-O-β-d-glucuronide, in comparison with the parent compound, to inhibit H(2)O(2) induced oxidative damage and cell death in LLC-PK1 cells, a porcine kidney epithelial cell line. H(2)O(2) treatment exerted a toxic effect inducing cell death, interacting selectively within the pro-death extracellular-signal relate kinase (ERK 1/2) and the pro-survival Akt/PKB signaling pathways. It also produced direct oxidative damage initiating the membrane lipid peroxidation process. None of the tested glucuronides exhibited any protection against the loss in renal cell viability. They also failed to prevent the changes in the phosphorylation states of ERK and Akt, probably reflecting their inability to enter the cells, while HT was highly effective. Notably, pretreatment with glucuronides exerted a protective effect at the highest concentration tested against membrane oxidative damage, comparable to that of HT: the formation of malondialdehyde, fatty acid hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol was significantly inhibited.

  20. Species difference in glucuronidation formation kinetics with a selective mTOR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Berry, Loren M; Liu, Jingzhou; Colletti, Adria; Krolikowski, Paul; Zhao, Zhiyang; Teffera, Yohannes

    2014-04-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that shows key involvement in age-related disease and promises to be a target for treatment of cancer. In the present study, the elimination of potent ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor 3-(6-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-4-yl)-N-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazin-2-amine (compound 1) is studied in bile duct-cannulated rats, and the metabolism of compound 1 in liver microsomes is compared across species. Compound 1 was shown to undergo extensive N-glucuronidation in bile duct-catheterized rats. N-glucuronides were detected on positions N1 (M2) and N2 (M1) of the pyrazole moiety as well as on the primary amine (M3). All three N-glucuronide metabolites were detected in liver microsomes of the rat, dog, and human, while primary amine glucuronidation was not detected in cynomolgus monkey. In addition, N1- and N2-glucuronidation showed strong species selectivity in vitro, with rat, dog, and human favoring N2-glucuronidation and monkey favoring N1-glucuronide formation. Formation of M1 in monkey liver microsomes also followed sigmoidal kinetics, singling out monkey as unique among the species with regard to compound 1 N-glucuronidation. In this respect, monkeys might not always be the best animal model for N-glucuronidation of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A9 or UGT1A1 substrates in humans. The impact of N-glucuronidation of compound 1 could be more pronounced in higher species such as monkey and human, leading to high clearance in these species. While compound 1 shows promise as a candidate for investigating the impact of pan-mTOR inhibition in vivo, opportunities may exist through medicinal chemistry efforts to reduce metabolic liability with the goal of improving systemic exposure. PMID:24423753

  1. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and sterile inflammation: The mechanism of protection of Chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is characterized by extensive necrotic cell death and a sterile inflammatory response. A recent report suggested that a therapeutic intervention with chlorogenic acid, a dietary polyphenolic compound, protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory injury. The purpose of this letter is to discuss a number of reasons why the protective mechanism of chlorogenic acid against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not involve an anti-inflammatory effect and provides an alternative explanation for the observed protection. PMID:26363200

  2. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and sterile inflammation: The mechanism of protection of Chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is characterized by extensive necrotic cell death and a sterile inflammatory response. A recent report suggested that a therapeutic intervention with chlorogenic acid, a dietary polyphenolic compound, protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory injury. The purpose of this letter is to discuss a number of reasons why the protective mechanism of chlorogenic acid against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not involve an anti-inflammatory effect and provides an alternative explanation for the observed protection.

  3. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  4. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. PMID:25962350

  5. Effects of Acetaminophen on Left Atrial Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jun-Hei; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Hong, Po-Da

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen shows cardioprotective efficacy in mammals. In this study, we investigated the electromechanical effects of acetaminophen on the left atrium (LA). Methods Conventional microelectrodes were used to record the action potentials (AP) in rabbit LA preparations. The action potential duration (APD) at repolarization levels of 90%, 50% and 20% of the AP amplitude (APD90, APD50, and APD20, respectively), resting membrane potential, and contractile force were measured during 2 Hz electrical stimulation before and after sequential acetaminophen administration to the LA. Results Acetaminophen (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mM) reduced APD20 from 9.4 ± 1.2 to 8.0 ± 1.1 (p < 0.05), 7.1 ± 0.8 (p < 0.05), 7.8 ± 1.1, and 6.8 ± 1.2 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, and APD50 from 20.2 ± 1.9 to 17.4 ± 2.0, 15.6 ± 1.8 (p < 0.05), 15.8 ± 2.2 (p < 0.05), and 14.1 ± 2.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. APD90 was reduced from 72.0 ± 3.6 to 64.7 ± 4.2, 61.9 ± 4.3, 60.5 ± 3.7, and 53.4 ± 4.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively. Acetaminophen increased LA contractility from 45 ± 9 to 52 ± 10 (p < 0.05), 55 ± 9 (p < 0.01), 58 ± 9 (p < 0.01), and 60 ± 9 mg (p < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME or PKG-I inhibitor DT-2, additional acetaminophen treatment did not significantly increase LA contractility. Conclusions Acetaminophen modulated the electromechanical characteristics of LA by inhibiting the NOS and PKG I pathway, and then contributed to the positive inotropic effect. PMID:27471362

  6. High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance approach to the study of hepatocyte and drug metabolism. Application to acetaminophen

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, J.K.; Timbrell, J.A.; Bales, J.R.; Sadler, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    /sub 1/H spin echo NMR spectra of intact hepatocytes, isolated from rat liver, showed resonances for glucose, mobile fatty acids, and +N(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ groups including choline headgroups of phosphoglycerides. Spectra from extracts of the same cells contained many more well resolved resonances due to low Mr metabolites. These included signals for free amino acids, ketone bodies, glucose, lactate, and acetate. 1H NMR spectra from suspensions of intact hepatocytes incubated with acetaminophen showed no resonances for drug metabolites, although changes in sugar resonances were observed. However, spectra of extracts from acetaminophen-treated hepatocytes contained resonances for both acetaminophen itself and its major metabolites, the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. Results on the extent of acetaminophen metabolism as measured by 1H NMR compared well with previously reported chromatographic studies. The rate of metabolism of acetaminophen by hepatocytes was much slower in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O buffer compared to H/sub 2/O buffer and selective deuteration of several metabolites including the ketone bodies, glucose, and acetaminophen glucuronide was observed. The deuteration of glucose C/sup 2/H appeared to be due to futile cycling of the glycolytic pathway to at least fructose 6-phosphate, and incorporation of deuterium by the enzyme phosphoglucoisomerase. This work demonstrates that 1H NMR studies of intact hepatocytes and cell extracts together can provide considerable insight into the metabolism of acetaminophen in vitro. Little pretreatment of samples is required, results can be obtained rapidly, and both normal and drug metabolites can be observed simultaneously. Similar studies should be applicable to a wide range of other drugs.

  7. Inhibitory effects of Schisandra chinensis on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jin-Zhen

    2014-05-01

    Schisandra chinensis is a well-known traditional medicinal herb. Acetaminophen is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and overdose of acetaminophen was the most frequent cause of acute liver failure. However, no studies have demonstrated the role of Schisandra chinensis in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure to the best of our knowledge. In this study, an acute liver injury model was established in mice using acetaminophen. The protective role of Schisandra chinensis was detected by histopathological analysis, and measurement of the serum transaminase levels and hepatic Cyp activity levels in the mouse model. Subsequently, hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of the mouse model. The cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were determined using flow cytometry. Cell proliferation and 26S proteasome activity were determined using spectrophotometry. Schisandra chinensis was found to resist acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by protecting mitochondria and lysosomes and inhibiting the phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. These findings provide a novel application of Schisandra chinensis against acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

  8. Bilirubin Glucuronidation Revisited: Proper Assay Conditions to Estimate Enzyme Kinetics with Recombinant UGT1A1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Bilirubin, an end product of heme catabolism, is primarily eliminated via glucuronic acid conjugation by UGT1A1. Impaired bilirubin conjugation, caused by inhibition of UGT1A1, can result in clinical consequences, including jaundice and kernicterus. Thus, evaluation of the ability of new drug candidates to inhibit UGT1A1-catalyzed bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro has become common practice. However, the instability of bilirubin and its glucuronides presents substantial technical challenges to conduct in vitro bilirubin glucuronidation assays. Furthermore, because bilirubin can be diglucuronidated through a sequential reaction, establishment of initial rate conditions can be problematic. To address these issues, a robust high-performance liquid chromatography assay to measure both bilirubin mono- and diglucuronide conjugates was developed, and the incubation conditions for bilirubin glucuronidation by human embryonic kidney 293-expressed UGT1A1 were carefully characterized. Our results indicated that bilirubin glucuronidation should be assessed at very low protein concentrations (0.05 mg/ml protein) and over a short incubation time (5 min) to assure initial rate conditions. Under these conditions, bilirubin total glucuronide formation exhibited a hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetic profile with a Km of ∼0.2 μM. In addition, under these initial rate conditions, the relative proportions between the total monoglucuronide and the diglucuronide product were constant across the range of bilirubin concentration evaluated (0.05–2 μM), with the monoglucuronide being the predominant species (∼70%). In conclusion, establishment of appropriate incubation conditions (i.e., very low protein concentrations and short incubation times) is necessary to properly characterize the kinetics of bilirubin glucuronidation in a recombinant UGT1A1 system. PMID:20668247

  9. Platelets mediate acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Fong W; Rumbaut, Rolando E

    2015-10-01

    In this issue of Blood, Miyakawa et al show that platelets and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4 contribute to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. Using various strategies in a mouse model of APAP overdose, the authors demonstrate that platelets participate in the progression of liver damage, and that the direct thrombin inhibitor lepirudin and PAR-4 deficiency attenuate hepatotoxicity. These findings have the potential to help identify future therapeutic targets for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26450954

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen protect against oxidative neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, H; Maharaj, D S; Daya, S

    2006-09-01

    Due to the implication of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders we decided to investigate the antioxidant properties of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen either alone or in combination. The thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay were used to investigate quinolinic acid (QA)-induced: lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion generation in the rat hippocampus, in vivo. The study also shows, using cresyl violet staining, the preservation of structural integrity of neuronal cells following treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in QA-lesioned rat hippocampus. Furthermore the study sought to determine whether these agents have any effect on endogenous (QA) formation. This study shows that acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen inhibit QA-induced superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation and cell damage, in vivo, in the rat hippocampus. In addition these agents inhibit the enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid oxygenase (3-HAO), responsible for the synthesis of endogenous QA.

  11. Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra Sphenanthera extract) protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of NRF2-ARE and p53/p21 pathways.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Pan; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2014-12-01

    Schisandra sphenanthera is widely used as a tonic and restorative in many countries to enhance the function of liver and other organs. Wuzhi tablet (WZ) is a preparation of an ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera. Our previous study demonstrated that WZ exerted a protective effect toward acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study aimed to determine what molecular pathways contributed to the hepatoprotective effects of WZ against APAP toxicity. Administration of WZ 3 days before APAP treatment significantly attenuated APAP hepatotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner and reduced APAP-induced JNK activation. Treatment with WZ resulted in potent inhibition of CYP2E1, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2 activities and then caused significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine-reduced glutathione. The expression of NRF2 was increased after APAP and/or WZ treatment, whereas KEAP1 levels were decreased. The protein expression of NRF2 target genes including Gclc, Gclm, Ho-1, and Nqo1 was significantly increased by WZ treatment. Furthermore, APAP increased the levels of p53 and its downstream gene p21 to trigger cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, whereas WZ pretreatment could inhibit p53/p21 signaling to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins including cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to promote hepatocyte proliferation. This study demonstrated that WZ prevented APAP-induced liver injury by inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated APAP bioactivation, activation of the NRF2-antioxidant response element pathway to induce detoxification and antioxidation, and regulation of the p53, p21, cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to facilitate liver regeneration after APAP-induced liver injury.

  12. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics.

  13. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 mainly contributes to the glucuronidation of trovafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Sumida, Kyohei; Kutsuno, Yuki; Sakamoto, Masaya; Itoh, Tomoo

    2015-02-01

    Identification of drug-metabolizing enzyme(s) responsible for the metabolism of drugs is an important step to understand not only interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics but also molecular mechanisms of metabolite-related toxicity. While it was reported that the major metabolic pathway of trovafloxacin, which is an antibiotic, was glucuronidation, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform(s) responsible for the trovafloxacin glucuronidation has not been identified yet. In the present study, among the functional human UGT members, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9 exhibited higher trovafloxacin acyl-glucuronidation activities. While other UGT members such as UGT1A8, UGT2B7, and UGT2B15 showed glucuronidation activity toward trovafloxacin, the metabolic velocity was extremely low. In human liver microsomes, trovafloxacin acyl-glucuronidation followed the Hill equation with S50 value of 95 μM, Vmax value of 243 pmol/min per mg, and a Hill coefficient of 2.0, while the UGT1A1-expressing system displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a substrate inhibition, with Km value of 759 μM and Vmax value of 1160 pmol/min per mg. In human liver microsomes prepared from poor metabolizers (UGT1A1*28/*28), significantly reduced trovafloxacin acyl-glucuronide formation activity was observed, indicating that UGT1A1 mainly, while other UGT members such as UGT1A3 and UGT1A9 partially, contributes to the glucuronidation of trovafloxacin. PMID:25760534

  14. Lithocholate glucuronide is a cholestatic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Oelberg, D.G.; Chari, M.V.; Little, J.M.; Adcock, E.W.; Lester, R.

    1984-06-01

    Lithocholic acid and its taurine, glycine, and sulfate derivatives are potent cholestatic agents. (3 beta-/sup 3/H)lithocholate 3-O-beta-D-glucuronide was synthesized, and chemical and radiochemical purity were established. The aqueous solubility of lithocholate glucuronide was determined and found to be greater than that of lithocholic acid or several of its derivatives. In the range of concentrations examined, calcium ions precipitated lithocholate glucuronide stoichiometrically. The material was administered to rats prepared with an external biliary fistula. When 17-25 micrograms quantities were administered, 89.1 +/- 4.5% (mean +/- SEM) of the radiolabel was secreted in bile within the first 20 h after administration, the major fraction being secreted in less than 20 min. Four-fifths of the radiolabeled material in bile was the administered unaltered parent compound, while a minor fraction consisted of a more polar derivative(s). We showed that increasing biliary concentrations of more polar derivatives were observed with milligram doses of (3H)lithocholate glucuronide, and with time after the administration of these loading doses. Milligram doses of (3H)lithocholate glucuronide resulted in partial or complete cholestasis. When induced cholestasis was partial, secretion in bile remained the primary excretory route (82.5-105.6% recovery in bile), while, when complete cholestasis was induced, wide tissue distribution of radiolabel was observed. Cholestasis developed rapidly during infusion of (3H)lithocholate glucuronide. Bile flow was diminished within 10-20 min of the start of an infusion of 0.05 mumol, 100 g-1 body weight, minute-1, administered concomitantly with an equimolar infusion of taurocholate. The results establish that lithocholate glucuronide exerts cholestatic effects comparable to those exerted by unconjugated lithocholic acid.

  15. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatial distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.

  16. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatialmore » distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.« less

  17. Protective effects of fulvotomentosides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y P; Liu, J; Jia, X S; Mao, Q; Madhu, C; Klaassen, C D

    1992-05-01

    Fulvotomentosides (Ful) is the total saponins of Lonicera fulvotomentosa. In the present study, we examined the effect of Ful on acetaminophen (AA)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Ful pretreatment (75-225 mg.kg-1, sc x 3 d) significantly decreased AA (500 mg.kg-1, ip)-induced liver damage as indicated by serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and sorbitol dehydrogenase. Ful pretreatment (225 mg.kg-1, sc x 3 d) decreased hepatic cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase by approximately 15-20%. Microsomes from Ful-pretreated mice, incubated in vitro with AA, produced less AA-glutathione. A 28% increase in urinary excretion of AA-glucuronide was observed in Ful (150 mg.kg-1, sc x 3 d) pretreated mice. Ful pretreatment had no influence on liver UDP-glucuronic acid concentration, but increased hepatic glucuronyltransferase activity towards AA. In summary, Ful pretreatment protects against AA-induced hepatotoxicity. One of the mechanisms for this protection appears to be the decreased AA toxic activation via P-450, as well as increased detoxication via glucuronidation of AA.

  18. Acetaminophen Pharmacokinetics in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barshop, Nicole J.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) activity and the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of acetaminophen (APAP) in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods Twelve boys 10–17 years old with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 12 age and gender-matched controls without NAFLD were recruited. Following administration of a single oral dose of APAP (5mg/kg, maximum 325mg), APAP and its glucuronide metabolite (APAP-G) were measured in plasma, urine, and sputum at various intervals up to 24 hours. The activity of UGT was estimated by the plasma ratio of APAP-G to APAP at 4 hours. Results Following administration of APAP, children with NAFLD had significantly higher concentrations of APAP-G in serum (p=.0071) and urine (p=.0210) compared to controls. No significant differences in APAP pharmacokinetics parameters were observed between the two groups. Conclusions APAP glucuronidation is altered in children with fatty liver disease. Despite the altered disposition of this metabolite, the pharmacokinetics of a single 5 mg/kg dose of APAP is the same in children with NAFLD as in children with normal liver function. PMID:21240014

  19. Identification of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 as the Major Isozyme Responsible for the Glucuronidation of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; He, Chunyong; Fang, Lianxiang; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-01-01

    20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), one of the representative aglycones of ginsenosides, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Although phase I metabolism has been investigated extensively, information regarding phase II metabolism of this compound remains to be elucidated. Here, a glucuronidated metabolite of PPD in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and rat liver microsomes (RLMs) was unambiguously identified as PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. The chemical inhibition and recombinant human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms assay showed that the PPD glucuronidation was mainly catalyzed by UGT1A4 in HLM, whereas UGT1A3 showed weak catalytic activity. In conclusion, PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide was first identified as the principal glucuronidation metabolite of PPD in HLMs, which was catalyzed by UGT1A4. PMID:27005621

  20. Pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen in children.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R G; Rumack, B H

    1978-11-01

    Acetaminophen absorption may occur at a somewhat greater rate in children if the syrup form is utilized. The overall plasma elimination of acetaminophen is somewhat slow in the neonate, but is comparable to that of adults in both children and adolescents, as judged by half-life determinations. This would suggest that the frequency of acetaminophen administration in children should be similar to the schedule recommended for adults and that a dosing interval of four hours should not result in drug accumulation. The question of a toxic quantity of acetaminophen for young children must remain open until adequate metabolic or retrospective toxicologic data become known. Since the volumes of distribution appear to be the same in both adults and children, the same dose should apply in both groups; currently, 10 mg/kg is considered to be both safe and effective for antipyresis. PMID:364399

  1. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Elizabeth M; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Zarrinpar, Ali

    2015-02-01

    As the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the USA and UK, acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity remains a significant public health concern and common indication for emergent liver transplantation. This problem is largely attributable to acetaminophen combination products frequently prescribed by physicians and other healthcare professionals, with unintentional and chronic overdose accounting for over 50 % of cases of acetaminophen-related ALF. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine can effectively reduce progression to ALF if given early after an acute overdose; however, liver transplantation is the only routinely used life-saving therapy once ALF has developed. With the rapid course of acetaminophen-related ALF and limited supply of donor livers, early and accurate diagnosis of patients that will require transplantation for survival is crucial. Efforts in developing novel treatments for acetaminophen-induced ALF are directed toward bridging patients to recovery. These include auxiliary, artificial, and bioartificial support systems. This review outlines the most recent developments in diagnosis and management of acetaminophen-induced ALF.

  2. The common pain of surrealism and death: acetaminophen reduces compensatory affirmation following meaning threats.

    PubMed

    Randles, Daniel; Heine, Steven J; Santos, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death or a control topic. In Study 2, participants watched either a surrealist film clip or a control film clip. In both studies, participants in the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did not. PMID:23579320

  3. Quercitrin from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Toxicity in HepG2 Cells and Mice through Induction of Antioxidant Machinery and Inhibition of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Long; Ko, Se-Yeon; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Quercitrin is found in many kinds of vegetables and fruits, and possesses various bioactive properties. The aim of the present study was to elucidate hepatoprotective mechanisms of quercitrin isolated from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. (syn. Cedrela sinensis Juss.), using acetaminophen (APAP)-treated HepG2 cell and animal models. In an in vitro study, quercitrin suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), activity of antioxidant response element (ARE)-reporter gene, and protein levels of NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) in APAP-treated HepG2 cells. In an in vivo study, Balb/c mice were orally administered with 10 or 50 mg/kg of quercitrin for 7 days and followed by the injection with single dose of 300 mg/kg APAP. Quercitrin decreased APAP-caused elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, the expression of pro-inflammatory factors including inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 and inerleukin-1β, and phosphorylation of kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Quercitrin restored protein levels of Nrf2, NQO1 and activities and expressions of CAT, GPx, SOD-2. The results suggested that quercitrin attenuates APAP-induced liver damage by the activation of defensive genes and the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes via the suppressions of JNK and p38 signaling. PMID:27428996

  4. Quercitrin from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Toxicity in HepG2 Cells and Mice through Induction of Antioxidant Machinery and Inhibition of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Van-Long; Ko, Se-Yeon; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Quercitrin is found in many kinds of vegetables and fruits, and possesses various bioactive properties. The aim of the present study was to elucidate hepatoprotective mechanisms of quercitrin isolated from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. (syn. Cedrela sinensis Juss.), using acetaminophen (APAP)-treated HepG2 cell and animal models. In an in vitro study, quercitrin suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), activity of antioxidant response element (ARE)-reporter gene, and protein levels of NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) in APAP-treated HepG2 cells. In an in vivo study, Balb/c mice were orally administered with 10 or 50 mg/kg of quercitrin for 7 days and followed by the injection with single dose of 300 mg/kg APAP. Quercitrin decreased APAP-caused elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, the expression of pro-inflammatory factors including inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 and inerleukin-1β, and phosphorylation of kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Quercitrin restored protein levels of Nrf2, NQO1 and activities and expressions of CAT, GPx, SOD-2. The results suggested that quercitrin attenuates APAP-induced liver damage by the activation of defensive genes and the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes via the suppressions of JNK and p38 signaling. PMID:27428996

  5. Identification and characterization of oxymetazoline glucuronidation in human liver microsomes: evidence for the involvement of UGT1A9.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Mukesh K; Uttamsingh, Vinita; Gan, Liang-Shang; Leduc, Barbara; Williams, David A

    2011-02-01

    The incubation of oxymetazoline, a nonprescription nasal decongestant, with human liver microsomes (HLMs) supplemented with uridine-5-diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA) generated glucuronide metabolite as observed by LC/MS/MS. The uridine glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) responsible for the O-glucuronidation of oxymetazoline remain thus far unidentified. The glucuronide formed in HLMs was identified by LC/MS/MS and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR to be the β-O-glucuronide of oxymetazoline. UGT screening with expressed UGTs identified UGT1A9 as the single UGT isoform catalyzing O-glucuronidation of oxymetazoline. Oxymetazoline O-glucuronidation by using HLMs was best fitted to the allosteric sigmoidal model. The derived S(50) and V(max) values were 2.42 ± 0.40 mM and 8.69 ± 0.58 pmole/(min mg of protein), respectively, and maximum clearance (CL(max)) was 3.61 L/min/mg. Oxymetazoline O-glucuronidation by using expressed UGT1A9 was best fitted to the substrate inhibition model. The derived K(m) and V(max) values were 2.53 ± 1.03 mM and 54.18 ± 16.92 pmole/(min mg of protein), respectively, and intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) was 21.41 L/(min mg). Our studies indicate that oxymetazoline is not glucuronidated at its nanomolar intranasal dose and thus is eliminated unchanged, because UGT1A9 would only contribute to its elimination at the toxic plasma concentrations.

  6. Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... urging consumers to carefully read the labels of liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants to avoid giving the ... less concentrated version for all children. Until now, liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants has only been available ...

  7. High-throughput screening technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Olga; Finel, Moshe; Trubetskoy, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    A significant number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including many therapeutic agents, are metabolized in humans via glucuronidation, catalysed by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). The study of the UGTs is a growing field of research, with constantly accumulated and updated information regarding UGT structure, purification, substrate specificity and inhibition, including clinically relevant drug interactions. Development of reliable UGT assays for the assessment of individual isoform substrate specificity and for the discovery of novel isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors is crucial for understanding the function and regulation of the UGT enzyme family and its clinical and pharmacological relevance. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful technology used to search for novel substrates and inhibitors for a wide variety of targets. However, application of HTS in the context of UGTs is complicated because of the poor stability, low levels of expression, low affinity and broad substrate specificity of the enzymes, combined with difficulties in obtaining individual UGT isoforms in purified format, and insufficient information regarding isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors. This review examines the current status of HTS assays used in the search for novel UGT substrates and inhibitors, emphasizing advancements and challenges in HTS technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling, and discusses possible avenues for future advancement of the field.

  8. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity in CD-1 mice: I. Enhancement of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity by acetaminophen-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Hennig, Gayle E.; Horton, Robert A.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Recent studies suggest a contributory role for glutathione (GSH)-derived conjugates of APAP in the development of nephrotoxicity. Inhibitors of either {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) or the probenecid-sensitive organic anion transporter ameliorate APAP-induced nephrotoxicity but not hepatotoxicity in mice and inhibition of {gamma}-GT similarly protected rats from APAP nephrotoxicity. Protection against APAP nephrotoxicity by disruption of these GSH conjugate transport and metabolism pathways suggests that GSH conjugates are involved. APAP-induced renal injury may involve the acetaminophen-glutathione (APAP-GSH) conjugate or a metabolite derived from APAP-GSH. Acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is a likely candidate for involvement in APAP nephrotoxicity because it is both a product of the {gamma}-GT pathway and a probable substrate for the organic anion transporter. The present experiments demonstrated that APAP-CYS treatment alone depleted renal but not hepatic glutathione (GSH) in a dose-responsive manner. This depletion of renal GSH may predispose the kidney to APAP nephrotoxicity by diminishing GSH-mediated detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, pretreatment of male CD-1 mice with APAP-CYS before challenge with a threshold toxic dose of APAP resulted in significant enhancement of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity. This was evidenced by histopathology and plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at 24 h after APAP challenge. APAP alone was minimally nephrotoxic and APAP-CYS alone produced no detectable injury. By contrast, APAP-CYS pretreatment did not alter the liver injury induced by APAP challenge. These data are consistent with there being a selective, contributory role for APAP-GSH-derived metabolites in APAP-induced renal injury that may involve renal-selective GSH depletion.

  9. Fennel and raspberry leaf as possible inhibitors of acetaminophen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Astrid Jordet; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2014-10-01

    In addition to CYP2E1, several CYP isoenzymes, notably CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A4, are suggested to contribute in acetaminophen oxidation and formation of the hepatotoxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The in vitro CYP2E1 inhibitory potentials of fennel and raspberry leaf, herbs previously found to inhibit CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A4 activities in vitro, were investigated. Extracts from commercially available herbal products were incubated with recombinant cDNA-expressed human CYP2E1. A validated LC/MS/MS methodology was applied for determination of 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone formation with disulfiram used as a positive inhibitory control. CYP2E1 IC50 inhibition constants were found to be 23 ± 4 and 27 ± 5 µg/ml for fennel and raspberry leaf, respectively, constants significantly lower than those presented in the literature for other herbal extracts. Together with previous findings, the presented in vitro data for CYP2E1 inhibition suggest that fennel and raspberry leaf have a significant potential of inhibiting all the major metabolic pathways for acetaminophen oxidation and NAPQI formation. Both herbs should be further investigated for their in vivo ability of inhibiting acetaminophen oxidation and NAPQI formation.

  10. 2D QSAR Study for Gemfibrozil Glucuronide as the Mechanism-based Inhibitor of CYP2C8

    PubMed Central

    Taxak, N.; Bharatam, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 involves the bioactivation of the drug to a reactive metabolite, which leads to cytochrome inhibition via various mechanisms. This is generally seen in the Phase I of drug metabolism. However, gemfibrozil (hypolipidemic drug) leads to mechanism-based inhibition after generating glucuronide conjugate (gemfibrozil acyl-β-glucuronide) in the Phase II metabolism reaction. The mechanism involves the covalent binding of the benzyl radical (generated from the oxidation of aromatic methyl group in conjugate) to the heme of CYP2C8. This article deals with the development of a 2D QSAR model based on the inhibitory potential of gemfibrozil, its analogues and corresponding glucuronide conjugates in inhibiting the CYP2C8-catalysed amodiaquine N-deethylation. The 2D QSAR model was developed using multiple linear regression analysis in Accelrys Discovery Studio 2.5 and helps in identifying the descriptors, which are actually contributing to the inhibitory potency of the molecules studied. The built model was further validated using leave one out method. The best quantitative structure activity relationship model was selected having a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.814 and cross-validated correlation coefficient (q2) of 0.799. 2D QSAR revealed the importance of volume descriptor (Mor15v), shape descriptor (SP09) and 3D matrix-based descriptor (SpMax_RG) in defining the activity for this series of molecules. It was observed that volume and 3D matrix-based descriptors were crucial in imparting higher potency to gemfibrozil glucuronide conjugate, as compared with other molecules. The results obtained from the present study may be useful in predicting the inhibitory potential (IC50 for CYP2C8 inhibition) of the glucuronide conjugates of new molecules and compare with the standard gemfibrozil acyl-β-glucuronide (in terms of pIC50 values) in early stages of drug discovery and development. PMID:24591743

  11. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  12. Acyl glucuronides: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sophie L; Maggs, James L; Hammond, Thomas G; Lambert, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Park, B Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronidation is the major metabolic conjugation reaction of most carboxylic acid drugs in mammals. The physiological consequences of this biotransformation have been investigated incompletely but include effects on drug metabolism, protein binding, distribution and clearance that impact upon pharmacological and toxicological outcomes. In marked contrast, the exceptional but widely disparate chemical reactivity of acyl glucuronides has attracted far greater attention. Specifically, the complex transacylation and glycation reactions with proteins have provoked much inconclusive debate over the safety of drugs metabolised to acyl glucuronides. It has been hypothesised that these covalent modifications could initiate idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. However, despite a large body of in vitro data on the reactions of acyl glucuronides with protein, evidence for adduct formation from acyl glucuronides in vivo is limited and potentially ambiguous. The causal connection of protein adduction to adverse drug reactions remains uncertain. This review has assessed the intrinsic reactivity, metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of acyl glucuronides in the context of physiological, pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Although numerous experiments have characterised the reactions of acyl glucuronides with proteins, these might be attenuated substantially in vivo by rapid clearance of the conjugates. Consequently, to delineate a relationship between acyl glucuronide formation and toxicological phenomena, detailed pharmacokinetic analysis of systemic exposure to the acyl glucuronide should be undertaken adjacent to determining protein adduct concentrations in vivo. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether acyl glucuronide clearance is sufficient to prevent covalent modification of endogenous proteins and consequentially a potential immunological response. PMID:20830700

  13. Investigations of acetaminophen binding to bovine serum albumin in the presence of fatty acid: Fluorescence and 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, B.; Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    The binding of acetaminophen to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by the quenching fluorescence method and the proton nuclear magnetic resonance technique ( 1H NMR). For fluorescence measurements 1-anilino-9-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) hydrophobic probe was used to verify subdomain IIIA as acetaminophen's likely binding site. Three binding sites of acetaminophen in subdomain IIA of bovine serum albumin were found. Quenching constants calculated by the Stern-Volmer modified method were used to estimate the influence of myristic acid (MYR) on the drug binding to the albumin. The influence of [fatty acid]/[albumin] molar ratios on the affinity of the protein towards acetaminophen was described. Changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicated that the presence of MYR inhibits interaction in the AA-albumin complex. It is suggested that the elevated level of fatty acids does not significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen.

  14. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Jones, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. Five published trials directly compare acetaminophen injection to drugs available in the United States. For management of pain in adults, acetaminophen injection was at least as effective as morphine injection in renal colic, oral ibuprofen after cesarean delivery, and oral acetaminophen after coronary artery bypass surgery. In children (3 to 16 years old), single-dose acetaminophen injection was similar to meperidine intramuscular (i.m.) for pain after tonsillectomy; readiness for discharge from the recovery room was shorter with acetaminophen injection (median 15 minutes) compared with meperidine i.m. (median 25 minutes), P = .005. In children (2 to 5 years old) postoperative adenotonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the time to rescue analgesia was superior with high-dose acetaminophen rectal suppository (median 10 hours) compared with acetaminophen injection (median 7 hours), P = .01. One published trial demonstrated acetaminophen injection is noninferior to propacetamol injection for fever related to infection in pediatric patients. Dosing adjustments are not required when switching between oral and injectable acetaminophen formulations in adult and adolescent patients. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:21936636

  15. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  16. Phyllanthus urinaria extract attenuates acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity: involvement of cytochrome P450 CYP2E1.

    PubMed

    Hau, Desmond Kwok Po; Gambari, Roberto; Wong, Raymond Siu Ming; Yuen, Marcus Chun Wah; Cheng, Gregory Yin Ming; Tong, Cindy Sze Wai; Zhu, Guo Yuan; Leung, Alexander Kai Man; Lai, Paul Bo San; Lau, Fung Yi; Chan, Andrew Kit Wah; Wong, Wai Yeung; Kok, Stanton Hon Lung; Cheng, Chor Hing; Kan, Chi Wai; Chan, Albert Sun Chi; Chui, Chung Hin; Tang, Johnny Cheuk On; Fong, David Wang Fun

    2009-08-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used drug for the treatment of patients with common cold and influenza. However, an overdose of acetaminophen may be fatal. In this study we investigated whether mice, administered intraperitoneally with a lethal dose of acetaminophen, when followed by oral administration of Phyllanthus urinaria extract, may be prevented from death. Histopathological analysis of mouse liver sections showed that Phyllanthus urinaria extract may protect the hepatocytes from acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Therapeutic dose of Phyllanthus urinaria extract did not show any toxicological phenomenon on mice. Immunohistochemical staining with the cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 antibody revealed that Phyllanthus urinaria extract reduced the cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 protein level in mice pre-treated with a lethal dose of acetaminophen. Phyllanthus urinaria extract also inhibited the cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 enzymatic activity in vitro. Heavy metals, including arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead, as well as herbicide residues were not found above their detection limits. High performance liquid chromatography identified corilagin and gallic acid as the major components of the Phyllanthus urinaria extract. We conclude that Phyllanthus urinaria extract is effective in attenuating the acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity, and inhibition of cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 enzyme may be an important factor for its therapeutic mechanism.

  17. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    temperature, heart rate, or thermal sensation between the acetaminophen and placebo trials (p > 0.05). The results indicate oral acetaminophen reduces core temperature of humans exposed to an environment beneath the thermal neutral zone. These results suggest that acetaminophen may inhibit the thermogenic mechanisms required to regulate core temperature during exposure to sub-neutral environments. PMID:27014068

  18. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    temperature, heart rate, or thermal sensation between the acetaminophen and placebo trials (p > 0.05). The results indicate oral acetaminophen reduces core temperature of humans exposed to an environment beneath the thermal neutral zone. These results suggest that acetaminophen may inhibit the thermogenic mechanisms required to regulate core temperature during exposure to sub-neutral environments. PMID:27014068

  19. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    temperature, heart rate, or thermal sensation between the acetaminophen and placebo trials (p > 0.05). The results indicate oral acetaminophen reduces core temperature of humans exposed to an environment beneath the thermal neutral zone. These results suggest that acetaminophen may inhibit the thermogenic mechanisms required to regulate core temperature during exposure to sub-neutral environments.

  20. Carrier-mediated mechanism for the biliary excretion of the quinolone antibiotic grepafloxacin and its glucuronide in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, H; Tsuji, A; Sugiyama, Y

    1998-03-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) has a comparatively greater hepatobiliary transport than other quinolone antibiotics. The biliary excretion mechanism of GPFX was investigated in a series of in vivo and in vitro studies with Sprague-Dawley rats and the mutant strain Eisai-hyperbilirubinemia rats (EHBR), which have a hereditary defect in their bile canalicular multispecific organic anion transport system (cMOAT). The biliary excretion of the parent drug in EHBR was 38% of that in normal rats, whereas the 3-glucuronide, a main metabolite of GPFX, was scarcely excreted into the bile in EHBR. To clarify the biliary excretion mechanism of GPFX, studies of uptake by bile canalicular membrane vesicle (CMV) were performed. ATP dependence was observed in the uptake of GPFX by CMV, although the extent was not very marked, whereas no ATP-dependent uptake was observed by CMV prepared from EHBR. An inhibition study of the ATP-dependent uptake of the glutathione conjugate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a typical substrate for cMOAT, was performed in order to differentiate among the affinities of six quinolone antibiotics for this transporter. All quinolone antibiotics inhibited the ATP-dependent uptake of DNP-SG with different half-inhibition concentrations (IC50), and GPFX had the lowest IC50 value. The uptake of GPFX-glucuronide by CMV from normal rats showed a marked ATP dependence, whereas there was little ATP-dependent uptake in EHBR. The K(m) value (7.2 microM) for the higher-affinity component of the glucuronide uptake was comparable to the Ki value (9.2 microM) of the glucuronide in terms of inhibition of the ATP-dependent uptake of DNP-SG, which indicates that DNP-SG and the glucuronide may share the same transporter, cMOAT. The Ki value of the glucuronide observed in this inhibition was less than 1/200 that of the parent, which suggests that the glucuronide had a much higher affinity than the parent drug. These results lead us to conclude that at least a part of the

  1. Safety and Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Neonates, Infants, Children, and Adolescents With Pain or Fever

    PubMed Central

    Zuppa, Athena F.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kenney, Brian F.; Kassir, Nastya; Mouksassi, Samer; Royal, Mike A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The administration of acetaminophen via the oral and rectal routes may be contraindicated in specific clinical settings. Intravenous administration provides an alternative route for fever reduction and analgesia. This phase 1 study of intravenous acetaminophen (Ofirmev, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA) in inpatient pediatric patients with pain or fever requiring intravenous therapy was designed to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of repeated doses over 48 hours. METHODS Neonates (full-term to 28 days) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 6 hours or 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Infants (29 days to <2 years), children (2 to <12 years) and adolescents (≥12 years) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 4 hours or 15 mg/kg every 6 hours. Both noncompartmental and population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approaches were used. Urinary metabolite data were analyzed, and safety and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS Pharmacokinetic parameters of acetaminophen were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with weight allometrically expressed on clearances and central and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vds). Postnatal age, with a maturation function, was a significant covariate on clearance. Total systemic normalized clearance was 18.4 L/hr per 70 kg, with a plateau reached at approximately 2 years. Total central and peripheral Vds of acetaminophen were 16 and 59.5 L/70 kg, respectively. The drug was well tolerated based on the incidence of adverse events. The primary and minor pathways of elimination were acetaminophen glucuronidation, sulfation, and glutathione conjugate metabolites across all age groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen in infants, children, and adolescents was well tolerated and achieved plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with labeled 15 mg/kg body weight doses by oral or rectal administration. PMID:22768009

  2. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  3. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  4. Altered regulation of hepatic efflux transporters disrupts acetaminophen disposition in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Canet, Mark J; Merrell, Matthew D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Bataille, Amy M; Campion, Sarah N; Ferreira, Daniel W; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Manautou, Jose E; A-Kader, H Hesham; Erickson, Robert P; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and healthy patients (n = 12) were recruited in a small pilot study design. All patients received a single 1000-mg dose of APAP. Blood and urine samples were collected at 1, 2, and 4 hours postdose, and APAP and APAP metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, human liver tissues from patients diagnosed with various stages of NAFLD were acquired from the Liver Tissue Cell Distribution System to investigate the regulation of the membrane transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 3 (MRP2 and MRP3, respectively). Patients with the more severe disease (i.e., NASH) had increased serum and urinary levels of APAP-glucuronide along with decreased serum levels of APAP-sulfate. Moreover, an induction of hepatic MRP3 and altered canalicular localization of the biliary efflux transporter, MRP2, describes the likely mechanism for the observed increase in plasma retention of APAP-glucuronide, whereas altered regulation of sulfur activation genes may explain decreased sulfonation activity in NASH. APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate disposition is altered in NASH and is likely due to hepatic membrane transporter dysregulation as well as altered intracellular sulfur activation.

  5. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  6. Cooperativity in CYP2E1 metabolism of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jessica H; Letzig, Lynda G; Roberts, Dean W; James, Laura P; Fifer, E Kim; Miller, Grover P

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessment for exposure to mixtures of drugs and pollutants relies heavily on in vitro characterization of their bioactivation and/or metabolism individually and extrapolation to mixtures assuming no interaction. Herein, we demonstrated that in vitro CYP2E1 metabolic activation of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures could not be explained through the Michaelis-Menten mechanism or any models relying on that premise. As a baseline for mixture studies with styrene, steady-state analysis of acetaminophen oxidation revealed a biphasic kinetic profile that was best described by negative cooperativity (Hill coefficient=0.72). The best-fit mechanism for this relationship involved two binding sites with differing affinities (Ks=830μM and Kss=32mM). Introduction of styrene inhibited that reaction less than predicted by simple competition and thus provided evidence for a cooperative mechanism within the mixture. Likewise, acetaminophen acted through a mixed-type inhibition mechanism to impact styrene epoxidation. In this case, acetaminophen competed with styrene for CYP2E1 (Ki=830μM and Ksi=180μM for catalytic and effector sites, respectively) and resulted in cooperative impacts on binding and catalysis. Based on modeling of in vivo clearance, cooperative interactions between acetaminophen and styrene resulted in profoundly increased styrene activation at low styrene exposure levels and therapeutic acetaminophen levels. Current Michaelis-Menten based toxicological models for mixtures such as styrene and acetaminophen would fail to detect this concentration-dependent relationship. Hence, future studies must assess the role of alternate CYP2E1 mechanisms in bioactivation of compounds to improve the accuracy of interpretations and predictions of toxicity. PMID:26225832

  7. Cooperativity in CYP2E1 metabolism of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jessica H; Letzig, Lynda G; Roberts, Dean W; James, Laura P; Fifer, E Kim; Miller, Grover P

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessment for exposure to mixtures of drugs and pollutants relies heavily on in vitro characterization of their bioactivation and/or metabolism individually and extrapolation to mixtures assuming no interaction. Herein, we demonstrated that in vitro CYP2E1 metabolic activation of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures could not be explained through the Michaelis-Menten mechanism or any models relying on that premise. As a baseline for mixture studies with styrene, steady-state analysis of acetaminophen oxidation revealed a biphasic kinetic profile that was best described by negative cooperativity (Hill coefficient=0.72). The best-fit mechanism for this relationship involved two binding sites with differing affinities (Ks=830μM and Kss=32mM). Introduction of styrene inhibited that reaction less than predicted by simple competition and thus provided evidence for a cooperative mechanism within the mixture. Likewise, acetaminophen acted through a mixed-type inhibition mechanism to impact styrene epoxidation. In this case, acetaminophen competed with styrene for CYP2E1 (Ki=830μM and Ksi=180μM for catalytic and effector sites, respectively) and resulted in cooperative impacts on binding and catalysis. Based on modeling of in vivo clearance, cooperative interactions between acetaminophen and styrene resulted in profoundly increased styrene activation at low styrene exposure levels and therapeutic acetaminophen levels. Current Michaelis-Menten based toxicological models for mixtures such as styrene and acetaminophen would fail to detect this concentration-dependent relationship. Hence, future studies must assess the role of alternate CYP2E1 mechanisms in bioactivation of compounds to improve the accuracy of interpretations and predictions of toxicity.

  8. A specific immunoassay for the determination of morphine and its glucuronides in human blood.

    PubMed

    Beike, J; Blaschke, G; Mertz, A; Köhler, H; Brinkmann, B

    1998-01-01

    The development of specific antisera for immunochemical determination of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide is described. Morphine was N-demethylated to normorphine and N-alkylated to give N-aminopropyl-normorphine as hapten for antisera against morphine. As haptens for antisera against morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide, N-aminopropyl-nor-morphine was glucuronidated in position 3 or 6 respectively. Each of these three haptens were coupled to BSA employing the glutaraldehyde method to obtain three different immunogens. Immunisation of rabbits with these conjugates gave anti-morphine, anti-morphine-3-glucuronide and anti-morphine-6-glucuronide antisera, which were tested in a competitive, heterogeneous radioimmunoassay. Tracers for this radioimmunoassay procedure were synthesised by substitution of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in position 2 with 125I and indirect iodination of the morphine-3-glucuronide hapten according to the method of Bolton and Hunter. The resulting antisera show very specific reactions with morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. Cross reactivities of each antiserum with structurally related opiates and opioides are very low. The cross reactivities of the anti-morphine antiserum against morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide or dihydrocodeine were less than 0.3%, the anti-morphine-3-glucuronide antiserum against morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide, codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide or dihydrocodeine less than 0.1% and the anti-morphine-6-glucuronide antiserum against morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, codeine or dihydrocodeine less than 0.1%, against codeine-6-glucuronide less than 2.3%. The determination of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide in blood samples (limit of detection= 3, 1, 0.5 ng/g) of nine cases of fatal heroin overdose with this radioimmunoassay method and the comparison with a GC/MS method is described.

  9. Identification and preliminary characterization of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases catalyzing formation of ethyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2014-04-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a minor metabolite of ethanol, is used as a marker of alcohol consumption in a variety of clinical and forensic settings. At present there are very few studies of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT), responsible for catalyzing EtG formation, and the possible effect of nutritional components, e.g. flavonoids, which are extensively glucuronidated, on EtG formation has not been addressed at all. The following incubation conditions were optimized with regard to previously published conditions: buffer, substrate concentration, and incubation time. Isolation of EtG from the incubation mixture was also optimized. Recombinant UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, 2B7, 2B10, 2B15) were screened for their activity towards ethanol, and kinetic data were then established for all enzymes. It was decided to study the effect of the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol on glucuronidation of ethanol. Isolation was by solid-phase extraction (SPE) to minimize matrix effects. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), with EtG-d5 as the internal standard. SPE was vital to avoid severe ion suppression after direct injection of the incubation solution. EtG formation was observed for all enzymes under investigation; their kinetics followed the Michaelis-Menten model, meaning the maximum reaction rate achieved at saturating substrate concentrations (V(max)) and the substrate concentration at which the reaction rate is half of V(max) (Michaelis-Menten constant, K(m)) could be calculated. The highest rate of glucuronidation was observed with UGT1A9 and 2B7. After co-incubation with both flavonoids, formation of EtG was significantly reduced for all enzymes except for UGT2B15, whose activity did not seem to be affected. Results reveal that multiple UGT isoforms are capable of catalyzing glucuronidation of ethanol; nevertheless, the effect of UGT polymorphism on glucuronidation of ethanol needs further study. Formation of Et

  10. Farnesol is glucuronidated in human liver, kidney and intestine in vitro, and is a novel substrate for UGT2B7 and UGT1A1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Farnesol is an isoprenoid found in many aromatic plants and is also produced in humans, where it acts on numerous nuclear receptors and has received considerable attention due to its apparent anticancer properties. Although farnesol has been studied for over 30 years, its metabolism has not been well characterized. Recently, farnesol was shown to be metabolized by cytochromes P450 in rabbit; however, neither farnesol hydroxylation nor glucuronidation in humans have been reported to date. In the present paper, we show for the first time that farnesol is metabolized to farnesyl glucuronide, hydroxyfarnesol and hydroxyfarnesyl glucuronide by human tissue microsomes, and we identify the specific human UGTs (uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases) involved. Farnesol metabolism was examined by a sensitive LC (liquid chromatography)–MS/MS method. Results indicate that farnesol is a good substrate for glucuronidation in human liver, kidney and intestine microsomes (values in nmol/min per mg). Initial analysis using expressed human UGTs indicated that UGTs 1A1 and 2B7 were primarily responsible for glucuronidation in vitro, with significantly lower activity for all the other UGTs tested (UGTs 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9 and 2B4). Kinetic analysis and inhibition experiments indicate that, in liver microsomes, UGT1A1 is primarily responsible for farnesol glucuronidation; however, in intestine microsomes, UGT2B7 is probably the major isoform involved, with a very-low-micromolar Km. We also show the first direct evidence that farnesol can be metabolized to hydroxyfarnesol by human liver microsomes and that hydroxyfarnesol is metabolized further to hydroxyfarnesyl glucuronide. Thus glucuronidation may modulate the physiological and/or pharmacological properties of this potent signalling molecule. PMID:15320866

  11. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862....3030 Acetaminophen test system. (a) Identification. An acetaminophen test system is a device intended to measure acetaminophen, an analgestic and fever reducing drug, in serum. Measurements obtained...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862....3030 Acetaminophen test system. (a) Identification. An acetaminophen test system is a device intended to measure acetaminophen, an analgestic and fever reducing drug, in serum. Measurements obtained...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862....3030 Acetaminophen test system. (a) Identification. An acetaminophen test system is a device intended to measure acetaminophen, an analgestic and fever reducing drug, in serum. Measurements obtained...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862....3030 Acetaminophen test system. (a) Identification. An acetaminophen test system is a device intended to measure acetaminophen, an analgestic and fever reducing drug, in serum. Measurements obtained...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862....3030 Acetaminophen test system. (a) Identification. An acetaminophen test system is a device intended to measure acetaminophen, an analgestic and fever reducing drug, in serum. Measurements obtained...

  16. Glutathione disulfide formation and oxidant stress during acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice in vivo: the protective effect of allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H

    1990-12-01

    Acetaminophen (500 mg/kg i.p.) induced hepatotoxicity in fasted ICR mice in vivo. Acetaminophen also caused a long-lasting 50% reduction of the hepatic ATP content, an irreversible loss of hepatic xanthine dehydrogenase activity and a transient increase of the xanthine oxidase activity. All effects occurred before parenchymal cell damage, i.e., the release of cellular enzymes. The hepatic content of GSH and GSSG was initially depleted by acetaminophen without affecting the GSSG:GSH ratio (1:200), however, during the recovery phase of the hepatic GSH levels the GSSG content increased faster than GSH, resulting in a GSSG:GSH ratio of 1:18 24 h after acetaminophen administration. The mitochondrial GSSG content increased from 2% in controls to greater than 20% in acetaminophen-treated mice. The extremely elevated tissue GSSG levels were accompanied by a 4-fold increase of the plasma GSSG concentrations but not by an enhanced biliary efflux, although hepatic GSSG formation and biliary excretion were not affected by acetaminophen. Allopurinol protected dose-dependently against acetaminophen-induced cell injury, the loss of ATP and the increase of the GSSG content in the total liver and in the mitochondrial compartment without inhibiting reactive metabolite formation. High, protective as well as low, nonprotective doses of allopurinol almost completely inhibited hepatic xanthine oxidase and dehydrogenase activity, but only high doses prevented the increase of the mitochondrial GSSG content. The data indicate a long-lasting, primarily intracellular oxidant stress during the progression phase of acetaminophen-induced cell necrosis. The protective effect of allopurinol is unlikely to involve the inhibition of reactive oxygen formation by xanthine oxidase but could be the result of its antioxidant property. PMID:2262912

  17. IN VITRO GLUCURONIDATION OF APREPITANT: A MODERATE INHIBITOR OF UGT2B7

    PubMed Central

    House, Larry; Ramirez, Jacqueline; Seminerio, Michael; Mirkov, Snezana; Ratain, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Aprepitant, an oral antiemetic, commonly used in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4. Aprepitant glucuronidation has yet to be evaluated in humans. The contribution of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms to the metabolism of aprepitant was investigated by performing kinetic studies, inhibition studies, and correlation analyses. In addition, aprepitant was evaluated as an inhibitor of UGTs.Glucuronidation of aprepitant was catalyzed by UGT1A4 (82%), UGT1A3 (12%), and UGT1A8 (6%) and Kms were 161.6 ± 15.6 µM, 69.4 ± 1.9 µM, and 197.1 ± 28.2 µM, respectively. Aprepitant glucuronidation was significantly correlated with both UGT1A4 substrates anastrazole and imipramine (rs = 0.77, P < 0.0001 for both substrates; n = 44), and with the UGT1A3 substrate thyroxine (rs = 0.58, P < 0.0001; n = 44).We found aprepitant to be a moderate inhibitor of UGT2B7 with a Ki of ~10 µM for 4-MU, morphine, and zidovudine. Our results suggest aprepitant can alter clearance of drugs primarily eliminated by UGT2B7. Given the likelihood for first-pass metabolism by intestinal UGT2B7, this is of particular concern for oral aprepitant co-administered with oral substrates of UGT2B7, such as zidovudine and morphine. PMID:26053558

  18. Determination of major UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes and their genotypes responsible for 20-HETE glucuronidation[S

    PubMed Central

    Jarrar, Yazun Bashir; Cha, Eun-Young; Seo, Kyung-Ah; Ghim, Jong-Lyul; Kim, Hyo-Ji; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Su-Jun; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2014-01-01

    The compound 20-HETE is involved in numerous physiological functions, including blood pressure and platelet aggregation. Glucuronidation of 20-HETE by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) is thought to be a primary pathway of 20-HETE elimination in humans. The present study identified major UGT enzymes responsible for 20-HETE glucuronidation and investigated their genetic influence on the glucuronidation reaction using human livers (n = 44). Twelve recombinant UGTs were screened to identify major contributors to 20-HETE glucuronidation. Based on these results, UGT2B7, UGT1A9, and UGT1A3 exhibited as major contributors to 20-HETE glucuronidation. The Km values of 20-HETE glucuronidation by UGT1A3, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 were 78.4, 22.2, and 14.8 μM, respectively, while Vmax values were 1.33, 1.78, and 1.62 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Protein expression levels and genetic variants of UGT1A3, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 were analyzed in human livers using Western blotting and genotyping, respectively. Glucuronidation of 20-HETE was significantly correlated with the protein levels of UGT2B7 (r2 = 0.33, P < 0.001) and UGT1A9 (r2 = 0.31, P < 0.001), but not UGT1A3 (r2 = 0.02, P > 0.05). A correlation between genotype and 20-HETE glucuronidation revealed that UGT2B7 802C>T, UGT1A9 −118T9>T10, and UGT1A9 1399T>C significantly altered 20-HETE glucuronide formation (P < 0.05–0.001). Increased levels of 20-HETE comprise a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and the present data may increase our understanding of 20-HETE metabolism and cardiovascular complications. PMID:25249502

  19. Transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide, estrone-3-sulfate and taurocholate across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane: evidence for different transport systems.

    PubMed

    Wlcek, Katrin; Hofstetter, Lia; Stieger, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Important reactions of drug metabolism, including UGT mediated glucuronidation and steroidsulfatase mediated hydrolysis of sulfates, take place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. Consequently, UGT generated glucuronides, like estradiol-17β-glucuronide, have to be translocated back into the cytoplasm to reach their site of excretion. Also steroidsulfatase substrates, including estrone-3-sulfate, have to cross the ER membrane to reach their site of hydrolysis. Based on their physicochemical properties such compounds are not favored for passive diffusion and therefore likely necessitate transport system(s) to cross the ER membrane in either direction. The current study aims to investigate the transport of taurocholate, estradiol-17β-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate in smooth (SER) and rough (RER) endoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from Wistar and TR(-) rat liver. Time-dependent and bidirectional transport was demonstrated for taurocholate, showing higher uptake rates in SER than RER vesicles. For estradiol-17β-glucuronide a fast time-dependent efflux with similar efficiencies from SER and RER but no clear protein-mediated uptake was shown, indicating an asymmetric transport system for this substrate. Estrone-3-sulfate uptake was time-dependent and higher in SER than in RER vesicles. Inhibition of steroidsulfatase mediated estrone-3-sulfate hydrolysis decreased estrone-3-sulfate uptake but had no effect on taurocholate or estradiol-17β-glucuronide transport. Based on inhibition studies and transport characteristics, three different transport mechanisms are suggested to be involved in the transport of taurocholate, estrone-3-sulfate and estradiol-17β-glucuronide across the ER membrane.

  20. Transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide, estrone-3-sulfate and taurocholate across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane: evidence for different transport systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Wlcek, Katrin; Hofstetter, Lia; Stieger, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Important reactions of drug metabolism, including UGT mediated glucuronidation and steroidsulfatase mediated hydrolysis of sulfates, take place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. Consequently, UGT generated glucuronides, like estradiol-17β-glucuronide, have to be translocated back into the cytoplasm to reach their site of excretion. Also steroidsulfatase substrates, including estrone-3-sulfate, have to cross the ER membrane to reach their site of hydrolysis. Based on their physicochemical properties such compounds are not favored for passive diffusion and therefore likely necessitate transport system(s) to cross the ER membrane in either direction. The current study aims to investigate the transport of taurocholate, estradiol-17β-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate in smooth (SER) and rough (RER) endoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from Wistar and TR− rat liver. Time-dependent and bidirectional transport was demonstrated for taurocholate, showing higher uptake rates in SER than RER vesicles. For estradiol-17β-glucuronide a fast time-dependent efflux with similar efficiencies from SER and RER but no clear protein-mediated uptake was shown, indicating an asymmetric transport system for this substrate. Estrone-3-sulfate uptake was time-dependent and higher in SER than in RER vesicles. Inhibition of steroidsulfatase mediated estrone-3-sulfate hydrolysis decreased estrone-3-sulfate uptake but had no effect on taurocholate or estradiol-17β-glucuronide transport. Based on inhibition studies and transport characteristics, three different transport mechanisms are suggested to be involved in the transport of taurocholate, estrone-3-sulfate and estradiol-17β-glucuronide across the ER membrane. PMID:24406246

  1. Glucuronidation of bavachinin by human tissues and expressed UGT enzymes: Identification of UGT1A1 and UGT1A8 as the major contributing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xia; Hou, Jie; Xia, Yang-Liu; Ning, Jing; He, Gui-Yuan; Wang, Ping; Ge, Guang-Bo; Xiu, Zhi-Long; Yang, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Bavachinin (BCI), a major bioactive compound in Chinese herbal Psoralea corylifolia, possesses a wide range of biological activities. In this study, the glucuronidation pathway of BCI was characterized for the first time, by using pooled human liver microsomes (HLM), pooled human intestine microsomes (HIM) and recombinant human UDP-glucosyltransferases (UGTs). One mono-glucuronide was detected in HLM in the presence of uridine-diphosphate glucuronic acid (UDPGA), and it was biosynthesized and well-characterized as BCI-4'-O-glucuronide (BCIG). Reaction phenotyping assay showed that UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT1A8 were involved in BCI-4'-O-glucuronidation, while UGT1A1 and UGT1A8 displayed the higher catalytic ability among all tested UGT isoforms. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that BCI-4'-O-glucuronidation in both HLM and UGT1A1 followed sigmoidal kinetic behaviors and displayed much close Km values (12.4 μM in HLM & 9.7 μM in UGT1A1). Both chemical inhibition assays and correlation analysis demonstrated that UGT1A1 displayed a predominant role in BCI-4'-O-glucuronidation in HLM. Both HIM and UGT1A8 exhibited substrate inhibition at high concentrations, and Km values of HIM and UGT1A8 were 3.6 and 2.3 μM, respectively. Similar catalytic efficiencies were observed for HIM (199.3 μL/min/mg) and UGT1A8 (216.2 μL/min/mg). These findings suggested that UGT1A1 and UGT1A8 were the primary isoforms involved in BCI-4'-O-glucuronidation in HLM, and HIM, respectively. PMID:26320626

  2. Involvement of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 in ethanol glucuronidation, and interactions with common drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Al Saabi, Alaa; Allorge, Delphine; Sauvage, François-Ludovic; Tournel, Gilles; Gaulier, Jean-Michel; Marquet, Pierre; Picard, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) determination is increasingly used in clinical and forensic toxicology to document ethanol consumption. The enzymes involved in EtG production, as well as potential interactions with common drugs of abuse, have not been extensively studied. Activities of human liver (HLM), kidney (HKM), and intestinal (HIM) microsomes, as well as of 12 major human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), toward ethanol (50 and 500 mM) were evaluated in vitro using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined for pooled microsomes and recombinant UGTs with significant activity. Individual contributions of UGTs were estimated using the relative activity factor approach, proposed for scaling activities obtained with cDNA-expressed enzymes to HLM. Interaction of morphine, codeine, lorazepam, oxazepam, nicotine, cotinine, cannabinol, and cannabidiol (5, 10, 15 mg/l) with ethanol (1.15, 4.6, 11.5 g/l; i.e., 25, 100, 250 mM) glucuronidation was assessed using pooled HLM. Ethanol glucuronidation intrinsic clearance (Cl(int)) was 4 and 12.7 times higher for HLM than for HKM and HIM, respectively. All recombinant UGTs, except UGT1A1, 1A6, and 1A10, produced EtG in detectable amounts. UGT1A9 and 2B7 were the most active enzymes, each accounting for 17 and 33% of HLM Cl(int), respectively. Only cannabinol and cannabidiol significantly affected ethanol glucuronidation. Cannabinol increased ethanol glucuronidation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas cannabidiol significantly inhibited EtG formation in a noncompetitive manner (IC(50) = 1.17 mg/l; inhibition constant (K(i)) = 3.1 mg/l). UGT1A9 and 2B7 are the main enzymes involved in ethanol glucuronidation. In addition, our results suggest that cannabinol and cannabidiol could significantly alter ethanol glucuronidation. PMID:23230132

  3. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md Aminul; Tanvir, E M; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  4. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md. Aminul; Tanvir, E. M.; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md. Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  5. The Social Side Effects of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischkowski, Dominik

    About 23% of all adults in the US take acetaminophen during an average week (Kaufman, Kelly, Rosenberg, Anderson, & Mitchell, 2002) because acetaminophen is an effective physical painkiller and easily accessible over the counter. The physiological side effects of acetaminophen are well documented and generally mild when acetaminophen is consumed in the appropriate dosage. In contrast, the psychological and social side effects of acetaminophen are largely unknown. Recent functional neuroimaging research suggests that the experience of physical pain is fundamentally related to the experience of empathy for the pain of other people, indicating that pharmacologically reducing responsiveness to physical pain also reduces cognitive, affective, and behavioral responsiveness to the pain of others. I tested this hypothesis across three double-blind between-subjects drug intervention studies. Two experiments showed that acetaminophen had moderate effects on empathic affect, specifically personal distress and empathic concern, and a small effect on empathic cognition, specifically perceived pain, when facing physical and social pain of others. The same two experiments and a third experiment also showed that acetaminophen can increase the willingness to inflict pain on other people, i.e., actual aggressive behavior. This effect was especially pronounced among people low in dispositional empathic concern. Together, these findings suggest that the physical pain system is more involved in the regulation of social cognition, affect, and behavior than previously assumed and that the experience of physical pain and responsiveness to the pain of others share a common neurochemical basis. Furthermore, these findings suggest that acetaminophen has unappreciated but serious social side effects, and that these side effects may depend on psychological characteristics of the drug consumer. This idea is consistent with recent theory and research on the context-dependency of neurochemical

  6. Acetaminophen toxicity with concomitant use of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Jickling, Glen; Heino, Angela; Ahmed, S Nizam

    2009-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic that can cause acute liver failure when consumed above a maximum daily dose. Certain patients may be at increased risk of hepatocellular damage even at conventional therapeutic doses. We report a case of a 34-year-old man on carbamazepine for complex partial seizures who developed acute liver and renal failure on less than 2.5 grams a day of acetaminophen. This raises caution that patients on carbamazepine should avoid chronic use of acetaminophen, and if required use at lower doses with vigilant monitoring for signs of liver damage.

  7. Synthesis, hydrolysis and stability of psilocin glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Lehr, Matthias; Köhler, Helga

    2014-04-01

    A two-step synthesis of psilocin glucuronide (PCG), the main metabolite of psilocin, with methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-isobutyryl-1-O-trichloroacetimidoyl-α-d-glucopyranuronate is reported. With the synthesized PCG, hydrolysis conditions in serum and urine were optimized. Escherichia coli proved to be a better enzyme source for β-glucuronidase than Helix pomatia. It was essential to add ascorbic acid to serum samples to protect psilocin during incubation. Furthermore the stability of PCG and psilocin was compared as stability data are the basis for forensic interpretation of measurements. PCG showed a greater long-term stability after six months in deep frozen serum and urine samples than psilocin. The short-term stability of PCG for one week in whole blood at room temperature and in deep frozen samples was also better than that of psilocin. Therefore, PCG can be considered to be more stable than the labile psilocin and should always be included if psilocin is analyzed in samples. PMID:24513688

  8. Synthesis, hydrolysis and stability of psilocin glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Lehr, Matthias; Köhler, Helga

    2014-04-01

    A two-step synthesis of psilocin glucuronide (PCG), the main metabolite of psilocin, with methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-isobutyryl-1-O-trichloroacetimidoyl-α-d-glucopyranuronate is reported. With the synthesized PCG, hydrolysis conditions in serum and urine were optimized. Escherichia coli proved to be a better enzyme source for β-glucuronidase than Helix pomatia. It was essential to add ascorbic acid to serum samples to protect psilocin during incubation. Furthermore the stability of PCG and psilocin was compared as stability data are the basis for forensic interpretation of measurements. PCG showed a greater long-term stability after six months in deep frozen serum and urine samples than psilocin. The short-term stability of PCG for one week in whole blood at room temperature and in deep frozen samples was also better than that of psilocin. Therefore, PCG can be considered to be more stable than the labile psilocin and should always be included if psilocin is analyzed in samples.

  9. Did acetaminophen provoke the autism epidemic?

    PubMed

    Good, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Schultz et al (2008) raised the question whether regression into autism is triggered, not by the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, but by acetaminophen (Tylenol) given for its fever and pain. Considerable evidence supports this contention, most notably the exponential rise in the incidence of autism since 1980, when acetaminophen began to replace aspirin for infants and young children. The impetus for this shift - a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warning that aspirin was associated with Reye's syndrome - has since been compellingly debunked. If aspirin is not to be feared as a cause of Reyes syndrome, and acetaminophen is to be feared as a cause of autism, can the autism epidemic be reversed by replacing acetaminophen with aspirin or other remedies?

  10. Acrolein, a highly toxic aldehyde generated under oxidative stress in vivo, aggravates the mouse liver damage after acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Arai, Tomoya; Koyama, Ryo; Yuasa, Makoto; Kitamura, Daisuke; Mizuta, Ryushin

    2014-01-01

    Although acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice has been extensively studied as a model of human acute drug-induced hepatitis, the mechanism of liver injury remains unclear. Liver injury is believed to be initiated by metabolic conversion of acetaminophen to the highly reactive intermediate N-acetyl p-benzoquinoneimine, and is aggravated by subsequent oxidative stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the hydroxyl radical (•OH). In this study, we found that a highly toxic unsaturated aldehyde acrolein, a byproduct of oxidative stress, has a major role in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Acetaminophen administration in mice resulted in liver damage and increased acrolein-protein adduct formation. However, both of them were decreased by treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA), two known acrolein scavengers. The specificity of NAC and MESNA was confirmed in cell culture, because acrolein toxicity, but not H2O2 or •OH toxicity, was inhibited by NAC and MESNA. These results suggest that acrolein may be more strongly correlated with acetaminophen-induced liver injury than ROS, and that acrolein produced by acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress can spread from dying cells at the primary injury site, causing damage to the adjacent cells and aggravating liver injury.

  11. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables.

  12. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables. PMID:26013309

  13. Detection of Acetaminophen-Protein Adducts in Decedents with Suspected Opioid-Acetaminophen Combination Product Overdose.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen C; Wilkins, Diana G; Curry, Steven C; Grey, Todd C; Andrenyak, David M; McGill, Lawrence D; Rollins, Douglas E

    2016-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the United States. Acetaminophen-protein adducts have been suggested as a biomarker of hepatotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether protein-derived acetaminophen-protein adducts are quantifiable in postmortem samples. Heart blood, femoral blood, and liver tissue were collected at autopsy from 22 decedents suspected of opioid-acetaminophen overdose. Samples were assayed for protein-derived acetaminophen-protein adducts, acetaminophen, and selected opioids found in combination products containing acetaminophen. Protein-derived APAP-CYS was detected in 17 of 22 decedents and was measurable in blood that was not degraded or hemolyzed. Heart blood concentrations ranged from 11 ng/mL (0.1 μM) to 7817 ng/mL (28.9 μM). Protein-derived acetaminophen-protein adducts were detectable in liver tissue for 20 of 22 decedents. Liver histology was also performed for all decedents, and no evidence of centrilobular hepatic necrosis was observed. PMID:27479586

  14. Hepatocyte cotransport of taurocholate and bilirubin glucuronides: Role of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.M.; Gollan, J.L. )

    1988-07-01

    Modulation of bile pigment excretion by bile salts has been attributed to modification of canalicular membrane transport or a physical interaction in bile. Based on the observation that a microtubule-dependent pathway is involved in the hepatocellular transport of bile salts, the authors investigated the possibility that bilirubin glucuronides are associated with bile salts during intracellular transport. Experiments were conducted in intact rats (basal) or after overnight biliary diversion and intravenous reinfusion of taurocholate (depleted/reinfused). All rats were pretreated with intravenous low-dose colchicine or its inactive isomer lumicolchicine. Biliary excretion of radiolabeled bilirubin glucuronides derived from tracer ({sup 14}C)bilirubin-({sup 3}H)bilirubin monoglucuronide (coinjected iv) was unchanged in basal rats but was consistently delayed in depleted/reinfused rats. This was accompanied by a significant shift toward bilirubin diglucuronide formation from both substrates. In basal Gunn rats, with deficient bilirubin glucuronidation, biliary excretion of intravenous ({sup 14}C)bilirubin monoglucuronide-({sup 3}H)bilirubin diglucuronide was unaffected by colchicine but was retarded in depleted/reinfused Gunn rats. Colchicine had no effect on the rate of bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro in rat liver microsomes. They conclude that a portion of the bilirubin glucuronides generated endogenously in hepatocytes or taken up directly from plasma may be cotransported with bile salts to the bile canalicular membrane via a microtubule-dependent mechanism.

  15. Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids But only association found, and researchers ... their child will develop behavioral problems such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. Acetaminophen is generally ...

  16. Effect of inducers and inhibitors of glucuronidation on the biliary excretion and choleretic action of valproic acid in the rat.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Klaassen, C D

    1982-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) induces an immediate choleresis in the rat which may be attributable to the osmotic properties of VPA-glucuronic acid conjugates in bile. The influence of inducers and inhibitors of glucuronidation of VPA on the biliary excretion and choleretic effect of VPA was studied. Hepatic UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity toward VPA was determined in vitro. Pretreatment with phenobarbital (75 mg/kg/day for 4 days) enhanced VPA glucuronidation; borneol (750 mg/kg) decreased VPA conjugation; 3-methylcholanthrene (20 mg/kg/day for 4 days) and galactosamine (600 mg/kg) had no effect on glucuronidation of VPA in vitro. Hepatic UDP-glucuronic acid content was decreased by borneol and galactosamine administration and was enhanced by phenobarbital and 3-methylcholanthrene pretreatment. The enzyme inducers increased the plasma disappearance of VPA in vivo but did not augment its biliary excretion or choleretic effect. Borneol and galactosamine, which inhibited the conjugation and plasma disappearance of VPA, decreased its biliary excretion and inhibited the VPA-induced increase in bile flow. Thus, the bile flow rate after VPA administration is closely related to the excretion of VPA-glucuronic acid. These data support the conclusion that the choleretic effect of VPA is due to the osmotic activity of VPA conjugates in bile.

  17. Microvascular protective activity of flavonoid glucuronides fraction from Tulipa gesneriana.

    PubMed

    Budzianowski, J; Korzeniowska, K; Chmara, E; Mrozikiewicz, A

    1999-03-01

    A mixture of flavonoid glucuronides, consisting of 7-O-glucuronides of kaempferol and quercetin 3-O-rutinosides, 3-O-gentiobiosides and 3-O-glucosides, was isolated from the perianths of Tulipa gesneriana L. var. 'Paradae'. It showed protective activity against the increased (both chloroform and histamine) skin vascular permeability in rabbits. The protective effect, measured as the reduction in leakage of Evans blue, was 59.8% after peritoneal treatment at a dose of 25 mg/kg, while that of troxerutin was 45.5%.

  18. Inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin on β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation of mycophenolic acid glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Kodawara, Takaaki; Masuda, Satohiro; Yano, Yoshitaka; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Masada, Mikio

    2014-07-01

    The interaction between mycophenolate (MPA) and quinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin is considered to reduce the enterohepatic recycling of MPA, which is biotransformed in the intestine from MPA glucuronide (MPAG) conjugate excreted via the biliary system; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this biotransformation of MPA is still unclear. In this study, an in vitro system was established to evaluate β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation and to examine the influence of ciprofloxacin on the enzymatic deconjugation of MPAG and MPA resynthesis. Resynthesis of MPA via deconjugation of MPAG increased in a time-dependent manner from 5 to 60 min in the presence of β-glucuronidase. Ciprofloxacin and phenolphthalein-β-d-glucuronide (PhePG), a typical β-glucuronidase substrate, significantly decreased the production of MPA from MPAG in the β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation system. In addition, enoxacin significantly inhibited the production of MPA from MPAG, while levofloxacin and ofloxacin had no inhibitory effect on MPA synthesis. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on MPA production from MPAG via β-glucuronidase with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) value of 30.4 µm. While PhePG inhibited the β-glucuronidase-mediated production of MPA from MPAG in a competitive manner, ciprofloxacin inhibited MPA synthesis via noncompetitive inhibition. These findings suggest that the reduction in the serum MPA concentration during the co-administration of ciprofloxacin is at least in part due to the decreased enterohepatic circulation of MPA because of noncompetitive inhibition of deconjugation of MPAG by intestinal β-glucuronidase.

  19. Quantitation of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine Glucuronide, Norbuprenorphine Glucuronide, and Naloxone in Urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Some formulations of buprenorphine also contain naloxone to discourage misuse. The major metabolite of buprenorphine is norbuprenorphine. Both compounds are pharmacologically active and both are extensively metabolized to their glucuronide conjugates, which are also active metabolites. Direct quantitation of the glucuronide conjugates in conjunction with free buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone in urine can distinguish compliance with prescribed therapy from specimen adulteration intended to mimic compliance with prescribed buprenorphine. This chapter quantitates buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, their glucuronide conjugates and naloxone directly in urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine is pretreated with formic acid and undergoes solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26660175

  20. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  1. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  2. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  3. PRACTICAL PREPARATION OF RESVERATROL 3-O-β-D-GLUCURONIDE

    PubMed Central

    Jungong, Christian S.; Novikov, Alexei V.

    2012-01-01

    A practical synthesis of resveratrol 3-O-β-D-glucuronide, suitable for preparation of large quantities, was developed using selective deacetylation of resveratrol triacetate with ammonium acetate. A simplified procedure for large scale preparation of resveratrol is also reported. PMID:22919115

  4. Fate of glucuronide conjugated estradiol in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate and transport of conjugated reproductive hormones, which are polar compared to parent hormones, are little understood. Laboratory bench-scale soil (Hamar; Sandy, mixed, frigid typic Endoaquolls) sorption studies were conducted using [14C] 17ß-estradiol-3-glucuronide for a range of concentra...

  5. Decreased Expression of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) Leads to Reduced Glucuronidation of Flavonoids in UGT1A1-Overexpressing HeLa Cells: The Role of Futile Recycling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the role of futile recycling (or deglucuronidation) in the disposition of two flavonoids (i.e., genistein and apigenin) was explored using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells). Glucuronidation of the flavonoids by HeLa1A1 cell lysate followed the substrate inhibition kinetics (Vmax = 0.10 nmol/min/mg, Km = 0.54 μM, and Ksi = 2.0 μM for genistein; Vmax = 0.19 nmol/min/mg, Km = 0.56 μM, and Ksi = 3.7 μM for apigenin). Glucuronide was efficiently generated and excreted after incubation of the cells with the aglycone (at doses of 1.25-20 nmol). The excretion rates were 0.40-0.69 and 0.84-1.1 nmol/min/mg protein for genistein glucuronide (GG) and apigenin glucuronide (AG), respectively. Furthermore, glucuronide excretion and total glucuronidation were significantly reduced in MRP4 knocked-down as compared to control cells. The alterations were well characterized by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model incorporating the process of futile recycling (defined by a first-order rate constant, Kde). The derived Kde values were 15 and 25 h(-1) for GG and AG, respectively. This was well consistent with the in vitro observation that AG was subjected to more efficient futile recycling compared to GG. In conclusion, futile recycling was involved in cellular glucuronidation, accounting for transporter-dependent glucuronidation of flavonoids.

  6. Enantiomer selective glucuronidation of the non-steroidal pure anti-androgen bicalutamide by human liver and kidney: role of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A9 enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Laurent; Campeau, Anne-Sophie; Caron, Sarah; Morin, Frédéric-Alexandre; Meunier, Kim; Trottier, Jocelyn; Caron, Patrick; Verreault, Mélanie; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Bicalutamide (Casodex®) is a non-steroidal pure anti-androgen used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. It is a racemate drug and its activity resides in the (R)-enantiomer, with little in the (S)-enantiomer. A major metabolic pathway for bicalutamide is glucuronidation catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. While (S)bicalutamide is directly glucuronidated, (R)bicalutamide requires hydroxylation prior to glucuronidation. The contribution of human tissues and UGT isoforms in the metabolism of these enantiomers has not been extensively investigated. In this study, both (R) and/or (S)bicalutamide were converted into glucuronide (-G) derivatives following incubation of pure and racemic solutions with microsomal extracts from human liver and kidney. Intestinal microsomes exhibited only low reactivity with these substrates. Km values of liver and kidney samples for (S)bicalutamide glucuronidation were similar, and lower than values obtained with the (R)-enantiomer. Among the 16 human UGTs tested, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 were able to form both (S) and (R)bicalutamide-G from pure or racemic substrates. UGT2B7 was also able to form (R)bicalutamide-G. Kinetic parameters of the recombinant UGT2B7, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 enzymes support a predominant role of the UGT1A9 isoform in bicalutamide metabolism. Accordingly, (S)bicalutamide inhibited the ability of human liver and kidney microsomes to glucuronidate the UGT1A9 probe substrate, propofol. In conclusion, the present study provides the first comprehensive analysis of in vitro bicalutamide glucuronidation by human tissues and UGTs, and identifies UGT1A9 as a major contributor for (R) and (S) glucuronidation in the human liver and kidney. PMID:23527766

  7. CM2 antigen, a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on rat hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, J; Zhou, X; Li, J; Shi, Y; Han, Z; Wang, X; Li, S; Yang, Z; Wang, R; Fan, D; Han, Y

    2012-06-29

    The polarized molecules predominately distributing at hepatocyte canalicular surface play a vital role in disclosing the process of bile formation and etiopathogenisis of cholestatic live diseases. Therefore, it is important to find novel polarized molecules on hepatocyte canalicular membrane. In the present study, canalicular membrane vesicles (CMVs) isolated from rat hepatocyte by density gradient centrifugation were used as immunogens to produce hybridoma and 46 strains of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against CMVs were obtained. With a series of morphological assay methods, including immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscope, the antigens recognized by canalicular mAb1 (CM1) and canalicular mAb2 (CM2) were confirmed to predominately distribute at hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Transport activity assay revealed that CM2 could inhibit ATP-dependent E217βG uptake of rat hepatocyte CMVs. Meanwhile, Western blotting analysis showed that the molecular mass of CM2 antigen was approximately 110kDa, which was much less than Mr 180kDa of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) involved in glucuronide transport. These data indicated that CM2 antigen might be a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on the hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

  8. UGT1A6 and UGT2B15 Polymorphisms and Acetaminophen Conjugation in Response to a Randomized, Controlled Diet of Select Fruits and Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Chen, Yu; Li, Lin; Li, Shuying S.; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Schwarz, Yvonne; King, Irena B.; Potter, John D.; Bigler, Jeannette

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation is thought to occur mainly by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) in the UGT1A family. Interindividual variation in APAP glucuronidation is attributed in part to polymorphisms in UGT1As. However, evidence suggests that UGT2B15 may also be important. We evaluated, in a controlled feeding trial, whether APAP conjugation differed by UGT1A6 and UGT2B15 genotypes and whether supplementation of known dietary inducers of UGT (crucifers, soy, and citrus) modulated APAP glucuronidation compared with a diet devoid of fruits and vegetables (F&V). Healthy adults (n = 66) received 1000 mg of APAP orally on days 7 and 14 of each 2-week feeding period and collected saliva and urine over 12 h. Urinary recovery of the percentage of the APAP dose as free APAP was higher (P = 0.02), and the percentage as APAP glucuronide (APAPG) was lower (P = 0.004) in women. The percentage of APAP was higher among UGT1A6*1/*1 genotypes, relative to *1/*2 and *2/*2 genotypes (P = 0.045). For UGT2B15, the percentage of APAPG decreased (P < 0.0001) and that of APAP sulfate increased (P = 0.002) in an allelic dose-dependent manner across genotypes from *1/*1 to *2/*2. There was a significant diet × UGT2B15 genotype interaction for the APAPG ratio (APAPG/total metabolites × 100) (P = 0.03), with *1/*1 genotypes having an approximately 2-fold higher F&V to basal diet difference in response compared with *1/*2 and *2/*2 genotypes. Salivary APAP maximum concentration (Cmax) was significantly higher in women (P = 0.0003), with F&V (P = 0.003), and among UGT1A6*2/*2 and UGT2B15*1/*2 genotypes (P = 0.02 and 0.002, respectively). APAP half-life was longer in UGT2B15*2/*2 genotypes with F&V (P = 0.009). APAP glucuronidation was significantly influenced by the UGT2B15*2 polymorphism, supporting a role in vivo for UGT2B15 in APAP glucuronidation, whereas the contribution of UGT1A6*2 was modest. Selected F&V known to affect UGT activity led to greater glucuronidation and less

  9. Crystallisation of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the presence of structurally related substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriksen, Barry A.; Grant, David J. W.; Meenan, Paul; Green, Daniel A.

    1998-02-01

    Paracetamol was crystallised from aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of structurally related compounds. Crystal shape was characterised by image analysis and the additive concentration incorporated into the crystals determined by HPLC. The crystal structure of pure acetaminophen displays a hydrogen bonded network, from which is derived a mechanistic interpretation of the abilities of additive molecules to influence crystal growth. This structural approach was used to explain the observed additive uptake, the morphological changes, and the previously reported inhibition of nucleation.

  10. Removal of acetaminophen and naproxen by combined coagulation and adsorption using biochar: influence of combined sewer overflow components.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Oh, Jeill; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-07-01

    The combined coagulation and adsorption of targeted acetaminophen and naproxen using activated biochar and aluminum sulfate were studied under various synthetic "combined sewer overflow" (CSO) conditions. The biochar demonstrated better adsorption performance for both acetaminophen and naproxen (removal, 94.1 and 97.7%, respectively) than that of commercially available powdered activated carbon (removal, 81.6 and 94.1%, respectively) due to superior carbonaceous structure and surface properties examined by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The adsorption of naproxen was more favorable, occupying active adsorption sites on the adsorbents by naproxen due to its higher adsorption affinity compared to acetaminophen. Three classified CSO components (i.e., representing hydrophobic organics, hydrophilic organics, and inorganics) played different roles in the adsorption of both adsorbates, resulted in inhibition by humic acid complexation or metal ligands and negative electrostatic repulsion under adsorption and coagulation combined system. Adsorption alone with biochar was determined to be the most effective adsorptive condition for the removal of both acetaminophen and naproxen under various CSO conditions, while both coagulation alone and combined adsorption and coagulation failed to remove the acetaminophen and naproxen adequately due to an increase in ionic strength in the presence of spiked aluminum species derived from the coagulant.

  11. Removal of acetaminophen and naproxen by combined coagulation and adsorption using biochar: influence of combined sewer overflow components.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Oh, Jeill; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-07-01

    The combined coagulation and adsorption of targeted acetaminophen and naproxen using activated biochar and aluminum sulfate were studied under various synthetic "combined sewer overflow" (CSO) conditions. The biochar demonstrated better adsorption performance for both acetaminophen and naproxen (removal, 94.1 and 97.7%, respectively) than that of commercially available powdered activated carbon (removal, 81.6 and 94.1%, respectively) due to superior carbonaceous structure and surface properties examined by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The adsorption of naproxen was more favorable, occupying active adsorption sites on the adsorbents by naproxen due to its higher adsorption affinity compared to acetaminophen. Three classified CSO components (i.e., representing hydrophobic organics, hydrophilic organics, and inorganics) played different roles in the adsorption of both adsorbates, resulted in inhibition by humic acid complexation or metal ligands and negative electrostatic repulsion under adsorption and coagulation combined system. Adsorption alone with biochar was determined to be the most effective adsorptive condition for the removal of both acetaminophen and naproxen under various CSO conditions, while both coagulation alone and combined adsorption and coagulation failed to remove the acetaminophen and naproxen adequately due to an increase in ionic strength in the presence of spiked aluminum species derived from the coagulant. PMID:25680690

  12. Dimerization of human uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase allozymes 1A1 and 1A9 alters their quercetin glucuronidation activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Ling-Min; Gao, Zhang-Zhao; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Hong-Ying; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) is a major phase II drug-metabolism enzyme superfamily involved in the glucuronidation of endobiotics and xenobiotics in humans. Many polymorphisms in UGT1A genes are reported to inhibit or decrease UGT1A activity. In this study, two UGT1A1 allozymes, UGT1A1 wild-type and a splice mutant, as well as UGT1A9 wild-type and its three UGT1A9 allozymes, UGT1A9*2(C3Y), UGT1A9*3(M33T), and UGT1A9*5(D256N) were single- or double-expressed in a Bac-to-Bac expression system. Dimerization of UGT1A1 or UGT1A9 allozymes was observed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. SNPs of UGT1A altered the ability of protein-protein interaction, resulting in differential FRET efficiencies and donor-acceptor r distances. Dimerization changed the chemical regioselectivity, substrate-binding affinity, and enzymatic activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in glucuronidation of quercetin. These findings provide molecular insights into the consequences of homozygous and heterozygous UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 allozymes expression on quercetin glucuronidation. PMID:27025983

  13. Dimerization of human uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase allozymes 1A1 and 1A9 alters their quercetin glucuronidation activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Ling-Min; Gao, Zhang-Zhao; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Hong-Ying; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) is a major phase II drug-metabolism enzyme superfamily involved in the glucuronidation of endobiotics and xenobiotics in humans. Many polymorphisms in UGT1A genes are reported to inhibit or decrease UGT1A activity. In this study, two UGT1A1 allozymes, UGT1A1 wild-type and a splice mutant, as well as UGT1A9 wild-type and its three UGT1A9 allozymes, UGT1A9*2(C3Y), UGT1A9*3(M33T), and UGT1A9*5(D256N) were single- or double-expressed in a Bac-to-Bac expression system. Dimerization of UGT1A1 or UGT1A9 allozymes was observed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. SNPs of UGT1A altered the ability of protein-protein interaction, resulting in differential FRET efficiencies and donor-acceptor r distances. Dimerization changed the chemical regioselectivity, substrate-binding affinity, and enzymatic activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in glucuronidation of quercetin. These findings provide molecular insights into the consequences of homozygous and heterozygous UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 allozymes expression on quercetin glucuronidation. PMID:27025983

  14. [Use of acetaminophen in the community].

    PubMed

    Guberman, D

    1990-01-01

    Acetaminophen (Acamol) is one of the most widely used medications in children. The recommended dose is 10-15 mg/kg every 4 hours, and up to 5 doses a day. In a prospective study in an outpatient clinic, 101 parents of children 5 years old or younger were asked to describe their use of acetaminophen for their children, including dose, mode administration and maximal frequency of administration for fever. 2/3 used the syrup and 1/3 used suppositories. The average single dose was 13.8 +/- 5.5 mg/kg. Only 61% of the children received reasonable quantities of acetaminophen per dose. While 12% got an overdose of 20 mg/kg or more, 27% got an underdose of less than 10 mg/kg. Treatment was as often as every 2-3 hours in 13% of the children but only once every 8-24 hours in 22%. To overcome inadequate administration of acetaminophen, parents must be properly educated. PMID:2303194

  15. Magnetic beads as an extraction medium for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and structurally related compounds in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bylda, Caroline; Velichkova, Vanya; Bolle, Jens; Thiele, Roland; Kobold, Uwe; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a sample preparation method that complements a previously published liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for acetaminophen and eight structurally-related compounds in human serum (C. Bylda, R. Thiele, U. Kobold, D.A. Volmer. Drug Test. Anal. 2014, 6, 451). The analytes (acetaminophen [APAP] + metabolites acetaminophen-glucuronide [APG], -cysteine [APC], -mercapturate [APM] and -cysteine [APC], structurally similar analogues phenacetin and p-phenetidine, as well as tricyclic antidepressants imipramine and amitryptiline) were extracted from serum using magnetized hyper-crosslinked polystyrene particles. The sample preparation protocol was developed by means of a design of experiments (DoE) statistical approach. Using three representative compounds from the analyte panel with different polarities (high, medium, and low), two screening designs were used to identify factors that exhibited significant impact on recovery of the analytes. These parameters were then optimized to permit extraction of the complete target panel exhibiting a broad range of chemical polarities. Liquid chromatographic separations were achieved by gradient elution using a pentafluorphenyl column with subsequent detection by electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method was linear over the range 0.1-100 µg/mL for APAP, APG, p-phenetidine and phenacetin, 0.03-50 µg/mL for APS, and 0.01-10 µg/mL for APM, APC, imipramine and amitriptyline, with R(2)  > 0.99. The assay exhibited good precision with CVs ranging from 2 to 9% for all analytes; the accuracy was assessed by comparing two LC-MS/MS methods using a set of 68 patient samples.

  16. Effects of mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine (the alkaloids of Mitragyna speciosa Korth) on 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronidation in rat and human liver microsomes and recombinant human uridine 5’-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Haron, Munirah; Ismail, Sabariah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glucuronidation catalyzed by uridine 5’- diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is a major phase II drug metabolism reaction which facilitates drug elimination. Inhibition of UGT activity can cause drug-drug interaction. Therefore, it is important to determine the inhibitory potentials of drugs on glucuronidation. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the inhibitory potentials of mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine, ketamine and buprenorphine, respectively on 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation in rat liver microsomes, human liver microsomes and recombinant human UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 isoforms. Materials and Methods: The effects of the above four compounds on the formation of 4-MU glucuronide from 4-MU by rat liver microsomes, human liver microsomes, recombinant human UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 isoforms were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Results: For rat liver microsomes, ketamine strongly inhibited 4-MU glucuronidation with an IC50 value of 6.21 ± 1.51 μM followed by buprenorphine with an IC50 value of 73.22 ± 1.63 μM. For human liver microsomes, buprenorphine strongly inhibited 4-MU glucuronidation with an IC50 value of 6.32 ± 1.39 μM. For human UGT1A1 isoform, 7-hydroxymitragynine strongly inhibited 4-MU glucuronidation with an IC50 value of 7.13 ± 1.16 μM. For human UGT2B7 isoform, buprenorphine strongly inhibited 4-MU glucuronidation followed by 7-hydroxymitragynine and ketamine with respective IC50 values of 5.14 ± 1.30, 26.44 ± 1.31, and 27.28 ± 1.18 μM. Conclusions: These data indicate the possibility of drug-drug interaction if 7-hydroxymitragynine, ketamine, and buprenorphine are co-administered with drugs that are UGT2B7 substrates since these three compounds showed significant inhibition on UGT2B7 activity. In addition, if 7-hydroxymitragynine is to be taken with other drugs that are highly metabolized by UGT1A1, there is a possibility of drug-drug interaction to occur. PMID

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial on Analgesic Effects of Intravenous Acetaminophen versus Dexamethasone after Pediatric Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud Reza; Sedaghat, Minow

    2013-01-01

    Background A few studies are available actually comparing the clinical efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen with other medications such as dexamethasone to inhibit postoperative adverse events in children. Objectives This randomized blinded controlled trial was designed to compare controlling status of postoperative events in children after tonsillectomy randomized to receive either intravenous acetaminophen or dexamethasone. Patients and Methods Eighty four children aged between 4 to 13 undergoing tonsillectomy were randomized using a computer-generated schedule to double-blind treatment with intravenous acetaminophen (15 mg/kg) or intravenous dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg). Children were post-operatively assessed for swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, and postoperative sore throat in recovery room (within one hour after surgery), at the time of admission to the ward, as well as at 12 and 24 hours after surgery, assessed by the objective pain scoring system (OPS; minimum score: 0 = no pain, maximum score: 10 = extreme pain). Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the severity of postoperative pain due to swallowing or opening mouth measured at the different study time points from postoperative recovery to 24 hours after the surgery. There was no difference in ear pain severity at the time of postoperative recovery, at the admission time to ward and also at 12 hours after surgery; however mean score of ear pain severity was significantly higher in those who administered acetaminophen 24 hours after operation. Also, the mean score severity of sore throat was significantly higher in the acetaminophen compared with the dexamethasone group within 12 hours of surgery. Postoperative vomiting and bleeding were similarly observed between the two study groups. The severity of swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, as well as postoperative sore throat as gradually assuaged within 24 hours of

  18. [Detection and application of ethyl glucuronide in forensic toxicology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Zhuo, Xian-yi; Shen, Bao-hua

    2009-02-01

    Ethyl glucuronide is a specific metabolite of ethanol. There have been plenty of articles referring its pharmacokinetics, detection and application as a specific bio-marker of alcohol intake. This article reviews various analytical methods of EtG, relationship between EtG quantification and ethanol intake, and criteria for determining chronic alcohol abuse, and origin of ethanol found in the cadavers by EtG analysis. EtG has its potential application in forensic toxicology. PMID:19397218

  19. Influence of organic amendment on fate of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Juying; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Land application of biosolids or compost constitutes an important route of soil contamination by emerging contaminants such as acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole. Using (14)C labeling, we evaluated the influence of biosolids and compost on individual fate processes of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil. The amendment of biosolids or compost consistently inhibited the mineralization of both compounds but simultaneously enhanced the dissipation of their extractable residues or parent form. Immediately after treatment, the majority of (14)C-residue became non-extractable, reaching 80.3-92.3% of the applied amount at the end of 84-d incubation. Addition of biosolids or compost appreciably accelerated the formation of bound residue, likely due to the fact that the organic material provided additional sites for binding interactions or introduced exogenous microorganisms facilitating chemical transformations. This effect of biosolids or compost should be considered in risk assessment of these and other emerging contaminants. PMID:26301692

  20. Influence of organic amendment on fate of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Juying; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Land application of biosolids or compost constitutes an important route of soil contamination by emerging contaminants such as acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole. Using (14)C labeling, we evaluated the influence of biosolids and compost on individual fate processes of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil. The amendment of biosolids or compost consistently inhibited the mineralization of both compounds but simultaneously enhanced the dissipation of their extractable residues or parent form. Immediately after treatment, the majority of (14)C-residue became non-extractable, reaching 80.3-92.3% of the applied amount at the end of 84-d incubation. Addition of biosolids or compost appreciably accelerated the formation of bound residue, likely due to the fact that the organic material provided additional sites for binding interactions or introduced exogenous microorganisms facilitating chemical transformations. This effect of biosolids or compost should be considered in risk assessment of these and other emerging contaminants.

  1. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks.

    PubMed

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic-antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  2. [A Case of Acetaminophen Poisoning Associated with Tramcet Overdose].

    PubMed

    Urabe, Shigehiko; Terao, Yoshiaki; Tuji, Tikako; Egashira, Takashi; Goto, Shino; Fukusaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tramcet is a mixture of tramadol and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen poisoning may be caused by excessive intake of Tramcet. A 17-year-old female took excessive quantity of Tramcet before noon. She reported it herself in the emergency room. Her main complaint was nausea and dizziness. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage with dose-dependent manner. Because there was a possibility of acetaminophen poisoning, we started oral acetylcysteine. She was discharged from hospital 5 days later without side effects of acetylecysteine and liver damage. PMID:27483669

  3. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  4. [A Case of Acetaminophen Poisoning Associated with Tramcet Overdose].

    PubMed

    Urabe, Shigehiko; Terao, Yoshiaki; Tuji, Tikako; Egashira, Takashi; Goto, Shino; Fukusaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tramcet is a mixture of tramadol and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen poisoning may be caused by excessive intake of Tramcet. A 17-year-old female took excessive quantity of Tramcet before noon. She reported it herself in the emergency room. Her main complaint was nausea and dizziness. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage with dose-dependent manner. Because there was a possibility of acetaminophen poisoning, we started oral acetylcysteine. She was discharged from hospital 5 days later without side effects of acetylecysteine and liver damage.

  5. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  6. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  7. Simultaneous quantification of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine glucuronide, and norbuprenorphine glucuronide in human placenta by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    A LCMS method was developed and validated for the determination of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine glucuronide (BUP-Gluc), and norbuprenorphine glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) in placenta. Quantification was achieved by selected ion monitoring of m/z 468.4 (BUP), 414.3 (NBUP), 644.4 (BUP-Gluc), and 590 (NBUP-Gluc). BUP and NBUP were identified monitoring MS2 fragments m/z 396, 414 and 426 for BUP, and 340, 364 and 382 for NBUP, and glucuronide conjugates monitoring MS3 fragments m/z 396 and 414 for BUP-Gluc, and 340 and 382 for NBUP-Gluc. Linearity was 1–50 ng/g. Intra-day, inter-day and total assay imprecision (% RSD) were <13.4%, and analytical recoveries were 96.2–113.1%. Extraction efficiencies ranged from 40.7–68%, process efficiencies 38.8–70.5%, and matrix effect 1.3–15.4%. Limits of detection were 0.8 ng/g for all compounds. An authentic placenta from an opioid-dependent pregnant woman receiving BUP pharmacotherapy was analyzed. BUP was not detected but metabolite concentrations were NBUP-Gluc 46.6, NBUP 15.7 and BUP-Gluc 3.2 ng/g. PMID:19247639

  8. Enzyme-assisted synthesis and structural characterization of the 3-, 8-, and 15-glucuronides of deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Silvio; Ivanova, Lada; Fæste, Christiane Kruse

    2013-02-27

    4-Deoxynivalenol is one of the most prevalent mycotoxins in grain-based food and feed products worldwide. Conjugation of deoxynivalenol to glucuronic acid and elimination via the urine appears to be the major metabolism pathway, although with differing efficiency in different species. In order to make pure deoxynivalenol glucuronides for analytical methodologies available we intended to enzymatically synthesize glucuronides of deoxynivalenol using rat and human liver microsomes supplemented with uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid and alamethicin as detergent. Three glucuronides were isolated and purified using solid-phase extraction of microsomal incubations and subsequent semipreparative hydrophilic interaction chromatography. NMR spectra were obtained for all three compounds from solutions in methanol, showing that deoxynivalenol 3-O-β-D-glucuronide and deoxynivalenol 15-O-β-D-glucuronide were the major products from incubations of deoxynivalenol with rat and human liver microsomes, respectively. The NMR spectra of a third glucuronide showed replacement of the C-8 carbonyl by a ketal carbon. This glucuronide was finally identified as deoxynivalenol 8-O-β-D-glucuronide. The present study provides unequivocal structural evidence for three glucuronides of deoxynivalenol formed by liver enzymes.

  9. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary.

  10. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary. PMID:27448313

  11. Optimization in development of acetaminophen syrup formulation.

    PubMed

    Worakul, Nimit; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2002-03-01

    Formulation of acetaminophen syrup could be developed by an optimization technique to reduce the time and cost of study. Cosolvents were used in the formulation because of the low solubility of acetaminophen in water. They were composed of polyethylene glycol 4000, propylene glycol, sorbitol solution, and glycerin. Their effects on the solubility of acetaminophen and the pH of formulations were investigated. Effects on taste and price were calculated based on their properties. Simulation study of the effect of cosolvents upon the formulation scores was performed, using an algorithm based upon a simulated annealing concept to achieve the global optima and heuristic optimization concept to accelerate convergence. The program written as a Visual Basic module within Microsoft Access 97 was used to simulate and assess the optimal cosolvent amounts to achieve the most desirable formulations automatically according to the specified criteria. Formulators could customize the optimal formulation according to their needs and cost constraints by redefining the desirable outcomes in the source code of the program. PMID:12026227

  12. Establishment of a model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Tokuno, M; Yamasaki, K; Kadowaki, D; Seo, H; Otagiri, M

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, has the potential to cause lethal hepatotoxicity. Mice are widely used for developing murine models of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and many researchers have used these models for APAP-related studies including the fields of biology, pharmacology and toxicology. Although drug-induced hepatotoxicity is dependent on a number of factors (species, gender and age), very few studies have investigated the effect of aging on APAP hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of age on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged mice to establish a model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity that is an accurate reflection of general experimental conditions. Male ICR mice 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks old were given APAP intraperitoneally, and mortality, hepatic damage and the plasma concentration of APAP metabolites were evaluated. It was found that younger male ICR mice were relatively resistant to hepatotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal APAP administration. In addition, the APAP-glucuronide concentration in plasma remained essentially the same among the differently-aged mice, while APAP-sulfate levels were dramatically decreased in an age-dependent manner. Thus, it is recommended that mice of the same ages be used in studies related to APAP-induced hepatotoxixity. These results provide evidence in support of not only the age-related changes in susceptibility to APAP-derived hepatotoxicity in mice but also in developing mouse models for APAP-related studies.

  13. Alteration in metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen upon repeated administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun J; Lee, Min Y; Kwon, Do Y; Kim, Sung Y; Kim, Young C

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that administration of a subtoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) to female rats increased generation of carbon monoxide from dichloromethane, a metabolic reaction catalyzed mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. In this study we examined the changes in metabolism and toxicity of APAP upon repeated administration. An intraperitoneal dose of APAP (500 mg/kg) alone did not increase aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in serum, but was significantly hepatotoxic when the rats had been pretreated with an identical dose of APAP 18 h earlier. The concentrations and disappearance of APAP and its metabolites in plasma were monitored for 8 h after the treatment. APAP pretreatment reduced the elevation of APAP-sulfate, but increased APAP-cysteine concentrations in plasma. APAP or APAP-glucuronide concentrations were not altered. Administration of a single dose of APAP 18 h before sacrifice increased microsomal CYP activities measured with p-nitrophenol, p-nitroanisole, and aminopyrine as probes. Expression of CYP2E1, CYP3A, and CYP1A proteins in the liver was also elevated significantly. The results suggest that administration of APAP at a subtoxic dose may result in an induction of hepatic CYP enzymes, thereby altering metabolism and toxicological consequences of various chemical substances that are substrates for the same enzyme system.

  14. Select steroid hormone glucuronide metabolites can cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Frick, Morin M.; Zhang, Yingning; Maier, Steven F.; Sammakia, Tarek; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that several classes of glucuronide metabolites, including the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide and the ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide, cause toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signalling in vitro and enhanced pain in vivo. Steroid hormones, including estrogens and corticosterone, are also metabolized through glucuronidation. Here we demonstrate that in silico docking predicts that corticosterone, corticosterone-21-glucuronide, estradiol, estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide all dock with the MD-2 component of the TLR4 receptor complex. In addition to each docking with MD-2, the docking of each was altered by pre-docking with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. As agonist versus antagonist activity cannot be determined from these in silico interactions, an in vitro study was undertaken to clarify which of these compounds can act in an agonist fashion. Studies using a cell line transfected with TLR4, necessary co-signaling molecules, and a reporter gene revealed that only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide increased reporter gene product, indicative of TLR4 agonism. Finally, in in vivo studies, each of the 5 drugs was injected intrathecally at equimolar doses. In keeping with the in vitro results, only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide caused enhanced pain. For both compounds, pain enhancement was blocked by the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, evidence for the involvement in TLR4 in the resultant pain enhancement. These findings have implications for several chronic pain conditions, including migraine and tempromandibular joint disorder, in which pain episodes are more likely in cycling females when estradiol is decreasing and estradiol metabolites are at their highest. PMID:25218902

  15. In vitro glucuronidation of five rhubarb anthraquinones by intestinal and liver microsomes from humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjin; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Qingwen; Li, Yaping; Li, Peng; Yan, Ru; Wang, Yitao

    2014-08-01

    Anthraquinones naturally distribute in many plants including rhubarb and have widespread applications throughout industry and medicine. Recent studies provided new insights in potential applications of these traditional laxative constituents. Glucuronidation was the main metabolic pathway of rhubarb anthraquinones in vivo. This study examined the activity and regioselectivity of glucuronidation of rhubarb anthraquinones (aloe-emodin, emodin, chrysophanol, physcion, rhein) in liver and intestinal microsomes from rats and humans, by comparing with the core structure danthron. All anthraquinones formed mono-glucuronides and, except for rhein, the conjugation sites of the main metabolites were unambiguously identified. Two minor glucuronides of emodin were first reported together with the dominant emodin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide. The substitution on the anthraquinone ring was crucial to the activity and regioselectivity of glucuronidation. In general, the activity was decreased greatly with a β-COOH (rhein), while enhanced dramatically with a β-OH (emodin). Glucuronidation showed an absolute preference towards β-OH, followed by α-OH and β-alcoholic OH. The glucuronidation activity and regioselectivity also varied slightly with organs and species. All glucuronides of aloe-emodin, emodin, chrysophanol and physcion were formed by multiple human UGT isoforms with 1A9 being the most prominent in most cases. The UGT2B subfamily (2B7 and 2B15) only showed high activity towards a β-OH. In conclusion, the substitution at the anthraquinone ring was crucial to the rate and preference of glucuronidation. The high glucuronidation activity of UGT1A9 towards anthraquinones highlighted potential drug interactions.

  16. Double-peaked Acetaminophen Concentration Secondary to Intestinal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, B; Tamur, S; Aljenedil, S; Larocuque, A; Holody, E; Gosselin, S

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundReduced gastrointestinal motility can alter the toxicokinetics of acetaminophen poisoning. We report a case of altered acetaminophen toxicokinetics due to delayed gastrointestinal absorption, likely secondary to intestinal trauma/surgery.  Case ReportA 37-year-old woman ingested an unknown amount of acetaminophen and ethanol then stabbed herself in the abdomen. The initial acetaminophen was 1,285.9 μmol/L and the time of ingestion was not known. Intravenous acetylcysteine protocol was started. She developed an ileus post-surgery for the stab wounds. At 31 hours post-presentation, the acetaminophen returned undetectable, and the transaminases were normal. After the resolution of the ileus, repeated acetaminophen peaked at 363.3 μmol/L 52 hours post-admission. At 76 hours post-admission, the acetaminophen was undetectable, and transaminases and coagulation parameters were normal. ConclusionsReduction in gastrointestinal motility secondary to trauma and/or surgery must be considered when determining when to initiate or discontinue treatment as well as how long to monitor acetaminophen concentrations. PMID:27463118

  17. Adolescents' Misperceptions of the Dangerousness of Acetaminophen in Overdose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Hope Elaine; Myers, Wade C.

    1997-01-01

    Assesses the generality and strength of nonclinical youths' (N=569) perceptions of the harmfulness and lethality of acetaminophen in overdose. Findings indicate that adolescents have ready access to acetaminophen and use it in suicide attempts but underestimate its potential for toxicity, lacking knowledge regarding side effects of overdose. (RJM)

  18. Electronic Spectra of the Jet-Cooled Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Min, Ahreum; Kim, Yusic; Choi, Myong Yong; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-06-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and UV-UV double resonance spectra of the jet-cooled acetaminophen, widely used as a pain reliever and fever reducer, were obtained in the gas phase. Conformational characterizations for acetaminophen will be presented with an aid of spectroscopic techniques and DFT B3LYP calculations.

  19. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  20. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide anions against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Kamata, Shotaro; Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Abiko, Yumi; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The key mechanism for hepatotoxicity resulting from acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is cytochrome P450-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a potent electrophilic metabolite that forms protein adducts. The fundamental roles of glutathione in the effective conjugation/clearance of NAPQI have been established, giving a molecular basis for the clinical use of N-acetylcysteine as a sole antidote. Recent evidence from in vitro experiments suggested that sulfide anions (S(2-)) to yield hydrogen sulfide anions (HS(-)) under physiological pH could effectively react with NAPQI. This study evaluated the protective roles of HS(-) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. We utilized cystathionine γ-lyase-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice that are highly sensitive to acetaminophen toxicity. Intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (150 mg/kg) into Cth(-/-) mice resulted in highly elevated levels of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase associated with marked increases in oncotic hepatocytes; all of which were significantly inhibited by intraperitoneal preadministration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). NaHS preadministration significantly suppressed APAP-induced serum malondialdehyde level increases without abrogating APAP-induced rapid depletion of hepatic glutathione. These results suggest that exogenous HS(-) protects hepatocytes by directly scavenging reactive NAPQI rather than by increasing cystine uptake and thereby elevating intracellular glutathione levels, which provides a novel therapeutic approach against acute APAP poisoning. PMID:26558465

  1. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide anions against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Kamata, Shotaro; Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Abiko, Yumi; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The key mechanism for hepatotoxicity resulting from acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is cytochrome P450-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a potent electrophilic metabolite that forms protein adducts. The fundamental roles of glutathione in the effective conjugation/clearance of NAPQI have been established, giving a molecular basis for the clinical use of N-acetylcysteine as a sole antidote. Recent evidence from in vitro experiments suggested that sulfide anions (S(2-)) to yield hydrogen sulfide anions (HS(-)) under physiological pH could effectively react with NAPQI. This study evaluated the protective roles of HS(-) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. We utilized cystathionine γ-lyase-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice that are highly sensitive to acetaminophen toxicity. Intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (150 mg/kg) into Cth(-/-) mice resulted in highly elevated levels of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase associated with marked increases in oncotic hepatocytes; all of which were significantly inhibited by intraperitoneal preadministration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). NaHS preadministration significantly suppressed APAP-induced serum malondialdehyde level increases without abrogating APAP-induced rapid depletion of hepatic glutathione. These results suggest that exogenous HS(-) protects hepatocytes by directly scavenging reactive NAPQI rather than by increasing cystine uptake and thereby elevating intracellular glutathione levels, which provides a novel therapeutic approach against acute APAP poisoning.

  2. Multiplexed Targeted Quantitative Proteomics Predicts Hepatic Glucuronidation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Margaillan, Guillaume; Rouleau, Michèle; Klein, Kathrin; Fallon, John K.; Caron, Patrick; Villeneuve, Lyne; Smith, Philip C.; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2015-01-01

    Phase II metabolism is prominently governed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in humans. These enzymes regulate the bioactivity of many drugs and endogenous small molecules in many organs, including the liver, a major site of regulation by the glucuronidation pathway. This study determined the expression of hepatic UGTs by targeted proteomics in 48 liver samples and by measuring the glucuronidation activity using probe substrates. It demonstrates the sensitivity and accuracy of nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to establish the complex expression profiles of 14 hepatic UGTs in a single analysis. UGT2B7 is the most abundant UGT in our collection of livers, expressed at 69 pmol/mg microsomal proteins, whereas UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT2B4, and UGT2B15 are similarly abundant, averaging 30–34 pmol/mg proteins. The average relative abundance of these five UGTs represents 81% of the measured hepatic UGTs. Our data further highlight the strong relationships in the expression of several UGTs. Most notably, UGT1A4 correlates with most measured UGTs, and the expression levels of UGT2B4/UGT2B7 displayed the strongest correlation. However, significant interindividual variability is observed for all UGTs, both at the level of enzyme concentrations and activity (coefficient of variation: 45%–184%). The reliability of targeted proteomics quantification is supported by the high correlation between UGT concentration and activity. Collectively, these findings expand our understanding of hepatic UGT profiles by establishing absolute hepatic concentrations of 14 UGTs and further suggest coregulated expression between most abundant hepatic UGTs. Data support the value of multiplexed targeted quantitative proteomics to accurately assess specific UGT concentrations in liver samples and hepatic glucuronidation potential. PMID:26076694

  3. Influence of Gilbert's syndrome on the formation of ethyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Laura M; Gunsilius, Leonie; Lardi, Christelle; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-09-01

    A drinking experiment with participants suffering from Gilbert's syndrome was performed to study the possible influence of this glucuronidation disorder on the formation of ethyl glucuronide (EtG). Gilbert's syndrome is a rather common and, in most cases, asymptomatic congenital metabolic aberration with a prevalence of about 5 %. It is characterized by a reduction of the enzyme activity of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform 1A1 up to 80 %. One of the glucuronidation products is EtG, which is formed in the organism following exposure to ethanol. EtG is used as a short-term marker for ethyl alcohol consumption to prove abstinence in various settings. After 2 days of abstinence from ethanol and giving a void urine sample, 30 study participants drank 0.1 L of sparkling wine (9 g ethanol). 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after drinking, urine samples were collected. 3 hours after drinking, an additional blood sample was taken, in which liver enzyme activities, ethanol, hematological parameters, and bilirubin were measured. EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS), another short-term marker of ethanol consumption, were determined in the urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); creatinine was measured photometrically. In all participants, EtG and EtS were detected in concentrations showing a wide range (EtG: 3 h sample 0.5-18.43 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.67-13.8 mg/L; EtS: 3 h sample 0.87-6.87 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.29-4.48 mg/L). No evidence of impaired EtG formation was found. Thus, EtG seems to be a suitable marker for ethanol consumption even in individuals with Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:25680552

  4. Effects of morphine glucuronides on the function of opioid receptors in human SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Baker, L; Dye, A; Ratka, A

    2000-03-01

    Morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are active metabolites of morphine. The effects of M3G and M6G on the opioid receptor transduction system has not yet been fully elucidated. Formation of cAMP after treatment with various doses of morphine, M3G, and M6G was studied. M6G and morphine, but not M3G, showed a dose dependent inhibition of cAMP accumulation. Naloxone blocked the inhibitory effect of M6G, M3G, and morphine. Pretreatment with M3G did not change the effects of morphine and M6G. The G-protein inhibitor PTX, prevented morphine, M3G, and M6G effects on cAMP. M3G and M6G vary in their ability to interact with the opioid receptor effector system. Inhibition of cAMP evoked by activation of opioid receptors and inhibitory G-proteins may play a role in the actions of M6G and M3G.

  5. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  6. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C

    2015-12-11

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)(-/-) mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase(+/+) littermates. ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase(+/+) hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase(-/-) mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury.

  7. TRPA1 mediates the hypothermic action of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Clive; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective antipyretic and one of the most commonly used analgesic drugs. Unlike antipyretic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, APAP elicits hypothermia in addition to its antipyretic effect. Here we have examined the mechanisms responsible for the hypothermic activity of APAP. Subcutaneous, but not intrathecal, administration of APAP elicited a dose dependent decrease in body temperature in wildtype mice. Hypothermia was abolished in mice pre-treated with resiniferatoxin to destroy or defunctionalize peripheral TRPV1-expressing terminals, but resistant to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases. The hypothermic activity was independent of TRPV1 since APAP evoked hypothermia was identical in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, and not reduced by administration of a maximally effective dose of a TRPV1 antagonist. In contrast, a TRPA1 antagonist inhibited APAP induced hypothermia and APAP was without effect on body temperature in Trpa1−/− mice. In a model of yeast induced pyrexia, administration of APAP evoked a marked hypothermia in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, but only restored normal body temperature in Trpa1−/− and Trpa1−/−/Trpv1−/− mice. We conclude that TRPA1 mediates APAP evoked hypothermia. PMID:26227887

  8. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1A6 and 1A10 catalyze reduced menadione glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Takahito; Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Inoue, Yuu; Kishi, Takehiko; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2008-06-27

    Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquine), also known as vitamin K3, has been widely used as a model compound in the field of oxidative stress-related research. The metabolism of menadione has been studied, and it is known that menadione undergoes a two-electron reduction by NAD(P)H:Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) after which the reduced form of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenediol, menadiol) is glucuronidated and excreted in urine. To investigate which human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms participate in the glucuronidation of menadiol reduced by NQO1 from menadione, we first constructed heterologously expressed NQO1 in Sf9 cells and tested the menadiol glucuronidating activity of 16 human recombinant UGT isoforms. Of the 16 UGT isoforms, UGTs 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10 catalyzed menadiol glucuronidation, and, of these, UGTs 1A6 and 1A10 catalyzed menadiol glucuronidation at much higher rates than the other UGTs. Menadiol was regioselectively glucuronidated in the manner of 4-position > 1-position by UGTs 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10. In contrast to these UGTs, only UGT1A6 exhibited 1-menadiol-preferential glucuronidating activity. The results suggest possible detoxification pathways for quinones via NQO1 reduction followed by UGT glucuronidation.

  9. Biosynthesis of Drug Glucuronide Metabolites in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ikushiro, Shinichi; Nishikawa, Miyu; Masuyama, Yuuka; Shouji, Tadashi; Fujii, Miharu; Hamada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Finel, Moshe; Yasuda, Kaori; Kamakura, Masaki; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Glucuronidation is one of the most common pathways in mammals for detoxification and elimination of hydrophobic xenobiotic compounds, including many drugs. Metabolites, however, can form active or toxic compounds, such as acyl glucuronides, and their safety assessment is often needed. The absence of efficient means for in vitro synthesis of correct glucuronide metabolites frequently limits such toxicological analyses. To overcome this hurdle we have developed a new approach, the essence of which is a coexpression system containing a human, or another mammalian UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), as well as UDP-glucose-6-dehydrogenase (UGDH), within the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system was first tested using resting yeast cells coexpressing UGDH and human UGT1A6, 7-hydroxycoumarin as the substrate, in a reaction medium containing 8% glucose, serving as a source of UDP-glucuronic acid. Glucuronides were readily formed and recovered from the medium. Subsequently, by selecting suitable mammalian UGT enzyme for the coexpression system we could obtain the desired glucuronides of various compounds, including molecules with multiple conjugation sites and acyl glucuronides of several carboxylic acid containing drugs, namely, mefenamic acid, flufenamic acid, and zomepirac. In conclusion, a new and flexible yeast system with mammalian UGTs has been developed that exhibits a capacity for efficient production of various glucuronides, including acyl glucuronides. PMID:27241161

  10. A fluorescent assay amenable to measuring production of beta-D-glucuronides produced from recombinant UDP-glycosyl transferase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, O V; Shaw, P M

    1999-05-01

    Beta-glucuronidase cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide generates the highly fluorescent compound, 4-methylumbelliferone. We show that other beta-D-glucuronide compounds act as competitors in this assay. The 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide cleavage assay can easily be adapted to high throughput formats to detect the presence of beta-D glucuronides generated using recombinant glycosyl transferase preparations.

  11. Detection of ethyl glucuronide in blood spotted on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Kaufmann, E; Thoma, D; Thierauf, A; Weinmann, W; Skopp, G; Alt, A

    2011-07-15

    This study aims to show that sensitive detection of ethyl glucuronide in dried blood spotted onto various surfaces after a period of 24h is feasible. At present, there is insufficient information how tightly ethyl glucuronide (EtG) binds to various materials and how easily it can be eluted. 4ml aliquots of blood samples obtained from seven volunteers after consumption of alcoholic beverages were applied to six different surfaces. After drying and a 24h-storage at 20±2°C the samples were re-dissolved in water, and EtG was subsequently analyzed by a LC-MS Paul-type ion trap. A comparison was made between dried and corresponding fluid samples. EtG was detectable in all subjects' samples following consumption of alcohol. EtG was also detectable after a storage time of four weeks at 4°C in whole blood that had been preserved with EDTA. EtG was detectable in all samples dried on different surfaces and its concentration remained relatively constant irrespective of the particular condition of the material. Detection of EtG in blood spots from the scene may indicate recent alcohol consumption in cases where collection of blood remained undone or could not be performed. PMID:21641739

  12. Transmembrane transport of steviol glucuronide and its potential interaction with selected drugs and natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meiyu; Qi, Huixin; Li, Jiajun; Xu, Yunting; Zhang, Hongjian

    2015-12-01

    Steviol glucuronide (SVG) is the major metabolite derived from steviol, the aglycone of stevioside and rebaudioside A. After the ingestion of stevioside and rebaudioside A, SVG is formed and excreted into the urine in humans. In the present study, transporter mediated efflux and uptake of SVG was investigated in order to understand molecular mechanisms underlying its renal clearance. Results showed that SVG was not a substrate of efflux transporters BCRP, MRP2, MATE1 or P-gp. In contrast, OAT3 played a predominant role in the uptake of SVG in comparison to OATP1B1, OATP1B3, or OATP2B1. Quercetin, telmisartan, diclofenac, and mulberrin displayed a relatively strong inhibition against OAT3 mediated uptake of SVG with IC50 values of 1.8, 2.9, 8.0, and 10.0 μM, respectively. Because OAT3 is a major uptake transporter in the kidney, inhibition of OAT3 activity may alter SVG's renal clearance by drugs and natural compounds that are used concomitantly with stevia leaf extracts. PMID:26525112

  13. Trans-stilbene oxide administration increased hepatic glucuronidation of morphine but decreased biliary excretion of morphine glucuronide in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman-Lane, C.; Fujimoto, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The effect of the inducing agent trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) on the metabolism and biliary excretion of (/sup 14/C)morphine was studied in the isolated in situ perfused rat liver. After administration of morphine by intraportal injection or by the segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection technique, the TSO-treated group showed a marked decrease in the biliary recovery of morphine as its glucuronide conjugate (morphine-3-glucuronide (MG)). However, recovery of MG in the venous outflow of the single pass perfusate was greatly increased. These findings suggested that TSO treatment enhanced the formation of MG from morphine and changed the primary route of hepatic elimination of MG. TSO treatment also decreased the excretion of morphine (as MG) in the bile of anesthetized renal-ligated rats. This decreased biliary function required several days to develop and appeared closely associated with the inductive effect of TSO. After i.v. administration of (/sup 14/C)MG itself, biliary recovery was also markedly decreased in TSO-treated rats. It is postulated that the effect of the TSO treatment led to either a decrease in canalicular transport of MG into bile or an increase in the efficiency of transfer of MG to the blood at the sinusoidal side of the hepatocyte. Regardless of the mechanism, the results indicate the need to study compartmentalization of drug transport and metabolism functions.

  14. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-05-15

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1{sup -/-}) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1{sup -/-} mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  15. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  16. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Carroll, C C; Dickinson, J M; LeMoine, J K; Haus, J M; Weinheimer, E M; Hollon, C J; Aagaard, P; Magnusson, S P; Trappe, T A

    2011-08-01

    Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance training. Thirty-six individuals were randomly assigned to a placebo (67 ± 2 yr old), acetaminophen (64 ± 1 yr old; 4,000 mg/day), or ibuprofen (64 ± 1 yr old; 1,200 mg/day) group in a double-blind manner and completed 12 wk of knee extensor resistance training. Before and after training in vivo patellar tendon properties were assessed with MRI [cross-sectional area (CSA) and signal intensity] and ultrasonography of patellar tendon deformation coupled with force measurements to obtain stiffness, modulus, stress, and strain. Mean patellar tendon CSA was unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo group, and this response was not influenced with ibuprofen consumption. Mean tendon CSA increased with training in the acetaminophen group (3%, P < 0.05), primarily due to increases in the mid (7%, P < 0.05) and distal (8%, P < 0.05) tendon regions. Correspondingly, tendon signal intensity increased with training in the acetaminophen group at the mid (13%, P < 0.05) and distal (15%, P = 0.07) regions. When normalized to pretraining force levels, patellar tendon deformation and strain decreased 11% (P < 0.05) and stiffness, modulus, and stress were unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo group. These responses were generally uninfluenced by ibuprofen consumption. In the acetaminophen group, tendon deformation and strain increased 20% (P < 0.05) and stiffness (-17%, P < 0.05) and modulus (-20%, P < 0.05) decreased with training. These data suggest that 3 mo of knee extensor resistance training in older adults induces modest changes in the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Over-the-counter doses of acetaminophen, but not ibuprofen, have a strong influence on

  17. HT-2 toxin 4-glucuronide as new T-2 toxin metabolite: enzymatic synthesis, analysis, and species specific formation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides by rat, mouse, pig, and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Tanja; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-10-10

    Glucuronides of the mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its phase I metabolite HT-2 toxin are important phase II metabolites under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Since standard substances are essential for the direct quantitation of these glucuronides, a method for the enzymatic synthesis of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides employing liver microsomes was optimized. Structure elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry revealed that besides T-2 toxin glucuronide and HT-2 toxin 3-glucuronide also the newly identified isomer HT-2 toxin 4-glucuronide was formed. Glucuronidation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin in liver microsomes of rat, mouse, pig, and human was compared and metabolites were analyzed directly by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A distinct, species specific pattern of glucuronidation of T-2 and HT-2 toxin was observed with interesting interindividual differences. Until recently, glucuronides have frequently been analyzed indirectly by quantitation of the aglycone after enzymatic cleavage of the glucuronides by β-glucuronidase. Therefore, the hydrolysis efficiencies of T-2 and HT-2 toxin glucuronides using β-glucuronidases from Helix pomatia, bovine liver, and Escherichia coli were compared. PMID:22967261

  18. Rationale for Use of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Special Operations Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vokoun, Edward Scott

    2015-01-01

    Use of intravenous acetaminophen has increased recently as an opioid-sparing strategy for patients undergoing major surgery. Its characteristics and efficacy suggest that it would a useful adjunct in combat trauma medicine. This article reviews those characteristics, which include rapid onset, high peak plasma concentration, and favorable side-effect profile. Also discussed is the hepatotoxicity risk of acetaminophen in a combat trauma patient. It concludes that intravenous acetaminophen should be considered as an addition to the US Special Operations Command Tactical Trauma Protocols and supplied to medics for use in field care.

  19. Mechanisms of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dean W.; James, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, at higher doses, acetaminophen produces a centrilobular hepatic necrosis that can be fatal. Acetaminophen poisoning accounts for approximately one-half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain today. The mechanism occurs by a complex sequence of events. These events include: (1) CYP metabolism to a reactive metabolite which depletes glutathione and covalently binds to proteins; (2) loss of glutathione with an increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in hepatocytes undergoing necrotic changes; (3) increased oxidative stress, associated with alterations in calcium homeostasis and initiation of signal transduction responses, causing mitochondrial permeability transition; (4) mitochondrial permeability transition occurring with additional oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and loss of the ability of the mitochondria to synthesize ATP; and (5) loss of ATP which leads to necrosis. Associated with these essential events there appear to be a number of inflammatory mediators such as certain cytokines and chemokines that can modify the toxicity. Some have been shown to alter oxidative stress, but the relationship of these modulators to other critical mechanistic events has not been well delineated. In addition, existing data support the involvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in the initiation of regenerative processes leading to the reestablishment of hepatic structure and function. PMID:20020268

  20. Time-Dependent Metabolism of Luteolin by Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases and Its Intestinal First-Pass Glucuronidation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Liu, Junjin; Han, Weichao; Zhou, Xuefeng; Yu, Xiaoming; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Shuwen; Tang, Lan

    2015-10-01

    Luteolin is a well-known flavonoid with various pharmacological properties but has low bioavailability due to glucuronidation. This study investigated the time-course of luteolin glucuronidation by 12 human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and its intestinal first-pass metabolism in mice. Six metabolites, including two novel abundant diglucuronides [3',7-O-diglucuronide (diG) and 4',7-diG] and four known ones, were identified. UGT1A6 and UGT1A9 generated almost only monoglucuronides (G's). The production of 3',7-diG followed a sequential time-dependent process along with decrease of 3'-G mainly by UGT1A1, indicating that 3',7-diG was produced from 3'-G. Metabolism in mice intestine differed from that in humans. Probenecid, a nonspecific UGT inhibitor, did not affect absorption but significantly inhibited production of 7-, 4'-, and 3'-G, and enhanced the formation of another novel metabolite, 5-G, in mice. In conclusion, diglucuronide formation is time-dependent and isoform-specific. UGT1A1 preferentially generates diG, whereas UGT1A6 and UGT1A9 share a preference for G production.

  1. Elucidation of the Mechanisms through Which the Reactive Metabolite Diclofenac Acyl Glucuronide Can Mediate Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Scialis, Renato J; Manautou, José E

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that mice lacking the efflux transporter Mrp3 had significant intestinal injury after toxic diclofenac (DCF) challenge, and proposed that diclofenac acyl glucuronide (DCF-AG), as a substrate of Mrp3, played a part in mediating injury. Since both humans and mice express the uptake transporter OATP2B1 in the intestines, OATP2B1 was characterized for DCF-AG uptake. In vitro assays using human embryonic kidney (HEK)-OATP2B1 cells demonstrated that DCF-AG was a substrate with a maximal velocity (Vmax) and Km of 17.6 ± 1.5 pmol/min per milligram and 14.3 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Another key finding from our in vitro assays was that DCF-AG was more cytotoxic compared with DCF, and toxicity occurred within 1-3 hours of exposure. We also report that 1 mM DCF-AG caused a 6-fold increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) by 3 hours. Investigation of oxidative stress through inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) revealed that DCF-AG had 100% inhibition of SOD at the highest tested dose of 1 mM. The SOD and ROS results strongly suggest DCF-AG induced oxidative stress in vitro. Lastly, DCF-AG was screened for pharmacologic activity against COX-1 and COX-2 and was found to have IC50 values of 0.620 ± 0.105 and 2.91 ± 0.36 μM, respectively, which represents a novel finding. Since cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition can lead to intestinal ulceration, it is plausible that DCF-AG can also contribute to enteropathy via COX inhibition. Taken in context, the work presented herein demonstrated the multifactorial pathways by which DCF-AG can act as a direct contributor to toxicity following DCF administration.

  2. Species Differences in Microsomal Oxidation and Glucuronidation of 4-Ipomeanol: Relationship to Target Organ Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Oliver T; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Whittington, Dale; Kelly, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E

    2016-10-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a model pulmonary toxicant that undergoes P450-mediated metabolism to reactive electrophilic intermediates that bind to tissue macromolecules and can be trapped in vitro as the NAC/NAL adduct. Pronounced species and tissue differences in IPO toxicity are well documented, as is the enzymological component of phase I bioactivation. However, IPO also undergoes phase II glucuronidation, which may compete with bioactivation in target tissues. To better understand the organ toxicity of IPO, we synthesized IPO-glucuronide and developed a new quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay for IPO glucuronidation. Microsomal rates of glucuronidation and P450-dependent NAC/NAL adduct formation were compared in lung, kidney, and liver microsomes from seven species with different target organ toxicities to IPO. Bioactivation rates were highest in pulmonary and renal microsomes from all animal species (except dog) known to be highly susceptible to the extrahepatic toxicities induced by IPO. In a complementary fashion, pulmonary and renal IPO glucuronidation rates were uniformly low in all experimental animals and primates, but hepatic glucuronidation rates were high, as expected. Therefore, with the exception of the dog, the balance between microsomal NAC/NAL adduct and glucuronide formation correlate well with the risk for IPO-induced pulmonary, renal, and hepatic toxicities across species. PMID:27468999

  3. Species Differences in Microsomal Oxidation and Glucuronidation of 4-Ipomeanol: Relationship to Target Organ Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Oliver T; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Whittington, Dale; Kelly, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E

    2016-10-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a model pulmonary toxicant that undergoes P450-mediated metabolism to reactive electrophilic intermediates that bind to tissue macromolecules and can be trapped in vitro as the NAC/NAL adduct. Pronounced species and tissue differences in IPO toxicity are well documented, as is the enzymological component of phase I bioactivation. However, IPO also undergoes phase II glucuronidation, which may compete with bioactivation in target tissues. To better understand the organ toxicity of IPO, we synthesized IPO-glucuronide and developed a new quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay for IPO glucuronidation. Microsomal rates of glucuronidation and P450-dependent NAC/NAL adduct formation were compared in lung, kidney, and liver microsomes from seven species with different target organ toxicities to IPO. Bioactivation rates were highest in pulmonary and renal microsomes from all animal species (except dog) known to be highly susceptible to the extrahepatic toxicities induced by IPO. In a complementary fashion, pulmonary and renal IPO glucuronidation rates were uniformly low in all experimental animals and primates, but hepatic glucuronidation rates were high, as expected. Therefore, with the exception of the dog, the balance between microsomal NAC/NAL adduct and glucuronide formation correlate well with the risk for IPO-induced pulmonary, renal, and hepatic toxicities across species.

  4. Improved detection of opioid use in chronic pain patients through monitoring of opioid glucuronides in urine.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Jane A; Laha, Thomas J; Pagano, Monica B; O'Donnell, Brendan R; Hoofnagle, Andrew N

    2012-10-01

    When chronic pain patients are suspected of being non-compliant, their therapy can be withdrawn. Therefore, sensitive and specific confirmatory testing is important for identifying diversion and adherence. This work aimed to develop a novel liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method to detect 14 opioids and six opioid glucuronide metabolites in urine with minimal sample preparation. Analytes included were morphine, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, fentanyl, norfentanyl, 6-monoacetylmorphine, meperidine, normeperidine, propoxyphene, methadone, buprenorphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, oxymorphone glucuronide, hydromorphone glucuronide, codeine-6-glucuronide and norbuprenorphine glucuronide. Samples were processed by centrifugation and diluted in equal volume with a deuterated internal standard containing 14 opioids and four opioid glucuronides. The separation of all compounds was complete in nine minutes. The assay was linear between 10 and 1,000 ng/mL (fentanyl 0.25-25 ng/mL). Intra-assay imprecision (500 ng/mL, fentanyl 12.5 ng/mL) ranged from 1.0 to 8.4% coefficient of variation. Inter-assay precision ranged from 2.9 to 6.0%. Recovery was determined by spiking five patient specimens with opioid and opioid glucuronide standards at 100 ng/mL (fentanyl 2.5 ng/mL). Recoveries ranged from 82 to 107% (median 98.9%). The method correlated with our current quantitative LC-MS-MS assay for opioids, which employs different chromatography. Internal standards were not available for every analyte to critically evaluate for ion suppression. Instead, a novel approach was designed to achieve the most rigorous quality control possible, in which the recovery of each analyte was evaluated in each negative sample. PMID:22833646

  5. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  6. Glucuronidation and Sulfation Kinetics of Diflunisal in Man.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewen, Gordon Rapheal

    Diflunisal is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in the treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal pain. Diflunisal exhibits concentration- and dose-dependent kinetics, the mechanism of which has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for non-linear disposition of diflunisal and to examine environmental factors which may affect the elimination of diflunisal. The metabolites of diflunisal, including a new metabolite, the sulphate conjugate, were purified by column and semi-preparative high pressure liquid chromatography. Assays for the quantitation of diflunisal and conjugates in urine and diflunisal in plasma were developed. Plasma protein binding of diflunisal in blank plasma and in plasma obtained following multiple doses of diflunisal was determined by equilibrium dialysis. Total body clearance of diflunisal decreased when dose increased from 100 to 750 mg. Total clearance increased when dose increased from 750 to 1000 mg. The percent of recovered dose eliminated as the acyl glucuronide decreased and the percent eliminated as the sulphate increased with increasing dose of diflunisal. Plasma protein binding of diflunisal was concentration dependent over a range of diflunisal plasma concentrations of 3 to 257 mug/ml. Total clearance, and to a lesser degree, unbound clearance of diflunisal were decreased following multiple dose administration of 250 and 500 mg diflunisal. Percent of recovered dose eliminated as the acyl glucuronide decreased and percent eliminated as the sulphate conjugate increased following multiple dosing. Plasma protein binding of diflunisal was similar in blank plasma and plasma obtained at steady state. Unbound clearance of diflunisal exceeded liver plasma flow. Frequency distributions of the elimination of the conjugates of diflunisal were normally distributed. Sex, smoking, and use of vitamins or oral contraceptives were identified as factors which may affect the elimination of

  7. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay for 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and 6-hydroxymelatonin glucuronide in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, P.L.; Leone, A.M.; Young, I.M.; Stovell, P.; Silman, R.E.

    1987-04-01

    Circulating melatonin is hydroxylated to 6-hydroxymelatonin and excreted in urine as the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. We extracted these two compounds from urine by using octadecylsilane-bonded silica cartridges to eliminate most of the urea and electrolytes, and silica cartridges to separate the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. After hydrolyzing the separated conjugates enzymically, we determined the free hydroxymelatonin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Though recoveries were low and variable, we were able to quantify the analyte in the original sample by adding deuterated sulfate and glucuronide conjugates to the urines before extraction.

  8. A rapid and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of serum androsterone glucuronide, etiocholanolone glucuronide, and androstan-3α, 17β diol 17-glucuronide in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuyong; Gonthier, Renaud; Isabelle, Maxim; Bertin, Jonathan; Simard, Jean-Nicolas; Dury, Alain Y; Labrie, Fernand

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of steroidal glucuronide conjugates by the indirect methods of immunoassay and GC-MS/MS may underestimate some conjugates since hydrolysis is needed in sample processing. In the present work, a sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous direct quantification of androsterone glucuronide, etiocholanolone glucuronide, and androstan-3α, 17β diol 17-glucuronide in postmenopausal women's serum. The quantification limits are 0.1ng/mL for 3α-diol-17G and 4ng/mL for both ADT-G and Etio-G, respectively, with an extraction from 200μL serum while the total run time is less than 6min for all three glucuronides. In this method, solid phase extraction is used for sample preparation. The assay has been validated in compliance with EndoCeutics SOPs and FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method development and validation. The recovery of glucuronides in stripped serum is consistent with that in unstripped serum, where the average difference in stripped and unstripped is less than 10%. A linear regression model fits well the standard curves of all three compounds with R≥0.99 where the weighting factor is 1/X. Interday accuracy and CV for all levels of QCs are within the range of 15% in both stripped and unstripped serum while all calibration curves are within the range of 6% except for LLOQs, which are within the range of 9%. Other parameters have also been assessed such as selectivity, matrix, lipemic and hemolysis effects as well as stabilities in solution and matrix. Incurred sample reanalysis has been performed with a result of over 93% within 20% of the original values. This reliable, sensitive and fast method is ready for large-scale clinical sample assays. PMID:25701608

  9. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Severe liver damage may occur and may lead to death ...

  10. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  11. NQO2 Is a Reactive Oxygen Species Generating Off-Target for Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:25313982

  12. High-sensitivity analysis of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine glucuronide, and norbuprenorphine glucuronide in plasma and urine by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Karen J.; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    A new method using ultra-fast liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC–MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine and the metabolites norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine-3β-glucuronide, and norbuprenorphine-3β-glucuronide in plasma and urine. Sample handling, sample preparation and solid-phase extraction procedures were optimized for maximum analyte recovery. All four analytes of interest were quantified by positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction. The lower limits of quantification in plasma were 1 pg/mL for buprenorphine and buprenorphine glucuronide, and 10 pg/mL for norbuprenorphine and norbuprenorphine glucuronide. The lower limits of quantitation in urine were 10 pg/mL for buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine and their glucuronides. Overall extraction recoveries ranged from 68–100% in both matrices. Interassay precision and accuracy was within 10% for all four analytes in plasma and within 15% in urine. The method was applicable to pharmacokinetic studies of low-dose buprenorphine. PMID:24095872

  13. High-sensitivity analysis of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine glucuronide, and norbuprenorphine glucuronide in plasma and urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Regina, Karen J; Kharasch, Evan D

    2013-11-15

    A new method using ultra-fast liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine and the metabolites norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine-3β-glucuronide, and norbuprenorphine-3β-glucuronide in plasma and urine. Sample handling, sample preparation and solid-phase extraction procedures were optimized for maximum analyte recovery. All four analytes of interest were quantified by positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction. The lower limits of quantification in plasma were 1pg/mL for buprenorphine and buprenorphine glucuronide, and 10pg/mL for norbuprenorphine and norbuprenorphine glucuronide. The lower limits of quantitation in urine were 10pg/mL for buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine and their glucuronides. Overall extraction recoveries ranged from 68-100% in both matrices. Interassay precision and accuracy was within 10% for all four analytes in plasma and within 15% in urine. The method was applicable to pharmacokinetic studies of low-dose buprenorphine. PMID:24095872

  14. Reversal of acetaminophen toxicity in isolated hamster hepatocytes by dithiothreitol

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, L.B.; Boobis, A.R.; Huggett, A.C.; Davies, D.S.

    1986-04-01

    The toxicity of acetaminophen in freshly isolated hamster hepatocytes was investigated. Cells exposed to 2.5 mM acetaminophen for 90 min, followed by washing to completely remove unbound acetaminophen, and resuspension in fresh buffer, showed a dramatic decrease in viability over the ensuing 4.5 hr by which time only 4% of the cells could still exclude trypan blue. During the initial 90-min incubation, there was a substantial depletion of glutathione, to 19% of control values, covalent binding of (/sup 14/C)acetaminophen to cellular proteins, and evidence of morphological changes consistent with some disturbance of the plasma membrane. During subsequent incubation of these cells, covalent binding did not change nor did lipid peroxidation, despite the decrease in viability that occurred. Subsequent incubation of cells exposed to acetaminophen for 90 min in buffer containing 1.5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT), a disulfide-reducing agent, largely prevented the decrease in cell viability and reversed the morphological changes that occurred during the first 90-min incubation. However, there was no change in lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, or covalent binding. It is concluded that acetaminophen interacted with some critical target in the cell, and that this left unchecked, led eventually to the death of the cell. DTT prevented and reversed this effect. The toxicity of acetaminophen, and its reversal by DTT, appear independent of either covalent binding of acetaminophen or lipid peroxidation. In addition, the effect of DTT was independent of the concentration of glutathione, most probably acting by directly reducing oxidized SH-groups in critical enzymes, possibly membrane-bound ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocases.

  15. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  16. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  17. Acetaminophen Induces Apoptosis in Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Blanco, Almudena; Muñoz-Fernández, Maríangeles; Ceña, Valentín

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (AAP) is widely prescribed for treatment of mild pain and fever in western countries. It is generally considered a safe drug and the most frequently reported adverse effect associated with acetaminophen is hepatotoxicity, which generally occurs after acute overdose. During AAP overdose, encephalopathy might develop and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Our hypothesis is that AAP causes direct neuronal toxicity contributing to the general AAP toxicity syndrome. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that AAP causes direct toxicity on rat cortical neurons both in vitro and in vivo as measured by LDH release. We have found that AAP causes concentration-dependent neuronal death in vitro at concentrations (1 and 2 mM) that are reached in human plasma during AAP overdose, and that are also reached in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats for 3 hours following i.p injection of AAP doses (250 and 500 mg/Kg) that are below those required to induce acute hepatic failure in rats. AAP also increases both neuronal cytochrome P450 isoform CYP2E1 enzymatic activity and protein levels as determined by Western blot, leading to neuronal death through mitochondrial–mediated mechanisms that involve cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. In addition, in vivo experiments show that i.p. AAP (250 and 500 mg/Kg) injection induces neuronal death in the rat cortex as measured by TUNEL, validating the in vitro data. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here establish, for the first time, a direct neurotoxic action by AAP both in vivo and in vitro in rats at doses below those required to produce hepatotoxicity and suggest that this neurotoxicity might be involved in the general toxic syndrome observed during patient APP overdose and, possibly, also when AAP doses in the upper dosing schedule are used, especially if other risk factors (moderate drinking, fasting, nutritional impairment) are present. PMID:21170329

  18. Chemical synthesis and growth-promoting activity of all-trans-retinyl beta-D-glucuronide.

    PubMed Central

    Barua, A B; Olson, J A

    1987-01-01

    All-trans-retinol reacts with methyl (2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-1-bromo-1-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyran)uronate in the presence of Ag2CO3 to give the triacetate methyl ester of retinyl beta-glucuronide. Hydrolysis of this ester with sodium methylate in methanol gives retinyl beta-D-glucuronide in about 15% yield. The water-soluble retinyl beta-D-glucuronide was characterized by u.v.-visible, n.m.r. and mass spectra, by elemental analysis and by its susceptibility to hydrolysis by bacterial beta-glucuronidase. Retinyl beta-glucuronide, when administered intraperitoneally in saline (0.9% NaCl), supports well the growth of vitamin A-deficient rats. PMID:3663114

  19. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  20. UGT2B10 genotype influences nicotine glucuronidation, oxidation and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jeannette Zinggeler; von Weymarn, Linda; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Wickham, Katherine M.; Weisensel, Natalie A.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Murphy, Sharon E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tobacco exposure is routinely assessed by quantifying nicotine metabolites in plasma or urine. On average, 80% of nicotine undergoes C-oxidation to cotinine. However, interindividual variation in nicotine glucuronidation is substantial and glucuronidation accounts for from 0 to 40% of total nicotine metabolism. We report here the effect of a polymorphism in a UDP-glucuronsyl transferase, UGT2B10, on nicotine metabolism and consumption. Methods Nicotine, cotinine, their N-glucuronide conjugates, and total trans-3'-hydroxycotinine were quantified in the urine (n=327) and plasma (n =115) of smokers. Urinary nicotine N-oxide was quantified in 105 smokers. Nicotine equivalents, the sum of nicotine and all major metabolites, were calculated for each smoker. The relationship of the UGT2B10 Asp67Tyr allele to nicotine equivalents, N-glucuronidation, and C-oxidation was determined. Results Individuals heterozygous for the Asp67Tyr allele excreted less nicotine or cotinine as their glucuronide conjugates than wild-type, resulting in a 60% lower ratio of cotinine glucuronide:cotinine, a 50% lower ratio of nicotine glucuronide:nicotine and increased cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine. Nicotine equivalents, a robust biomarker of nicotine intake, were lower among Asp67Tyr heterozygotes compared to individuals without this allele; 58.2 nmol/ml (95% CI, 48.9 – 68.2) versus 69.2 nmol/ml (95% CI, 64.3 – 74.5). Conclusions Individuals heterozygous for UGT2B10 Asp67Tyr consume less nicotine than do wild type smokers. This striking observation suggests that variations in nicotine N-glucuronidation, as reported for nicotine C-oxidation, may influence smoking behavior. Impact UGT2B10 genotype influences nicotine metabolism and should be taken into account when characterizing the role of nicotine metabolism on smoking. PMID:20501767

  1. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies.

  2. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies. PMID:16258079

  3. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis, Characterization, and Scale-Up of Milk Thistle Flavonolignan Glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Graf, Tyler N; Paguigan, Noemi D; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-11-01

    Plant-based therapeutics, including herbal products, continue to represent a growing facet of the contemporary health care market. Mechanistic descriptions of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of constituents composing these products remain nascent, particularly for metabolites produced following herbal product ingestion. Generation and characterization of authentic metabolite standards are essential to improve the quantitative mechanistic understanding of herbal product disposition in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Using the model herbal product, milk thistle, the objective of this work was to biosynthesize multimilligram quantities of glucuronides of select constituents (flavonolignans) to fill multiple knowledge gaps in the understanding of herbal product disposition and action. A partnership between clinical pharmacology and natural products chemistry expertise was leveraged to optimize reaction conditions for efficient glucuronide formation and evaluate alternate enzyme and reagent sources to improve cost effectiveness. Optimized reaction conditions used at least one-fourth the amount of microsomal protein (from bovine liver) and cofactor (UDP glucuronic acid) compared with typical conditions using human-derived subcellular fractions, providing substantial cost savings. Glucuronidation was flavonolignan-dependent. Silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and isosilybin B generated five, four, four, and three monoglucuronides, respectively. Large-scale synthesis (40 mg of starting material) generated three glucuronides of silybin A: silybin A-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (15.7 mg), silybin A-5-O-β-D-glucuronide (1.6 mg), and silybin A-4´´-O-β-D-glucuronide (11.1 mg). This optimized, cost-efficient method lays the foundation for a systematic approach to synthesize and characterize herbal product constituent glucuronides, enabling an improved understanding of mechanisms underlying herbal product disposition and action.

  4. In vitro glucuronidation of the antibacterial triclocarban and its oxidative metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schebb, N H; Franze, B; Maul, R; Ranganathan, A; Hammock, B D

    2012-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is widely used as an antibacterial in bar soaps. During use of these soaps, a significant portion of TCC is absorbed by humans. For the elimination from the body, glucuronidation plays a key role in both biliary and renal clearance. To investigate this metabolic pathway, we performed microsomal incubations of TCC and its hydroxylated metabolites 2'-OH-TCC, 3'-OH-TCC, and 6-OH-TCC. Using a new liquid chromatography-UV-mass spectrometry method, we could show a rapid glucuronidation for all OH-TCCs by the uridine-5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) present in liver microsomes of humans (HLM), cynomolgus monkeys (CLM), rats (RLM), and mice (MLM). Among the tested human UGT isoforms, UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A9 showed the highest activity for the conjugation of hydroxylated TCC metabolites followed by UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A10. Due to this broad pattern of active UGTs, OH-TCCs can be efficiently glucuronidated in various tissues, as shown for microsomes from human kidney (HKM) and intestine (HIM). The major renal metabolites in humans, TCC-N-glucuronide and TCC-N'-glucuronide, were formed at very low conversion rates (<1%) by microsomal incubations. Low amounts of N-glucuronides were generated by HLM, HIM, and HKM, as well as by MLM and CLM, but not by RLM, according to the observed species specificity of this metabolic pathway. Among the human UGT isoforms, only UGT1A9 had activity for the N-glucuronidation of TCC. These results present an anomaly where in vivo the predominant urinary metabolites of TCC are N and N'-glucuronides, but these compounds are slowly produced in vitro. PMID:21953915

  5. Glucuronidation and Methylation of Procyanidin Dimers B2 and 3,3’’-Di-O-Galloyl-B2 and Corresponding Monomers Epicatechin and 3-O-Galloyl-Epicatechin in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Suraj P.; Thompson, John A.; Wempe, Michael F.; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The 3,3’’-di-O-galloyl ester of procyanidin B2 (B2G2) is a component of grape seed extract that inhibits growth of human prostate carcinoma cell lines. In preparation for studies in mice, its hepatic metabolism was examined in vitro and compared to B2 and the corresponding monomers, epicatechin (EC) and 3-O-galloyl-epicatechin (ECG). Methods Compounds were incubated with liver microsomes or cytosol containing cofactors for glucuronidation, sulfation or methylation, and products analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). B2G2 was administered orally to mice and plasma analyzed by LC-MS for unmodified procyanidin and metabolites. Results Glucuronides and methyl ethers of B2 and B2G2 were formed in small amounts. In contrast, EC and ECG were largely or completely converted to glucuronides, sulfates and methyl ethers under the same incubation conditions. B2G2 given orally to mice was partially absorbed intact; no significant metabolites were detected in plasma. Conclusions Glucuronidation and methylation of procyanidins B2 and B2G2 occurred but were minor processes in vitro. B2G2 was partially absorbed intact in mice after oral dosing and did not undergo significant metabolism. Unlike the flavanol monomers EC and ECG, therefore, B2G2 bioavailability should not be limited by metabolism. These results paved the way for ongoing pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies. PMID:22068277

  6. A perspective on the epidemiology of acetaminophen exposure and toxicity in the United States.

    PubMed

    Blieden, Marissa; Paramore, L Clark; Shah, Dhvani; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2014-05-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly-used analgesic in the US and, at doses of more than 4 g/day, can lead to serious hepatotoxicity. Recent FDA and CMS decisions serve to limit and monitor exposure to high-dose acetaminophen. This literature review aims to describe the exposure to and consequences of high-dose acetaminophen among chronic pain patients in the US. Each year in the US, approximately 6% of adults are prescribed acetaminophen doses of more than 4 g/day and 30,000 patients are hospitalized for acetaminophen toxicity. Up to half of acetaminophen overdoses are unintentional, largely related to opioid-acetaminophen combinations and attempts to achieve better symptom relief. Liver injury occurs in 17% of adults with unintentional acetaminophen overdose.

  7. In vitro antioxidative activity of (-)-epicatechin glucuronide metabolites present in human and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Osakabe, Naomi; Yasuda, Akiko; Baba, Seigo; Tokunaga, Takashi; Kondo, Kazuo; Osawa, Toshihiko; Terao, Junji

    2004-12-01

    Recently we identified four conjugated glucuronide metabolites of epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (E3'G), 4'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (4'ME3'G), (-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (E7G) and 3'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (3'ME7G) from plasma and urine. E3'G and 4'ME3'G were isolated from human urine, while E7G and 3'ME7G were isolated from rats that had received oral administration of (-)-epicatechin (Natsume et al. (2003), Free Radic. Biol. Med. 34,840-849). It has been suggested that these metabolites possess considerable in vivo activity, and therefore we carried out a study to compare the antioxidant activities of the metabolites with that of the parent compound. This was achieved by measuring superoxide scavenging activity, reduction of plasma TBARS production and reduced susceptibility of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation. (-)-Epicatechin was found to have more potent antioxidant activity than the conjugated glucuronide metabolites. Both (-)-epicatechin and E7G had marked antioxidative properties with respect to superoxide radical scavenging activity, plasma oxidation induced by 2,2'-azobis-(2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and LDL oxidation induced by copper ions or 2,2'-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (MeO-AMVN). In contrast, the other metabolites had light antioxidative activities over the range of physiological concentrations found in plasma.

  8. Separation of substrates and closely related glucuronide metabolites using various chromatographic modes.

    PubMed

    Romand, Stéphanie; Rudaz, Serge; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-02-26

    The aim of this study was to assess the retention and selectivity of a cocktail of 10 substrates of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) and their respective glucuronides using four chromatographic approaches. For this purpose, seven different stationary phases were employed in reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), two in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), one in aqueous normal phase chromatography (ANPC) and four in subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Highly orthogonal separations were achieved with these chromatographic modes. Hydrophobic interactions mainly governed the retention of the substrates and their polar glucuronides in RPLC despite the use of different chemical stationary phase bonding, involving additional possible interactions. In ANPC, atypical separations and poor peak shapes were observed with the selected compounds. In HILIC and SFC conditions, the metabolites were more retained than the substrates because of the polarity increase related to the glucuronic acid moiety. For the latter, a very high proportion of organic solvent (up to 80%) was required to elute the glucuronides that often displayed poor peak shapes. Finally, the selectivity of nine chromatographic systems was compared for the separation of isomeric and diastereoisomeric compounds. The stationary phases used in RPLC mode were more selective towards the two positional isomers of morphine glucuronides since they possess distinct lipophilicity. HILIC and SFC columns were found to be promising for the separation of a critical diastereoisomers pair, namely epitestosterone-glucuronide and testosterone-glucuronide. PMID:26818236

  9. Glucuronidation of Drugs and Drug-Induced Toxicity in Humanized UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kutsuno, Yuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze glucuronidation of various drugs. Although experimental rodents are used in preclinical studies to predict glucuronidation and toxicity of drugs in humans, species differences in glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity have been reported. Humanized UGT1 mice in which the original Ugt1 locus was disrupted and replaced with the human UGT1 locus (hUGT1 mice) were recently developed. In this study, acyl-glucuronidations of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen in liver microsomes of hUGT1 mice were examined and compared with those of humans and regular mice. The kinetics of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen acyl-glucuronidation in hUGT1 mice were almost comparable to those in humans, rather than in mice. We further investigated the hepatotoxicity of ibuprofen in hUGT1 mice and regular mice by measuring serum alanine amino transferase (ALT) levels. Because ALT levels were increased at 6 hours after dosing in hUGT1 mice and at 24 hours after dosing in regular mice, the onset pattern of ibuprofen-induced liver toxicity in hUGT1 mice was different from that in regular mice. These data suggest that hUGT1 mice can be valuable tools for understanding glucuronidations of drugs and drug-induced toxicity in humans. PMID:24764149

  10. Transformation of acetaminophen during water chlorination treatment: kinetics and transformation products identification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Zhang, Mengtao; Yuan, Shoujun; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Qiquan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenhu

    2016-06-01

    As a high-consumption drug in the world, acetaminophen (AAP) has been widely detected in natural waters and wastewaters. Its reactivity and the transformation products formed during chlorination may greatly threaten the safety of drinking water. The reaction kinetics of AAP during chlorination was investigated in this study. The results showed that the reaction kinetics could be well described with a kinetics model of -d[AAP]/dt = k app[AAP]t (0.63)[Cl2]t (1.37). The values of apparent rate constant (k app) were dependent on reaction temperature, ammonium, and pH. With the increase in reaction temperature from 5.0 ± 1.0 to 40.0 ± 1.0 °C, the removal efficiency of AAP increased from 60 to 100 %. When ammonium was present in the solution at 2.0 mg/L, the transformation of AAP was inhibited due to the rapid formation of chloramines. The maximum of k app was 0.58 × 10(2) M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 9.0, and the minimum was 0.27 M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 11.0. A low mineralization of AAP (about 7.2 %) with chlorination was observed through TOC analysis, implying the formation of plenty of transformation products during chlorination. The main transformation products, hydroquinone and two kinds of chlorinated compounds, monochlorinated acetaminophen and dichlorinated acetaminophen, were detected in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

  11. Effects of clofibrate and indocyanine green on the hepatobiliary disposition of acetaminophen and its metabolites in male CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Hennig, G E; McCann, D J; Manautou, J E

    2000-11-01

    1. The effects of clofibrate (CFB) and indocyanine green (ICG) on the biliary excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) and its metabolites were investigated. 2. Male CD-1 mice were pretreated with 500 mg CFB/kg, i.p. for 10 days. Controls received corn oil vehicle only. After overnight fasting, common bile duct-cannulated mice were challenged with a non-toxic dose of APAP (1 mmol/kg, i.v.). 3. CFB pretreatment did not affect bile flow rate, nor did it affect the cumulative biliary excretion of APAP and its conjugated metabolites. 4. Additional CFB or corn oil pretreated mice were given 30 mumol indocyanine green (ICG)/kg, i.v., immediately before APAP dosing. ICG is a non-metabolizable organic anion that is completely excreted into the bile through a canalicular transport process for organic anions. 5. ICG significantly decreased the bile flow rate and biliary concentration of APAP-glutathione, APAP-glucuronide and APAP-mercapturate within the first hour after dosing without affecting the biliary concentration of APAP. 6. The results indicate that CFB pretreatment does not affect the total amount of APAP and its metabolites excreted in bile. They also suggest that the biliary excretion of several conjugated metabolites of APAP share the same excretory pathway with the organic anion ICG.

  12. MODULATION OF ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY BY THE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR CAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified the xenobiotic receptor CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) as a key regulator of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity. Known CAR activators as well as high doses of acetaminophen induced expression of three acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes in wild-type but not in CAR-...

  13. Tramadol and acetaminophen tablets for dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Medve, R. A.; Wang, J.; Karim, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the efficacy and time to analgesia of a new tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablet to those of tramadol or acetaminophen (APAP) alone. A meta-analysis was performed of 3 separate single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group trials in patients with moderate or severe pain following extraction of 2 or more third molars. Patients in each study were evenly randomized to a single dose of tramadol/APAP (75 mg/650 mg), tramadol 75 mg, APAP 650 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. Active control with ibuprofen was used to determine model sensitivity. Pain relief (scale, 0-4) and pain intensity (scale, 0-3) were reported at 30 minutes after the dose and then hourly for 8 hours. Total pain relief over 8 hours (TOTPAR8) and the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID8) were calculated from the hourly scores. Time to onset of pain relief was determined by the double-stopwatch technique, and patients were advised to wait at least 2 hours before taking supplemental analgesia. Patients assessed overall efficacy (scale, 1-5) upon completion. In all, 1197 patients (age range, 16-46 years) were evaluable for efficacy; treatment groups in each study were similar at baseline. Pain relief was superior to placebo (P < or = .0001) for all treatments. Pain relief provided by tramadol/ APAP was superior to that of tramadol or APAP alone, as shown by mean TOT-PAR8 (12.1 vs 6.7 and 8.6, respectively, P < or = .0001) and SPID8 (4.7 vs 0.9 and 2.7, respectively, P < or = .0001). Estimated onset of pain relief was 17 minutes (95% CI, 15-20 minutes) for tramadol/APAP compared with 51 minutes (95% CI, 40-70 minutes) for tramadol, 18 minutes (95% CI, 16-21 minutes) for APAP, and 34 minutes (95% CI, 28-44 minutes) for ibuprofen. Median time to supplemental analgesia and mean overall assessment of efficacy were greater (P < .05) for the tramadol/APAP group (302 minutes and 3.0, respectively) than for the tramadol (122 minutes and 2.0) or APAP (183 minutes and 2

  14. Glucuronic acid and the ethanol metabolite ethyl-glucuronide cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Zhang, Yingning; Hund, Dana K.; Maier, Steven F.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously observed that the non-opioid morphine metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, enhances pain via a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent mechanism. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether TLR4-dependent pain enhancement generalizes to other classes of glucuronide metabolites. In silico modeling predicted that glucuronic acid alone and ethyl glucuronide, a minor but long-lasting ethanol metabolite, would dock to the same MD-2 portion of the TLR4 receptor complex previously characterized as the docking site for morphine-3-glucuronide. Glucuronic acid, ethyl glucuronide and ethanol all caused an increase in TLR4-dependent reporter protein expression in a cell line transfected with TLR4 and associated co-signaling molecules. Glucuronic acid-, ethyl glucuronide-, and ethanol-induced increases in TLR4 signaling were blocked by the TLR4 antagonists LPS-RS and (+)-naloxone. Glucuronic acid and ethyl glucuronide both caused allodynia following intrathecal injection in rats, which was blocked by intrathecal co-administration of the TLR4 antagonist LPS-RS. The finding that ethyl glucuronide can cause TLR4-dependent pain could have implications for human conditions such as hangover headache and alcohol withdrawal hyperalgesia, as well as suggesting that other classes of glucuronide metabolites could have similar effects. PMID:23348028

  15. Nilotinib interferes with the signalling pathways implicated in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mohamed E

    2014-03-01

    Nilotinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia. The objective of this study was to explore the potential effects of clinically relevant doses of nilotinib against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. To simulate the clinical application in human beings, nilotinib (25 and 50 mg/kg) was administered to mice 2 hr after APAP intoxication (500 mg/kg). The results indicated that nilotinib (25 mg/kg) (i) abolished APAP-induced liver injury and necro-inflammation, (ii) increased hepatic-reduced glutathione (GSH) and its related enzymes synthesis, (iii) suppressed hepatic oxidative/nitrosative stress cascades, (iv) decreased neutrophil accumulation in the liver, and (v) prevented the over-expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 (bcl-2), cyclin-D1 and stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) proteins in the liver. Although nilotinib (50 mg/kg) acted through the same mechanisms, there was severe depletion in hepatic GSH content by nilotinib itself at that dose level, rather than the potent stimulation observed by using a dose of 25 mg/kg. Consequently, the mortality rate after 18 hr was 100% for nilotinib (50 mg/kg) + APAP (750 mg/kg) versus 60% for APAP (750 mg/kg) and 40% for nilotinib (25 mg/kg) + APAP (750 mg/kg) in the survival analysis experiment. In conclusion, nilotinib can counteract the hepatotoxicity produced by a non-lethal dose of APAP. However, there is a risk of aggravating the mortality for a lethal dose of APAP when nilotinib is co-administered at doses relatively high, or near to the clinical range because of hepatic GSH depletion and c-kit inhibition.

  16. In vitro glucuronidation kinetics of deoxynivalenol by human and animal microsomes and recombinant human UGT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Ronald; Warth, Benedikt; Schebb, Nils Helge; Krska, Rudolf; Koch, Matthias; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), formed by Fusarium species, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins contaminating food and feed worldwide. Upon ingestion, the majority of the toxin is excreted by humans and animal species as glucuronide conjugate. First in vitro data indicated that DON phase II metabolism is strongly species dependent. However, kinetic data on the in vitro metabolism as well as investigations on the specific enzymes responsible for DON glucuronidation in human are lacking. In the present study, the DON metabolism was investigated using human microsomal fractions and uridine-diphosphoglucuronyltransferases (UGTs) as well as liver microsomes from five animal species. Only two of the twelve tested human recombinant UGTs led to the formation of DON glucuronides with a different regiospecificity. UGT2B4 predominantly catalyzed the formation of DON-15-O-glucuronide (DON-15GlcA), while for UGT2B7 the DON-3-O-glucuronide (DON-3GlcA) metabolite prevailed. For human UGTs, liver, and intestinal microsomes, the glucuronidation activities were low. The estimated apparent intrinsic clearance (Clapp,int) for all human UGT as well as tissue homogenates was <1 mL/min mg protein. For the animal liver microsomes, moderate Clapp,int between 1.5 and 10 mL/min mg protein were calculated for carp, trout, and porcine liver. An elevated glucuronidation activity was detected for rat and bovine liver microsomes leading to Clapp,int between 20 and 80 mL/min mg protein. The obtained in vitro data points out that none of the animal models is suitable for estimating the human DON metabolism with respect to the metabolite pattern and formation rate.

  17. Human hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 are glucuronidated and sulfated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio; Zheng, Xiaobo; Ryden, Andreas; Marsh, Goran; Maho, Walid; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-16

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were used worldwide as additive flame retardants and are classified as persistent, bioaccumulable and toxic environmental pollutants. In humans, the hydroxylated metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) formed in vitro have also been detected in vivo. To further characterize the metabolism of BDE-47 and BDE-99 and to identify candidate markers for monitoring the human exposure to PBDEs using non-invasive approaches, glucuronidation and sulfation of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were investigated using human liver microsomes and cytoplasm, respectively. The formed Phase II metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a novel approach to develop analytical methods in absence of authentic standards. All available standards for hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were glucuronidated and sulfated, showing that glucuronidation and sulfation are part of the metabolism pathway of BDE-47 and BDE-99 in vitro. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 were (a) 2,4-DBP-Gluc and 5-Gluc-BDE-47, and (b) 2'-Sulf-BDE-28, 4-Sulf-BDE-42 and 3-Sulf-BDE-47, respectively. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 were (a) 2,4,5-TBP-Gluc and 6'-Gluc-BDE-99, and (b) 3'-Sulf-BDE-99 and 5'-Sulf-BDE-99, respectively. Apparent Km values associated with the formation of sulfated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were ten times lower than those of the corresponding glucuronidated metabolites, suggesting that sulfated rather than glucuronidated metabolites of OH-PBDEs might be used as markers of human exposure to PBDEs using a non-invasive approach based on urine sample collection. PMID:25956475

  18. Glucuronidation of anabolic androgenic steroids by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kuuranne, Tiia; Kurkela, Mika; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Finel, Moshe; Kostiainen, Risto

    2003-09-01

    A multidimensional study on the glucuronidation of anabolic androgenic steroids and their phase I metabolites by 11 recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) was carried out using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analyses. Large differences between the enzymes with respect to the conjugation profiles of the 11 tested aglycones were detected. Two UGTs, 1A6 and 1A7, did not exhibit measurable activity toward any of the aglycones that were examined in this study. Regioselectivity was demonstrated by UGTs 1A8, 1A9, and 2B15 that preferentially catalyzed hydroxyl glucuronidation at the 17beta-position. Most of the other enzymes glucuronidated hydroxyl groups at both the 3alpha- and the 17beta-positions. Clear stereoselectivity was observed in glucuronidation of diastereomeric nandrolone metabolites (5alpha-estran-3alpha-ol-17-one and 5beta-estran-3alpha-ol-17-one), whereas such specificity was not seen when analogous methyltestosterone metabolites were assayed. UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, and 2B15 readily glucuronidated 5alpha-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol, but none of them exhibited methyltestosterone glucuronidation activity. In agreement with the latter observations, we found that the methyltestosterone glucuronidation activity of human liver microsomes is extremely low, whereas in induced rat liver microsomes it was significantly higher. The homology among UGTs 1A7 to 1A10 at the level of amino acid sequence is very high, and it was thus surprising to find large differences in their activity toward this set of aglycones. Furthermore, the high activity of UGT1A8 and 1A10 toward some of the substrates indicates that extrahepatic enzymes might play a role in the metabolism of anabolic androgenic steroids. PMID:12920167

  19. Ethanol extract from portulaca oleracea L. attenuated acetaminophen-induced mice liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Zheng, Cheng-Gang; Shi, Hong-Guang; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Wan-Yin; Zhou, Juan; Dong, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen-induced liver injury represents the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the world. Portulaca oleracea L., a widely distributed weed, has been used as a folk medicine in many countries. Previously, we reported that the ethanol extracts of Portulaca oleracea L. (PO) exhibited significant anti-hypoxic activity. In the present study, we investigated the role of PO on acetaminophen (APAP) induced hepatotoxicity. The results demonstrated that PO was an effective anti-oxidative agent, which could, to some extent, reverse APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by regulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the liver of mice. At the same time, PO treatment significantly decreased mice serum levels of IL-6 and TNFα and their mRNA expression in liver tissue IL-α and TNFα play an important role during APAP-induced liver injury. Furthermore, PO inhibited APAP and TNFα-induced activation of JNK, whose activation play an important effect during APAP induced liver injury. These findings suggested that administration of PO may be an effective strategy to prevent or treat liver injury induced by APAP. PMID:25901199

  20. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice.

  1. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice. PMID:25384447

  2. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-06-28

    Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  3. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  4. Xenobiotics and Autoimmunity: Does Acetaminophen Cause Primary Biliary Cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patrick S.C.; Lam, Kit; Kurth, Mark J.; Coppel, Ross L.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    The serologic hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is the presence of antimitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA) directed against the E2 subunit of PDC-E2. The PBC-related autoepitope of PDC-E2 contains lipoic acid, and previous work has demonstrated that mimics of lipoic acid following immunization of mice lead to a PBC-like disease. Furthermore, approximately one third of patients who have ingested excessive amounts of acetaminophen (paracetamol) develop AMA of the same specificity as patients with PBC. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) data indicates that acetaminophen metabolites are particularly immunoreactive with AMA, and we submit that in genetically susceptible hosts, electrophilic modification of lipoic acid in PDC-E2 by acetaminophen or similar drugs can facilitate a loss of tolerance and lead to the development of PBC. PMID:22920894

  5. Direct radioimmunoassay of urinary estrogen and pregnanediol glucuronides during the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stanczyk, F.Z.; Miyakawa, I.; Goebelsmann, U.

    1980-06-15

    Assays measuring immunoreactive estrone glucuronide (E/sub 1/G), estradiol-3-glucuronide (E/sub 2/-3G), estradiol-17..beta..-glucuronide (E/sub 2/-17G), estriol-3-glucuronide (E/sub 3/-3G), estriol-16..cap alpha..-glucuronide (E/sub 3/-16G), and pregnanediol-3..cap alpha..-glucuronide (Pd-3G) directly in diluted urine were developed and validated. These estrogen and pregnanediol glucuronide fractions were measured in aliquots of 24-hour and overnight samples of urine collected daily from seven women for one menstrual cycle. Urinary hormone excretion was correlated with daily serum estradiol (E/sub 2/), progesterone (P), and lutenizing hormonee (LH) levels. A sharp midcycle LH peak preceded by a preovulatory rise in serum E/sub 2/ and followed by luteal phase serum P levels were noted in each of the seven apparently ovulatory cycles. Twenty-four-hour and overnight urinary excretion patterns of estrogen glucuronides were similar to those of serum E/sub 2/. Of the five estrogen glucuronide fractions tested, excretion of E/sub 2/-17G exhibited the earliest and steepest ascending slope of the preovulatory estrogen surge and correlated best with serum E/sub 2/ levels. Urinary excretion of E/sub 1/-G, E/sub 2/-3G, and E/sub 3/-16G also showed an early and steep preovulatory rise and preceded that of E/sub 3/-3G, whereas urinary excretion of E/sub 3/-3G exhibited the poorest correlation with serum E/sub 2/ concentrations. The urinary excretion of Pd-3G rose parallel to serum P levels and was markedly elevated 2 to 3 days after the midcycle LH peak in both 24-hour and overnight collections of urine. These results indicate that among the urinary estrogen conjugate fractions tested, E/sub 2/-17G is the one that most suitably predicts ovulation.

  6. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  7. Bisphenol A glucuronide/sulfate diconjugate in perfused liver of rats

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Hiroki; KEMANAI, Shino; SANO, Chie; KATO, Seiyu; YOKOTA, Hiroshi; IWANO, Hidetomo

    2016-01-01

    In isolated hepatocytes, the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) is metabolized into a mono-glucuronide and a glucuronide/sulfate diconjugate. Little is known about the fate of the diconjugate in the liver. The present study focused on the metabolism and dispostion of BPA diconjugate in the liver using a perfusion method. In Sprague-Dawley rats, BPA (15,150 or 1,500 nmol) was applied into the liver. In male rats, the infused BPA was conjugated to both glucuronide and a diconjugate during passage through the liver. The diconjugate was observed at high-dose application of the substrate. In female rats, the chemical was conjugated almost exclusively to the glucuronide in all doses utilized in this study. In both the male and female rats, the resultant metabolites were preferentially excreted into the bile. These results suggest that BPA is conjugated primarily to mono-glucuronide in rat liver; and that in males, diconjugate production occurs under conditions of high-dose exposure to BPA. PMID:26782136

  8. Genetic and environmental factors associated with variation of human xenobiotic glucuronidation and sulfation.

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, B; Coughtrie, M W

    1997-01-01

    Glucuronidation and sulfation are phase 2 metabolic reactions catalyzed by large families of different isoenzymes in man. The textbook view that glucuronidation and sulfation lead to the production of harmless conjugates for simple excretion is not valid. Biologically active and toxic sulfates and glucuronides are produced and leed to adverse drug reactions, including immune hypersensitivity. Considerable variation in xenobiotic conjugation is observed as a result of altered expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and sulfotransferases (STs). Recent cloning and expression of human cDNA encoding UGTs and STs has facilitated characterization of isoform substrate specificity, which has been further validated using specific antibodies and human tissue fractions. The availability of cloned/expressed human enzymes and specific antibodies has enabled the investigation of xenobiotic induction and metabolic disruption leeding to adverse responses. Genetic polymorphisms of glucuronidation and sulfation are known to exist although the characterization and assessment of the importance of these variations are hampered by appropriate ethical studies in men with suitable safe model compounds. Genetic analysis has allowed molecular identification of defects in well-known hyperbilirubinemias. However, full characterization of the specific functional roles of human UGTs and STs requires rigorous kinetic and molecular analyses of the role of each enzyme in vivo through the use of specific antibodies and inhibitors. This will leed to the better prediction of variation of xenobiotic glucuronidation and sulfation in man. PMID:9255555

  9. New Flavonol Glucuronides from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum (Clove).

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byeol; Kim, Hye Mi; Lee, Jin Su; Lee, Chan Kyu; Sezirahiga, Jurdas; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Jung-Hye; Jang, Dae Sik

    2016-04-20

    Repeated chromatography of the EtOAc-soluble fraction from the 70% EtOH extract of the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum (clove) led to the isolation and characterization of four new flavonol glucuronides, rhamnetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide (1), rhamnazin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide (2), rhamnazin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide-6″-methyl ester (3), and rhamnocitrin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide-6″-methyl ester (4), together with 15 flavonoids (5-19) having previously known chemical structures. The structures of the new compounds 1-4 were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data, particularly by 1D- and 2D-NMR studies. Six flavonoids (6, 7, 9, 14, 18, and 19) were isolated from the flower buds of S. aromaticum for the first time in this study. The flavonoids were examined for their cytotoxicity against human ovarian cancer cells (A2780) using MTT assays. Among the isolates, pachypodol (19) showed the most potent cytotoxicity on A2780 cells with an IC50 value of 8.02 μM. PMID:27045836

  10. New Flavonol Glucuronides from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum (Clove).

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byeol; Kim, Hye Mi; Lee, Jin Su; Lee, Chan Kyu; Sezirahiga, Jurdas; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Jung-Hye; Jang, Dae Sik

    2016-04-20

    Repeated chromatography of the EtOAc-soluble fraction from the 70% EtOH extract of the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum (clove) led to the isolation and characterization of four new flavonol glucuronides, rhamnetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide (1), rhamnazin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide (2), rhamnazin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide-6″-methyl ester (3), and rhamnocitrin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide-6″-methyl ester (4), together with 15 flavonoids (5-19) having previously known chemical structures. The structures of the new compounds 1-4 were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic data, particularly by 1D- and 2D-NMR studies. Six flavonoids (6, 7, 9, 14, 18, and 19) were isolated from the flower buds of S. aromaticum for the first time in this study. The flavonoids were examined for their cytotoxicity against human ovarian cancer cells (A2780) using MTT assays. Among the isolates, pachypodol (19) showed the most potent cytotoxicity on A2780 cells with an IC50 value of 8.02 μM.

  11. The gusBC genes of Escherichia coli encode a glucuronide transport system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Jun; Wilson, Kate J; Xie, Hao; Knol, Jan; Suzuki, Shun'ichi; Rutherford, Nicholas G; Henderson, Peter J F; Jefferson, Richard A

    2005-04-01

    Two genes, gusB and gusC, from a natural fecal isolate of Escherichia coli are shown to encode proteins responsible for transport of beta-glucuronides with synthetic [(14)C]phenyl-1-thio-beta-d-glucuronide as the substrate. These genes are located in the gus operon downstream of the gusA gene on the E. coli genome, and their expression is induced by a variety of beta-d-glucuronides. Measurements of transport in right-side-out subcellular vesicles show the system has the characteristics of secondary active transport energized by the respiration-generated proton motive force. When the genes were cloned together downstream of the tac operator-promoter in the plasmid pTTQ18 expression vector, transport activity was increased considerably with isopropylthiogalactopyranoside as the inducer. Amplified expression of the GusB and GusC proteins enabled visualization and identification by N-terminal sequencing of both proteins, which migrated at ca. 32 kDa and 44 kDa, respectively. Separate expression of the GusB protein showed that it is essential for glucuronide transport and is located in the inner membrane, while the GusC protein does not catalyze transport but assists in an as yet unknown manner and is located in the outer membrane. The output of glucuronides as waste by mammals and uptake for nutrition by gut bacteria or reabsorption by the mammalian host is discussed. PMID:15774881

  12. Separation and Purification of Two Flavone Glucuronides from Erigeron multiradiatus (Lindl.) Benth with Macroporous Resins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-feng; Liu, Yuan; Luo, Pei; Zhang, Hao

    2009-01-01

    Scutellarein-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (SG) and apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (AG) are two major bioactive constituents with known pharmacological effects in Erigeron multiradiatus. In this study, a simple method for preparative separation of the two flavone glucuronides was established with macroporous resins. The performance and adsorption characteristics of eight macroporous resins including AB-8, HPD100, HPD450, HPD600, D100, D101, D141, and D160 have been evaluated. The results confirmed that D141 resin offered the best adsorption and desorption capacities and the highest desorption ratio for the two glucuronides among the tested resins. Sorption isotherms were constructed for D141 resin under optimal ethanol conditions and fitted well to the Freundlich and Langmuir models (R2 > 0.95). Dynamic adsorption and desorption tests was performed on column packed with D141 resin. After one-run treatment with D141 resin, the two-constituent content in the final product was increased from 2.14% and 1.34% in the crude extract of Erigeron multiradiatus to 24.63% and 18.42% in the final products with the recoveries of 82.5% and 85.4%, respectively. The preparative separation of SG and AG can be easily and effectively achieved via adsorption and desorption on D141 resin, and the method developed can be referenced for large-scale separation and purification of flavone glucuronides from herbal raw materials. PMID:19918373

  13. A long-standing mystery solved: the formation of 3-hydroxydesloratadine is catalyzed by CYP2C8 but prior glucuronidation of desloratadine by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B10 is an obligatory requirement.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Faraz; Barbara, Joanna E; Yerino, Phyllis; Parkinson, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Desloratadine (Clarinex), the major active metabolite of loratadine (Claritin), is a nonsedating long-lasting antihistamine that is widely used for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria. For over 20 years, it has remained a mystery as to which enzymes are responsible for the formation of 3-hydroxydesloratadine, the major active human metabolite, largely due to the inability of any in vitro system tested thus far to generate this metabolite. In this study, we demonstrated that cryopreserved human hepatocytes (CHHs) form 3-hydroxydesloratadine and its corresponding O-glucuronide. CHHs catalyzed the formation of 3-hydroxydesloratadine with a Km of 1.6 μM and a Vmax of 1.3 pmol/min per million cells. Chemical inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in CHHs demonstrated that gemfibrozil glucuronide (CYP2C8 inhibitor) and 1-aminobenzotriazole (general P450 inhibitor) inhibited 3-hydroxydesloratadine formation by 91% and 98%, respectively. Other inhibitors of CYP2C8 (gemfibrozil, montelukast, clopidogrel glucuronide, repaglinide, and cerivastatin) also caused extensive inhibition of 3-hydroxydesloratadine formation (73%-100%). Assessment of desloratadine, amodiaquine, and paclitaxel metabolism by a panel of individual CHHs demonstrated that CYP2C8 marker activity robustly correlated with 3-hydroxydesloratadine formation (r(2) of 0.70-0.90). Detailed mechanistic studies with sonicated or saponin-treated CHHs, human liver microsomes, and S9 fractions showed that both NADPH and UDP-glucuronic acid are required for 3-hydroxydesloratadine formation, and studies with recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and P450 enzymes implicated the specific involvement of UGT2B10 in addition to CYP2C8. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time that desloratadine glucuronidation by UGT2B10 followed by CYP2C8 oxidation and a deconjugation event are responsible for the formation of 3-hydroxydesloratadine. PMID:25595597

  14. Characterization of retinoyl beta-glucuronide as a minor metabolite of retinoic acid in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Zile, M H; Schnoes, H K; DeLuca, H F

    1980-01-01

    Several metabolites detected in the bile of rats given radioactive retinoic acid were separated by liquid/gel partition chromatography and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. One of these metabolites was found to be sensitive to beta-D-glucuronidase, yielding both 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid. It had the characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of retinoic acid esters. Trimethylsilyl ether and acetyl derivatives of the methylated metabolite were prepared and examined by mass spectrometry. The resulting mass spectra established the structure to be retinoyl beta-glucuronide. Retinoyl glucuronide was rapidly excreted into the bile: the excretion was complete by 12 hr after the administration of retinoic acid. At this time the metabolite represented 12% of bile radioactivity (10% of dose). These observations confirm the existence of retinoyl glucuronide but demonstrate that it represents only one of several retinoic acid metabolites in bile. PMID:6932017

  15. A major glucuronidated metabolite of JWH-018 is a neutral antagonist at CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Endres, Gregory W; Keyes, Gregory S; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2012-04-16

    Recently, hydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018, a synthetic cannabinoid found in many K2/Spice preparations, have been shown to retain affinity and activity for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs). The activity of glucuronidated metabolites of JWH-018 is not known; hence, this study investigated the affinity and activity of a major metabolite, JWH-018-N-(5-hydroxypentyl) β-D-glucuronide (018-gluc), for CB1Rs. The 018-gluc binds CB1Rs (K(i) = 922 nM), has no effect on G-protein activity, but antagonizes JWH-018 activity at CB1Rs. The data suggests that hydroxylation by cytochrome P450s and subsequent glucuronidation by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases produces a metabolite, 018-gluc, which possesses antagonistic activity at CB1Rs.

  16. A major glucuronidated metabolite of JWH-018 is a neutral antagonist at CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Kathryn A.; Brents, Lisa K.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Endres, Gregory W.; Keyes, Gregory S.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, hydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018, a synthetic cannabinoid found in many K2/Spice preparations, have been shown to retain affinity and activity for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs). The activity of glucuronidated metabolites of JWH-018 is not known; hence this study investigated the affinity and activity of a major metabolite, JWH-018-N-(5-hydroxypentyl) β-D-glucuronide (018-gluc), for CB1Rs. The 018-gluc binds CB1Rs (Ki = 922 nM), has no effect on G-protein activity, but antagonizes JWH-018 activity at CB1Rs. The data suggests that hydroxylation by cytochrome P450s and subsequent glucuronidation by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases produces a metabolite, 018-gluc, which possesses antagonistic activity at CB1Rs. PMID:22404317

  17. Synthesis of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide histaminyl conjugate for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Vinš, Petr; Černý, Ivan; Mikšátková, Petra; Drašar, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Simple method of preparation of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol 17-O-glucuronide N-histaminyl amide was developed for the construction of immunoanalytical kit. Improved method of glucuronide derivative synthesis was used, followed by hydroxybenzotriazole-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling with histamine. PMID:26898541

  18. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  19. In vitro characterization of glucuronidation of vanillin: identification of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and species differences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Han, Jing-Chun; Hua, Li-Min; Gao, Ya-Jie

    2013-09-01

    Vanillin is a food flavoring agent widely utilized in foods, beverages, drugs, and perfumes and has been demonstrated to exhibit multiple pharmacological activities. Given the importance of glucuronidation in the metabolism of vanillin, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase conjugation pathway of vanillin was investigated in this study. Vanillin glucuronide was identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and a hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by β-glucuronidase. The kinetic study showed that vanillin glucuronidation by HLMs and HIMs followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the kinetic parameters were as follows: 134.9 ± 13.5 μM and 81.3 ± 11.3 μM for K(m) of HLMs and HIMs, 63.8 ± 2.0 nmol/min/mg pro and 13.4 ±2.0 nmol/min/mg pro for Vmax of HLMs and HIMs. All UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms except UGT1A4, 1A9, and 2B7 showed the capability to glucuronidate vanillin, and UGT1A6 exerted the higher V(max)/K(m) values than other UGT isoforms for the glucuronidation of vanillin when assuming expression of isoforms is similar in recombinant UGTs. Kinetic analysis using liver microsomes from six studied speices indicated that vanillin had highest affinity for the monkey liver microsomes enzyme (K(m)  = 25.6 ± 3.2 μM) and the lowest affinity for the mice liver microsomes enzyme (K(m)  = 149.1 ± 18.4 μM), and intrinsic clearance was in the following order: monkey > dog > minipig > mice > rat ~ human. These data collectively provided important information for understanding glucuronidation of vanillin.

  20. Comparison of the effects of curcumin and curcumin glucuronide in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Motomu; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Akio; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Teiko; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-05-15

    Curcumin is a yellow pigment found in turmeric (Curcuma Longa L.), and is reported, in recent studies, to have several pharmacological effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and lipid-lowering properties. However, as most curcumin is conjugated when absorbed through the intestine, free curcumin is present at extremely low levels inside the body. Therefore, curcumin metabolites have been presumed to be responsible for the curcumin bioactivity. In this study, we first confirmed that curcumin glucuronide is the major metabolite of curcumin found in the plasma after oral administration of curcumin in rats. Next, we synthesised curcumin glucuronide and compared the effects of curcumin and curcumin glucuronide on gene expression in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). We found that the effects of curcumin glucuronide are weaker than those of curcumin and that this difference is related to relative absorption rates of curcumin and curcumin glucuronide into HepG2 cells.

  1. Postsurgical pain: zomepirac sodium, propoxyphene/-acetaminophen combination, and placebo.

    PubMed

    Honig, S; Murray, K A

    1981-10-01

    Zomepirac sodium, a new, nonnarcotic analgesic agent, was compared with the combination of propoxyphene/acetaminophen in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-dose study in 196 hospitalized postsurgical patients with pain severe enough to require a prescription analgesic. Patients received 100 mg zomepirac sodium, 50 mg zomepirac sodium, 100 mg propoxyphene napsylate with 650 mg acetaminophen, or placebo. Total pain relief during the 6-hour observation period showed that 100 mg zomepirac sodium was significantly more effective than the propoxyphene combination. All active drugs were superior to placebo. Percentages of patients requiring remedication before the end of the study were: 77 per cent for placebo, 48 per cent for propoxyphene/acetaminophen, 43 per cent for 50 mg zomepirac sodium, and 29 per cent for 100 mg zomepirac sodium. The numbers of patients reporting side effects were not significantly different among the treatment groups. These results confirm those of other single-dose pain studies which showed 100 mg zomepirac sodium significantly more efficacious than the propoxyphene/acetaminophen combination.

  2. Acetaminophen-induced Liver Injury: from Animal Models to Humans.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R

    2014-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is an important clinical problem and a challenge for drug development. Whereas progress in understanding rare and unpredictable (idiosyncratic) drug hepatotoxicity is severely hampered by the lack of relevant animal models, enormous insight has been gained in the area of predictable hepatotoxins, in particular acetaminophen-induced liver injury, from a broad range of experimental models. Importantly, mechanisms of toxicity obtained with certain experimental systems, such as in vivo mouse models, primary mouse hepatocytes, and metabolically competent cell lines, are being confirmed in translational studies in patients and in primary human hepatocytes. Despite this progress, suboptimal models are still being used and experimental data can be confusing, leading to controversial conclusions. Therefore, this review attempts to discuss mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity using the most studied drug acetaminophen as an example. We compare the various experimental models that are used to investigate mechanisms of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, discuss controversial topics in the mechanisms, and assess how these experimental findings can be translated to the clinic. The success with acetaminophen in demonstrating the clinical relevance of experimental findings could serve as an example for the study of other drug toxicities. PMID:26355817

  3. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  4. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; Maria Monteiro de Araújo, Cintia; Tiburcio, Taynã; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Farhood, Anwar; Zaidan Dagli, Maria Lucia; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-h time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739117

  5. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  6. Recent Updates on Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity: The Role of Nrf2 in Hepatoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Gum, Sang Il

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) known as paracetamol is the main ingredient in Tylenol, which has analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. Inappropriate use of APAP causes major morbidity and mortality secondary to hepatic failure. Overdose of APAP depletes the hepatic glutathione (GSH) rapidly, and the metabolic intermediate leads to hepatocellular death. This article reviews the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and provides an overview of current research studies. Pharmacokinetics including metabolism (activation and detoxification), subsequent transport (efflux)-facilitating excretion, and some other aspects related to toxicity are discussed. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene battery plays a critical role in the multiple steps associated with the mitigation of APAP toxicity. The role of Nrf2 as a protective target is described, and potential natural products inhibiting APAP toxicity are outlined. This review provides an update on the mechanism of APAP toxicity and highlights the beneficial role of Nrf2 and specific natural products in hepatoprotection. PMID:24386516

  7. Comparison of stably expressed rat UGT1.1 and UGT2B1 in the glucuronidation of opioid compounds.

    PubMed

    King, C D; Rios, G R; Green, M D; MacKenzie, P I; Tephly, T R

    1997-02-01

    Opioids are important drugs used as analgesics, antitussives, antidiarrheals, and in the therapy of myocardial infarctions, and as antagonists of opioid intoxication. The glucuronidation of these compounds, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), is well known to be a primary step in their metabolism to hydrophilic products and in their ultimate excretion. The present study was designed to compare the reactivity and relative glucuronidation efficiencies of opioid agonists, antagonists, and partial agonists with two rat UGT isoforms; UGT1.1, which is generally considered the "bilirubin UGT," and UGT2B1, which has previously been shown to catalyze the glucuronidation of testosterone, chloramphenicol, and (-)-morphine. Rat UGT2B1, stably expressed in HK293 cells, exhibited high glucuronidation rates and catalytic efficiencies for many opioids, although values for (-)-morphine and nalorphine were the highest. In contrast, these compounds were very poor substrates for expressed rat UGT1.1. Comparably high glucuronidation rates and efficiencies were found for buprenorphine and diprenorphine with both UGT isoforms. These results suggest that opioids with morphinan-based chemical structures similar to (-)-morphine interact with UGTs differently than those with oripavine-based chemical structures similar to buprenorphine. To investigate the contribution of rat UGT1.1 and UGT2B1 in the overall rate of glucuronidation of buprenorphine in the rat liver, hepatic microsomes from Gunn rats (where UGT1.1 activity is absent) and Wistar rats (where UGT1.1 activity is present) were studied. Buprenorphine glucuronidation activity in Gunn rat liver microsomes exhibit approximately 25% of rates observed in Wistar rat liver microsomes, whereas (-)-morphine, naloxone, and naltrexone glucuronidation rates were not significantly different in microsomal preparations from Gunn and Wistar rats. These data suggest that UGT2B1 is the major hepatic enzyme involved in the glucuronidation

  8. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  9. Structure-inhibition relationship of podophyllotoxin (PT) analogues towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia-Qi; Cao, Yun-Feng; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Meng, Da-Li; Sun, Dong-Xue

    2015-04-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are involved in the clearance of many important drugs and endogenous substances, and inhibition of UGTs' activity by herbal components might induce severe herb-drug interactions or metabolic disturbances of endogenous substances. The present study aims to determine the inhibition of UGTs' activity by podophyllotoxin derivatives, trying to indicate the potential herb-drug interaction or metabolic influence towards endogenous substances' metabolism. Recombinant UGT isoforms (except UGT1A4)-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP) glucuronidation were employed to firstly screen the podophyllotoxin derivatives' inhibition potential. Structure-dependent inhibition behavior of podophyllotoxin derivatives towards UGT isoforms was detected. Inhibition kinetic type and parameter (Ki) were determined for the inhi- bition of podophyllotoxin towards UGT1A1, and competitive inhibition of podophyllotoxin towards UGT1A1 was observed with the inhibition kinetic parameter (Ki) to be 4.0 μM. Furthermore, podophyllotoxin was demonstrated to exert medium and weak inhibition potential towards human liver microsomes (HLMs)-catalyzed SN-38 glucuronidation and estradiol-3-glucuronidation. In conclusion, podophyllotoxin inhibited UGT1A1 activity, indicating potential herb-drug interactions between podophyllotoxin-containing herbs and drugs mainly undergoing UGT1A1-mediated metabolism.

  10. Structure-inhibition relationship of podophyllotoxin (PT) analogues towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia-Qi; Cao, Yun-Feng; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Meng, Da-Li; Sun, Dong-Xue

    2015-04-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are involved in the clearance of many important drugs and endogenous substances, and inhibition of UGTs' activity by herbal components might induce severe herb-drug interactions or metabolic disturbances of endogenous substances. The present study aims to determine the inhibition of UGTs' activity by podophyllotoxin derivatives, trying to indicate the potential herb-drug interaction or metabolic influence towards endogenous substances' metabolism. Recombinant UGT isoforms (except UGT1A4)-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP) glucuronidation were employed to firstly screen the podophyllotoxin derivatives' inhibition potential. Structure-dependent inhibition behavior of podophyllotoxin derivatives towards UGT isoforms was detected. Inhibition kinetic type and parameter (Ki) were determined for the inhi- bition of podophyllotoxin towards UGT1A1, and competitive inhibition of podophyllotoxin towards UGT1A1 was observed with the inhibition kinetic parameter (Ki) to be 4.0 μM. Furthermore, podophyllotoxin was demonstrated to exert medium and weak inhibition potential towards human liver microsomes (HLMs)-catalyzed SN-38 glucuronidation and estradiol-3-glucuronidation. In conclusion, podophyllotoxin inhibited UGT1A1 activity, indicating potential herb-drug interactions between podophyllotoxin-containing herbs and drugs mainly undergoing UGT1A1-mediated metabolism. PMID:26012253

  11. Glucuronidation of OTS167 in Humans Is Catalyzed by UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Jacqueline; Mirkov, Snezana; House, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    OTS167 is a potent maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitor undergoing clinical testing as antineoplastic agent. We aimed to identify the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) involved in OTS167 metabolism, study the relationship between UGT genetic polymorphisms and hepatic OTS167 glucuronidation, and investigate the inhibitory potential of OTS167 on UGTs. Formation of a single OTS167-glucuronide (OTS167-G) was observed in pooled human liver (HLM) (Km = 3.4 ± 0.2 µM), intestinal microsomes (HIM) (Km = 1.7 ± 0.1 µM), and UGTs. UGT1A1 (64 µl/min/mg) and UGT1A8 (72 µl/min/mg) exhibited the highest intrinsic clearances (CLint) for OTS167, followed by UGT1A3 (51 µl/min/mg) and UGT1A10 (47 µl/min/mg); UGT1A9 was a minor contributor. OTS167 glucuronidation in HLM was highly correlated with thyroxine glucuronidation (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001), SN-38 glucuronidation (r = 0.79, P < 0.0001), and UGT1A1 mRNA (r = 0.72, P < 0.0001). Nilotinib (UGT1A1 inhibitor) and emodin (UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 inhibitor) exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on OTS167-G formation in HLM (68%) and HIM (47%). We hypothesize that OTS167-G is an N-glucuronide according to mass spectrometry. A significant association was found between rs6706232 and reduced OTS167-G formation (P = 0.03). No or weak UGT inhibition (range: 0–21%) was observed using clinically relevant OTS167 concentrations (0.4–2 µM). We conclude that UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 are the main UGTs responsible for hepatic formation of OTS167-G. Intestinal UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 may contribute to first-pass OTS167 metabolism after oral administration. PMID:25870101

  12. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  13. Incomplete recovery of prescription opioids in urine using enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Stone, Judith A; Chen, Katherine H; Gross, Susan F; Haller, Christine A; Wu, Alan H B

    2006-10-01

    Confirmation of opioids in urine samples of clinical patients requires liberation of opioids from their glucuronide conjugates. Both acid hydrolysis and enzyme hydrolysis using beta-glucuronidase from various sources have been reported, with the latter approach prevailing in most clinical toxicology laboratories. The goal of this study was to compare the efficiency of acid versus different enzyme hydrolysis methods in recovering morphine and common semisynthetic opioids from glucuronide standards and 78 patient urine samples that were screened positive for opioids as a class. Specimens were analyzed with a validated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure. With the exception of oxycodone, the results indicated that the majority of opioids tested were extensively glucuronide-conjugated in urine. Significantly, acid hydrolysis liberated > 90% of morphine and hydromorphone from their glucuronide standards but enzyme hydrolysis had lower and variable efficiency, depending on the opiate type and the enzyme source. In patient specimens, much higher concentrations of free codeine, morphine, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone were obtained with acid hydrolysis than with various enzyme methods. Incomplete hydrolysis using beta-glucuronidase could lead to false-negative results for many opioids when urine is tested for drugs of abuse. We conclude that acid hydrolysis is the method of choice for GC-MS confirmation of urine opioids.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A CLASS-SELECTIVE ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY FOR URINARY PHENOLIC GLUCURONIDES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Class-selective immunoassays for the measurement of glucuronides in human urine can aid evaluation of human exposure to complex mixtures of xenobiotics. Therefore, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the group-selective detection of phenolic Profiling serum bile acid glucuronides in humans: gender divergences, genetic determinants and response to fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Jocelyn; Perreault, Martin; Rudkowska, Iwona; Levy, Cynthia; Dallaire-Theroux, Amélie; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Straka, Robert J.; Barbier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Glucuronidation, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes detoxifies cholestatic bile acids (BAs). We aimed at i) characterizing the circulating BA-glucuronide (-G) pool composition in humans, ii) evaluating how sex and UGT polymorphisms influence this composition, and iii) analyzing the effects of lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate on the circulating BA-G profile in 300 volunteers and 5 cholestatic patients. Eleven BA-Gs were determined in pre- and post-fenofibrate samples. Men exhibited higher BA-G concentrations, and various genotype/BA-G associations were discovered in relevant UGT genes. The chenodeoxycholic acid-3G concentration was associated with the UGT2B7 802C>T polymorphism. Glucuronidation assays confirmed the predominant role of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 in CDCA-3G formation. Fenofibrate exposure increased the serum levels of 5 BA-G species, including CDCA-3G, and up-regulated expression of UGT1A4, but not UGT2B7, in hepatic cells. This study demonstrates that fenofibrate stimulates BA glucuronidation in humans, and thus reduces bile acid toxicity in the liver. PMID:23756370

  15. Voucher-Based Reinforcement for Alcohol Abstinence Using the Ethyl-Glucuronide Alcohol Biomarker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonell, Michael G.; Howell, Donelle N,; McPherson, Sterling; Cameron, Jennifer M.; Srebnik, Debra; Roll, John M.; Ries, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a contingency management (CM) intervention for alcohol consumption in 10 alcohol-dependent participants. An ABCA design was used. Vouchers were provided contingent on results of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) urine tests (an alcohol biomarker with a 2-day detection period) and alcohol breath tests during the C phase.…

  16. Urinary excretion of bile acid glucosides and glucuronides in extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Wietholtz, H; Marschall, H U; Reuschenbach, R; Matern, H; Matern, S

    1991-04-01

    Recently the formation of bile acid glucosides has been described as a novel conjugation mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In 10 patients with extrahepatic cholestasis caused by carcinoma of the head of the pancreas we investigated excretion rates and profiles of urinary bile acid glucosides. Urinary bile acid glucosides and, for comparison, bile acid glucuronides were extracted and characterized according to established methods. In controls total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.22 +/- 0.03 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- S.E.M.)-in the range of bile acid glucuronide excretion (0.41 +/- 0.06 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- S.E.M.). A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-characterized trihydroxy bile acid glucoside of still-unknown hydroxyl positions accounted for 65% of total urinary bile acid glucosides. In extrahepatic cholestasis total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.52 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- SEM), yet significantly lower than bile acid glucuronide excretion (1.53 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- SEM; p less than 0.001). In cholestasis the primary bile acid derivatives cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid glucosides amounted to 90%, whereas the trihydroxy bile acid glucoside had decreased to 5% of total bile acid glucoside excretion, indicating its alteration during enterohepatic circulation. The data establish the composition and quantity of urinary bile acid glucosides in healthy controls and cholestasis and constitute a quantitative comparison with another glycosidic conjugation reaction, bile acid glucuronidation.

  17. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome.

    PubMed

    Eakins, R; Walsh, J; Randle, L; Jenkins, R E; Schuppe-Koistinen, I; Rowe, C; Starkey Lewis, P; Vasieva, O; Prats, N; Brillant, N; Auli, M; Bayliss, M; Webb, S; Rees, J A; Kitteringham, N R; Goldring, C E; Park, B K

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10-15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury. PMID:26607827

  18. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome

    PubMed Central

    Eakins, R.; Walsh, J.; Randle, L.; Jenkins, R. E.; Schuppe-Koistinen, I.; Rowe, C.; Starkey Lewis, P.; Vasieva, O.; Prats, N.; Brillant, N.; Auli, M.; Bayliss, M.; Webb, S.; Rees, J. A.; Kitteringham, N. R.; Goldring, C. E.; Park, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10–15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury. PMID:26607827

  19. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome.

    PubMed

    Eakins, R; Walsh, J; Randle, L; Jenkins, R E; Schuppe-Koistinen, I; Rowe, C; Starkey Lewis, P; Vasieva, O; Prats, N; Brillant, N; Auli, M; Bayliss, M; Webb, S; Rees, J A; Kitteringham, N R; Goldring, C E; Park, B K

    2015-11-26

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10-15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury.

  1. Oral pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen to evaluate gastric emptying profiles of Shiba goats.

    PubMed

    Elbadawy, Mohamed; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Aboubakr, Mohamed; Khalil, Waleed Fathy; Shimoda, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen was investigated following oral dosing to Shiba goats in order to evaluate the properties of gastric emptying. Acetaminophen was intravenously and orally administered at 30 mg/kg body weight to goats using a crossover design with a 3-week washout period. The stability of acetaminophen in rumen juice was also assessed. Acetaminophen concentrations were measured by HPLC. Since acetaminophen was stable in rumen juice for 24 hr, the extremely low bioavailability (16%) was attributed to its hepatic extensive first-pass effect. The mean absorption time and absorption half-life were unexpectedly short (4.93 and 3.35 hr, respectively), indicating its marked absorption from the forestomach, which may have been due to its smaller molecular weight. Therefore, acetaminophen was considered to be unsuitable for evaluating gastric emptying in Shiba goats.

  2. A validated method for simultaneous determination of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide, norcodeine, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide in post-mortem blood, vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Frost, Joachim; Løkken, Trine N; Brede, Wenche R; Hegstad, Solfrid; Nordrum, Ivar S; Slørdal, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The toxicodynamics and, to a lesser degree, toxicokinetics of the widely used opiate codeine remain a matter of controversy. To address this issue, analytical methods capable of providing reliable quantification of codeine metabolites alongside codeine concentrations are required. This article presents a validated method for simultaneous determination of codeine, codeine metabolites codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), norcodeine and morphine, and morphine metabolites morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) in post-mortem whole blood, vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction. The validated ranges were 1.5-300 ng/mL for codeine, norcodeine and morphine, and 23-4,600 ng/mL for C6G, M3G and M6G, with exceptions for norcodeine in muscle (3-300 ng/mL), morphine in muscle, fat and brain (3-300 ng/mL) and M6G in fat (46-4,600 ng/mL). Within-run and between-run accuracy (88.1-114.1%) and precision (CV 0.6-12.7%), matrix effects (CV 0.3-13.5%) and recovery (57.8-94.1%) were validated at two concentration levels; 3 and 150 ng/mL for codeine, norcodeine and morphine, and 46 and 2,300 ng/mL for C6G, M3G and M6G. Freeze-thaw and long-term stability (6 months at -80°C) was assessed, showing no significant changes in analyte concentrations (-12 to +8%). The method was applied in two authentic forensic autopsy cases implicating codeine in both therapeutic and presumably lethal concentration levels.

  3. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  4. Drug Utilization, Dosing, and Costs After Implementation of Intravenous Acetaminophen Guidelines for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Parbuoni, Kristine; Morgan, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this evaluation of medication use were to characterize the use of intravenous acetaminophen at our institution and to determine if acetaminophen was prescribed at age-appropriate dosages per institutional guidelines, as well as to evaluate compliance with restrictions for use. Total acquisition costs associated with intravenous acetaminophen usage is described as well. METHODS This retrospective study evaluated the use of acetaminophen in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age, admitted to a tertiary care hospital, who received at least 1 dose of intravenous acet-aminophen between August 1, 2011, and January 31, 2012. RESULTS A total of 52 doses of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to 31 patients during the 6-month study period. Most patients were admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service (55%), and the majority of doses were administered either in the operating room (46%) or in the intensive care unit (46%). Nineteen doses (37%) of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to patients who did not meet institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Three patients received single doses of intravenous acetaminophen that were greater than the dose recommended for their age. One patient during the study period received more than the recommended 24-hour maximum cumulative dose for acetaminophen. Total acquisition cost of intravenous acetaminophen therapy over the 6-month study period was $530.40. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen was used most frequently among pediatric patients admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service during the perioperative period. Nineteen doses (37%) were administered to patients who did not meet the institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Our data support reinforcing the availability of institutional guidelines to promote cost-effective use of intravenous acetaminophen while minimizing the prescription of inappropriate doses. PMID:24782690

  5. Glucuronidation by UGT1A1 Is the Dominant Pathway of the Metabolic Disposition of Belinostat in Liver Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling-Zhi; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Yeo, Winnie; Chan, Mei-Yi Michelle; Thuya, Win-Lwin; Lau, Jie-Ying Amelia; Wan, Seow-Ching; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Lim, Robert; Lee, Soo-Chin; Ho, Paul C.; Lee, How-Sung; Chan, Anthony; Ansher, Sherry; Ratain, Mark J.; Goh, Boon-Cher

    2013-01-01

    Belinostat is a hydroxamate class HDAC inhibitor that has demonstrated activity in peripheral T-cell lymphoma and is undergoing clinical trials for non-hematologic malignancies. We studied the pharmacokinetics of belinostat in hepatocellular carcinoma patients to determine the main pathway of metabolism of belinostat. The pharmacokinetics of belinostat in liver cancer patients were characterized by rapid plasma clearance of belinostat with extensive metabolism with more than 4-fold greater relative systemic exposure of major metabolite, belinostat glucuronide than that of belinostat. There was significant interindividual variability of belinostat glucuronidation. The major pathway of metabolism involves UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation and a good correlation has been identified between belinostat glucuronide formation and glucuronidation of known UGT1A1 substrates. In addition, liver microsomes harboring UGT1A1*28 alleles have lower glucuronidation activity for belinostat compared to those with wildtype UGT1A1. The main metabolic pathway of belinostat is through glucuronidation mediated primarily by UGT1A1, a highly polymorphic enzyme. The clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00321594 PMID:23382909

  6. Biotransformation of bisphenol AF to its major glucuronide metabolite reduces estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yang, Yunjia; Yang, Yi; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF), an endocrine disrupting chemical, can induce estrogenic activity through binding to estrogen receptor (ER). However, the metabolism of BPAF in vivo and the estrogenic activity of its metabolites remain unknown. In the present study, we identified four metabolites including BPAF diglucuronide, BPAF glucuronide (BPAF-G), BPAF glucuronide dehydrated and BPAF sulfate in the urine of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BPAF-G was further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). After treatment with a single dose of BPAF, BPAF was metabolized rapidly to BPAF-G, as detected in the plasma of SD rats. Biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G was confirmed with human liver microsomes (HLM), and Vmax of glucuronidation for HLM was 11.6 nmol/min/mg. We also found that BPAF glucuronidation could be mediated through several human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) including UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, among which UGT2B7 showed the highest efficiency of glucuronidation. To explain the biological function of BPAF biotransformation, the estrogenic activities of BPAF and BPAF-G were evaluated in ER-positive breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cells. BPAF significantly stimulates ER-regulated gene expression and cell proliferation at the dose of 100 nM and 1 μM in breast cancer cells. However, BPAF-G did not show any induction of estrogenic activity at the same dosages, implying that formation of BPAF-G is a potential host defense mechanism against BPAF. Based on our study, biotransformation of BPAF to BPAF-G can eliminate BPAF-induced estrogenic activity, which is therefore considered as reducing the potential threat to human beings. PMID:24349450

  7. Luminal accumulation of newly synthesized morphine-3-glucuronide in rat liver microsomal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Révész, Katalin; Tóth, Blanka; Staines, Adam G; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Mandl, József; Csala, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Morphine is converted to morphine 3-β-D-glucuronide (M3G) by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase Ugt2b1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of rat liver. Because of its luminal localization, UGT activity requires UDP-glucuronate import and glucuronide export across the ER membrane. The former transport is generally considered to be rate limiting and to explain the latency of UGT activities in intact microsomal vesicles. However, some observations indicate that the release of bulky glucuronides, such as M3G, might also be rate limiting for glucuronidation. This assumption was tested by characterizing the transport of M3G and its distribution between the intra- and extravesicular spaces during synthesis in rat liver microsomes. The amount of vesicle-associated M3G was measured using rapid filtration and LC-MS measurement. Our results reveal a remarkable accumulation of newly synthesized M3G in the microsomal lumen above the equilibrium. The transport showed a linear concentration-dependence in a wide range (5-200 μM). Therefore, the build-up of high (about 20 μM) luminal M3G concentration could adjust the rate of release to that of synthesis (44.85 ± 4.08 pmol/min/mg protein) during the conjugation of 100 μM morphine. These data can explain earlier findings indicative of separate intracellular pools of M3G in rat liver. Accumulation of bulky glucuronides in the ER lumen might also play an important role in their targeting and in the control of biliary excretion.

  8. Glucuronidation of Monohydroxylated Warfarin Metabolites by Human Liver Microsomes and Human Recombinant UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Bratton, Stacie; Mitchell, Neil C.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Le, Vi-Huyen; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of human phase II metabolic pathways which facilitate detoxification and excretion of warfarin (Coumadin) is limited. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are specific human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isozymes, which are responsible for conjugating warfarin and hydroxylated metabolites of warfarin. Glucuronidation activity of human liver microsomes (HLMs) and eight human recombinant UGTs toward (R)- and (S)-warfarin, racemic warfarin, and major cytochrome P450 metabolites of warfarin (4′-, 6-, 7-, 8-, and 10-hydroxywarfarin) has been assessed. HLMs, UGT1A1, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10 showed glucuronidation activity toward 4′-, 6-, 7-, and/or 8-hydroxywarfarin with Km values ranging from 59 to 480 μM and Vmax values ranging from 0.03 to 0.78 μM/min/mg protein. Tandem mass spectrometry studies and structure comparisons suggested glucuronidation was occurring at the C4′-,C6-, C7-, and C8-positions. Of the hepatic UGT isozymes tested, UGT1A9 exclusively metabolized 8-hydroxywarfarin, whereas UGT1A1 metabolized 6-, 7-, and 8-hydroxywarfarin. Studies with extrahepatic UGT isoforms showed that UGT1A8 metabolized 7- and 8-hydroxywarfarin and that UGT1A10 glucuronidated 4′-, 6-, 7-, and 8-hydroxywarfarin. UGT1A4, 1A6, 1A7, and 2B7 did not have activity with any substrate, and none of the UGT isozymes evaluated catalyzed reactions with (R)- and (S)-warfarin, racemic warfarin, or 10-hydroxywarfarin. This is the first study identifying and characterizing specific human UGT isozymes, which glucuronidate major cytochrome P450 metabolites of warfarin with similar metabolic rates known to be associated with warfarin metabolism. Continued characterization of these pathways may enhance our ability to reduce life-threatening and costly complications associated with warfarin therapy. PMID:17921187

  9. The Human UGT1A3 Enzyme Conjugates Norursodeoxycholic Acid into a C23-ester Glucuronide in the Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Jocelyn; El Husseini, Diala; Perreault, Martin; Pâquet, Sophie; Caron, Patrick; Bourassa, Sylvie; Verreault, Mélanie; Inaba, Ted T.; Poirier, Guy G.; Bélanger, Alain; Guillemette, Chantal; Trauner, Michael; Barbier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) exhibits efficient anti-cholestatic properties in an animal model of sclerosing cholangitis. norUDCA is eliminated as a C23-ester glucuronide (norUDCA-23G) in humans. The present study aimed at identifying the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) involved in hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and at evaluating the consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of UGT genes on norUDCA-23G formation. The effects of norUDCA on the formation of the cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative and of rifampicin on hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation were also explored. In vitro glucuronidation assays were performed with microsomes from human tissues (liver and intestine) and HEK293 cells expressing human UGT enzymes and variant allozymes. UGT1A3 was identified as the major hepatic UGT enzyme catalyzing the formation of norUDCA-23G. Correlation studies using samples from a human liver bank (n = 16) indicated that the level of UGT1A3 protein is a strong determinant of in vitro norUDCA glucuronidation. Analyses of the norUDCA-conjugating activity by 11 UGT1A3 variant allozymes identified three phenotypes with high, low, and intermediate capacity. norUDCA is also identified as a competitive inhibitor for the hepatic formation of the pro-cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative, whereas norUDCA glucuronidation is weakly stimulated by rifampicin. This study identifies human UGT1A3 as the major enzyme for the hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and supports that some coding polymorphisms affecting the conjugating activity of UGT1A3 in vitro may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of norUDCA in cholestasis treatment. PMID:19889628

  10. The human UGT1A3 enzyme conjugates norursodeoxycholic acid into a C23-ester glucuronide in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Jocelyn; El Husseini, Diala; Perreault, Martin; Pâquet, Sophie; Caron, Patrick; Bourassa, Sylvie; Verreault, Mélanie; Inaba, Ted T; Poirier, Guy G; Bélanger, Alain; Guillemette, Chantal; Trauner, Michael; Barbier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) exhibits efficient anti-cholestatic properties in an animal model of sclerosing cholangitis. norUDCA is eliminated as a C(23)-ester glucuronide (norUDCA-23G) in humans. The present study aimed at identifying the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) involved in hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and at evaluating the consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of UGT genes on norUDCA-23G formation. The effects of norUDCA on the formation of the cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative and of rifampicin on hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation were also explored. In vitro glucuronidation assays were performed with microsomes from human tissues (liver and intestine) and HEK293 cells expressing human UGT enzymes and variant allozymes. UGT1A3 was identified as the major hepatic UGT enzyme catalyzing the formation of norUDCA-23G. Correlation studies using samples from a human liver bank (n = 16) indicated that the level of UGT1A3 protein is a strong determinant of in vitro norUDCA glucuronidation. Analyses of the norUDCA-conjugating activity by 11 UGT1A3 variant allozymes identified three phenotypes with high, low, and intermediate capacity. norUDCA is also identified as a competitive inhibitor for the hepatic formation of the pro-cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative, whereas norUDCA glucuronidation is weakly stimulated by rifampicin. This study identifies human UGT1A3 as the major enzyme for the hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and supports that some coding polymorphisms affecting the conjugating activity of UGT1A3 in vitro may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of norUDCA in cholestasis treatment.

  11. Simultaneous determination of sulfation and glucuronidation of flavones in FVB mouse intestine in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanfang; Tang, Lan; Zhou, Juan; Feng, Qian; Xia, Bijun; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2013-04-01

    Glucuronidation and sulfation are the two major phase II metabolic pathways for flavones, natural compounds that hold great potential for improving human health. We investigated the positional preference for sulfation and glucuronidation of seven structurally similar flavones in vitro and in situ. An FVB mouse intestinal perfusion model was used in addition to three small intestine S9 fractions catalyzing sulfation only (Sult enzymes), glucuronidation only (Ugt enzymes) or both (Sult and Ugt enzymes). In both the single and co-reaction S9 systems, flavones containing 7-OH groups were conjugated only at 7-OH despite the presence of other hydroxyl groups, and 7-OH glucuronidation was faster than sulfation (P <0.05). The sulfation rate was enhanced in the Sult-Ugt co-reaction system, while glucuronidation was usually unchanged by the presence of Sult. In the intestinal perfusate, sulfation patterns were the same in the small intestine and colon, and the excretion rate of 7-O-sulfate was the fastest or second fastest. The excretion of 7-O-glucuronidates was faster in small intestine (P < 0.05) than in colon. The S9-mediated sulfation rates of the different flavones were significantly correlated with the excretion rates of the same flavones from perfused intestine. In conclusion, flavone glucuronidation and sulfation rates were sensitive to minor changes in molecular structure. In intestinal S9 fractions, both Ugts and Sults preferentially catalyzed reactions at 7-OH. The sulfation rate was significantly enhanced by simultaneous glucuronidation, but glucuronidation was unaltered by sulfation. Sulfation rates in mouse S9 fractions correlated with sulfation rates in perfused intestine.

  12. Severe anion gap metabolic acidosis from acetaminophen use secondary to 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Muriithi, Angela; Nelsen, Eric; Franco, Pablo M; Greene, Eddie L; Qian, Qi; El-Zoghby, Ziad M

    2012-12-01

    Anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA) is commonly encountered in medical practice. Acetaminophen-induced AGMA is, however, not widely recognized. We report 2 cases of high anion gap metabolic acidosis secondary to 5-oxoproline accumulation resulting from acetaminophen consumption: the first case caused by acute one-time ingestion of large quantities of acetaminophen and the second case caused by chronic repeated ingestion in a patient with chronic liver disease. Recognition of this entity facilitated timely diagnosis and effective treatment. Given acetaminophen is commonly used over the counter medication, increased recognition of this adverse effect is of important clinical significance.

  13. Acetaminophen Poisoning and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Jou; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether acetaminophen poisoning is associated with a higher risk of acute pancreatitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using the longitudinal population-based database of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) program between 2000 and 2011. The acetaminophen cohort comprised patients aged ≥ 20 years with newly identified acetaminophen poisoning (N = 2958). The comparison cohort comprised randomly selected patients with no history of acetaminophen poisoning. The acetaminophen and comparison cohorts were frequency matched by age, sex, and index year (N = 11,832) at a 1:4 ratio. Each patient was followed up from the index date until the date an acute pancreatitis diagnosis was made, withdrawal from the NHI program, or December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effects of acetaminophen on the risk of acute pancreatitis.The risk of acute pancreatitis was 3.11-fold higher in the acetaminophen cohort than in the comparison cohort (11.2 vs 3.61 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-4.47). The incidence rate was considerably high in patients who were aged 35 to 49 years, men, those who had comorbidities, and within the first year of follow-up.Acetaminophen poisoning is associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Additional prospective studies are necessary to verify how acetaminophen poisoning affects the risk of acute pancreatitis.

  14. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia; Moreau, Caroline; Bucher, Simon; McGill, Mitchell R; Martinais, Sophie; Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5mM) or high (20mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739624

  15. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia; Moreau, Caroline; Bucher, Simon; McGill, Mitchell R; Martinais, Sophie; Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5mM) or high (20mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  16. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today. PMID:26250417

  17. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today.

  18. Quantitative Rationalization of Gemfibrozil Drug Interactions: Consideration of Transporters-Enzyme Interplay and the Role of Circulating Metabolite Gemfibrozil 1-O-β-Glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V S; Lin, Jian; Bi, Yi-an; Kimoto, Emi; Rodrigues, A David

    2015-07-01

    Gemfibrozil has been suggested as a sensitive cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) inhibitor for clinical investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. However, gemfibrozil drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are complex; its major circulating metabolite, gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide (Gem-Glu), exhibits time-dependent inhibition of CYP2C8, and both parent and metabolite also behave as moderate inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) in vitro. Additionally, parent and metabolite also inhibit renal transport mediated by OAT3. Here, in vitro inhibition data for gemfibrozil and Gem-Glu were used to assess their impact on the pharmacokinetics of several victim drugs (including rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide) by employing both static mechanistic and dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. Of the 48 cases evaluated using the static models, about 75% and 98% of the DDIs were predicted within 1.5- and 2-fold of the observed values, respectively, when incorporating the interaction potential of both gemfibrozil and its 1-O-β-glucuronide. Moreover, the PBPK model was able to recover the plasma profiles of rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide under control and gemfibrozil treatment conditions. Analyses suggest that Gem-Glu is the major contributor to the DDIs, and its exposure needed to bring about complete inactivation of CYP2C8 is only a fraction of that achieved in the clinic after a therapeutic gemfibrozil dose. Overall, the complex interactions of gemfibrozil can be quantitatively rationalized, and the learnings from this analysis can be applied in support of future predictions of gemfibrozil DDIs. PMID:25941268

  19. What's in a teaspoon? Underdosing with acetaminophen in family practice.

    PubMed

    Hyam, E; Brawer, M; Herman, J; Zvieli, S

    1989-09-01

    A study was made of 100 paediatric encounters in which an accompanying parent stated that the child had been given acetaminophen syrup during the preceding 24 hours. In 80% of cases a household teaspoon had been used to determine the amount of medication required. The volumes of these spoons were measured using a syringe. The range was from 1.5 to 5 cm3 with 79% containing 2 to 3 cm3. The mean volume was 2.95 cm3 (SD 0.79) and the median was 2.5 cm3. The mean dose administered was 62% of that recommended when the calculation was made according to age and 64% according to body weight. Much of the underdosing observed was due to parents' assumption that a household teaspoon contains 5 cm3 of acetaminophen syrup and also to a failure to correct for advancing age and increasing weight. PMID:2792624

  20. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic investigation of the acetaminophen toxicity in liver microfluidic biochip.

    PubMed

    Prot, Jean Matthieu; Briffaut, Anne-Sophie; Letourneur, Franck; Chafey, Philippe; Merlier, Franck; Grandvalet, Yves; Legallais, Cécile; Leclerc, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioartificial organs allow the reproduction of in vivo-like properties such as cell culture in a 3D dynamical micro environment. In this work, we established a method and a protocol for performing a toxicogenomic analysis of HepG2/C3A cultivated in a microfluidic biochip. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have shown the induction of the NRF2 pathway and the related drug metabolism pathways when the HepG2/C3A cells were cultivated in the biochip. The induction of those pathways in the biochip enhanced the metabolism of the N-acetyl-p-aminophenol drug (acetaminophen-APAP) when compared to Petri cultures. Thus, we observed 50% growth inhibition of cell proliferation at 1 mM in the biochip, which appeared similar to human plasmatic toxic concentrations reported at 2 mM. The metabolic signature of APAP toxicity in the biochip showed similar biomarkers as those reported in vivo, such as the calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism and reorganization of the cytoskeleton, at the transcriptome and proteome levels (which was not the case in Petri dishes). These results demonstrate a specific molecular signature for acetaminophen at transcriptomic and proteomic levels closed to situations found in vivo. Interestingly, a common component of the signature of the APAP molecule was identified in Petri and biochip cultures via the perturbations of the DNA replication and cell cycle. These findings provide an important insight into the use of microfluidic biochips as new tools in biomarker research in pharmaceutical drug studies and predictive toxicity investigations.

  1. Role of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) in acetaminophen-induced changes in rat liver: Nicotinamide effect in acetaminophen-damged liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna I; Mahmoud, Asmaa A

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, which is safe at therapeutic doses. However, overdoses of acetaminophen induce severe oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Nicotinamide has proven effective in ameliorating many pathological conditions that occur due to oxidative stress. This study verifies the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of nicotinamide against the hepatic pathophysiological and ultrastructural alterations induced by acetaminophen. Wistar rats intoxicated with an acute overdose of acetaminophen (5g/kg b.wt) were given a single dose of nicotinamide (500mg/kg b.wt) either before or after intoxication. Acetaminophen caused significant elevation in the liver functions and lipid peroxidation marker, and decline in the activities of the hepatic antioxidant enzymes. This oxidative injury was associated with hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrage, vacuolar degeneration, lipid accumulation and mitochondrial alterations. Treating intoxicated rats with nicotinamide (500mg/kg) significantly ameliorated acetaminophen-induced biochemical changes and pathological injuries. However, administering the same dose of nicotinamide to healthy animals or prior to acetaminophen-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity. Caution should be taken when administering high doses of NAM because of its possible hepatotoxicity. Considering the wide use of nicotinamide, there is an important need for monitoring nicotinamide tolerance, safety and efficacy in healthy and diseased subjects. PMID:27211843

  2. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT. PMID:26454079

  3. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT.

  4. Effect of trifluoperazine on toxicity, HIF-1α induction and hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Brown, Aliza T.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2012-10-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are important mechanisms in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity. The MPT inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP) reduced MPT, oxidative stress, and toxicity in freshly isolated hepatocytes treated with APAP. Since hypoxia inducible factor-one alpha (HIF-1α) is induced very early in APAP toxicity, a role for oxidative stress in the induction has been postulated. In the present study, the effect of TFP on toxicity and HIF-1α induction in B6C3F1 male mice treated with APAP was examined. Mice received TFP (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) prior to APAP (200 mg/kg IP) and at 7 and 36 h after APAP. Measures of metabolism (hepatic glutathione and APAP protein adducts) were comparable in the two groups of mice. Toxicity was decreased in the APAP/TFP mice at 2, 4, and 8 h, compared to the APAP mice. At 24 and 48 h, there were no significant differences in toxicity between the two groups. TFP lowered HIF-1α induction but also reduced the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of hepatocyte regeneration. TFP can also inhibit phospholipase A{sub 2}, and cytosolic and secretory PLA{sub 2} activity levels were reduced in the APAP/TFP mice compared to the APAP mice. TFP also lowered prostaglandin E{sub 2} expression, a known mechanism of cytoprotection. In summary, the MPT inhibitor TFP delayed the onset of toxicity and lowered HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice. TFP also reduced PGE{sub 2} expression and hepatocyte regeneration, likely through a mechanism involving PLA{sub 2}. -- Highlights: ► Trifluoperazine reduced acetaminophen toxicity and lowered HIF-1α induction. ► Trifluoperazine had no effect on the metabolism of acetaminophen. ► Trifluoperazine reduced hepatocyte regeneration. ► Trifluoperazine reduced phospholipase A{sub 2} activity and prostaglandin E{sub 2} levels.

  5. Simultaneous Quantification of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine-Glucuronide and Norbuprenorphine-Glucuronide in Human Umbilical Cord by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    A LCMS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) in human umbilical cord. Quantification was achieved by selected ion monitoring of precursor ions m/z 468.4 for BUP; 414.3 for NBUP; 644.4 for BUP-Gluc and 590 for NBUP-Gluc. BUP and NBUP were identified by MS2, with m/z 396, 414 and 426 for BUP, and m/z 340, 364 and 382 for NBUP. Glucuronide conjugates were identified by MS3 with m/z 396 and 414 for BUP-Gluc and m/z 340 and 382 for NBUP-Gluc. The assay was linear 1–50 ng/g. Intra, inter-day and total assay imprecision (%RSD) were <14.5%, and analytical recovery ranged from 94.1% to 112.3% for all analytes. Extraction efficiencies were >66.3%, and process efficiency >73.4%. Matrix effect ranged, in absolute value, from 3.7% to 27.4% (CV<21.8%, n=8). The method was selective with no endogenous or exogenous interferences from 41 compounds evaluated. Sensitivity was high with limits of detection of 0.8 ng/g. In order to prove method applicability, an authentic umbilical cord obtained from an opioid-dependent pregnant woman receiving BUP pharmacotherapy was analyzed. Interestingly, BUP was not detected but concentrations of the other metabolites were NBUP-Gluc 13.4 ng/g, BUP-Gluc 3.5 ng/g and NBUP 1.2 ng/g. PMID:19406593

  6. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mossanen, J C; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The induction of acute hepatic damage by acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]), also termed paracetamol, is one of the most commonly used experimental models of acute liver injury in mice. The specific values of this model are the highly reproducible, dose-dependent hepatotoxicity of APAP and its outstanding translational importance, because acetaminophen overdose is one of the most frequent reasons for acute liver failure (ALF) in humans. However, preparation of concentrated APAP working solutions, application routes, fasting period and variability due to sex, genetic background or barrier environment represent important considerations to be taken into account before implementing this model. This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides a detailed protocol for APAP preparation and application in mice, aimed at facilitating comparability between research groups as well as minimizing animal numbers and distress. The mouse model of acetaminophen poisoning therefore helps to unravel the pathogenesis of APAP-induced toxicity or subsequent immune responses in order to explore new therapeutic interventions for improving the prognosis of ALF in patients.

  7. [Analgesic/Antipyretic treatment: ibuprofen or acetaminophen? An update].

    PubMed

    Olive, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects associated with aspirin, especially Reye's syndrome in children, practitioners currently use as first line therapy drugs such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Their pharmacokinetic characteristics are not quite identical: both are absorbed rapidly and have high bioavailability, however, unlike acetaminophen, ibuprofen is characterized by high plasma protein binding and a limited distribution volume. Both drugs are metabolized essentially in the liver into inactive hydroxylated or glucoronidated metabolites by conjugation but acetaminophen is also transformed into an oxidation compound--normally reduced by glutathione--which, in the case of acute overdosing with depletion of endogenous glutathione stores, may lead to severe hepatotoxicity. Old age and light to moderate renal or hepatic failure do not significantly modify their pharmacokinetic parameters, and thus do not call for dose adjustment. Clinical trials have shown both drugs to have comparable efficacy on pain and fever, with perhaps a slight advantage for ibuprofen. In practice, the choice will depend on the prescription habits of the practitioner, patient's (or parents') preferences and, above all, the pathological context and possible contra-indications. PMID:16886709

  8. Formulation and characterization of acetaminophen nanoparticles in orally disintegrating films.

    PubMed

    Al-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare orally disintegrating films containing nanoparticles loaded with acetaminophen. Nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method where acetone phase containing acetaminophen and poly(lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) was added to water phase containing hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, poly ethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and aspartame in a rate of 1.5 drop s(-1) and agitated at 1200 rpm. The size, polydispersity index (PI) and drug entrapment (DE) were measured. The emulsions were cast to form films, which were evaluated physico-mechanically. The effect of different degrees of hydrolization of PVA and polymerization of PLGA and the effect of different ratios of PVA to PLGA was studied. Films with acceptable physico-mechanical properties were further studied. The size and PI of the nanoparticles was dependent on PVA hydrolization, PLGA polymerization and the ratio of PVA to PLGA. All films disintegrated in less than one minute, but acetaminophen was not free in the dissolution media even after six days. These results may indicate that although the nanoparticles released from the films immediately when impressed in solution the drug is sustained in the nanoparticles for longer time, which is to be clarified in future work.

  9. Developmental exposure to acetaminophen does not induce hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Isabel; Knaup, Sabine; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Drepper, Carsten; Lillesaar, Christina

    2016-08-01

    First line pain relief medication during pregnancy relies nearly entirely on the over-the-counter analgesic acetaminophen, which is generally considered safe to use during gestation. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest a risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in children if mothers use acetaminophen during pregnancy. Currently, there are no experimental proofs that prenatal acetaminophen exposure causes developmental brain alterations of progeny. Exposure to high acetaminophen concentrations causes liver toxicity, which is well investigated in different model organisms. However, sub-liver-toxic concentrations have not been experimentally investigated with respect to ADHD endophenotypes such as hyperactivity. We used zebrafish to investigate the potential impact of acetaminophen exposure on locomotor activity levels, and compared it to the established zebrafish Latrophilin 3 (Lphn3) ADHD-model. We determined the sub-liver-toxic concentration of acetaminophen in zebrafish larvae and treated wild-type and lphn3.1 knockdown larvae with increasing concentrations of acetaminophen. We were able to confirm that lphn3.1 knockdown alone causes hyperactivity, strengthening the implication of Lphn3 dysfunction as an ADHD risk factor. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to acetaminophen at sub-liver-toxic concentrations in wild-type or lphn3.1 knock-downs increases locomotor activity levels. Together our findings show that embryonic to larval exposure to acetaminophen does not cause hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae. Furthermore, there are no additive and/or synergistic effects of acetaminophen exposure in a susceptible background induced by knock-down of lphn3.1. Our experimental study suggests that there is, at least in zebrafish larvae, no direct link between embryonic acetaminophen exposure and hyperactivity. Further work is necessary to clarify this issue in humans. PMID:27116683

  10. Post-mortem levels and tissue distribution of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide, norcodeine, morphine and morphine glucuronides in a series of codeine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Frost, Joachim; Løkken, Trine Nordgård; Helland, Arne; Nordrum, Ivar Skjåk; Slørdal, Lars

    2016-05-01

    This article presents levels and tissue distribution of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), norcodeine, morphine and the morphine metabolites morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) in post-mortem blood (peripheral and heart blood), vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue in a series of 23 codeine-related fatalities. CYP2D6 genotype is also determined and taken into account. Quantification of codeine, C6G, norcodeine, morphine, M3G and M6G was performed with a validated solid phase extraction LC-MS method. The series comprise 19 deaths (83%) attributed to mixed drug intoxication, 4 deaths (17%) attributed to other causes of death, and no cases of unambiguous monointoxication with codeine. The typical peripheral blood concentration pattern in individual cases was C6G≫codeine≫norcodeine>morphine, and M3G>M6G>morphine. In matrices other than blood, the concentration pattern was similar, although in a less systematic fashion. Measured concentrations were generally lower in matrices other than blood, especially in brain and fat, and in particular for the glucuronides (C6G, M3G and M6G) and, to some extent, morphine. In brain tissue, the presumed active moieties morphine and M6G were both below the LLOQ (0.0080mg/L and 0.058mg/L, respectively) in a majority of cases. In general, there was a large variability in both measured concentrations and calculated blood/tissue concentration ratios. There was also a large variability in calculated ratios of morphine to codeine, C6G to codeine and norcodeine to codeine in all matrices, and CYP2D6 genotype was not a reliable predictor of these ratios. The different blood/tissue concentration ratios showed no systematic relationship with the post-mortem interval. No coherent degradation or formation patterns for codeine, morphine, M3G and M6G were observed upon reanalysis in peripheral blood after storage.

  11. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  12. Glucuronidation of estrone and 16α-hydroxyestrone by human UGT enzymes: The key roles of UGT1A10 and UGT2B7.

    PubMed

    Kallionpää, Roope A; Järvinen, Erkka; Finel, Moshe

    2015-11-01

    The glucuronidation of estrone and 16α-hydroxyestrone by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) of subfamilies 1A, 2A and 2B was studied. Microsomes from human liver and small intestine were also tested for the glucuronidation of these two estrogens. The results revealed that UGT1A10 is by far the most active enzyme in estrone glucuronidation. UGT1A10 also exhibited high rate of 16α-hydroxyestrone conjugation at the 3-OH, whereas UGT2B7 catalyzed its glucuronidation at high rates at the 16-OH. Human liver microsomes exhibited high rates of 16α-hydroxyestrone-16-glucuronide formation, but very low formation rates of either 16α-hydroxyestrone-3-glucuronide or estrone glucuronide. On the other hand, human intestine microsomes catalyzed the formation of all these 3 different glucuronides at high rates. Kinetic analyses revealed very low Km value for 16α-hydroxyestrone glucuronidation by UGT2B7, below 4 μM, suggesting higher affinity than commonly found among UGTs and their substrates. In further studies with UGT1A10, mutant F93G exhibited increased glucuronidation rates of 16α-hydroxyestrone, but not estrone, whereas mutations in F90 did not reveal any activity with either estrogen. Taken together, the results of this study significantly expand our understanding on the metabolism of estrogens and their interactions with the human UGTs. PMID:26220143

  13. [Impact factors and degradation mechanism for the ozonation of acetaminophen in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Yuan, Shou-Jun; Zhang, Meng-Tao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2014-11-01

    The effect and mechanism of O3 on the degradation of acetaminophen in aqueous solution were studied by the batch experiment. The results showed that acetaminophen could be degraded effectively by ozone and degradation of acetaminophen fitted well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics model (R2 > 0.992). The degradation of acetaminophen was promoted with the increase of pH, the concentration of bicarbonate and ozone. The results of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography analysis showed that degradation products such as hydroquinone and a series of carboxylic acids were firstly formed during ozonation of acetaminophen. Then, the products were further oxidized. The degradation pathways of acetaminophen were also discussed by the identified products. The result of TOC showed that the mineralization of acetaminophen was ultimately lower. When the initial concentration of acetaminophen was 20 mg x L(-1) and the concentration of ozone was 9.10 mg x L(-1), the mineralization was only 16.42% after 130 min.

  14. Protective effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats).

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Yang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chen-Hui; Yang, Hui-Ting; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2015-09-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant catechin with various biological activities found in tea. In this study, the effects of EGCG on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen in rat liver were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a controlled diet without or with EGCG (0.54 %, w/w) for 1 week and were then intraperitoneally injected with acetaminophen (1 g/kg body weight) and killed after 12 h. Concentrations of acetaminophen and its conjugates in plasma and liver were then determined. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) and phase II enzymes activities were also evaluated. Rats fed the EGCG diet had lower plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, as indices of hepatotoxicity, after acetaminophen treatment. Morphological damage by acetaminophen was lower in rats fed the EGCG diet. In addition, EGCG significantly reduced hepatic activities of midazolam 1-hydroxylation (CYP3A), nitrophenol 6-hydroxylase (CYP2E1), UDP-glucurosyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. Finally, EGCG feeding reduced acetaminophen-glucuronate and acetaminophen-glutathione contents in plasma and liver. These results indicate that EGCG feeding may reduce the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen in rats. PMID:26264479

  15. Sulphation of acetaminophen by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akihiro; Liu, Ming-Yih; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Saeki, Yuichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2015-12-01

    Sulphation is known to be critically involved in the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo. This study aimed to systematically identify the major human cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) enzyme(s) responsible for the sulphation of acetaminophen. A systematic analysis showed that three of the twelve human SULTs, SULT1A1, SULT1A3 and SULT1C4, displayed the strongest sulphating activity towards acetaminophen. The pH dependence of the sulphation of acetaminophen by each of these three SULTs was examined. Kinetic parameters of these three SULTs in catalysing acetaminophen sulphation were determined. Moreover, sulphation of acetaminophen was shown to occur in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells under the metabolic setting. Of the four human organ samples tested, liver and intestine cytosols displayed considerably higher acetaminophen-sulphating activity than those of lung and kidney. Collectively, these results provided useful information concerning the biochemical basis underlying the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo previously reported.

  16. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  17. Hormonal monitoring of early pregnancy by a direct radioimmunoassay of steroid glucuronides in first morning urine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendizabal, A.F.; Quiroga, S.; Farinati, Z.; Lahoz, M.; Nagle, C.

    1984-11-01

    The usefulness of the direct 4-hour radioimmunoassay of estriol-16-glucuronide (E/sub 3/G) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (P/sub 2/G) in first morning urine (FMU) for establishing a prognosis of the early pregnancy outcome was evaluated in 106 patients that became pregnant. Microaliquots of FMU were serially assayed from day 3 of the conception cycle until day 80 of pregnancy. The E/sub 3/G and P/sub 2/G profiles of 19 pregnancies which terminated in spontaneous abortion with either a diagnosis of the blighted ovum syndrome (n = 11) or presumption of a corpus luteum/trophoblast failure (n = 8) have been compared with those of clinically normal pregnancies (n = 87). Normal pregnancies displayed typical patterns of E/sub 3/G and P/sub 2/G development, while variations were observed in abortive events that reflected changes of the fetoplacental unit.

  18. Soy isoflavone metabolism in cats compared with other species: urinary metabolite concentrations and glucuronidation by liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Redmon, Joanna M; Shrestha, Binu; Cerundolo, Rosario; Court, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    1. Soybean is a common source of protein in many pet foods. Slow glucuronidation of soy-derived isoflavones in cats has been hypothesized to result in accumulation with adverse health consequences. Here, we evaluated species' differences in soy isoflavone glucuronidation using urine samples from cats and dogs fed a soy-based diet and liver microsomes from cats compared with microsomes from 12 other species. 2. Significant concentrations of conjugated (but not unconjugated) genistein, daidzein and glycitein, and the gut microbiome metabolites, dihydrogenistein and dihydrodaidzein, were found in cat and dog urine samples. Substantial amounts of conjugated equol were also found in cat urine but not in dog urine. 3. β-Glucuronidase treatment showed that all these compounds were significantly glucuronidated in dog urine while only daidzein (11%) and glycitein (37%) showed any glucuronidation in cat urine suggesting that alternate metabolic pathways including sulfation predominate in cats. 4. Glucuronidation rates of genistein, daidzein and equol by cat livers were consistently ranked within the lowest 3 out of 13 species' livers evaluated. Ferret and mongoose livers were also ranked in the lowest four species. 5. Our results demonstrate that glucuronidation is a minor pathway for soy isoflavone metabolism in cats compared with most other species.

  19. Soy isoflavone metabolism in cats compared with other species: urinary metabolite concentrations and glucuronidation by liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Redmon, Joanna M; Shrestha, Binu; Cerundolo, Rosario; Court, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    1. Soybean is a common source of protein in many pet foods. Slow glucuronidation of soy-derived isoflavones in cats has been hypothesized to result in accumulation with adverse health consequences. Here, we evaluated species' differences in soy isoflavone glucuronidation using urine samples from cats and dogs fed a soy-based diet and liver microsomes from cats compared with microsomes from 12 other species. 2. Significant concentrations of conjugated (but not unconjugated) genistein, daidzein and glycitein, and the gut microbiome metabolites, dihydrogenistein and dihydrodaidzein, were found in cat and dog urine samples. Substantial amounts of conjugated equol were also found in cat urine but not in dog urine. 3. β-Glucuronidase treatment showed that all these compounds were significantly glucuronidated in dog urine while only daidzein (11%) and glycitein (37%) showed any glucuronidation in cat urine suggesting that alternate metabolic pathways including sulfation predominate in cats. 4. Glucuronidation rates of genistein, daidzein and equol by cat livers were consistently ranked within the lowest 3 out of 13 species' livers evaluated. Ferret and mongoose livers were also ranked in the lowest four species. 5. Our results demonstrate that glucuronidation is a minor pathway for soy isoflavone metabolism in cats compared with most other species. PMID:26366946

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Ambar K; Raja, Suganya; Mahapatra, Sanjata; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method) and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated compared to the anti-oxidant activity of curcumin. PMID:26783957

  1. Sequestered endoplasmic reticulum space for sequential metabolism of salicylamide. Coupling of hydroxylation and glucuronidation.

    PubMed

    Tirona, R G; Pang, K S

    1996-08-01

    The metabolic disposition of simultaneously delivered [14C]salicylamide (SAM) (100 microM) and a tracer concentration of its hydroxylated metabolite [3H]gentisamide (GAM) was studied with single-pass followed by recirculating rat liver perfusion (10 ml/min). The use of dual radiolabeling of precursor-product pairs in single-pass and recirculating perfusions allowed for characterization of the differential metabolism of preformed [3H]GAM and formed [14C]GAM, which arose in situ in the liver with [14C]SAM single-pass perfusion, and the behavior of circulating [14C]GAM, which behaved as a preformed species in recirculation. In both modes of perfusion, [14C]SAM was mainly sequentially metabolized to [14C]GAM-5-glucuronide, whereas [3H]GAM predominantly formed [3H]GAM-5-sulfate. The steady-state and time-averaged clearances of SAM were identical and approached the value of flow, yielding a high hepatic extraction ratio (E = 0.98). The apparent extraction ratio of formed GAM [E(mi) = 0.96] was greater than that of the preformed species [E(pmi) approximately 0.7]. Because the coupling of (SAM) oxidation and (GAM) glucuronidation was a plausible explanation for the observation, a novel physiological pharmacokinetic model was developed to interpret the data. In this model, the liver was divided into three zonal units, within which acinar distribution of enzymatic activities was considered, namely periportal sulfation, evenly distributed glucuronidation, and perivenous hydroxylation. Each zonal region was subdivided into extracellular, cytosolic, and endoplasmic reticulum compartments, with cytosolic (sulfotransferases) and microsomal (cytochromes P-450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) enzymes being segregated intracellularly into the cytosolic compartment and endoplasmic reticulum compartment, respectively. The simulations provided a good prediction of the present experimental data as well as previously obtained data with increasing SAM concentration and retrograde flow and

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Ambar K.; Raja, Suganya; Mahapatra, Sanjata; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method) and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated compared to the anti-oxidant activity of curcumin. PMID:26783957

  3. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  4. 5-oxoproline-induced anion gap metabolic acidosis after an acute acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David T; Bechtel, Laura K; Charlton, Nathan P; Holstege, Christopher P

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic acidosis after acute acetaminophen overdose is typically attributed to either transient lactic acidosis without evidence of hepatic injury or hepatic failure. High levels of the organic acid 5-oxoprolinuria are usually reported in patients with predisposing conditions, such as sepsis, who are treated in a subacute or chronic fashion with acetaminophen. The authors report a case of a 40-year-old woman who developed anion gap metabolic acidosis and somnolence after an acute acetaminophen overdose. Substantial hepatic damage did not occur, which ruled out acetaminophen-induced hepatic insufficiency as a cause of the patient's acidosis or altered mental status. Urinalysis revealed elevated levels of 5-oxoproline, suggesting that the patient's acute acetaminophen overdose was associated with marked anion gap metabolic acidosis due solely to 5-oxoproline without hepatic complications. The acidosis fully resolved with N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care including hydration.

  5. Identification of a hydroxylamine glucuronide metabolite of an oral hypoglycemic agent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Randall R; Doss, George A; Stearns, Ralph A

    2004-02-01

    Glucuronides of piperazine hydroxylamines are rarely reported in the literature, and even more rarely are their structures unambiguously identified. One major metabolite was detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-radioactivity in urine from monkeys treated with the aryl piperazine oral hypoglycemic agent 9-[(1S,2R)-2-fluoro-1-methylpropyl]-2-methoxy-6-(1-piperazinyl) purine hydrochloride (1). The mass spectrum of this metabolite indicated that it was both monooxygenated and glucuronidated on the piperazine ring. Possible structures included the N- or O-glucuronic acid conjugates of a carbinolamine, hydroxylamine, or N-oxide. Treatment with beta-glucuronidase gave a monooxygenated derivative of the parent compound. 1H NMR analysis of either the glucuronic acid conjugate or the monooxygenated product provided insufficient evidence to unambiguously determine their structures. Incubation of 1 with pig liver microsomes resulted in formation of the same monooxygenated derivative derived from beta-glucuronidase treatment of the glucuronide metabolite. This in vitro system was used to generate sufficient material for analysis by 13C NMR, and the metabolite was identified as a hydroxylamine derivative 2. Incubation of the hydroxylamine with monkey liver microsomes and uridine diphospho-5'-glucuronic acid gave the same glucuronic acid conjugate as that observed in monkey urine. 13C NMR analysis of this biosynthetic product led to its unequivocal structure assignment as the O-glucuronic acid conjugate of the hydroxylamine 3.

  6. Characterization of oligomeric procyanidins and identification of quercetin glucuronide from lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpod.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun-Song; Xie, Bi-Jun; Cao, Yan-Ping; Wu, Hua; Sun, Zhi-Da; Xiao, Di

    2012-03-21

    Procyanidins are a class of polyphenols in the plant kingdom. Lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpods, the inedible part of lotus and a byproduct during the production of lotus seeds, were found to be a new source rich in procyanidins. Detailed information about oligomeric procyanidins in lotus seedpods remains unknown. In this study, lotus seedpods were extracted using 60% aqueous methanol and characterized with phloroglucinolysis and liquid chromatography (mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization source). The results indicate that the oligomeric and polymeric fraction had a mean degree of polymerization of 3.2 and 15.4, respectively, and consisted of (+)-catechin (m/z 289), gallocatechin or epigallocatechin (m/z 305), quercetin glycoside (m/z 463), quercetin glucuronide (m/z 477), procyanidin dimers (m/z 577.1), proanthocyanidin dimer gallate (m/z 593.3), prodelphinidin dimers (m/z 609.1), procyanidin trimers (m/z 865.1), etc. Quercetin glucuronide was further purified using flash chromatography and identified as quercetin-3-O-β-glucuronide by determining its exact mass using ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ¹H and ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance, ¹H-detected heteronuclear single-quantum coherence, and ¹H-detected heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation analyses.

  7. Hepatoprotective, antioxidant, and ameliorative effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and vitamin E in acetaminophen treated rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Azeem, Amal S; Hegazy, Amany M; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Farrag, Abdel-Razik H; El-Sayed, Eman M

    2013-09-01

    Ginger is a remedy known to possess a number of pharmacological properties. This study investigated efficacy of ginger pretreatment in alleviating acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were divided into six groups; negative control, acetaminophen (APAP) (600 mg/kg single intraperitoneal injection); vitamin E (75 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), vitamin E + APAP, and ginger + APAP. Administration of APAP elicited significant liver injury that was manifested by remarkable increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), arginase activities, and total bilirubin concentration. Meanwhile, APAP significantly decreased plasma total proteins and albumin levels. APAP administration resulted in substantial increase in each of plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs), malondialdhyde (MDA) levels, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). However, ginger or vitamin E treatment prior to APAP showed significant hepatoprotective effect by lowering the hepatic marker enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP, and arginase) and total bilirubin in plasma. In addition, they remarkably ameliorated the APAP-induced oxidative stress by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (MDA). Pretreatment by ginger or vitamin E significantly restored TAGs, and total protein levels. Histopathological examination of APAP treated rats showed alterations in normal hepatic histoarchitecture, with necrosis and vacuolization of cells. These alterations were substantially decreased by ginger or vitamin E. Our results demonstrated that ginger can prevent hepatic injuries, alleviating oxidative stress in a manner comparable to that of vitamin E. Combination therapy of ginger and APAP is recommended especially in cases with hepatic disorders or when high doses of APAP are required. PMID:23927622

  8. In Vitro antioxidative activity of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate and its In Vivo effect on alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in acetaminophen-induced liver injury in low protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative effects of pumpkin seed protein isolate (Cucurbita pepo) were investigated in vitro. The isolate exhibited about 80% radical scavenging activity, chelating activity of approximately 64% on Fe2+ ions and an inhibition of approximately 10% of xanthine oxidase. Subsequently the effects of the isolate on the plasma activity levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase against acetaminophen induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were ascertained. The rats were maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days and divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with acetaminophen and the other with an equivalent amount of polyethylene glycol 400. Two hours after intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with the protein isolate. Rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of the enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. The administration of protein isolate after acetaminophen intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels. It is concluded that the protein isolate has promising antioxidative properties. Furthermore, the isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition and acetaminophen intoxication.

  9. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Mitchell, Sarah J; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice. PMID:26615879

  10. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: assessment of causality and dose in reported cases.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L; Bond, G Randall; Clark, Richard F; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S; Dart, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study was to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years who were administered repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. We reviewed US Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reports, and US Manufacturer Safety Reports describing adverse effects after acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death after acetaminophen administration to children younger than 6 years were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supratherapeutic. Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Although we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death after repeated doses of acetaminophen, all the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses more than 75 mg/kg per day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg per day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years.

  11. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Inga; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Greenblatt, David J.; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF). Genetic differences might predispose some individuals to develop ALF. In this exploratory study, we evaluated genotype frequency differences among patients enrolled by the ALF Study Group who had developed ALF either intentionally from a single-time-point overdose of acetaminophen (n = 78), unintentionally after chronic high doses of acetaminophen (n = 79), or from causes other than acetaminophen (n = 103). The polymorphisms evaluated included those in genes encoding putative acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B15, SULT1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A5) as well as CD44 and BHMT1. Individuals carrying the CYP3A5 rs776746 A allele were overrepresented among ALF patients who had intentionally overdosed with acetaminophen, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.9; P = 0.034) compared with all other ALF patients. This finding is consistent with the enhanced bioactivation of acetaminophen by the CYP3A5 enzyme. Persons homozygous for the CD44 rs1467558 A allele were also overrepresented among patients who had unintentionally developed ALF from chronic acetaminophen use, with an odds ratio of 4.0 (1.0–17.2, P = 0.045) compared with all other ALF subjects. This finding confirms a prior study that found elevated serum liver enzyme levels in healthy volunteers with the CD44 rs1467558 AA genotype who had consumed high doses of acetaminophen for up to 2 weeks. However, both genetic associations were considered relatively weak, and they were not statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons testing. Nevertheless, both CYP3A5 rs776746 and CD44 rs1467558 warrant further investigation as potential genomic markers of enhanced risk of acetaminophen-induced ALF. PMID:24104197

  12. Dual role of acetaminophen in promoting hepatoma cell apoptosis and kidney fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    YU, YUNG-LUEN; YIANG, GIOU-TENG; CHOU, PEI-LUN; TSENG, HSU-HUNG; WU, TSAI-KUN; HUNG, YU-TING; LIN, PEI-SHIUAN; LIN, SHU-YU; LIU, HSIAO-CHUN; CHANG, WEI-JUNG; WEI, CHYOU-WEI

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), is a safe analgesic and antipyretic drug at therapeutic dose, and is widely used in the clinic. However, high doses of APAP can induce hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Most studies have focused on high-dose APAP-induced acute liver and kidney injury. So far, few studies have investigated the effects of the therapeutic dose (1/10 of the high dose) or of the low dose (1/100 of the high dose) of APAP on the cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular effects of therapeutic- or low-dose APAP treatment on hepatoma cells and kidney fibroblasts. As expected, high-dose APAP treatment inhibited while therapeutic and low-dose treatment did not inhibit cell survival of kidney tubular epithelial cells. In addition, therapeutic-dose treatment induced an increase in the H2O2 level, activated the caspase-9/-3 cascade, and induced cell apoptosis of hepatoma cells. Notably, APAP promoted fibroblast proliferation, even at low doses. This study demonstrates that different cellular effects are exerted upon treatment with different APAP concentrations. Our results indicate that treatment with the therapeutic dose of APAP may exert an antitumor activity on hepatoma, while low-dose treatment may be harmful for patients with fibrosis, since it may cause proliferation of fibroblasts. PMID:24682227

  13. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  14. Induction of an acetaminophen-sensitive cyclooxygenase with reduced sensitivity to nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D L; Botting, R M; Robertson, P M; Madsen, M L; Vane, J R

    1999-03-16

    The transformed monocyte/macrophage cell line J774.2 undergoes apoptosis when treated for 48 h with competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes 1 and 2. Many of these nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but in particular diclofenac, induce during this time period a COX activity that coincides with a robust induction of COX-2 protein. Induction of this activity requires high, apoptosis-inducing concentrations of diclofenac (>100 microM). Prolonged treatment of J774.2 cells with lower doses of diclofenac inhibits COX activity, indicating that diclofenac is a time-dependent, pseudoirreversible inhibitor of COX-2. It is difficult to wash out the inhibition. However, the activity evoked by high concentrations of diclofenac has a profoundly distinct COX active site that allows diclofenac, its inducer, to be washed readily from its active site. The diclofenac-induced activity also has the unusual property of being more sensitive to inhibition by acetaminophen (IC50 = 0.1-1.0 mM) than COX-2 induced with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, relative to COX-1 or COX-2, diclofenac-induced enzyme activity shows significantly reduced sensitivity to inhibition by diclofenac or other competitively acting nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the enzyme activity is insensitive to aspirin. If the robust induction of COX-2 observed is responsible for diclofenac-induced COX enzyme activity, it is clear that COX-2 can, therefore, exist in two catalytically active states. A luciferase reporter-construct that contains part of the COX-2 structure and binds into the membrane showed that chronic diclofenac treatment of fibroblasts results in marked mobilization of the fusion protein. Such a mobilization could result in enzymatically distinct COX-2 populations in response to chronic diclofenac treatment. PMID:10077674

  15. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  16. Selective crystallization of metastable phase of acetaminophen by ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoichiro; Maruyama, Mihoko; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Kenji; Fukukita, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    A new method for selective crystallization of the metastable phase (form II) of acetaminophen is described. To obtain form II, we prepared a highly supersaturated solution (σI = 3.7) and then applied ultrasonic irradiation at different frequencies. Without ultrasonic irradiation, spontaneous crystallization did not occur within one month in the highly supersaturated condition (σI = 3.7). When ultrasonic irradiation at 28 kHz was applied, form II preferentially crystallized. Therefore, we conclude that ultrasonic irradiation can be an effective technique for selectively crystallizing the metastable phase.

  17. Translational biomarkers of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yang, Xi; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; James, Laura P

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug that can cause liver injury, liver necrosis and liver failure. APAP-induced liver injury is associated with glutathione depletion, the formation of APAP protein adducts, the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and mitochondrial injury. The systems biology omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) have been used to discover potential translational biomarkers of liver injury. The following review provides a summary of the systems biology discovery process, analytical validation of biomarkers and translation of omics biomarkers from the nonclinical to clinical setting in APAP-induced liver injury.

  18. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M.; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual’s psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  19. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual's psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  20. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Potential of Acetyl-L-carnitine against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Salman A; Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Bakheet, Saleh A; Alharbi, Naif O; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in mice. To evaluate the prophylactic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were supplemented with acetylcarnitine (2 mmol/kg/day per oral (p.o.) for 5 days) before a single dose of acetaminophen (350 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)). Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen injection. Acetaminophen significantly increased the markers of liver injury, hepatic reactive oxygen species, and nitrate/nitrite, and decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation resulted in reversal of all biochemical parameters toward the control values. To explore the therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were given a single dose of acetylcarnitine (0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/kg p.o.) 1.5 h after acetaminophen. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen. Acetylcarnitine administration resulted in partial reversal of liver injury only at 2 mmol/kg p.o. At equimolar doses, N-acetylcystiene was superior as therapeutic agent to acetylcarnitine. However, acetylcarnitine potentiated the effect of N-acetylcystiene in the treatment of acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:26265018

  1. Association between recent acetaminophen use and asthma: modification by polymorphism at TLR4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kang, Mi-Jin; Yu, Ho-Sung; Hong, Kyungmo; Jung, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Young; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Ha-Jung; Kim, Young-Joon; Kim, Hee-Suk; Kim, Hyo Bin; Park, Kang Seo; Lee, So-Yeon; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2014-05-01

    The risk of asthma has been increasing in parallel with use of acetaminophen, which is a potential source of oxidative stress. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role not only in innate immunity, but also in mediating reactive oxygen species induced inflammation. Therefore, we investigated associations between acetaminophen usage and TLR4 polymorphism on asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). The number of 2,428 elementary school children in Seoul and Jeongeup cities was recruited. Subjects who used acetaminophen with a family history of asthma had an increased risk of both asthma diagnosis ever and current asthma. Individuals with CT+TT genotypes at the TLR4 polymorphism, in combination with acetaminophen usage, also demonstrated an increased risk of asthma diagnosis ever (aOR, 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-3.92). Family history of asthma and acetaminophen usage were risk factors for BHR. Although TLR4 was not an independent risk factor for BHR, individuals with CT+TT genotypes at the TLR4 polymorphism had an increased risk of BHR when combined with acetaminophen usage (aOR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.03-2.94). In conclusion, acetaminophen usage may be associated with asthma and BHR in genetically susceptible subjects. This effect may be modified by polymorphism at TLR4.

  2. Acetaminophen for analgesia following pyloromyotomy: does the route of administration make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Arvid; Thung, Arlyne; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background During the perioperative care of infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, an opioid-sparing technique is often advocated due to concerns such as postoperative hypoventilation and apnea. Although the rectal administration of acetaminophen is commonly employed, an intravenous (IV) preparation is also currently available, but only limited data are available regarding IV acetaminophen use for infants undergoing pyloromyotomy. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of IV and rectal acetaminophen for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Methods A retrospective review of the use of IV and rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the perioperative need for supplemental analgesic agents, postoperative pain scores, tracheal extubation time, time in the postanesthesia care unit, time to oral feeding, and time to hospital discharge. Results The study cohort included 68 patients, of whom 34 patients received IV acetaminophen and 34 received rectal acetaminophen. All patients also received local infiltration of the surgical site with 0.25% bupivacaine. No intraoperative opioids were administered. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative pain scores, need for supplemental analgesic agents, time in the postanesthesia care unit, or time in the hospital. There was no difference in the number of children who tolerated oral feeds on the day of surgery or in postoperative complications. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that there is no clinical difference or advantage with the use of IV versus rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27022299

  3. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A; Johnston, Zoe C; Chetty, Tarini; Smith, Lee B; McKinnell, Chris; Dean, Afshan; Homer, Natalie Z; Jorgensen, Anne; Camacho-Moll, Maria E; Sharpe, Richard M; Mitchell, Rod T

    2015-05-20

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45% reduction; P = 0.025) and seminal vesicle weight (a biomarker of androgen exposure; 18% reduction; P = 0.005) in castrate host mice bearing human fetal testis xenografts, whereas acetaminophen exposure for just 1 day did not alter either parameter. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations (at 1 hour after the final dose) in exposed host mice were substantially below those reported in humans after a therapeutic oral dose. Subsequent in utero exposure studies in rats indicated that the acetaminophen-induced reduction in testosterone likely results from reduced expression of key steroidogenic enzymes (Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1). Our results suggest that protracted use of acetaminophen (1 week) may suppress fetal testosterone production, which could have adverse consequences. Further studies are required to establish the dose-response and treatment-duration relationships to delineate the maximum dose and treatment period without this adverse effect.

  4. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Potential of Acetyl-L-carnitine against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Salman A; Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Bakheet, Saleh A; Alharbi, Naif O; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in mice. To evaluate the prophylactic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were supplemented with acetylcarnitine (2 mmol/kg/day per oral (p.o.) for 5 days) before a single dose of acetaminophen (350 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)). Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen injection. Acetaminophen significantly increased the markers of liver injury, hepatic reactive oxygen species, and nitrate/nitrite, and decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation resulted in reversal of all biochemical parameters toward the control values. To explore the therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were given a single dose of acetylcarnitine (0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/kg p.o.) 1.5 h after acetaminophen. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen. Acetylcarnitine administration resulted in partial reversal of liver injury only at 2 mmol/kg p.o. At equimolar doses, N-acetylcystiene was superior as therapeutic agent to acetylcarnitine. However, acetylcarnitine potentiated the effect of N-acetylcystiene in the treatment of acetaminophen toxicity.

  5. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen in 100 mL saline within 15 minutes and patients in group M received a single intravenous injection of meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, 15 minutes prior to the end of operation. Postoperative pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS). Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and respiratory depressions were compared between the two groups. Results: Pain severity in patients treated with intravenous acetaminophen six hours after the operation within one-hour interval was significantly lower than meperidine group (P < 0.0001). Ninety patients in the meperidine group and five patients in the acetaminophen group required additional doses of analgesics. Nausea was significantly lower in acetaminophen group than meperidine group. Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen reduced pain following outpatient urological surgery more significantly than meperidine. PMID:25798377

  6. Variability in Acetaminophen Labeling Practices: a Missed Opportunity to Enhance Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; McCarthy, Danielle M; Serper, Marina; Jacobson, Kara L; Mullen, Rebecca J; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Confusion regarding a drug's active ingredient may lead to simultaneous use of multiple acetaminophen-containing prescriptions and increase the risk of unintentional overdose. The objective of this study was to examine prescription labeling practices for commonly prescribed acetaminophen-containing analgesics, specifically focusing on how active ingredient information and concomitant use warnings were conveyed. Patients with new acetaminophen-containing prescriptions were recruited upon discharge from an emergency department in Chicago or at an outpatient, hospital-based pharmacy in Atlanta. Label information was transcribed from prescription bottles and patients' knowledge of active ingredient was assessed by in-person interviews. Among the 245 acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, hydrocodone was the most common second active ingredient (n = 208, 84.8 %) followed by oxycodone (n = 28, 11.4 %). Acetaminophen was identified by its full name on 6.9 % (n = 17) of labels; various abbreviations were used in 93.1 % of cases. One hundred forty-seven bottles used auxiliary warning labels with the majority of labels (n = 130, 88.4 %) warning about maximum dose and 11.5 % (n = 17) about concomitant use. Most of the study participants (n = 177, 72.2 %) were not able to identify acetaminophen as an active ingredient in their prescription. There was no significant association between the use of unabbreviated labels including warning information and patients' awareness of acetaminophen as an active ingredient (36.4 vs. 27.3 %, p = 0.50). We noted high variability in labeling practices and warning information conveyed to patients receiving acetaminophen-containing prescriptions. Missed opportunities to adequately convey risk information may contribute to the burden of acetaminophen-related liver injury.

  7. Relationship between serum acetaminophen concentration and N-acetylcysteine-induced adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Awang, Rahmat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Khan, Halilol Rahman Mohamed; Sawalha, Ansam F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous N-acetylcysteine is usually regarded as a safe antidote. However, during the infusion of the loading dose, different types of adverse drug reactions (ADR) may occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between the incidence of different types of ADR and serum acetaminophen concentration in patients presenting to the hospital with acetaminophen overdose. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital for acute acetaminophen overdose over a period of 5 years (1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008). Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to test differences between groups depending on the normality of the data. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis. Of 305 patients with acetaminophen overdose, 146 (47.9%) were treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and 139 (45.6%) were included in this study. Different types of ADR were observed in 94 (67.6%) patients. Low serum acetaminophen concentrations were significantly associated with cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions but not other types of ADR. Low serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly associated with flushing (p < 0.001), rash (p < 0.001) and pruritus (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in serum acetaminophen concentrations between patients with and without the following ADR: gastrointestinal reactions (p = 0.77), respiratory reactions (p = 0.96), central nervous reactions (p = 0.82) and cardiovascular reactions (p = 0.37). In conclusion, low serum acetaminophen concentrations were associated with higher cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions. Such high serum acetaminophen concentrations may be protective against N-acetylcysteine-induced cutaneous ADR. PMID:20374238

  8. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring.

  9. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring. PMID:26930528

  10. Study on the reaction mechanism and the static injection chemiluminescence method for detection of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huili; Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Li, Yanqiang; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, is found in Tylenol, Excedrin and other products as over-the-counter medicines. In this study, acetaminophen as a luminol signal enhancer was used in the chemiluminescence (CL) substrate solution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the first time. The use of acetaminophen in the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system affected not only the intensity of the obtained signal, but also its kinetics. It was shown that acetaminophen was to be a potent enhancer of the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system. A putative enhancement mechanism for the luminol-H2O2-HRP-acetaminophen system is presented. The resonance of the nucleophilic amide group and the benzene ring of acetaminophen structure have a great effect on O-H bond dissociation energy of the phenol group and therefore on phenoxyl radical stabilization. These radicals act as mediators between HRP and luminol in an electron transfer reaction that generates luminol radicals and subsequently light emission, in which the intensity of CL is enhanced in the presence of acetaminophen. In addition, a simple method was developed to detect acetaminophen by static injection CL based on the enhanced CL system of luminol-H2O2-HRP by acetaminophen. Experimental conditions, such as pH and concentrations of substrates, have been examined and optimized. The proposed method exhibited good performance, the linear range was from 0.30 to 7.5 mM, the relative standard deviation was 1.86% (n = 10), limit of detection was 0.16 mM and recovery was 99 ± 4%.

  11. Variability in Acetaminophen Labeling Practices: a Missed Opportunity to Enhance Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; McCarthy, Danielle M; Serper, Marina; Jacobson, Kara L; Mullen, Rebecca J; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Confusion regarding a drug's active ingredient may lead to simultaneous use of multiple acetaminophen-containing prescriptions and increase the risk of unintentional overdose. The objective of this study was to examine prescription labeling practices for commonly prescribed acetaminophen-containing analgesics, specifically focusing on how active ingredient information and concomitant use warnings were conveyed. Patients with new acetaminophen-containing prescriptions were recruited upon discharge from an emergency department in Chicago or at an outpatient, hospital-based pharmacy in Atlanta. Label information was transcribed from prescription bottles and patients' knowledge of active ingredient was assessed by in-person interviews. Among the 245 acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, hydrocodone was the most common second active ingredient (n = 208, 84.8 %) followed by oxycodone (n = 28, 11.4 %). Acetaminophen was identified by its full name on 6.9 % (n = 17) of labels; various abbreviations were used in 93.1 % of cases. One hundred forty-seven bottles used auxiliary warning labels with the majority of labels (n = 130, 88.4 %) warning about maximum dose and 11.5 % (n = 17) about concomitant use. Most of the study participants (n = 177, 72.2 %) were not able to identify acetaminophen as an active ingredient in their prescription. There was no significant association between the use of unabbreviated labels including warning information and patients' awareness of acetaminophen as an active ingredient (36.4 vs. 27.3 %, p = 0.50). We noted high variability in labeling practices and warning information conveyed to patients receiving acetaminophen-containing prescriptions. Missed opportunities to adequately convey risk information may contribute to the burden of acetaminophen-related liver injury. PMID:25697756

  12. Day-to-day variations during clinical drug monitoring of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide serum concentrations in cancer patients. A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Klepstad, Pål; Hilton, Priscilla; Moen, Jorunn; Kaasa, Stein; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Dale, Ola

    2004-01-01

    Background The feasibility of drug monitoring of serum concentrations of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) during chronic morphine therapy is not established. One important factor relevant to drug monitoring is to what extent morphine, M6G and M3G serum concentrations fluctuate during stable morphine treatment. Methods We included twenty-nine patients admitted to a palliative care unit receiving oral morphine (n = 19) or continuous subcutaneous (sc) morphine infusions (n = 10). Serum concentrations of morphine, M6G and M3G were obtained at the same time on four consecutive days. If readmitted, the patients were followed for another trial period. Day-to-day variations in serum concentrations and ratios were determined by estimating the percent coefficient of variation (CV = (mean/SD) ×100). Results The patients' median morphine doses were 90 (range; 20–1460) mg/24 h and 135 (range; 30–440) mg/24 h during oral and sc administration, respectively. Intraindividual fluctuations of serum concentrations estimated by median coefficients of day-to-day variation were in the oral group for morphine 46%, for M6G 25% and for M3G 18%. The median coefficients of variation were lower in patients receiving continuous sc morphine infusions (morphine 10%, M6G 13%, M3G 9%). Conclusion These findings indicate that serum concentrations of morphine and morphine metabolites fluctuate. The fluctuations found in our study are not explained by changes in morphine doses, administration of other drugs or by time for collection of blood samples. As expected the day-to-day variation was lower in patients receiving continuous sc morphine infusions compared with patients receiving oral morphine. PMID:15461818

  13. Anti-inflammatory, antiviral and quantitative study of quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide in Polygonum perfoliatum L.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongsheng; Zhou, Xin; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Huaguo; Zhao, Yang; Gong, Xiaojian

    2011-09-01

    Quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide, isolated from Polygonum perfoliatum L., was evaluated by antiviral efficacy against influenza A virus and anti-inflammatory activity in vivo in mouse, and it was used for quality evaluation of P. perfoliatum L.. In vivo study, oral administration of quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide significantly suppressed ear edema induced by dimethyl benzene and peritoneal permeability induced by acetic acid in mice, and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide also showed to possess inhibitory activity against influenza A virus (FLUAV). In the present study, additionally, a rapid, simple and sensitive method for quantitative analysis of quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide in P. perfoliatum L. was developed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with photodiode array detection. The separation was carried out on a Lichrosher-C18 column (250 mm × 4.6mm, 5 μm) together with a C18 guard column at isocratic elution systems of methanol (A) and 0.05% aqueous phosphoric acid (B) (43:57, v/v) with detection wavelength at 258 nm and column temperature at 30°C. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, limit of quantification (LOQ), precision and robustness. The contents of quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide in 28 samples from different regions of China were between 0.06% and 2.09%. The developed analytical method was applied to investigate P. perfoliatum L. and for quality control of the herb.

  14. Oral coadministration of β-glucuronidase to increase exposure of extensively glucuronidated drugs that undergo enterohepatic recirculation.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Gary; Hsu, C-P; Subrahmanyam, Vangala; Chen, Jing; Scicinski, Jan; Galemmo, Robert A; Tuman, Robert W; Johnson, Dana L

    2012-07-01

    Extensive first-pass metabolism can significantly limit a drug's oral exposure levels. In this work, we introduce an innovative approach for increasing the oral bioavailability of a drug that undergoes extensive reversible glucuronidation and enterohepatic recirculation through intraduodenal coadministration of the deconjugating enzyme β-glucuronidase. Intraduodenal administration of JNJ-10198409 (10 mg/kg) with β-glucuronidase (34,000-140,000 units/kg) to catheterized rats resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.005) in the mean area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC; approx. threefold) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max); approx. twofold) of JNJ-10198409. The AUC and C(max) were 60 ± 18 ng h/mL and 76 ± 29 ng/mL, respectively, with no enzyme and 177 ± 55 ng h/mL and 129 ± 41 ng/mL, respectively, with β-glucuronidase coadministered. Moreover, the AUC of the primary glucuronide metabolite increased approximately sevenfold from 1173 ± 361 (ng h)/mL with no enzyme coadministered to 8723 ± 2133 ng h/mL with coadministered enzyme. These pharmacokinetic data support the hypothesis that when the primary glucuronide is secreted into the duodenum via the bile duct, the glucuronide is converted by β-glucuronidase back to the parent compound. The parent compound is then reabsorbed and reconjugated, resulting in elevated systemic exposures to both parent and glucuronide. Potential clinical and preclinical applications and considerations for this approach are discussed.

  15. The detection and quantification of lorazepam and its 3-O-glucuronide in fingerprint deposits by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Goucher, Edward; Kicman, Andrew; Smith, Norman; Jickells, Sue

    2009-07-01

    The use of fingerprints as an alternative biological matrix to test for the presence of drugs and/or their metabolites is a novel area of research in analytical toxicology. This investigation describes quantitative analysis for the benzodiazepine lorazepam and its 3-O-glucuronide conjugate in fingerprints following the oral administration of a single 2 mg dose of lorazepam to five volunteers. Creatinine was also measured to investigate whether the amount of drug relative to that of creatinine would help to account for the variable amount of secretory material deposited. Fingerprints were deposited on glass cover slips and extracted by dissolving them in a solution of dichloromethane/methanol, containing tetradeuterated lorazepam as an internal standard. The samples were evaporated, reconstituted with mobile phase and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Chromatography was achieved using an RP (C18) column for the analysis of lorazapem and its glucuronide, and a hydrophilic interaction column (HILIC) for the analysis of creatinine. Lorazepam and its glucuronide were only detected where ten prints had been combined, up to 12 h following drug administration. In every case, the amount of lorazepam glucuronide exceeded that of lorazepam, the peak amounts being 210 and 11 pg, respectively. Adjusting for creatinine smoothed the elimination profile. To our knowledge, this represents the first time a drug glucuronide has been detected in deposited fingerprints.

  16. Methylation, Glucuronidation, and Sulfonation of Daphnetin in Human Hepatic Preparations In Vitro: Metabolic Profiling, Pathway Comparison, and Bioactivity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Si-Cheng; Xia, Yang-Liu; Hou, Jie; Ge, Guang-Bo; Zhang, Jiang-Wei; He, Yu-Qi; Wang, Jia-Yue; Qi, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that daphnetin is subject to glucuronidation in vitro. However, daphnetin metabolism is still poorly documented. This study aimed to investigate daphnetin metabolism and its consequent effect on the bioactivity. Metabolic profiles obtained by human liver S9 fractions and human hepatocytes showed that daphnetin was metabolized by glucuronidation, sulfonation, and methylation to form 6 conjugates which were synthesized and identified as 7-O-glucuronide, 8-O-glucuronide, 7-O-sulfate and 8-O-sulfate, 8-O-methylate, and 7-O-suflo-8-O-methylate. Regioselective 8-O-methylation of daphnetin was investigated using in silico docking calculations, and the results suggested that a close proximity (2.03 Å) of 8-OH to the critical residue Lysine 144 might be the responsible mechanism. Compared with glucuronidation and sulfonation pathways, the methylation of daphnetin had a high clearance rate (470 μL/min/mg) in human liver S9 fractions and contributed to a large amount (37.3%) of the methyl-derived metabolites in human hepatocyte. Reaction phenotyping studies showed the major role of SULT1A1, -1A2, and -1A3 in daphnetin sulfonation, and soluble COMT in daphnetin 8-O-methylation. Of the metabolites, only 8-O-methyldaphnetin exhibited an inhibitory activity on lymphocyte proliferation comparable to that of daphnetin. In conclusion, methylation is a crucial pathway for daphnetin clearance and might be involved in pharmacologic actions of daphnetin in humans. PMID:26869431

  17. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim; Ye, Young-Min

    2016-08-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  18. Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  19. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  20. Electrochemical properties of the acetaminophen on the screen printed carbon electrode towards the high performance practical sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Karikalan, Natarajan; Karthik, Raj; Chen, Shen-Ming; Velmurugan, Murugan; Karuppiah, Chelladurai

    2016-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used as an antipyretic agent for the alternative to aspirin. Conversely, the overdoses of acetaminophen can cause hepatic toxicity and kidney damage. Hence, the determination of acetaminophen receives much more attention in biological samples and also in pharmaceutical formulations. Here, we report a rapid and sensitive detection of the acetaminophen based on the bare (unmodified) screen printed carbon electrode (BSPCE) and its electrochemistry was studied in various pHs. From the observed results, the mechanism of the electro-oxidation of acetaminophen was derived for various pHs. The acetaminophen is not stable in strong acidic and strong alkaline media, which is hydrolyzed and hydroxylated. However, it is stable in intermediate pHs due to the dimerization of acetaminophen. The kinetics of the acetaminophen oxidation was briefly studied and documented in the schemes. In addition, the surface morphology and disorders of BSPCE was probed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the BSPCE determined the acetaminophen with the linear concentration ranging from 0.05 to 190μM and the lower detection limit of 0.013μM. Besides that it reveals the good recoveries towards the pharmaceutical samples and shows the excellent selectivity, sensitivity and stability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the better performance compare to the previously reported unmodified acetaminophen sensors. PMID:27552419

  1. The analgesic efficacy of intra-articular acetaminophen in an experimental model of carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Oguzhan; Canbay, Ozgur; Celebi, Nalan; Sahin, Altan; Konan, Ali; Atilla, Pergin; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is one of the most common drugs used for the treatment of pain and fever. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of intra-articular (IA) acetaminophen on carrageenan-induced arthritic pain-related behaviour and spinal c-Fos expression in rats. METHODS: The present study was performed using 20 Sprague Dawley rats. Forty microlitres of IA 0.9% NaCl was injected in the control group, and 40 μL of IA carrageenan was injected in the carrageenan group. One hour after carrageenan injection, 400 μg of IA acetaminophen was injected in the IA acetaminophen group, and 400 μg of intraperitoneal (IP) acet-aminophen was injected in the IP acetaminophen group. One day before injection, and 4 h and 8 h after injection, diameters of both knee joints, motility of the rat, paw loading and joint mobility were assessed. After the rats were euthanized, L3 and L4 spinal segments were excised for c-Fos assessment. RESULTS: IA acetaminophen decreased both the severity and distribution of c-Fos expression. IP acetaminophen decreased only the distribution of c-Fos expression. IA acetaminophen decreased knee diameter at 8 h. IA and IP acetaminophen increased rat motility and paw loading scores. Joint mobility scores of IP acetaminophen were similar to saline at 8 h. CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate an analgesic and/or possible anti-inflammatory effect of IA acetaminophen and provide further evidence on the efficacy of systemic acetaminophen injection in reducing arthritic pain. PMID:24093120

  2. Glucuronidated Quercetin Lowers Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats via Deconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Pilar; Rodriguez-Gómez, Isabel; González-Manzano, Susana; Dueñas, Montserrat; Jiménez, Rosario; Menéndez, Carmen; Vargas, Félix; Tamargo, Juan; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic oral quercetin reduces blood pressure and restores endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive animals. However, quercetin (aglycone) is usually not present in plasma, because it is rapidly metabolized into conjugated, mostly inactive, metabolites. The aim of the study is to analyze whether deconjugation of these metabolites is involved in the blood pressure lowering effect of quercetin. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the effects on blood pressure and vascular function in vitro of the conjugated metabolites of quercetin (quercetin-3-glucuronide, Q3GA; isorhamnetin-3-glucuronide, I3GA; and quercetin-3′-sulfate, Q3'S) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Q3GA and I3GA (1 mg/kg i.v.), but not Q3'S, progressively reduced mean blood pressure (MBP), measured in conscious SHR. The hypotensive effect of Q3GA was abolished in SHR treated with the specific inhibitor of β-glucuronidase, saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (SAL, 10 mg/ml). In mesenteric arteries, unlike quercetin, Q3GA had no inhibitory effect in the contractile response to phenylephrine after 30 min of incubation. However, after 1 hour of incubation Q3GA strongly reduced this contractile response and this effect was prevented by SAL. Oral administration of quercetin (10 mg/Kg) induced a progressive decrease in MBP, which was also suppressed by SAL. Conclusions Conjugated metabolites are involved in the in vivo antihypertensive effect of quercetin, acting as molecules for the plasmatic transport of quercetin to the target tissues. Quercetin released from its glucuronidated metabolites could be responsible for its vasorelaxant and hypotensive effect. PMID:22427863

  3. Zomepirac Acyl Glucuronide Is Responsible for Zomepirac-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Atsushi; Watanabe, Katsuhito; Akai, Sho; Nishinosono, Tsubasa; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Kume, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Glucuronidation, an important phase II metabolic route, is generally considered to be a detoxification pathway. However, acyl glucuronides (AGs) have been implicated in the toxicity of carboxylic acid drugs due to their electrophilic reactivity. Zomepirac (ZP) was withdrawn from the market because of adverse effects such as renal toxicity. Although ZP is mainly metabolized to acyl glucuronide (ZP-AG) by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, the role of ZP-AG in renal toxicity is unknown. In this study, we established a ZP-induced kidney injury mouse model by pretreatment with tri-o-tolyl phosphate (TOTP), a nonselective esterase inhibitor, and l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a glutathione synthesis inhibitor. The role of ZP-AG in renal toxicity was investigated using this model. The model showed significant increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (CRE), but not alanine aminotransferase. The ZP-AG concentrations were elevated by cotreatment with TOTP in the plasma and liver and especially in the kidney. The ZP-AG concentrations in the kidney correlated with values for BUN and CRE. Upon histopathological examination, vacuoles and infiltration of mononuclear cells were observed in the model mouse. In addition to immune-related responses, oxidative stress markers, such as the glutathione/disulfide glutathione ratio and malondialdehyde levels, were different in the mouse model. The suppression of ZP-induced kidney injury by tempol, an antioxidant agent, suggested the involvement of oxidative stress in ZP-induced kidney injury. This is the first study to demonstrate that AG accumulation in the kidney by TOTP and BSO treatment could explain renal toxicity and to show the in vivo toxicological potential of AGs. PMID:27112166

  4. Bilirubin glucuronidation by intact Gunn rat fibroblasts expressing bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Seppen, J; Tada, K; Hellwig, S; Bakker, C T; Prasad, V R; Roy Chowdhury, N; Roy Chowdhury, J; Bosma, P J; Oude Elferink, R P

    1996-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar (CN) disease is an inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism. The disease is caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (B-UGT). Patients with CN disease have high serum levels of the toxic compound, unconjugated bilirubin. The only defect in bilirubin metabolism of CN patients is the absence of B-UGT activity. The transplantation of cells able to glucuronidate bilirubin should therefore lower serum bilirubin levels. The Gunn rat is the animal model of CN disease. Primary Gunn rat fibroblasts (GURF) were transduced with a recombinant retrovirus, capable of transferring B-UGT cDNA. A cell line was obtained expressing B-UGT at a level comparable to hepatocytes. Bilirubin added to the culture medium of these cells was glucuronidated and excreted. The B-UGT activities of transduced GURF and freshly isolated Wistar hepatocytes were compared at different bilirubin concentrations. The specific B-UGT activities of these two cell types were comparable when physiological bilirubin concentrations (5-10 microM) were present in the culture media. At higher bilirubin concentrations (20-80 microM) the hepatocytes were more active than the transduced GURF. We conclude that with the addition of only one enzyme (B-UGT) fibroblasts can perform the complete set of reactions necessary for bilirubin glucuronidation. The difference in B-UGT activity between transduced GURF and hepatocytes at 20-80 microM bilirubin can be explained by lower UDP-glucuronic acid and glutathione S-transferase levels in GURF. Our findings also indicate that these cells could be used to develop extrahepatic gene therapy for CN disease. PMID:8670060

  5. Voucher-based reinforcement for alcohol abstinence using the ethyl-glucuronide alcohol biomarker.

    PubMed

    McDonell, Michael G; Howell, Donelle N; McPherson, Sterling; Cameron, Jennifer M; Srebnik, Debra; Roll, John M; Ries, Richard K

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a contingency management (CM) intervention for alcohol consumption in 10 alcohol-dependent participants. An ABCA design was used. Vouchers were provided contingent on results of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) urine tests (an alcohol biomarker with a 2-day detection period) and alcohol breath tests during the C phase. The percentage of negative urines was 35% during the first baseline phase, 69% during the C phase, and 20% during the return-to-baseline phase. Results suggest that EtG urine tests may be a feasible method to deliver CM to promote alcohol abstinence.

  6. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1(-/-)) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1(-/-) mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1(-/-) mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1(-/-) mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  7. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1−/−) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1−/− mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1−/− mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1−/− mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  8. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of the 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen protein adduct in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D. W.; Bucci, T. J.; Benson, R. W.; Warbritton, A. R.; McRae, T. A.; Pumford, N. R.; Hinson, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in humans and laboratory animals, presumably by metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine: and binding to cysteine groups as 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen-protein adduct. Antiserum specific for the adduct was used immunohistochemically to demonstrate the formation, distribution, and concentration of this specific adduct in livers of treated mice and was correlated with cell injury as a function of dose and time. Within the liver lobule, immunohistochemically demonstrable adduct occurred in a temporally progressive, central-to-peripheral pattern. There was concordance between immunohistochemical staining and quantification of the adduct in hepatic 10,000g supernate, using a quantitative particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay. Findings include: 1) immunochemically detectable adduct before the appearance of centrilobular necrosis, 2) distinctive lobular zones of adduct localization with subsequent depletion during the progression of toxicity, 3) drug-protein binding in hepatocytes at subhepatotoxic doses and before depletion of total hepatic glutathione, 4) immunohistochemical evidence of drug binding in the nucleus, and 5) adduct in metabolically active and dividing hepatocytes and in macrophagelike cells in the regenerating liver. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1992763

  9. The kinetics of the urinary excretion of the N-oxide and glucuronides of methaqualone in man.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Burnett, D; Oram, M; Reynolds, C T

    1981-01-01

    The urinary excretion of the N-oxide and the glucuronides of five C-monohydroxy metabolites of methaqualone has been studied following the oral administration of a single dose of the drug. The apparent first order rate constants for the excretion of each metabolite (kme) were shown to be numerically smaller than the overall elimination rate constant for methaqualone (k10). The Kme values tended to be greater than or equal to the corresponding apparent first order rate constants for the formation of the metabolite (km) but corresponding kme and km values were always of the same order magnitude. The kme values for the glucuronides were much smaller than the literature kme value for paracetemol glucuronide. The rate of renal elimination of the metabolites was variably sensitive to urine flow but over a period of time of 8 hours or greater the total amount of metabolite recovered in the urine was was independent of the total urine volume.

  10. Alpha-lipoic acid treatment of acetaminophen-induced rat liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Mahmoud, A A; Nassar, G

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a well-tolerated analgesic and antipyretic drug when used at therapeutic doses. Overdoses, however, cause oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Alpha lipoic acid is an antioxidant that has proven effective for ameliorating many pathological conditions caused by oxidative stress. We evaluated the effect of alpha lipoic acid on the histological and histochemical alterations of liver caused by an acute overdose of acetaminophen in rats. Livers of acetaminophen-intoxicated rats were congested and showed centrilobular necrosis, vacuolar degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Necrotic hepatocytes lost most of their carbohydrates, lipids and structural proteins. Liver sections from rats pre-treated with lipoic acid showed fewer pathological changes; the hepatocytes appeared moderately vacuolated with moderate staining of carbohydrates and proteins. Nevertheless, alpha lipoic acid at the dose we used did not protect the liver fully from acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity. PMID:26179071

  11. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  12. N-Acetylcysteine Use in Non-Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    McPheeters, Chelsey M; VanArsdale, Vanessa M; Weant, Kyle A

    2016-01-01

    This article will review the available evidence related to the management of non-acetaminophen induced acute liver failure with N-acetylcysteine. Randomized controlled trials and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The efficacy of N-acetylcysteine in the treatment of acute liver failure from causes other than acetaminophen toxicity was evaluated. The efficacy of N-acetylcysteine in non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure is limited to specific patient populations. Patients classified as Coma Grade I or II are more likely to benefit from the use of this agent. The use of N-acetylcysteine is associated with improved transplant-free survival, not overall survival, in adults. N-Acetylcysteine does not improve the overall survival of patients with non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure but may be beneficial in those patients with Coma Grades I-II. Liver transplantation remains the only definitive therapy in advanced disease. PMID:27482990

  13. Drugs in the Chemistry Laboratory: The Conversion of Acetaminophen into Phenacetin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Eugene J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which acetaminophen is converted into phenacetin, that has been used at Shepherd College in an introductory chemistry course for nurses and in the organic chemistry laboratory. (BT)

  14. A zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as useful sensor for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour-Mobarakeh, Leila; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The voltammetric behavior of a carbon paste electrode modified with Co(II)-exchanged zeolite A (Co(II)-A/ZMCPE) for determination of acetaminophen was studied. The proposed electrode showed a diffusion controlled reaction with the electron transfer rate constant (Ks) of 0.44s(-1) and charge transfer coefficient of 0.73 in the absence of acetaminophen. A linear voltammetric response was obtained in the range of 0.1 to 190μmolL(-1) of acetaminophen [r(2)=0.9979, r=0.9989 (n=10)] with a detection limit of 0.04μmolL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of acetaminophen in some drugs.

  15. Efficacy of charcoal cathartic versus ipecac in reducing serum acetaminophen in a simulated overdose.

    PubMed

    McNamara, R M; Aaron, C K; Gemborys, M; Davidheiser, S

    1989-09-01

    The traditional role of gastric emptying as the initial step in the management of the poisoned patient has recently been questioned; immediate activated charcoal administration has been recommended by some. In the setting of acetaminophen overdose, ipecac-induced emesis may interfere with subsequent oral antidotal therapy. Therefore, we conducted a study to compare the efficacy of initial therapy with ipecac with therapy with activated charcoal-cathartic in a simulated acetaminophen overdosage. Ten healthy volunteers participated in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects ingested 3.0 g acetaminophen, followed by either no intervention, 30 mL syrup of ipecac, or 50 g activated charcoal-sorbitol solution at one hour. Serial acetaminophen levels were determined at intervals over eight hours. Both interventions significantly reduced the area under the curve compared with control (P less than .05). When comparing ipecac with activated charcoal-cathartic, no significant difference was noted among these groups. PMID:2569851

  16. Alpha-lipoic acid treatment of acetaminophen-induced rat liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Mahmoud, A A; Nassar, G

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a well-tolerated analgesic and antipyretic drug when used at therapeutic doses. Overdoses, however, cause oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Alpha lipoic acid is an antioxidant that has proven effective for ameliorating many pathological conditions caused by oxidative stress. We evaluated the effect of alpha lipoic acid on the histological and histochemical alterations of liver caused by an acute overdose of acetaminophen in rats. Livers of acetaminophen-intoxicated rats were congested and showed centrilobular necrosis, vacuolar degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Necrotic hepatocytes lost most of their carbohydrates, lipids and structural proteins. Liver sections from rats pre-treated with lipoic acid showed fewer pathological changes; the hepatocytes appeared moderately vacuolated with moderate staining of carbohydrates and proteins. Nevertheless, alpha lipoic acid at the dose we used did not protect the liver fully from acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity.

  17. Solid dispersion of pharmaceutical ternary systems I: Phase diagram of aspirin-acetaminophen-urea system.

    PubMed

    el-Banna, H M

    1978-08-01

    The phase diagram of an aspirin-acetaminophen-urea system was constructed. The data obtained by the thermomicroscopic method showed that the binary systems of aspirin-acetaminophen, aspirin-urea, and acetaminophen-urea are simple eutectic mixtures with negligible formation of solid solutions or molecular compounds. The equilateral triangular phase diagram of the ternary system revealed that it forms, upon solidification, solid dispersions of the mechanical mixture type. The ternary eutectic corresponded to a composition of 60% aspirin, 20% acetaminophen, and 20% urea at 72 degrees. The method of calculating the composition finally solidified melts, lying within any area of the phase diagram, is presented. Use of the phase diagram in selecting the optimum ratio of components to enhance dissolution rates of these drugs may be possible. PMID:671247

  18. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D.; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  19. Slow O-demethylation of methyl triclosan to triclosan, which is rapidly glucuronidated and sulfonated in channel catfish liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O; Marth, Christopher J; Rowland-Faux, Laura

    2012-11-15

    bioaccumulate in the channel catfish. Triclosan itself, however, was readily glucuronidated by hepatic and intestinal microsomes and sulfonated by hepatic and intestinal cytosol. Triclosan glucuronidation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics when rates were measured across a concentration range of 5-1000 μM, whereas triclosan sulfonation exhibited substrate inhibition at concentrations above 10-20 μM in both intestinal and hepatic cytosol. Based on the enzyme kinetic constants measured in hepatic and intestinal fractions at 21°C, triclosan at 1 μM could be glucuronidated at rates of 23 and 3.2 pmol/min/mg protein respectively in liver and intestine, and sulfonated at rates of 277 (liver) and 938 (intestine) pmol/min/mg protein. These rates are much higher than the rates of demethylation of methyl triclosan, and suggest that triclosan would be rapidly cleared and unlikely to bioaccumulate in catfish tissues.

  20. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript. PMID:27004010

  1. Acetaminophen absorption kinetics in altered gastric emptying: establishing a relevant pharmacokinetic surrogate using published data.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen has been used as a tool for clinical and nonclinical experimental designs that evaluate gastric emptying because acetaminophen is not absorbed in stomach but efficiently absorbed from the small intestine. Published pharmacokinetic data of acetaminophen in subjects with normal gastric emptying vs. impaired gastric emptying (i.e., morphine treatment) were evaluated to select a key surrogate. Using Caverage (average concentration), computed from the exposure within the first hour, individual rank distribution was plotted across different studies. Caverage was highly correlated with Cmax (maximum concentration) in subjects with normal gastric emptying (R(2) = .7532) but not in those where gastric emptying was impaired (R(2) = .0213). The 50th percentile value of the distribution pattern of 1/Caverage in acetaminophen+morphine-treated group (coincided with the first shift in the slope) was considered as the cutoff point to figure out the impaired gastric emptying. The individual rank distribution plots for 1/Caverage across different studies supported similar trends in subjects with normal gastric emptying but showed a distinct distribution pattern in the cohort of impaired gastric emptying. Caverage, calculated within the first hour of dosing of acetaminophen (average concentration at 0-1 hour, C0-1havg), can be used as a key surrogate to distinguish the effects of gastric emptying on the absorption of acetaminophen. A 4 μg/mL C0-1havg of acetaminophen (dose: 1.5 g) may be used as cutoff point in future clinical investigations of acetaminophen to clarify the role of gastric emptying.

  2. Acetaminophen use and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in a hypertensive cohort.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Rachael L; Walters, Matthew R; Morton, Ross; Touyz, Rhian M; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morrison, David S; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Meredith, Peter A; McInnes, Gordon T; Dawson, Jesse

    2015-05-01

    Recent data suggest that self-reported acetaminophen use is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and that acetaminophen causes a modest blood pressure rise. There are no randomized trials or studies using verified prescription data of this relationship. We aimed to assess the relationship between verified acetaminophen prescription data and risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in patients with hypertension. We performed a retrospective data analysis using information contained within the UK Clinical Research Practice Datalink. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios for myocardial infarction (primary end point), stroke, and any cardiovascular event (secondary end points) associated with acetaminophen use during a 10-year period. Acetaminophen exposure was a time-dependent variable. A propensity-matched design was also used to reduce potential for confounding. We included 24,496 hypertensive individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Of these, 10,878 were acetaminophen-exposed and 13,618 were not. There was no relationship between risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or any cardiovascular event and acetaminophen exposure on adjusted analysis (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.27; hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.38; and hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.37; respectively). Results in the propensity-matched sample (n=4000 per group) and when men and women were analyzed separately were similar. High-frequency users (defined as receiving a prescription for >75% of months) were also not at increased risk. After allowance for potentially confounding variables, the use of acetaminophen was not associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in a large cohort of hypertensive patients.

  3. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika; Abiko, Yumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs(+/-) or Cth(+/-)) and homozygous (Cth(-/-)) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth(-/-) mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs(+/-) or Cth(+/-) mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth(-/-) mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate-cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth(-/-) mice with lower Km values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth(-/-) mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200-300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities.

  4. Protective effect of ajoene on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hattori, A; Yamada, N; Nishikawa, T; Fukuda, H; Fujino, T

    2001-11-01

    Ajoene, a garlic-derived sulfur-containing compound, exhibited a hepatoprotective effect against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. A pretreatment with ajoene suppressed the rise in serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity and the reduction in the hepatic reduced glutathione level. These effects of ajoene were observed dose-dependently (20-100 mg/kg). The pretreatment by ajoene also suppressed the decrease in hepatic protein thiol content resulting from acetaminophen administration.

  5. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-03-21

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript.

  6. Intravenous acetaminophen reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Apfel, Christian C; Turan, Alparslan; Souza, Kimberly; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Hornuss, Cyrill

    2013-05-01

    Opioids are a key risk factor for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). As intravenous (i.v.) acetaminophen reduces postoperative pain and opioid requirements, one would expect i.v. acetaminophen to be associated with a lower incidence of opioid-induced side effects, including PONV. We conducted a systematic search using Medline and Cochrane databases supplemented with hand search of abstract proceedings to identify randomized-controlled trials of i.v. acetaminophen. Inclusion criteria were (a) randomized for i.v. acetaminophen vs a placebo control, (b) general anesthesia, and (c) reported or obtainable PONV outcomes. Primary outcome was postoperative nausea and secondary outcome was postoperative vomiting. We included 30 studies with 2364 patients (1223 in the acetaminophen group, 1141 in the placebo group). The relative risk (95% confidence interval) was 0.73 (0.60-0.88) for nausea and 0.63 (0.45-0.88) for vomiting. Data showed significant heterogeneity for both nausea (P=0.02, I(2)=38%) and vomiting (P=0.006, I(2)=47%), but were homogeneous when studies were grouped according to timing of first administration: i.v. acetaminophen reduced nausea when given prophylactically either before surgery, 0.54 (0.40-0.74), or before arrival in the postanesthesia care unit, 0.67 (0.55-0.83); but not when given after the onset of pain, 1.12 (0.85-1.48). When i.v. acetaminophen was given prophylactically, the reduction of nausea correlated with the reduction of pain (odds ratio 0.66, 0.47-0.93), but not with reduction in postoperative opioids (odds ratio 0.89, 0.64-1.22). Prophylactically administered i.v. acetaminophen reduced PONV, mainly mediated through superior pain control.

  7. Thermal analysis study of the interactions between acetaminophen and excipients in solid dosage forms and in some binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, M; Catalani, A; Rossi, V; Vecchio, S

    2005-04-29

    Thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to assess the compatibility between acetaminophen (Ac) and some excipients (polyvinylpyrrolidone (P), magnesium stearate (M), citric acid (C), aspartame (As), mannitol (Mn), cellulose (Cll) and starch (S)) in several of the more commercially available pharmaceutical formulations and in solid binary mixtures. The present study compared thermodynamic data on acetaminophen melting and vaporization processes of pure acetaminophen with those found for several solid mixtures and in some commercially available acetaminophen-based dosage forms. Appreciable modifications occur only for solid mixtures with high content of excipient. Acetaminophen-based dosage forms and its solid binary mixtures usually show "additivity" of calorimetric peaks number of pure components in their calorimetric curve profiles, thus revealing a good thermoanalytical compatibility between acetaminophen and the excipients examined, except for samples containing appreciable content of mannitol.

  8. Antimicrobial and demelanizing activity of Ganoderma lucidum extract, p-hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids and their synthetic acetylated glucuronide methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Sandrina A; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Esteves, Ana P; Ćirić, Ana; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Martins, Anabela; Soković, Marina; Queiroz, Maria João R P

    2013-08-01

    Mushroom extracts or isolated compounds may be useful in the search of new potent antimicrobial agents. Herein, it is described the synthesis of protected (acetylated) glucuronide derivatives of p-hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids, two compounds identified in the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum. Their antimicrobial and demelanizing activities were evaluated and compared to the parent acids and G. lucidum extract. p-Hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids, as also their protected glucuronide derivatives revealed high antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal) activity, even better than the one showed by commercial standards. Despite the variation in the order of parent acids and the protected glucuronide derivatives, their antimicrobial activity was always higher than the one revealed by the extract. Nevertheless, the extract was the only one with demelanizing activity against Aspergillus niger. The acetylated glucuronide derivatives could be deprotected to obtain glucuronide metabolites, which circulate in the human organism as products of the metabolism of the parent compounds.

  9. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB: gamma-hydroxybutyric acid glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Breindahl, Torben

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an important analyte in clinical and forensic toxicology with a narrow detection window of 3-6 h. In the search of improved detection methods, the existence in vivo of a glucuronated GHB metabolite (GHB-GLUC) was hypothesized. Chemically pure standards of GHB-GLUC and a deuterated analogue for chromatography were synthesized. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry were used for targeted analysis in anonymous clinical urine samples (n = 50). GHB-GLUC was found in concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 5.0 µg/mL (mean: 1.3 ± 1.2 µg/mL). Thus far, this is the first report of a GHB glucuronide detected in biological samples. Given that glucuronides generally have longer half-life values than their corresponding free drugs, GHB-GLUC should theoretically be a biomarker of GHB intoxication. It is also proposed that the hitherto unexplained reports of elevated GHB concentrations in some biological samples, which has caused the setting of a relatively high cutoff value (10 µg/mL), represent total GHB measurements (sum of free GHB and actively chemically hydrolyzed GHB-GLUC). To address these challenges, the present study must be followed by comprehensive pharmacokinetic and stability studies after the controlled administration of GHB.

  10. UGT1A1*28 polymorphism influences glucuronidation of bazedoxifene.

    PubMed

    Lušin, T Trdan; Mrhar, A; Trontelj, J

    2015-02-01

    Bazedoxifene is used for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. After peroral application, bazedoxifene is metabolized by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) to bazedoxifene-4'-glucuronide (M4) and bazedoxifene-5-glucuronide (M5). It has already been shown that a relatively common UGT1A1*28 polymorphism can considerably affect raloxifene pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. As pharmacokinetics of bazedoxifene and raloxifene are very similar, the influence of UGT1A1*28 polymorphism on metabolism of bazedoxifene was investigated by genotyped microsomes. Our results indicate an influence of UGT1A1*28 allele on the formation clearance of both bazedoxifene metabolites. The decreased metabolic clearance was most pronounced in microsomes from polymorphic homozygote (*28/*28) where a 7 to 10-fold lower metabolic clearance was observed for both metabolites compared to other genotypes. In conclusion, the significant UGT1A1*28 genotype effect on bazedoxifene intrinsic metabolic clearance indicates that this subject is worth further exploration in vivo and provides valuable information research in this field. PMID:25997248

  11. Chemical reactivity of the naproxen acyl glucuronide and the naproxen coenzyme A thioester towards bionucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jørgen; Bjørnsdottir, Inga; Tjørnelund, Jette; Honoré Hansen, Steen

    2002-06-20

    Drugs may be metabolised to reactive electrophilic species that spontaneously react with proteins. The presence of such drug-protein adducts has been associated with drug toxicity. In this study, the reactivity of the major metabolite of naproxen--the 1-beta-O-glucuronide (Nap-GlcU)--was compared to the corresponding naproxen coenzyme A (Nap-CoA) thioester. The reactivity of the two metabolites was assessed in vitro in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4; 0.1 M) at 37 degrees C towards the model bionucleophiles glutathione and human serum albumin (HSA). The reaction between the electrophilic species (Nap-GlcU and Nap-CoA) and glutathione forming the Nap-glutathione conjugate was monitored using LC-MS-MS and LC-UV, respectively. It was shown that Nap-CoA resulted in an approximate 100-fold higher formation of Nap-glutathione conjugate than Nap-GlcU. The presence of Nap-CoA also resulted in acylated HSA with a rate and a yield that was significantly higher than reported for Nap-GlcU. In summary, the data suggest that CoA metabolites may be more reactive species than acyl glucuronides that previously have been associated with severe drug related side effects in vivo.

  12. Isolation and determination of benzo(a)pyrene glucuronide and sulfate conjugates in soybean leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, T.; Nakano, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Kim, C.H.

    1987-08-01

    BaP is metabolized in mammalian systems by the mixed function oxidase system of liver microsomes. This system catalyzes the oxidation of BaP via epoxide intermediate to phenol, diol and quinone metabolites. One of these 7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP is thought to act as the ultimate carcinogen by binding covalently to cellular DNA. It is also known that Cunninghamella elegans oxidized BaP to its phenol, diol and quinone metabolites. In addition, the alcohols were detected as glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. These metabolites are remarkably similar to those observed in higher organisms. On the other hand, some investigators have demonstrated that plants take up BaP and anthracene from soil or culture medium containing these compounds. This paper reports the finding that soybeans grown in BaP polluted soil take it up and metabolize to its phenol, diol and the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of the alcohols.

  13. Impact of Educational Levels and Health Literacy on Community Acetaminophen Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Ip, Eric J; Tang, Terrill T-L; Cheng, Vincent; Yu, Junhua; Cheongsiatmoy, Derren S

    2015-12-01

    Patient understanding of acetaminophen is important for its safe and appropriate self-use. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area to determine the impact of educational level, patient health literacy score, and other demographic characteristics on acetaminophen knowledge. A 17-item, in-person, paper-and-pen questionnaire containing questions about demographics and acetaminophen knowledge was administered to 311 adults outside 5 local grocery stores in varying socioeconomic communities. Knowledge assessed was whether Tylenol-McNeil contains acetaminophen, maximum daily dose, and primary organ affected by toxicity. Participant health literacy was evaluated using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form (REALM-SF) test. Of the 300 who successfully completed the study, only 3.8% of all subjects were able to answer all 3 acetaminophen knowledge questions correctly regardless of educational level or health literacy score. This reaffirms that a lack of appropriate acetaminophen knowledge remains present in the general population, and further efforts to educate patients will be needed to prevent adverse events.

  14. Hepatoprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 in rats with acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Jresat, Iyad

    2012-03-01

    The potential protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against acute liver injury induced by a single dose of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg, p.o.) was investigated in rats. Coenzyme Q10 treatment was given as two i.p. injections, 10 mg/kg each, at 1 and 12 h following acetaminophen administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly reduced the levels of serum aminotransferases, suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented the decreases of reduced glutathione and catalase activity, decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide as well as attenuating the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in liver tissue resulting from acetaminophen administration. Histopathological liver tissue damage mediated by acetaminophen was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the acetaminophen-induced overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and p53 in liver tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 protects rat liver against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, most probably through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects.

  15. The effect of acetaminophen nanoparticles on liver toxicity in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Rezayat, S Mahdi; Montazeri, Naser; Pourshamsian, Khalil; Zeinali, Reza; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mehdi; Zadehzare, Mohammadmajid; Mahmoudi, Mehran; Mazinani, Rohollah; Ziaei, Mehdi

    2010-04-07

    Acetaminophen, a pain-reliever, is one of the most widely used medications in the world. Acetaminophen with normal dosage is considered a nontoxic drug for therapeutic applications, but when taken at overdose levels it produces liver damage in human and various animal species. By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm). Forty-eight hours after injection of crystalline particles with normal and reduced size of our drug, the effect of liver toxicity was compared by determination of liver transferase enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These enzymes were examined by routine colorimetric methods using commercial kits and pathologic investigations. Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen. Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

  16. From painkiller to empathy killer: acetaminophen (paracetamol) reduces empathy for pain.

    PubMed

    Mischkowski, Dominik; Crocker, Jennifer; Way, Baldwin M

    2016-09-01

    Simulation theories of empathy hypothesize that empathizing with others' pain shares some common psychological computations with the processing of one's own pain. Support for this perspective has largely relied on functional neuroimaging evidence of an overlap between activations during the experience of physical pain and empathy for other people's pain. Here, we extend the functional overlap perspective to the neurochemical level and test whether a common physical painkiller, acetaminophen (paracetamol), can reduce empathy for another's pain. In two double-blind placebo-controlled experiments, participants rated perceived pain, personal distress and empathic concern in response to reading scenarios about another's physical or social pain, witnessing ostracism in the lab, or visualizing another study participant receiving painful noise blasts. As hypothesized, acetaminophen reduced empathy in response to others' pain. Acetaminophen also reduced the unpleasantness of noise blasts delivered to the participant, which mediated acetaminophen's effects on empathy. Together, these findings suggest that the physical painkiller acetaminophen reduces empathy for pain and provide a new perspective on the neurochemical bases of empathy. Because empathy regulates prosocial and antisocial behavior, these drug-induced reductions in empathy raise concerns about the broader social side effects of acetaminophen, which is taken by almost a quarter of adults in the United States each week. PMID:27217114

  17. Biochemical effects of acetaminophen in aquatic species: edible clams Venerupis decussata and Venerupis philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Antunes, S C; Freitas, Rosa; Figueira, E; Gonçalves, Fernando; Nunes, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used pharmaceutical drugs, due to its antipyretic and analgesic properties that turn it into a primary choice in varied pathologies and conditions. However, and despite its massive use, acetaminophen is not exempt of adverse effects, especially when administered in over dosage, which are related to the formation of toxic metabolites by oxidative pathways. It is thus possible to observe that toxicity caused by acetaminophen is usually mediated by reactive oxygen species and can result in multiple effects, ranging from protein denaturation to lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The occurrence of acetaminophen has been reported in the aquatic environment, being important to address the potential exertion of toxic effects on nontarget environmentally exposed organisms. The present study intended to characterize the effects of acute acetaminophen exposure on physiological traits (antioxidant defense, oxidative damage) of two species of bivalves, namely, the edible clams Venerupis decussata and Venerupis philippinarum. Results showed a significant increase in all oxidative stress biomarkers, evidencing the bioactivation of acetaminophen into a deleterious prooxidant, triggering the onset of deleterious effects. Furthermore, strong interspecific differences were observed among responses of the two tested species, which was a major issue due to intrinsic ecological implications when one considers that both species share the same habitat.

  18. Hepatoprotective Potential of Prosopis farcta Beans Extracts against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity in Wister Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahi, Akram; Sarir, Hadi; Omidi, Arash; Torbati, Mohammad Bagher Montazar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatotoxicity by acetaminophen is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. Prosopis farcta beans extract (PFE) has some antioxidant property and may alleviate hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PFE against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats weighing 220 ± 30 g were distributed into six groups. Two groups were pretreated with PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) for 7 days before administration of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg). Two were given acetaminophen or PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) alone, and the control received normal saline. One day after acetaminophen, administration blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture to determine liver function enzymes markers; aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL). Results: In acetaminophen-treated rat plasma AST (314 ± 18.54 vs. 126.37 ± 4.13), ALT (304 ± 49.24 vs. 187.33 ± 3.71), cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL were increased by 149, 160, 37, 92, 60, and 94%, respectively. PFE at both doses significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the above biochemical indices to near normal. Conclusions: Prosopis farcta beans extract (50 and 75 mg/kg) exhibited hepatoprotective activity against APAP. PMID:25400887

  19. [Determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction and its application in the evaluation of gastric emptying].

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-na; Sun, Su-juan; Shen, Zhu-fang

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to establish a method to determine the serum acetaminophen concentration based on diazo reaction, and apply it in the gastric emptying evaluation. Theoretically, acetaminophen could take hydrolysis reaction in hydrochloric acid solution to produce p-aminophenol, which could then take diazo reaction resulting in a product with special absorption peak at 312 nm. Then the serum acetaminophen concentration and recovery rate were calculated according to the standard curve drawn with absorbance at 312 nm. ICR mice were given a dose of acetaminophen (500 mg x kg(-1)) by gavage and the serum acetaminophen was dynamically measured through the diazo reaction. Besides, ICR mice were subcutaneously injected with the long-acting GLP-1 analog GW002 before the gavage of acetaminophen, and serum acetaminophen concentration was measured as above to study how GW002 could influence the gastric emptying. The data showed acetaminophen ranging from 0 to 160 μg x mL(-1) could take diazo reaction with excellent linear relationship, and the regression equation was y = 0.0181 x +0.0104, R2 = 0.9997. The serum acetaminophen was also measured with good linear relationship (y = 0.0045 x + 0.0462, R = 0.9982) and the recovery rate was 97.4%-116.7%. The serum concentration of acetaminophen reached peak at about 0.5 h after gavage, and then gradually decreased. GW002 could significantly lower the serum acetaminophen concentration and make the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) decrease by 28.4%. In conclusion, a method for the determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction was established with good accuracy and could be used in the evaluation of gastric emptying.

  20. Maternal and fetal effects of acetaminophen and salicylates in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collins, E

    1981-11-01

    Salicylates have been the most widely studied of the nonnarcotic analgesics in pregnancy, and in the last 20 years evidence has accumulated indicating that their ingestion in pregnancy may have adverse effects on the mother and her child. Salicylates have been found to reduce the mean birth weight of the offspring in animal studies and in 1 human study. In the third trimester of pregnancy the maternal and fetal effects are mediated through the antiprostaglandin properties of salicylates and include prolongation of gestation and labor, increased blood loss at delivery, and increased perinatal mortality. Bleeding manifestations and withdrawal symptoms in newborn infants are associated with raised fetal blood salicylate levels. These effects of salicylates warrant routine antenatal urinary screening for salicylates in communities known to use them heavily. Adverse maternal or fetal effects form acetaminophen use in pregnancy have not been reported, but formal clinical or epidemiologic studies of its use have not been conducted.

  1. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  2. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:26602168

  3. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  4. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity.

  5. Acute acetaminophen intoxication leads to hepatic iron loading by decreased hepcidin synthesis.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Blous, Linda; Peters, Janny G P; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; van der Kraan, Peter M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a major cause of acute liver injury in the Western world, is mediated by metabolism and oxidative stress. Recent studies have suggested a role for iron in potentiating APAP-induced liver injury although its regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. The current study was designed to unravel the iron-regulating pathways in mice after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Mice with severe injury showed a significant increase in liver iron concentration and oxidative stress. Concurrently, the plasma concentration of hepcidin, the key regulator in iron metabolism, and hepatic hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (Hamp) mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced. We showed that hepcidin transcription was inhibited via several hepcidin-regulating factors, including the bone morphogenetic protein/small mother against decapentaplegic (BMP/SMAD) pathway, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and possibly also via erythropoietin (EPO). Downregulation of the BMP/SMAD signaling pathway was most likely caused by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), which was increased in mice with severe APAP-induced liver injury. HIF-1α stimulates cleaving of hemojuvelin, the cofactor of the BMP receptor, thereby blocking BMP-induced signaling. In addition, gene expression levels of C/ebpα were significantly reduced, and Epo mRNA expression levels were significantly increased after APAP intoxication. These factors are regulated through HIF-1α during oxidative stress and suggest that HIF-1α is a key modulator in reduced hepcidin transcription after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, acute APAP-induced liver injury leads to activation of HIF-1α, which results in a downregulation in hepcidin expression through a BMP/SMAD signaling pathway and through C/EBPα inhibition. Eventually, this leads to hepatic iron loading associated with APAP cytotoxicity. PMID:22610607

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  7. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  8. Screening for chloramphenicol residues in the tissues and fluids of treated cattle by the four plate test, Charm II radioimmunoassay and Ridascreen CAP-Glucuronid enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lynas, L; Currie, D; Elliott, C T; McEvoy, J D; Hewitt, S A

    1998-12-01

    The administration of chloramphenicol (CAP) is banned in food animals in the European Union (EU). It is, therefore, important to have adequate screening methods to determine if residues of CAP and its major metabolite, chloramphenicol-glucuronide (CAP-Gluc), are present in samples taken for monitoring purposes. Six castrated male cattle were treated with a single intramuscular injection of 10 mg kg-1 CAP. Animals were sampled once daily for urine and were slaughtered at 3 and 6 d post-injection. Samples of bile, kidney, liver and diaphragmatic muscle were removed at slaughter. All matrices were analysed using the four plate test (FPT) bioassay, the Charm II radioimmunoassay and a Ridascreen CAP-Glucuronid competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The FPT detected CAP residues in urine samples taken up to 2 d post-treatment. The Charm assay detected CAP in the urine for up to 4 d post-treatment. The EIA detected CAP throughout the 6 d sampling period. Samples of bile were positive by both the EIA and the Charm assay at day 3 and day 6. No zones of inhibition were obtained using the FPT in bile or diaphragm either with or without sample pre-treatment with beta-glucuronidase. However, the kidney and the liver from one animal killed at day 6 gave larger zones of inhibition after treatment with beta-glucuronidase, indicating the presence of CAP. The kidneys of all treated animals slaughtered at day 3 were positive by both the EIA and the Charm assay but none of the kidneys at day 6 tested positive by either method. Owing to technical difficulties, the Charm assay was not suitable for the analysis of liver. The EIA failed to detect CAP in the liver of any treated animal. It is concluded that urine appears to be the best matrix for screening purposes. The sensitivity of the FPT is inadequate for the determination of CAP residues were minimal withdrawal periods have been observed. The Charm assay and the EIA were suitable for the detection of both CAP and CAP-Gluc in tissues

  9. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  10. Differences in the glucuronidation of bisphenols F and S between two homologous human UGT enzymes, 1A9 and 1A10.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Troberg, Johanna; Lavdas, Jason; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Finel, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    1. Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are bisphenol A (BPA) analogues commonly used in the manufacturing of industrial and consumer products. 2. Bisphenols are often detoxified through conjugation with glucuronic acid or sulfate. In this work, we have examined the glucuronidation of BPS and BPF by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. In addition, we have reexamined BPA glucuronidation, using extra-hepatic UGTs that were not tested previously. 3. The results revealed that UGT1A9, primarily a hepatic enzyme, is mainly responsible for BPS glucuronidation, whereas UGT1A10, an intestine enzyme that is highly homologous to UGT1A9 at the protein level, is by far the most active UGT in BPF glucuronidation. In contrast to the latter two UGTs that display significant specificity in the glucuronidation of BPS and BPF, UGT2A1 that is mainly expressed in the airways, exhibited high activity toward all the tested bisphenols, BPS, BPF and BPA. UGT1A10 exhibited somewhat higher BPA glucuronidation activity than UGT1A9, but it was lower than UGT2A1 and UGT2B15. 4. The new findings demonstrate interesting differences in the glucuronidation patterns of bisphenols and provide new insights into the role of extra-hepatic tissues in their detoxification.

  11. Effect of acetaminophen on the leukocyte-labeling efficiency of indium oxine In 111

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, S.C.; Schmelter, R.F.; Nelson, K.L.; Petersen, R.J.; Qualfe, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on the labeling efficiency of leukocytes with indium oxine In 111 was studied. A blood sample was obtained from eight healthy men before and after they received acetaminophen 650 mg every four hours for 24 hours. After dividing the plasma from each sample into three portions, leukocytes were separated and labeled with indium oxine In 111. In an in vitro study, 200 ml of blood was obtained from one of the men, and the plasma was separated into four portions. Acetaminophen in 95% ethanol was added to three of the plasma fractions to produce acetaminophen concentrations of 4, 20, and 100 micrograms/ml; ethanol was added to the fourth fraction as a control. Each plasma fraction was then subdivided into three aliquots, and leukocytes were labeled as in the in vivo study. Mean leukocyte labeling efficiencies in both studies were calculated from the ratios of leukocyte radioactivity to initial radioactivity in the samples, expressed as percentages. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies before acetaminophen administration ranged from 79 to 85%; after administration, labeling efficiencies ranged from 70 to 87%. No significant differences in mean labeling efficiency before and after acetaminophen administration were noted in any of the subjects. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies in all in vitro plasma fractions were reduced, ranging from 54 to 63%, but no significant differences in labeling efficiency between any of the plasma fractions were found. Using the labeling procedures in this study, exposure of leukocytes from healthy men to acetaminophen in vivo or in vitro does not affect labeling efficiency with indium oxine In 111.

  12. Physical and Chemical Compatibility of Injectable Acetaminophen During Simulated Y-Site Administration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin; Boehme, Sabrina; Ouellette, Jacquelyn; Stidham, Chanelle; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The physical and chemical compatibility of intravenous acetaminophen with commonly administered injectable medications was evaluated. Methods: Simulated Y-site evaluation was accomplished by mixing 2 mL of acetaminophen (10 mg/mL) with 2 mL of an alternative intravenous medication and subsequently storing the mixture in a polypropylene syringe for 4 hours. The aliquot solutions were visually inspected and evaluated for crystal content at 4 hours by infusing 4 mL of the medication mixture through a 0.45-μm nitrocellulose filter disc. Medication mixtures that were selected for chemical stability testing were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography at 0, 1, and 4 hours using a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, 4.6 x 100 mm, 3.5-μm column for separation of analytes with subsequent diode-array detection. Medications were considered chemically compatible if the concentrations of all components were >90% of the original concentrations during the 4 hour simulated Y-site compatibility test. Results: U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) standards for physical particle counts were met for acetaminophen injection (10 mg/mL) when combined with cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, dolasetron, fentanyl, granisetron, hydrocortisone, hydromorphone, ketorolac, meperidine, methylprednisolone, midazolam, morphine, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, ranitidine, and vancomycin. Injectable acetaminophen is incompatible with acyclovir and diazepam and therefore should not be administered concomitantly with either of these products. Further testing confirmed the chemical compatibility of acetaminophen with ceftriaxone, diphenhydramine, granisetron, ketorolac, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, and vancomycin. Conclusion: All medications tested with acetaminophen were physically compatible except for acyclovir and diazepam. All 8 medications tested for chemical compatibility with acetaminophen were stable over the 4

  13. Acute acetaminophen (paracetamol) ingestion improves time to exhaustion during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Alexis R; Taylor, Lee; Harding, Christopher; Wright, Benjamin; Foster, Josh; Castle, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic and has previously been shown to improve exercise performance through a reduction in perceived pain. This study sought to establish whether its antipyretic action may also improve exercise capacity in the heat by moderating the increase in core temperature. On separate days, 11 recreationally active participants completed two experimental time-to-exhaustion trials on a cycle ergometer in hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity) after ingesting a placebo control or an oral dose of acetaminophen in a randomized, double-blind design. Following acetaminophen ingestion, participants cycled for a significantly longer period of time (acetaminophen, 23 ± 15 min versus placebo, 19 ± 13 min; P = 0.005; 95% confidence interval = 90-379 s), and this was accompanied by significantly lower core (-0.15°C), skin (-0.47°C) and body temperatures (0.19°C; P < 0.05). In the acetaminophen condition, participants also reported significantly lower ratings of thermal sensation (-0.39; P = 0.015), but no significant change in heart rate was observed (P > 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate that an acute dose of acetaminophen can improve cycling capacity in hot conditions, and that this may be due to the observed reduction in core, skin and body temperature and the subjective perception of thermal comfort. These findings suggest that acetaminophen may reduce the thermoregulatory strain elicited from exercise, thus improving time to exhaustion.

  14. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  15. Comparison of Oral Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen in Premature Infants With Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Mohammad Mehdi; Niknafs, Pedram; Sabsevari, Fatemeh; Torabi, Mohammad Hosein; Bahman Bijari, Bahareh; Noroozi, Elahe; Mossavi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common cause of morbidity. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of oral Acetaminophen and oral Ibuprofen for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants. Objectives This study demonstrated that, there was no significant difference between treatment of PDA with either oral Acetaminophen or oral Ibuprofen in preterm neonates. Patients and Methods This clinical trial, randomized study, enrolled 120 infants, with a gestational age of < 37 weeks, who were admitted in neonatal intensive care unit of Afzalipour hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2014. PDA was confirmed echocardiographically. The trial was registered in Iranian registry of clinical trials (Reg. No. 25542). Sixty-seven infants received oral Acetaminophen (15mg/kg every six hours for three days) and 62 infants received Ibuprofen (an initial dose of 20 mg/kg, followed by 10 mg/kg at 24 and 48 hours). To evaluate the efficacy of the treatment, a second echocardiography was done after completing the treatment. Results After the first course of the treatment, PDA closed in 55 (82.1 %) patients who received oral Acetaminophen vs. 47 (75.8 %) of those given oral Ibuprofen (P = 0.38). After the second course of treatment, PDA closed in 50 % of oral Acetaminophen group and 73.3% of oral Ibuprofen group (P = 0.21). Conclusions This study demonstrated that, there was no significant difference between treatment of PDA with either oral Acetaminophen or oral Ibuprofen in preterm neonates. Oral Ibuprofen can effectively close PDA but is unfortunately associated with some adverse effects limiting its utility thus we studied an alternative drug with similar efficacy and less adverse effects. This study has recommends Acetaminophen with minimal complications for the treatment of PDA in preterm neonates instead of Ibuprofen.

  16. Patterns of Acetaminophen Use Exceeding 4 Grams Daily in a Hospitalized Population at a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Victor; Herrine, Steven K.; Riggio, Jeffrey M.; Adams, Paul; Rossi, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity has been increasingly recognized as a significant problem, prompting increased scrutiny and restrictions from the US Food and Drug Administration on products combining acetaminophen with narcotics. Patterns of acetaminophen use have not previously been reported in the hospitalized patient population, which may be especially vulnerable to liver injury. We aimed to quantify the frequency at which acetaminophen dosing exceeded the recommended maximum of 4 g/day in hospitalized patients. This was a retrospective, single-center, cohort study at a large tertiary care academic hospital. We queried our inpatient electronic medical record database to identify patients admitted between 2008 and 2010 who were receiving cumulative daily acetaminophen doses exceeding 4 g on at least 1 hospital day. Of 43,761 admissions involving acetaminophen administration, the recommended maximum cumulative daily dose of 4 g was exceeded in 1119 (2.6%) cases. Patients who were administered a larger number of acetaminophen-containing medications were more likely to receive doses in excess of the recommended maximum. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were checked within 14 days following acetaminophen exposure in excess of 4 g in 35 (3.1%) cases. Excessive acetaminophen dosing of hospitalized patients, who may be at increased risk for acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, occurred in a minority of patients. The use of multiple acetaminophen-containing medication formulations contributed to excessive dosing. ALT level monitoring in this group was infrequent, precluding assessment of biochemical evidence of liver injury. This cohort of patients may represent an ideal population for further prospective study with more intensive and longer-term biochemical monitoring to assess for evidence of liver injury. PMID:24799836

  17. Quantitative Profiling of Human Renal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and Glucuronidation Activity: A Comparison of Normal and Tumoral Kidney Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Margaillan, Guillaume; Rouleau, Michèle; Fallon, John K.; Caron, Patrick; Villeneuve, Lyne; Turcotte, Véronique; Smith, Philip C.; Joy, Melanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Renal metabolism by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes is central to the clearance of many drugs. However, significant discrepancies about the relative abundance and activity of individual UGT enzymes in the normal kidney prevail among reports, whereas glucuronidation in tumoral kidney has not been examined. In this study, we performed an extensive profiling of glucuronidation metabolism in normal (n = 12) and tumor (n = 14) kidneys using targeted mass spectrometry quantification of human UGTs. We then correlated UGT protein concentrations with mRNA levels assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and with conjugation activity for the major renal UGTs. Beyond the wide interindividual variability in expression levels observed among kidney samples, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and UGT1A6 are the most abundant renal UGTs in both normal and tumoral tissues based on protein quantification. In normal kidney tissues, only UGT1A9 protein levels correlated with mRNA levels, whereas UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 quantification correlated significantly with their mRNA levels in tumor kidneys. Data support that posttranscriptional regulation of UGT2B7 and UGT1A6 expression is modulating glucuronidation in the kidney. Importantly, our study reveals a significant decreased glucuronidation capacity of neoplastic kidneys versus normal kidneys that is paralleled by drastically reduced UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 mRNA and protein expression. UGT2B7 activity is the most repressed in tumors relative to normal tissues, with a 96-fold decrease in zidovudine metabolism, whereas propofol and sorafenib glucuronidation is decreased by 7.6- and 5.2-fold, respectively. Findings demonstrate that renal drug metabolism is predominantly mediated by UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 and is greatly reduced in kidney tumors. PMID:25650382

  18. Determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hye Kyung; Choe, Sanggil; In, Sangwhan; Pyo, Jae Sung

    2016-03-15

    The main objective of this study was to develop and validate a simpler and less time consuming analytical method for determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample, by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The study uses propofol glucuronide, a major metabolite of propofol, as a marker for propofol abuse. The hair sample was digested in sodium hydroxide solution and loaded in mixed-mode anion cartridge for solid phase extraction. Water and ethyl acetate were used as washing solvents to remove interfering substances from the hair sample. Consequently, 2% formic acid in ethyl acetate was employed to elute propofol glucuronide from the sorbent of mixed-mode anion cartridge, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The method validation parameters such as selectivity, specificity, LOD, LLOQ, accuracy, precision, recovery, and matrix effect were also tested. The linearity of calibration curves showed good correlation, with correlation coefficient 0.998. The LOD and LLOQ of the propofol glucuronide were 0.2 pg/mg and 0.5 pg/mg, respectively. The intra and inter-day precision and accuracy were acceptable within 15%. The mean values of recovery and matrix effect were in the range of 91.7-98.7% and 87.5-90.3%, respectively, signifying that the sample preparation, washing and extraction procedure were efficient, and there was low significant hair matrix effect for the extraction of propofol glucuronide from hair sample on the mixed mode anion cartridge. To evaluate the suitability of method, the hair of propofol administered rat was successfully analyzed with this method.

  19. Focused ultrasound-assisted acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of alkylphenols and 17β-oestradiol glucuronide in fish bile.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Asier; Usobiaga, Aresatz; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren; Cajaraville, Miren P; Fernández, Luis A; Zuloaga, Olatz

    2010-11-01

    According to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD), alkylphenols, such as octylphenols and nonylphenols, and 17β-oestradiol are considered as priority or emerging pollutants, respectively, mainly due to their possible properties as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs are accumulated in liver, fat, kidney and bile in the glucuronide form. In order to determine the concentration of these compounds in bile, an enzymatic hydrolysis step is necessary. This step is usually long (~16 h), and in this sense, ultrasound probes were studied as a possible alternative energy source to accelerate this process. Enzymatic hydrolysis was reduced to 20 min using an ultrasound probe at one cycle and 10% of amplitude. For validation of analytical procedure, nonylphenol glucuronide (4NP-G), 4-tert-octylphenol glucuronide (4tOP-G) and 4-n-octylphenol glucuronide (4nOP-G) were synthesised while 17β-oestradiol glucuronide (E2-G) was commercially available. Bile from thick-lip grey mullets (Chelon labrosus) was spiked with known amounts of 4NP-G, 4tOP-G, 4nOP-G and E2-G and submitted to the optimised procedure. Good recoveries (77-122%), precision in the 5% to 12% range and limits of detection, ranging from the low nanogramme per gramme level for 4tOP, 4nOP and E2 to the low microgramme per gramme level for nonylphenols, were obtained. The optimised method was applied for the determination of alkylphenol in the bile of thick-lip grey mullets fish bile from the Urdaibai estuary (UNESCO reserve of the Biosphere, Bay of Biscay), and high concentrations (2.3-14.2 μg/g), such as those obtained in polluted areas, were measured. E2 was determined in the bile of thick-lip grey mullets, intraperitoneally injected with E2.

  20. Detection of pentachlorophenol and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates in fish bile and exposure water

    SciTech Connect

    Stehly, G.R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1988-08-01

    The glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of pentachlorophenol (PCP) that were present in the bile and exposure water of goldfish (Carassius auratus) were used to develop methodology to quantify PCP and its metabolites. Reverse phase HPLC with radioactivity detection separated PCP and its metabolites, and was used to verify a method of quantification that used differential extraction and scintillation counting. Extractions of aqueous phase at pH 2 or 8, with butanol, ethyl acetate, or ether indicated that ether at pH 8 best separated PCP from its metabolites. The sulfate conjugate of PCP was the major metabolite produced when goldfish were exposed to 125 micrograms UC-PCP/l. It was present primarily in the exposure water, but also appeared in the bile.

  1. Metabolite kinetics: formation of acetaminophen from deuterated and nondeuterated phenacetin and acetanilide on acetaminophen sulfation kinetics in the perfused rat liver preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.S.; Waller, L.; Horning, M.G.; Chan, K.K.

    1982-07-01

    The role of hepatic intrinsic clearance for metabolite formation from various precursors on subsequent metabolite elimination was was investigated in the once-through perfused rat liver preparation. Two pairs of acetaminophen precursors: (/sup 14/C) phenacetin-d5 and (/sup 3/H) phenacetin-do, (/sup 14/C) acetanilide and (/sup 3/H) phenacetin were delivered by constant flow (10 ml/min/liver) either by normal or retrograde perfusion to the rat liver preparations. The extents of acetaminophen sulfation were compared within the same preparation. The data showed that the higher the hepatocellular activity (intrinsic clearance) for acetaminophen formation, the greater the extent of subsequent acetaminophen sulfation. The findings were explained on the basis of blood transit time and metabolite duration time. Because of blood having only a finite transit time in liver, the longer the drug requires for metabolite formation, the less time will remain for metabolite sulfation and the less will be the degree of subsequent sulfation. Conversely, when the drug forms the primary metabolite rapidly, a longer time will remain for the metabolite to be sulfated in liver to result in a greater degree of metabolite sulfation. Finally, the effects of hepatic intrinsic clearances for metabolite formation and zonal distribution of enzyme systems for metabolite formation and elimination in liver are discussed.

  2. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  3. Photoinduced covalent binding of frusemide and frusemide glucuronide to human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Mizuma, Takashi; McDonagh, Antony F; Lin, Emil T; Benet, Leslie Z

    1999-01-01

    Aims To study reaction of photoactivated frusemide (F) and F glucuronide (Fgnd metabolite) with human serum albumin in order to find a clue to clarify a mechanism of phototoxic blisters from high frusemide dosage. Methods F was exposed to light in the presence of human serum albumin (HSA). HSA treated with this method (TR-HSA) was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopic experiment, alkali treatment and reversible binding experiment. Results Less 4-hydroxyl-N-furfuryl-5-sulphamoylanthranilic acid (4HFSA, a photodegradation product of F) was formed in the presence of HSA than in the absence of HSA. A new fluorescence spectrum excited at 320 nm was observed for TR-HSA. Alkali treatment of TR-HSA released 4HFSA. Quenching of the fluorescence due to the lone tryptophan near the warfarin-binding site of HSA was observed in TR-HSA. The reversible binding of F or naproxen to the warfarin-binding site of TR-HSA was less than to that of native HSA. These results indicate the photoactivated F was covalently bound to the warfarin-binding site of HSA. The covalent binding of Fgnd, which is also reversibly bound to the wafarin-binding site of HSA, was also induced by exposure to sunlight. Fgnd was more photoactive than F, indicating that F could be activated by glucuronidation to become a more photoactive compound. Conclusions The reactivity of photoactivated F and Fgnd to HSA and/or to other endogenous compounds may cause the phototoxic blisters that result at high F dosage. PMID:10383564

  4. Evaluation of Clopidogrel Conjugation Metabolism: PK Studies in Man and Mice of Clopidogrel Acyl Glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Savu, Simona Nicoleta; Silvestro, Luigi; Surmeian, Mariana; Remis, Lina; Rasit, Yuksel; Savu, Simona Rizea; Mircioiu, Constantin

    2016-09-01

    The existence of a glucuronide conjugate of the major circulating clopidogrel metabolites, called clopidogrel acyl glucuronide (CAG), is already known. However, information regarding its pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, and clearance are modest. We investigated in vivo the potential CAG trans-esterification to clopidogrel (reaction occurring in vitro in particular conditions) by administering the metabolite to mice. Experiments were then carried out on men, clopidogrel administered alone or followed by activated charcoal intake (intestinal reabsorption blockade). Study objectives included: PK comparison of CAG, clopidogrel carboxylic acid (CCA), and clopidogrel in plasma, determination of their elimination patterns in urine and feces, and tracking of charcoal-induced changes in PK and/or urinary excretion that would indicate relevant enterohepatic recycling of CAG. In mice, CAG was rapidly hydrolyzed to CCA after oral administration, whereas by intravenous route metabolic conversion to CCA was delayed. No levels of clopidogrel were detected in mice plasma, excluding any potential trans-esterification or other form of back-conversion in vivo. PK experiments in man showed that CAG is hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract (very low concentrations in feces), but there is no evidence of enterohepatic recirculation. Quantitation of the three moieties in stool samples accounted for only 1.2% of an administered dose, suggesting that other yet unknown metabolites/degradation products formed through metabolic processes and/or the activity of local microflora are mainly excreted by this route. In man CAG was confirmed as one of the major terminal metabolites of clopidogrel, with a PK behavior similar to CCA. PMID:27402727

  5. Identifying and applying a highly selective probe to simultaneously determine the O-glucuronidation activity of human UGT1A3 and UGT1A4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Liang, Si-Cheng; Wang, Chao; Ge, Guang-Bo; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Qi, Xiao-Yi; Deng, Sa; Liu, Ke-Xin; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase is an important detoxification pathway. However, identifying a selective probe of UDP- glucuronosyltransferase is complicated because of the significant overlapping substrate specificity displayed by the enzyme. In this paper, desacetylcinobufagin (DACB) 3-O- and 16-O-glucuronidation were found to be isoform-specific probe reactions for UGT1A4 and UGT1A3, respectively. DACB was well characterized as a probe for simultaneously determining the catalytic activities of O-glucuronidation mediated by UGT1A3 and UGT1A4 from various enzyme sources, through a sensitive analysis method. PMID:25884245

  6. Identification of the Position of Mono-O-Glucuronide of Flavones and Flavonols by Analyzing Shift in Online UV Spectrum (λmax) Generated from an Online Diode-arrayed Detector

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rashim; Wu, Baojian; Tang, Lan; Liu, Zhongqiu; Hu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial pharmacological effects of flavonoids such as chemo-prevention against cancer, aging and heart diseases are severely limited due to their extensive in vivo glucuronidation by UGTs. UGTs showed regiospecificity (i.e. position preference) in the glucuronidation of the flavonoids based on substrate’s chemical structure. In this paper, glucuronide(s) of 36 flavones and flavonols were generated using an in vitro glucuronidation reaction. UPLC/MS/MS was used to confirm the degree (mono- or di-) of glucuronidation in flavonoids with up to four hydroxyl group. UV spectra of flavonoids and their respective mono-O-glucuronides were generated using UPLC with an online diode-arrayed detector. Analysis of the extent of shift in spectra of glucuronides in Band I and Band II regions as reflected by changes in λmax value was used to identify the position of glucuronidation. The data showed that glucuronidation of 3- and 4’-hydroxyl resulted in Band I λmax hypsochromic shift (or blue shift) of 13–30 nm and 5–10 nm, respectively. And glucuronidation of 5-hydroxyl group caused Band II λmax hypsochromic shift of 5–10 nm. In contrast, glucuronidation of 7-hydroxyl group did not cause any λmax change in Band I or II λmax whereas glucuronidation of 6-hydroxyl group did not cause predictable changes in λmax values. The paper demonstrated for the first time that a rapid and robust analysis method using λmax changes in online UV spectra can be used to pinpoint region-specific glucuronidation of flavones and flavonols with hydroxyl groups at 4’, 3, 5, and/or 7 position(s). PMID:20687611

  7. Extrapolation of diclofenac clearance from in vitro microsomal metabolism data: role of acyl glucuronidation and sequential oxidative metabolism of the acyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Samuel, Koppara; Subramanian, Ramaswamy; Braun, Matthew P; Stearns, Ralph A; Chiu, Shuet-Hing Lee; Evans, David C; Baillie, Thomas A

    2002-12-01

    Diclofenac is eliminated predominantly (approximately 50%) as its 4'-hydroxylated metabolite in humans, whereas the acyl glucuronide (AG) pathway appears more important in rats (approximately 50%) and dogs (>80-90%). However, previous studies of diclofenac oxidative metabolism in human liver microsomes (HLMs) have yielded pronounced underprediction of human in vivo clearance. We determined the relative quantitative importance of 4'-hydroxy and AG pathways of diclofenac metabolism in rat, dog, and human liver microsomes. Microsomal intrinsic clearance values (CL(int) = V(max)/K(m)) were determined and used to extrapolate the in vivo blood clearance of diclofenac in these species. Clearance of diclofenac was accurately predicted from microsomal data only when both the AG and the 4'-hydroxy pathways were considered. However, the fact that the AG pathway in HLMs accounted for ~75% of the estimated hepatic CL(int) of diclofenac is apparently inconsistent with the 4'-hydroxy diclofenac excretion data in humans. Interestingly, upon incubation with HLMs, significant oxidative metabolism of diclofenac AG, directly to 4'-hydroxy diclofenac AG, was observed. The estimated hepatic CL(int) of this pathway suggested that a significant fraction of the intrahepatically formed diclofenac AG may be converted to its 4'-hydroxy derivative in vivo. Further experiments indicated that this novel oxidative reaction was catalyzed by CYP2C8, as opposed to CYP2C9-catalyzed 4'-hydroxylation of diclofenac. These findings may have general implications in the use of total (free + conjugated) oxidative metabolite excretion for determining primary routes of drug clearance and may question the utility of diclofenac as a probe for phenotyping human CYP2C9 activity in vivo via measurement of its pharmacokinetics and total 4'-hydroxy diclofenac urinary excretion.

  8. Influence of repeated preexposure to arsenic on acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress in liver of male rats.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, Ayyasamy; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath; Sankar, Palanisamy

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated whether repeated arsenic preexposure can increase acetaminophen-induced hepatic oxidative stress. Rats were exposed to arsenic (25 ppm; rat equivalent concentration of maximum groundwater contamination level) via drinking water for 28 days. Next day, they were given single oral administration of acetaminophen (420 or 1000 mg/kg b.w.). Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by assessing serum biomarkers, cytochrome-P450 (CYP) content, CYP3A4- and CYP2E1-dependent enzymes, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants. Arsenic or acetaminophen increased serum ALT and AST activities and depleted CYP. Arsenic decreased, but acetaminophen increased CYP-dependent enzyme activities. These agents independently increased lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidants. Arsenic did not alter the effects of acetaminophen on serum biomarkers, caused further CYP depletion and decreased acetaminophen-mediated induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Arsenic enhanced the lower dose of acetaminophen-mediated lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion with no further alterations in enzymatic antioxidants. However, arsenic attenuated the higher dose-mediated lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion with improvement in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, further decrease in catalase and no alterations in superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities. Results show that arsenic preexposure increased the susceptibility of rats to hepatic oxidative stress induced by the lower dose of acetaminophen, but reduced the oxidative stress induced by the higher dose.

  9. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation), antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH), and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw) orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model. PMID:23864853

  10. Timescale analysis of a mathematical model of acetaminophen metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reddyhoff, Dennis; Ward, John; Williams, Dominic; Regan, Sophie; Webb, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a widespread and commonly used painkiller all over the world. However, it can cause liver damage when taken in large doses or at repeated chronic doses. Current models of acetaminophen metabolism are complex, and limited to numerical investigation though provide results that represent clinical investigation well. We derive a mathematical model based on mass action laws aimed at capturing the main dynamics of acetaminophen metabolism, in particular the contrast between normal and overdose cases, whilst remaining simple enough for detailed mathematical analysis that can identify key parameters and quantify their role in liver toxicity. We use singular perturbation analysis to separate the different timescales describing the sequence of events in acetaminophen metabolism, systematically identifying which parameters dominate during each of the successive stages. Using this approach we determined, in terms of the model parameters, the critical dose between safe and overdose cases, timescales for exhaustion and regeneration of important cofactors for acetaminophen metabolism and total toxin accumulation as a fraction of initial dose. PMID:26348886

  11. Enhancement of Antihyperalgesia by the Coadministration of N-palmitoylethanolamide and Acetaminophen in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ortíz-Andrade, Rolffy

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological antihyperalgesic interaction between N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and acetaminophen in diabetic rats using the formalin paw test. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats received subcutaneous injections in the paw of PEA alone (1-100 μg/paw) or acetaminophen alone (3-300 μg/paw) 15 min before formalin (0.5%) injection. The results revealed concentration-dependent responses produced by PEA (EC50 = 7.19 ± 0.7 μg/paw) and acetaminophen (EC50 = 57.9 ± 1.9 μg/paw). Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between the PEA + acetaminophen using the EC50 value and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. The isobologram demonstrated that the combination investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction; the experimental value (EC50 = 23.64 ± 1.9 μg/paw) was significantly smaller than those that resulted from theoretical calculations (EC50 = 32.56 μg/paw). These results provide evidence that PEA in combination with acetaminophen could be useful for pain therapy in neuropathic diabetic patients.

  12. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury: Implications for temporal homeostasis of lipid metabolism and eicosanoid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Maria; Gruia, Alexandra T; Nica, Dragos V; Azghadi, Seyed M R; Mic, Ani A; Mic, Felix A

    2015-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used drug that induces serious hepatotoxicity when overdosed, leading to increased levels of serum aminotransferases. However, little knowledge exists linking acetaminophen to liver free fatty acids and the eicosanoid-mediated signaling pathway. To this end, adult NMRI mice injected with a dose of 400 mg/kg acetaminophen were monitored for one week post-treatment. Consistent changes were observed in serum transaminases, profile of hepatic free fatty acids, expression of cyclooxygenase, elongase, lipogenesis, and lipolysis genes; as well as in expression patterns of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in the liver. Both linoleic acid and arachidonic acid--substrates in eicosanoid biosynthesis--were significantly influenced by overdose, and the latter peaked first among the free fatty acids examined here. There was a close similarity between the temporal dynamics of linoleic acid and aspartate aminotransferases. Moreover, serum transaminases were reduced by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but not by cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors. Our results hence attest to the hazard of acetaminophen overdose on the temporal homeostasis of hepatic concentrations of free fatty acids and expression of key genes underlying liver lipid metabolism. There is also evidence for activation of a cyclooxygenase-mediated signaling pathway, especially the cyclooxygenase 2-prostanoid pathway, during acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therefore, the results of the present study should provide valuable information to a wide audience, working to understand the health hazard of this drug and the implications of the eicosanoid signaling pathway in liver pathophysiology.

  13. Timescale analysis of a mathematical model of acetaminophen metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reddyhoff, Dennis; Ward, John; Williams, Dominic; Regan, Sophie; Webb, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a widespread and commonly used painkiller all over the world. However, it can cause liver damage when taken in large doses or at repeated chronic doses. Current models of acetaminophen metabolism are complex, and limited to numerical investigation though provide results that represent clinical investigation well. We derive a mathematical model based on mass action laws aimed at capturing the main dynamics of acetaminophen metabolism, in particular the contrast between normal and overdose cases, whilst remaining simple enough for detailed mathematical analysis that can identify key parameters and quantify their role in liver toxicity. We use singular perturbation analysis to separate the different timescales describing the sequence of events in acetaminophen metabolism, systematically identifying which parameters dominate during each of the successive stages. Using this approach we determined, in terms of the model parameters, the critical dose between safe and overdose cases, timescales for exhaustion and regeneration of important cofactors for acetaminophen metabolism and total toxin accumulation as a fraction of initial dose.

  14. Perioperative effects of oral ketorolac and acetaminophen in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy.

    PubMed

    Watcha, M F; Ramirez-Ruiz, M; White, P F; Jones, M B; Lagueruela, R G; Terkonda, R P

    1992-09-01

    Prophylactic administration of analgesics before surgery can decrease the intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and decrease pain during the early postoperative period. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 90 healthy ASA physical status I or II children undergoing bilateral myringotomy, we compared the postoperative analgesic effects of oral acetaminophen and ketorolac, when administered 30 min before induction of anaesthesia. Patients were randomized to receive saline (0.1 ml.kg-1), acetaminophen (10 mg.kg-1) or ketorolac (1 mg.kg-1) diluted in cherry syrup to a total volume of 5 ml. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with halothane and nitrous oxide via a face mask. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer using an objective pain scale. The three study groups were similar with respect to demographic data, duration of anaesthesia and surgery, induction behaviour, oxygen saturation, incidence of postoperative emesis and, recovery times. The ketorolac group had lower postoperative pain scores and required less frequent analgesic therapy in the early postoperative period compared with the acetaminophen and placebo groups. In contrast, there were no differences in pain scores or analgesic requirements between the acetaminophen and the placebo groups. We conclude that the preoperative administration of oral ketorolac, but not acetaminophen, provided better postoperative pain control than placebo in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy. PMID:1394752

  15. Hepatoprotective Property of Oral Silymarin is Comparable to N-Acetyl Cysteine in Acetaminophen Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad; Hajaghamohammadi, Ali Akbar; Samimi, Rasoul; Alavi, Zohreh; Abbasi, Esmail; Asl, Marjan Nasiri

    2012-01-01

    Background N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) is usually used as antidote for prevention of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. In present study we have evaluated efficacy of oral silymarin in its prevention in rats intoxicated with lethal dose of acetaminophen. Methods A total of 50 Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The first group received only vehicle of acetaminophen and served as control. The second group was given 800 mg/kg acetaminophen by gavage with an orogastric canula. The third, fourth and fifth groups were given 300 mg/kg NAC and 150 and 300 mg/kg silymarin respectively. Analysis of serum AST, ALT, and ALP and liver histopathology were employed for assessment of hepatotoxicity. Results Mean serum ALT levels were significantly increased in the APAP group rats. The mean serum ALT levels returned to normal in both NAC treated and silymarin treated groups. Silymarin (150 mg/kg) had prevented hepatocytes necrosis similar to NAC. No severe hepatotoxicity were seen in groups 3 and 4; while it is seen in 70% of animals in group 2. Conclusion We found that a single dose of orally administered silymarin (150 mg/kg) significantly attenuated acetaminophen-induced liver damage in rat. Oral silymarin can be used in these patients instead of NAC.

  16. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%.

  17. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%. PMID:24570846

  18. Gymnaster koraiensis and its major components, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and gymnasterkoreayne B, reduce oxidative damage induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide or acetaminophen in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jho, Eun Hye; Kang, Kyungsu; Oidovsambuu, Sarangerel; Lee, Eun Ha; Jung, Sang Hoon; Shin, Il-Shik; Nho, Chu Won

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the protective effects of Gymnaster koraiensis against oxidative stress-induced hepatic cell damage. We used two different cytotoxicity models, i.e., the administration of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) and acetaminophen, in HepG2 cells to evaluate the protective effects of G. koraiensis. The ethyl acetate (EA) fraction of G. koraiensis and its major compound, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (DCQA), exerted protective effects in the t-BHP-induced liver cytotoxicity model. The EA fraction and DCQA ameliorated t-BHP-induced reductions in GSH levels and exhibited free radical scavenging activity. The EA fraction and DCQA also significantly reduced t-BHP-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the hexane fraction of G. koraiensis and its major compound, gymnasterkoreayne B (GKB), exerted strong hepatoprotection in the acetaminophen-induced cytotoxicity model. CYP 3A4 enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by the extract, hexane fraction, and GKB. The hexane fraction and GKB ameliorated acetaminophen-induced reductions in GSH levels and protected against cell death.

  19. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  20. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed.

  1. Reactive nitrogen species in acetaminophen-induced mitochondrial damage and toxicity in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Burke, Angela S; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Hinson, Jack A

    2010-07-19

    Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in primary mouse hepatocytes occurs in two phases. The initial phase (0-2 h) occurs with metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine which depletes glutathione, and covalently binds to proteins, but little toxicity is observed. Subsequent washing of hepatocytes to remove APAP and reincubating in media alone (2-5 h) results in toxicity. We previously reported that the reincubation phase occurs with mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and increased oxidative stress (dichlorodihydrofluorescein fluorescence) (DCFH(2)). Since DCFH(2) may be oxidized by multiple oxidative mechanisms, we investigated the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leading to 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins by ELISA and by immunoblots. Incubation of APAP with hepatocytes for 2 h did not result in toxicity or protein nitration; however, washing hepatocytes and reincubating in media alone (2-5 h) resulted in protein nitration which correlated with toxicity. Inclusion of the MPT inhibitor, cyclosporine A, in the reincubation media eliminated toxicity and protein nitration. The general nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA and the neuronal NOS (NOS1) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, added in the reincubation media decreased toxicity and protein nitration; however, neither the inducible NOS (NOS2) inhibitors L-NIL (N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine) nor SAIT (S-(2-aminoethyl)isothiourea) decreased protein nitration or toxicity. The RNS scavengers, N-acetylcysteine, and high concentrations of APAP, added in the reincubation phase decreased toxicity and protein nitration. 7-Nitroindazole and cyclosporine A inhibited the APAP-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential when added in the reincubation phase. The data indicate a role for RNS in APAP induced toxicity.

  2. Protective effects of acetaminophen on ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats with associated suppression of matrix metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Eriko; Monoi, Noriyuki; Mikoshiba, Shigeo; Hirayama, Yutaka; Serizawa, Tetsushi; Adachi, Kiyo; Koide, Misao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Murakoshi, Michiaki; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastric mucosal damage as a side effect. Acetaminophen, widely used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has gastroprotective effects against gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol and certain NSAIDs. However, the mechanisms that underlie the gastroprotective effects of acetaminophen have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we examined the role and protective mechanism of acetaminophen on ibuprofen-induced gastric damage in rats. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were administered orally, and the gastric mucosa was macroscopically examined 4 hours later. Acetaminophen decreased ibuprofen-induced gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the mechanisms involved, transcriptome analyses of the ibuprofen-damaged gastric mucosa were performed in the presence and absence of acetaminophen. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software revealed that acetaminophen suppressed the pathways related to cellular assembly and inflammation, whereas they were highly activated by ibuprofen. On the basis of gene classifications from the IPA Knowledge Base, we identified the following five genes that were related to gastric damage and showed significant changes in gene expression: interleukin-1β (IL-1β), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10), MMP-13, and FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (FOS). Expression of these salient genes was confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of MMP-13 was the most reactive to the treatments, showing strong induction by ibuprofen and suppression by acetaminophen. Moreover, MMP-13 inhibitors decreased ibuprofen-induced gastric damage. In conclusion, these results suggest that acetaminophen decreases ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage and that the suppression of MMP-13 may play an important role in the gastroprotective effects of acetaminophen.

  3. Increased hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in Hsp70i knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tolson, J. Keith; Dix, David J.; Voellmy, Richard W.; Roberts, Stephen M. . E-mail: smr@ufl.edu

    2006-01-15

    The effect of the inducible forms of 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70i) on acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity was assessed in an Hsp70i knockout mouse model. Absence of the Hsp70i protein in liver was verified by monitoring Hsp levels in knockout and control mice after heat stress (41.5 {sup o}C water bath immersion for 30 min). Hsp70i knockout mice were more susceptible to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity than controls, as indicated by elevated serum alanine aminotransferase activities 24 and 48 h after the APAP dose. Increased APAP hepatotoxicity in knockout mice was verified by morphological evaluation of liver sections. The difference in toxic response to APAP between knockout and control strain mice could not be attributed to differences in APAP bioactivation, assessed by measurement of CYP2E1 and glutathione S-transferase activities, hepatic nonprotein sulfhydryl content, or covalent binding of reactive APAP metabolites to proteins. Pretreatment with transient hyperthermia to produce a general upregulation of Hsps resulted in decreased APAP hepatotoxicity in both the knockout and control strains. Among thermally-pretreated mice, hepatotoxicity of APAP was greater in the knockouts compared with the control strain. These observations suggest that increased Hsp70i expression in response to APAP acts to limit the extent of tissue injury. Results further suggest that other factors related to heat stress can also contribute to protection against APAP toxicity.

  4. Pharmacogenomics of acetaminophen in pediatric populations: a moving target

    PubMed Central

    Krasniak, Anne E.; Knipp, Gregory T.; Svensson, Craig K.; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is widely used as an over-the-counter fever reducer and pain reliever. However, the current therapeutic use of APAP is not optimal. The inter-patient variability in both efficacy and toxicity limits the use of this drug. This is particularly an issue in pediatric populations, where tools for predicting drug efficacy and developmental toxicity are not well established. Variability in toxicity between age groups may be accounted for by differences in metabolism, transport, and the genetics behind those differences. While pharmacogenomics has been revolutionizing the paradigm of pharmacotherapy for many drugs, its application in pediatric populations faces significant challenges given the dynamic ontogenic changes in cellular and systems physiology. In this review we focused on the ontogenesis of the regulatory pathways involved in the disposition of APAP and on the variability between pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients. We also summarize important polymorphisms of the pharmacogenes associated with APAP metabolism. Pharmacogenetic studies in pediatric APAP treatment are also reviewed. We conclude that while a consensus in pharmacogenetic management of APAP in pediatric populations has not been achieved, a systems biology based strategy for comprehensively understanding the ontogenic regulatory pathway as well as the interaction between age and genetic variations are particularly necessary in order to address this question. PMID:25352860

  5. Chlorogenic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury: the involvement of CYP450 metabolic enzymes and some antioxidant signals.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Sheng, Yu-chen; Jiang, Ping; Wei, Hai; Ji, Li-li

    2015-07-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound, is abundant in fruits, dietary vegetables, and some medicinal herbs. This study investigated the prevention of CGA against acetaminophen (AP)-induced hepatotoxicity and its engaged mechanisms. CGA reversed the decreased cell viability induced by AP in L-02 cells in vitro. In addition, CGA reduced the AP-induced increased serum levels of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in vivo. The effect of CGA on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymatic (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4) activities showed that CGA caused very little inhibition on CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic activities, but not CYP3A4. The measurement of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) levels showed that CGA prevented AP-induced liver oxidative stress injury. Further, CGA increased the AP-induced decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxin (Prx) 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, epoxide hydrolase (Ephx) 2, and polymerase (RNA) II (DNA directed) polypeptide K (Polr2k), and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In summary, CGA ameliorates the AP-induced liver injury probably by slightly inhibiting CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic properties. In addition, cellular important antioxidant signals such as Prx1, 2, 3, 5, 6, Ephx2, Polr2k, and Nrf2 also contributed to the protection of CGA against AP-induced oxidative stress injury. PMID:26160718

  6. Chlorogenic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury: the involvement of CYP450 metabolic enzymes and some antioxidant signals*

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chun; Sheng, Yu-chen; Jiang, Ping; Wei, Hai; Ji, Li-li

    2015-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound, is abundant in fruits, dietary vegetables, and some medicinal herbs. This study investigated the prevention of CGA against acetaminophen (AP)-induced hepatotoxicity and its engaged mechanisms. CGA reversed the decreased cell viability induced by AP in L-02 cells in vitro. In addition, CGA reduced the AP-induced increased serum levels of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in vivo. The effect of CGA on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymatic (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4) activities showed that CGA caused very little inhibition on CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic activities, but not CYP3A4. The measurement of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) levels showed that CGA prevented AP-induced liver oxidative stress injury. Further, CGA increased the AP-induced decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxin (Prx) 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, epoxide hydrolase (Ephx) 2, and polymerase (RNA) II (DNA directed) polypeptide K (Polr2k), and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In summary, CGA ameliorates the AP-induced liver injury probably by slightly inhibiting CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic properties. In addition, cellular important antioxidant signals such as Prx1, 2, 3, 5, 6, Ephx2, Polr2k, and Nrf2 also contributed to the protection of CGA against AP-induced oxidative stress injury. PMID:26160718

  7. Comparison of diflunisal and acetaminophen with codeine in the management of grade 2 ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Aghababian, R V

    1986-01-01

    The emergency physician treats many patients with mild to moderate pain due to musculoskeletal injury. The physician must consider the extent of injury, the patient's medication history, and the potential for abuse when prescribing an oral analgesic. A study was designed to compare the efficacy of two oral analgesics, one containing a narcotic and one nonnarcotic, in relieving mild to moderate pain associated with grade 2 ankle sprain. Forty patients were enrolled--all with moderate pain--and were randomly allocated to treatment with either diflunisal or acetaminophen with codeine. Both analgesic agents were equally effective in relieving the pain. Side effects were experienced by six patients, all of whom were receiving acetaminophen with codeine; none of the patients given diflunisal noted side effects. Global assessments of the efficacy and tolerability of the study drugs showed that 89% of 19 patients given diflunisal and 43% of 21 patients given acetaminophen with codeine considered their respective analgesics excellent or very good.

  8. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M; Badr, Jihan M; Ibrahim, Amany K; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  9. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  10. Effects of naloxone and flumazenil on antinociceptive action of acetaminophen in rats

    PubMed Central

    Madenoğlu, Halit; Kaçmaz, Mustafa; Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir; Yaba, Gülay; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Doğru, Kudret; Boyaci, Adem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of acetaminophen suggest that multiple nociceptive pathways are involved in the drug's analgesic action. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether naloxone and flumazenil were able to modify or antagonize the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen in rats. Methods: Adult albino Wistar rats were used in the study and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups. The acetaminophen group (A group) was administered IP saline and then 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes thereafter. The acetaminophen + naloxone group (AN group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP naloxone, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The acetaminophen + flumazenil group (AF group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP flumazenil, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The control group received 2.5 mL IP saline, followed by an additional 2.5 mL IP injection of saline 5 minutes later. The paw-withdrawal latency period of the rats was assessed by an investigator blinded to treatment using the hot-plate test at 30, 45, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of acetaminophen. Results: Thirty-two rats were evenly randomized by envelope method into 4 groups of 8 rats each. Baseline values for the A, AN, AF, and control groups were not significantly different (9.1 [2.3], 10.5 [2.7], 9.8 [3.0], and 8.9 [1.4] sec, respectively). In the AF group, flumazenil appeared to antagonize the analgesic effect exerted by the acetaminophen in the hot-plate test (30 min, 10.3 [3.7] sec; 45 min, 11.7 [5.1] sec; 60 min, 12.1 [5.1] sec; and 90 min, 12.2 [4.9] sec) and values were not significantly different from those obtained in the control group (30 min, 9.8 [2.2] sec; 45 min, 9.0 [1.6] sec; 60 min, 9.2 [1.6] sec; and 90 min, 8.5 [2.0] sec). In the AN group, naloxone did not significantly affect the values observed in the hot-plate test (30 min, 18.0 [4.5] sec; 45 min, 21.5 [7.8] sec; 60 min, 20.5 [5.9] sec; and 90 min, 22.3 [7.4] sec) and values at all time

  11. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (see scheme 1) cause to reduce the concentration of NAPQI and decreases the effective concentration of antidepressants. The cyclic voltammetric data were analyzed by digital simulation to measure the homogeneous parameters for the suggesting electrode mechanism. The calculated observed homogeneous rate constants [Formula: see text] for the reaction of electrochemically generated N-acetyl-para benzoquinn-imine with antidepressant drugs was found to vary in the order [Formula: see text] > [Formula: see text] > [Formula: see text] at biological pH.

  12. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (see scheme 1) cause to reduce the concentration of NAPQI and decreases the effective concentration of antidepressants. The cyclic voltammetric data were analyzed by digital simulation to measure the homogeneous parameters for the suggesting electrode mechanism. The calculated observed homogeneous rate constants (kobs) for the reaction of electrochemically generated N-acetyl-para benzoquinn-imine with antidepressant drugs was found to vary in the order kobsnortriptyline > kobssertraline > kobsfluxetine at biological pH. PMID:26664378

  13. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M.; Badr, Jihan M.; Ibrahim, Amany K.; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  14. Carbon Based Electrodes Modified with Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized in Conducting Polymers for Acetaminophen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tertis, Mihaela; Florea, Anca; Sandulescu, Robert; Cristea, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The development and optimization of new biosensors with horseradish peroxidase immobilized in carbon nanotubes-polyethyleneimine or polypyrrole nanocomposite film at the surface of two types of transducer is described. The amperometric detection of acetaminophen was carried out at −0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl using carbon based-screen printed electrodes (SPEs) and glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) as transducers. The electroanalytical parameters of the biosensors are highly dependent on their configuration and on the dimensions of the carbon nanotubes. The best limit of detection obtained for acetaminophen was 1.36 ± 0.013 μM and the linear range 9.99–79.01 μM for the HRP-SWCNT/PEI in GCE configuration. The biosensors were successfully applied for the detection of acetaminophen in several drug formulations. PMID:23580052

  15. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  16. Possible Hepatotoxicity Associated With Intravenous Acetaminophen in a 36-Year-Old Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip J.; Shen, Mark; Wang, Shan; Spiegler, Peter; Caraccio, Thomas; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Malone, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 36-year-old female who came into the emergency department with right-side abdominal pain. She went to the operating room for a diagnostic laparoscopy and appendectomy. She received intravenous (IV) acetaminophen every six hours both preoperatively and postoperatively for pain control. The patient’s aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were elevated and peaked at 4,833 and 6,600 IU/L, respectively, from baselines of 14 and 15, respectively, while she was receiving 16 doses of IV acetaminophen. The patient was transferred to a regional liver transplant center for evaluation for a transplant. She was treated with IV N-acetylcysteine and discharged with a normal liver-function test without a transplant. This case report supports the possibility of hepatotoxicity associated with IV acetaminophen. PMID:25673962

  17. Development, validation and application of a comprehensive stereoselective LC/MS-MS assay for bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Flaker, Alicia M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2016-08-01

    A stereoselective assay was developed for the quantification of bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites (16 analytes total) in human urine. Initially, authentic glucuronide standards obtained from commercial sources were found to be incorrectly labeled with regard to stereochemistry; the correct stereochemistry was unequivocally reassigned. A trifurcated urine sample preparation and analysis procedure was employed for the stereoselective analysis of bupropion, hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and threohydrobupropion enantiomers, and hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers in urine. Method 1 stereoselectively analyzed bupropion (R and S), and unconjugated free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R), and threohydrobupropion (1R,2R and 1S,2S) using chiral chromatography with an α1-acid glycoprotein column. Because no hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide standards were commercially available, method 2 stereoselectively analyzed total hydroxybupropion aglycones (R,R and S,S-hydroxybupropion) after urine hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase. Hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide (R,R and S,S) urine concentrations were calculated as the difference between total and free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S) concentrations. Due to incomplete β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers, method 3 stereoselectively analyzed intact erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers using C18 column chromatography. All analytes were quantified by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The assay was fully validated over analyte-specific concentrations. Intra- and inter assay precision were within 15% for each analyte. The limits of quantification for bupropion (R and S), hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), threohydrobupropion (1S,2S and 1R,2R), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R

  18. Development, validation and application of a comprehensive stereoselective LC/MS-MS assay for bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Flaker, Alicia M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2016-08-01

    A stereoselective assay was developed for the quantification of bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites (16 analytes total) in human urine. Initially, authentic glucuronide standards obtained from commercial sources were found to be incorrectly labeled with regard to stereochemistry; the correct stereochemistry was unequivocally reassigned. A trifurcated urine sample preparation and analysis procedure was employed for the stereoselective analysis of bupropion, hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and threohydrobupropion enantiomers, and hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers in urine. Method 1 stereoselectively analyzed bupropion (R and S), and unconjugated free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R), and threohydrobupropion (1R,2R and 1S,2S) using chiral chromatography with an α1-acid glycoprotein column. Because no hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide standards were commercially available, method 2 stereoselectively analyzed total hydroxybupropion aglycones (R,R and S,S-hydroxybupropion) after urine hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase. Hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide (R,R and S,S) urine concentrations were calculated as the difference between total and free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S) concentrations. Due to incomplete β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers, method 3 stereoselectively analyzed intact erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers using C18 column chromatography. All analytes were quantified by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The assay was fully validated over analyte-specific concentrations. Intra- and inter assay precision were within 15% for each analyte. The limits of quantification for bupropion (R and S), hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), threohydrobupropion (1S,2S and 1R,2R), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R

  19. Acute liver failure following cleft palate repair: a case of therapeutic acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Matthew L; Cheerharan, Meera; Kaufman, Stuart S; Reece-Stremtan, Sarah; Boyajian, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Background : Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent in the pediatric population. While the hepatotoxic effects of the drug have been well recognized in cases of acute overdose and chronic supratherapeutic doses, the toxic effects of acetaminophen are rarely documented in cases where therapeutic guidelines are followed. Case : An 8-month-old boy underwent cleft palate repair and placement of bilateral myringotomy tubes. His anesthetic course was uneventful, consisting of maintenance with desflurane and fentanyl. He received acetaminophen for routine postoperative pain management and was tolerating liquids and discharged home on postoperative day 1. On day 3, the child was profoundly lethargic with multiple episodes of emesis and was taken to the emergency department. He suffered a 45-second tonic-clonic seizure in transport to the regional children's medical center, and initial laboratory results demonstrated acute hepatitis with AST 24,424 U/L, ALT 12,885 U/L, total bilirubin 3.1 mg/dL, and a serum acetaminophen level of 83 μg/mL. Aggressive supportive measures including blood products and periprocedural fresh frozen plasma, piperacillin/tazobactam, and intravenous infusions of N-acetylcysteine, sodium phenylacetate and sodium benzoate, carnitine, and citrulline were administered. His metabolic acidosis and acute hepatitis began to correct by day 4, and he was discharged home without further surgical intervention on day 15. Conclusion : Although acetaminophen is an effective and commonly used analgesic in pediatric practice, hepatotoxicity is a potentially devastating complication. This report challenges the appropriateness of existing guidelines for acetaminophen administration and emphasizes the importance of close follow-up and hydration after even relatively minor surgery.

  20. Fulminate Hepatic Failure in a 5 Year Old Female after Inappropriate Acetaminophen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Irena; Sallabanda, Sashenka; Kasmi, Gentian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is a drug widely used in children because of its safety and efficacy. Although the risk of its toxicity is lower in children such reactions occur in pediatric patients from intentional overdoses and less frequently attributable to unintended inappropriate dosing. The aim of reporting this case is to attract the attention to the risk of the acetaminophen toxicity when administered in high doses. CASE PRESENTATION: We report here a 5 year old girl who developed fulminate liver failure with renal impairment and acute pancreatitis, as a result of acetaminophen toxicity caused from unintentional repeated supratherapeutic ingestion, with a total administered dose of 4800 mg in three consecutive days, 1600 mg/day, approximately 90 mg/kg/day. The blood level of acetaminophen after 10 hours of the last administered dose was 32 mg/l. The patient presented with high fever, jaundice, lethargic, agitating with abdominal pain accompanied by encephalopathy. The liver function test revealed with high level of alanine aminotransferase 5794 UI/l and aspartate aminotransferase 6000 UI/l. Early initiation of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after biochemical evidence of liver toxicity was beneficial with rapid improvement of liver enzymes, hepatic function and encephalopathy. During the course of the illness the child developed acute pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia 255 UI/L and hyperlypasemia 514 UI/L. Patient totally recovered within 29 days. CONCLUSION: Healthcare providers should considered probable acetaminophen toxicity in any child who has received the drug and presented with liver failure. When there is a high index of suspicion of acetaminophen toxicity NAC should be initiated and continued until there are no signs of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27275268

  1. Zingiber officinale Roscoe prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity by enhancing hepatic antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Hema, U; Aswathy, M S

    2007-11-01

    A large number of xenobiotics are reported to be potentially hepatotoxic. Free radicals generated from the xenobiotic metabolism can induce lesions of the liver and react with the basic cellular constituents - proteins, lipids, RNA and DNA. Hepatoprotective activity of aqueous ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale was evaluated against single dose of acetaminophen-induced (3g/kg, p.o.) acute hepatotoxicity in rat. Aqueous extract of Z. officinale significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the activities of serum transaminase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and ALP activities were significantly (p<0.01) elevated in the acetaminophen alone treated animals. Antioxidant status in liver such as activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), a phase II enzyme, and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were declined significantly (p<0.01) in the acetaminophen alone treated animals (control group). Hepatic lipid peroxidation was enhanced significantly (p<0.01) in the control group. Administration of single dose of aqueous extract of Z. officinale (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o.) prior to acetaminophen significantly declines the activities of serum transaminases and ALP. Further the hepatic antioxidant status was enhanced in the Z. officinale plus acetaminophen treated group than the control group. The results of the present study concluded that the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity is mediated either by preventing the decline of hepatic antioxidant status or due to its direct radical scavenging capacity. PMID:17637489

  2. Evidence for differences in regioselective and stereoselective glucuronidation of silybin diastereomers from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) by human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jančová, Petra; Siller, Michal; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Křen, Vladimír; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Simánek, Vilím

    2011-09-01

    The flavonolignan silybin, the main component of silymarin, extract from the seeds of Silybum marianum, is used mostly as a hepatoprotectant. Silybin is almost 1:1 mixture of two diastereomers A and B. The individual UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) contributing to the metabolism of silybin diastereomers have not been identified yet. In this study, the contribution of UGTs to silybin metabolism was examined. The potential silybin metabolites were formed in vitro by incubating silybin (i) with the human liver microsomal fraction, (ii) with human hepatocytes and finally (iii) with 12 recombinant UGTs (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15 and 2B17). High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) techniques with UV detection and additionally MS detection were used for metabolite identification. Hepatocytes and microsomes formed silybin A-7-O-β-D-glucuronides, B-7-O-β-D-glucuronides, A-20-O-β-D-glucuronides and B-20-O-β-D-glucuronides. With recombinant UGTs, the major role of the UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8 and 1A10 enzymes but also of the UGT1A6, 1A7, 1A9, 2B7 and 2B15 in the stereoselective reactions leading to the respective silybin glucuronides was confirmed. UGT1A4, UGT2B4 and UGT2B17 did not participate in silybin glucuronidation. The predominant formation of 7-O-β-D-glucuronides and the preferential glucuronidation of silybin B diastereomer in vitro by human UGTs were confirmed.

  3. Rapid and Selective Crystallization of Acetaminophen using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Bhatt, Mona J; Hoffman, Eugene J; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique to rapid and selective crystallization of a small drug compound. i.e. acetaminophen. Subsequent characterization of the crystals by optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Raman spectroscopy showed quantitatively selective growth of different crystal forms at various experimental conditions. Acetaminophen crystals were grown predominantly as Form I (99%) on blank glass slides at room temperature. Form II crystals with 39% purity grown on SIFs using microwave energy.

  4. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika; Abiko, Yumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  5. Electrochemical sensors based on carbon nanomaterials for acetaminophen detection: A review.

    PubMed

    Cernat, Andreea; Tertiş, Mihaela; Săndulescu, Robert; Bedioui, Fethi; Cristea, Alexandru; Cristea, Cecilia

    2015-07-30

    This study describes the advancements made over the last five years in the development of electrochemical sensors and biosensors for acetaminophen detection. This study reviews the different configurations based on unmodified and chemically modified carbon nanotubes and graphene. The influence of various modifiers on the two types of materials is presented along with their role on the enhancement of the selectivity and sensitivity of (bio)sensors. The review is focused on a comparative description of the applications of carbon-based nanomaterials towards acetaminophen detection and presents the results in a critical manner.

  6. Fluorescence excitation spectrum and solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI) of jet-cooled acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Kang, Jeong Seok; Lee, So Young; Kang, Hyuk

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled acetaminophen was obtained. When AAP was expanded with a buffer gas containing 0.3-1.1% of water, absorption peaks of the less stable trans conformer was significantly reduced by solvent-assisted conformational isomerization (SACI), which is confirmed by a separately measured UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy. It is also confirmed by quantum mechanical calculation and RRKM calculation that it is energetically and kinetically possible to induce SACI in AAP with water. The SACI mechanism suggests a possible pathway that acetaminophen can adopt an active conformation in vivo, which is need for molecular recognition and drug activity.

  7. Liver transplant for intentional acetaminophen overdose and hepatic encephalopathy: a conflict between beneficence and justice.

    PubMed

    Willey, Joshua Z; Tolchin, Benjamin David

    2014-06-01

    In cases of severe acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy, liver transplant can be the only real hope for neurologic recovery and indeed survival. In such cases, the bioethical principles of beneficence and justice often come into conflict. This article examines a case in which a neurologist managing an acetaminophen-overdose patient in the neurologic intensive care unit is faced with a conflict between her patient's need for a liver transplant and the needs of other patients on the transplant list.

  8. Examination of sex differences in fatty acid ethyl ester and ethyl glucuronide hair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gareri, Joey; Rao, Chitra; Koren, Gideon

    2014-06-01

    Clinical studies examining performance of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in identifying excessive alcohol consumption have been primarily conducted in male populations. An impact of hair cosmetics in producing both false-negative EtG results and false-positive FAEE results has been demonstrated, suggesting a possible bias in female populations. This study evaluates FAEE-positive hair samples (>0.50 ng/mg) from n = 199 female and n = 73 male subjects for EtG. Higher FAEE/EtG concordance was observed amongst male over female subjects. Performance of multiple proposed EtG cut-off levels were assessed; amongst female samples, FAEE/EtG concordance was 36.2% (30 pg/mg), 36.7% (27 pg/mg), and 43.7% (20 pg/mg). Non-coloured hair demonstrated a two-fold increase in concordance (41.8 v. 20.8%) over coloured hair in the female cohort. FAEE levels did not differ between male and female subjects; however they were lower in coloured samples (p = 0.046). EtG was lower in female subjects (p = 0.019) and coloured samples (p = 0.026). A total of n = 111 female samples were discordant. Amongst discordant samples (EtG-negative), 26% had evidence of recent alcohol use including consultation histories (n = 20) and detectable cocaethylene (n = 9); 29% of discordant samples were coloured. False-negative risk with ethyl glucuronide analysis in females was mediated by cosmetic colouring. These findings suggest that combined analysis of FAEE and EtG is optimal when assessing a female population and an EtG cut-off of 20 pg/mg is warranted when using combined analysis. While concordant FAEE/EtG-positive findings constitute clear evidence, discordant FAEE/EtG findings should still be considered suggestive evidence of chronic excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:24817046

  9. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy), and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy), and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20-IC80) determined to be 2.6-24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol glucuronide. There was virtually no recognition by antibody 2621 to any of these cross-reactants. Graphical Abstract Urinary biomarker analysis of triclosan glucuronide. PMID:26255293

  10. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy), and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy), and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20-IC80) determined to be 2.6-24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcoho