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  1. The downregulation of Mcl-1 via USP9X inhibition sensitizes solid tumors to Bcl-xl inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been shown in many solid tumors that the overexpression of the pro-survival Bcl-2 family members Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 confers resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. Mcl-1 is a critical survival protein in a variety of cell lineages and is critically regulated via ubiquitination. Methods The Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and USP9X expression patterns in human lung and colon adenocarcinomas were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Interaction between USP9X and Mcl-1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation-western blotting. The protein expression profiles of Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and USP9X in multiple cancer cell lines were determined by western blotting. Annexin-V staining and cleaved PARP western blotting were used to assay for apoptosis. The cellular toxicities after various treatments were measured via the XTT assay. Results In our current analysis of colon and lung cancer samples, we demonstrate that Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL are overexpressed and also co-exist in many tumors and that the expression levels of both genes correlate with the clinical staging. The downregulation of Mcl-1 or Bcl-xL via RNAi was found to increase the sensitivity of the tumor cells to chemotherapy. Furthermore, our analyses revealed that USP9X expression correlates with that of Mcl-1 in human cancer tissue samples. We additionally found that the USP9X inhibitor WP1130 promotes Mcl-1 degradation and increases tumor cell sensitivity to chemotherapies. Moreover, the combination of WP1130 and ABT-737, a well-documented Bcl-xL inhibitor, demonstrated a chemotherapeutic synergy and promoted apoptosis in different tumor cells. Conclusion Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and USP9X overexpression are tumor survival mechanisms protective against chemotherapy. USP9X inhibition increases tumor cell sensitivity to various chemotherapeutic agents including Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitors. PMID:23171055

  2. EZH2 inhibition sensitizes BRG1 and EGFR mutant lung tumors to TopoII inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Christine M.; Xu, Chunxiao; Desai, Pooja T.; Berry, Joanne M.; Rowbotham, Samuel P.; Lin, Yi-Jang; Zhang, Haikuo; Marquez, Victor E.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide1. Chemotherapies such as the topoisomerase II inhibitor (TopoIIi) etoposide effectively reduce disease in a minority of NSCLC patients2,3; therefore, alternative drug targets, including epigenetic enzymes, are under consideration for therapeutic intervention4. A promising potential epigenetic target is the methyltransferase EZH2, which in the context of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is well known to tri-methylate Histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and elicit gene silencing5. Here, we demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition (EZH2i) had differential effects on TopoIIi response of NSCLCs in vitro and in vivo. EGFR and BRG1 mutations were genetic biomarkers that predicted enhanced sensitivity to TopoIIi in response to EZH2i. BRG1 loss-of-function mutant tumors responded to EZH2i with increased S phase, anaphase bridging, apoptosis, and TopoIIi sensitivity. Conversely, EGFR and BRG1 wild-type tumors up-regulated BRG1 in response to EZH2i and ultimately became more resistant to TopoIIi. EGFR gain-of-function mutant tumors were also sensitive to dual EZH2i and TopoIIi, due to genetic antagonism between EGFR and BRG1. These findings suggest an exciting opportunity for precision medicine in the genetically complex disease of NSCLC. PMID:25629630

  3. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  4. Inhibition of Galectin-1 Sensitizes HRAS-driven Tumor Growth to Rapamycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Michael, James V; Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to develop combinatorial application of two drugs currently either in active use as anticancer agents (rapamycin) or in clinical trials (OTX008) as a novel strategy to inhibit Harvey RAS (HRAS)-driven tumor progression. HRAS anchored to the plasma membrane shuttles from the lipid ordered (Lo) domain to the lipid ordered/lipid disordered border upon activation, and retention of HRAS at these sites requires galectin-1. We recently showed that genetically enforced Lo sequestration of HRAS inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, but not phoshatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. Here we show that inhibition of galectin-1 with OTX008 sequestered HRAS in the Lo domain, blocked HRAS-mediated MAPK signaling, and attenuated HRAS-driven tumor progression in mice. HRAS-driven tumor growth was also attenuated by treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin, and this effect was further enhanced in tumors driven by Lo-sequestered HRAS. These drugs also revealed bidirectional cross-talk in HRAS pathways. Moreover, dual pathway inhibition with OTX008 and rapamycin resulted in nearly complete ablation of HRAS-driven tumor growth. These findings indicate that membrane microdomain sequestration of HRAS with galectin-1 inhibition, coupled with mTOR inhibition, may support a novel therapeutic approach to treat HRAS-mutant cancer.

  5. Inhibition of DNA methylation promotes breast tumor sensitivity to netrin-1 interference.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Mélodie; Mathot, Pauline; Devailly, Guillaume; Bidet, Yannick; Ghantous, Akram; Favrot, Clementine; Gibert, Benjamin; Gadot, Nicolas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Herceg, Zdenko; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2016-08-01

    In a number of human cancers, NTN1 upregulation inhibits apoptosis induced by its so-called dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H, thus promoting tumor progression. In other cancers however, the selective inhibition of this dependence receptor death pathway relies on the silencing of pro-apoptotic effector proteins. We show here that a substantial fraction of human breast tumors exhibits simultaneous DNA methylation-dependent loss of expression of NTN1 and of DAPK1, a serine threonine kinase known to transduce the netrin-1 dependence receptor pro-apoptotic pathway. The inhibition of DNA methylation by drugs such as decitabine restores the expression of both NTN1 and DAPK1 in netrin-1-low cancer cells. Furthermore, a combination of decitabine with NTN1 silencing strategies or with an anti-netrin-1 neutralizing antibody potentiates tumor cell death and efficiently blocks tumor growth in different animal models. Thus, combining DNA methylation inhibitors with netrin-1 neutralizing agents may be a valuable strategy for combating cancer.

  6. Akt inhibition promotes autophagy and sensitizes PTEN-null tumors to lysosomotropic agents

    PubMed Central

    Degtyarev, Michael; De Mazière, Ann; Orr, Christine; Lin, Jie; Lee, Brian B.; Tien, Janet Y.; Prior, Wei W.; van Dijk, Suzanne; Wu, Hong; Gray, Daniel C.; Davis, David P.; Stern, Howard M.; Murray, Lesley J.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Klumperman, Judith; Friedman, Lori S.; Lin, Kui

    2008-01-01

    Although Akt is known as a survival kinase, inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt pathway do not always induce substantial apoptosis. We show that silencing Akt1 alone, or any combination of Akt isoforms, can suppress the growth of tumors established from phosphatase and tensin homologue–null human cancer cells. Although these findings indicate that Akt is essential for tumor maintenance, most tumors eventually rebound. Akt knockdown or inactivation with small molecule inhibitors did not induce significant apoptosis but rather markedly increased autophagy. Further treatment with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine caused accumulation of abnormal autophagolysosomes and reactive oxygen species, leading to accelerated cell death in vitro and complete tumor remission in vivo. Cell death was also promoted when Akt inhibition was combined with the vacuolar H+–adenosine triphosphatase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with cathepsin inhibition. These results suggest that blocking lysosomal degradation can be detrimental to cancer cell survival when autophagy is activated, providing rationale for a new therapeutic approach to enhancing the anticancer efficacy of PI3K–Akt pathway inhibition. PMID:18838554

  7. Suppression of homologous recombination sensitizes human tumor cells to IGF-1R inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, Kunal A; Gao, Shan; Aleksic, Tamara; Esashi, Fumiko; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2015-06-15

    Inhibition of type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) sensitizes to DNA-damaging cancer treatments, and delays repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination (HR). In a recent screen for mediators of resistance to IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801, we identified RAD51, required for the strand invasion step of HR. These findings prompted us to test the hypothesis that IGF-1R-inhibited cells accumulate DSBs formed at endogenous DNA lesions, and depend on residual HR for their repair. Indeed, initial experiments showed time-dependent accumulation of γH2AX foci in IGF-1R -inhibited or -depleted prostate cancer cells. We then tested effects of suppressing HR, and found that RAD51 depletion enhanced AZ12253801 sensitivity in PTEN wild-type prostate cancer cells but not in cells lacking functional PTEN. Similar sensitization was induced in prostate cancer cells by depletion of BRCA2, required for RAD51 loading onto DNA, and in BRCA2(-/-) colorectal cancer cells, compared with isogenic BRCA2(+/-) cells. We also assessed chemical HR inhibitors, finding that RAD51 inhibitor BO2 blocked RAD51 focus formation and sensitized to AZ12253801. Finally, we tested CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306, which impairs HR by inhibiting CDK1-mediated BRCA1 phosphorylation. R0-3306 suppressed RAD51 focus formation consistent with HR attenuation, and sensitized prostate cancer cells to IGF-1R inhibition, with 2.4-fold reduction in AZ12253801 GI50 and 13-fold reduction in GI80. These data suggest that responses to IGF-1R inhibition are enhanced by genetic and chemical approaches to suppress HR, defining a population of cancers (PTEN wild-type, BRCA mutant) that may be intrinsically sensitive to IGF-1R inhibitory drugs.

  8. miR-103 inhibits proliferation and sensitizes hemopoietic tumor cells for glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Moshe; Stepensky, Polina

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) hormones are an important ingredient of leukemia therapy since they are potent inducers of lymphoid cell apoptosis. However, the development of GC resistance remains an obstacle in GC-based treatment. In the present investigation we found that miR-103 is upregulated in GC-sensitive leukemia cells treated by the hormone. Transfection of GC resistant cells with miR-103 sensitized them to GC induced apoptosis (GCIA), while miR-103 sponging of GC sensitive cells rendered them partially resistant. miR-103 reduced the expression of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK2) and its cyclin E1 target, thereby leading to inhibition of cellular proliferation. miR-103 is encoded within the fifth intron of PANK3 gene. We demonstrate that the GC receptor (GR) upregulates miR-103 by direct interaction with GC response element (GRE) in the PANK3 enhancer. Consequently, miR-103 targets the c-Myc activators c-Myb and DVL1, thereby reducing c-Myc expression. Since c-Myc is a transcription factor of the miR-17~92a poly-cistron, all six miRNAs of the latter are also downregulated. Of these, miR-18a and miR-20a are involved in GCIA, as they target GR and BIM, respectively. Consequently, GR and BIM expression are elevated, thus advancing GCIA. Altogether, this study highlights miR-103 as a useful prognostic biomarker and drug for leukemia management in the future. PMID:27888798

  9. Mechanism of Telomerase Inhibition Using a Small Inhibitory RNAs and Induction of Breast Tumor Cell Sensitization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Other studies have attempted to target hTERT in a chronic fashion and inhibit telomerase using a variety of strategies including ribozymes , peptide...Hao, Z-M. et al. 2005. Intensive inhibition of hTERT expression by a ribozyme induces rapid apoptosis of cancer cells through a telomere length...limiting and necessary for telomerase function in vivo. Curr. Biol. 10: 1459-1462. Ludwig, A., et al. 2001. Ribozyme cleavage of telomerse mRNA

  10. Whole-genome duplication increases tumor cell sensitivity to MPS1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Manic, Gwenola; Lledo, Gwendaline; Lissa, Delphine; Reynes, Christelle; Morin, Nathalie; Chibon, Frédéric; Sistigu, Antonella; Castedo, Maria; Vitale, Ilio; Kroemer, Guido; Abrieu, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that whole-genome duplication resulting in tetraploidy facilitates carcinogenesis by providing an intermediate and metastable state more prone to generate oncogenic aneuploidy. Here, we report a novel strategy to preferentially kill tetraploid cells based on the abrogation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) via the targeting of TTK protein kinase (better known as monopolar spindle 1, MPS1). The pharmacological inhibition as well as the knockdown of MPS1 kills more efficiently tetraploid cells than their diploid counterparts. By using time-lapse videomicroscopy, we show that tetraploid cells do not survive the aborted mitosis due to SAC abrogation upon MPS1 depletion. On the contrary diploid cells are able to survive up to at least two more cell cycles upon the same treatment. This effect might reflect the enhanced difficulty of cells with whole-genome doubling to tolerate a further increase in ploidy and/or an elevated level of chromosome instability in the absence of SAC functions. We further show that MPS1-inhibited tetraploid cells promote mitotic catastrophe executed by the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as indicated by the loss of mitochondrial potential, the release of the pro-apoptotic cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the activation of caspases. Altogether, our results suggest that MPS1 inhibition could be used as a therapeutic strategy for targeting tetraploid cancer cells. PMID:26637805

  11. Inhibition of 4E-BP1 Sensitizes U87 Glioblastoma Xenograft Tumors to Irradiation by Decreasing Hypoxia Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Ludwig; Magagnin, Michael G.; Cleven, Arjen H.G.; Weppler, Sherry A.; Grenacher, Beat; Landuyt, Willy; Lieuwes, Natasja; Lambin, Philippe; Gorr, Thomas A.; Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is an essential rate-limiting factor for cap-dependent translation in eukaryotic cells. Elevated eIF4E activity is common in many human tumors and is associated with disease progression. The growth-promoting effects of eIF4E are in turn negatively regulated by 4E-BP1. However, although 4E-BP1 harbors anti-growth activity, its expression is paradoxically elevated in some tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional role of 4E-BP1 in the context of solid tumors. Methods and Materials: In vitro and in vivo growth properties, hypoxia tolerance, and response to radiation were assessed for HeLa and U87 cells, after stable expression of shRNA specific for 4E-BP1. Results: We found that loss of 4E-BP1 expression did not significantly alter in vitro growth but did accelerate the growth of U87 tumor xenografts, consistent with the growth-promoting function of deregulated eIF4E. However, cells lacking 4E-BP1 were significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-induced cell death in vitro. Furthermore, 4E-BP1 knockdown cells produced tumors more sensitive to radiation because of a reduction in the viable fraction of radioresistant hypoxic cells. Decreased hypoxia tolerance in the 4E-BP1 knockdown tumors was evident by increased cleaved caspase-3 levels and was associated with a reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Conclusions: Our results suggest that although tumors often demonstrate increases in cap-dependent translation, regulation of this activity is required to facilitate energy conservation, hypoxia tolerance, and tumor radioresistance. Furthermore, we suggest that targeting translational control may be an effective way to target hypoxic cells and radioresistance in metabolically hyperactive tumors.

  12. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase sensitizes tumor cells to flavonoid-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of JunD

    SciTech Connect

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Son, Young-Ok; Jang, Yong-Suk; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Lee, Seung-Ah; Kim, Beom-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2008-03-15

    Reduction of susceptibility to apoptosis signals is a crucial step in carcinogenesis. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells to apoptosis is a promising therapeutic strategy. c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in stress-induced apoptosis. However, many studies also emphasize the role of JNK on cell survival, although its mechanisms are not completely understood. Previously, we found that inhibition of JNK activity promotes flavonoid-mediated apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells. We thus determined whether inhibition of JNK sensitizes tumor cells to a bioflavonoid-induced apoptosis, and whether this effect of JNK is a general effect. As the results, quercetin and genistein as well as a flavonoid fraction induced apoptosis of tumor cells, which was further accelerated by specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125 or by small interfering RNA specific to JNK1/2. This effect was specific to types of cells because it was further apparent in tumorigenic cell lines. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125 also reduced flavonoid-stimulated nuclear induction of JunD which was known to have protective role in apoptosis, whereas JNK inhibition alone had little effect on apoptosis. The flavonoid-induced apoptosis of tumor cells was significantly enhanced by transfecting them with antisense JunD oligonucleotides. These results suggest that inhibition of JNK facilitates flavonoid-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of JunD, which is further sensitive to tumor cells. Therefore, combination with a specific JNK inhibitor further enhances the anti-cancer and chemopreventive potential of bio-flavonoids.

  13. NAMPT inhibition sensitizes pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to tumor-selective, PAR-independent metabolic catastrophe and cell death induced by β-lapachone.

    PubMed

    Moore, Z; Chakrabarti, G; Luo, X; Ali, A; Hu, Z; Fattah, F J; Vemireddy, R; DeBerardinis, R J; Brekken, R A; Boothman, D A

    2015-01-15

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors (e.g., FK866) target the most active pathway of NAD(+) synthesis in tumor cells, but lack tumor-selectivity for use as a single agent. Reducing NAD(+) pools by inhibiting NAMPT primed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells for poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP1)-dependent cell death induced by the targeted cancer therapeutic, β-lapachone (β-lap, ARQ761), independent of poly(ADP ribose) (PAR) accumulation. β-Lap is bioactivated by NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a futile redox cycle that consumes oxygen and generates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause extensive DNA damage and rapid PARP1-mediated NAD(+) consumption. Synergy with FK866+β-lap was tumor-selective, only occurring in NQO1-overexpressing cancer cells, which is noted in a majority (∼85%) of PDA cases. This treatment strategy simultaneously decreases NAD(+) synthesis while increasing NAD(+) consumption, reducing required doses and treatment times for both drugs and increasing potency. These complementary mechanisms caused profound NAD(P)(+) depletion and inhibited glycolysis, driving down adenosine triphosphate levels and preventing recovery normally observed with either agent alone. Cancer cells died through an ROS-induced, μ-calpain-mediated programmed cell death process that kills independent of caspase activation and is not driven by PAR accumulation, which we call NAD(+)-Keresis. Non-overlapping specificities of FK866 for PDA tumors that rely heavily on NAMPT-catalyzed NAD(+) synthesis and β-lap for cancer cells with elevated NQO1 levels affords high tumor-selectivity. The concept of reducing NAD(+) pools in cancer cells to sensitize them to ROS-mediated cell death by β-lap is a novel strategy with potential application for pancreatic and other types of NQO1+ solid tumors.

  14. Dimethyl fumarate restores apoptosis sensitivity and inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in CTCL by targeting NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Decker, Karin; Schroeder, Anne; Brechmann, Markus; Möbs, Markus; Géraud, Cyrill; Assaf, Chalid; Goerdt, Sergij; Krammer, Peter H.; Gülow, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts in recent years, a curative therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) has not yet been developed. Therefore, the establishment of new therapeutic approaches with higher efficacy rates and milder side effects is strongly desired. A characteristic feature of the malignant T-cell population in CTCL is resistance toward cell death resulting from constitutive NF-κB activation. Therefore, NF-κB–dependent cell death resistance represents an interesting therapeutic target in CTCL because an NF-κB–directed therapy would leave bystander T cells widely unaffected. We investigated the effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) on CTCL cells in vitro and in vivo. DMF induced cell death in primary patient-derived CD4+ cells and CTCL cell lines, but hardly in T cells from healthy donors. DMF-induced cell death was linked specifically to NF-κB inhibition. To study the impact of DMF in vivo, we developed 2 CTCL xenograft mouse models with different cutaneous localizations of the T-cell infiltrate. DMF treatment delayed the growth of CTCL tumors and prevented formation of distant metastases. In addition, DMF induced increased cell death in primary CTCL tumors and in liver metastases. In summary, DMF treatment represents a remarkable therapeutic option in CTCL because it restores CTCL apoptosis in vitro and in preclinical models in vivo and prevents spreading of the disease to distant sites. DMF treatment is of particular promise in CTCL because DMF is already in successful clinical use in the treatment of psoriasis and multiple sclerosis allowing fast translation into clinical studies in CTCL. PMID:27268084

  15. The loss of Ezh2 drives the pathogenesis of myelofibrosis and sensitizes tumor-initiating cells to bromodomain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Akinori; Mochizuki-Kashio, Makiko; Harada, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    EZH2 is a component of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and functions as an H3K27 methyltransferase. Loss-of-function mutations in EZH2 are associated with poorer outcomes in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly those with primary myelofibrosis (MF [PMF]). To determine how EZH2 insufficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of PMF, we generated mice compound for an Ezh2 conditional deletion and activating mutation in JAK2 (JAK2V617F) present in patients with PMF. The deletion of Ezh2 in JAK2V617F mice markedly promoted the development of MF, indicating a tumor suppressor function for EZH2 in PMF. The loss of Ezh2 in JAK2V617F hematopoietic cells caused significant reductions in H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) levels, resulting in an epigenetic switch to H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac). These epigenetic switches were closely associated with the activation of PRC2 target genes including Hmga2, an oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of PMF. The treatment of JAK2V617F/Ezh2-null mice with a bromodomain inhibitor significantly attenuated H3K27ac levels at the promoter regions of PRC2 targets and down-regulated their expression, leading to the abrogation of MF-initiating cells. Therefore, an EZH2 insufficiency not only cooperated with active JAK2 to induce MF, but also conferred an oncogenic addiction to the H3K27ac modification in MF-initiating cells that was capable of being restored by bromodomain inhibition. PMID:27401345

  16. Proteasomal inhibition sensitizes cervical cancer cells to mitomycin C-induced bystander effect: the role of tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Singh, S V; Ajay, A K; Mohammad, N; Malvi, P; Chaube, B; Meena, A S; Bhat, M K

    2015-10-22

    Inaccessibility of drugs to poorly vascularized strata of tumor is one of the limiting factors in cancer therapy. With the advent of bystander effect (BE), it is possible to perpetuate the cellular damage from drug-exposed cells to the unexposed ones. However, the role of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), an integral part of the tumor microenvironment, in further intensifying BE remains obscure. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of mitomycin C (MMC), a chemotherapeutic drug, to induce BE in cervical carcinoma. By using cervical cancer cells and differentiated macrophages, we demonstrate that MMC induces the expression of FasL via upregulation of PPARγ in both cell types (effector cells) in vitro, but it failed to induce bystander killing in cervical cancer cells. This effect was primarily owing to the proteasomal degradation of death receptors in the cervical cancer cells. Pre-treatment of cervical cancer cells with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, facilitates MMC-mediated bystander killing in co-culture and condition medium transfer experiments. In NOD/SCID mice bearing xenografted HeLa tumors administered with the combination of MMC and MG132, tumor progression was significantly reduced in comparison with those treated with either agent alone. FasL expression was increased in TAMs, and the enhanced level of Fas was observed in these tumor sections, thereby causing increased apoptosis. These findings suggest that restoration of death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway in tumor cells with concomitant activation of TAMs could effectively restrict tumor growth.

  17. Breast Tumors with Elevated Expression of 1q Candidate Genes Confer Poor Clinical Outcome and Sensitivity to Ras/PI3K Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Viveka Thangaraj, Soundara; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Bhaskar Rao, Divya; Barnabas, Georgina D.; Raghavan, Swetha; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2013-01-01

    Genomic aberrations are common in cancers and the long arm of chromosome 1 is known for its frequent amplifications in breast cancer. However, the key candidate genes of 1q, and their contribution in breast cancer pathogenesis remain unexplored. We have analyzed the gene expression profiles of 1635 breast tumor samples using meta-analysis based approach and identified clinically significant candidates from chromosome 1q. Seven candidate genes including exonuclease 1 (EXO1) are consistently over expressed in breast tumors, specifically in high grade and aggressive breast tumors with poor clinical outcome. We derived a EXO1 co-expression module from the mRNA profiles of breast tumors which comprises 1q candidate genes and their co-expressed genes. By integrative functional genomics investigation, we identified the involvement of EGFR, RAS, PI3K / AKT, MYC, E2F signaling in the regulation of these selected 1q genes in breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Expression of EXO1 module was found as indicative of elevated cell proliferation, genomic instability, activated RAS/AKT/MYC/E2F1 signaling pathways and loss of p53 activity in breast tumors. mRNA–drug connectivity analysis indicates inhibition of RAS/PI3K as a possible targeted therapeutic approach for the patients with activated EXO1 module in breast tumors. Thus, we identified seven 1q candidate genes strongly associated with the poor survival of breast cancer patients and identified the possibility of targeting them with EGFR/RAS/PI3K inhibitors. PMID:24147022

  18. Immunogenic chemotherapy sensitizes tumors to checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Rickelt, Steffen; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Garris, Christopher; Pucci, Ferdinando; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Colame, Vichnou Poirier; Newton, Andita; Redouane, Younes; Lin, Yi-Jang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Huynh, Tiffany G.; Hynes, Richard O.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Checkpoint blockade immunotherapies can be extraordinarily effective, but may benefit only the minority of patients whose tumors are pre-infiltrated by T cells. Here, using lung adenocarcinoma mouse models, including genetic models, we show that autochthonous tumors that lacked T cell infiltration and resisted current treatment options could be successfully sensitized to host antitumor T cell immunity when using appropriately selected immunogenic drugs (e.g. oxaliplatin combined with cyclophosphamide for treatment against tumors expressing oncogenic Kras and lacking Trp53). The antitumor response was triggered by direct drug actions on tumor cells, relied on innate immune sensing through toll-like receptor 4 signaling, and ultimately depended on CD8+ T cell antitumor immunity. Furthermore, instigating tumor infiltration by T cells sensitized tumors to checkpoint inhibition and controlled cancer durably. These findings indicate that the proportion of cancers responding to checkpoint therapy can be feasibly and substantially expanded by combining checkpoint blockade with immunogenic drugs. PMID:26872698

  19. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 sensitizes liver cancer stem-like cells to magnetic hyperthermia and enhances anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Qiusha; Miao, Fengqin; An, Yanli; Li, Mengfei; Han, Yong; Wang, Xihui; Wang, Juan; Liu, Peidang; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the thermoresistance and expression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in magnetic hyperthermia-treated human liver cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) and the effects of a heat-shock protein HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxgeldanamycin (17-AAG) on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice. Methods CD90+ LCSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from BEL-7404. Spheroid formation, proliferation, differentiation, drug resistance, and tumor formation assays were performed to identify stem cell characteristics. CD90-targeted thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TMs)-encapsulated 17-AAG (CD90@17-AAG/TMs) was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation and its characteristics were studied. Heat tolerance in CD90+ LCSCs and the effect of CD90@17-AAG/TMs-mediated heat sensitivity were examined in vitro and in vivo. Results CD90+ LCSCs showed significant stem cell-like properties. The 17-AAG/TMs were successfully prepared and were spherical in shape with an average size of 128.9±7.7 nm. When exposed to magnetic hyperthermia, HSP90 was up-regulated in CD90+ LCSCs. CD90@17-AAG/TMs inhibited the activity of HSP90 and increased the sensitivity of CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia. Conclusion The inhibition of HSP90 could sensitize CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia and enhance its anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26677324

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  2. Cellular hierarchy as a determinant of tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio; Kurtova, Antonina V; Lin, Christopher; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Xiao, Jing; Mims, Martha P; Chan, Keith Syson; Wodarz, Dominik

    2017-02-24

    Chemotherapy has been shown to enrich cancer stem cells in tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that administration of chemotherapy to human bladder cancer xenografts could trigger a wound-healing response that mobilizes quiescent tumor stem cells into active proliferation, leading to a loss of sensitivity to chemotherapy. Different bladder cancer xenografts, however, demonstrate differential sensitivities to chemotherapy, the basis of which is not understood. Using mathematical models, we show here that characteristics of the tumor cell hierarchy can be crucial for determining the sensitivity of tumors to drug therapy, under the assumption that stem cell enrichment is the primary basis for drug resistance. Our model predicted a weaker response to therapy if negative feedback from differentiated tumor cells inhibited the rate of tumor stem cell division. If this negative feedback was less pronounced, treatment response was predicted to be enhanced. Negative feedback on the rate of tumor cell division promoted a permanent rise of the tumor stem cell population over time both in the absence of treatment and even more so during drug therapy. Model application to data from chemotherapy-treated, patient-derived xenografts indicated support for model predictions. These findings call for further research into feedback mechanisms that might remain active in cancers, and they highlight the presence of feedback as an indication to potentially combine chemotherapy with approaches that limit the process of tumor stem cell enrichment.

  3. The TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangement is a recurring event in colorectal carcinoma and is associated with tumor sensitivity to TRKA kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ardini, Elena; Bosotti, Roberta; Borgia, Andrea Lombardi; De Ponti, Cristina; Somaschini, Alessio; Cammarota, Rosaria; Amboldi, Nadia; Raddrizzani, Laura; Milani, Andrea; Magnaghi, Paola; Ballinari, Dario; Casero, Daniele; Gasparri, Fabio; Banfi, Patrizia; Avanzi, Nilla; Saccardo, Maria B; Alzani, Rachele; Bandiera, Tiziano; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Pesenti, Enrico; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Gambacorta, Marcello; Pierotti, Marco A; Siena, Salvatore; Veronese, Silvio; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    The NTRK1 gene encodes Tropomyosin-related kinase A (TRKA), the high-affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor. NTRK1 was originally isolated from a colorectal carcinoma (CRC) sample as component of a somatic rearrangement (TPM3-NTRK1) resulting in expression of the oncogenic chimeric protein TPM3-TRKA, but there has been no subsequent report regarding the relevance of this oncogene in CRC. The KM12 human CRC cell line expresses the chimeric TPM3-TRKA protein and is hypersensitive to TRKA kinase inhibition. We report the detailed characterization of the TPM3-NTRK1 genomic rearrangement in KM12 cells and through a cellular screening approach, the identification of NMS-P626, a novel highly potent and selective TRKA inhibitor. NMS-P626 suppressed TPM3-TRKA phosphorylation and downstream signaling in KM12 cells and showed remarkable antitumor activity in mice bearing KM12 tumors. Finally, using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we identified the TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangement in a CRC clinical sample, therefore suggesting that this chromosomal translocation is indeed a low frequency recurring event in CRC and that such patients might benefit from therapy with TRKA kinase inhibitors.

  4. Role of the nitric oxide synthase pathway in inhibition of growth of interferon-sensitive and interferon-resistant Rickettsia prowazekii strains in L929 cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Turco, J; Winkler, H H

    1993-01-01

    The ability of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) alone and in combination with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) to inhibit the growth of interferon-sensitive and -resistant Rickettsia prowazekii strains in mouse L929 cells was examined, and the possible role of the nitric oxide synthase pathway in the suppression of rickettsial growth induced by TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, or both cytokines was evaluated. TNF-alpha inhibited the growth of strains Madrid E (IFN-gamma sensitive and alpha/beta interferon [IFN-alpha/beta] sensitive) and Breinl (IFN-gamma sensitive and IFN-alpha/beta resistant), but not that of strain 83-2P (IFN-gamma resistant and IFN-alpha/beta resistant), in L929 cells. Inhibition of the growth of the Madrid E strain in L929 cells treated with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma in combination was greater than that observed with either TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma alone. Similarly, inhibition of the growth of the Breinl strain in L929 cells treated with both cytokines was greater than that observed with TNF-alpha alone; however, it did not differ significantly from the inhibition observed with IFN-gamma alone. Although strain 83-2P was resistant to TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma alone, its growth was inhibited in L929 cells treated with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma in combination. Nitrite production was measured in mock-infected and infected L929 cell cultures, and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors NG-methyl-L-arginine (NGMA) and aminoguanidine were used to evaluate the role of the nitric oxide synthase pathway in cytokine-induced inhibition of rickettsial growth. Nitrite production was induced in mock-infected or R. prowazekii-infected L929 cell cultures treated with IFN-gamma plus TNF-alpha, but not in mock-infected cultures that were untreated or treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha alone. Nitrite production was also not induced in untreated, R. prowazekii-infected cultures; however, in some instances, it was induced in infected cultures treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha alone

  5. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  6. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Qingyi; Qing, Yong; Wu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  7. Amiodarone Inhibits Apamin-Sensitive Potassium Currents

    PubMed Central

    Turker, Isik; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Po-Cheng; Chen, Zhenhui; Sohma, Yoshiro; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Ai, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Apamin sensitive potassium current (IKAS), carried by the type 2 small conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK2) channels, plays an important role in post-shock action potential duration (APD) shortening and recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF) in failing ventricles. Objective To test the hypothesis that amiodarone inhibits IKAS in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells. Methods We used the patch-clamp technique to study IKAS in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing human SK2 before and after amiodarone administration. Results Amiodarone inhibited IKAS in a dose-dependent manner (IC50, 2.67±0.25 µM with 1 µM intrapipette Ca2+). Maximal inhibition was observed with 50 µM amiodarone which inhibited 85.6±3.1% of IKAS induced with 1 µM intrapipette Ca2+ (n = 3). IKAS inhibition by amiodarone was not voltage-dependent, but was Ca2+-dependent: 30 µM amiodarone inhibited 81.5±1.9% of IKAS induced with 1 µM Ca2+ (n = 4), and 16.4±4.9% with 250 nM Ca2+ (n = 5). Desethylamiodarone, a major metabolite of amiodarone, also exerts voltage-independent but Ca2+ dependent inhibition of IKAS. Conclusion Both amiodarone and desethylamiodarone inhibit IKAS at therapeutic concentrations. The inhibition is independent of time and voltage, but is dependent on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. SK2 current inhibition may in part underlie amiodarone's effects in preventing electrical storm in failing ventricles. PMID:23922993

  8. Gabapentin inhibits central sensitization during migraine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbo; Shao, Guo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Sijie; Niu, Jingzhong; Hu, Dongmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Ji, Xunming

    2013-11-15

    Peripheral and central sensitizations are phenomena that occur during migraine. The role of pentin, a migraine preventive drug, on central sensitization remains unclear. In this study, a rat model of migraine was established by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, and the an-imals were given intragastric gabapentin. Changes in amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and protein kinase C membrane translocation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus were examined to clarify the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of gabapentin in the treatment of central sensitization during migraine. Electrophysiology, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and western blot analysis results revealed that gabapentin reduces neuronal excitability in the spinal nucleus in the trigeminal nerve, decreases excitatory amino acid content and inhibits the activation of protein ki-nase C. This provides evidence that excitatory amino acids and protein kinase C are involved in the formation and maintenance of central sensitization during migraine. Gabapentin inhibits migraine by reducing excitatory amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and inhibiting protein kinase C ac-tivation.

  9. The Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 potentiates radiosensitization of tumor cells by Hsp90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Daniela; Garrido, Carmen; Combs, Stephanie E; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. However, Hsp90 inhibition induces the expression of Hsp70 which is a prominent cytoprotective protein. Therefore, dual targeting of Hsp70 and Hsp90 might be beneficial to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamers have been shown to increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to apoptosis induced by different anticancer drugs. Herein, we studied the radiosensitizing activity of the Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 in combination with the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Whereas A17 significantly increased apoptosis induction by NVP-AUY922 it did not significantly affect the radiosensitivity of human lung and breast cancer cells. However, Hsp70 inhibition by the aptamer A17 potentiated the radiosensitizing effects of the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Mechanistically we speculate that an increased number of DNA double strand breaks and an enhanced G2/M arrest might be responsible for the increased radiosensitization in A17 expressing tumor cells. Therefore, the simultaneous inhibition of Hsp90 and Hsp70 combined with radiotherapy might provide a promising anti-cancer strategy.

  10. Combining radiation with autophagy inhibition enhances suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YONGSHUN; LI, XIAOHONG; GUO, LEIMING; WU, XIAOYUAN; HE, CHUNYU; ZHANG, SONG; XIAO, YANJING; YANG, YUANYUAN; HAO, DAXUAN

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for esophageal cancer; however, tumor resistance to radiation remains a major biological problem. The present study aimed to investigate whether inhibition of autophagy may decrease overall tumor resistance to radiation. The effects of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) on radiosensitivity were tested in the EC9706 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line by colony formation assay. Furthermore, the synergistic cytotoxic effects of 3-MA and radiation were assessed in a tumor xenograft model in nude mice. Mechanistic studies were performed using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that radiation induced an accumulation of autophagosomes and 3-MA effectively inhibited radiation-induced autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy was shown to significantly increase the radiosensitivity of the tumors in vitro and in vivo. The enhancement ratio of sensitization in EC9706 cells was 1.76 when the cells were treated with 10 mM 3-MA, alongside ionizing radiation. In addition, autophagy inhibition increased apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation. The combination of radiation and autophagy inhibition resulted in a significant reduction in tumor volume and vasculature in the murine model. The present study demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that radiation-induced autophagy has a protective effect against cell death, and inhibition of autophagy is able to enhance the radiosensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25891159

  11. Tumor Vascular Changes Mediated by Inhibition of Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qayum, Naseer; Muschel, Ruth J.; Im, Jae Hong; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Koch, Cameron J.; Patel, Sonal; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Many inhibitors of the EGFR-RAS-PI3 kinase-AKT signaling pathway are in clinical use or under development for cancer therapy. Here we show that treatment of mice bearing human tumor xenografts with inhibitors that block EGFR, RAS, PI3 kinase or AKT resulted in prolonged and durable enhancement of tumor vascular flow, perfusion and decreased tumor hypoxia. The vessels in the treated tumors had decreased tortuosity and increased internodal length accounting for the functional alterations. Inhibition of tumor growth cannot account for these results as the drugs were given at doses that did not alter tumor growth. The tumor cell itself was an essential target as HT1080 tumors that lack EGFR did not respond to an EGFR inhibitor, but did respond with vascular alterations to RAS or PI3 Kinase inhibition. We extended these observations to spontaneously arising tumors in MMTV-neu mice. These tumors also responded to PI3 kinase inhibition with decreased tumor hypoxia, increased vascular flow and morphological alterations of their vessels including increased vascular maturity and acquisition of pericyte markers. These changes are similar to the vascular normalization that has been described after anti-angiogenic treatment of xenografts. One difficulty in the use of vascular normalization as a therapeutic strategy has been its limited duration. In contrast, blocking tumor cell RAS-PI3K-AKT signaling led to persistent vascular changes that might be incorporated into clinical strategies based on improvement of vascular flow or decreased hypoxia. These results indicate that vascular alterations must be considered as a consequence of signaling inhibition in cancer therapy. PMID:19622766

  12. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1–5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  13. Statistical inference for tumor growth inhibition T/C ratio.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2010-09-01

    The tumor growth inhibition T/C ratio is commonly used to quantify treatment effects in drug screening tumor xenograft experiments. The T/C ratio is converted to an antitumor activity rating using an arbitrary cutoff point and often without any formal statistical inference. Here, we applied a nonparametric bootstrap method and a small sample likelihood ratio statistic to make a statistical inference of the T/C ratio, including both hypothesis testing and a confidence interval estimate. Furthermore, sample size and power are also discussed for statistical design of tumor xenograft experiments. Tumor xenograft data from an actual experiment were analyzed to illustrate the application.

  14. Lithium inhibits tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis through the inhibition of TGFBIp expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Yong-Sun; Lee, Rina; Lee, Boram; Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-02-09

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in cancer patients. Although there are many anti-cancer drugs targeting tumor growth, anti-metastatic agents are rarely developed. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are crucial for cancer progression; in particular, lymphangiogenesis is pivotal for metastasis in cancer. Here we report that lithium inhibits colon cancer metastasis by blocking lymphangiogenesis. Lithium reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β-induced protein (TGFBIp) in colon cancer cells by inhibiting Smad3 phosphorylation via GSK3β inactivation. Moreover, lithium inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell migration, which is increased upon TGFBIp expression in tumor cells. Lithium had no significant effect on SW620 tumor growth in vitro and in vivo; however, it inhibited lymphangiogenesis in tumors. In tumor xenografts model, lithium was found to prevent metastasis to the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes by inhibiting TGFBIp-induced tumor lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel role of lithium in the inhibition of colon cancer metastasis by blocking TGFBIp expression, and thereby TGFBIp-induced lymphangiogenesis, in primary tumors.

  15. High rates of chromosome missegregation suppress tumor progression but do not inhibit tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Britigan, Eric M. C.; Ryan, Sean D.; Kaur, Charanjeet; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Moser, Amy R.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that deviates from a multiple of the haploid, has been recognized as a common feature of cancers for >100 yr. Previously, we showed that the rate of chromosome missegregation/chromosomal instability (CIN) determines the effect of aneuploidy on tumors; whereas low rates of CIN are weakly tumor promoting, higher rates of CIN cause cell death and tumor suppression. However, whether high CIN inhibits tumor initiation or suppresses the growth and progression of already initiated tumors remained unclear. We tested this using the ApcMin/+ mouse intestinal tumor model, in which effects on tumor initiation versus progression can be discriminated. ApcMin/+ cells exhibit low CIN, and we generated high CIN by reducing expression of the kinesin-like mitotic motor protein CENP-E. CENP-E+/−;ApcMin/+ doubly heterozygous cells had higher rates of chromosome missegregation than singly heterozygous cells, resulting in increased cell death and a substantial reduction in tumor progression compared with ApcMin/+ animals. Intestinal organoid studies confirmed that high CIN does not inhibit tumor cell initiation but does inhibit subsequent cell growth. These findings support the conclusion that increasing the rate of chromosome missegregation could serve as a successful chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27146113

  16. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-05

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments.

  17. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments. PMID:26517244

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated sensitization of resistant tumor cells to apoptosis by chemo-immunotherapeutics☆

    PubMed Central

    Bonavida, Benjamin; Garban, Hermes

    2015-01-01

    The generation of NO by the various NO synthases in normal and malignant tissues is manifested by various biological effects that are involved in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation and cell death. The role of NO in the cytotoxic immune response was first revealed by demonstrating the induction of iNOS in target cells by immune cytokines (e.g. IFN-γ, IL-1, TNF-α, etc.) and resulting in the sensitization of resistant tumor cells to death ligands-induced apoptosis. Endogenous/exogenous NO mediated its immune sensitizing effect by inhibiting NF-κΒ activity and downstream, inactivating the repressor transcription factor YY1, which inhibited both Fas and DR5 expressions. In addition, NO-mediated inhibition of NF-κΒ activity and inhibition downstream of its anti-apoptotic gene targets sensitized the tumor cells to apoptosis by chemotherapeutic drugs. We have identified in tumor cells a dysregulated pro-survival/anti-apoptotic loop consisting of NF-κB/Snail/YY1/RKIP/PTEN and its modification by NO was responsible, in large, for the reversal of chemo and immune resistance and sensitization to apoptotic mechanisms by cytotoxic agents. Moreover, tumor cells treated with exogenous NO donors resulted in the inhibition of NF-κΒ activity via S-nitrosylation of p50 and p65, inhibition of Snail (NF-κΒ target gene), inhibition of transcription repression by S-nitrosylation of YY1 and subsequent inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), induction of RKIP (inhibition of the transcription repressor Snail), and induction of PTEN (inhibition of the repressors Snail and YY1). Further, each gene product modified by NO in the loop was involved in chemo-immunosensitization. These above findings demonstrated that NO donors interference in the regulatory circuitry result in chemo-immunosensitization and inhibition of EMT. Overall, these observations suggest the potential anti-tumor therapeutic effect of NO donors in combination with subtoxic chemo

  19. MGMT Inhibition Restores ERα Functional Sensitivity to Antiestrogen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bobustuc, George C; Smith, Joshua S; Maddipatla, Sreeram; Jeudy, Sheila; Limaye, Arati; Isley, Beth; Caparas, Maria-Lourdes M; Constantino, Susan M; Shah, Nikita; Baker, Cheryl H; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S; Baidas, Said; Konduri, Santhi D

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen therapy resistance remains a huge stumbling block in the treatment of breast cancer. We have found significant elevation of O6 methylguanine DNA methyl transferase (MGMT) expression in a small sample of consecutive patients who have failed tamoxifen treatment. Here, we show that tamoxifen resistance is accompanied by upregulation of MGMT. Further we show that administration of the MGMT inhibitor, O6-benzylguanine (BG), at nontoxic doses, leads to restoration of a favorable estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) phosphorylation phenotype (high p-ERα Ser167/low p-ERα Ser118), which has been reported to correlate with sensitivity to endocrine therapy and improved survival. We also show BG to be a dual inhibitor of MGMT and ERα. In tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells, BG alone or in combination with antiestrogen (tamoxifen [TAM]/ICI 182,780 [fulvestrant, Faslodex]) therapy enhances p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression, cytochrome C release and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, all indicative of apoptosis. In addition, BG increases the expression of p21cip1/waf1. We also show that BG, alone or in combination therapy, curtails the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. In tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 breast cancer xenografts, BG alone or in combination treatment causes significant delay in tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry confirms that BG increases p21cip1/waf1 and p-ERα Ser167 expression and inhibits MGMT, ERα, p-ERα Ser118 and ki-67 expression. Collectively, our results suggest that MGMT inhibition leads to growth inhibition of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer in vitro and in vivo and resensitizes tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells to antiestrogen therapy. These findings suggest that MGMT inhibition may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for overcoming antiestrogen resistance. PMID:22549111

  20. Alpha1-antitrypsin inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hanhua; Campbell, Steven C; Nelius, Thomas; Bedford, Dhugal F; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bouck, Noel P; Volpert, Olga V

    2004-12-20

    Disturbances of the ratio between angiogenic inducers and inhibitors in tumor microenvironment are the driving force behind angiogenic switch critical for tumor progression. Angiogenic inhibitors may vary depending on organismal age and the tissue of origin. We showed that alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT), a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, which induced apoptosis and inhibited chemotaxis of endothelial cells. S- and Z-type mutations that cause abnormal folding and defective serpin activity abrogated AAT antiangiogenic activity. Removal of the C-terminal reactive site loop had no effect on its angiostatic activity. Both native AAT and AAT truncated on C-terminus (AATDelta) inhibited neovascularization in the rat cornea and delayed the growth of subcutaneous tumors in mice. Treatment with native AAT and truncated AATDelta, but not control vehicle reduced tumor microvessel density, while increasing apoptosis within tumor endothelium. Comparative analysis of the human tumors and normal tissues of origin showed correlation between reduced local alpha(1)-antitrypsin expression and more aggressive tumor growth.

  1. Bicarbonate Increases Tumor pH and Inhibits Spontaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Ian F.; Baggett, Brenda K.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Roe, Denise J.; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L.; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO3 selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO3 therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO3 therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease. PMID:19276390

  2. Bicarbonate increases tumor pH and inhibits spontaneous metastases.

    PubMed

    Robey, Ian F; Baggett, Brenda K; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Roe, Denise J; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2009-03-15

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO(3) selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO(3) therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO(3) therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease.

  3. Correlation between the sensitivity of tumors to treatment with CZ48 and local concentrations of the active metabolite CPT within the tumors

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XING; CAO, ZHISONG; MENDOZA, JOHN; VARDEMAN, DANA; GIOVANELLA, BEPPINO

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline camptothecin-20-O-propionate hydrate (CZ48) is an esterification product from the reaction of natural camptothecin with propionic anhydride. CZ48 has been tested against 29 human tumor lines grown in nude mice as xenografts. Of the tested tumor lines, 28 were found to be responsive to CZ48, by regression or significant inhibition. The total response rate was 97%. However, the effective dose required to achieve the positive response varied from 100 to 2000 mg/kg/day depending on the tumor type. Thus, the sensitivity of tumors to CZ48 treatment varied from tumor to tumor. The most sensitive CLO-breast carcinoma achieved regression when treated with 100 mg/kg/day, while PC3-prostate carcinoma required as high as 1000 mg/kg/day to achieve a definitive response. To determine the reason for these differences in sensitivities among the tumors, we treated 9 human xenografts grown in nude mice with 1000 mg/kg/day CZ48 until saturation and measured the local concentrations of the parental CZ48 as well as the corresponding metabolite camptothecin (CPT) in the tumors with the established high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. Results showed that the sensitivities of these tumors to CZ48 treatment were not affected by local concentrations of the active metabolite CPT in the tumors, but instead by the types of tumors. PMID:24648919

  4. Targeting Aurora Kinase A enhances radiation sensitivity of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sujatha; Alimova, Irina; Tello, Tiffany; Harris, Peter S; Knipstein, Jeffrey A; Donson, Andrew M; Foreman, Nicholas K; Liu, Arthur K; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are rare, highly malignant, embryonal CNS tumors with a poor prognosis. Therapy relies on highly toxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To improve outcomes and decrease morbidity, more targeted therapy is required. Gene expression analysis revealed elevated expression of multiple kinases in ATRT tissues. Aurora Kinase A was one of the candidate kinases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of Aurora Kinase A inhibition in ATRT cell lines. Our analysis revealed that inhibition of Aurora Kinase A induces cell death in ATRT cells and the small molecule inhibitor MLN 8237 sensitizes these cells to radiation. Furthermore, inhibition of Aurora Kinase A resulted in decreased activity of pro-proliferative signaling pathways. These data indicate that inhibition of Aurora Kinase A is a promising small molecule target for ATRT therapy.

  5. PPARγ ligands inhibit primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Singer, Samuel; Shen, Lucy Q.; Butterfield, Catherine E.; Freedman, Deborah A.; Chen, Emy J.; Moses, Marsha A.; Kilroy, Susan; Duensing, Stefan; Fletcher, Christopher; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Folkman, Judah; Kaipainen, Arja

    2002-01-01

    Several drugs approved for a variety of indications have been shown to exhibit antiangiogenic effects. Our study focuses on the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone, a compound widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that PPARγ is highly expressed in tumor endothelium and is activated by rosiglitazone in cultured endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that rosiglitazone suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis by both direct and indirect antiangiogenic effects. Rosiglitazone inhibits bovine capillary endothelial cell but not tumor cell proliferation at low doses in vitro and decreases VEGF production by tumor cells. In our in vivo studies, rosiglitazone suppresses angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane, in the avascular cornea, and in a variety of primary tumors. These results suggest that PPARγ ligands may be useful in treating angiogenic diseases such as cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:12370270

  6. Inhibition of metastasis by inhibition of tumor-derived CCL5.

    PubMed

    Stormes, Kerry A; Lemken, Charles A; Lepre, James V; Marinucci, Michelle N; Kurt, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether tumor-derived CCL5 contributes to the metastatic potential of murine mammary carcinoma, we used the 4T1 tumor which spontaneously metastasizes and constitutively produces CCL5. Mice bearing 4T1 that expressed less CCL5 had significantly fewer lung and liver metastasis. The decrease in tumor-derived CCL5 also correlated with decreased cathepsin L, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-10 and MMP-17 gene expression. Thus, inhibition of tumor-derived CCL5 can impact the metastatic capability of 4T1 and may do so by modulating protease expression.

  7. Tumor-Penetrating iRGD Peptide Inhibits Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Braun, Gary B.; de Mendoza, Tatiana Hurtado; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; French, Randall P.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific tissue-penetrating peptides deliver drugs into extravascular tumor tissue by increasing tumor vascular permeability through interaction with neuropilin (NRP). Here we report that a prototypic tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD (amino acid sequence: CRGDKGPDC) potently inhibits spontaneous metastasis in mice. The anti-metastatic effect was mediated by the NRP-binding RXXK peptide motif (CendR motif), and not by the integrin-binding RGD motif. iRGD inhibited migration of tumor cells and caused chemorepulsion in vitro in a CendR- and NRP-1-dependent manner. The peptide induced dramatic collapse of cellular processes and partial cell detachment, resulting in the repellent activity. These effects were prominently displayed when the cells were seeded on fibronectin, suggesting a role of CendR in functional regulation of integrins. The anti-metastatic activity of iRGD may provide a significant additional benefit when this peptide is used for drug delivery to tumors. PMID:25392370

  8. Plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xiao, J; Wu, X; Li, W; Yang, Z; Xie, J; Xu, L; Cai, X; Lin, Z; Guo, W; Luo, J; Liu, M

    2012-09-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and serious consequence of breast cancer. Bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment drives a so-called 'vicious cycle' that promotes tumor cell malignancy and stimulates osteolysis. Targeting these interactions and pathways in the tumor-bone microenvironment has been an encouraging strategy for bone metastasis therapy. In the present study, we examined the effects of plumbagin on breast cancer bone metastasis. Our data indicated that plumbagin inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, suppressed the expression of osteoclast-activating factors, altered the cancer cell induced RANKL/OPG ratio in osteoblasts, and blocked both cancer cell- and RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. In mouse model of bone metastasis, we further demonstrated that plumbagin significantly repressed breast cancer cell metastasis and osteolysis, inhibited cancer cell induced-osteoclastogenesis and the secretion of osteoclast-activating factors in vivo. At the molecular level, we found that plumbagin abrogated RANKL-induced NF-κB and MAPK pathways by blocking RANK association with TRAF6 in osteoclastogenesis, and by inhibiting the expression of osteoclast-activating factors through the suppression of NF-κB activity in breast cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment and that plumbagin may serve as a novel agent in the treatment of tumor bone metastasis.

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of KIT activates MET signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noah A.; Zeng, Shan; Seifert, Adrian M.; Kim, Teresa S.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Beckman, Michael J.; Santamaria-Barria, Juan A.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common adult sarcomas and the oncogenic driver is usually a KIT or PDGFRA mutation. While GIST are often initially sensitive to imatinib or other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, resistance generally develops necessitating backup strategies for therapy. In this study, we determined that a subset of human GIST specimens that acquired imatinib resistance acquired expression of activated forms of the MET oncogene. MET activation also developed after imatinib therapy in a mouse model of GIST (KitV558del/+ mice), where it was associated with increased tumor hypoxia. MET activation also occurred in imatinib-sensitive human GIST cell lines after imatinib treatment in vitro. MET inhibition by crizotinib or RNA interference was cytotoxic to an imatinib-resistant human GIST cell population. Moreover, combining crizotinib and imatinib was more effective than imatinib alone in imatinib-sensitive GIST models. Lastly, cabozantinib, a dual MET and KIT small molecule inhibitor, was markedly more effective than imatinib in multiple preclinical models of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. Collectively, our findings showed that activation of compensatory MET signaling by KIT inhibition may contribute to tumor resistance. Furthermore, our work offered a preclinical proof of concept for MET inhibition by cabozantinib as an effective strategy for GIST treatment. PMID:25836719

  10. Autophagy inhibition overcomes multiple mechanisms of resistance to BRAF inhibition in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy Levy, Jean M; Zahedi, Shadi; Griesinger, Andrea M; Morin, Andrew; Davies, Kurtis D; Aisner, Dara L; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, BK; Fitzwalter, Brent E; Goodall, Megan L; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Amani, Vladimir; Donson, Andrew M; Birks, Diane K; Mirsky, David M; Hankinson, Todd C; Handler, Michael H; Green, Adam L; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Foreman, Nicholas K; Thorburn, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are effective cancer therapies, but tumors frequently develop resistance. Current strategies to circumvent resistance target the same or parallel pathways. We report here that targeting a completely different process, autophagy, can overcome multiple BRAF inhibitor resistance mechanisms in brain tumors. BRAFV600Emutations occur in many pediatric brain tumors. We previously reported that these tumors are autophagy-dependent and a patient was successfully treated with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine after failure of the BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib, suggesting autophagy inhibition overcame the kinase inhibitor resistance. We tested this hypothesis in vemurafenib-resistant brain tumors. Genetic and pharmacological autophagy inhibition overcame molecularly distinct resistance mechanisms, inhibited tumor cell growth, and increased cell death. Patients with resistance had favorable clinical responses when chloroquine was added to vemurafenib. This provides a fundamentally different strategy to circumvent multiple mechanisms of kinase inhibitor resistance that could be rapidly tested in clinical trials in patients with BRAFV600E brain tumors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19671.001 PMID:28094001

  11. Inhibiting the HSP90 chaperone destabilizes macrophage migration inhibitory factor and thereby inhibits breast tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Ramona; Marchenko, Natalia D.; Holembowski, Lena; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Pesic, Marina; Zender, Lars; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) often becomes stabilized in human cancer cells. MIF can promote tumor cell survival, and elevated MIF protein correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism facilitating MIF stabilization in tumors is not understood. We show that the tumor-activated HSP90 chaperone complex protects MIF from degradation. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 activity, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of HSP90 or HDAC6, destabilizes MIF in a variety of human cancer cells. The HSP90-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP mediates the ensuing proteasome-dependent MIF degradation. Cancer cells contain constitutive endogenous MIF–HSP90 complexes. siRNA-mediated MIF knockdown inhibits proliferation and triggers apoptosis of cultured human cancer cells, whereas HSP90 inhibitor-induced apoptosis is overridden by ectopic MIF expression. In the ErbB2 transgenic model of human HER2-positive breast cancer, genetic ablation of MIF delays tumor progression and prolongs overall survival of mice. Systemic treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17AAG reduces MIF expression and blocks growth of MIF-expressing, but not MIF-deficient, tumors. Together, these findings identify MIF as a novel HSP90 client and suggest that HSP90 inhibitors inhibit ErbB2-driven breast tumor growth at least in part by destabilizing MIF. PMID:22271573

  12. ET-04MEBENDAZOLE IS EFFICACIOUS IN DIVERSE MEDULLOBLASTOMA TUMOR MODELS AND INHIBITS TUMOR ANGIOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Renyuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rudin, Charles; Bunz, Fred; Riggins, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the leading cause of cancer death in children. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens are the current standard for treatment. While effective in most patients, those have long-term neurological sequelae in survivors, and a significant fraction of patients still succumb to the disease. In this study, we found that mebendazole (MBZ), an FDA-approved antiparasitic, demonstrated significant anti-tumor efficacy in etiologically distinct medulloblastoma mouse models. MBZ significantly improved the survival of mice with orthotopic xenograft tumors derived from the SHH group and group 3 medulloblastomas and was also highly efficacious against a PTCH1-mutant medulloblastoma with acquired resistance to the SMO inhibitor vismodgib. Analysis of the vasculature in rodent tumors revealed that MBZ selectively inhibited tumor angiogenesis but not the normal brain vasculature, and inhibited the kinase activity of VEGFR2 in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that MBZ could be a highly promising therapeutic for medulloblastoma with anti- angiogenesis activity.

  13. BPIC: A novel anti-tumor lead capable of inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation has a critical role in the tumor progression, free radical damage can worse the status of patients in cancer condition. The anti-cancer agents capable of inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals attract a lot of our interest. Aimed at the discovery of such anti-tumor agent, a novel intercalator, benzyl 1-[4-hydroxy-3-(methoxycarbonyl)-phenyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carboxylate (BPIC) was presented. The docking investigation of BPIC and doxorubicin towards the DNA (PDB ID: 1NAB) gave equal score and similar feature. The anti-proliferation assay of 8 cancer cells identified S180 cells had equal sensitivity to BPIC and doxorubicin. The anti-tumor assay defined the efficacy of BPIC been 2 folds higher than that of doxorubicin. At 1μmol/kg of dose BPIC effectively inhibited xylene-induced ear edema and decreased the plasma TNF-α and IL-8 of the mice. BPIC scavenged ∙OH, ∙O2(-) and NO free radicals in a concentration dependent manner and NO free radicals had the highest sensitivity. BPIC could be a novel anti-tumor lead capable of simultaneously inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals.

  14. RSUME inhibits VHL and regulates its tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Gerez, J; Tedesco, L; Bonfiglio, J J; Fuertes, M; Barontini, M; Silberstein, S; Wu, Y; Renner, U; Páez-Pereda, M; Holsboer, F; Stalla, G K; Arzt, E

    2015-09-10

    Somatic mutations or loss of von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL) happen in the majority of VHL disease tumors, which present a constitutively active Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), essential for tumor growth. Recently described mechanisms for pVHL modulation shed light on the open question of the HIF/pVHL pathway regulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the molecular mechanism by which RSUME stabilizes HIFs, by studying RSUME effect on pVHL function and to determine the role of RSUME on pVHL-related tumor progression. We determined that RSUME sumoylates and physically interacts with pVHL and negatively regulates the assembly of the complex between pVHL, Elongins and Cullins (ECV), inhibiting HIF-1 and 2α ubiquitination and degradation. We found that RSUME is expressed in human VHL tumors (renal clear-cell carcinoma (RCC), pheochromocytoma and hemangioblastoma) and by overexpressing or silencing RSUME in a pVHL-HIF-oxygen-dependent degradation stability reporter assay, we determined that RSUME is necessary for the loss of function of type 2 pVHL mutants. The functional RSUME/pVHL interaction in VHL-related tumor progression was further confirmed using a xenograft assay in nude mice. RCC clones, in which RSUME was knocked down and express either pVHL wt or type 2 mutation, have an impaired tumor growth, as well as HIF-2α, vascular endothelial growth factor A and tumor vascularization diminution. This work shows a novel mechanism for VHL tumor progression and presents a new mechanism and factor for targeting tumor-related pathologies with pVHL/HIF altered function.

  15. ME-10TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT INFILTRATING MYELOID DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS INHIBIT ANTI-TUMOR T CELL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Ayala, Mariela; Li, Youping; Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent a population of immature myeloid cells at various stages of differentiation that inhibit anti-tumor T cell-mediated responses. We demonstrate the accumulation of MDSCs in GL26 induced glioma and B16 melanoma bearing mice. Absolute numbers of Ly-6G+ (Gr-1high) MDSCs showed a 200 fold increase within the tumor microenvironment (TME) 28 days post-tumor implantation. The numbers of Ly-6C+ (Gr-1low) MDSCs also showed a similar trend within the TME. While this massive influx of MDSCs was noted within intracranial tumors, MDSC levels did not increase in the dLNs, spleen or bone marrow (BM) of intracranial tumor bearing mice. MDSCs numbers were significantly elevated in the blood of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice at 28 days. Mice bearing B16 tumors in the flank showed a ∼5 fold increased influx of Ly-6G+ MDSCs while the Ly6C+ MDSCs increased marginally by 1.1 fold within the tumor mass. Levels of circulating MDSCs also increased by ∼10 fold, while the levels of splenic MDSCs did not change. While both Ly-6G+ and Ly6C+ MDSCs isolated from the brain TME of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice inhibited antigen-specific T cell proliferation, Ly6C+ MDSC were found to be more efficient. Ly6G+ or Ly6C+ MDSCs from the bone marrow of intracranial tumor bearing mice failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Splenic and bone marrow MDSCs from naïve mice also did not inhibit antigen-specific T cell proliferation suggesting that TME derived factors may activate MDSCs to exert their immune-suppressive properties. Microarray analysis of glioma cell lines showed elevated levels of CXCL1 mRNA and splenic MDSCs from GL26 tumor mice showed upregulation of the CXCR2 mRNA. Preliminary experiments indicate that CXCR2 signaling mediates MDSC chemotaxis. Overall, our data suggests that strategies that inhibit MDSC recruitment to the TME and/or block their activity could enhance the T cell mediated tumor clearance.

  16. Inhibition of autophagy stimulate molecular iodine-induced apoptosis in hormone independent breast tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Preeti; Godbole, Madan; Rao, Geeta; Annarao, Sanjay; Mitra, Kalyan; Roy, Raja; Ingle, Arvind; Agarwal, Gaurav; Tiwari, Swasti

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) causes non-apoptotic cell death in MDA-MB231 breast tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy is activated as a survival mechanism in response to I{sub 2} in MDA-MB231. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to I{sub 2}-induced apoptotic cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy inhibitor potentiates apoptosis and tumor regressive effects of I{sub 2} in mice. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor negative (ER{sup -ve}) and p53 mutant breast tumors are highly aggressive and have fewer treatment options. Previously, we showed that molecular Iodine (I{sub 2}) induces apoptosis in hormone responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and non-apoptotic cell death in ER{sup -ve}-p53 mutant MDA-MB231 cells (Shrivastava, 2006). Here we show that I{sub 2} (3 {mu}M) treatment enhanced the features of autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. Since autophagy is a cell survival response to most anti-cancer therapies, we used both in vitro and in vivo systems to determine whether ER{sup -ve} mammary tumors could be sensitized to I{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. Autophagy inhibition with chloroquine (CQ) and inhibitors for PI3K (3MA, LY294002) and H+/ATPase (baflomycin) resulted in enhanced cell death in I{sub 2} treated MDA-MB231 cells. Further, CQ (20 {mu}M) in combination with I{sub 2}, showed apoptotic features such as increased sub-G1 fraction ({approx}5-fold), expression of cleaved caspase-9 and -3 compared to I{sub 2} treatment alone. Flowcytometry of I{sub 2} and CQ co-treated cells revealed increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability (p < 0.01) and translocation of cathepsin D activity to cytosol relative to I{sub 2} treatment. For in vivo studies ICRC mice were transplanted subcutaneously with MMTV-induced mammary tumors. A significant reduction in tumor volumes, as measured by MRI, was found in I{sub 2} and CQ co-treated mice relative to I{sub 2} or

  17. Colon tumor cell growth inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide and other NSAIDs is associated with PDE5 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Thaiparambil, Jose; Li, Nan; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y.; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    In experimental studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicity resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their clinical use for chemoprevention. Studies suggest that the mechanism may be COX independent, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here we show that the NSAID, sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in colon tumor cell lysates at concentrations that inhibit colon tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. A series of chemically diverse NSAIDs inhibited cGMP hydrolysis at concentrations that correlate with their potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth, while no correlation was observed with COX-2 inhibition. Consistent with its selectivity for inhibiting cGMP hydrolysis compared with cAMP hydrolysis, SS inhibited the cGMP specific PDE5 isozyme and increased cGMP levels in colon tumor cells. Of numerous PDE isozyme specific inhibitors evaluated, only the PDE5 selective inhibitor MY5445 inhibited colon tumor cell growth. The effects of SS and MY5445 on cell growth were associated with inhibition of β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity to suppress the synthesis of cyclin D and survivin, which regulate tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. SS had minimal effects on cGMP PDE activity in normal colonocytes, which displayed reduced sensitivity to SS and did not express PDE5. PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in colon tumor cell lines as well as in colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared to normal colonic mucosa. These results suggest that PDE5 inhibition, cGMP elevation, and inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of certain NSAIDs. PMID:20876730

  18. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  19. Growth inhibition, tumor maturation, and extended survival in experimental brain tumors in rats treated with phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ram, Z; Samid, D; Walbridge, S; Oshiro, E M; Viola, J J; Tao-Cheng, J H; Shack, S; Thibault, A; Myers, C E; Oldfield, E H

    1994-06-01

    Phenylacetate is a naturally occurring plasma component that suppresses the growth of tumor cells and induces differentiation in vitro. To evaluate the in vivo potential and preventive and therapeutic antitumor efficacy of sodium phenylacetate against malignant brain tumors, Fischer 344 rats (n = 50) bearing cerebral 9L gliosarcomas received phenylacetate by continuous s.c. release starting on the day of tumor inoculation (n = 10) using s.c. osmotic minipumps (550 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Rats with established brain tumors (n = 12) received continuous s.c. phenylacetate supplemented with additional daily i.p. dose (300 mg/kg). Control rats (n = 25) were treated in a similar way with saline. Rats were sacrificed during treatment for electron microscopic studies of their tumors, in vivo proliferation assays, and measurement of phenylacetate levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with phenylacetate extended survival when started on the day of tumor inoculation (P < 0.01) or 7 days after inoculation (P < 0.03) without any associated adverse effects. In the latter group, phenylacetate levels in pooled serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples after 7 days of treatment were in the therapeutic range as determined in vitro (2.45 mM in serum and 3.1 mM in cerebrospinal fluid). Electron microscopy of treated tumors demonstrated marked hypertrophy and organization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, indicating cell differentiation, in contrast to the scant and randomly distributed endoplasmic reticulum in tumors from untreated animals. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the rate of tumor proliferation and restoration of anchorage dependency, a marker of phenotypic reversion. Phenylacetate, used at clinically achievable concentrations, prolongs survival of rats with malignant brain tumors through induction of tumor differentiation. Its role in the treatment of brain tumors and other cancers should be explored further.

  20. Hematoporphyrin-derivative photodynamic in-vitro sensitivity testing for brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Michael; Bernwick, Walter; Kostron, Herwig

    1993-03-01

    Brain tumors of various histologies were subjected to an in-vitro photodynamic-sensitivity test. The studies were performed on primary cultures of human glioblastomas, meningiomas, and ependymomas, which were exposed to increasing concentrations of hematoporphyrin derivative and 60 J/cm2 delivered by an argon-dye laser at 632 nm. A growth inhibition of 75% was demonstrated at a concentration of 25 (mu) g and 10 (mu) g HPD/ml medium for two different glioblastomas, respectively. A growth inhibition of 75% was observed in the ependymoma line at 10 and 50 (mu) g HPD/ml with and without light, respectively. The meningioma demonstrated a 75% inhibition already at (mu) g and 75 (mu) g/ml medium with and without light, respectively. These results demonstrate a significant difference in the response of brain tumors to photodynamic treatment (PDT). In vitro-PDT-assay should be taken into account if clinical application of PDT is considered.

  1. Silencing of ATF2 inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells and enhances sensitivity to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Wu, Xingda; Liu, Ning; Li, Xiaoying; Meng, Fanbin; Song, Shaowei

    2017-03-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a multifunctional transcription factor, and is implicated in tumor progress, yet its role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In the present study, the level of ATF2 in pancreatic cancer tissues and the adjacent non-tumorous tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. The roles of ATF2 in the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells were investigated through ATF2 silencing, and the effect of ATF2 shRNA on the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, was explored. The results of our study showed that the ATF2 level in the pancreatic cancer tissues was higher than that in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Silencing of ATF2 was found to inhibit proliferation, arrest cell cycle at G1 phase and induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, ATF2 silencing enhanced gemcitabine-induced growth-inhibition and apoptosis-induction effects in pancreatic cancer cells. In summary, silencing of ATF2 inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells and enhanced the anti-tumor effects of gemcitabine, suggesting that ATF2 plays a pro-survival role in pancreatic cancer. Our results also propose that a high level of ATF2 may serve as a potential biomarker of pancreatic cancer, and that ATF2 may become a potential target for anti-tumor therapy.

  2. Salinomycin inhibits osteosarcoma by targeting its tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing-Lian; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jin-Chun; Liang, Yi; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Zou, Chang-Ye; Xie, Xian-Biao; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Shen, Jing-Nan; Kang, Tiebang; Wang, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. Tumor stem cells (TSCs) are presumed to drive tumor initiation and tumor relapse or metastasis. Hence, the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma likely results from a failure to target the osteosarcoma stem cells. Here, we have utilized three different methods to enrich TSCs in osteosarcoma and further evaluated whether salinomycin could selectively target TSCs in osteosarcoma. Our results indicated that sarcosphere selection, chemotherapy selection and stem cell marker OCT4 or SOX2 over-expression are all effective in the enrichment of TSCs from osteosarcoma cell lines. Further investigation found that salinomycin inhibited osteosarcoma by selectively targeting its stem cells both in vitro and in vivo without severe side effects, and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in this inhibition of salinomycin. Taken together, we have identified that salinomycin is an effective inhibitor of osteosarcoma stem cells, supporting the use of salinomycin for elimination of osteosarcoma stem cells and implying a need for further clinical evaluation.

  3. MerTK inhibition in tumor leukocytes decreases tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca S.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; Wofford, Anne M.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stanford, Jamie; Prieto, Anne L.; Redente, Elizabeth; Sandahl, Melissa; Hunter, Debra M.; Strunk, Karen E.; Graham, Douglas K.; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    MerTK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the TYRO3/AXL/MerTK family, is expressed in myeloid lineage cells in which it acts to suppress proinflammatory cytokines following ingestion of apoptotic material. Using syngeneic mouse models of breast cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer, we found that tumors grew slowly and were poorly metastatic in MerTK–/– mice. Transplantation of MerTK–/– bone marrow, but not wild-type bone marrow, into lethally irradiated MMTV-PyVmT mice (a model of metastatic breast cancer) decreased tumor growth and altered cytokine production by tumor CD11b+ cells. Although MerTK expression was not required for tumor infiltration by leukocytes, MerTK–/– leukocytes exhibited lower tumor cell–induced expression of wound healing cytokines, e.g., IL-10 and growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), and enhanced expression of acute inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-12 and IL-6. Intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers were higher and lymphocyte proliferation was increased in tumor-bearing MerTK–/– mice compared with tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Antibody-mediated CD8+ T lymphocyte depletion restored tumor growth in MerTK–/– mice. These data demonstrate that MerTK signaling in tumor-associated CD11b+ leukocytes promotes tumor growth by dampening acute inflammatory cytokines while inducing wound healing cytokines. These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK in the tumor microenvironment may have clinical benefit, stimulating antitumor immune responses or enhancing immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:23867499

  4. MerTK inhibition in tumor leukocytes decreases tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rebecca S; Jacobsen, Kristen M; Wofford, Anne M; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stanford, Jamie; Prieto, Anne L; Redente, Elizabeth; Sandahl, Melissa; Hunter, Debra M; Strunk, Karen E; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton

    2013-08-01

    MerTK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the TYRO3/AXL/MerTK family, is expressed in myeloid lineage cells in which it acts to suppress proinflammatory cytokines following ingestion of apoptotic material. Using syngeneic mouse models of breast cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer, we found that tumors grew slowly and were poorly metastatic in MerTK-/- mice. Transplantation of MerTK-/- bone marrow, but not wild-type bone marrow, into lethally irradiated MMTV-PyVmT mice (a model of metastatic breast cancer) decreased tumor growth and altered cytokine production by tumor CD11b+ cells. Although MerTK expression was not required for tumor infiltration by leukocytes, MerTK-/- leukocytes exhibited lower tumor cell-induced expression of wound healing cytokines, e.g., IL-10 and growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), and enhanced expression of acute inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-12 and IL-6. Intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers were higher and lymphocyte proliferation was increased in tumor-bearing MerTK-/- mice compared with tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Antibody-mediated CD8+ T lymphocyte depletion restored tumor growth in MerTK-/- mice. These data demonstrate that MerTK signaling in tumor-associated CD11b+ leukocytes promotes tumor growth by dampening acute inflammatory cytokines while inducing wound healing cytokines. These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK in the tumor microenvironment may have clinical benefit, stimulating antitumor immune responses or enhancing immunotherapeutic strategies.

  5. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  6. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-10-13

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  7. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  8. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2015-02-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  9. Tumor suppressor ING4 inhibits estrogen receptor activity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Keenen, Madeline M; Kim, Suwon

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antiestrogen therapy remains a significant problem in breast cancer. Low expression of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) in primary tumors has been correlated with increased rates of recurrence in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients, suggesting a role for ING4 in ER signaling. This study provides evidence that ING4 inhibits ER activity. ING4 overexpression increased the sensitivity of T47D and MCF7 ER+ breast cancer cells to hormone deprivation. ING4 attenuated maximal estrogen-dependent cell growth without affecting the dose–response of estrogen. These results indicated that ING4 functions as a noncompetitive inhibitor of estrogen signaling and may inhibit estrogen-independent ER activity. Supportive of this, treatment with fulvestrant but not tamoxifen rendered T47D cells sensitive to hormone deprivation as did ING4 overexpression. ING4 did not affect nuclear ERα protein expression, but repressed selective ER-target gene transcription. Taken together, these results demonstrated that ING4 inhibited estrogen-independent ER activity, suggesting that ING4-low breast tumors recur faster due to estrogen-independent ER activity that renders tamoxifen less effective. This study puts forth fulvestrant as a proposed therapy choice for patients with ING4-low ER+ breast tumors. PMID:27895513

  10. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics.

  11. AIF inhibits tumor metastasis by protecting PTEN from oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shao-Ming; Guo, Meng; Xiong, Zhong; Yu, Yun; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) exerts dual roles on cell death and survival, but its substrates as a putative oxidoreductase and roles in tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we report that AIF physically interacts with and inhibits the oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor susceptible for oxidation-mediated inactivation. More intriguingly, we also identify PTEN as a mitochondrial protein and the ectopic expression of mitochondrial targeting sequence-carrying PTEN almost completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation in PTEN-deficient cells. AIF knockdown causes oxidation-mediated inactivation of the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN, with ensuing activation of Akt kinase, phosphorylation of the Akt substrate GSK-3β, and activation of β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Through its effect on β-catenin signaling, AIF inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of cancer cells in vitro and in orthotopically implanted xenografts. Accordingly, the expression of AIF is correlated with the survival of human patients with cancers of multiple origins. These results identify PTEN as the substrate of AIF oxidoreductase and reveal a novel function for AIF in controlling tumor metastasis. PMID:26415504

  12. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin.

  13. Inhibition Effect of a Custom Peptide on Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Yu; Forrest, Michael D.; Pan, Yun-Ru; Wu, Wei-Jen; Chen, Hueih-Min

    2014-01-01

    Cecropin B is a natural antimicrobial peptide and CB1a is a custom, engineered modification of it. In vitro, CB1a can kill lung cancer cells at concentrations that do not kill normal lung cells. Furthermore, in vitro, CB1a can disrupt cancer cells from adhering together to form tumor-like spheroids. Mice were xenografted with human lung cancer cells; CB1a could significantly inhibit the growth of tumors in this in vivo model. Docetaxel is a drug in present clinical use against lung cancers; it can have serious side effects because its toxicity is not sufficiently limited to cancer cells. In our studies in mice: CB1a is more toxic to cancer cells than docetaxel, but dramatically less toxic to healthy cells. PMID:25310698

  14. Inhibition of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V enhances sensitivity of radiotherapy in human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Huiyi; Chen, Wenxia; Liu, Qiulian; Wei, Ting; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • We first evaluated the effect of GnT-V on radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer. • Higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the PCa advanced tumors. • Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis. • Knockdown of GnT-V could decrease radiation-induced G2/M arrest and NF-κB activity. • Inhibition of GnT-V may be involved in increasing radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer (PCa) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, the GnT-V expression was studied in 84 cases of PCa tissues, in which higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the advanced tumors. Secondly, the GnT-V stably suppressed cell lines PCa/1079 (Lncap/1079 and PC3/1079) were constructed from PCa cell lines (Lncap and PC3) in vitro. Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis, which resulted in enhanced radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. The underlying mechanism may be relevant to the increasing ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, the blocking transcription of NF-κB and the reduction of cell cycle G2-M arrest. Finally, in in vivo study, compared with control groups, the irradiated PCa xenograft nude mice of PCa/1079 indicated to reduce tumor-growth rate and enhance survival time. Summary, our studies showed that inhibition of GnT-V probably improved PCa cells’ radiation sensitivity.

  15. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Keeton, Adam B; Gary, Bernard D; Sklar, Larry A; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A

    2016-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxorubicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxorubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxorubicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intracellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress.

  16. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Gary, Bernard D.; Sklar, Larry A.; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transpo rters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the non­steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemother­apeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxoru­bicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxor­ubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxoru­bicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intra­cellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress. PMID:28276667

  17. Noscapine sensitizes chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin through inhibition of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenjing; Huang, Lei; Ao, Qilin; Zhang, Qinghua; Tian, Xun; Fang, Yong; Lu, Yunping

    2011-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is closely related with chemoresistance of solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of noscapine to inhibit HIF-1α and sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin (DDP) under hypoxic conditions. Herein, we report that noscapine sensitized cobalt-induced chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells to DDP-induced apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. Noscapine also promoted proteasome-mediated degradation of cobalt-stabilized HIF-1α protein, with subsequent inhibition of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. These data establish noscapine as a small molecule inhibitor of HIF-1α and provide an evidence for its combination with DDP in combating ovarian cancer chemoresistance.

  18. Inhibition of tumor energy pathways for targeted esophagus cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shafaee, Abbas; Dastyar, Davood Zarei; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Hatamian, Milad

    2015-10-01

    Interest in targeting cancer metabolism has been renewed in recent years with the discovery that many cancer related pathways have a profound effect on metabolism and that many tumors become dependent on specific metabolic processes. Accelerated glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis and loss of regulation between glycolytic metabolism and respiration, are the major metabolic changes found in malignant cells. The non-metabolizable glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose inhibits glucose synthesis and adenosine triphosphate production. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of cellular energy and AMPK is a potential target for cancer prevention and/or treatment. Metformin is an activator of AMPK which inhibits protein synthesis and gluconeogenesis during cellular stress. This article reviews the status of clinical and laboratory researches exploring targeted therapies via metabolic pathways for treatment of esophageal cancer.

  19. Antitumor effects of hyaluronan inhibition in desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Laura; Buie, Justin D; Rizvi, Hira; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Cho, Nancy L

    2015-02-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare, mesenchymal tumors that exhibit features of an abundant wound healing process. Previously, we showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are constituents of DTs and may contribute to desmoid tumorigenesis via activities associated with wound healing. Hyaluronan (HA) is a long-charged chain of repeating glucuronate and N-acetylglucosamine disaccharides that is synthesized by HA synthases (HAS) and degraded by hyaluronidases (HYAL). HA is secreted into the extracellular matrix by injured stroma and is important for normal tissue repair and neoplastic progression. Here, we investigated the presence of HA in DTs and the antitumor effects of the HA inhibitor, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), on DT-derived mesenchymal cells. By immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found abundant expression of HA in 29/30 DTs as well as >5-fold increased HA levels in DT-derived cell lines relative to controls. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated high expression of HAS2 in DTs, and quantitative PCR analysis showed increased HAS2 upregulation in frozen DTs and DT-derived cells. 4-MU treatment of DT-derived cells significantly decreased proliferation as well as HA and HAS2 levels. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry showed that MSCs in DTs coexpressed HA, HAS2, HYAL2, as well as the major HA receptor CD44 and HA coreceptor TLR4. Taken together, our results suggest that paracrine regulation of HA signaling in DTs may contribute to MSC recruitment and tumor proliferation. Future studies investigating the role of HA in tumor-stroma crosstalk and inhibition of HA-MSC interactions as a novel therapeutic target in DTs and other solid tumors are warranted.

  20. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  1. IGF-1R inhibition in mammary epithelia promotes canonical Wnt signaling and Wnt1-driven tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Lauren M.; Albanito, Lidia; Shin, Marcus E.; Goyeneche, Corey L.; Shushanov, Sain; Gallagher, Emily J.; LeRoith, Derek; Lazzarino, Deborah A.; Wood, Teresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are an aggressive disease subtype which unlike other subtypes lack an effective targeted therapy. Inhibitors of the insullin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have been considered for use in treating TNBC. Here we provide genetic evidence that IGF-1R inhibition promotes development of Wnt1-mediated murine mammary tumors that offer a model of TNBC. We found that in a double transgenic mouse model carrying activated Wnt-1 and mutant IGF-1R, a reduction in IGF-1R signaling reduced tumor latency and promoted more aggressive phenotypes. These tumors displayed a squamal cell phenotype with increased expression of keratins 5/6 and β-catenin. Notably, cell lineage analyses revealed an increase in basal (CD29hi/CD24+) and luminal (CD24+/CD61+/CD29lo) progenitor cell populations, along with increased Nanog expression and decreased Elf5 expression. In these doubly transgenic mice, lung metastases developed with characteristics of the primary tumors, unlike MMTV-Wnt1 mice. Mechanistic investigations showed that pharmacological inhibition of the IGF-1R in vitro was sufficient to increase the tumorsphere-forming efficiency of MMTV-Wnt1 tumor cells. Tumors from doubly transgenic mice also exhibited an increase in the expression ratio of the IGF-II-sensitive, A isoform of the insulin receptor vs the IR-B isoform, which in vitro resulted in enhanced expression of β-catenin. Overall, our results revealed that in Wnt-driven tumors an attenuation of IGF-1R signaling accelerates tumorigenesis and promotes more aggressive phenotypes, with potential implications for understanding TNBC pathobiology and treatment. PMID:25092896

  2. Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our

  3. [A novel HIF-1 inhibitor--manassantin A derivative LXY6099 inhibits tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Lai, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Niu, Fei; Lang, Li-Wei; Xie, Ping; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor on hypoxia responses in mammalian tissues. HIF-1 plays as a positive factor in solid tumor and leads to hypoxia-driven responses that enhance its downstream gene expression for tumor growth and survival. LXY6099 was obtained by the structural modification and optimization of manassantin A (MA) as a high potent HIF-1 inhibitor. Antitumor activity of LXY6099 was observed in this study. LXY6099 with an IC50 value of 2.46 x 10(-10) mol x L(-1) showed more sensitive inhibition activity to HIF-1 than that of MA detected by reporter gene assay (> 100 folds). It showed strong inhibition on the growth of human solid tumor cell lines. Furthermore, LXY6099 exhibited significant antitumor activity against established human tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice with treatment of MX-1 breast cancer. Thus, LXY6099 as a novel HIF-1 inhibitor could be further developed into anti-cancer agents.

  4. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  5. Dependence On Glycolysis Sensitizes BRAF-mutated Melanomas For Increased Response To Targeted BRAF Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hardeman, Keisha N.; Peng, Chengwei; Paudel, Bishal B.; Meyer, Christian T.; Luong, Thong; Tyson, Darren R.; Young, Jamey D.; Quaranta, Vito; Fessel, Joshua P.

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulated metabolism can broadly affect therapy resistance by influencing compensatory signaling and expanding proliferation. Given many BRAF-mutated melanoma patients experience disease progression with targeted BRAF inhibitors, we hypothesized therapeutic response is related to tumor metabolic phenotype, and that altering tumor metabolism could change therapeutic outcome. We demonstrated the proliferative kinetics of BRAF-mutated melanoma cells treated with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 fall along a spectrum of sensitivity, providing a model system to study the interplay of metabolism and drug sensitivity. We discovered an inverse relationship between glucose availability and sensitivity to BRAF inhibition through characterization of metabolic phenotypes using nearly a dozen metabolic parameters in Principle Component Analysis. Subsequently, we generated rho0 variants that lacked functional mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolytic metabolism. The rho0 cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to PLX4720 compared to the respiration-competent parental lines. Finally, we utilized the FDA-approved antiretroviral drug zalcitabine to suppress mitochondrial respiration and to force glycolysis in our cell line panel, resulting in increased PLX4720 sensitivity via shifts in EC50 and Hill slope metrics. Our data suggest that forcing tumor glycolysis in melanoma using zalcitabine or other similar approaches may be an adjunct to increase the efficacy of targeted BRAF therapy. PMID:28205616

  6. Aloe emodin inhibits the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Harhaji, Ljubica; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Popadic, Dusan; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-07-30

    We demonstrate the capacity of an herbal anthraquinone aloe emodin to reduce the cytotoxicity of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) towards L929 mouse fibrosarcoma and U251 human glioma cell lines. Aloe emodin inhibited both TNF-induced cell necrosis and apoptosis, but it did not reduce cell death induced by UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide. Aloe emodin inhibited both basal and TNF-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and a selective blockade of ERK activation mimicked the cytoprotective action of the drug. On the other hand, aloe emodin did not affect TNF-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or generation of reactive oxygen species. The combination of aloe emodin and TNF caused an intracellular appearance of acidified autophagic vesicles, and the inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine efficiently blocked the cytoprotective action of aloe emodin. These data indicate that aloe emodin could prevent TNF-triggered cell death through mechanisms involving induction of autophagy and blockade of ERK activation.

  7. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis sensitizes lung adenocarcinoma to chemotherapeutic drugs by inhibiting mitochondrial DNA repair and suppressing cellular bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Bartosz; Marcatti, Michela; Zatarain, John R.; Druzhyna, Nadiya; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Nagy, Péter; Hellmich, Mark R.; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic manipulation of the gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently been proposed as a novel targeted anticancer approach. Here we show that human lung adenocarcinoma tissue expresses high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) producing enzymes, namely, cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), in comparison to adjacent lung tissue. In cultured lung adenocarcinoma but not in normal lung epithelial cells elevated H2S stimulates mitochondrial DNA repair through sulfhydration of EXOG, which, in turn, promotes mitochondrial DNA repair complex assembly, thereby enhancing mitochondrial DNA repair capacity. In addition, inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes suppresses critical bioenergetics parameters in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Together, inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes sensitize lung adenocarcinoma cells to chemotherapeutic agents via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as shown in in vitro and in vivo models, suggesting a novel mechanism to overcome tumor chemoresistance. PMID:27808278

  8. Salvinorin A Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity Induced by Ovalbumin Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonietta; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Bilancia, Rossella; Riemma, Maria A; Pagano, Ester; Cicala, Carla; Ialenti, Armando; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Izzo, Angelo A; Capasso, Raffaele; Roviezzo, Fiorentina

    2016-01-01

    Salvinorin A, a neoclerodane diterpene isolated from Salvia divinorum, exerts a number of pharmacological actions which are not solely limited to the central nervous system. Recently it has been demonstrated that Salvinorin A inhibits acute inflammatory response affecting leukotriene (LT) production. Since LTs are potent lipid mediators implicated in allergic diseases, we evaluated the effect of Salvinorin A on allergic inflammation and on airways following sensitization in the mouse. Mice were sensitized with s.c. injection of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 1 and 8. Sensitized mice received on days 9 and 12 on the shaved dorsal surface air administration to induce the development of the air-pouches. On day 15 animals were challenged by injection of OVA into the air-pouch. Salvinorin A, administered (10 mg/kg) before each allergen exposure, significantly reduced OVA-induced LT increase in the air pouch. This effect was coupled to a reduction in cell recruitment and Th2 cytokine production. In another set of experiments, mice were sensitized with OVA and both bronchial reactivity and pulmonary inflammation were assessed. Salvinorin A abrogated bronchial hyperreactivity and interleukin (IL)-13 production, without effect on pulmonary inflammation. Indeed cell infiltration and peribronchial edema were still present following diterpenoid treatment. Similarly, pulmonary IL-4 and plasmatic IgE levels were not modulated. Conversely, Salvinorin A significantly reduced LTC4 production in the lung of sensitized mice. Finally mast cell activity was evaluated by means of toluidine blue staining. Data obtained evidenced that Salvinorin A significantly inhibited mast cell degranulation in the lung. Our study demonstrates that Salvinorin A inhibits airway hyperreactivity induced by sensitization by inhibition of LT production and mast cell degranulation. In conclusion Salvinorin A could represent a promising candidate for drug development in allergic diseases such as asthma.

  9. Salvinorin A Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity Induced by Ovalbumin Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Antonietta; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Bilancia, Rossella; Riemma, Maria A.; Pagano, Ester; Cicala, Carla; Ialenti, Armando; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Izzo, Angelo A.; Capasso, Raffaele; Roviezzo, Fiorentina

    2017-01-01

    Salvinorin A, a neoclerodane diterpene isolated from Salvia divinorum, exerts a number of pharmacological actions which are not solely limited to the central nervous system. Recently it has been demonstrated that Salvinorin A inhibits acute inflammatory response affecting leukotriene (LT) production. Since LTs are potent lipid mediators implicated in allergic diseases, we evaluated the effect of Salvinorin A on allergic inflammation and on airways following sensitization in the mouse. Mice were sensitized with s.c. injection of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 1 and 8. Sensitized mice received on days 9 and 12 on the shaved dorsal surface air administration to induce the development of the air-pouches. On day 15 animals were challenged by injection of OVA into the air-pouch. Salvinorin A, administered (10 mg/kg) before each allergen exposure, significantly reduced OVA-induced LT increase in the air pouch. This effect was coupled to a reduction in cell recruitment and Th2 cytokine production. In another set of experiments, mice were sensitized with OVA and both bronchial reactivity and pulmonary inflammation were assessed. Salvinorin A abrogated bronchial hyperreactivity and interleukin (IL)-13 production, without effect on pulmonary inflammation. Indeed cell infiltration and peribronchial edema were still present following diterpenoid treatment. Similarly, pulmonary IL-4 and plasmatic IgE levels were not modulated. Conversely, Salvinorin A significantly reduced LTC4 production in the lung of sensitized mice. Finally mast cell activity was evaluated by means of toluidine blue staining. Data obtained evidenced that Salvinorin A significantly inhibited mast cell degranulation in the lung. Our study demonstrates that Salvinorin A inhibits airway hyperreactivity induced by sensitization by inhibition of LT production and mast cell degranulation. In conclusion Salvinorin A could represent a promising candidate for drug development in allergic diseases such as asthma. PMID

  10. Tumor Expression of CD200 Inhibits IL-10 Production by Tumor-Associated Myeloid Cells and Prevents Tumor Immune Evasion of CTL Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Liu, Jin-Qing; Talebian, Fatemeh; El-Omrani, Hani Y.; Khattabi, Mazin; Yu, Li; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2010-01-01

    CD200 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that functions through interaction with the CD200 receptor (CD200R) on myeloid lineage cells to regulate myeloid cell functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in multiple types of human cancer, however the impact of tumor expression of CD200 on tumor immunity remains poorly understood. To evaluate this issue, we generated CD200-positive mouse plasmacytoma J558 and mastocytoma P815 cells. We found that established CD200-positive tumors were often completely rejected by adoptively transferred CTL without tumor recurrence; in contrast, CD200-negative tumors were initially rejected by adoptively transferred CTL but the majority of tumors recurred. Tumor expression of CD200 significantly inhibited suppressive activity and IL-10 production by tumor-associated myeloid cells (TAMC), and as a result, more CTL accumulated in the tumor and exhibited a greater capacity to produce IFN-γ in CD200-positive tumors than in CD200-negative tumors. Neutralization of IL-10 significantly inhibited the suppressor activity of TAMC, and IL-10-deficiency allowed TAMC to kill cancer cells and their antigenic variants, which prevented tumor recurrence during CTL therapy. Thus, tumor expression of CD200 prevents tumor recurrence via inhibiting IL-10 production by TAMC. PMID:20662098

  11. Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator, sensitizes estrogen receptor negative breast tumors to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donghai; Huang, Yuan; Han, Ning; Xu, Mingjie; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Shu; Fan, Weimin

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance frequently results in poor prognosis and high 5-year recurrence rate in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer patients. Herein, we examined the reversal effects of fulvestrant on multidrug resistance (MDR) in ER- breast cancer cells. Co-administration of fulvestrant significantly sensitized ER- MDR tumors to paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses indicated that fulvestrant did not affect P-gp expression, but could inhibit P-gp function and subsequently reverse P-gp mediated drug resistance in ER- breast cancer cells. These results showed that combination of fulvestrant and chemotherapeutic agents might provide an effective treatment for ER- MDR breast cancers.

  12. The role of DNA polymerase β in determining sensitivity to ionizing radiation in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vens, Conchita; Dahmen-Mooren, Els; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; Blyweert, Wim; Graversen, Lise; Bartelink, Harry; Begg, Adrian C.

    2002-01-01

    Lethal lesions after ionizing radiation are thought to be mainly unrepaired or misrepaired DNA double-strand breaks, ultimately leading to lethal chromosome aberrations. However, studies with radioprotectors and repair inhibitors indicate that single-strand breaks, damaged nucleotides or abasic sites can also influence cell survival. This paper reports on studies to further define the role of base damage and base excision repair on the radiosensitivity of human cells. We retrovirally transduced human tumor cells with a dominant negative form of DNA polymerase β, comprising the 14 kDa DNA-binding domain of DNA polymerase β but lacking polymerase function. Radiosensitization of two human carcinoma cell lines, A549 and SQD9, was observed, achieving dose enhancement factors of 1.5–1.7. Sensitization was dependent on expression level of the dominant negative and was seen in both single cell clones and in unselected virally transduced populations. Sensitization was not due to changes in cell cycle distribution. Little or no sensitization was seen in G1-enriched populations, indicating cell cycle specificity for the observed sensitization. These results contrast with the lack of effect seen in DNA polymerase β knockout cells, suggesting that polDN also inhibits the long patch, DNA polymerase β-independent repair pathway. These data demonstrate an important role for BER in determining sensitivity to ionizing radiation and might help identify targets for radiosensitizing tumor cells. PMID:12087186

  13. Relationship between laminin binding capacity and laminin expression on tumor cells sensitive or resistant to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Laybourn, K.A.; Varani, J.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Hiserodt, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Previous studies have identified the presence of laminin binding sites on murine NK and NC sensitive tumor cells by /sup 125/I-laminin binding and laminin induced cell-cell aggregation. The finding that the addition of exogenous laminin inhibits NK/NC binding to sensitive tumor cells suggests laminin binding sites may serve as target antigens for NK cells. The present study extends earlier reports by analyzing a large panel of tumor cells for laminin binding capacity, laminin expression and sensitivity to NK/NC killing. The data indicate that all tumor cells which bind to NK/NC cells (8 lines tested) express laminin binding sites. All of these tumor cells were capable of competing for NK lysis of YAC-1 cells in cold target competition assays, and all bound enriched NK cells in direct single cell binding assays. In contrast, tumor cells expressing high levels of surface laminin (B16 melanomas, C57B1/6 fibrosarcomas, and RAS transfected 3T3 fibroblasts) but low levels of laminin binding capacity did not bind NK/NC cells and were resistant to lysis. These data support the hypothesis that expression of laminin/laminin binding sites may contribute to tumor cell sensitivity to NK/NC binding and/or killing.

  14. PTEN Regulates Glutamine Flux to Pyrimidine Synthesis and Sensitivity to Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Deepti; Stratikopoulos, Elias; Ozturk, Sait; Steinbach, Nicole; Pegno, Sarah; Schoenfeld, Sarah; Yong, Raymund; Murty, Vundavalli V; Asara, John M; Cantley, Lewis C; Parsons, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic changes induced by oncogenic drivers of cancer contribute to tumor growth and are attractive targets for cancer treatment. Here, we found that increased growth of PTEN-mutant cells was dependent on glutamine flux through the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway, which created sensitivity to the inhibition of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme for pyrimidine ring synthesis. S-phase PTEN-mutant cells showed increased numbers of replication forks, and inhibitors of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase led to chromosome breaks and cell death due to inadequate ATR activation and DNA damage at replication forks. Our findings indicate that enhanced glutamine flux generates vulnerability to dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibition, which then causes synthetic lethality in PTEN-deficient cells due to inherent defects in ATR activation. Inhibition of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase could thus be a promising therapy for patients with PTEN-mutant cancers.Significance: We have found a prospective targeted therapy for PTEN-deficient tumors, with efficacy in vitro and in vivo in tumors derived from different tissues. This is based upon the changes in glutamine metabolism, DNA replication, and DNA damage response which are consequences of inactivation of PTENCancer Discov; 7(4); 380-90. ©2017 AACR.See related article by Brown et al., p. 391This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 339.

  15. A Novel IL6 Antibody Sensitizes Multiple Tumor Types to Chemotherapy Including Trastuzumab-Resistant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Haihong; Davis, April; Ouzounova, Maria; Carrasco, Rosa A; Chen, Cui; Breen, Shannon; Chang, Yong S; Huang, Jiaqi; Liu, Zheng; Yao, Yihong; Hurt, Elaine; Moisan, Jacques; Fung, Michael; Tice, David A; Clouthier, Shawn G; Xiao, Zhan; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan; Hollingsworth, Robert E

    2016-01-15

    Elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL6 are associated with poor survival outcomes in many cancers. Antibodies targeting IL6 and its receptor have been developed for chronic inflammatory disease, but they have not yet been shown to clearly benefit cancer patients, possibly due to antibody potency or the settings in which they have been tested. In this study, we describe the development of a novel high-affinity anti-IL6 antibody, MEDI5117, which features an extended half-life and potent inhibitory effects on IL6 biologic activity. MEDI5117 inhibited IL6-mediated activation of STAT3, suppressing the growth of several tumor types driven by IL6 autocrine signaling. In the same models, MEDI5117 displayed superior preclinical activity relative to a previously developed anti-IL6 antibody. Consistent with roles for IL6 in promoting tumor angiogenesis, we found that MEDI5117 inhibited the growth of endothelial cells, which can produce IL6 and support tumorigenesis. Notably, in tumor xenograft assays in mice, we documented the ability of MEDI5117 to enhance the antitumor activities of chemotherapy or gefitinib in combination treatment regimens. MEDI5117 also displayed robust activity on its own against trastuzumab-resistant HER2(+) tumor cells by targeting the CD44(+)CD24(-) cancer stem cell population. Collectively, our findings extend the evidence of important pleiotropic roles of IL6 in tumorigenesis and drug resistance, and offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of IL6 antibodies in combination regimens to heighten therapeutic responses and overcome drug resistance.

  16. Carbon monoxide expedites metabolic exhaustion to inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Wegiel, Barbara; Gallo, David; Csizmadia, Eva; Harris, Clair; Belcher, John; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Penacho, Nuno; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas; Ahmed, Asif; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Persson, Jenny Liao; Otterbein, Leo E

    2013-12-01

    One classical feature of cancer cells is their metabolic acquisition of a highly glycolytic phenotype. Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the products of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cancer cells, has been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. However, the functional contributions of CO and HO-1 to these processes are poorly defined. In human prostate cancers, we found that HO-1 was nuclear localized in malignant cells, with low enzymatic activity in moderately differentiated tumors correlating with relatively worse clinical outcomes. Exposure to CO sensitized prostate cancer cells but not normal cells to chemotherapy, with growth arrest and apoptosis induced in vivo in part through mitotic catastrophe. CO targeted mitochondria activity in cancer cells as evidenced by higher oxygen consumption, free radical generation, and mitochondrial collapse. Collectively, our findings indicated that CO transiently induces an anti-Warburg effect by rapidly fueling cancer cell bioenergetics, ultimately resulting in metabolic exhaustion.

  17. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yu, Shiyan; Zhang, Xiao; Hoffman, Andrew; Sun, Jiaxin; Das, Soumyashree; Vedula, Pavan; Li, Guangxun; Fu, Jiang; Walker, Francesca; Yang, Chung S.; Yi, Zheng; Hsu, Wei; Yu, Da-Hai; Shen, Lanlan; Rodriguez, Alexis J.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the APC or β-catenin genes are well established initiators of colorectal cancer (CRC), yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches in mouse CRC and human CRC xenograft models, we show that incipient intestinal tumor cells activate CDC42, an APC-interacting small GTPase, as a crucial step in malignant progression. In the mouse, Cdc42 ablation attenuated the tumorigenicity of mutant intestinal cells carrying single APC or β-catenin mutations. Similarly, human CRC with relatively higher levels of CDC42 activity were particularly sensitive to CDC42 blockade. Mechanistic studies suggested that Cdc42 may be activated at different levels, including at the level of transcriptional activation of the stem-cell-enriched Rho family exchange factor Arhgef4. Our results suggest that early-stage mutant intestinal epithelial cells must recruit the pleiotropic functions of Cdc42 for malignant progression, suggesting its relevance as a biomarker and therapeutic target for selective CRC intervention. PMID:25113996

  18. Colchicine inhibits pressure-induced tumor cell implantation within surgical wounds and enhances tumor-free survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Craig, David H.; Owen, Cheri R.; Conway, William C.; Walsh, Mary F.; Downey, Christina; Basson, Marc D.

    2008-01-01

    Iatrogenic tumor cell implantation within surgical wounds can compromise curative cancer surgery. Adhesion of cancer cells, in particular colon cancer cells, is stimulated by exposure to increased extracellular pressure through a cytoskeleton-dependent signaling mechanism requiring FAK, Src, Akt, and paxillin. Mechanical stimuli during tumor resection may therefore negatively impact patient outcome. We hypothesized that perioperative administration of colchicine, which prevents microtubule polymerization, could disrupt pressure-stimulated tumor cell adhesion to surgical wounds and enhance tumor-free survival. Ex vivo treatment of Co26 and Co51 colon cancer cells with colchicine inhibited pressure-stimulated cell adhesion to murine surgical wounds and blocked pressure-induced FAK and Akt phosphorylation. Surgical wound contamination with pressure-activated Co26 and Co51 cells significantly reduced tumor-free survival compared with contamination with tumor cells under ambient pressure. Mice treated with pressure-activated Co26 and Co51 cells from tumors preoperatively treated with colchicine in vivo displayed reduced surgical site implantation and significantly increased tumor-free survival compared with mice exposed to pressure-activated cells from tumors not pretreated with colchicine. Our data suggest that pressure activation of malignant cells promotes tumor development and impairs tumor-free survival and that perioperative colchicine administration or similar interventions may inhibit this effect. PMID:18704196

  19. A systemic administration of liposomal curcumin inhibits radiation pneumonitis and sensitizes lung carcinoma to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua-shan; Gao, Xiang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Qiong-wen; Wang, Yong-sheng; Zheng, Yu; Cai, Lu-Lu; Zhong, Ren-ming; Rui, Ao; Li, Zhi-yong; Zheng, Hao; Chen, Xian-cheng; Chen, Li-juan

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. Previous investigations have shown that curcumin is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions and cancer, suggesting that curcumin may prevent RP and sensitize cancer cells to irradiation. However, the clinical advancement of curcumin is limited by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability after oral administration. Here, a water-soluble liposomal curcumin system was developed to investigate its prevention and sensitizing effects by an intravenous administration manner in mice models. The results showed that liposomal curcumin inhibited nuclear factor-κB pathway and downregulated inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and transforming growth factor-β induced by thoracic irradiation. Furthermore, the combined treatment with liposomal curcumin and radiotherapy increased intratumoral apoptosis and microvessel responses to irradiation in vivo. The significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth also was observed in a murine lung carcinoma (LL/2) model. There were no obvious toxicities observed in mice. The current results indicate that liposomal curcumin can effectively mitigate RP, reduce the fibrosis of lung, and sensitize LL/2 cells to irradiation. This study also suggests that the systemic administration of liposomal curcumin is safe and deserves to be investigated for further clinical application. PMID:22679371

  20. Inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonghai; Yang, Lin; Wang, Guangsuo; Ding, Guanggui; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression. Skp2 is upregulated in several cancers, including lung cancers, but the role of Skp2 in the tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in human lung cancer remains to be determined. We report here that Skp2 positively regulated mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) expression and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel. Knockdown of Skp2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased Mad2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in A549 and NCI-H1975 cells, accompanied with upregulation of p27 but decrease of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Skp2 increased Mad2 mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of Rb, while it decreased p27. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1/2 by flavopiridol or E2F1 with HLM006474 led to downregulation of Mad2 expression and prevented the increase of Mad2 expression by Skp2. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Skp2 sensitized A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel. Our results demonstrated that SKP2 positively regulates the gene expression of MAD2 through p27-CDKs-E2F1 signaling pathway and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of Skp2 are potential agents for the treatment of lung cancer with upregulation of Skp2. PMID:28176922

  1. Sensitivity of tumor cells towards CIGB-300 anticancer peptide relies on its nucleolar localization.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Costales, Heydi C; Diaz, Yakelin; Reyes, Osvaldo; Farina, Hernan G; Mendez, Lissandra; Gómez, Roberto E; Acevedo, Boris E; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Perea, Silvio E

    2012-04-01

    CIGB-300 is a novel anticancer peptide that impairs the casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation by direct binding to the conserved phosphoacceptor site on their substrates. Previous findings indicated that CIGB-300 inhibits tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induces tumor growth delay in vivo in cancer animal models. Interestingly, we had previously demonstrated that the putative oncogene B23/nucleophosmin (NPM) is the major intracellular target for CIGB-300 in a sensitive human lung cancer cell line. However, the ability of this peptide to target B23/NPM in cancer cells with differential CIGB-300 response phenotype remained to be determined. Interestingly, in this work, we evidenced that CIGB-300's antiproliferative activity on tumor cells strongly correlates with its nucleolar localization, the main subcellular localization of the previously identified B23/NPM target. Likewise, using CIGB-300 equipotent doses (concentration that inhibits 50% of proliferation), we demonstrated that this peptide interacts and inhibits B23/NPM phosphorylation in different cancer cell lines as evidenced by in vivo pull-down and metabolic labeling experiments. Moreover, such inhibition was followed by a fast apoptosis on CIGB-300-treated cells and also an impairment of cell cycle progression mainly after 5 h of treatment. Altogether, our data not only validates B23/NPM as a main target for CIGB-300 in cancer cells but also provides the first experimental clues to explain their differential antiproliferative response. Importantly, our findings suggest that further improvements to this cell penetrating peptide-based drug should entail its more efficient intracellular delivery at such subcellular localization.

  2. Shikonin and its analogs inhibit cancer cell glycolysis by targeting tumor pyruvate kinase-M2.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Xie, J; Jiang, Z; Wang, B; Wang, Y; Hu, X

    2011-10-20

    We recently reported that shikonin and its analogs were a class of necroptotic inducers that could bypass cancer drug resistance. However, the molecular targets of shikonin are not known. Here, we showed that shikonin and its analogs are inhibitors of tumor-specific pyruvate kinase-M2 (PKM2), among which shikonin and its enantiomeric isomer alkannin were the most potent and showed promising selectivity, that is, shikonin and alkannin at concentrations that resulted in over 50% inhibition of PKM2 activity did not inhibit PKM1 and pyruvate kinase-L (PKL). Shikonin and alkannin significantly inhibited the glycolytic rate, as manifested by cellular lactate production and glucose consumption in drug-sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MCF-7/Adr, MCF-7/Bcl-2, MCF-7/Bcl-x(L) and A549) that primarily express PKM2. HeLa cells transfected with PKM1 showed reduced sensitivity to shikonin- or alkannin-induced cell death. To the best of our knowledge, shikonin and alkannin are the most potent and specific inhibitors to PKM2 reported so far. As PKM2 universally expresses in cancer cells and dictates the last rate-limiting step of glycolysis vital for cancer cell proliferation and survival, enantiomeric shikonin and alkannin may have potential in future clinical application.

  3. Inhibition of TRPV1 for the treatment of sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Thomas; Krohn, Michael; Haustedt, Lars Ole; Hatt, Hanns; Schmaus, Gerhard; Vielhaber, Gabriele

    2010-11-01

    During the past years, the topic sensitive skin became one of the most important fields in dermatology. The tremendous interest is based on several studies showing that about 50% of the population declares to have sensitive skin. The human thermoreceptor hTRPV1 was previously identified to contribute to this skin condition while facilitating neurogenic inflammation leading to hyperalgesia. Furthermore, skin sensitivity towards capsaicin, a natural activator of TRPV1, was shown to correlate with sensitive skin. In a screening campaign based on recombinant HEK293-cells stably transfected with hTRPV1, the selective antagonist trans-4-tert-butylcyclohexanol was identified. This antagonist is able to inhibit capsaicin-induced hTRPV1 activation with an IC(50) value of 34 ± 5 μm tested in HEK293-cells as well as in electrophysiological recordings performed in oocytes expressing hTRPV1. Strikingly, in a clinical study with 30 women using topical treatment with o/w emulsions containing 31.6 ppm capsaicin, we were able to show that 0.4% of this inhibitor significantly reduces capsaicin-induced burning (P < 0.0001) in vivo. Thus trans-4-tert-butylcyclohexanol has the potential as a novel bioactive for the treatment of sensitive skin.

  4. Zinc inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Uzzo, Robert G; Leavis, Paul; Hatch, William; Gabai, Vladimir L; Dulin, Nickolai; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Kolenko, Vladimir M

    2002-11-01

    Prostate carcinogenesis involves transformation of zinc-accumulating normal epithelial cells to malignant cells, which do not accumulate zinc. In this study, we demonstrate by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry that physiological levels of zinc inhibit activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B transcription factor in PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells, reduce expression of NF-kappa B-controlled antiapoptotic protein c-IAP2, and activate c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. Preincubation of PC-3 cells with physiological concentrations of zinc sensitized tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and paclitaxel mediated cell death as defined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. These results suggest one possible mechanism for the inhibitory effect of zinc on the development and progression of prostate malignancy and might have important consequences for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to identify tumor stromal fibrosis and increase tumor biopsy yield (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Tissue biopsy is the principal method used to diagnose tumors in a variety of organ systems. It is essential to maximize tumor yield in biopsy specimens for both clinical diagnostic and research purposes. This is particularly important in tumors where additional tissue is needed for molecular analysis to identify patients who would benefit from mutation-specific targeted therapy, such as in lung carcinomas. Inadvertent sampling of fibrotic stroma within tumor nodules contaminates biopsies, decreases tumor yield, and can impede diagnosis. The ability to assess tumor composition and guide biopsy site selection in real time is likely to improve diagnostic yield. Polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) measures birefringence in organized tissues, such as collagen, and could be used to distinguish tumor from fibrosis. In this study, PS-OCT was obtained in 65 lung nodule samples from surgical resection specimens containing varying ratios of tumor and fibrosis. PS-OCT was obtained with either a custom-built helical scanning catheter (0.8 or 1.6mm in diameter) or a dual-axis bench top scanner. Strong birefringence was observed in nodules containing dense fibrosis, with no birefringence in adjacent regions of tumor. Tumors admixed with early, loosely-organized collagen demonstrated mild-to-moderate birefringence, and tumors with little collagen content showed little to no birefringent signal. PS-OCT provides significant insights into tumor nodule composition, and has potential to differentiate tumor from stromal fibrosis during biopsy site selection to increase diagnostic tumor yield.

  6. Adenovirus replication as an in vitro probe for drug sensitivity in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Parsons, P G; Maynard, K R; Little, J H; McLeod, G R

    1986-04-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus 5 as an in vitro probe for chemosensitivity in short-term cultures of human tumors was evaluated using human melanoma cell lines and primary cultures of melanoma biopsies. A convenient immunoperoxidase method was developed for quantitating viral replication 2 days after infection. Two different approaches were explored: the host cell reactivation assay (HCR) using drug-treated virus; and the viral capacity assay using drug-treated cells. The HCR assay detected sensitivity to 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC) in Mer- (methyl excision repair deficient) cell lines as decreased ability of the cells to replicate MTIC-treated virus. This test should be applicable to DNA-damaging agents and repair-deficient tumors. Adenovirus replicated readily in nonproliferating primary cultures of melanoma biopsies; application of the HCR assays to this material identified one Mer- sample of 11 tested. Herpes viruses were not suitable for use in HCR because herpes simplex virus type 1 failed to distinguish Mer- from Mer+ melanoma cells; and nonproductive infection of MTIC-sensitive lymphoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus yielded an MTIC-resistant cell line. The second assay (viral capacity) involved determination of the inhibition of replication of untreated virus in treated cells. This approach correctly predicted sensitivity to hydroxyurea and deoxyadenosine in melanoma cell lines when compared with clonogenic survival assay. Viral capacity was also inhibited by cytosine arabinoside, fluorouracil, vincristine, adriamycin, 6-mercaptopurine and ionising radiation, and may therefore be useful for detecting sensitivity to a wide range of antitumor agents.

  7. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity.

  8. Gracilaria edulis extract induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor in Ehrlich Ascites tumor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine environment is inestimable for their chemical and biological diversity and therefore is an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new anticancer drugs. Recent development in elucidation of the mechanism and therapeutic action of natural products helped to evaluate for their potential activity. Methods We evaluated Gracilaria edulis J. Ag (Brown algae), for its antitumor potential against the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo and in vitro. Cytotoxicity evaluation of Ethanol Extract of Gracilaria edulis (EEGE) using EAT cells showed significant activity. In vitro studies indicated that EEGE cytotoxicity to EAT cells is mediated through its ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore decreasing intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels may be attributed to oxidative stress. Results Apoptotic parameters including Annexin-V positive cells, increased levels of DNA fragmentation and increased caspase-2, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities indicated the mechanism might be by inducing apoptosis. Intraperitoneally administration of EEGE to EAT-bearing mice helped to increase the lifespan of the animals significantly inhibited tumor growth and increased survival of mice. Extensive hematology, biochemistry and histopathological analysis of liver and kidney indicated that daily doses of EEGE up to 300 mg/kg for 35 days are well tolerated and did not cause hematotoxicity nor renal or hepatotoxicity. Conclusion Comprehensive antitumor analysis in animal model and in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor cells was done including biochemical, and pathological evaluations indicate antitumor activity of the extract and non toxic in vivo. It was evident that the mechanism explains the apoptotic activity of the algae extract. PMID:24274337

  9. Enhancement of glioblastoma radioresponse by a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Khong Bee . E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg; Wang, Ting Ting; Woon, Chow Thai; Cheah, Elizabeth S.; Moore, Xiao Lei; Zhu Congju; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Toward improved glioblastoma multiforme treatment, we determined whether celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could enhance glioblastoma radiosensitivity by inducing tumor necrosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Methods and Materials: U-87MG cells treated with celecoxib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival and angiogenic factor protein analysis (angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). In vivo, survival of mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells and treated with celecoxib and/or irradiation was monitored. Isolated tumors were assessed for tumor necrosis and tumor microvascular density by von Williebrand's factor (vWF) immunohistochemical staining. Results: Celecoxib (4 and 30 {mu}M; 24, 48, and 72 h) enhanced U-87MG cell radiosensitivity by significantly reducing clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Angiopoietin-1 and VEGF proteins were decreased, whereas angiopoietin-2 expression increased after 72 h of celecoxib alone and when combined with irradiation. In vivo, median survival of control mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells was 18 days. Celecoxib (100 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) significantly extended median survival of irradiated mice (24 Gy total) from 34 to 41 days, with extensive tumor necrosis [24.5 {+-} 8.6% of tumor region, compared with irradiation alone (2.7 {+-} 1.8%)]. Tumor microvascular density was significantly reduced in combined celecoxib and irradiated tumors (52.5 {+-} 2.9 microvessels per mm{sup 2} tumor region), compared with irradiated tumors alone (65.4 {+-} 4.0 microvessels per mm{sup 2}). Conclusion: Celecoxib significantly enhanced glioblastoma radiosensitivity, reduced clonogenic survival, and prolonged survival of glioblastoma-implanted mice by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necr0010os.

  10. Inhibition of Glutathione Biosynthesis Sensitizes Plasmodium berghei to Antifolates

    PubMed Central

    Koonyosying, Pongpisid; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione plays a central role in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, and modulations to this status may affect malaria parasite sensitivity to certain types of antimalarials. In this study, we demonstrate that inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain through disruption of the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) gene, which encodes the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the glutathione biosynthetic pathway, significantly sensitizes parasites in vivo to pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine, but not to chloroquine, artesunate, or primaquine, compared with control parasites containing the same pyrimethamine-resistant marker cassette. Treatment of mice infected with an antifolate-resistant P. berghei control line with a γ-GCS inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine, could partially abrogate pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine resistance. The role of glutathione in modulating the malaria parasite's response to antifolates suggests that development of specific inhibitors against Plasmodium γ-GCS may offer a new approach to counter Plasmodium antifolate resistance. PMID:26953195

  11. A Versatile Imaging and Therapeutic Platform Based on Dual-Band Luminescent Lanthanide Nanoparticles toward Tumor Metastasis Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Tang, Jinglong; Pan, Dong-Xu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ye-Fu; Shi, Shuo; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2016-02-23

    Upconversion (UC) luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles (LNPs) are expected to play an important role in imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vitro and in vivo. However, with the absorption of UC emissions by photosensitizers (PSs) to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) for PDT, the imaging signals from LNPs are significantly weakened. It is important to activate another imaging route to track the location of the LNPs during PDT process. In this work, Nd(3+)-sensitized LNPs with dual-band visible and near-infrared (NIR) emissions under single 808 nm excitation were reported to address this issue. The UC emissions in green could trigger covalently linked rose bengal (RB) molecules for efficient PDT, and NIR emissions deriving from Yb(3+) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used for imaging simultaneously. Notably, the designed therapeutic platform could further effectively avoid the overheating effect induced by the laser irradiation, due to the minimized absorption of biological media at around 808 nm. TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed serious cell apoptosis in the tumor after PDT for 2 weeks, leading to an effective tumor inhibition rate of 67%. Benefit from the PDT, the tumor growth-induced liver and spleen burdens were largely attenuated, and the liver injury was also alleviated. More importantly, pulmonary and hepatic tumor metastases were significantly reduced after PDT. The Nd(3+)-sensitized LNPs provide a multifunctional nanoplatform for NIR light-assisted PDT with minimized heating effect and an effective inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis.

  12. Colon tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Thaiparambil, Jose; Li, Nan; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicity resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their clinical use for chemoprevention. Studies suggest that the mechanism may be COX independent, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here, we show that the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in colon tumor cell lysates at concentrations that inhibit colon tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. A series of chemically diverse NSAIDs also inhibited cGMP hydrolysis at concentrations that correlate with their potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth, whereas no correlation was observed with COX-2 inhibition. Consistent with its selectivity for inhibiting cGMP hydrolysis compared with cyclic AMP hydrolysis, SS inhibited the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme and increased cGMP levels in colon tumor cells. Of numerous PDE isozyme-specific inhibitors evaluated, only the PDE5-selective inhibitor MY5445 inhibited colon tumor cell growth. The effects of SS and MY5445 on cell growth were associated with inhibition of β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity to suppress the synthesis of cyclin D and survivin, which regulate tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. SS had minimal effects on cGMP PDE activity in normal colonocytes, which displayed reduced sensitivity to SS and did not express PDE5. PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in colon tumor cell lines as well as in colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared with normal colonic mucosa. These results suggest that PDE5 inhibition, cGMP elevation, and inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of certain NSAIDs.

  13. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs.

  14. AMPK-autophagy inhibition sensitizes icaritin-induced anti-colorectal cancer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunxian; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Gang; Dong, Da; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Min-Bin; Xu, Dongfeng

    2017-01-18

    The current research studied the potential effect of autophagy on icaritin-induced anti-colorectal cancer (CRC) cell activity. Treatment of icaritin in both primary and established (HT-29) CRC cells induced feedback activation of autophagy, evidenced by p62 degradation, Beclin-1 and autophagy-related gene-5 (ATG-5) upregulation, as well as light chain 3B (LC3B)-GFP puncta formation. Pharmacological inhibiting of autophagy dramatically potentiated icaritin-induced CRC cell death and apoptosis. Meanwhile, shRNA-mediated knockdown of Beclin-1 or ATG-5 also sensitized icaritin-induced CRC cell death and apoptosis. Icaritin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in CRC cells, functioning as the upstream signaling for autophagy activation. shRNA/siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1inhibited icaritin-induced autophagy activation, but exacerbated CRC cell death. On the other hand, the AMPK activator compound 13 (C13) or the autophagy activator MHY1485 attenuated icaritin-induced cytotoxicity. In nude mice, icaritin (oral administration)-induced HT-29 tumor growth inhibition was potentiated when combined with AMPKα1 shRNA knockdown in tumors. We conclude that feedback activation of AMPK-autophagy pathway could be a primary resistance factor of icaritin.

  15. Enhancing chemotherapeutic drug inhibition on tumor growth by ultrasound: an in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Cai; Jin, Zhuo; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Chang-Zheng; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hui-Sheng; Tian, Ji-Lai; Gao, Feng-Hou; Tang, Qin-Qin; Li, Wei; Xiang, Qi; Li, Xiao-Kun; Li, Wen-Feng

    2011-02-01

    An in vivo study on enhancing epirubicin hydrochloride (EPI) inhibition on tumor growth by ultrasound (US) was reported. Five-week-old male nude mice were used and HL-60 cells were s.c. (subcutaneous injection) inoculated in axilla of these mice. Six groups were designed and five consecutive treatments were applied to investigate the inhibition on tumor growth and body weight growth. US applied locally to the tumor resulted in a substantially increased drug uptake in tumor cells. The inhibition on tumor growth depended on the position of drug injection and phospholipid-based microbubble (PMB) application. Tumor growth rate under group 1 (PMB+US) was similar to that of blank control. The order of the inhibition on tumor volume growth was: group 4 (s.c. EPI+PMB+US) > group 5 intraperitoneal (i.p. EPI+PMB+US) > group 2 (i.p. EPI) > group 3 (s.c. EPI+US) > group 1 (PMB+US). Similar conclusion was obtained from experimental measurements of tumor weight change. The order of animal survival status for EPI administration groups was: group 4 > group 5 > group 2 > group 3. Chemotherapeutic drug inhibition on tumor growth could be enhanced by local US combined with PMB, which might provide a potential application for US-mediated chemotherapy.

  16. Diethyl pyrocarbonate inhibits rostral ventrolateral medullary H+ sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nattie, E E

    1988-04-01

    Diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), an acylating agent that reacts with imidazole-histidine in vitro, inhibits CO2 sensitivity when applied by pledget to the rostral chemosensitive area on the ventrolateral medullary (VLM) surface in glomectomized, chloralose-urethan-anesthetized cats. In this study similar application of DEPC inhibits the phrenic nerve response to CO2 expressed as a function of VLM [H+] measured by surface pH electrode. Attempts to evaluate direct chemoreceptor stimulation by HCL-soaked surface pledgets proved difficult, but rostral DEPC did inhibit the response to intravenous infusion of HCl. As previously reported, the CO2 and intravenous H+ responses are not a unique function of the VLM [H+]. DEPC had similar inhibitory effects on both the CO2 and the intravenous H+ responses, suggesting that the difference between them may reflect more the orientation or accessibility of the central chemoreceptor than a different mechanism for sensing CO2 vs. H+. DEPC did not alter the phrenic nerve response to hypoxia, indicating that DEPC effects on central chemoreception are not the result of a generalized inhibitory process. The results support the hypothesis that imidazolehistidine is involved at the rostral area with chemoreception of both CO2 and H+.

  17. Autophagy inhibition sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma to the multikinase inhibitor linifanib.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongming; Wang, Zhanggui; Jiang, Liming; Sui, Xinbing; You, Liangkun; Shou, Jiawei; Jing, Zhao; Xie, Jiansheng; Ge, Weiting; Cai, Xiujun; Huang, Wendong; Han, Weidong

    2014-10-20

    Autophagy is a critical survival pathway for cancer cells under conditions of stress. Thus, induction of autophagy has emerged as a drug resistance mechanism. This study is to determine whether autophagy is activated by a novel multikinase inhibitor linifanib, thereby impairing the sensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to this targeted therapy. Here, we found that linifanib induced a high level of autophagy in HCC cells, which was accompanied by suppression of phosphorylation of PDGFR-β and its downstream Akt/mTOR and Mek/Erk signaling pathways. Cell death induced by linifanib was greatly enhanced after autophagy inhibition by the pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs against autophagy related genes, ATG5 and ATG7, in vitro. Moreover, HCQ, an FDA-approved drug used to inhibit autophagy, could significantly augment the anti-HCC effect of linifanib in a mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, linifanib can induce cytoprotective autophagy by suppression of PDGFR-β activities in HCC cells. Thus, autophagy inhibition represents a promising approach to improve the efficacy of linifanib in the treatment of HCC patients.

  18. 5α-reductase Inhibition Coupled with Short Off Cycles Increases Survival in the LNCaP Xenograft Prostate Tumor Model on Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Shevrin, Daniel; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Parikh, Rahul A.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) for patients with PSA progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer is an alternative to the standard continuous ADT. IADT allows for the recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor in order to lessen the side effects of continuous ADT and potentially prolong survival. Previously, IADT coupled with finasteride was shown to prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was not prolonged and fixed at 10–14 days. Regressed prostate tumor xenografts with testosterone replacement were initially responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition, but resumed growth after several days in the animal models. 5α-reductase inhibition in shorter off-cycles of testosterone recovery could maximize tumor growth inhibition during IADT and perhaps increase survival. Materials and Methods The LNCaP xenograft tumor model was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of short off-cycles of 4 days coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition on IADT on survival and tumor regrowth. Results Dutasteride inhibited initial testosterone-induced tumor regrowth during both the first and second off-cycle and significantly increased survival. Conclusions These results further support the potential for IADT combined with 5α-reductase inhibition to improve survival in prostate cancer patients when off cycle durations are short or very short. PMID:25444984

  19. Hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles restore sensitivity to letrozole-resistant xenograft tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Hareesh B; Huffman, Steven; Veerapaneni, Poornachand; Kirma, Nameer B; Binkley, Peter; Perla, Rao P; Evans, Dean B; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R

    2011-05-01

    Letrozole is a potent aromatase inhibitor and superior to other defined selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen in treating hormone-responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Patients who receive this drug may become insensitive to the effects of estrogen deprivation induced by letrozole. Letrozole has known side effects on bone metabolism due to systemic ablation of estrogen production. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles (HA-Letr-NPs) in restoring sensitivity to letrozole-resistant (LTLT-Ca) cells. To target letrozole to LTLT-Ca cells, hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation using biodegradable PLGA-PEG co-polymer. Binding specificity of HA to CD44 on the cell surface was analyzed in vitro using FITC-CD44 Ab and CD44 siRNA by flow cytometry. Effects on in vitro cytotoxicity and aromatase enzymatic activity of HA-Letr-NPs were performed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells over-expressing aromatase (MCF-7/Aro), and LTLT-Ca cells resistant to letrozole. Preclinical efficacy of HA-Letr-NPs was examined in mice using LTLT-Ca xenograft tumors. HA-Letr-NPs were restricted to a maximum size of 100 nm. The in vitro drug release assay showed that the highest released concentration of letrozole occurred after 23 hours at 37 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline. HA-Letr-NPs on MCF-7/Aro and LTLT-Ca cells showed an IC50 of 2 microM and 5 microM, respectively. HA-Letr-NPs were more efficacious in inhibiting tumor growth, reducing in vitro cellular and in vivo tumor aromatase enzyme activity more than the corresponding Letr-NPs or letrozole. HA-Letr-NPs restored and maintained a prolonged sensitivity and targeted delivery of letrozole in letrozole-resistant tumors in vivo.

  20. Tumor Specific Gene Expression and Tumor Specific Vector Replication for Systemic Chemotherapy Sensitization Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    directed at the use of the L-plastin tumor-specific transcriptional promoter to control the expression of a chemotherapy sensitization gene ( cytosine ... deaminase ) and a viral replication gene (ElA) so that any toxic effect is tumor specific. These vectors have been shown to suppress the growth of human

  1. Piperlongumine inhibits lung tumor growth via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Son, Dong Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Woo, Ju Rang; Ham, Young Wan; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Wun Jae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Piperlongumine has anti-cancer activity in numerous cancer cell lines via various signaling pathways. But there has been no study regarding the mechanisms of PL on the lung cancer yet. Thus, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects and possible mechanisms of PL on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showed that PL induced apoptotic cell death and suppressed the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in a concentration dependent manner (0–15 μM) in NSCLC cells. Docking model and pull down assay showed that PL directly binds to the DNA binding site of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 subunit, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that PL binds to p50 concentration-dependently. Moreover, co-treatment of PL with NF-κB inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (0.1 μM) or p50 siRNA (100 nM) augmented PL-induced inhibitory effect on cell growth and activation of Fas and DR4. Notably, co-treatment of PL with p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) partially abolished PL-induced cell growth inhibition and decreased the enhanced expression of Fas and DR4. In xenograft mice model, PL (2.5–5 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth of NSCLC dose-dependently. Therefore, these results indicated that PL could inhibit lung cancer cell growth via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27198178

  2. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  3. Targeting distinct tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells by inhibiting CSF-1 receptor: combating tumor evasion of antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Priceman, Saul J; Sung, James L; Shaposhnik, Zory; Burton, Jeremy B; Torres-Collado, Antoni X; Moughon, Diana L; Johnson, Mai; Lusis, Aldons J; Cohen, Donald A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Wu, Lily

    2010-02-18

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) support tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune responses. CSF-1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling is important for the recruitment of CD11b(+)F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and contributes to myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis. However, the impact of the CSF1R signaling pathway on other TIM subsets, including CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. Tumor-infiltrating MDSCs have also been shown to contribute to tumor angiogenesis and have recently been implicated in tumor resistance to antiangiogenic therapy, yet their precise involvement in these processes is not well understood. Here, we use the selective pharmacologic inhibitor of CSF1R signaling, GW2580, to demonstrate that CSF-1 regulates the tumor recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr-1(lo)Ly6C(hi) mononuclear MDSCs. Targeting these TIM subsets inhibits tumor angiogenesis associated with reduced expression of proangiogenic and immunosuppressive genes. Combination therapy using GW2580 with an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody synergistically suppresses tumor growth and severely impairs tumor angiogenesis along with reverting at least one TIM-mediated antiangiogenic compensatory mechanism involving MMP-9. These data highlight the importance of CSF1R signaling in the recruitment and function of distinct TIM subsets, including MDSCs, and validate the benefits of targeting CSF1R signaling in combination with antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of solid cancers.

  4. The HSP90 Inhibitor, AT13387, Is Effective against Imatinib-Sensitive and -Resistant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Tomoko; Van Looy, Thomas; Curry, Jayne E.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Ana M.; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Zhu, Meijun; Donsky, Rachel; Morgan, Jennifer G.; Mayeda, Mark; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Schöffski, Patrick; Lyons, John; Thompson, Neil T.; Wallis, Nicola G.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are characterized by activating mutations of KIT, an HSP90 client protein. Further secondary resistance mutations within KIT limit clinical responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. The dependence of KIT and its mutated forms on HSP90 suggests that HSP90 inhibition might be a valuable treatment option for GIST, which would be equally effective on imatinib-sensitive and -resistant clones. We investigated the activity of AT13387, a potent HSP90 inhibitor currently being evaluated in clinical trials, in both in vitro and in vivo GIST models. AT13387 inhibited the proliferation of imatinib-sensitive (GIST882, GIST-T1) and -resistant (GIST430, GIST48) cell lines, including those resistant to the geldanamycin analogue HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG. Treatment with AT13387 resulted in depletion of HSP90 client proteins, KIT and AKT, along with their phospho-forms in imatinib-sensitive and -resistant cell lines, irrespective of KIT mutation. KIT signaling was ablated, whereas HSP70, a marker of HSP90 inhibition, was induced. In vivo, antitumor activity of AT13387 was showed in both the imatinib-sensitive, GIST-PSW, xenograft model and a newly characterized imatinib-resistant, GIST430, xenograft model. Induction of HSP70, depletion of phospho-KIT and inhibition of KIT signaling were seen in tumors from both models after treatment with AT13387. A combination of imatinib and AT13387 treatment in the imatinib-resistant GIST430 model significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition over either of the monotherapies. Importantly, the combination of AT13387 and imatinib was well tolerated. These results suggest AT13387 is an excellent candidate for clinical testing in GIST in combination with imatinib. PMID:22714264

  5. Peperomin E reactivates silenced tumor suppressor genes in lung cancer cells by inhibition of DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Zhi; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Kui-Long; Liu, Rui; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Wen, Hong-Mei; Chai, Chuan; Liang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Advanced lung cancer has poor prognosis owing to its low sensitivity to current chemotherapy agents. Therefore, discovery of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of peperomin E, a secolignan isolated from Peperomia dindygulensis, a frequently used Chinese folk medicine for lung cancer treatment. The results indicate that peperomin E has antiproliferative effects, promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, while showing lower toxicity against normal human lung epidermal cells. Peperomin E inhibited tumor growth in A549 xenograft BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating that it may be safely used to treat NSCLC. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of peperomin E have been investigated. Using an in silico target fishing method, we observed that peperomin E directly interacts with the active domain of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), potentially affecting its genome methylation activity. Subsequent experiments verified that peperomin E decreased DNMT1 activity and expression, thereby decreasing global methylation and reactivating the epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A, APC, RUNX3, and p16INK4, which in turn activates their mediated pro-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory signaling pathways in lung cancer cells. The observations herein report for the first time that peperomin E is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for NSCLC. The anticancer effects of peperomin E may be partly attributable to its ability to demethylate and reactivate methylation-silenced tumor suppressor genes through direct inhibition of the activity and expression of DNMT1.

  6. N-end rule pathway inhibition assists colon tumor regression via necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwalla, Pritha; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Recent study has shown that N-end rule pathway, an ubiquitin dependent proteolytic system, counteracts cell death by degrading many antisurvival protein fragments like BCLxL, BRCA1, RIPK1, etc. Inhibition of the N-end rule pathway can lead to metabolic stabilization of proapoptotic protein fragments like RIPK1, thereby sensitizing cells to programmed cell death. Receptor interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-1 (RIPK1) is one of the upstream regulators of programmed necrosis known as necroptosis. Necroptosis is particularly gaining attention of cancer biologists as it provides an alternate therapeutic modality to kill cancer cells, which often evolve multiple strategies to circumvent growth inhibition by apoptosis. Utilizing the over expression of biotin receptor in cancer cells, herein, we report that coadministration of synthetic hetero-bivalent N-end rule inhibitor RFC11 and anticancer drug shikonin solubilized in a stable biotin receptor-targeted liposome exhibited significant synergistic antitumor effect in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse colon tumor model through induction of necroptosis with distinctive upregulation of RIPK1. Besides developing a newly targeted formulation for necroptosis induction, this report is the first in vivo evidence demonstrating that potent inhibition of N-end rule pathway can enhance therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:27556106

  7. TGFβ1 Inhibition Increases the Radiosensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro and Promotes Tumor Control by Radiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Fanny; Pal, Anupama; Pilones, Karsten A.; Demaria, Sandra; Hann, Byron; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Babb, Jim S.; Lonning, Scott M.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether inhibition of TGFβ signaling prior to irradiation sensitizes human and murine cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design TGFβ-mediated growth and Smad phosphorylation of MCF7, Hs578T, MDA-MB-231, and T47D human breast cancer cell lines were examined and correlated with clonogenic survival following graded radiation doses with and without pretreatment with LY364947, a small molecule inhibitor of the TGFβ type I receptor kinase. The DNA damage response was assessed in irradiated MDA-MB-231 cells pretreated with LY364947 in vitro and LY2109761, a pharmacokinetically stable inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, in vivo. The in vitro response of a syngeneic murine tumor, 4T1, was tested using a TGFβ neutralizing antibody, 1D11, with single or fractionated radiation doses in vivo. Results Human breast cancer cell lines pretreated with TGFβ small molecule inhibitor were radio-sensitized, irrespective of sensitivity to TGFβ growth inhibition. Consistent with increased clonogenic cell death, radiation-induced phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 was significantly reduced in MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells when pretreated in vitro or in vivo with a TGFfS type I receptor kinase inhibitor. Moreover, TGFβ neutralizing antibodies increased radiation sensitivity, blocked γH2AX foci formation, and significantly increased tumor growth delay in 4T1 murine mammary tumors in response to single and fractionated radiation exposures. Conclusion These results show that TGFβ inhibition prior to radiation attenuated DNA damage responses, increased clonogenic cell death, and promoted tumor growth delay, and thus may be an effective adjunct in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:22028490

  8. Phloroglucinol Inhibits the Bioactivities of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Angiogenesis in LLC-Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yi-Hong; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Boo-Yong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that phloroglucinol, a compound from Ecklonia cava, induces the apoptosis of cancer cells, eventually suppressing tumor angiogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings This is the first report on phloroglucinol's ability to potentially inhibit the functional bioactivities of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and thereby attenuate tumor growth and angiogenesis in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC)-tumor-bearing mouse model. Although Phloroglucinol did not affect their cell toxicity, it specifically inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) dependent migration and capillary-like tube formation of EPCs. Our matrigel plug assay clearly indicated that orally injected phloroglucinol effectively disrupts VEGF-induced neovessel formation. Moreover, we demonstrated that when phloroglucinol is orally administered, it significantly inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis as well as CD45−/CD34+ progenitor mobilization into peripheral blood in vivo in the LLC-tumor-bearing mouse model. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest a novel role for phloroglucinol: Phloroglucinol might be a modulator of circulating EPC bioactivities, eventually suppressing tumorigenesis. Therefore, phloroglucinol might be a candidate compound for biosafe drugs that target tumor angiogenesis. PMID:22496756

  9. NIR-Laser-Controlled Drug Release from DOX/IR-780-Loaded Temperature-Sensitive-Liposomes for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Duan, Wanlu; Li, Yekuo; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Yuli; Pan, Min; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    NIR laser-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) through near-infrared agents has demonstrated the great potential in solid tumor ablation. However, the nonuniform heat distribution over tumors from PTT makes it insufficient to kill all tumor cells, resulting in tumor recurrence and inferior outcomes. To improve the tumor treatment efficacy, it is highly desirable to develop the combinational treatment of PTT with other modalities, especially with chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a smart DOX/IR-780-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (DITSL) which can achieve NIR-laser-controlled drug release for chemo-photothermal synergistic tumor therapy. In this system, the liposoluble IR-780 was incorporated into the temperature-sensitive lipid bilayer and the soluble chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated in the hydrophilic core. The resulting DITSL is proved to be physiologically stable and can provide a fast and laser irradiation-controllable DOX release in the PBS and cellular conditions. We further employed this nanoparticle for tumor treatment, demonstrating significantly higher tumor inhibition efficacy than that of DOX-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (DTSL) or IR780-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (ITSL) in the in vitro cells and in vivo animals. Histological analysis further revealed much more apoptotic cells, confirming the advantageous anti-tumor effect of DITSL over DTSL or ITSL. Our study provides a promising strategy to realize chemo-photothermal synergistic combination therapy for breast tumors. PMID:27877239

  10. Zyflamend Suppresses Growth and Sensitizes Human Pancreatic Tumors to Gemcitabine in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Through Modulation of Multiple Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Sung, Bokyung; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Deorukhkar, Amit; Dey, Sanjit; Koca, Cemile; Tong, Zhimin; Gelovani, Juri G.; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Agents that can potentiate the efficacy of standard chemotherapy against pancreatic cancer are of great interest. Because of their low cost and safety, patients commonly use a variety of dietary supplements, although evidence of their efficacy is often lacking. One such commonly used food supplement, Zyflamend, is a polyherbal preparation with potent anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical efficacy against prostate and oral cancer. Whether Zyflamend has any efficacy against human pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with gemcitibine, a commonly used agent, was examined in cell cultures and in an orthotopic mouse model. In vitro, Zyflamend inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines regardless of p53 status and also enhanced gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This finding correlated with inhibition of NF-κB activation by Zyflamend and suppression of cyclin D1, c-myc, COX-2, Bcl-2, IAP, survivin, VEGF, ICAM-1, and CXCR4. In nude mice, oral administration of Zyflamend alone significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted human pancreatic tumors, and when combined with gemcitabine, further enhanced the antitumor effects. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of tumor tissue showed that the suppression of pancreatic cancer growth correlated with inhibition of proliferation index marker (Ki-67), COX-2, MMP-9, NF-κB, and VEGF. Overall, these results suggest that the concentrated multiherb product Zyflamend alone can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and, in addition, can sensitize pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine through the suppression of multiple targets linked to tumorigenesis. PMID:21935918

  11. Neutral pH hydrogen-enriched electrolyzed water achieves tumor-preferential clonal growth inhibition over normal cells and tumor invasion inhibition concurrently with intracellular oxidant repression.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yasukazu; Okayasu, Hajime; Xiao, Li; Harata, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The properties and effects of neutral pH hydrogen-enriched electrolyzed water (NHE water) on tumor cells were examined. NHE water diminished hydroxyl radicals as demonstrated by ESR in a cell-free system. Human tongue carcinoma cells HSC-4 were inhibited for either colony formation efficiencies or colony sizes by NHE water without significant inhibition to normal human tongue epithelial-like cells DOK. Furthermore, NHE water caused growth inhibition, cell degeneration, and inhibition of invasion through the reconstituted basement membrane to human fibrosarcoma cells HT-1080. Intracellular oxidants such as hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxides were scavenged in HSC-4 or HT-1080 cells by NHE water. In the human oral cavity, a dissolved hydrogen concentrations (DH) of NHE water was drastically declined from 1.1 to 0.5 ppm, but settled to 0.3-0.4 ppm until 180 s, upon static holding without gargling. Thus, NHE water was shown to achieve tumor-preferential growth inhibition and tumor invasion together with scavenging of intracellular oxidants, and is expected as a preventive material against tumor progression and invasion.

  12. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  13. Halofuginone inhibits angiogenesis and growth in implanted metastatic rat brain tumor model--an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rinat; Itzik, Anna; Harel, Hila; Nagler, Arnon; Vlodavsky, Israel; Siegal, Tali

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF) is a potent inhibitor of collagen type alpha1(I). In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001). Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001). In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05). Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03). Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  14. Devazepide, a nonpeptide antagonist of CCK receptors, induces apoptosis and inhibits Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; Agra, Noelia; Fernández, Noemí; Pestaña, Angel; Alonso, Javier

    2009-08-01

    The Ewing family of tumors is a group of highly malignant tumors that mainly arise in bone and most often affect children and young adults in the first two decades of life. Despite the use of multimodal therapy, the long-term disease-free survival rate of patients with Ewing tumors is still disappointingly low, making the discovery of innovative therapeutic strategies all the more necessary. We have recently shown that cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuroendocrine peptide, involved in many biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation, is a relevant target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein characteristic of Ewing tumors. CCK silencing inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor for Ewing cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of two CCK receptor antagonists, devazepide (a CCK1-R antagonist) and L365 260 (a CCK2-R antagonist), on the growth of Ewing tumor cells. Devazepide (10 micromol/l) inhibited cell growth of four different Ewing tumor cells in vitro (range 85-88%), whereas the effect of the CCK2-R antagonist on cell growth was negligible. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, devazepide reduced tumor growth by 40%. Flow cytometry experiments showed that devazepide, but not L365 260, induced apoptosis of Ewing tumor cells. In summary, devazepide induces cell death of Ewing tumor cells, suggesting that it could represent a new therapeutic approach in the management of Ewing's tumor patients.

  15. Ascitic and solid Ehrlich tumor inhibition by Chenopodium ambrosioides L. treatment.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Flávia R F; Cruz, Gustavo V B; Pereira, Paulo Vitor S; Maciel, Márcia C G; Silva, Lucilene A; Azevedo, Ana Paula S; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth S B; Guerra, Rosane N M

    2006-04-25

    The leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. [Chenopodiaceae] ('mastruz') have been indicated for the treatment of several diseases, among which the cancer. There are no results focusing the effect of C. ambrosioides treatment on tumor development in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment with C. ambrosioides on Ehrlich tumor development. Swiss mice were treated by intraperitoneal route (i.p.) with hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of C. ambrosioides (5 mg/kg) or with PBS (control group) 48 h before or 48 h later the Ehrlich tumor implantation. The tumor cells were implanted on the left footpad (solid tumor) or in the peritoneal cavity (ascitic tumor). To determine the solid tumor growth, footpad was measured each 2 days until the fourteenth day, when the feet were weighed. Ascitic tumor development was evaluated after 8 days of tumor implantation by quantification of the ascitic fluid volume and tumor cell number. The i.p. administration of C. ambrosioides extract before or after the tumor implantation significantly inhibited the solid and ascitic Ehrlich tumor forms. This inhibition was observed in ascitic tumor cell number, in the ascitic volume, in the tumor-bearing foot size and foot weight when compared to control mice. The treatments also increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, C. ambrosioides has a potent anti-tumoral effect which was evident with a small dose and even when the treatment was given two days after the tumor implantation. This effect is probably related with anti-oxidant properties of C. ambrosioides.

  16. Inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, X J; Xu, H Q; Chen, Z W; Fan, H H

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1 and its mechanism. For this study, athymic nude mice were injected with either normal pituitary tumor RC-4B/C cells or LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells. We then calculated the volume inhibition rate of the tumors, as well as the apoptosis index of tumor cells and the expression of Ras, Raf, AKt, and ERK mRNA in tumor cells. Tumor cell morphological and structural changes were also observed under electron microscope. Our data showed that subcutaneous tumor growth was slowed or even halted in LRIG1-transfected tumors. The tumor volumes were significantly different between the two groups of mice (χ2 = 2.14, P < 0.05). The tumor apoptosis index was found to be 8.72% in the control group and 39.7% in LRIG1-transfected mice (χ2 = 7.59, P < 0.05). The levels of Ras, Raf, and AKt mRNA in LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells were significantly reduced after transfection (P < 0.01). Transfected subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be in early or late apoptosis under an electron microscope, while only a few subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be undergoing apoptosis in the control group. In conclusion, the LRIG1 gene is able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumors in nude mice. The mechanism of LRIG1 may involve the inhibition of the PI3K/ Akt and Ras/Raf/ERK signal transduction pathways.

  17. miR-25 modulates NSCLC cell radio-sensitivity through directly inhibiting BTG2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhiwei Liu, Yi Xiao, Bing Qian, Xiaosen

    2015-02-13

    A large proportion of the NSCLC patients were insensitive to radiotherapy, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study explored the role of miR-25 in regulating sensitivity of NSCLC cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and its downstream targets. Based on measurement in tumor samples from NSCLC patients, this study found that miR-25 expression is upregulated in both NSCLC and radio-resistant NSCLC patients compared the healthy and radio-sensitive controls. In addition, BTG expression was found negatively correlated with miR-25a expression in the both tissues and cells. By applying luciferase reporter assay, we verified two putative binding sites between miR-25 and BTG2. Therefore, BTG2 is a directly target of miR-25 in NSCLC cancer. By applying loss-and-gain function analysis in NSCLC cell lines, we demonstrated that miR-25-BTG2 axis could directly regulated BTG2 expression and affect radiotherapy sensitivity of NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • miR-25 is upregulated, while BTG2 is downregulated in radioresistant NSCLC patients. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiation induced apoptosis. • miR-25 directly targets BTG2 and suppresses its expression. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiotherapy through inhibiting BTG2 expression.

  18. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors.

  19. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  20. Simvastatin inhibits tumor angiogenesis in HER2-overexpressing human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Junhua; Xu, Bin; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yongbing

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of the HER2 oncogene contributes to tumor angiogenesis, which is an essential hallmark of cancer. Simvastatin has been reported to exhibit antitumor activities in several cancers; however, its roles and molecular mechanismsin the regulation of colorectal angiogenesis remain to be clarified. Here, we show that colon cancer cells express high levels of VEGF, total HER2 and phosphorylated HER2, and simvastatin apparently decreased their expression in HER2-overexpressing colon cancer cells. Simvastatin pretreatment reduced endothelial tube formation in vitro and microvessel density in vivo. Furthermore, simvastatin markedly inhibited tumor angiogenesis even in the presence of heregulin (HRG)-β1 (a HER2 co-activator) pretreatment in HER2+ tumor cells. Mechanistic investigation showed that simvastatin significantly abrogated HER2-induced tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF secretion. Together, these results provide a novel mechanism underlying the simvastatin-induced inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through regulating HER2/VEGF axis.

  1. Aromatase Inhibition Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Faqehi, Abdullah M. M.; Upreti, Rita; Livingstone, Dawn E.; McInnes, Kerry J.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Deficiency of aromatase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is associated with insulin resistance in humans and mice. Objective: We hypothesized that pharmacological aromatase inhibition results in peripheral insulin resistance in humans. Design: This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover study. Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical research facility. Participants: Seventeen healthy male volunteers (18–50 y) participated in the study. Intervention: The intervention included oral anastrozole (1 mg daily) and placebo, each for 6 weeks with a 2-week washout period. Main Outcome Measure: Glucose disposal and rates of lipolysis were measured during a stepwise hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Data are mean (SEM). Results: Anastrozole therapy resulted in significant estradiol suppression (59.9 ± 3.6 vs 102.0 ± 5.7 pmol/L, P = < .001) and a more modest elevation of total T (25.8 ± 1.2 vs 21.4 ± 0.7 nmol/L, P = .003). Glucose infusion rate, during the low-dose insulin infusion, was lower after anastrozole administration (12.16 ± 1.33 vs 14.15 ± 1.55 μmol/kg·min, P = .024). No differences in hepatic glucose production or rate of lipolysis were observed. Conclusion: Aromatase inhibition reduces insulin sensitivity, with respect to peripheral glucose disposal, in healthy men. Local generation and action of estradiol, at the level of skeletal muscle, is likely to be an important determinant of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26967690

  2. Tumor suppressor WWOX binds to ΔNp63α and sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Salah, Z; Bar-mag, T; Kohn, Y; Pichiorri, F; Palumbo, T; Melino, G; Aqeilan, R I

    2013-01-31

    The WWOX tumor suppressor is a WW domain-containing protein. Its function in the cell has been shown to be mediated, in part, by interacting with its partners through its first WW (WW1) domain. Here, we demonstrated that WWOX via WW1 domain interacts with p53 homolog, ΔNp63α. This protein-protein interaction stabilizes ΔNp63α, through antagonizing function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, inhibits nuclear translocation of ΔNp63α into the nucleus and suppresses ΔNp63α transactivation function. Additionally, we found that this functional crosstalk reverses cancer cells resistance to cisplatin, mediated by ΔNp63α, and consequently renders these cells more sensitive to undergo apoptosis. These findings suggest a functional crosstalk between WWOX and ΔNp63α in tumorigenesis.

  3. Tumor suppressor WWOX binds to ΔNp63α and sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Z; Bar-mag, T; Kohn, Y; Pichiorri, F; Palumbo, T; Melino, G; Aqeilan, R I

    2013-01-01

    The WWOX tumor suppressor is a WW domain-containing protein. Its function in the cell has been shown to be mediated, in part, by interacting with its partners through its first WW (WW1) domain. Here, we demonstrated that WWOX via WW1 domain interacts with p53 homolog, ΔNp63α. This protein–protein interaction stabilizes ΔNp63α, through antagonizing function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, inhibits nuclear translocation of ΔNp63α into the nucleus and suppresses ΔNp63α transactivation function. Additionally, we found that this functional crosstalk reverses cancer cells resistance to cisplatin, mediated by ΔNp63α, and consequently renders these cells more sensitive to undergo apoptosis. These findings suggest a functional crosstalk between WWOX and ΔNp63α in tumorigenesis. PMID:23370280

  4. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  5. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

  6. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  7. Levetiracetam enhances p53-mediated MGMT inhibition and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Bobustuc, George C.; Baker, Cheryl H.; Limaye, Arati; Jenkins, Wayne D.; Pearl, Gary; Avgeropoulos, Nicholas G.; Konduri, Santhi D.

    2010-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are frequently used to treat seizures in glioma patients. AEDs may have an unrecognized impact in modulating O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein that has an important role in tumor cell resistance to alkylating agents. We report that levetiracetam (LEV) is the most potent MGMT inhibitor among several AEDs with diverse MGMT regulatory actions. In vitro, when used at concentrations within the human therapeutic range for seizure prophylaxis, LEV decreases MGMT protein and mRNA expression levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that LEV enhances p53 binding on the MGMT promoter by recruiting the mSin3A/histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) corepressor complex. However, LEV does not exert any MGMT inhibitory activity when the expression of either p53, mSin3A, or HDAC1 is abrogated. LEV inhibits malignant glioma cell proliferation and increases glioma cell sensitivity to the monofunctional alkylating agent temozolomide. In 4 newly diagnosed patients who had 2 craniotomies 7–14 days apart, prior to the initiation of any tumor-specific treatment, samples obtained before and after LEV treatment showed the inhibition of MGMT expression. Our results suggest that the choice of AED in patients with malignant gliomas may have an unrecognized impact in clinical practice and research trial design. PMID:20525765

  8. Alternating electric fields (TTFields) inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Kirson, Eilon D; Giladi, Moshe; Gurvich, Zoya; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Wasserman, Yoram; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Palti, Yoram

    2009-01-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields used to treat cancerous tumors. This novel treatment modality effectively inhibits the growth of solid tumors in vivo and has shown promise in pilot clinical trials in patients with advanced stage solid tumors. TTFields were tested for their potential to inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs in two animal models: (1) Mice injected with malignant melanoma cells (B16F10) into the tail vein, (2) New Zealand White rabbits implanted with VX-2 tumors within the kidney capsule. Mice and rabbits were treated using two-directional TTFields at 100-200 kHz. Animals were either monitored for survival, or sacrificed for pathological and histological analysis of the lungs. The total number of lung surface metastases and the absolute weight of the lungs were both significantly lower in TTFields treated mice then in sham control mice. TTFields treated rabbits survived longer than sham control animals. This extension in survival was found to be due to an inhibition of metastatic spread, seeding or growth in the lungs of TTFields treated rabbits compared to controls. Histologically, extensive peri- and intra-tumoral immune cell infiltration was seen in TTFields treated rabbits only. These results raise the possibility that in addition to their proven inhibitory effect on the growth of solid tumors, TTFields may also have clinical benefit in the prevention of metastatic spread from primary tumors.

  9. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita G.; McCravy, Matthew S.; Basham, Jacob H.; Earl, Joshua A.; McMurray, Stacy L.; Starner, Chelsey J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  10. MiR-122 targets VEGFC in bladder cancer to inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Xing, Qing-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Qiang; Guo, Zhan-Jun; Li, Chang-Ying; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that microRNA-122 (miR-122) is down-regulated in several cancer cells and regulates cell apoptosis, proliferation, metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the mount of miR-122 in bladder cancer and the pivotal molecular mechanisms of miR-122 used to regulate bladder carcinogenesis and angiogenesis remain to be clarified. Here, we reveal that miR-122 expression is down-regulated in human bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. MiR-122 represses vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) post-transcriptional expression by directly binding to its 3’-UTR. The protein kinase B (AKT) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which are the most important downstream molecules of VEGFC, are also decreased in bladder cancer cell after miR-122 overexpression. Furthermore, miR-122 over-expression decreases bladder cancer cell migration, invasion, colony formation in vitro and slow bladder cancer growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Finally, miR-122 sensitizes bladder cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these studies suggest that miR-122 serves as a tumor suppressor and down-regulating VEGFC expression, leading to the inhibition of bladder cancer growth and angiogenesis. PMID:27508026

  11. Dual-targeted and pH-sensitive Doxorubicin Prodrug-Microbubble Complex with Ultrasound for Tumor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wanxian; Wen, Ge; Yang, Li; Tang, Jiao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Jihui; Zhang, Shiyu; Zhang, Li; Ma, Fei; Xiao, Liling; Wang, Ying; Li, Yingjia

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of a dual-targeted pH-sensitive doxorubicin prodrug-microbubble complex (DPMC) in ultrasound (US)-assisted antitumor therapy. The doxorubicin prodrug (DP) consists of a succinylated-heparin carrier conjugated with doxorubicin (DOX) via hydrazone linkage and decorated with dual targeting ligands, folate and cRGD peptide. Combination of microbubble (MB) and DP, generated via avidin-biotin binding, promoted intracellular accumulation and improved therapeutic efficiency assisted by US cavitation and sonoporation. Aggregates of prepared DP were observed with an inhomogeneous size distribution (average diameters: 149.6±29.8 nm and 1036.2±38.8 nm, PDI: 1.0) while DPMC exhibited a uniform distribution (average diameter: 5.804±2.1 μm), facilitating its usage for drug delivery. Notably, upon US exposure, DPMC was disrupted and aggregated DP dispersed into homogeneous small-sized nanoparticles (average diameter: 128.6±42.3 nm, PDI: 0.21). DPMC could target to angiogenic endothelial cells in tumor region via αvβ3-mediated recognition and subsequently facilitate its specific binding to tumor cells mediated via recognition of folate receptor (FR) after US exposure. In vitro experiments showed higher tumor specificity and killing ability of DPMC with US than free DOX and DP for breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, significant accumulation and specificity for tumor tissues of DPMC with US were detected using in vivo fluorescence and ultrasound molecular imaging, indicating its potential to integrate tumor imaging and therapy. In particular, through inducing apoptosis, inhibiting cell proliferation and antagonizing angiogenesis, DPMC with US produced higher tumor inhibition rates than DOX or DPMC without US in MCF-7 xenograft tumor-bearing mice while inducing no obvious body weight loss. Our strategy provides an effective platform for the delivery of large-sized or aggregated particles to tumor sites, thereby extending their

  12. Sterol and triterpene derivatives from plants inhibit the effects of a tumor promoter, and sitosterol and betulinic acid inhibit tumor formation in mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, K; Takido, M; Matsumoto, T; Takeuchi, M; Nakagawa, S

    1991-01-01

    A single topical application of 1 microgram of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) to the ears of mice was shown to induce edema, and this TPA-induced inflammation was inhibited by 4-methylsterol and triterpene derivatives. The ED50 of these compounds against TPA-induced inflammation was 0.1-3 mumol. Phytosterols had only slight inhibitory effects. Furthermore, application of 5 micrograms TPA to mouse skin rapidly caused accumulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Similarly, sitosterol and lupane-type triterpene derivatives markedly inhibited this TPA-induced ODC accumulation. In addition, 5 mumol betulinic acid markedly inhibited the promoting effect of 2.5 micrograms TPA applied twice weekly on skin tumor formation in mice initiated with 50 micrograms of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 5 mumol of sitosterol caused slight suppression. Thus, the inhibitory effects of sterol and triterpene derivatives on TPA-induced inflammation roughly parallelled their inhibitory activities against tumor promotion.

  13. Tumor acidosis enhances cytotoxic effects and autophagy inhibition by salinomycin on cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Paola; Dyczynski, Matheus; Sbrana, Francesca Vittoria; Karlgren, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Ma, Ran; Hartman, Johan; Bajalica-Lagercrantz, Svetlana; Grander, Dan; Kharaziha, Pedram; De Milito, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Sustained autophagy contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cancer cells to hypoxic and acidic microenvironments. Since cells in such environments are resistant to conventional cytotoxic drugs, inhibition of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in clinical oncology. We previously reported that the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor under clinical investigation is strongly impaired in acidic tumor environments, due to poor uptake of the drug, a phenomenon widely associated with drug resistance towards many weak bases. In this study we identified salinomycin (SAL) as a potent inhibitor of autophagy and cytotoxic agent effective on several cancer cell lines under conditions of transient and chronic acidosis. Since SAL has been reported to specifically target cancer-stem cells (CSC), we used an established model of breast CSC and CSC derived from breast cancer patients to examine whether this specificity may be associated with autophagy inhibition. We indeed found that CSC-like cells are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition compared to cells not expressing CSC markers. We also report that the ability of SAL to inhibit mammosphere formation from CSC-like cells was dramatically enhanced in acidic conditions. We propose that the development and use of clinically suitable SAL derivatives may result in improved autophagy inhibition in cancer cells and CSC in the acidic tumor microenvironment and lead to clinical benefits. PMID:27248168

  14. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in TMZ-resistant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Cho, Heeyeon; Torres, Shering; Wang, Weijun; Schönthal, Axel H; Petasis, Nicos A; Louie, Stan G; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2011-12-22

    Noscapine, a common oral antitussive agent, has been shown to have potent antitumor activity in a variety of cancers. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with temozolomide (TMZ), its current standard of care, is problematic because the tumor generally recurs and is then resistant to this drug. We therefore investigated the effects of noscapine on human TMZ-resistant GBM tumors. We found that noscapine significantly decreased TMZ-resistant glioma cell growth and invasion. Using the intracranial xenograft model, we showed that noscapine increased survival of animals with TMZ-resistant gliomas. Thus noscapine can provide an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  15. Glutaminase inhibitor compound 968 inhibits cell proliferation and sensitizes paclitaxel in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lingqin; Sheng, Xiugui; Clark, Leslie H; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Hui; Jones, Hannah M; Willson, Adam K; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our overall goal was to investigate the anti-tumor activity of the glutaminase 1 (GLS1) Inhibitor compound 968 in ovarian cancer cells. The human ovarian cancer cell lines, HEY, SKOV3 and IGROV-1 were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay after treatment with compound 968. Cell cycle progression and Annexin V expression were evaluated using Cellometer. Western blotting was performed to determine changes in GLS1, cellular stress and cell cycle checkpoints. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity were assessed by ELISA assay. Compound 968 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of GLS1 in a dose-dependent manner in all three ovarian cancer cell lines. Compound 968 induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment with compound 968 increased ROS levels and induced the protein expression of calnexin, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK). Deprivation of glutamine increased the sensitivity of cells to paclitaxel, and compound 968 sensitized cells to the anti-proliferative effects of paclitaxel. Compound 968 inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells through induction of G1 phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and cellular stress, suggesting that targeting GLS1 provide a novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. PMID:27830010

  16. Inhibition of demethylase KDM6B sensitizes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohit; Sehgal, Lalit; Havranek, Ondrej; Köhrer, Stefan; Khashab, Tamer; Jain, Neeraj; Burger, Jan A.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Davis, R. Eric; Samaniego, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation and demethylation regulate B-cell development, and their deregulation correlates with tumor chemoresistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, limiting cure rates. Since histone methylation status correlates with disease aggressiveness and relapse, we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting histone 3 Lys27 demethylase KDM6B, in vitro, using the small molecule inhibitor GSK-J4. KDM6B is overexpressed in the germinal center B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and higher KDM6B levels are associated with worse survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP. GSK-J4-induced apoptosis was observed in five (SU-DHL-6, OCI-Ly1, Toledo, OCI-Ly8, SU-DHL-8) out of nine germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Treatment with GSK-J4 predominantly resulted in downregulation of B-cell receptor signaling and BCL6. Cell lines expressing high BCL6 levels or CREBBP/EP300 mutations were sensitive to GSK-J4. Our results suggest that B-cell receptor-dependent downregulation of BCL6 is responsible for GSK-J4-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GSK-J4-mediated inhibition of KDM6B sensitizes germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to chemotherapy agents that are currently utilized in treatment regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27742770

  17. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  18. Pu-erh tea inhibits tumor cell growth by down-regulating mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms' metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects.

  19. Activated platelets inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell differentiation and promote tumor progression via platelet-tumor cell binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingchao; Li, Bing; Liu, Yue-Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of differentiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with increased circulating platelet size. We measured platelet activation and plasma adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels in HCC patients based on differentiation status. Local platelet accumulation and platelet-hepatoma cell binding were measured using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Using a xenograft assay in NON/SCID mice, we tested the effects of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel on platelet activation, platelet infiltration, platelet-tumor cell binding and tumor cell differentiation. HCC patients with poor differentiation status displayed elevated platelet activation and higher ADP levels. Platelets accumulated within poorly differentiated tissues and localized at hepatoma cell membranes. Platelet-tumor cell binding was existed in carcinoma tissues, largely mediated by P-selectin on platelets. NOD/SCID mice with xenograft tumors also exhibited increased platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. Clopidogrel therapy triggered hepatoma cell differentiation by attenuating platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. TCF4 knockdown promoted HepG-2 cell differentiation and inhibited tumor formation, and TCF4 could be the potential downstream target for clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27542264

  20. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting Rho GTPases and ERK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-01

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown anti-oxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. We demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the rat aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases, but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/MEK/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGFR2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts anti-angiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  1. Se-methylselenocysteine sensitizes hypoxic tumor cells to irinotecan by targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Tóth, Károly; Cao, Shousong; Durrani, Farukh A.; Vaughan, Mary M.; Jensen, Randy L.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxic tumor cells overexpressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α) are generally resistant to chemo/radiotherapy. We have reported that Se-methylselenocysteine (MSC) therapeutically enhances the efficacy and selectivity of irinotecan against human tumor xenografts. The aim of this study was to delineate the mechanism responsible for the observed efficacy targeting on HIF-1α and its transcriptionally regulated genes VEGF and CAIX. Methods We investigated the mechanism of HIF-1α inhibition by MSC and its critical role in the therapeutic outcome by generating HIF-1α stable knockdown (KD) human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, FaDu by transfecting HIF-1α short hairpin RNA. Results While cytotoxic efficacy in combination with methylselenic acid (MSA) with SN-38 (active metabolites of MSC and irinotecan) could not be confirmed in vitro against normoxic tumor cells, the hypoxic tumor cells were more sensitive to the combination. Reduction in HIF-1α either by MSA or shRNA knockdown resulted in significant increase in cytotoxicity of SN38 in vitro against hypoxic, but not the normoxic tumor cells. Similarly, in vivo, either MSC in combination with irinotecan treatment of parental xenografts or HIF-1α KD tumors treated with irinotecan alone resulted in comparable therapeutic response and increase in the long-term survival of mice bearing FaDu xenografts. Conclusions Our results show that HIF-1α is a critical target for MSC and its inhibition was associated with enhanced antitumor activity of irinotecan. Inhibition of HIF-1α appeared to be mediated through stabilization of PHD2, 3 and downregulation of ROS by MSC. Thus, our findings support the development of MSC as a HIF-1α inhibitor in combination chemotherapy. PMID:20066420

  2. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in the APC or Beta-catenin genes are well-established initiators of colorectal cancer, yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacologic approaches in mouse colorectal cancer and human colorectal cancer x...

  3. CA-1H, a novel oxazole bearing analogue of combretastatin A-4, disrupts the tumor vasculatures and inhibits the tumor growth via inhibiting tubulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Han, Fuguo; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing; Zhang, Qun; Qi, Xin; Liu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Vascular disrupting agents destroy established tumor vasculatures selectively, and have achieved encouraging antitumor activity in both pre-clinical and clinical trials. In the present study, we reported the vascular disruption and antitumor effects of CA-1H and its prodrug CA-1HP, oxazole bearing analogues of combretastatin A-4 (CA4). CA-1H was a tighter binder of tubulin than CA4 with the same binding site to chochcine and CA4, and inhibited tubulin polymerization both in cell free system and in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, CA-1H significantly disrupted the microtubulin skeleton in proliferating HUVECs rather than the quiescent ones, damaged the HUVECs-preformed tubes markedly, and lead to necrosis in tumor tissues in NCI-H1975 xenograft mice. Continuous administration for 19 days, CA-1HP could inhibit the NCI-H1975 xenograft tumor growth significantly without obvious weight loss and normal tissue damage, in addition, CA-1HP also inhibited the tumor growth in H22 hepatocellular carcinoma bearing mice; and combination CA-1HP with cisplatin showed more potent antitumor activity than used alone. Taken together, our present investigation suggested that CA-1H was a potential vascular disrupting agent for further development of antitumor drugs.

  4. Rat Hormone Sensitive Lipase Inhibition by Cyclipostins and Their Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Vasilieva, Elena; Dutta, Supratik; Malla, Raj K.; Martin, Benjamin P.; Spilling, Christopher D.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclipostins are bicyclic lipophilic phosphate natural products. We report here that synthesized individual diastereomers of cyclipostins P and R have nanomolar IC50s toward hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). The less potent diastereomers of these compounds have 10-fold weaker IC50s. The monocyclic phosphate analog of cyclipostin P is nearly as potent as the bicyclic natural product. Bicyclic phosphonate analogs of both cyclipostins exhibit IC50s similar to those of the weaker diastereomer phosphates (about 400 nM). The monocyclic phosphonate analog of cyclipostin P has similar potency. A series of monocyclic phosphonate analogs in which a hydrophobic tail extends from the lactone side of the ring are considerably poorer inhibitors, with IC50s around 50 μM. Finally cyclophostin, a related natural product inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that lacks the hydrocarbon tail of cyclipostins, is not active against HSL. These results indicate a critical SAR for these compounds, the hydrophobic tail. The smaller lactone ring is not critical to activity, a similarity shared with cyclophostin and AChE. The HSL kinetics of inhibition for the cyclipostin P trans diastereomer were examined in detail. The reaction is irreversible with a KI of 40 nM and a rate constant for inactivation of 0.2 min−1. These results are similar to those observed for cyclophostin and AChE. PMID:25678014

  5. Dentate total molecular layer interneurons mediate cannabinoid-sensitive inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiandong; Swietek, Bogumila; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Activity of the dentate gyrus, which gates information flow to the hippocampus, is under tight inhibitory regulation by interneurons with distinctive axonal projections, intrinsic and synaptic characteristics and neurochemical identities. Total molecular layer cells (TML-Cs), a class of morphologically distinct GABAergic neurons with axonal projections across the molecular layer, are among the most frequent interneuronal type in the dentate subgranular region. However, little is known about their synaptic and neurochemical properties. We demonstrate that synapses from morphologically identified TML-Cs to dentate interneurons are characterized by low release probability, facilitating short-term dynamics and asynchronous release. TML-Cs consistently show somatic and axonal labeling for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 R) yet fail to express cholecystokinin (CCK) indicating their distinctive neurochemical identity. In paired recordings, the release probability at synapses between TML-Cs was increased by the CB1 R antagonist AM251, demonstrating baseline endocannabinoid regulation of TML-C synapses. Apart from defining the synaptic and neurochemical features of TML-Cs, our findings reveal the morphological identity of a class of dentate CB1 R-positive neurons that do not express CCK. Our findings indicate that TML-Cs can mediate cannabinoid sensitive feed-forward and feedback inhibition of dentate perforant path inputs.

  6. Tumor-Associated Lymphatic Vessels Upregulate PDL1 to Inhibit T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Lothar C.; Ikenberg, Kristian; Cetintas, Timur; Kapaklikaya, Kübra; Hutmacher, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels (LVs) play multiple roles during tumor progression, including promotion of metastasis and regulation of antitumor immune responses by delivering antigen from the tumor bed to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under steady-state conditions, LN resident lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) have been found to maintain peripheral tolerance by directly inhibiting autoreactive T-cells. Similarly, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium has been suggested to reduce antitumor T-cell responses, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect have not been clarified. Using two distinct experimental tumor models, we found that tumor-associated LVs gain expression of the T-cell inhibitory molecule PDL1, similar to LN resident LECs, whereas tumor-associated blood vessels downregulate PDL1. The observed lymphatic upregulation of PDL1 was likely due to IFN-g released by stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, we found that blocking PDL1 results in increased T-cell stimulation by antigen-presenting LECs in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that peripheral, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium contributes to T-cell inhibition, by a mechanism similar to peripheral tolerance maintenance described for LN resident LECs. These findings may have clinical implications for cancer therapy, as lymphatic expression of PDL1 could represent a new biomarker to select patients for immunotherapy with PD1 or PDL1 inhibitors. PMID:28217128

  7. Tumor-Associated Lymphatic Vessels Upregulate PDL1 to Inhibit T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Ikenberg, Kristian; Cetintas, Timur; Kapaklikaya, Kübra; Hutmacher, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels (LVs) play multiple roles during tumor progression, including promotion of metastasis and regulation of antitumor immune responses by delivering antigen from the tumor bed to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under steady-state conditions, LN resident lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) have been found to maintain peripheral tolerance by directly inhibiting autoreactive T-cells. Similarly, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium has been suggested to reduce antitumor T-cell responses, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect have not been clarified. Using two distinct experimental tumor models, we found that tumor-associated LVs gain expression of the T-cell inhibitory molecule PDL1, similar to LN resident LECs, whereas tumor-associated blood vessels downregulate PDL1. The observed lymphatic upregulation of PDL1 was likely due to IFN-g released by stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, we found that blocking PDL1 results in increased T-cell stimulation by antigen-presenting LECs in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that peripheral, tumor-associated lymphatic endothelium contributes to T-cell inhibition, by a mechanism similar to peripheral tolerance maintenance described for LN resident LECs. These findings may have clinical implications for cancer therapy, as lymphatic expression of PDL1 could represent a new biomarker to select patients for immunotherapy with PD1 or PDL1 inhibitors.

  8. MET inhibition in tumor cells by PHA665752 impairs homologous recombination repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2012-02-01

    Abnormal activation of cellular DNA repair pathways by deregulated signaling of receptor tyrosine kinase systems has broad implications for both cancer biology and treatment. Recent studies suggest a potential link between DNA repair and aberrant activation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition (MET), an oncogene that is overexpressed in numerous types of human tumors and considered a prime target in clinical oncology. Using the homologous recombination (HR) direct-repeat direct-repeat green fluorescent protein ((DR)-GFP) system, we show that MET inhibition in tumor cells with deregulated MET activity by the small molecule PHA665752 significantly impairs in a dose-dependent manner HR. Using cells that express MET-mutated variants that respond differentially to PHA665752, we confirm that the observed HR inhibition is indeed MET-dependent. Furthermore, our data also suggest that decline in HR-dependent DNA repair activity is not a secondary effect due to cell cycle alterations caused by PHA665752. Mechanistically, we show that MET inhibition affects the formation of the RAD51-BRCA2 complex, which is crucial for error-free HR repair of double strand DNA lesions, presumably via downregulation and impaired translocation of RAD51 into the nucleus. Taken together, these findings assist to further support the role of MET in the cellular DNA damage response and highlight the potential future benefit of MET inhibitors for the sensitization of tumor cells to DNA damaging agents.

  9. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  10. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors limits tumor progression in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M.Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) accumulate in both neoplastic and inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment and impact the progression of a variety of diseases, including colorectal cancer. Pharmacological HIF inhibition represents a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. We show here that acriflavine (ACF), a naturally occurring compound known to repress HIF transcriptional activity, halts the progression of an autochthonous model of established colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) in immunocompetent mice. ACF treatment resulted in decreased tumor number, size and advancement (based on histopathological scoring) of CAC. Moreover, ACF treatment corresponded with decreased macrophage infiltration and vascularity in colorectal tumors. Importantly, ACF treatment inhibited the hypoxic induction of M-CSFR, as well as the expression of the angiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), a canonical HIF target, with little to no impact on the Nuclear factor-kappa B pathway in bone marrow-derived macrophages. These effects probably explain the observed in vivo phenotypes. Finally, an allograft tumor model further confirmed that ACF treatment inhibits tumor growth through HIF-dependent mechanisms. These results suggest pharmacological HIF inhibition in multiple cell types, including epithelial and innate immune cells, significantly limits tumor growth and progression. PMID:24408928

  11. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  12. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mense, Sarah M; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-03-31

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP₃, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion.

  13. Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits colorectal cancer growth through suppression of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwu; Liu, Liya; Ye, Ling; Shen, Aling; Chen, Youqin; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor development and metastasis, therefore inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a promising strategy for anticancer treatments. Patrinia scabiosaefolia, a well-known Oriental folk medicine, has been shown to be effective in the clinical treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. However, the precise mechanism of its tumoricidal activity remains largely unknown. Using a colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse xenograft model, the human colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), in the present study we evaluated the effects of an ethanol extract of Patrinia scabiosaefolia (EEPS) on tumor angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EEPS treatment significantly reduced the tumor volume in CRC mice and decreased the intratumoral microvessel density in tumor tissues. In addition, EEPS inhibited several key processes of angiogenesis, including the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. Moreover, EEPS treatment suppressed the expression of VEGF-A in CRC tumors and HT-29 cells. Collectively, our data suggest that Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits CRC growth likely via suppression of tumor angiogenesis.

  14. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair in irradiated tumor cells pretreated with Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Miho; Yu, Dong; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Sekine, Emiko; Kubota, Nobuo; Ando, Koichi; Okayasu, Ryuichi . E-mail: rokayasu@nirs.go.jp

    2006-12-22

    In order to investigate the mechanism of radio-sensitization by an Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), we studied repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in irradiated human cells pre-treated with 17-AAG. DSBs are thought to be the critical target for radiation-induced cell death. Two human tumor cell lines DU145 and SQ-5 which showed clear radio-sensitization by 17-AAG revealed a significant inhibition of DSB repair, while normal human cells which did not show radio-sensitization by the drug indicated no change in the DSB repair kinetics with 17-AAG. We further demonstrated that BRCA2 was a novel client protein for Hsp90, and 17-AAG caused the degradation of BRCA2 and in turn altered the behavior of Rad51, a critical protein for homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DSB repair. Our data demonstrate for the first time that 17-AAG inhibits the HR repair process and could provide a new therapeutic strategy to selectively result in higher tumor cell killing.

  15. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  16. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  17. Inhibition and regression of tumors in hamster DMBA model following laser microvascular targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Wang, Zhi; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1998-07-01

    Vascular targeting is a recent approach to cancer therapy that aims at damaging tumor vasculature to induce tumor cell hypoxia and subsequent cell death. Squamous cell cancer arises in the superficial mucosal and cutaneous epithelial layers, and tumor microvasculature therefore may be particularly well suited for targeting by selective photothermolysis. An initial evaluation of the effect of selective eradication of microvasculature on tumor development was undertaken here using the chemically-induced hamster cheek pouch model and a 585 nm pulsed dye laser. In a first group of 6 hamsters, progression of premalignant mucosal lesions was compared between control and laser treatment groups, and laser-induced regression of established tumors was evaluated. In a second group of 12 hamsters, the number of laser treatments required to produce complete regression of tumors of the buccal mucosa was determined. The effect of the laser on tumors appearing on the skin in these animals was also investigated. These experiments showed that laser treatment inhibited tumor development and caused complete regression of established tumors 10 mm3 or smaller. Photothermal microvascular targeting may be useful in treating dyplasia and early tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and skin, with fewer adverse sequelae than existing modalities.

  18. Reactivation of mutant p53 by a dietary-related compound phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, M; Saxena, R; Sinclair, E; Fu, Y; Jacobs, A; Dyba, M; Wang, X; Cruz, I; Berry, D; Kallakury, B; Mueller, S C; Agostino, S D; Blandino, G; Avantaggiati, M L; Chung, F-L

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are prevalent in human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense, which can be classified into contact mutations (that directly disrupts the DNA-binding activity of p53) and structural mutations (that disrupts the conformation of p53). Both of the mutations can disable the normal wild-type (WT) p53 activities. Nevertheless, it has been amply documented that small molecules can rescue activity from mutant p53 by restoring WT tumor-suppressive functions. These compounds hold promise for cancer therapy and have now entered clinical trials. In this study, we show that cruciferous-vegetable-derived phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) can reactivate p53 mutant under in vitro and in vivo conditions, revealing a new mechanism of action for a dietary-related compound. PEITC exhibits growth-inhibitory activity in cells expressing p53 mutants with preferential activity toward p53R175, one of the most frequent ‘hotspot' mutations within the p53 sequence. Mechanistic studies revealed that PEITC induces apoptosis in a p53R175 mutant-dependent manner by restoring p53 WT conformation and transactivation functions. Accordingly, in PEITC-treated cells the reactivated p53R175 mutant induces apoptosis by activating canonical WT p53 targets, inducing a delay in S and G2/M phase, and by phosphorylating ATM/CHK2. Interestingly, the growth-inhibitory effects of PEITC depend on the redox state of the cell. Further, PEITC treatments render the p53R175 mutant sensitive to degradation by the proteasome and autophagy in a concentration-dependent manner. PEITC-induced reactivation of p53R175 and its subsequent sensitivity to the degradation pathways likely contribute to its anticancer activities. We further show that dietary supplementation of PEITC is able to reactivate WT activity in vivo as well, inhibiting tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. These findings provide the first example of mutant p53 reactivation by a dietary compound and

  19. B7-H3 silencing inhibits tumor progression of mantle cell lymphoma and enhances chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yanfang; Wang, Jing; Dong, Fei; Zhu, Mingxia; Wan, Wenli; Li, Haishen; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Xinxing; Ke, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    B7-H3 (CD276), known as a member of B7 immunoregulatory family, is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein aberrantly expressed in numerous types of cancer and associated with poor prognosis. However, the role of B7-H3 in oncogenesis and chemosensitivity of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains unknown. We determined the effects of downregulating B7-H3 expression on tumor progression and the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drug in mantle cell lymphoma. B7-H3 knockdown was performed using lentivirus transduction in the Maver and Z138 mantle cell lymphoma cell lines, respectively. The effects of B7-H3 on cell proliferation, cycle, migration and invasion were investigated by CCK-8 assay, methyl cellulose colony forming assay, PI staining, and Transwell assays in vitro. By establishing Maver and Z138 xenograft models, the effects of B7-H3 on tumorigenicity were observed, and Ki-67 and PCNA was detected by immunohistochemistry. The downregulation of B7-H3 significantly decreased tumor proliferation in MCL in vitro and in vivo. In the B7-H3 knockdown groups of Maver and Z138 xenograft models, the mean inhibition rate of tumor growth was 59.1 and 65.0% (p=0.010 and 0.003), and the expression of both Ki-67 and PCNA were significantly lower, respectively. After B7-H3 silencing, the cell cycles of Maver and Z138 were both arrested at G0/G1 phase, and the cell migration rates and invasion capacity were decreased as well. Moreover, the impacts of B7-H3 RNAi on the antitumor effect of chemotherapy drugs were determined with CCK-8 and Annexin V-FITC/PI assays in vitro and with xenograft models in vivo. The silencing of B7-H3 increased the sensitivity of Maver and Z138 cells to rituximab and bendamustine and enhanced the drug-induced apoptosis, respectively. Our study demonstrates for the first time that B7-H3 promotes mantle cell lymphoma progression and B7-H3 knockdown significantly enhances the chemosensitivity. This may provide a new therapeutic approach to mantle cell lymphoma.

  20. Loss of ARID1A expression sensitizes cancer cells to PI3K- and AKT-inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Samartzis, Eleftherios P; Gutsche, Katrin; Dedes, Konstantin J; Fink, Daniel; Stucki, Manuel; Imesch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ARID1A mutations are observed in various tumors, including ovarian clear cell (OCCC) and endometrioid carcinomas, endometrial, and breast carcinomas. They commonly result in loss of ARID1A-protein expression and frequently co-occur with PI3K/AKT-pathway activating mechanisms. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis as to whether PI3K/AKT-pathway activation is a critical mechanism in ARID1A-mutated tumors and if consequently ARID1A-deficient tumors show increased sensitivity to treatment with PI3K- and AKT-inhibitors. Upon ARID1A knockdown, MCF7 breast cancer cells and primary MRC5 cells exhibited a significantly increased sensitivity towards the AKT-inhibitors MK-2206 and perifosine, as well as the PI3K-inhibitor buparlisib. Knockdown of ARID1A in MCF7 led to an increase of pAKT-Ser473. AKT-inhibition with MK-2206 led to increased apoptosis and to a decrease of pS6K in ARID1A-depleted MCF7 cells but not in the controls. In five OCCC cell lines ARID1A-deficiency correlated with increased pAKT-Ser473 levels and with sensitivity towards treatment with the AKT-inhibitor MK-2206. In conclusion, ARID1A-deficient cancer cells demonstrate an increased sensitivity to treatment with small molecule inhibitors of the PI3K/AKT-pathway. These findings suggest a specific requirement of the PI3K/AKT pathway in ARID1A-deficient tumors and reveal a synthetic lethal interaction between loss of ARID1A expression and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:24979463

  1. Sensitivity of malignant rhabdoid tumor cell lines to PD 0332991 is inversely correlated with p16 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumi, Yoshiki; Iehara, Tomoko; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Tsubai-Shimizu, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ken; Tamura, Shinichi; Kuwahara, Yasumichi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Houghton, Peter J.; Hosoi, Hajime

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} PD 0332991 (PD) could suppress four of five malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) cell lines. {yields} The sensitivity of the MRT cell lines to PD was inversely correlated with p16 expression (r = 0.951). {yields} p16 expression in MRT could be used to predict its sensitivity to PD. {yields} PD may be an attractive agent for patients with MRT whose tumors express low levels of p16. -- Abstract: Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare and highly aggressive neoplasm of young children. MRT is characterized by inactivation of integrase interactor 1 (INI1). Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), which acts downstream of INI1, is required for the proliferation of MRT cells. Here we investigated the effects of PD 0332991 (PD), a potent inhibitor of CDK4, against five human MRT cell lines (MP-MRT-AN, KP-MRT-RY, G401, KP-MRT-NS, KP-MRT-YM). In all of the cell lines except KP-MRT-YM, PD inhibited cell proliferation >50%, (IC{sub 50} values 0.01 to 0.6 {mu}M) by WST-8 assay, and induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as shown by flow cytometry and BrdU incorporation assay. The sensitivity of the MRT cell lines to PD was inversely correlated with p16 expression (r = 0.951). KP-MRT-YM cells overexpress p16 and were resistant to the growth inhibitory effect of PD. Small interfering RNA against p16 significantly increased the sensitivity of KP-MRT-YM cells to PD (p < 0.05). These results suggest that p16 expression in MRT could be used to predict its sensitivity to PD. PD may be an attractive agent for patients with MRT whose tumors express low levels of p16.

  2. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  3. Porfimer-sodium (Photofrin-II) in combination with ionizing radiation inhibits tumor-initiating cell proliferation and improves glioblastoma treatment efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Benayoun, Liat; Schaffer, Moshe; Bril, Rotem; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Segal, Ehud; Nevelsky, Alexsander; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Tumor relapse and tumor cell repopulation has been explained partially by the drug-free break period between successive conventional treatments. Strategies to overcome tumor relapse have been proposed, such as the use of chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation in small, frequent fractionated doses without an extended break period between treatment intervals. Yet, tumors usually acquire resistance and eventually escape the therapy. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the resistance of tumors to therapy, one of which involves the cancer stem cell or tumor-initiating cell (TIC) concept. TICs are believed to resist many conventional therapies, in part due to their slow proliferation and self-renewal capacities. Therefore, emerging efforts to eradicate TICs are being undertaken. Here we show that treatment with Photofrin II, among the most frequently used photosensitizers, sensitized a TIC-enriched U-87MG human glioblastoma cell to radiation, and improve treatment outcome when used in combination with radiotherapy. A U-87MG tumor cell population enriched with radiation-resistant TICs becomes radio-sensitive, and an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis are found in the presence of Photofrin II. Furthermore, U-87MG tumors implanted in mice treated with Photofrin II and radiation exhibit a significant reduction in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and an increased percentage of apoptotic TICs when compared with tumors grown in mice treated with radiation alone. Collectively, our results offer a new possible explanation for the therapeutic effects of radiosensitizing agents, and suggest that combinatorial treatment modalities can effectively prolong treatment outcome of glioblastoma tumors by inhibiting tumor growth mediated by TICs. PMID:23114641

  4. Preparation of Conjugated Polymer Grafted with H2O2-Sensitive Prodrug for Cell Imaging and Tumor Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Shengliang; Chen, Hui; Hu, Rong; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-13

    In this work, a new conjugated polymer poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) derivative containing pendent quaternized chlormethine (PFP-Chl) was synthesized by covalent linking small molecular prodrug groups onto conjugated polymer side chains. H2O2-sensitive prodrug with an eight-member-cyclic boronate ester structure could suffer from H2O2-triggered nitrogen mustard release and further DNA cross-linking and alkylation. PFP-Chl combines therapeutic characteristic with excellent optical property of conjugated polymers. It is found that PFP-Chl could enter into cells by endocytosis to simultaneously exhibit abilities of fluorescent imaging and tumor cell inhibition.

  5. miR-218 inhibited tumor angiogenesis by targeting ROBO1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiangyuan, Zhang; Jiaqiang, Dong; Yan, He; Ming, Zhao; Zhen, Liu; Na, Wang; Mingzuo, Jiang; Zhe, Zhang; Gang, Liu; Haiming, Liu; Yongzhan, Nie; Daiming, Fan; Jun, Tie

    2017-03-17

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs is involved in several carcinogenic processes, including tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the role of miR-218 in gastric cancer angiogenesis. In situ hybridization was performed on a set of tissue microarray samples to assess the difference in miR-218 expression in vessels between tumor tissues and normal gastric mucosa. In vitro, ectopic expression of miR-218 disturbed the tubular structure and inhibited the migration of endothelial cells. Motility and tube formation were rescued when miR-218 was downregulated. Moreover, miR-218 suppressed endothelial cell sprouting in a fibrin bead sprouting assay. Subsequently, we identified ROBO1 as a target of miR-218 in endothelial cells and determined it was responsible for the effect of miR-218 on tumor angiogenesis. In vivo, local injection of mature miR-218 in xenografted tumors disrupted the vessel plexus and thus inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, our study demonstrated an anti-angiogenic role of miR-218 in gastric cancer and indicated that delivery of miR-218 may be a potential therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor angiogenesis.

  6. Inhibition of mouse B16 melanoma by sodium butyrate correlated to tumor associated macrophages differentiation suppression

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fen; Mou, Yun-Zhu; Xiang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As one member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) family, Sodium butyrate (NaB) was found out that could be used as a differentiation inducer of much cancer cell. But its effects on tumor microenvironment cells are not well recognized. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of NaB on B16 melanoma and analysis its relevant mechanism. Methods: We observed the effect of sodium butyrate on B16 melanoma in vivo and in vitro. MTT method was performed to detect cell apoptosis rate after treatment. Tumor associated macrophage infiltration condition was detected by flow cytometry. Western-blotting and immunohistochemical method were used to detect the expression of tumor associated macrophage cytokines. Results: A certain concentration of sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth in vivo and in vitro, and this inhibition effects related to the suppression of tumor associated macrophage differentiation. At the same time we observed the relevant macrophage factors were down-regulated compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth through suppressing tumor associated macrophage proliferation and reduce relevant pro-tumor macrophage factors expression, which may help to promote the clinical study of melanoma epigenetic therapy. PMID:26064327

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Sensitizes Breast Cancer Cells to Natural Products with Proteasome-Inhibitory Activity Leading to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Shi, Wenli; Deshmukh, Rahul R.; Long, Jie; Cheng, Xiaoli; Ji, Weidong; Zeng, Guohua; Chen, Xianliang; Zhang, Yajie; Dou, Q. Ping

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment plays an important role in the process of tumor development. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, has a significant role in this process. Natural medicinal products such as Withaferin A (WA) and Celastrol (Cel) have shown anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties that can be attributed to multiple mechanisms including, but not limited to, apoptosis induction due to the inhibition of proteasomal activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of TNF-α in combination with WA or Cel in vitro in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. TNF-α, when combined with WA or Cel, activated caspase-3 and -9 and downregulated XIAP in a dose-dependent manner, leading to induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The combination also caused accumulation of the proteasomal target protein IκBα, resulting in inhibition of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these results suggest that TNF-α could sensitize breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to WA and Cel, at least in part, through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB signaling, leading to XIAP inhibition with subsequent upregulation of caspase-3 and -9 activities. Thus, the anti-cancer activities of TNF-α are enhanced when combined with the natural proteasome inhibitors, WA or Cel. PMID:25419573

  8. Ganoderma lucidum exerts anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and enhances their sensitivity to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sufen; Ye, Gang; Fu, Guodong; Cheng, Jian-Xin; Yang, Burton B; Peng, Chun

    2011-05-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a herbal mushroom known to have many health benefits, including the inhibition of tumor cell growth. However, the effect of Ganoderma lucidum on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most fatal gynecological malignancy, has not yet been reported. In this study, we determined whether Ganoderma lucidum regulates EOC cell activity. Using several cell lines derived from EOC, we found that Ganoderma lucidum strongly decreased cell numbers in a dose-dependent manner. Ganoderma lucidum also inhibited colony formation, cell migration and spheroid formation. In particular, Ganoderma lucidum was effective in inhibiting cell growth in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant cells and the treatment with Ganoderma lucidum significantly enhanced the effect of cisplatin on EOC cells. Furthermore, Ganoderma lucidum induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and also induced apoptosis by activating caspase 3. Finally, Ganoderma lucidum increased p53 but inhibited Akt expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that Ganoderma lucidum exerts multiple anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and can enhance the sensitivity of EOC cells to cisplatin.

  9. Statins improve survival by inhibiting spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Obata, Naoya; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daichiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a life-threatening disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. In melanoma cells, Rho overexpression promotes invasion and metastasis. However, the effect of statins on spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of statin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis inhibition in an in vivo model. We found that statins significantly inhibited spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth. Statins inhibited the mRNA expression and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in vivo and also suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of very late antigens (VLAs). Moreover, statins inhibited the prenylation of Rho as well as the phosphorylation of LIM kinase, serum response factor (SRF), and c-Fos downstream of the Rho signaling pathway. In addition, statins enhanced p53, p21, and p27 expression and reduced phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase and expression of cyclin D1 and E2. These results indicate that statins suppress Rho signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting tumor metastasis and growth. Furthermore, statins markedly improved the survival rate in a metastasis model, suggesting that statins have potential clinical applications for the treatment of metastatic cancers. PMID:26693069

  10. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  11. ERα-XPO1 Cross Talk Controls Tamoxifen Sensitivity in Tumors by Altering ERK5 Cellular Localization.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Kinga; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Kulkoyluoglu, Eylem; Chen, Karen Lee Ann; Hieronymi, Kadriye; Holloway, Jamie; Li, Sarah; Ray, Tania; Ray, Partha Sarathi; Landesman, Yosef; Lipka, Alexander Edward; Smith, Rebecca Lee; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep

    2016-10-01

    Most breast cancer deaths occur in women with recurrent, estrogen receptor (ER)-α(+), metastatic tumors. There is a critical need for therapeutic approaches that include novel, targetable mechanism-based strategies by which ERα (+) tumors can be resensitized to endocrine therapies. The objective of this study was to validate a group of nuclear transport genes as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of endocrine therapy failure and to evaluate the inhibition of XPO1, one of these genes as a novel means to enhance the effectiveness of endocrine therapies. Using advanced statistical methods, we found that expression levels of several of nuclear transport genes including XPO1 were associated with poor survival and predicted recurrence of tamoxifen-treated breast tumors in human breast cancer gene expression data sets. In mechanistic studies we showed that the expression of XPO1 determined the cellular localization of the key signaling proteins and the response to tamoxifen. We demonstrated that combined targeting of XPO1 and ERα in several tamoxifen-resistant cell lines and tumor xenografts with the XPO1 inhibitor, Selinexor, and tamoxifen restored tamoxifen sensitivity and prevented recurrence in vivo. The nuclear transport pathways have not previously been implicated in the development of endocrine resistance, and given the need for better strategies for selecting patients to receive endocrine modulatory reagents and improving therapy response of relapsed ERα(+) tumors, our findings show great promise for uncovering the role these pathways play in reducing cancer recurrences.

  12. ERα-XPO1 Cross Talk Controls Tamoxifen Sensitivity in Tumors by Altering ERK5 Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Kinga; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Kulkoyluoglu, Eylem; Chen, Karen Lee Ann; Hieronymi, Kadriye; Holloway, Jamie; Li, Sarah; Ray, Tania; Ray, Partha Sarathi; Landesman, Yosef; Lipka, Alexander Edward; Smith, Rebecca Lee

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer deaths occur in women with recurrent, estrogen receptor (ER)-α(+), metastatic tumors. There is a critical need for therapeutic approaches that include novel, targetable mechanism-based strategies by which ERα (+) tumors can be resensitized to endocrine therapies. The objective of this study was to validate a group of nuclear transport genes as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of endocrine therapy failure and to evaluate the inhibition of XPO1, one of these genes as a novel means to enhance the effectiveness of endocrine therapies. Using advanced statistical methods, we found that expression levels of several of nuclear transport genes including XPO1 were associated with poor survival and predicted recurrence of tamoxifen-treated breast tumors in human breast cancer gene expression data sets. In mechanistic studies we showed that the expression of XPO1 determined the cellular localization of the key signaling proteins and the response to tamoxifen. We demonstrated that combined targeting of XPO1 and ERα in several tamoxifen-resistant cell lines and tumor xenografts with the XPO1 inhibitor, Selinexor, and tamoxifen restored tamoxifen sensitivity and prevented recurrence in vivo. The nuclear transport pathways have not previously been implicated in the development of endocrine resistance, and given the need for better strategies for selecting patients to receive endocrine modulatory reagents and improving therapy response of relapsed ERα(+) tumors, our findings show great promise for uncovering the role these pathways play in reducing cancer recurrences. PMID:27533791

  13. Growth inhibition and pro-apoptotic activity of violacein in Ehrlich ascites tumor.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Natália; Dreyfuss, Juliana L; Regatieri, Caio V; Palladino, Marcelly V; Durán, Nelson; Nader, Helena B; Haun, Marcela; Justo, Giselle Z

    2010-06-07

    The continuing threat to biodiversity lends urgency to the need of identification of sustainable source of natural products. This is not so much trouble if there is a microbial source of the compound. Herein, violacein, a natural indolic pigment extracted from Chromobacterium violaceum, was evaluated for its antitumoral potential against the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo and in vitro. Evaluation of violacein cytotoxicity using different endpoints indicated that EAT cells were twofold (IC(50)=5.0 microM) more sensitive to the compound than normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro studies indicated that violacein cytotoxicity to EAT cells is mediated by a rapid (8-12h) production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in intracellular GSH levels, probably due to oxidative stress. Additionally, apoptosis was primarily induced, as demonstrated by an increase in Annexin-V positive cells, concurrently with increased levels of DNA fragmentation and increased caspase-2, caspase-9 and caspase-3 activities up to 4.5-, 6.0- and 5.5-fold, respectively, after 72 h of treatment. Moreover, doses of 0.1 and 1.0 microg kg(-1) violacein, administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to EAT-bearing mice throughout the lifespan of the animals significantly inhibited tumor growth and increased survival of mice. In view of these results, a 35-day toxicity study was conducted in vivo. Complete hematology, biochemistry (ALT, AST and creatinine levels) and histopathological analysis of liver and kidney indicated that daily doses of violacein up to 1000 microg kg(-1) for 35 days are well tolerated and did not cause hematotoxicity nor renal or hepatotoxicity when administered i.p. to mice. Altogether, these results indicate that violacein causes oxidative stress and an imbalance in the antioxidant defense machinery of cells culminating in apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, this is the first report of its antitumor activity in vivo, which occurs in the absence of toxicity to

  14. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O.M. Zack

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and antiinflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  15. A small-molecule antagonist of CXCR4 inhibits intracranial growth of primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Joshua B; Kung, Andrew L; Klein, Robyn S; Chan, Jennifer A; Sun, YanPing; Schmidt, Karl; Kieran, Mark W; Luster, Andrew D; Segal, Rosalind A

    2003-11-11

    The vast majority of brain tumors in adults exhibit glial characteristics. Brain tumors in children are diverse: Many have neuronal characteristics, whereas others have glial features. Here we show that activation of the Gi protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 is critical for the growth of both malignant neuronal and glial tumors. Systemic administration of CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 inhibits growth of intracranial glioblastoma and medulloblastoma xenografts by increasing apoptosis and decreasing the proliferation of tumor cells. This reflects the ability of AMD 3100 to reduce the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt, all of which are pathways downstream of CXCR4 that promote survival, proliferation, and migration. These studies (i) demonstrate that CXCR4 is critical to the progression of diverse brain malignances and (ii) provide a scientific rationale for clinical evaluation of AMD 3100 in treating both adults and children with malignant brain tumors.

  16. Direct pharmacological inhibition of β-catenin by RNA interference in tumors of diverse origin

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Shanthi; Koser, Martin; Cyr, Wendy; Chopda, Girish; Tao, Junyan; Shui, Xue; Ying, Bo; Chen, Dongyu; Pandya, Purva; Chipumuro, Edmond; Siddiquee, Zakir; Craig, Kevin; Lai, Chengjung; Dudek, Henryk; Monga, Satdarshan; Wang, Weimin; Brown, Bob D.; Abrams, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is among the most frequently altered signaling networks in human cancers. Despite decades of preclinical and clinical research, efficient therapeutic targeting of Wnt/β-catenin has been elusive. RNA interference (RNAi) technology silences genes at the mRNA level, and therefore can be applied to previously-undruggable targets. Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) represent an elegant solution for delivery of RNAi-triggering oligonucleotides to disease-relevant tissues, but have been mostly restricted to applications in the liver. In this study, we systematically tuned the composition of a prototype LNP to enable tumor-selective delivery of a Dicer-substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) targeting CTNNB1, the gene encoding β-catenin. This formulation, termed EnCore-R, demonstrated pharmacodynamic activity in subcutaneous human tumor xenografts, orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (PDx) tumors, disseminated hematopoietic tumors, genetically induced primary liver tumors, metastatic colorectal tumors, murine metastatic melanoma. DsiRNA delivery was homogeneous in tumor sections, selective over normal liver and independent of apolipoprotein-E binding. Significant tumor growth inhibition was achieved in Wnt-dependent colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma models, but not in Wnt-independent tumors. Finally, no evidence of accelerated blood clearance or sustained liver transaminase elevation was observed after repeated dosing in nonhuman primates. These data support further investigation to gain mechanistic insight, optimize dose regimens and identify efficacious combinations with standard-of-care therapeutics. PMID:27390343

  17. Macrophage PPARγ inhibits Gpr132 to mediate the anti-tumor effects of rosiglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wing Yin; Huynh, HoangDinh; Chen, Peiwen; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Wan, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) significantly contributes to cancer progression. Human cancer is enhanced by PPARγ loss-of-function mutations, but inhibited by PPARγ agonists such as TZD diabetes drugs including rosiglitazone. However, it remains enigmatic whether and how macrophage contributes to PPARγ tumor-suppressive functions. Here we report that macrophage PPARγ deletion in mice not only exacerbates mammary tumor development but also impairs the anti-tumor effects of rosiglitazone. Mechanistically, we identify Gpr132 as a novel direct PPARγ target in macrophage whose expression is enhanced by PPARγ loss but repressed by PPARγ activation. Functionally, macrophage Gpr132 is pro-inflammatory and pro-tumor. Genetic Gpr132 deletion not only retards inflammation and cancer growth but also abrogates the anti-tumor effects of PPARγ and rosiglitazone. Pharmacological Gpr132 inhibition significantly impedes mammary tumor malignancy. These findings uncover macrophage PPARγ and Gpr132 as critical TAM modulators, new cancer therapeutic targets, and essential mediators of TZD anti-cancer effects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18501.001 PMID:27692066

  18. Inhibition by alcohols of the localization of radioactive nitrosonornicotine in sites of tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, W.J.; Marlowe, C.

    1983-06-01

    Oral administration of ethanol, n-butanol, or t-butanol to mice 20 minutes before injection of carbon-14-labeled nitrosonornicotine inhibited the localization of radioactivity in bronchial and salivary duct epithelium and in the liver. Localization of radioactivity in the nasal epithelium and esophagus was not significantly reduced. These alcohols therefore may selectively inhibit tumor formation in three of the five sites where this carcinogen typically acts.

  19. Breast tumor oxygenation in response to carbogen intervention assessed simultaneously by three oxygen-sensitive parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yueqing; Bourke, Vincent; Kim, Jae Gwan; Xia, Mengna; Constantinescu, Anca; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2003-07-01

    Three oxygen-sensitive parameters (arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation SaO2, tumor vascular oxygenated hemoglobin concentration [HbO2], and tumor oxygen tension pO2) were measured simultaneously by three different optical techniques (pulse oximeter, near infrared spectroscopy, and FOXY) to evaluate dynamic responses of breast tumors to carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) intervention. All three parameters displayed similar trends in dynamic response to carbogen challenge, but with different response times. These response times were quantified by the time constants of the exponential fitting curves, revealing the immediate and the fastest response from the arterial SaO2, followed by changes in global tumor vascular [HbO2], and delayed responses for pO2. The consistency of the three oxygen-sensitive parameters demonstrated the ability of NIRS to monitor therapeutic interventions for rat breast tumors in-vivo in real time.

  20. Dual EGFR/HER2 inhibition sensitizes prostate cancer cells to androgen withdrawal by suppressing ErbB3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Mooso, Benjamin A.; Jathal, Maitreyee K.; Madhav, Anisha; Johnson, Sherra D.; van Spyk, Elyse; Mikhailova, Margarita; Ripoll, Alexandra Zierenberg; Xue, Lingru; Vinall, Ruth L.; deVere White, Ralph W; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) are commonly treated with androgen withdrawal therapy (AWT); however, almost all patients eventually progress to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), indicating failure of AWT to eliminate androgen-sensitive PCa. The overall goal of these studies is to determine whether dual inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR and HER2 would prolong the effectiveness of this treatment in PCa. Experimental Design We used androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and its CRPC sublines LNCaP-AI and C4-2. Additional data were collected in pRNS-1-1 cells stably expressing a mutant androgen receptor (AR-T877A), and in nude mice harboring CWR22 tumors. Studies utilized EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and AG1478, and HER2 inhibitors trastuzumab and AG879. Results Dual EGFR/HER2 inhibition induced apoptosis selectively in androgen-sensitive PCa cells undergoing AWT, but not in the presence of androgens, or in CRPC cells. We show that AWT alone failed to induce significant apoptosis in androgen-dependent cells, due to AWT-induced increase in HER2 and ErbB3, which promoted survival by increasing Akt phosphorylation. AWT-induced ErbB3 stabilized the AR and stimulated PSA, while it was inactivated only by inhibition of both its dimerization partners EGFR and HER2 (PCa cells do not express ErbB4); but not the inhibition of any one receptor alone, explaining the success of dual EGFR/HER2 inhibition in sensitizing androgen-dependent cells to AWT. The effectiveness of the inhibitors in suppressing growth correlated with its ability to prevent Akt phosphorylation. Conclusions These studies indicate that dual EGFR/HER2 inhibition, administered together with AWT; sensitize PCa cells to apoptosis during AWT. PMID:21844010

  1. Inhibition of solid tumor growth by gene transfer of VEGF receptor-1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Regina; Machein, Marcia; Nicolaus, Anke; Hilbig, Andreas; Wild, Carola; Clauss, Matthias; Plate, Karl H; Breier, Georg

    2004-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the high-affinity VEGF receptor Flk-1/KDR (VEGFR-2) are key regulators of tumor angiogenesis. Strategies to block VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling were successfully used to inhibit experimental tumor growth and indicated that VEGFR-2 is the main signaling VEGF receptor in proliferating tumor endothelium. Here, we investigated the role of the VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1/Flt-1) in the vascularization of 2 different experimental tumors in vivo. VEGFR-1 mutants were generated that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of the VEGFR-1 mutants led to a strong reduction of tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenografted C6 glioma and in syngeneic BFS-1 fibrosarcoma. Histological analysis of the inhibited fibrosarcoma revealed reduced vascular density, decreased tumor cell proliferation as well as increased tumor cell apoptosis and the formation of necrosis. The retroviral gene transfer of the full length VEGFR-1 also caused a significant reduction of tumor growth in both models. The inhibitory effects of the VEGFR-1 mutants and the full length VEGFR-1 in BFS-1 fibrosarcoma were mediated through host tumor endothelial cells because the BFS-1 fibrosarcoma cells were not infected by the retrovirus. The formation of heterodimers between VEGFR-2 and full length or truncated VEGFR-1 was observed in vitro and might contribute to the growth inhibitory effect by modulating distinct signal transduction pathways. The results of our study underline the central role of the VEGF/VEGFR-1 signaling system in tumor angiogenesis and demonstrate that VEGFR-1 can serve as a target for anti-angiogenic gene therapy.

  2. Cytosolic phospholipaseA2 inhibition with PLA-695 radiosensitizes tumors in lung cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Thotala, Dinesh; Craft, Jeffrey M; Ferraro, Daniel J; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Bhave, Sandeep R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted.

  3. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy.

  4. Chloroquine alleviates etoposide-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 in adrenocortical tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T-Y; Syu, J-S; Lin, T-C; Cheng, H-l; Lu, F-l; Wang, C-Y

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor drug etoposide (ETO) is widely used in treating several cancers, including adrenocortical tumor (ACT). However, when used at sublethal doses, tumor cells still survive and are more susceptible to the recurring tumor due to centrosome amplification. Here, we checked the effect of sublethal dose of ETO in ACT cells. Sublethal dose of ETO treatment did not induce cell death but arrested the ACT cells in G2/M phase. This resulted in centrosome amplification and aberrant mitotic spindle formation leading to genomic instability and cellular senescence. Under such conditions, Chk2, cyclin A/CDK2 and ERK1/2 were aberrantly activated. Pharmacological inactivation of Chk2, CDK2 or ERK1/2 or depletion of CDK2 or Chk2 inhibited the centrosome amplification in ETO-treated ACT cells. In addition, autophagy was activated by ETO and was required for ACT cell survival. Chloroquine, the autophagy inhibitor, reduced ACT cell growth and inhibited ETO-induced centrosome amplification. Chloroquine alleviated CDK2 and ERK, but not Chk2, activation and thus inhibited centrosome amplification in either ETO- or hydroxyurea-treated ACT cells. In addition, chloroquine also inhibited centrosome amplification in osteosarcoma U2OS cell lines when treated with ETO or hydroxyurea. In summary, we have demonstrated that chloroquine inhibited ACT cell growth and alleviated DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 and ERK activity, thus preventing genomic instability and recurrence of ACT. PMID:26690546

  5. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu; Wang, Xiu Jun; Tang, Xiuwen

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  6. Ursolic acid sensitized colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting MDR1 through HIF-1α*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jian-zhen; Xuan, Yan-yan; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Jian-jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the efficacy of ursolic acid in sensitizing colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia and its underlying mechanisms. Methods: Three colon cancer cell lines (RKO, LoVo, and SW480) were used as in vitro models. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin were used as chemotherapeutic drugs. Cell viability and apoptosis were tested to evaluate the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to chemotherapy. The transcription and expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunoblotting. Cycloheximide and MG132 were used to inhibit protein synthesis and degradation, respectively. In vitro tube formation assay was used to evaluate angiogenesis. Results: We demonstrated the chemosensitizing effects of ursolic acid with 5-FU and oxaliplatin in three colon cancer cell lines under hypoxia. This effect was correlated to its inhibition of MDR1 through HIF-1α. Moreover, ursolic acid was capable of inhibiting HIF-1α accumulation with little effects on its constitutional expression in normoxia. In addition, ursolic acid also down-regulated VEGF and inhibited tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions: Ursolic acid exerted chemosensitizing effects in colon cancer cells under hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-1α accumulation and the subsequent expression of the MDR1 and VEGF. PMID:27604859

  7. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  8. Xanthii Fructus inhibits allergic response in the ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Nam-Gil; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Bina; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Im, Yong-Seok; Lee, Ka-Yeon; Jun-Kum, Chang; Kim, Ho-Seok; Cho, Hyun-Joo; Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthii Fructus (XF) is widely used in traditional anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory Asian medicine. Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory disease characterized by markedly increased levels of anti-inflammatory factors and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the nasal mucosa. We investigated the effects of XF in the allergen-induced rhinitis model. Materials and Methods: Following ovalbumin (OVA)/alum intraperitoneal injection on days 0, 7 and 14, the BALB/c mice (albino, laboratory-bred strain of the house mice) were challenged intranasally with OVA for 10 days a week after the last sensitization. The number of sneezes was recorded for 10 days; additionally, the levels of cytokines, histamine, immunoglobulin E (IgE) and OVA-specific serum IgE were estimated. Eosinophil infiltration, thickness of nasal mucosa and expression of caspase-1 were determined by immunohistochemistry. We also evaluated the effect of XF on the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in human mast cell-1 (HMC-1), by Western blotting. Results: The administration of XF significantly decreased sneezing and the serum levels of histamine, IgE, OVA-specific IgE, and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-5, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). XF inhibited the changes in thickness of the nasal septum, influx of eosinophils and expression of capase-1. In addition, XF inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB in phorbol-myristate-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (A23187) stimulated HMC-1. Conclusion: This study suggests that XF acts a potent anti-allergic drug which alleviates the allergic responses in ovalbumin-sensitized mouse allergic rhinitis model. PMID:26664025

  9. Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to inhibition of graft-versus-tumor-effects against intraperitoneal Meth A tumor.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Kee; Lee, Na-Ri; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2004-08-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in graft-versus-tumor-effect (GVT) was evaluated in the present study. GVT was induced by intravenous injection of C57BL/6J (H-2b) mouse splenocytes to {C57BL/6J (H-2b) x BALB/c (H-2d)} F1 mice bearing Meth A (H-2d) ascites tumors. Induction of GVT increased nitrite production and expression of inducible NO synthase by ascites cells. The increased nitrite production was inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (MLA). Experiments employing immunomagnetic depletion of Mac-1+ cells from ascites indicated that macrophages were a major cellular source of the nitrite production. Interferon-gamma levels were increased in both serum and ascites fluid during GVT. Induction of GVT prolonged survival of ascites-bearing mice, and increased urinary nitrate excretion. MLA administration inhibited GVT-induced increase in urinary nitrate excretion, and further prolonged GVT-induced increase in survival. These results indicate that NO synthesis is induced in tumors during GVT, and the NO acts as an inhibitor of GVT.

  10. Rottlerin exerts its anti-tumor activity through inhibition of Skp2 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yingying; Wang, Lixia; Ye, Xiantao; Zhao, Zhe; Zhou, Xiuxia; Li, Yali; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Studies have investigated the tumor suppressive role of rottlerin in carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of rottlerin-induced anti-tumor activity are largely unclear. Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2) has been validated to play an oncogenic role in a variety of human malignancies. Therefore, inactivation of Skp2 could be helpful for the treatment of human cancers. In the current study, we explore whether rottlerin could inhibit Skp2 expression, leading to inhibition of cell growth, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. We found that rottlerin treatment inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We also revealed that rottlerin suppressed cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Mechanically, we observed that rottlerin significantly down-regulated the expression of Skp2 in breast cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of Skp2 abrogated rottlerin-mediated tumor suppressive activity, whereas down-regulation of Skp2 enhanced rottlerin-triggered anti-tumor function. Strikingly, we identified that rottlerin exhibited its anti-tumor potential partly through inactivation of Skp2 in breast cancer. Our findings indicate that rottlerin could be a potential safe agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27582552

  11. Inhibiting MDSC differentiation from bone marrow with phytochemical polyacetylenes drastically impairs tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Yen; Lan, Chun-Wen; Huang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Chih-Yu; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Yang, Wen-Chin; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-11-18

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are implicated in the promotion of tumor metastasis by protecting metastatic cancerous cells from immune surveillance and have thus been suggested as novel targets for cancer therapy. We demonstrate here that oral feeding with polyacetylenic glycosides (BP-E-F1) from the medicinal plant Bidens pilosa effectively suppresses tumor metastasis and inhibits tumor-induced accumulation of granulocytic (g) MDSCs, but does not result in body weight loss in a mouse mammary tumor-resection model. BP-E-F1 is further demonstrated to exert its anti-metastasis activity through inhibiting the differentiation and function of gMDSCs. Pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that BP-E-F1 suppresses the differentiation of gMDSCs via the inhibition of a tumor-derived, G-CSF-induced signaling pathway in bone marrow cells of test mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that specific plant polyacetylenic glycosides that target gMDSC differentiation by communicating with bone marrow cells may hence be seriously considered for potential application as botanical drugs against metastatic cancers.

  12. Inhibiting MDSC differentiation from bone marrow with phytochemical polyacetylenes drastically impairs tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Yen; Lan, Chun-Wen; Huang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Chih-Yu; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Yang, Wen-Chin; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are implicated in the promotion of tumor metastasis by protecting metastatic cancerous cells from immune surveillance and have thus been suggested as novel targets for cancer therapy. We demonstrate here that oral feeding with polyacetylenic glycosides (BP-E-F1) from the medicinal plant Bidens pilosa effectively suppresses tumor metastasis and inhibits tumor-induced accumulation of granulocytic (g) MDSCs, but does not result in body weight loss in a mouse mammary tumor-resection model. BP-E-F1 is further demonstrated to exert its anti-metastasis activity through inhibiting the differentiation and function of gMDSCs. Pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that BP-E-F1 suppresses the differentiation of gMDSCs via the inhibition of a tumor-derived, G-CSF-induced signaling pathway in bone marrow cells of test mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that specific plant polyacetylenic glycosides that target gMDSC differentiation by communicating with bone marrow cells may hence be seriously considered for potential application as botanical drugs against metastatic cancers. PMID:27857157

  13. Combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid inhibits tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Katsunori; Sato, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shinjiro; Morinaga, Tetsuo; Hirano, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Placental extract contains several biologically active compounds, and pharmacological induction of placental extract has therapeutic effects, such as improving liver function in patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis. Here, we searched for novel molecules with an anti-tumor activity in placental extracts. Active molecules were separated by chromatographic analysis, and their antiproliferative activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. We identified aspartic acid and glutamic acid to possess the antiproliferative activity against human hepatoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid exhibited enhanced antiproliferative activity, and inhibited Akt phosphorylation. We also examined in vivo tumor inhibition activity using the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The treatment mixture (emulsion of the amino acids with Lipiodol) administered by hepatic artery injection inhibited tumor cell growth of the rabbit VX2 liver. These results suggest that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid may be useful for induction of tumor cell death, and has the potential for clinical use as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  14. Identification of breast cancer cell subtypes sensitive to ATG4B inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bortnik, Svetlana; Choutka, Courtney; Horlings, Hugo M.; Leung, Samuel; Baker, Jennifer H.; Lebovitz, Chandra; Dragowska, Wieslawa H.; Go, Nancy E.; Bally, Marcel B.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Gelmon, Karen A.; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation and recycling process, functions in advanced malignancies to promote cancer cell survival and contribute to cancer progression and drug resistance. While various autophagy inhibition strategies are under investigation for cancer treatment, corresponding patient selection criteria for these autophagy inhibitors need to be developed. Due to its central roles in the autophagy process, the cysteine protease ATG4B is one of the autophagy proteins being pursued as a potential therapeutic target. In this study, we investigated the expression of ATG4B in breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease comprised of several molecular subtypes. We examined a panel of breast cancer cell lines, xenograft tumors, and breast cancer patient specimens for the protein expression of ATG4B, and found a positive association between HER2 and ATG4B protein expression. We showed that HER2-positive cells, but not HER2-negative breast cancer cells, require ATG4B to survive under stress. In HER2-positive cells, cytoprotective autophagy was dependent on ATG4B under both starvation and HER2 inhibition conditions. Combined knockdown of ATG4B and HER2 by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability, and the combination of ATG4B knockdown with trastuzumab resulted in a greater reduction in cell viability compared to trastuzumab treatment alone, in both trastuzumab-sensitive and -resistant HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells. Together these results demonstrate a novel association of ATG4B positive expression with HER2 positive breast cancers and indicate that this subtype is suitable for emerging ATG4B inhibition strategies. PMID:27556700

  15. Cell-permeable iron inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling and tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Devika; Saluja, Manju; Modi, Shrey; Venkatachalam, Annapoorna; Schnettler, Erica; Roy, Sabita; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and metastasis. Hypoxia in tumors drives this angiogenic response by stabilizing Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF) and target genes like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). HIF stability is regulated by Prolylhydroxylases (PHD)-mediated modification. Iron is an important cofactor in regulating the enzymatic activity of PHDs. Reducing intracellular iron, for instance, mimics hypoxia and induces a pro-angiogenic response. It is hypothesized that increasing the intracellular iron levels will have an opposite, anti-angiogenic effect. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing iron homeostasis in endothelial cells using a unique form of iron, Ferric Ammonium Citrate (FAC). FAC is a cell-permeable form of iron, which can passively enter into cells bypassing the transferrin receptor mediated uptake of transferrin-bound iron. Our studies show that FAC does not decrease the levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in endothelial cells but inhibits the autocrine stimulation of VEGF-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) system by blocking receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. FAC inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and sprouting. Finally, systemic administration of FAC inhibits VEGF and tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our studies show that cell-permeable iron attenuates VEGFR-2 mediated signaling and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27589831

  16. Orally Administered Mucolytic Drug l-Carbocisteine Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomohiro; Yokota, Tsubasa; Nakayama, Shiori; Oki, Sayuri; Mutoh, Junpei; Takahashi, Satoru; Sato, Keizo

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is essential for the growth and metastasis of tumors. In this study, we found that l-carbocisteine, a widely used expectorant, potently inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. An in vivo Matrigel plug assay revealed that l-carbocisteine (2.5 mg/kg i.p. twice daily) significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. l-Carbocisteine also suppressed VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration, and formation of capillary-like structures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We examined the signaling pathways affected in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs, and found that l-carbocisteine significantly inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, protein kinase C (PKC) μ, and extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK) 1/2, which have been shown to be essential for angiogenesis. However, these inhibitory effects of l-carbocisteine were not observed in the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line. An in vivo study of Colon-26 tumor-bearing mice found that tumor volumes were significantly smaller in mice treated with l-carbocisteine (150 mg/kg administered orally twice daily) in comparison with vehicle-treated mice. However, l-carbocisteine had no direct effect on Colon-26 cell proliferation or ERK activation. Collectively, our results suggest that l-carbocisteine inhibits tumor angiogenesis by suppressing PLCγ/PKC/ERK signaling.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibits Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Tom; Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Pinheiro, Iris; Petta, Ioanna; Engblom, David; Kleyman, Anna; Schütz, Günther; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2011-01-01

    As glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) and the concomitant burden pose a worldwide problem, there is an urgent need for a more effective glucocorticoid therapy, for which insights into the molecular mechanisms of GCR are essential. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that TNFα, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator in numerous inflammatory diseases, compromises the protective function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) against TNFα-induced lethal inflammation. Indeed, protection of mice by dexamethasone against TNFα lethality was completely abolished when it was administered after TNFα stimulation, indicating compromised GR function upon TNFα challenge. TNFα-induced GCR was further demonstrated by impaired GR-dependent gene expression in the liver. Furthermore, TNFα down-regulates the levels of both GR mRNA and protein. However, this down-regulation seems to occur independently of GC production, as TNFα also resulted in down-regulation of GR levels in adrenalectomized mice. These findings suggest that the decreased amount of GR determines the GR response and outcome of TNFα-induced shock, as supported by our studies with GR heterozygous mice. We propose that by inducing GCR, TNFα inhibits a major brake on inflammation and thereby amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. Our findings might prove helpful in understanding GCR in inflammatory diseases in which TNFα is intimately involved. PMID:21646349

  18. Biomarker- versus drug-driven tumor growth inhibition models: an equivalence analysis.

    PubMed

    Sardu, Maria Luisa; Poggesi, Italo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The mathematical modeling of tumor xenograft experiments following the dosing of antitumor drugs has received much attention in the last decade. Biomarker data can further provide useful insights on the pathological processes and be used for translational purposes in the early clinical development. Therefore, it is of particular interest the development of integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models encompassing drug, biomarker and tumor-size data. This paper investigates the reciprocal consistency of three types of models: drug-to-tumor, such as established drug-driven tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models, drug-to-biomarker, e.g. indirect response models, and biomarker-to-tumor, e.g. the more recent biomarker-driven TGI models. In particular, this paper derives a mathematical relationship that guarantees the steady-state equivalence of the cascade of drug-to-biomarker and biomarker-to-tumor models with a drug-to-tumor TGI model. Using the Simeoni TGI model as a reference, conditions for steady-state equivalence are worked out and used to derive a new biomarker-driven model. Simulated and real data are used to show that in realistic cases the steady-state equivalence extends also to transient responses. The possibility of predicting the drug-to-tumor potency of a new candidate drug based only on biomarker response is discussed.

  19. ICAM-1 suppresses tumor metastasis by inhibiting macrophage M2 polarization through blockade of efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Liu, J; Piao, C; Shao, J; Du, J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) can profoundly influence tumor-specific immunity. Tumor-associated macrophages are M2-polarized macrophages that promote key processes in tumor progression. Efferocytosis stimulates M2 macrophage polarization and contributes to cancer metastasis, but the signaling mechanism underlying this process is unclear. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which has been implicated in mediating cell–cell interaction and outside-in cell signaling during the immune response. We report that ICAM-1 expression is inversely associated with macrophage infiltration and the metastasis index in human colon tumors by combining Oncomine database analysis and immunohistochemistry for ICAM-1. Using a colon cancer liver metastasis model in ICAM-1-deficient (ICAM-1−/−) mice and their wild-type littermates, we found that loss of ICAM-1 accelerated liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, ICAM-1 deficiency increased M2 macrophage polarization during tumor progression. We further demonstrated that ICAM-1 deficiency in macrophages led to promotion of efferocytosis of apoptotic tumor cells through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway. More importantly, coculture of ICAM-1−/− macrophages with apoptotic cancer cells resulted in an increase of M2-like macrophages, which was blocked by an efferocytosis inhibitor. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for ICAM-1 in suppressing M2 macrophage polarization via downregulation of efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inhibiting metastatic tumor progression. PMID:26068788

  20. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate.

  1. Polyoxazoline multivalently conjugated with indocyanine green for sensitive in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-09-26

    Photoacoustic imaging, which enables high-resolution imaging in deep tissues, has lately attracted considerable attention. For tumor imaging, photoacoustic probes have been proposed to enhance the photoacoustic effect to improve detection sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, polyoxazoline, conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a tumor-targeted photoacoustic probe via enhanced permeability and retention effect. ICG molecules were multivalently conjugated to partially hydrolyzed polyoxazoline, thereby serving as highly sensitive photoacoustic probes. Interestingly, loading multiple ICG molecules to polyoxazoline significantly enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity under the same ICG concentration. In vivo biodistribution studies using tumor bearing mice demonstrated that 5% hydrolyzed polyoxazoline (50 kDa) conjugated with ICG (ICG/polyoxazoline = 7.8), P14-ICG7.8, showed relatively high tumor accumulation (9.4%ID/g), resulting in delivery of the highest dose of ICG among the probes tested. P14-ICG7.8 enabled clear visualization of the tumor regions by photoacoustic imaging 24 h after administration; the photoacoustic signal increased in proportion with the injected dose. In addition, the signal intensity in blood vessels in the photoacoustic images did not show much change, which was attributed to the high tumor-to-blood ratios of P14-ICG7.8. These results suggest that polyoxazoline-ICG would serve as a robust probe for sensitive photoacoustic tumor imaging.

  2. Polyoxazoline multivalently conjugated with indocyanine green for sensitive in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, which enables high-resolution imaging in deep tissues, has lately attracted considerable attention. For tumor imaging, photoacoustic probes have been proposed to enhance the photoacoustic effect to improve detection sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, polyoxazoline, conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a tumor-targeted photoacoustic probe via enhanced permeability and retention effect. ICG molecules were multivalently conjugated to partially hydrolyzed polyoxazoline, thereby serving as highly sensitive photoacoustic probes. Interestingly, loading multiple ICG molecules to polyoxazoline significantly enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity under the same ICG concentration. In vivo biodistribution studies using tumor bearing mice demonstrated that 5% hydrolyzed polyoxazoline (50 kDa) conjugated with ICG (ICG/polyoxazoline = 7.8), P14-ICG7.8, showed relatively high tumor accumulation (9.4%ID/g), resulting in delivery of the highest dose of ICG among the probes tested. P14-ICG7.8 enabled clear visualization of the tumor regions by photoacoustic imaging 24 h after administration; the photoacoustic signal increased in proportion with the injected dose. In addition, the signal intensity in blood vessels in the photoacoustic images did not show much change, which was attributed to the high tumor-to-blood ratios of P14-ICG7.8. These results suggest that polyoxazoline-ICG would serve as a robust probe for sensitive photoacoustic tumor imaging. PMID:27667374

  3. LZAP, a putative tumor suppressor, selectively inhibits NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; An, Hanbing; Mayo, Marty W; Baldwin, Albert S; Yarbrough, Wendell G

    2007-09-01

    LZAP has been reported to inhibit cellular proliferation and clonogenic growth. Here, we report that decreased LZAP expression promoted cellular transformation, xenograft tumor growth, and xenograft tumor vascularity. Loss of LZAP also increased cellular invasion, and MMP-9 expression dependent on NF-kappaB. LZAP directly bound to RelA, impaired serine 536 phosphorylation of RelA, increased HDAC association with RelA, inhibited basal and stimulated NF-kappaB transcriptional activity, and was found at the promoter of selective NF-kappaB-responsive genes. LZAP protein levels were markedly decreased in 32% of primary HNSCCs (n = 28) and decreased LZAP levels in primary HNSCC correlated with increased expression of the NF-kappaB-regulated genes IL-8 and IkappaBalpha. In aggregate, these data support a role of LZAP in NF-kappaB regulation and tumor suppression.

  4. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M.; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26036260

  5. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-07-10

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression.

  6. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-06-08

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule.

  7. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  8. Chicken HSP70 DNA vaccine inhibits tumor growth in a canine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Ying; Chuang, Tien-Fu; Guichard, Cécile; El-Garch, Hanane; Tierny, Dominique; Laio, Albert Taiching; Lin, Ching-Si; Chiou, Kuo-Hao; Tsai, Cheng-Long; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Chiuan; Fischer, Laurent; Chu, Rea-Min

    2011-04-18

    Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is a promising cancer treatment to overcome tolerance to self-antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is over-expressed in various kinds of tumors and is believed to be involved in tumor progression. This study tested a xenogeneic chicken HSP70 (chHSP70) DNA vaccine in an experimental canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) model. Three vaccination strategies were compared: the first (PE) was designed to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of chHSP70 DNA vaccination by delivering the vaccine before tumor inoculation in a prime boost setting, the second (T) was designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the same prime boost vaccine by vaccinating the dogs after tumor inoculation; the third (PT) was similar to the first strategy (PE), with the exception that the electroporation booster injection was replaced with a transdermal needle-free injection. Tumor growth was notably inhibited only in the PE dogs, in which the vaccination program triggered tumor regression significantly sooner than in control dogs (NT). The CD4(+) subpopulation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and canine HSP70 (caHSP70)-specific IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes were significantly increased during tumor regression in the PE dogs as compared to control dogs, demonstrating that specific tolerance to caHSP70 has been overcome. In contrast, no benefit of the therapeutic strategy (T) could be noticed and the (PT) strategy only led to partial control of tumor growth. In summary, antitumor prophylactic activity was demonstrated using the chHSP70 DNA vaccine including a boost via electroporation. Our data stressed the importance of DNA electroporation as a booster to get the full benefit of DNA vaccination but also of cancer immunotherapy initiation as early as possible. Xenogeneic chHSP70 DNA vaccination including an electroporation boost is a potential vaccine to HSP70-expressing tumors, although further research is still required to better understand true

  9. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  10. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation in ascites tumor mitochondria and cells by intramitochondrial Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Villalobo, A; Lehninger, A L

    1980-03-25

    Accumulation of Ca2+ (+ phosphate) by respiring mitochondria from Ehrlich ascites or AS30-D hepatoma tumor cells inhibits subsequent phosphorylating respiration in response to ADP. The respiratory chain is still functional since a proton-conducting uncoupler produces a normal stimulation of electron transport. The inhibition of phosphorylating respiration is caused by intramitochondrial Ca2+ (+ phosphate). ATP + Mg2+ together, but not singly, prevents the inhibitory action of Ca2+. Neither AMP, GTP, GDP, nor any other nucleoside 5'-triphosphate or 5'-diphosphate could replace ATP in this effect. Phosphorylating respiration on NAD(NADP)-linked substrates was much more susceptible to the inhibitory effect of intramitochondrial Ca2+ than succinate-linked respiration. Significant inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is given by the endogenous Ca2+ present in freshly isolated tumor mitochondria. The phosphorylating respiration of permeabilized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is also inhibited by Ca2+ accumulated by the mitochondria in situ. Possible causes of the Ca2+-induced inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation are considered.

  11. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP3, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion. PMID:25829446

  12. Effect of low frequency magnetic fields on melanoma: tumor inhibition and immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously found that the low frequency magnetic fields (LF-MF) inhibited gastric and lung cancer cell growth. We suppose that exposure to LF-MF may modulate immune function so as to inhibit tumor. We here investigated whether LF-MF can inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma and influence immune function. Methods The effect of MF on the proliferation, cell cycle and ultrastracture of B16-F10 in vitro was detected by cell counting Kit-8 assay, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Lung metastasis mice were prepared by injection of 2 × 105 B16-F10 melanoma cells into the tail vein in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were then exposed to an LF-MF (0.4 T, 7.5 Hz) for 43 days. Survival rate, tumor markers and the innate and adaptive immune parameters were measured. Results The growth of B16-F10 cells was inhibited after exposure to the LF-MF. The inhibition was related to induction of cell cycle arrest and decomposition of chromatins. Moreover, the LF-MF prolonged the mouse survival rate and inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 in melanoma metastasis mice model. Furthermore, the LF-MF modulated the immune response via regulation of immune cells and cytokine production. In addition, the number of Treg cells was decreased in mice with the LF-MF exposure, while the numbers of T cells as well as dendritic cells were significantly increased. Conclusion LF-MF inhibited the growth and metastasis of melanoma cancer cells and improved immune function of tumor-bearing mice. This suggests that the inhibition may be attributed to modulation of LF-MF on immune function and LF-MF may be a potential therapy for treatment of melanoma. PMID:24314291

  13. Andrographolide inhibits melanoma tumor growth by inactivating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Ding, Yi; Liu, Hong-Ying; Lei, Yan; Fang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Cui-Ling; Yang, Yi; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Xuesong; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in tumor progression. Andrographolide (Andro) has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer. However, the pharmacological activities of Andro in melanoma are not completely understood. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in melanoma and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our experiments showed that Andro significantly inhibited melanoma tumor growth and metastasis by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, Andro significantly inhibited the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 and Bcl-6, which are antitumor genes. This work provides evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer effect in melanoma.

  14. A synthetic manassantin a derivative inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Liwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Ping; Yan, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    The dineolignan manassantin A from Saururaceae was recently identified as a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibitor, but its in-vivo anti-tumor effect has not been explored. We synthesized a series of manassantin A derivatives, and found that replacing the central tetrahydrofuran moiety with a cyclopentane ring yielded a compound (LXY6006) with increased HIF-1-inhibitory activity yet decreased stereochemically complexity amenable to a simplified synthesis scheme. LXY6006 inhibited HIF-1α nuclear accumulation induced by hypoxia, and inhibited cancer cell growth as a consequence of G2/M arrest. Oral administration of LXY6006 significantly inhibited growth of breast, lung, and pancreatic tumors implanted in nude mice. These results indicate that LXY6006 represents a novel class of agents targeting a broad range of human cancers.

  15. A Synthetic Manassantin A Derivative Inhibits Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Ping; Yan, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    The dineolignan manassantin A from Saururaceae was recently identified as a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibitor, but its in-vivo anti-tumor effect has not been explored. We synthesized a series of manassantin A derivatives, and found that replacing the central tetrahydrofuran moiety with a cyclopentane ring yielded a compound (LXY6006) with increased HIF-1-inhibitory activity yet decreased stereochemically complexity amenable to a simplified synthesis scheme. LXY6006 inhibited HIF-1α nuclear accumulation induced by hypoxia, and inhibited cancer cell growth as a consequence of G2/M arrest. Oral administration of LXY6006 significantly inhibited growth of breast, lung, and pancreatic tumors implanted in nude mice. These results indicate that LXY6006 represents a novel class of agents targeting a broad range of human cancers. PMID:24925080

  16. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal

  17. Molecular phenotype predicts sensitivity of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Young, Natalie R; Liu, Jing; Pierce, Carolyn; Wei, Tai-Fen; Grushko, Tatyana; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Liu, Wanqing; Shen, Christine; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Cohen, Ezra E W

    2013-06-01

    Despite nearly universal expression of the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and reproducible activity of EGFR inhibitors in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), the majority of patients will not have objective responses. The mechanisms of this intrinsic resistance are not well established. We hypothesized that sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors can be predicted based on the inhibitors' effects on downstream signaling. Cell viability assays were used to assess sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib (ZD1839) in 8 SCCHN cell lines. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization showed the two most sensitive lines to be highly gene-amplified for EGFR. Western blotting confirmed that phosphoEGFR was inhibited at low concentrations of gefitinib in all lines tested. Phosphorylation of downstream signaling protein AKT was inhibited in sensitive lines while inhibition of phosphoERK displayed no relationship to gefitinib efficacy. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was evident in all cell lines. Activating PIK3CA mutations were found in two resistant cell lines where pAKT was not inhibited by gefitinib. In resistant cell lines harboring PIK3CA mutations, a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, or AKT siRNA reduced cell viability with an additive effect demonstrated in combination with gefitinib. Additionally, LY294002 alone and in combination with gefitinib, was effective at treating PIK3CA mutated tumors xenografted into nude mice. Taken together this suggests that constitutively active AKT is a mechanism of intrinsic gefitinib resistance in SCCHN. This resistance can be overcome through targeting of the PI3K/AKT pathway in combination with EGFR inhibition.

  18. Silencing Receptor EphA2 Enhanced Sensitivity to Lipoplatin™ in Lung Tumor and MPM Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Najmunnisa, Nasreen

    2016-08-08

    Receptor EphA2 is overexpressed in lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) which promote tumorogenesis. Lipoplatin™, a new liposomal cisplatin formulation, is used against resistant tumors. Use of cisplatin-based drugs leads to unacceptable toxicities. To improve the effectiveness of Lipoplatin, enhancing the cellular sensitivity of lung tumor and MPM cells is critical. Therefore, we targeted receptor EphA2 by silencing interference RNA (siRNA) and treated tumor cells with Lipoplatin. The combined effects of siRNA-EphA2 and Lipoplatin were determined. We report that silencing EphA2 significantly enhanced the cellular sensitivity of lung tumor and MPM cells to Lipoplatin and maybe a potential therapy for lung cancer.

  19. The isoflavone metabolite 6-methoxyequol inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased consumption of plant-based diets has been linked to the presence of certain phytochemicals, including polyphenols such as flavonoids. Several of these compounds exert their protective effect via inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Identification of additional phytochemicals with potential antiangiogenic activity is important not only for understanding the mechanism of the preventive effect, but also for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Results In an attempt to identify phytochemicals contributing to the well-documented preventive effect of plant-based diets on cancer incidence and mortality, we have screened a set of hitherto untested phytoestrogen metabolites concerning their anti-angiogenic effect, using endothelial cell proliferation as an end point. Here, we show that a novel phytoestrogen, 6-methoxyequol (6-ME), inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE) cells, whereas VEGF-induced migration and survival of HUVE cells remained unaffected. In addition, 6-ME inhibited FGF-2-induced proliferation of bovine brain capillary endothelial (BBCE) cells. In line with its role in cell proliferation, 6-ME inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK, the key cascade responsible for VEGF-induced proliferation of endothelial cells. In this context, 6-ME inhibited in a dose dependent manner the phosphorylation of MEK1/2, the only known upstream activator of ERK1/2. 6-ME did not alter VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK or AKT, compatible with the lack of effect on VEGF-induced migration and survival of endothelial cells. Peri-tumor injection of 6-ME in A-431 xenograft tumors resulted in reduced tumor growth with suppressed neovasularization compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.01). Conclusions 6-ME inhibits VEGF- and FGF2-induced proliferation of ECs by targeting the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and it downstream substrate ERK1/2, both key components of the mitogenic MAPK pathway

  20. Hair follicle-derived blood vessels vascularize tumors in skin and are inhibited by Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, Abdool R; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-03-15

    We have recently shown that the neural-stem cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells and the blood vessel network interconnecting hair follicles in the skin of transgenic mice with nestin regulatory element-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). The hair follicles were shown to give rise to the nestin-expressing blood vessels in the skin. In the present study, we visualized tumor angiogenesis by dual-color fluorescence imaging in ND-GFP transgenic mice after transplantation of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10 expressing red fluorescent protein. ND-GFP was highly expressed in proliferating endothelial cells and nascent blood vessels in the growing tumor. Results of immunohistochemical staining showed that the blood vessel-specific antigen CD31 was expressed in ND-GFP-expressing nascent blood vessels. ND-GFP expression was diminished in the vessels with increased blood flow. Progressive angiogenesis during tumor growth was readily visualized during tumor growth by GFP expression. Doxorubicin inhibited the nascent tumor angiogenesis as well as tumor growth in the ND-GFP mice transplanted with B16F10-RFP. This model is useful for direct visualization of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of angiogenic inhibitors.

  1. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity.

  2. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression. PMID:27602754

  3. Interferon and hormone sensitivity of endocrine-related tumors.

    PubMed

    Sica, G; Iacopino, F; Recchia, F

    1996-02-01

    Interferons (IFNs) have been shown to enhance both in vitro and in vivo the antiproliferative activity of some hormones and anti-hormones which mainly act via steroid receptors. We discuss some of the mechanisms which could be involved in determining this effect in breast, endometrial and prostatic cancer cells, with a particular emphasis on steroid receptor modulation, reduction of the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors and, finally, down-regulation of some oncogenes. It seems that under appropriate conditions IFN might produce changes in cancer cells that enhance or restore hormone sensitivity. Nevertheless, available clinical data are too few to allow any conclusion to be drawn and this problem merits further investigations.

  4. Pterostilbene Acts through Metastasis-Associated Protein 1 to Inhibit Tumor Growth, Progression and Metastasis in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rimando, Agnes M.; Dhar, Swati; Mizuno, Cassia S.; Penman, Alan D.; Lewin, Jack R.; Levenson, Anait S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of natural product agents with targeted strategies holds promise for enhanced anticancer therapy with reduced drug-associated side effects. Resveratrol found in red wine, has anticancer activity in various tumor types. We reported earlier on a new molecular target of resveratrol, the metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), which is a part of nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) co-repressor complex that mediates gene silencing. We identified resveratrol as a regulator of MTA1/NuRD complex and re-activator of p53 acetylation in prostate cancer (PCa). In the current study, we addressed whether resveratrol analogues also possess the ability to inhibit MTA1 and to reverse p53 deacetylation. We demonstrated that pterostilbene (PTER), found in blueberries, had greater increase in MTA1-mediated p53 acetylation, confirming superior potency over resveratrol as dietary epigenetic agent. In orthotopic PCa xenografts, resveratrol and PTER significantly inhibited tumor growth, progression, local invasion and spontaneous metastasis. Furthermore, MTA1-knockdown sensitized cells to these agents resulting in additional reduction of tumor progression and metastasis. The reduction was dependent on MTA1 signaling showing increased p53 acetylation, higher apoptotic index and less angiogenesis in vivo in all xenografts treated with the compounds, and particularly with PTER. Altogether, our results indicate MTA1 as a major contributor in prostate tumor malignant progression, and support the use of strategies targeting MTA1. Our strong pre-clinical data indicate PTER as a potent, selective and pharmacologically safe natural product that may be tested in advanced PCa. PMID:23469203

  5. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR.

  6. An implantable microdevice to perform high-throughput in vivo drug sensitivity testing in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Oliver; Landry, Heather M.; Fuller, Jason E.; Santini, John T.; Baselga, Jose; Tepper, Robert I.; Cima, Michael J.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Current anticancer chemotherapy relies on a limited set of in vitro or indirect prognostic markers of tumor response to available drugs. A more accurate analysis of drug sensitivity would involve studying tumor response in vivo. To this end, we have developed an implantable device that can perform drug sensitivity testing of several anticancer agents simultaneously inside the living tumor. The device contained reservoirs that released microdoses of single agents or drug combinations into spatially distinct regions of the tumor. The local drug concentrations were chosen to be representative of concentrations achieved during systemic treatment. Local efficacy and drug concentration profiles were evaluated for each drug or drug combination on the device, and the local efficacy was confirmed to be a predictor of systemic efficacy in vivo for multiple drugs and tumor models. Currently, up to 16 individual drugs or combinations can be assessed independently, without systemic drug exposure, through minimally invasive biopsy of a small region of a single tumor. This assay takes into consideration physiologic effects that contribute to drug response by allowing drugs to interact with the living tumor in its native microenvironment. Because these effects are crucial to predicting drug response, we envision that these devices will help identify optimal drug therapy before systemic treatment is initiated and could improve drug response prediction beyond the biomarkers and in vitro and ex vivo studies used today. These devices may also be used in clinical drug development to safely gather efficacy data on new compounds before pharmacological optimization. PMID:25904741

  7. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas.

  8. Oridonin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Anti-Angiogenesis by Blocking the Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjie; Deng, Huayun; Song, Yajuan; Zhai, Dong; Peng, Yi; Lu, Xiaoling; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases. PMID:25485753

  9. DCT015, a new sorafenib derivate, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in gastric cancer models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyan; Wang, Hui; Ni, Yingying; Yao, Zhenming; Ye, Liang; Tian, Jingwei

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antiproliferative activities against gastric cancer and anti-angiogenesis of DCT015, a novel sorafenib derivate, and potential mechanisms. The effects of DCT015 on proliferation and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cytotoxicity assays, apoptosis analysis, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blotting assays. The in vivo antitumor effects were carried out in nude mice bearing gastric cancer. On the other hand, the anti-angiogenesis effects of DCT015 were measured by human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, migration, tube formation, and Western blotting analysis. The results showed that DCT015 inhibited the proliferation, induced the morphological changes of apoptosis, and increased the apoptosis percentage, as well as increased the "sub-G1" population in gastric cancer cells. DCT015 also significantly decreased the tumor volumes and tumor weights in vivo by oral administration. Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated that DCT015 inhibited tumor growth and neovascularization. In vitro studies found that DCT015 inhibited both MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways by Western blotting assays. Moreover, DCT015 significantly inhibited VEGF-induced migration and tube formation in HUVECs. Western blotting analysis showed that DCT015 downregulated VEGF-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation with the decreased phosphorylation of the downstream key proteins. Taken together, our findings highlight that DCT015 is a promising orally anticancer drug for treating gastric cancer.

  10. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Tumor Cell Survival by Inhibiting CDON Pro-Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Nicolas; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Gadot, Nicolas; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Krauss, Robert; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling is a determinant pathway for tumor progression. However, while inhibition of the Hedgehog canonical pathway—Patched–Smoothened–Gli—has proved efficient in human tumors with activating mutations in this pathway, recent clinical data have failed to show any benefit in other cancers, even though Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) expression is detected in these cancers. Cell-adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by Oncogenes (CDON), a positive regulator of skeletal muscle development, was recently identified as a receptor for SHH. We show here that CDON behaves as a SHH dependence receptor: it actively triggers apoptosis in the absence of SHH. The pro-apoptotic activity of unbound CDON requires a proteolytic cleavage in its intracellular domain, allowing the recruitment and activation of caspase-9. We show that by inducing apoptosis in settings of SHH limitation, CDON expression constrains tumor progression, and as such, decreased CDON expression observed in a large fraction of human colorectal cancer is associated in mice with intestinal tumor progression. Reciprocally, we propose that the SHH expression, detected in human cancers and previously considered as a mechanism for activation of the canonical pathway in an autocrine or paracrine manner, actually provides a selective tumor growth advantage by blocking CDON-induced apoptosis. In support of this notion, we present the preclinical demonstration that interference with the SHH–CDON interaction triggers a CDON-dependent apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth inhibition in vivo. The latter observation qualifies CDON as a relevant alternative target for anticancer therapy in SHH-expressing tumors. PMID:23940460

  11. Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin significantly inhibits tumor angiogenesis and increases the survival rate of human A549 tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; XIA, XIZHENG; ZHOU, MINGKAI; LIU, XIAOJUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GP) on the tumor growth of A549 tumor-bearing mice and the potential anti-tumor mechanism. A total of 30 human A549 tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into the Avastin, chemotherapy and combined treatment groups for treatment with an intraperitoneal injection of Avastin (5 mg/kg) (Avastin group); an intraperitoneal injection of gemcitabine (4 mg/kg) and cisplatin (4 mg/kg) (chemotherapy group); or intraperitoneal injections of Avastin and GP (combined treatment group). The mice were observed for 30 days and the tumor growth, survival and body weight of the mice in the three groups were analyzed. The protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissues was analyzed by ELISA. The vascular density and structural changes of the tumor were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the Avastin and chemotherapy groups, the tumor growth of mice in the combined treatment group was significantly inhibited, and the survival rate of the mice was increased significantly. No difference in body weight was observed among the three groups of mice (P>0.05). The levels of VEGF in the combined treatment group tumor tissues were significantly reduced compared with those in the chemotherapy group tumor tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the vessel density of the tumor tissue in the combined treatment group was significantly reduced compared with that in the chemotherapy group (P<0.05), and the number of normal vessels in the combined treatment group tumors was significantly higher than that in the chemotherapy group tumors after 7 days of treatment (P<0.05). In conclusion, Avastin can significantly decrease the level of VEGF in tumor tissue, inhibit tumor angiogenesis and promote the normalization of tumor vascular structure, which may explain the enhanced efficacy of Avastin in combination with chemotherapy. PMID:26136956

  12. Targeting Notch, a key pathway for ovarian cancer stem cells, sensitizes tumors to platinum therapy.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, Shannon M; Morgan, Stefanie L; Wyant, Gregory A; Tran, Lieu T; Muto, Katherine W; Chen, Yu Sarah; Chin, Kenneth T; Partridge, Justin C; Poole, Barish B; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Daggett, John; Cullen, Kristen; Kantoff, Emily; Hasselbatt, Kathleen; Berkowitz, Julia; Muto, Michael G; Berkowitz, Ross S; Aster, Jon C; Matulonis, Ursula A; Dinulescu, Daniela M

    2012-10-23

    Chemoresistance to platinum therapy is a major obstacle that needs to be overcome in the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. The high rates and patterns of therapeutic failure seen in patients are consistent with a steady accumulation of drug-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). This study demonstrates that the Notch signaling pathway and Notch3 in particular are critical for the regulation of CSCs and tumor resistance to platinum. We show that Notch3 overexpression in tumor cells results in expansion of CSCs and increased platinum chemoresistance. In contrast, γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch pathway inhibitor, depletes CSCs and increases tumor sensitivity to platinum. Similarly, a Notch3 siRNA knockdown increases the response to platinum therapy, further demonstrating that modulation of tumor chemosensitivity by GSI is Notch specific. Most importantly, the cisplatin/GSI combination is the only treatment that effectively eliminates both CSCs and the bulk of tumor cells, indicating that a dual combination targeting both populations is needed for tumor eradication. In addition, we found that the cisplatin/GSI combination therapy has a synergistic cytotoxic effect in Notch-dependent tumor cells by enhancing the DNA-damage response, G(2)/M cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Based on these results, we conclude that targeting the Notch pathway could significantly increase tumor sensitivity to platinum therapy. Our study suggests important clinical applications for targeting Notch as part of novel treatment strategies upon diagnosis of ovarian cancer and at recurrence. Both platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive relapses may benefit from such an approach as clinical data suggest that all relapses after platinum therapy are increasingly platinum resistant.

  13. Inhibition of PDE5 by sulindac sulfide selectively induces apoptosis and attenuates oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcription in human breast tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Piazza, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as sulindac sulfide (SS) display promising antineoplastic properties, but toxicities resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limit their clinical use. While COX inhibition is responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of SS, recent studies suggest that phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibition and activation of cGMP signaling are closely associated with its ability to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for apoptosis induction, factors that influence sensitivity of tumor cells to SS, and the importance of PDE5 for breast tumor cell growth have not been established. Here we show that SS can induce apoptosis of breast tumor cells, which predominantly rely on PDE5 for cGMP hydrolysis, but not normal mammary epithelial cells, which rely on PDE isozymes other than PDE5 for cGMP hydrolysis. Inhibition of PDE5 and activation of PKG by SS was associated with increased β-catenin phosphorylation, decreased β-catenin mRNA and protein levels, reduced β-catenin nuclear localization, decreased Tcf/Lef promoter activity, and decreased expression of Wnt/β-catenin regulated proteins. Suppression of PDE5 with siRNA or known PDE5 inhibitors was sufficient to selectively induce apoptosis and attenuate β-catenin mediated transcription in breast tumor cells with minimal effects on normal mammary epithelial cells. These findings provide evidence that SS induces apoptosis of breast tumor cells through a mechanism involving inhibition of PDE5 and attenuation of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcription. We conclude that PDE5 represents a novel molecular target for the discovery of safer and more efficacious drugs for breast cancer chemoprevention. PMID:21505183

  14. Inhibition of PDE5 by sulindac sulfide selectively induces apoptosis and attenuates oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription in human breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Keeton, Adam B; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Piazza, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) such as sulindac sulfide (SS) display promising antineoplastic properties, but toxicities resulting from COX inhibition limit their clinical use. Although COX inhibition is responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of SS, recent studies suggest that phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibition and activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling are closely associated with its ability to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for apoptosis induction, factors that influence sensitivity of tumor cells to SS, and the importance of PDE5 for breast tumor cell growth have not been established. Here we show that SS can induce apoptosis of breast tumor cells, which predominantly rely on PDE5 for cGMP hydrolysis but not normal mammary epithelial cells, which rely on PDE isozymes other than PDE5 for cGMP hydrolysis. Inhibition of PDE5 and activation of protein kinase G (PKG) by SS was associated with increased β-catenin phosphorylation, decreased β-catenin mRNA and protein levels, reduced β-catenin nuclear localization, decreased T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (Tcf/Lef) promoter activity, and decreased expression of Wnt/β-catenin-regulated proteins. Suppression of PDE5 with siRNA or known PDE5 inhibitors was sufficient to selectively induce apoptosis and attenuate β-catenin-mediated transcription in breast tumor cells with minimal effects on normal mammary epithelial cells. These findings provide evidence that SS induces apoptosis of breast tumor cells through a mechanism involving inhibition of PDE5 and attenuation of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. We conclude that PDE5 represents a novel molecular target for the discovery of safer and more efficacious drugs for breast cancer chemoprevention.

  15. Tumor Therapeutics Work as Stress Inducers to Enhance Tumor Sensitivity to Natural Killer (NK) Cell Cytolysis by Up-regulating NKp30 Ligand B7-H6.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoshuai; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-12-11

    Immune cells are believed to participate in initiating anti-tumor effects during regular tumor therapy such as chemotherapy, radiation, hyperthermia, and cytokine injection. One of the mechanisms underlying this process is the expression of so-called stress-inducible immunostimulating ligands. Although the activating receptor NKG2D has been proven to play roles in tumor therapy through targeting its ligands, the role of NKp30, another key activating receptor, is seldom addressed. In this study, we found that the NKp30 ligand B7-H6 was widely expressed in tumor cells and closely correlated to their susceptibility to NK cell lysis. Further studies showed that treatment of tumor cells with almost all standard tumor therapeutics, including chemotherapy (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil), radiation therapy, non-lethal heat shock, and cytokine therapy (TNF-α), could up-regulate the expression of B7-H6 in tumor cells and enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis. B7-H6 shRNA treatment effectively dampened sensitization of tumor cells to NK-mediated lysis. Our study not only reveals the possibility that tumor therapeutics work as stress inducers to enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis but also suggests that B7-H6 could be a potential target for tumor therapy in the future.

  16. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  17. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase and Resistance to mTOR Inhibition in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    François, Rony A.; Maeng, Kyungah; Nawab, Akbar; Kaye, Frederic J.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Zajac-Kaye, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates survival of normal pancreatic islets through activation of AKT. Upon malignant transformation of islet cells into pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), AKT is frequently overexpressed and mutations in the AKT/mTOR pathway are detected. Because mTOR inhibitors rarely induce PanNET tumor regression, partly because of feedback activation of AKT, novel combination strategies are needed to target FAK/AKT/mTOR signaling. Methods: We characterized the activation of FAK in PanNETs using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis and tested the FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 in human PanNET cells in vitro and in vivo (at least three mice per group). In addition, we evaluated the effect of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition on PanNET viability and apoptosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We found that FAK is overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human PanNETs and that PF-04554878 strongly inhibited FAK (Tyr397) autophosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. We found that PF-04554878 inhibited cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in PanNET cells. Moreover, oral administration of PF-04554878 statistically significantly reduced tumor growth in a patient-derived xenograft model of PanNET (P = .02) and in a human PanNET xenograft model of peritoneal carcinomatosis (P = .03). Importantly, PF-04554878 synergized with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus by preventing feedback AKT activation. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that FAK is overexpressed in PanNETs and that inhibition of FAK activity induces apoptosis and inhibits PanNET proliferation. We found that the novel FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 synergizes with everolimus, a US Food and Drug Administration–approved agent for PanNETs. Our findings warrant the clinical investigation of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition in PanNETs. PMID:25971297

  18. CXCR3 as a molecular target in breast cancer metastasis: inhibition of tumor cell migration and promotion of host anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiquan; Yan, H Hannah; Pang, Yanli; Jian, Jiang; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Liang, Xinhua; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Hollander, M Christine; Yang, Li

    2015-12-22

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors have critical roles in cancer metastasis and have emerged as one of the targeting options in cancer therapy. However, the treatment efficacy on both tumor and host compartments needs to be carefully evaluated. Here we report that targeting CXCR3 decreased tumor cell migration and at the same time improved host anti-tumor immunity. We observed an increased expression of CXCR3 in metastatic tumor cells compared to those from non-metastatic tumor cells. Knockdown (KD) of CXCR3 in metastatic tumor cells suppressed tumor cell migration and metastasis. Importantly, CXCR3 expression in clinical breast cancer samples correlated with progression and metastasis. For the host compartment, deletion of CXCR3 in all host cells in 4T1 mammary tumor model significantly decreased metastasis. The underlying mechanisms involve a decreased expression of IL-4, IL-10, iNOs, and Arg-1 in myeloid cells and an increased T cell response. IFN-γ neutralization diminished the metastasis inhibition in the CXCR3 knockout (KO) mice bearing 4T1 tumors, suggesting a critical role of host CXCR3 in immune suppression. Consistently, targeting CXCR3 using a small molecular inhibitor (AMG487) significantly suppressed metastasis and improved host anti-tumor immunity. Our findings demonstrate that targeting CXCR3 is effective in both tumor and host compartments, and suggest that CXCR3 inhibition is likely to avoid adverse effects on host cells.

  19. [Possible relation between viruses and oromaxillofacial tumors. V. Demonstration of hemagglutination-inhibiting anti-BK virus antibodies in patients with tumors of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Zaharia, O; Suru, M; Constantinescu, E; Goldstein, I; Nastac, E

    1987-01-01

    Anti-BK-virus hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies were revealed in 81.8% of the patients with parotid gland tumors. Results of the investigations conducted on oromaxillofacial tumors including the parotid gland ones are discussed from the point of view of the presence of viral antigens (herpes-, SV40 and BK-viruses) and of specific antibodies. Possible implication of the papova viruses in the etiopathogenesis of the parotid gland tumors in humans are also discussed.

  20. Enhanced Inhibition of Prostate Tumor Growth by Dual Targeting the Androgen Receptor and the Regulatory Subunit Type Iα of Protein Kinase A in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Iris E.; Egger, Martina; Neuwirt, Hannes; Seifarth, Christof; Maddalo, Danilo; Desiniotis, Andreas; Schäfer, Georg; Puhr, Martin; Bektic, Jasmin; Cato, Andrew C. B.; Klocker, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Progression to castration resistance is a major problem in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer and is likely to be driven by activation of several molecular pathways, including androgen receptor (AR) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In this study, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of a combined inhibition of the AR and the regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) of protein kinase A with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant LNCaPabl tumors in vivo. We found that targeting the AR alone inhibited LNCaP, as well as LNCaPabl tumors. Combined inhibition resulted in an improved response over single targeting and even a complete tumor remission in LNCaPabl. Western blot analysis revealed that both ODNs were effective in reducing their target proteins when administered alone or in combination. In addition, treatment with the ODNs was associated with an induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest that dual targeting of the AR and PKARIα is more effective in inhibiting LNCaP and LNCaPabl tumor growth than single treatment and may give a treatment benefit, especially in castration-resistant prostate cancers. PMID:23736698

  1. Selective disruption of rb-raf-1 kinase interaction inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma growth irrespective of gemcitabine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Treviño, José G; Verma, Monika; Singh, Sandeep; Pillai, Smitha; Zhang, Dongyu; Pernazza, Daniele; Sebti, Said M; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Centeno, Barbara A; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    2013-12-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein is widespread in human cancers. Inactivation of Rb is thought to be initiated by association with Raf-1 (C-Raf) kinase, and here we determined how RRD-251, a disruptor of the Rb-Raf-1 interaction, affects pancreatic tumor progression. Assessment of phospho-Rb levels in resected human pancreatic tumor specimens by immunohistochemistry (n = 95) showed that increased Rb phosphorylation correlated with increasing grade of resected human pancreatic adenocarcinomas (P = 0.0272), which correlated with reduced overall patient survival (P = 0.0186). To define the antitumor effects of RRD-251 (50 μmol/L), cell-cycle analyses, senescence, cell viability, cell migration, anchorage-independent growth, angiogenic tubule formation and invasion assays were conducted on gemcitabine-sensitive and -resistant pancreatic cancer cells. RRD-251 prevented S-phase entry, induced senescence and apoptosis, and inhibited anchorage-independent growth and invasion (P < 0.01). Drug efficacy on subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft models was tested by intraperitoneal injections of RRD-251 (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with gemcitabine (250 mg/kg). RRD-251 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo accompanied by reduced Rb phosphorylation and lymph node and liver metastasis (P < 0.01). Combination of RRD-251 with gemcitabine showed cooperative effect on tumor growth (P < 0.01). In conclusion, disruption of the Rb-Raf-1 interaction significantly reduces the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells irrespective of their gemcitabine sensitivity. Selective targeting of Rb-Raf-1 interaction might be a promising strategy targeting pancreatic cancer.

  2. Clinically used antirheumatic agent auranofin is a proteasomal deubiquitinase inhibitor and inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenbin; Lu, Xiaoyu; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Yi, Songgang; Xu, Li; Jiang, Lili; Zhao, Canguo; Dong, Xiaoxian; Zhou, Ping; Li, Shujue; Wang, Shunqing; Shi, Xianping; Dou, Ping Q.; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes are attractive emerging targets for anti-cancer therapies. Auranofin (Aur), a gold-containing compound clinically used to treat rheumatic arthritis, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration for Phase II clinical trial to treat cancer but its anti-cancer mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that (i) Aur shows proteasome-inhibitory effect that is comparable to that of bortezomib/Velcade (Vel); (ii) different from bortezomib, Aur inhibits proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs) UCHL5 and USP14 rather than the 20S proteasome; (iii) inhibition of the proteasome-associated DUBs is required for Aur-induced cytotoxicity; and (iv) Aur selectively inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in cancer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients. This study provides important novel insight into understanding the proteasome-inhibiting property of metal-containing compounds. Although several DUB inhibitors were reported, this study uncovers the first drug already used in clinic that can inhibit proteasome-associated DUBs with promising anti-tumor effects. PMID:24977961

  3. Targeting a novel domain in podoplanin for inhibiting platelet-mediated tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Takaya; Takemoto, Ai; Takagi, Satoshi; Takatori, Kazuki; Sato, Shigeo; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin/Aggrus is a sialoglycoprotein expressed in various cancers. We previously identified podoplanin as a key factor in tumor-induced platelet aggregation. Podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation enhances tumor growth and metastasis by secreting growth factors and by forming tumor emboli in the microvasculature. Thus, precise analysis of the mechanisms of podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation is critical for developing anti-tumor therapies. Here we report the discovery of a novel platelet aggregation-inducing domain, PLAG4 (81-EDLPT-85). PLAG4 has high homology to the previously reported PLAG3 and contributes to the binding of its platelet receptor CLEC-2. Mutant analyses indicated that PLAG4 exhibits a predominant platelet-aggregating function relative to PLAG3 and that conserved Glu81/Asp82/Thr85 residues in PLAG4 are indispensable for CLEC-2 binding. By establishing anti-PLAG4-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, we confirmed its role in CLEC-2 binding, platelet aggregation, and tumor emboli formation. Our results suggest the requirement of simultaneous inhibition of PLAG3/4 for complete suppression of podoplanin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26684030

  4. Cimetidine induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Fu-Rong; Yu, Miao; Li, Jia-Bin; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2010-03-01

    Cimetidine, a histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonist, has been demonstrated to have anticancer effects on various types of malignancies. However, the mechanisms of its action on gastric cancer are not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells. The MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and flow cytometry, acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy were used to detect apoptosis, for cultured cells. The protein expression in cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis and colorimetric assay. Gastric tumors were established by subcutaneous injection of SGC-7901 cells in nude BALB/c mice, and cimetidine was administered to the mice. The size of tumors was monitored and the weight of tumors was examined. The exposure of gastric cancer cells to cimetidine resulted in growth inhibition and the induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Activation of the caspase cascade for both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways were demonstrated in vitro, including caspase-8, -9 and -3. We also found that the expression of Bcl-2 protein decreased and the expression of Bax protein increased which lead to an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In mice bearing SGC-7901 xenograft tumors, administration of cimetidine showed a significant decrease of tumor volumes and tumor weight compared with the control. Our results showed that cimetidine exhibited antitumor effects in gastric cancer cells with an induction of apoptosis.

  5. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Suppresses Intestinal Tumor Organoids by Inducing an Anti-Viral Response.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Nakaoka, Toshiaki; Sakai, Kasumi; Muramatsu, Toshihide; Toshimitsu, Kohta; Kimura, Masaki; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2016-05-04

    Recent studies have proposed that the major anti-tumor effect of DNA methylation inhibitors is induction of interferon-responsive genes via dsRNAs-containing endogenous retroviruses. Recently, a 3D culture system for stem cells known as organoid culture has been developed. Lgr5-positive stem cells form organoids that closely recapitulate the properties of original tissues. To investigate the effect of DNA demethylation on tumor organoids, we have established organoids from intestinal tumors of Apc(Min/+) (Min) mice and subjected them to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown. DNA demethylation induced by 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown significantly reduced the cell proliferation of the tumor organoids. Microarray analyses of the tumor organoids after 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown revealed that interferon-responsive genes were activated by DNA demethylation. Gene ontology and pathway analyses clearly demonstrated that these genes activated by DNA demethylation are involved in the anti-viral response. These findings indicate that DNA demethylation suppresses the proliferation of intestinal tumor organoids by inducing an anti-viral response including activation of interferon-responsive genes. Treatment with DNA methylation inhibitors to activate a growth-inhibiting immune response may be an effective therapeutic approach for colon cancers.

  6. Grepafloxacin inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Matsumoto, K; Gon, Y; Maruoka, S; Hayashi, S; Asai, Y; Machino, T; Horie, T

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, on interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated human airway epithelial cells (AEC). GPFX inhibited IL-8 protein production as well as mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5 - 25 micro g/ml), but the inhibition of IL-8 expression by corresponding concentrations of GPFX to serum and airway lining fluids was not complete. We discuss the modulatory effect of GPFX on IL-8 production in the context of its efficacy on controlling chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  7. Apigenin sensitizes colon cancer cells to anti-tumor activity of ABT-263

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huanjie; Jing, Kai; Mahmoud, Esraa; Huang, Haihong; Fang, Xianjun; Yu, Chunrong

    2013-01-01

    Apigenin is an edible plant-derived flavonoid that shows modest anti-tumor activities in vitro and in vivo. Apigenin treatment resulted in cell growth arrest and apoptosis in various types of tumors by modulating several signaling pathways. In the present study, we evaluated interactions between apigenin and ABT-263 in colon cancer cells. We observed a synergistic effect between apigenin and ABT-263 on apoptosis of colon cancer cells. ABT-263 alone induced limited cell death while upregulating expression of Mcl-1, a potential mechanism for the acquired resistance to ABT-263. The presence of apigenin antagonized ABT-263-induced Mcl-1 upregulation and dramatically enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death. Meanwhile, apigenin suppressed AKT and ERK activation. Inactivation of either AKT or ERK by lentivirus-transduced shRNA or treatment with specific small molecule inhibitors of these pathways enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death, mirroring the effect of apigenin. Moreover, the combination response was associated with upregulation of Bim and activation of Bax. Downregulation of Bax eliminated the synergistic effect of apigenin and ABT-263 on cell death. Xenograft studies in SCID mice showed that the combined treatment with apigenin and ABT-263 inhibited tumor growth by up to 70% without obvious adverse effects, while either agent only inhibited around 30%. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to enhance ABT-263 induced anti-tumor activity in human colon cancer cells by apigenin via inhibition of the Mcl-1, AKT and ERK pro-survival regulators. PMID:24126433

  8. Differential Inhibition of Ex-Vivo Tumor Kinase Activity by Vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E) and BRAF Wild-Type Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tahiri, Andliena; Røe, Kathrine; Ree, Anne H.; de Wijn, Rik; Risberg, Karianne; Busch, Christian; Lønning, Per E.; Kristensen, Vessela; Geisler, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma patients harboring BRAF(V600E) has improved drastically after the discovery of the BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib. However, drug resistance is a recurring problem, and prognoses are still very bad for patients harboring BRAF wild-type. Better markers for targeted therapy are therefore urgently needed. Methodology In this study, we assessed the individual kinase activity profiles in 26 tumor samples obtained from patients with metastatic malignant melanoma using peptide arrays with 144 kinase substrates. In addition, we studied the overall ex-vivo inhibitory effects of vemurafenib and sunitinib on kinase activity status. Results Overall kinase activity was significantly higher in lysates from melanoma tumors compared to normal skin tissue. Furthermore, ex-vivo incubation with both vemurafenib and sunitinib caused significant decrease in phosphorylation of kinase substrates, i.e kinase activity. While basal phosphorylation profiles were similar in BRAF wild-type and BRAF(V600E) tumors, analysis with ex-vivo vemurafenib treatment identified a subset of 40 kinase substrates showing stronger inhibition in BRAF(V600E) tumor lysates, distinguishing the BRAF wild-type and BRAF(V600E) tumors. Interestingly, a few BRAF wild-type tumors showed inhibition profiles similar to BRAF(V600E) tumors. The kinase inhibitory effect of vemurafenib was subsequently analyzed in cell lines harboring different BRAF mutational status with various vemurafenib sensitivity in-vitro. Conclusions Our findings suggest that multiplex kinase substrate array analysis give valuable information about overall tumor kinase activity. Furthermore, intra-assay exposure to kinase inhibiting drugs may provide a useful tool to study mechanisms of resistance, as well as to identify predictive markers. PMID:24023633

  9. Extract of Vernonia condensata, Inhibits Tumor Progression and Improves Survival of Tumor-allograft Bearing Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered as one of the ideal sources for cancer therapy due to their bioactive contents and low toxicity to humans. Vernonia genus is one of the common medicinal plants, which has wide spread usage in food and medicine. However, there are limited studies to explore its anticancer properties. In the current study, we have used Vernonia condensata, to explore its anticancer activity using various approaches. Here, we show that extract prepared from Vernonia condensata (VCE) exhibits cytotoxic properties against various cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, when treated with VCE, there was no significant cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that although VCE induced cell death, arrest was not observed. VCE treatment led to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in a concentration dependent manner resulting in activation of apoptosis culminating in cell death. Immunoblotting studies revealed that VCE activated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, VCE treatment resulted in tumor regression leading to significant enhancement in life span in treated mice, without showing any detectable side effects. Therefore, for the first time our study reveals the potential of extract from Vernonia condensata to be used as an anticancer agent. PMID:27009490

  10. Augmented IFN-γ and TNF-α Induced by Probiotic Bacteria in NK Cells Mediate Differentiation of Stem-Like Tumors Leading to Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Reduction in Inflammatory Cytokine Release; Regulation by IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vickie T.; Tseng, Han-Ching; Kozlowska, Anna; Maung, Phyu Ou; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    Our previous reports demonstrated that the magnitude of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity correlate directly with the stage and level of differentiation of tumor cells. In addition, we have shown previously that activated NK cells inhibit growth of cancer cells through induction of differentiation, resulting in the resistance of tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity through secreted cytokines, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. In this report, we show that in comparison to IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb-treated NK cells, activation of NK cells by probiotic bacteria (sAJ2) in combination with IL-2 and anti-CD16mAb substantially decreases tumor growth and induces maturation, differentiation, and resistance of oral squamous cancer stem cells, MIA PaCa-2 stem-like/poorly differentiated pancreatic tumors, and healthy stem cells of apical papillae through increased secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. Tumor resistance to NK cell-mediated killing induced by IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb + sAJ2-treated NK cells is induced by combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α since antibodies to both, and not each cytokine alone, were able to restore tumor sensitivity to NK cells. Increased surface expression of CD54, B7H1, and MHC-I on NK-differentiated tumors was mediated by IFN-γ since the addition of anti-IFN-γ abolished their increase and restored the ability of NK cells to trigger cytokine and chemokine release; whereas differentiated tumors inhibited cytokine release by the NK cells. Monocytes synergize with NK cells in the presence of probiotic bacteria to induce regulated differentiation of stem cells through secretion of IL-10 resulting in resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inhibition of cytokine release. Therefore, probiotic bacteria condition activated NK cells to provide augmented differentiation of cancer stem cells resulting in inhibition of tumor growth, and decreased inflammatory cytokine release. PMID

  11. Imatinib and Dasatinib Inhibit Hemangiosarcoma and Implicate PDGFR-β and Src in Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Erin B; Marley, Kevin; Edris, Wade; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Schalk, Vidya; MacDonald, Valerie; Loriaux, Marc; Druker, Brian J; Helfand, Stuart C

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma, a natural model of human angiosarcoma, is an aggressive vascular tumor diagnosed commonly in dogs. The documented expression of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by these tumors makes them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, we possess limited knowledge of the effects of TKIs on hemangiosarcoma as well as other soft tissue sarcomas. We report here on the use of the TKIs imatinib and dasatinib in canine hemangiosarcoma and their effects on platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) and Src inhibition. Both TKIs reduced cell viability, but dasatinib was markedly more potent in this regard, mediating cytotoxic effects orders of magnitude greater than imatinib. Dasatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of the shared PDGFR-β target at a concentration approximately 1000 times less than that needed by imatinib and effectively blocked Src phosphorylation. Both inhibitors augmented the response to doxorubicin, suggesting that clinical responses likely will be improved using both drugs in combination; however, dasatinib was significantly (P < .05) more effective in this context. Despite the higher concentrations needed in cell-based assays, imatinib significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < .05) in a tumor xenograft model, highlighting that disruption of PDGFR-β/PDGF signaling may be important in targeting the angiogenic nature of these tumors. Treatment of a dog with spontaneously occurring hemangiosarcoma established that clinically achievable doses of dasatinib may be realized in dogs and provides a means to investigate the effect of TKIs on soft tissue sarcomas in a large animal model. PMID:23544168

  12. Chrysin sensitizes tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis in human tumor cells via suppression of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Qing; Ong, Choon-Nam; Yang, Xing-Fen; Shen, Han-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a natural flavonoid commonly found in many plants. The anti-cancer property of chrysin has been demonstrated although the molecular mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In the present study, we found that, pretreatment with chrysin greatly sensitized various human cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-induced apoptosis. In the search of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the sensitization effect of chrysin, we discovered that such sensitization is closely associated with the inhibitory effect of chrysin on TNFalpha-mediated nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Pretreatment with chrysin inhibited TNFalpha-induced degradation of Inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB) protein and subsequent nuclear translocation of p65. As a result, chrysin suppressed the expression of NF-kappaB-targeted anti-apoptotic gene, c-FLIP-L. The role of c-FLIP-L was further confirmed by its ectopic expression, which significantly protected cell death induced by combined treatment with chrysin and TNFalpha. Data from this study thus reveal a novel function of chrysin and enhance the value of chrysin as an anti-cancer agent.

  13. Phytochemical potential of Eruca sativa for inhibition of melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Khoobchandani, M; Ganesh, N; Gabbanini, S; Valgimigli, L; Srivastava, M M

    2011-06-01

    Solvent extracts from the aerial and root parts and seed oil from E. sativa (rocket salad) were assayed for anticancer activity against melanoma cells. The seed oil (isothiocyanates rich) significantly (p<0.01) reduced the tumor growth comparable to the control. Remarkably, the seed oil inhibited melanoma growth and angiogenesis in mice without any major toxicity. The findings qualify seed oil for further investigations in the real of cancer prevention and treatment.

  14. Targeted inhibition of tumor-specific glutaminase diminishes cell-autonomous tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yan; Stine, Zachary E.; Xia, Jinsong; Lu, Yunqi; O’Connor, Roddy S.; Altman, Brian J.; Hsieh, Annie L.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Thomas, Ajit G.; Gao, Ping; Sun, Linchong; Song, Libing; Yan, Benedict; Slusher, Barbara S.; Zhuo, Jingli; Ooi, London L.; Lee, Caroline G.L.; Mancuso, Anthony; McCallion, Andrew S.; Le, Anne; Milone, Michael C.; Rayport, Stephen; Felsher, Dean W.; Dang, Chi V.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate, plays a key role in cancer cell metabolism, growth, and proliferation. GLS is being explored as a cancer therapeutic target, but whether GLS inhibitors affect cancer cell–autonomous growth or the host microenvironment or have off-target effects is unknown. Here, we report that loss of one copy of Gls blunted tumor progression in an immune-competent MYC-mediated mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma. Compared with results in untreated animals with MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma, administration of the GLS-specific inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) prolonged survival without any apparent toxicities. BPTES also inhibited growth of a MYC-dependent human B cell lymphoma cell line (P493) by blocking DNA replication, leading to cell death and fragmentation. In mice harboring P493 tumor xenografts, BPTES treatment inhibited tumor cell growth; however, P493 xenografts expressing a BPTES-resistant GLS mutant (GLS-K325A) or overexpressing GLS were not affected by BPTES treatment. Moreover, a customized Vivo-Morpholino that targets human GLS mRNA markedly inhibited P493 xenograft growth without affecting mouse Gls expression. Conversely, a Vivo-Morpholino directed at mouse Gls had no antitumor activity in vivo. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that GLS is required for tumorigenesis and support small molecule and genetic inhibition of GLS as potential approaches for targeting the tumor cell–autonomous dependence on GLS for cancer therapy. PMID:25915584

  15. Sapodilla plum (Achras sapota) induces apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2014-08-21

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice.

  16. Sapodilla Plum (Achras sapota) Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cell Lines and Inhibits Tumor Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  17. MicroRNA-141 inhibits tumor growth and minimizes therapy resistance in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Wuzhen; Wu, Dang; Wu, Pin; Huang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of most common cancers and causes of cancer-associated mortality worldwide, due to its recurrence, metastasis and therapy resistance. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been demonstrated to be vital for tumor initiation and recurrence. microRNAs may act as an oncogenes or tumor suppressors in numerous cancers. The present study demonstrated that microRNA-141 (miR-141) was downregulated in CSC compared with differentiated cancer cells, and in tumor compared with healthy tissue. miR-141 may inhibit CRC cell proliferation and the maintenance of CSC stemness, thereby enhancing drug susceptibility. In addition, the present study identified cyclin D2 as a novel target gene of miR-141. In conclusion, the antitumor role of miR-141 and its target cyclin D2 may suggest the development of miR-141 as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:28112364

  18. MicroRNA-141 inhibits tumor growth and minimizes therapy resistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Wuzhen; Wu, Dang; Wu, Pin; Huang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of most common cancers and causes of cancer-associated mortality worldwide, due to its recurrence, metastasis and therapy resistance. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been demonstrated to be vital for tumor initiation and recurrence. microRNAs may act as an oncogenes or tumor suppressors in numerous cancers. The present study demonstrated that microRNA-141 (miR‑141) was downregulated in CSC compared with differentiated cancer cells, and in tumor compared with healthy tissue. miR‑141 may inhibit CRC cell proliferation and the maintenance of CSC stemness, thereby enhancing drug susceptibility. In addition, the present study identified cyclin D2 as a novel target gene of miR‑141. In conclusion, the antitumor role of miR‑141 and its target cyclin D2 may suggest the development of miR‑141 as a potential therapeutic agent.

  19. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors.

  20. Antibody-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide Films with Extreme Sensitivity to Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Lu, Qihang; Liu, Hongliang; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Pengchao; Liang, Huageng; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Shutao

    2015-11-18

    An antibody-modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film with unexpected -extreme sensitivity to circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is reported. The antibody--modified rGO films efficiently capture CTCs from billions of blood cells and minimize the background of white blood cells, without complex microfluidic operations.

  1. A polypeptide from shark troponin I can inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiuling; Yao, Sheng; Chen, Xiaojia; Xu, Lihui; Peng, Wendan; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Qihao; Liang, Xu-Fang; Hong, An

    2012-02-01

    The shark troponin I gene (TnI) was found for the first time in this study to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. This shark TnI had 68.9% amino acid homology with human TnI, whereas the polypeptide from Lys91 to Leu123, which is thought to be the active site of TnI, had 78.8% homology with the corresponding fragment of human TnI. However, the polypeptide of shark had higher activity to inhibit the proliferation of HUVEC and tumor cell lines than that of human TnI. To investigate the anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor effect of the shark TnI polypeptide, the DNA sequence of polypeptide (Lys91-Leu123) of white-spot catshark TnI(psTnI) was cloned and fused with the His-SUMO cDNA, followed by expression in Escherichia coli. After its purification by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography, the fusion His-SUMO-psTnI protein was digested with the SUMO enzyme to release psTnI. The inhibitory ability of this recombinant shark TnI polypeptide for angiogenesis was confirmed by chicken embryo allantoic membrane (CAM) test and IHC analysis. It was also found by breast carcinoma xenograft study in Balb/c mice that this polypeptide could inhibit tumor growth in vivo.

  2. INHIBITION OF RHABDOMYOSARCOMA CELL AND TUMOR GROWTH BY TARGETING SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Pathi, Satya; Kim, Kyounghyun; Chen, Candy; Crose, Lisa; Linardic, Corinne; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 are highly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. In tissue arrays of RMS tumor cores from 71 patients, 80% of RMS patients expressed high levels of Sp1 protein, whereas low expression of Sp1 was detected in normal muscle tissue. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) tolfenamic acid (TA) inhibited growth and migration of RD and RH30 RMS cell lines and also inhibited tumor growth in vivo using a mouse xenograft (RH30 cells) model. The effects of TA were accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes in RMS cells and tumors, and the role of Sp protein downregulation in mediating inhibition of RD and RH30 cell growth and migration was confirmed by individual and combined knockdown of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins by RNA interference. TA treatment and Sp knockdown in RD and RH30 cells also showed that four genes that are emerging as individual drug targets for treating RMS, namely c-MET, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), PDGFRα and CXCR4, are also Sp-regulated genes. These results suggest that NSAIDs such as TA may have potential clinical efficacy in drug combinations for treating RMS patients. PMID:22815231

  3. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21.

  4. Metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor growth through upregulation of PEDF expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowan; Li, Chenli; He, Tiantian; Mao, Jiating; Li, Chunmei; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-05-03

    Metformin has been reported to inhibit the growth of various types of cancers, including prostate cancer. Yet the mode of anti-cancer action of metformin and the underlying mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. We hypothesized that the antitumorigenic effects of metformin are mediated through upregulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) expression in prostate cancer cells. In this report, metformin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of prostate cancer cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, Metformin markedly suppressed migration and invasion and induced apoptosis of both LNCaP and PC3 cancer cells. Metformin also reduced PC3 tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice in vivo. Furthermore, metformin treatment was associated with higher PEDF expression in both prostate cancer cells and tumor tissue. Taken together, metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumor growth, and these activities are mediated by upregulation of PEDF expression. These findings provide a novel insight into the molecular functions of metformin as an anticancer agent.

  5. Tumor Suppressor WWOX inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis by modulating RUNX2 function.

    PubMed

    Del Mare, Sara; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-08-10

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. This malignant osteoid forming tumor is characterized by its metastatic potential, mainly to lungs. We recently demonstrated that WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is frequently inactivated in human OS and that WWOX restoration in WWOX-negative OS cells suppresses tumorigenicity. Of note, WWOX levels are reduced in paired OS samples of post-treatment metastastectomies as compared to pre-treatment biopsies suggesting that decreased WWOX levels are associated with a more aggressive phenotype at the metastatic site. Nevertheless, little is known about WWOX function in OS metastasis. Here, we investigated the role of tumor suppressor WWOX in suppressing pulmonary OS metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of WWOX in OS cells, HOS and LM-7, inhibits OS invasion and cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, WWOX expression reduced tumor burden in vivo and inhibited metastases' seeding and colonization. Mechanistically, WWOX function is associated with reduced levels of RUNX2 metastatic target genes implicated in adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that WWOX plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of OS, and its expression could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease.

  6. Tumor Suppressor WWOX inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis by modulating RUNX2 function

    PubMed Central

    Del Mare, Sara; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. This malignant osteoid forming tumor is characterized by its metastatic potential, mainly to lungs. We recently demonstrated that WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is frequently inactivated in human OS and that WWOX restoration in WWOX-negative OS cells suppresses tumorigenicity. Of note, WWOX levels are reduced in paired OS samples of post-treatment metastastectomies as compared to pre-treatment biopsies suggesting that decreased WWOX levels are associated with a more aggressive phenotype at the metastatic site. Nevertheless, little is known about WWOX function in OS metastasis. Here, we investigated the role of tumor suppressor WWOX in suppressing pulmonary OS metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of WWOX in OS cells, HOS and LM-7, inhibits OS invasion and cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, WWOX expression reduced tumor burden in vivo and inhibited metastases’ seeding and colonization. Mechanistically, WWOX function is associated with reduced levels of RUNX2 metastatic target genes implicated in adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that WWOX plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of OS, and its expression could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease. PMID:26256646

  7. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kajikawa, Masunori; Sugiura, Masahito; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Urano, Sakiko; Karasawa, Chigusa; Usami, Ihomi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Masuda, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    To create a new anti-tumor antibody, we conducted signal sequence trap by retrovirus-meditated expression method and identified coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR) as an appropriate target. We developed monoclonal antibodies against human CXADR and found that one antibody (6G10A) significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous as well as orthotopic xenografts of human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, 6G10A also inhibited other cancer xenografts expressing CXADR, such as pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown and overexpression of CXADR confirmed the dependence of its anti-tumor activity on CXADR expression. Our studies of its action demonstrated that 6G10A exerted its anti-tumor activity primarily through both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, 6G10A reacted with human tumor tissues, such as prostate, lung, and brain, each of which express CXADR. Although we need further evaluation of its reactivity and safety in human tissues, our results show that a novel anti-CXADR antibody may be a feasible candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28074864

  8. The C-terminus of IGFBP-5 suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Ryoung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yoonna; Park, Youngmee; Han, Hee Dong; Ahn, Hyung Jun; Lee, Je-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5) plays a role in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that IGFBP5 was markedly downregulated in ovarian cancer tissue. We investigated the functional significance of IGFBP-5 as a tumor suppressor. To determine functional regions of IGFBP-5, truncation mutants were prepared and were studied the effect on tumor growth. Expression of C-terminal region of IGFBP-5 significantly decreased tumor growth in an ovarian cancer xenograft. A peptide derived from the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 (BP5-C) was synthesized to evaluate the minimal amino acid motif that retained anti-tumorigenic activity and its effect on angiogenesis was studied. BP5-C peptide decreased the expression of VEGF-A and MMP-9, phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, and NF-kB activity, and inhibited angiogenesis in in vitro and ex vivo systems. Furthermore, BP5-C peptide significantly decreased tumor weight and angiogenesis in both ovarian cancer orthotopic xenograft and patient-derived xenograft mice. These results suggest that the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 exerts anti-cancer activity by inhibiting angiogenesis via regulation of the Akt/ERK and NF-kB–VEGF/MMP-9 signaling pathway, and might be considered as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28008951

  9. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  10. Connexin 43 inhibition sensitizes chemoresistant glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan F; Varghese, Robin T; Lamouille, Samy; Guo, Sujuan; Pridham, Kevin J; Kanabur, Pratik; Osimani, Alyssa M; Sharma, Shaan; Jourdan, Jane; Rodgers, Cara M; Simonds, Gary R; Gourdie, Robert G; Sheng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of glioblastoma (GBM) to the front-line chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide (TMZ) continues to challenge GBM treatment efforts. The repair of TMZ-induced DNA damage by O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) confers one mechanism of TMZ resistance. Paradoxically, MGMT-deficient GBM patients survive longer despite still developing resistance to TMZ. Recent studies indicate that the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) renders GBM cells resistant to TMZ through its carboxyl terminus (CT). In this study, we report insights into how Cx43 promotes TMZ resistance. Cx43 levels were inversely correlated with TMZ sensitivity of GBM cells, including GBM stem cells. Moreover, Cx43 levels inversely correlated with patient survival, including as observed in MGMT-deficient GBM patients. Addition of the C-terminal peptide mimetic αCT1, a selective inhibitor of Cx43 channels, sensitized human MGMT-deficient and TMZ-resistant GBM cells to TMZ treatment. Moreover, combining αCT1 with TMZ blocked AKT/mTOR signaling, induced autophagy and apoptosis in TMZ-resistant GBM cells. Our findings suggest that Cx43 may offer a biomarker to predict the survival of patients with MGMT-independent TMZ resistance, and that combining a Cx43 inhibitor with TMZ could enhance therapeutic responses in GBM and perhaps other TMZ-resistant cancers. PMID:26542214

  11. Targeting Slit-Roundabout signaling inhibits tumor angiogenesis in chemical-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jing; Zhao, Yuan; Han, Bing; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ding-Ming; Mao, Jian-Wen; Tang, Fu-Tian; Li, Wei-Dong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Rui; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2008-03-01

    Slit is a secreted protein known to function through the Roundabout (Robo) receptor as a repellent for axon guidance and neuronal migration, and as an inhibitor in leukocyte chemotaxis. We have previously shown that Slit2 is also secreted by a variety of human cancer cells whereby it acts as a chemoattractant to vascular endothelial cells for tumor angiogenesis. We used a blocking antibody to investigate the role of Slit-Robo signaling in tumor angiogenesis during oral carcinogenesis. In this report we undertook a multistage model of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene-induced squamous cell carcinoma in the hamster buccal pouch. R5, a monoclonal antibody against the first immunoglobulin domain of Robo1, was used to study whether R5 blocks the Slit-Robo interaction and furthermore inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in our model. In addition, the expression of Slit2, von Willebrand factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were examined using human tissue of oral cheek mucosa with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data showed that Slit2 was expressed minimally in normal and hyperplastic mucosa, moderately in dysplastic mucosa, and highly in neoplastic mucosa obtained from hamster buccal pouch. We also found that increased Slit2 expression was associated with higher tumor angiogenesis, as reflected by increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and microvessel density. A similar Slit2 expression profile was found in human tissue. Importantly, interruption of the Slit2-Robo interaction using R5 inhibited tumor angiogenesis and growth in our in vivo model, which indicates that Slit2-mediated tumor angiogenesis is a critical process underlying the carcinogenesis of chemical-induced squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, targeting Slit-Robo signaling may offer a novel antiangiogenesis approach for oral cancer therapy.

  12. [Pulsed electric fields inhibit tumor growth but induce myocardial injury of melanoma-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Pan, Fengying; Wu, Sha; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the tumor inhibiting effect of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on melanoma-bearing mice, and understand its influence on myocardial cells and cardial electrical activity. Methods The melanoma models of the BALB/c mice were established by subcutaneously injecting B16 melanoma cells. These mice were randomly divided into four groups. The treated groups received pulsed electric stimulation at pulse width of 1, 3, 5 ms, with field strength of 100 V/cm and frequency of 10 Hz for 10 minutes daily in 15 consecutive days. ECG of mice was recorded. Tumor volume was measured with vernier caliper. Morphological changes of tumors were observed by HE staining. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) mRNA was tested by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression of PCNA protein was detected by immunofluorescence histochemistry. The ultrastructural changes of the cardiac tissues were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The serum levels of cardial troponin T (cTnT) and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) were detected by ELISA. Results Compared with the control group, tumor volumes in all treated groups were reduced 7 days after PEFs treatment; more melanin granules in tumor cells were found in the treated groups; the expressions of PCNA mRNA and protein were down-regulated in all treated groups, and there were greater changes in the groups receiving the bigger pulse width. Myocardial injury was found in 3 ms group and 5 ms group, and the expressions of cTnT and CK-MB were significantly higher than those in the control group. Conclusion PEFs can inhibit tumor growth in melanoma-bearing mice. Increase of pulse width will aggravate myocardial injury.

  13. Bcl-xL inhibition by molecular-targeting drugs sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoko; Harashima, Nanae; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Harada, Mamoru

    2015-12-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells without damaging normal cells. However, in terms of pancreatic cancer, not all cancer cells are sensitive to TRAIL. In this study, we examined a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines for TRAIL sensitivity and investigated the effects of Bcl-2 family inhibitors on their response to TRAIL. Both ABT-263 and ABT-737 inhibited the function of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w. Of the nine pancreatic cancer cell lines tested, six showed no or low sensitivity to TRAIL, which correlated with protein expression of Bcl-xL. ABT-263 significantly sensitized four cell lines (AsPC-1, Panc-1, CFPAC-1, and Panc10.05) to TRAIL, with reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Knockdown of Bcl-xL, but not Bcl-2, by siRNA transfection increased the sensitivity of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells to TRAIL. ABT-263 treatment had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, or c-FLIPs. In Panc-1 cells, ABT-263 increased the surface expression of death receptor (DR) 5; the NF-κB pathway, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, participated in the increase. In xenograft mouse models, the combination of TRAIL and ATB-737 suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells. These results indicate that Bcl-xL is responsible for TRAIL resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells, and that Bcl-2 family inhibitors could represent promising reagents to sensitize human pancreatic cancers in DR-targeting therapy.

  14. Increasing oxygenation and radiation sensitivity following photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in the RIF-1 tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Demidenko, Eugene; Wilmot, Carmen M.; Chen, Bin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2003-06-01

    The combination of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) wiht radiaiton therapy from an orthovoltage device has been examiend in the radiation induced fibrosarcoma tumor model. PDT with verteporfin using a 3 hour delay between injection and the time of optical irradiation has been shown to cause a significant rise in overlal tumor oxygenation. It was huypothesized that this mechanism arises from the reduced oxygen consumption from cells where the PDT has targeted the mitochondria and shut down cellular respiration. Tumor blood flow was measured and found to be still be patent immediately following therapy. This increasing oxygenation was thought to provide an opportunity to increase the radiation sensitivity of the tumor immediately following PDT. When this type of treatment was combined with radiation therapy, a delay in the tumor regrowth time demonstrated that the combined effect was greater than additive. Further study of this phenomenon will provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the effect and possibly provide a viable pre-treatment for radiation therapy of tumore that increases the therapeutic ratio. This effect could be used to either increase the radiaton dose without increasing the side effects or decrease the dose needed for the same effect on the tumor.

  15. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  16. Inhibition of the Proteasome β2 Site Sensitizes Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells to β5 Inhibitors and Suppresses Nrf1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Weyburne, Emily S; Wilkins, Owen M; Sha, Zhe; Williams, David A; Pletnev, Alexandre A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Overkleeft, Hermann S; Goldberg, Alfred L; Cole, Michael D; Kisselev, Alexei F

    2017-02-16

    The proteasome inhibitors carfilzomib (Cfz) and bortezomib (Btz) are used successfully to treat multiple myeloma, but have not shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors. Here we show that clinically achievable inhibition of the β5 site of the proteasome by Cfz and Btz does not result in loss of viability of triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. We use site-specific inhibitors and CRISPR-mediated genetic inactivation of β1 and β2 to demonstrate that inhibiting a second site of the proteasome, particularly the β2 site, sensitizes cell lines to Btz and Cfz in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting both β5 and β2 suppresses production of the soluble, active form of the transcription factor Nrf1 and prevents the recovery of proteasome activity through induction of new proteasomes. These findings provide a strong rationale for the development of dual β5 and β2 inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors.

  17. Overexpression of Aurora-A kinase promotes tumor cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Liu, Rong; Jin, Shun Qian; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhan, Qi Min

    2006-04-01

    Aurora-A kinase, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a potential oncogene. Amplification and overexpression of Aurora-A have been found in several types of human tumors, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). It has been demonstrated that cells overexpressing Aurora-A are more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects remain largely unknown. In this report, we showed that overexpression of Aurora-A through stable transfection of pEGFP-Aurora-A in human ESCC KYSE150 cells significantly promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cisplatin- or UV irradiation-induced apoptosis. Cleavages of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in Aurora-A overexpressing cells were substantially reduced after cisplatin or UV treatment. Furthermore, we found that silencing of endogenous Aurora-A kinase with siRNA substantially enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin- or UV-induced apoptosis in human ESCC EC9706 cells. In parallel, overexpression of Aurora-A potently upregulated the expression of Bcl-2. Moreover, the knockdown of Bcl-2 by siRNA abrogated the Aurora-A's effect on inhibiting apoptosis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that Aurora-A overexpression promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis, suggesting a novel mechanism that is closely related to malignant phenotype and anti-cancer drugs resistance of ESCC cells.

  18. Small-molecule inhibition of PTPRZ reduces tumor growth in a rat model of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Nagahira, Asako; Sugawara, Hajime; Ishii, Kentaro; Imajo, Seiichi; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Tanga, Naomi; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Ogata, Atsuto; Masumura, Makoto; Noda, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type Z (PTPRZ) is aberrantly over-expressed in glioblastoma and a causative factor for its malignancy. However, small molecules that selectively inhibit the catalytic activity of PTPRZ have not been discovered. We herein performed an in vitro screening of a chemical library, and identified SCB4380 as the first potent inhibitor for PTPRZ. The stoichiometric binding of SCB4380 to the catalytic pocket was demonstrated by biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses. We determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PTPRZ, and the structural basis of the binding of SCB4380 elucidated by a molecular docking method was validated by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The intracellular delivery of SCB4380 by liposome carriers inhibited PTPRZ activity in C6 glioblastoma cells, and thereby suppressed their migration and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in a rat allograft model. Therefore, selective inhibition of PTPRZ represents a promising approach for glioma therapy. PMID:26857455

  19. Tumor suppressor berberine binds VASP to inhibit cell migration in basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Kuang, Changchun; Xiang, Qingmin; Yang, Fang; Xiang, Jin; Zhu, Shan; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is a plant-derived compound used in traditional Chinese medicine, which has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer. On the other hand, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) promotes actin filament elongation and cell migration. We previously showed that VASP is overexpressed in high-motility breast cancer cells. Here we investigated whether the anti-tumorigenic effects of berberine are mediated by binding VASP in basal-like breast cancer. Our results show that berberine suppresses proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 nude mouse xenografts. We also show that berberine binds to VASP, inducing changes in its secondary structure and inhibits actin polymerization. Our study reveals the mechanism underlying berberine's inhibition of cell proliferation and migration in basal-like breast cancer, highlighting the use of berberine as a potential adjuvant therapeutic agent. PMID:27322681

  20. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  1. Astaxanthin Inhibits PC-3 Xenograft Prostate Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaofeng; Yu, Haining; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shen, Shengrong

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most common malignancy in men, is a major cause of cancer deaths. A better understanding of the mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression may identify actionable targets to improve treatment of this patient group. As a dietary carotenoid, astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects against inflammation, cardiovascular disease, oxidative damage, or different cancer sites. This study used intragastric administration of astaxanthin to detect its role on tumor proliferation, apoptosis, microRNA (miRNA) overexpression, and microbacteria composition change by establishing androgen-independent PCa cell PC-3 xenograft nude mice. Nude mice were inoculated with androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells subcutaneously. The intervention was started when tumors reached 0.5–0.6 cm in diameter. Mice were intragastrically administered 100 mg/kg astaxanthin (HA), 25 mg/kg astaxanthin (LA), or olive oil (TC). The results showed that 100 mg/kg astaxanthin significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the TC group, with an inhibitory rate of 41.7%. A decrease of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as well as an increase of cleaved caspase-3 were observed in HA-treated tumors, along with increasing apoptotic cells, obtained by TUNEL assay. The HA significantly elevated the levels of tumor suppressors miR-375 and miR-487b in tumor tissues and the amount of Lactobacillus sp. and Lachnospiraceae in mice stools, while there was no significant difference between LA and TC groups. These results provide a promising regimen to enhance the therapeutic effect in a dietary supplement manner. PMID:28282880

  2. Hypoxia inhibits semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Repessé, Xavier; Moldes, Marthe; Muscat, Adeline; Vatier, Camille; Chetrite, Gérard; Gille, Thomas; Planes, Carole; Filip, Anna; Mercier, Nathalie; Duranteau, Jacques; Fève, Bruno

    2015-08-15

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO), an enzyme highly expressed on adipocyte plasma membranes, converts primary amines into aldehydes, ammonium and hydrogen peroxide, and is likely involved in endothelial damage during the course of diabetes and obesity. We investigated whether in vitro, adipocyte SSAO was modulated under hypoxic conditions that is present in adipose tissue from obese or intensive care unit. Physical or pharmacological hypoxia decreased SSAO activity in murine adipocytes and human adipose tissue explants, while enzyme expression was preserved. This effect was time-, dose-dependent and reversible. This down-regulation was confirmed in vivo in subcutaneous adipose tissue from a rat model of hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced suppression in SSAO activity was independent of the HIF-1-α pathway or of oxidative stress, but was partially antagonized by medium acidification. Hypoxia-induced down-regulation of SSAO activity could represent an adaptive mechanism to lower toxic molecules production, and may thus protect from tissue injury during these harmful conditions.

  3. MDM2 Inhibition Sensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy in a p53-Dependent Manner12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Felix Y.; Zhang, Yu; Kothari, Vishal; Evans, Joseph R.; Jackson, William C.; Chen, Wei; Johnson, Skyler B.; Luczak, Connor; Wang, Shaomeng; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increased murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, independent of p53 status, is associated with increased cancer-specific mortality for men with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. We assessed MI-219, a small molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with improved pharmacokinetics over nutlin-3, for sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy, a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 was assessed in vitro and in vivo with mouse xenograft models across multiple prostate cancer cell lines containing varying p53 functional status. RESULTS: MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 resulted in dose- and time-dependent p53 activation and decreased clonogenic cell survival after radiation in a p53-dependent manner. Mechanistically, radiosensitization following inhibition of MDM2 was largely the result of p53-dependent increases in apoptosis and DNA damage as evidenced by Annexin V flow cytometry and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence. Similarly, treatment with MI-219 enhanced response to antiandrogen therapy via a p53-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death. Lastly, triple therapy with radiation, androgen deprivation therapy, and MI-219 decreased xenograft tumor growth compared with any single- or double-agent treatment. CONCLUSION: MDM2 inhibition with MI-219 results in p53-dependent sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiation, antiandrogen therapy, and the combination. These findings support MDM2 small molecule inhibitor therapy as a therapy intensification strategy to improve clinical outcomes in high-risk localized prostate cancer. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: The combination of radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy is a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Despite improvements in outcomes when androgen deprivation therapy is added to radiation, men with high-risk prostate cancer have significant risk for

  4. Patient-derived xenografts of triple-negative breast cancer reproduce molecular features of patient tumors and respond to mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is aggressive and lacks targeted therapies. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways are frequently activated in TNBC patient tumors at the genome, gene expression and protein levels, and mTOR inhibitors have been shown to inhibit growth in TNBC cell lines. We describe a panel of patient-derived xenografts representing multiple TNBC subtypes and use them to test preclinical drug efficacy of two mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus (rapamycin) and temsirolimus (CCI-779). Methods We generated a panel of seven patient-derived orthotopic xenografts from six primary TNBC tumors and one metastasis. Patient tumors and corresponding xenografts were compared by histology, immunohistochemistry, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) sequencing; TNBC subtypes were determined. Using a previously published logistic regression approach, we generated a rapamycin response signature from Connectivity Map gene expression data and used it to predict rapamycin sensitivity in 1,401 human breast cancers of different intrinsic subtypes, prompting in vivo testing of mTOR inhibitors and doxorubicin in our TNBC xenografts. Results Patient-derived xenografts recapitulated histology, biomarker expression and global genomic features of patient tumors. Two primary tumors had PIK3CA coding mutations, and five of six primary tumors showed flanking intron single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with conservation of sequence variations between primary tumors and xenografts, even on subsequent xenograft passages. Gene expression profiling showed that our models represent at least four of six TNBC subtypes. The rapamycin response signature predicted sensitivity for 94% of basal-like breast cancers in a large dataset. Drug testing of mTOR inhibitors in our xenografts showed 77 to 99% growth inhibition, significantly more than

  5. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-11-15

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

  6. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. PMID:25350971

  7. Targeted two-photon PDT photo-sensitizers for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Rebane, A.; Starkey, J.; Drobizhev, M.

    2009-06-01

    New porphyrin-based photo-sensitizers have been designed, synthesized and characterized that exhibit greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon absorption. These new photo-sensitizers have been incorporated into triad formulations that also incorporate Near-infrared (NIR) imaging agents, and small-molecule targeting agents that direct the triads to cancerous tumors' over-expressed receptor sites. PDT can be initiated deep into the tissue transparency window at 780-800 nm utilizing a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser using 100-150 fs pulses of 600-800 mW. Human tumor xenografts of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and both small SCLC (NCI-H69) and NSCLC (A-459) have been successfully treated using octreotate targeting of over-expressed SST2 receptors. In particular, the lung cancer xenografts can be successfully treated by irradiating from the side of the mouse opposite the implanted tumor, thereby passing through ca. 2 cm of mouse skin, tissue and organs with no discernible damage to healthy tissue while causing regression in the tumors. These results suggest a new PDT paradigm for the noninvasive treatment of subcutaneous tumors, including the possibility that the targeting moiety could be matched to individual patient genetic profiles (patient-specific therapeutics).

  8. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST) is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST. PMID:22410253

  9. Adenovirus E2F1 Overexpression Sensitizes LNCaP and PC3 Prostate Tumor Cells to Radiation In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Stoyanova, Radka; Hachem, Paul; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Pollack, Alan

    2011-02-01

    ectopic overexpression of E2F1 in vivo, using an adenoviral vector, significantly inhibits orthotopic p53 wild-type LNCaP tumors and subcutaneous p53-null PC3 tumors in nude mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that E2F1 strongly sensitizes LNCaP tumors to RT. These findings suggest that E2F1 overexpression can sensitize prostate tumor cells in vivo, independent of p53 or androgen receptor status.

  10. The immunosuppressant FTY720 inhibits tumor angiogenesis via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Ischenko, Ivan; Papyan, Armine; Joka, Mareile; Schrepfer, Sabine; Bruns, Christiane J; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Heeschen, Christopher; Graeb, Christian

    2007-05-01

    FTY720, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) analog, acts as an immunosuppressant through trapping of T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. FTY720 was also shown to prevent tumor growth and to inhibit vascular permeability. The MTT proliferation assay illustrated that endothelial cells are more susceptible to the anti-proliferative effect of FTY720 than Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1) cells. In a spheroid angiogenesis model, FTY720 potently inhibited the sprouting activity of VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cells even at concentrations that apparently had no anti-proliferative effect. Mechanistically, the anti-angiogenic effect of the general S1P receptor agonist FTY720 was mimicked by the specific S1P1 receptor agonist SEW2871. Moreover, the anti-angiogenic effect of FTY720 was abrogated in the presence of CXCR4-neutralizing antibodies. This indicates that the effect was at least in part mediated by the S1P1 receptor and involved transactivation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor. Additionally, we could illustrate in a coculture spheroid model, employing endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), that the latter confer a strong protective effect regarding the action of FTY720 upon the endothelial cells. In a subcutaneous LLC1 tumor model, the anti-angiogenic capacity translated into a reduced tumor size in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, in the Matrigel plug in vivo assay, 10 mg/kg/d FTY720 resulted in a strong inhibition of angiogenesis as demonstrated by a reduced capillary density. Thus, in organ transplant patients, FTY720 may prove efficacious in preventing graft rejection as well as tumor development.

  11. Combination of intermittent calorie restriction and eicosapentaenoic acid for inhibition of mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Nancy K; Rogozina, Olga P; Seppanen, Christine M; Liao, D Joshua; Cleary, Margot P; Grossmann, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    There are a number of dietary interventions capable of inhibiting mammary tumorigenesis; however, the effectiveness of dietary combinations is largely unexplored. Here, we combined 2 interventions previously shown individually to inhibit mammary tumor development. The first was the use of the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and the second was the implementation of calorie restriction. MMTV-Her2/neu mice were used as a model for human breast cancers, which overexpress Her2/neu. Six groups of mice were enrolled. Half were fed a control (Con) diet with 10.1% fat calories from soy oil, whereas the other half consumed a diet with 72% fat calories from EPA. Within each diet, mice were further divided into ad libitum (AL), chronic calorie-restricted (CCR), or intermittent calorie-restricted (ICR) groups. Mammary tumor incidence was lowest in ICR-EPA (15%) and highest in AL-Con mice (87%), whereas AL-EPA, CCR-Con, CCR-EPA, and ICR-Con groups had mammary tumor incidence rates of 63%, 47%, 40%, and 59%, respectively. Survival was effected similarly by the interventions. Consumption of EPA dramatically reduced serum leptin (P < 0.02) and increased serum adiponectin in the AL-EPA mice compared with AL-Con mice (P < 0.001). Both CCR and ICR decreased serum leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) compared with AL mice but not compared with each other. These results illustrate that mammary tumor inhibition is significantly increased when ICR and EPA are combined as compared with either intervention alone. This response may be related to alterations in the balance of serum growth factors and adipokines.

  12. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  13. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shu-Cheng; Guo, Wei; Tao, Ze-Zhang

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  14. shRNA-Mediated XRCC2 Gene Knockdown Efficiently Sensitizes Colon Tumor Cells to X-ray Irradiation in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Xu, Chang; Sun, Yuanming; Yang, Bing; Sun, Zhijuan; Fu, Yue; Cai, Lu; Fan, Saijun; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors of the digestive tract. Resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) decreased therapeutic efficiency in these patients’ radiotherapy. XRCC2 is the key protein of DNA homologous recombination repair, and its high expression is associated with enhanced resistance to DNA damage induced by IR. Here, we investigated the effect of XRCC2 silencing on colon tumor cells’ growth and sensitivity to X-radiation in vitro and in vivo. Colon tumor cells (T84 cell line) were cultivated in vitro and tumors originated from the cell line were propagated as xenografts in nude mice. The suppression of XRCC2 expression was achieved by using vector-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in T84 cells. We found that the knockdown of XRCC2 expression effectively decreased T84 cellular proliferation and colony formation, and led to cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase induced by X-radiation in vitro. In addition, tumor xenograft studies suggested that XRCC2 silencing inhibited tumorigenicity after radiation treatment in vivo. Our data suggest that the suppression of XRCC2 expression rendered colon tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo, implying XRCC2 as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of radioresistant human colon cancer. PMID:24481064

  15. Cool-1-mediated inhibition of c-Cbl modulates multiple critical properties of glioblastomas, including the ability to generate tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brett M; Folts, Christopher J; Cui, Wanchang; Bardin, Addie L; Walter, Kevin; Carson-Walter, Eleanor; Vescovi, Angelo; Noble, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We discovered that glioblastoma (GBM) cells use Cool-1/β-pix to inhibit normal activation of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase via the redox/Fyn/c-Cbl pathway and that c-Cbl inhibition is critical for GBM cell function. Restoring normal c-Cbl activity by Cool-1 knockdown in vitro reduced GBM cell division, almost eliminated generation of adhesion-independent spheroids, reduced the representation of cells expressing antigens thought to identify tumor initiating cells (TICs), reduced levels of several proteins of critical importance in TIC function (such as Notch-1 and Sox2), and increased sensitivity to BCNU (carmustine) and temozolomide (TMZ). In vivo, Cool-1 knockdown greatly suppressed the ability of GBM cells to generate tumors, an outcome that was c-Cbl dependent. In contrast, Cool-1 knockdown did not reduce division or increase BCNU or TMZ sensitivity in primary glial progenitor cells and Cool-1/c-Cbl complexes were not found in normal brain tissue. Our studies provide the first evidence that Cool-1 may be critical in the biology of human tumors, that suppression of c-Cbl by Cool-1 may be critical for generation of at least a subset of GBMs and offer a novel target that appears to be selectively necessary for TIC function and modulates chemoresistance in GBM cells. Targeting such proteins that inhibit c-Cbl offers potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development.

  16. Inhibition of histamine receptor 3 suppresses glioblastoma tumor growth, invasion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen-Ke; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Yu-Qiao; Chang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Histamine receptor 3 (H3R) is expressed in various tumors and correlated with malignancy and tumor proliferation. However, the role of H3R in tumor invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. Here, we explored the H3R in the highly invasive glioblastoma (GBM) and U87MG cells. We found that H3R mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the GBM and glioma cell lines compared to normal brain tissue and astrocytes. In U87MG cell line, inhibition of H3R by siRNA or the antagonist ciproxifan (CPX) suppressed proliferation, invasiveness, and the expression of EMT activators (Snail, Slug and Twist). In addition, expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and ZO-1) was up-regulated and expression of mesenchymal markers (vimentin and N-cadherin) was down-regulated in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model. In addition, we also showed that inhibition of H3R by siRNA or CPX inactivated the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways, while inhibition of Akt or ERK activity with antagonists or siRNAs suppressed H3R agonist (R)-(α)-(−)- methylhistamine dihydrobromide (RAMH) mediated invasion and reorganization of cadherin-household. In conclusion, overexpression of H3R is associated with glioma progression. Inhibition of H3R leads to suppressed invasion and EMT of GBM by inactivating the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in gliomas. PMID:25940798

  17. Inhibition of tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase by macrophage-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Stuehr, D J; Nathan, C F

    1991-10-01

    Macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) is cytostatic to tumor cells and microbial pathogens. We tested whether one molecular target for the cytostatic action of NO may be ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. In a concentration-dependent manner, NO gas and lysates of activated macrophages that generated comparable amounts of NO led to the same degree of inhibition of partially purified RR from L1210 mouse lymphoma cells. Lysates from nonactivated macrophages, which do not produce NO, were noninhibitory. With lysates from activated macrophages, RR was protected by omitting L-arginine or by adding the NO synthase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium, N omega-methyl-L-arginine, or N omega-amino-L-arginine. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine, abolished the protective effect of N omega-amino-L-arginine. The prototypic pharmacologic inhibitor of RR is hydroxyurea. Its structural resemblance to N omega-hydroxy-L-arginine, a reaction intermediate of NO synthase, prompted us to test if hydroxyurea can generate NO. In the presence of H2O2 and CuSO4, hydroxyurea produced NO2-/NO3-, aerobic reaction products of NO. Addition of morpholine blocked NO2-/NO3- generation from hydroxyurea and led to formation of nitrosomorpholine, as detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Thus, hydroxyurea can produce an NO-like, nitrosating rectant. L1210 cell DNA synthesis was inhibited completely by activated macrophages or by hydroxyurea, and was partially restored to the same degree in both settings by providing deoxyribonucleosides to bypass the block in RR. Thus, both NO gas and NO generated by activated macrophage lysates inhibit tumor cell RR. The RR inhibitor hydroxyurea can also generate an NO-like species. Similar, partial restoration of tumor cell DNA synthesis by deoxyribonucleosides in the presence of activated macrophages or hydroxyurea suggests that cytostasis by activated macrophages and by hydroxyurea has comparable mechanisms, including, but

  18. Intraoperative Spectroscopy with Ultrahigh Sensitivity for Image-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kairdolf, Brad A; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Sharma, Abhinav K; Wang, May Dongmei; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Nie, Shuming

    2016-01-05

    Intraoperative cancer imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery have attracted considerable interest because fluorescence signals can provide real-time guidance to assist a surgeon in differentiating cancerous and normal tissues. Recent advances have led to the clinical use of a natural fluorophore called protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for image-guided surgical resection of high-grade brain tumors (glioblastomas). However, traditional fluorescence imaging methods have only limited detection sensitivity and identification accuracy and are unable to detect low-grade or diffuse infiltrating gliomas (DIGs). Here we report a low-cost hand-held spectroscopic device that is capable of ultrasensitive detection of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in vivo, together with intraoperative spectroscopic data obtained from both animal xenografts and human brain tumor specimens. The results indicate that intraoperative spectroscopy is at least 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current surgical microscopes, allowing ultrasensitive detection of as few as 1000 tumor cells. For detection specificity, intraoperative spectroscopy allows the differentiation of brain tumor cells from normal brain cells with a contrast signal ratio over 100. In vivo animal studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX fluorescence is strongly correlated with both MRI and histological staining, confirming that the fluorescence signals are highly specific to tumor cells. Furthermore, ex vivo spectroscopic studies of excised brain tissues demonstrate that the hand-held spectroscopic device is capable of detecting diffuse tumor margins with low fluorescence contrast that are not detectable with current systems in the operating room. These results open new opportunities for intraoperative detection and fluorescence-guided resection of microscopic and low-grade glioma brain tumors with invasive or diffusive margins.

  19. Morphometric and colorimetric analyses of human tumor cell line growth and drug sensitivity in soft agar culture.

    PubMed

    Alley, M C; Pacula-Cox, C M; Hursey, M L; Rubinstein, L R; Boyd, M R

    1991-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the suitability of image analysis of tetrazolium-stained colonies to assess growth and drug sensitivity of human tumor cells cultivated in soft agar culture. In the present study, the potential utility of colorimetric analysis to expedite experimental drug evaluations using human tumor cell lines was investigated. The same culture dishes were assessed by image analysis and by formazan colorimetry for purposes of comparing multiple methods of measuring growth as well as growth inhibition. Replicate cultures treated with 2-(p-iodonitrophenyl)-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide exhibited nearly identical colony count and volume indices as well as excellent correlation in colorimetric end points. Colony-forming unit volume analysis versus colorimetric assessment of the same cultures following dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of protamine sulfate-rinsed, dried soft agar cultures exhibited excellent linear correlation for both growth (Pearson r ranging from 0.95 to 1.00) and drug sensitivity (Pearson r ranging from 0.90 to 0.99, and Spearman r ranging from 0.82 to 0.97) and similar drug sensitivity profiles. Results of the current investigation indicate that end points of soft agar culture remain stable for a period of at least 2 weeks following assay termination. In addition, a colorimetric detection range of 1.3-2.2 log units permits determinations of survival levels ranging from 100 to 5% of respective control levels. Colorimetric analysis is anticipated to expedite soft agar colony formation assay evaluations (a) by reducing the need to use the more rigorous and time-consuming image analysis procedures to measure activity in preliminary drug sensitivity assays and (b) by permitting the determination of effective concentration ranges of new experimental agents for subsequent, more detailed investigations.

  20. Reduced PAK1 activity sensitizes FA/BRCA-proficient breast cancer cells to PARP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Villamar Cruz, Olga; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Johnson, Neil; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Slifker, Michael; Renner, Catherine; Chernoff, Jonathan; Arias-Romero, Luis E

    2016-11-22

    Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination, such as those that have mutations in any of the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA genes, are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). However, FA/BRCA-deficient tumors represent a small fraction of breast cancers, which might restrict the therapeutic utility of PARP inhibitor monotherapy. The gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is amplified and/or overexpressed in several human cancer types including 25-30% of breast tumors. This enzyme controls many cellular processes by phosphorylating both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates. Here, we show that depletion or pharmacological inhibition of PAK1 down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the FA/BRCA pathway and compromised the ability of cells to repair DNA by Homologous Recombination (HR), promoting apoptosis and reducing colony formation. Combined inhibition of PAK1 and PARP in PAK1 overexpressing breast cancer cells had a synergistic effect, enhancing apoptosis, suppressing colony formation, and delaying tumor growth in a xenograft setting. Because reduced PAK1 activity impaired FA/BRCA function, inhibition of this kinase in PAK1 amplified and/or overexpressing breast cancer cells represents a plausible strategy for expanding the utility of PARP inhibitors to FA/BRCA-proficient cancers.

  1. Reduced PAK1 activity sensitizes FA/BRCA-proficient breast cancer cells to PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Johnson, Neil; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Slifker, Michael; Renner, Catherine; Chernoff, Jonathan; Arias, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination, such as those that have mutations in any of the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA genes, are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). However, FA/BRCA-deficient tumors represent a small fraction of breast cancers, which might restrict the therapeutic utility of PARP inhibitor monotherapy. The gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is amplified and/or overexpressed in several human cancer types including 25-30% of breast tumors. This enzyme controls many cellular processes by phosphorylating both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates. Here, we show that depletion or pharmacological inhibition of PAK1 down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the FA/BRCA pathway and compromised the ability of cells to repair DNA by Homologous Recombination (HR), promoting apoptosis and reducing colony formation. Combined inhibition of PAK1 and PARP in PAK1 overexpressing breast cancer cells had a synergistic effect, enhancing apoptosis, suppressing colony formation, and delaying tumor growth in a xenograft setting. Because reduced PAK1 activity impaired FA/BRCA function, inhibition of this kinase in PAK1 amplified and/or overexpressing breast cancer cells represents a plausible strategy for expanding the utility of PARP inhibitors to FA/BRCA-proficient cancers. PMID:27740936

  2. Sensitivity of prostate tumors to wild type and M protein mutant vesicular stomatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maryam; Cramer, Scott D; Lyles, Douglas S

    2004-12-05

    Because of its potent ability to induce apoptosis, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an attractive candidate as an oncolytic virus for tumor therapy. Previous studies have suggested that VSV selectively infects tumor cells due to defects in their antiviral responses making them more susceptible to VSV infection than normal cells. We tested this hypothesis in the prostate tumor system by comparing LNCaP and PC-3 prostate tumor cells to benign human prostatic epithelial cells from patient prostatectomy specimens. We compared the cell killing ability of a recombinant virus containing a wild-type (wt) M protein (rwt) and an isogenic M protein mutant virus (rM51R-M) that induces interferon (IFN) in infected cells and should display a greater selectivity for tumor cells. Our results showed that in single-cycle infection experiments, LNCaP cells were sensitive to killing by both wt and mutant viruses, while PC-3 cells were highly resistant to VSV-induced cell killing. LNCaP and benign prostate cells were similarly susceptible to both viruses, indicating that normal prostate cells are not inherently resistant to killing by VSV. In each of the cell lines, the rM51R-M virus induced similar levels of apoptosis to rwt virus, showing that the M protein does not play a significant role in apoptosis induction by VSV in these cells. In multiple-cycle infection experiments, LNCaP cells were more sensitive than benign prostatic epithelial cells to virus-induced cell killing by rM51R-M virus, but not rwt virus. Both viruses were equally effective at reducing LNCaP tumor volume in vivo following intratumoral and intravenous inoculation in nude mice, while PC-3 tumors were resistant to VSV treatment. None of the mice treated with rM51R-M virus died as a result of virus infection, while 50-71% of mice treated with rwt virus succumbed to virus infection. Similarly, when inoculated by the more sensitive intranasal route, the rM51R-M virus was less pathogenic than the rwt virus from

  3. Syzygium campanulatum korth methanolic extract inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Syzygium campanulatum Korth (Myrtaceae) is an evergreen shrub rich in phenolics, flavonoid antioxidants, and betulinic acid. This study sought to investigate antiangiogenic and anti-colon cancer effects of S.C. standardized methanolic extract. Methods Betulinic acid was isolated from methanolic extract by crystallization and chromatography techniques. S.C. methanolic extract was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, LC-MS, and HPLC. Antiangiogenic effect was studied on rat aortic rings, matrigel tube formation, cell proliferation and migration, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Antitumor effect was studied using a subcutaneous tumor model of HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells established in nude mice. Results Analysis by HPLC, LC-MS and FTIR confirm presence of betulinic acid in S.C. methanolic extract. Quantitative analysis by HPLC indicates presence of betulinic acid in S.C. extract at 5.42 ± 0.09% (w/w). Antiangiogenesis study showed potent inhibition of microvessels outgrowth in rat aortic rings, and studies on normal and cancer cells did not show any significant cytotoxic effect. Antiangiogenic effect was further confirmed by inhibition of tube formation on matrigel matrix that involves human endothelial cells (IC50 = 17.6 ± 2.9 μg/ml). S.C. extract also inhibited migration of endothelial cells and suppressed expression of VEGF. In vivo antiangiogenic study showed inhibition of new blood vessels in chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), and in vivo antitumor study showed significant inhibition of tumor growth due to reduction of intratumor blood vessels and induction of cell death. Conclusion Collectively, our results indicate S. campanulatum as antiangiogenic and antitumor candidate, and a new source of betulinic acid. PMID:23842450

  4. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits pre-osteoblast differentiation through its type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiha; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Clohisy, John C; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2003-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a profound role in many skeletal diseases. The cytokine has been described as a mediator of bone loss in osteolysis and other inflammatory bone diseases. In addition to its known bone resorptive action, TNF reduces bone formation by inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Using primary and transformed osteoblastic cells, we first document that TNF inhibits expression of alkaline phosphatase and matrix deposition, both considered markers of osteoblast differentiation. The effects are dose- and time-dependent. Core-binding factor A1 (cbfa1) is a transcription factor critical for osteoblast differentiation, and we show here that it is activated by the osteoblast differentiation agent, beta-glycerophosphate. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibitory effects of TNF were associated with altered activity of this transcription factor. Using retardation assays, we show that TNF significantly inhibits cbfal activation by beta-glycerophosphate, manifested by reduced DNA-binding activity. Next, we turned to determine the signaling pathway by which TNF inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Utilizing animals lacking individual TNF receptors, we document that TNFr1 is required for transmitting the cytokine's inhibitory effect. In the absence of this receptor, TNF failed to impact all osteoblast differentiation markers tested. In summary, TNF blocks expression of osteoblast differentiation markers and inhibits beta-glycerophosphate-induced activation of the osteoblast differentiation factor cbfa1. Importantly, these effects are mediated via a mechanism requiring the TNF type-1 receptor.

  6. Inhibition of uncoupled respiration in tumor cells. A possible role of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L

    1993-08-23

    Uncouplers CCCP (2-4 microM) or DNP (200-400 microM) when added to EL-4 thymoma or Ehrlich carcinoma ascites cells initially stimulated endogenous respiration about 2-fold but then inhibited it to a first-order rate 20-25% of controls. This inhibition was accelerated by intracellular acidification or by A23187, a Ca2+/H(+)-antiporter (i.e. when mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux was stimulated) whereas Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of uniporter-driven Ca2+ efflux, significantly slowed down the effect of uncouplers. The respiratory inhibition was associated with NAD(P)H oxidation and was partially reversed by exogenous substrates (glutamine or glucose). In the permeabilized cells, endogenous and glutamine-supported respiration was inhibited by EGTA, while succinate-supported respiration was Ca2+ independent. It is suggested that mitochondrial Ca2+ is necessary for NADH-dependent respiration of tumor cells, and uncouplers inhibit it by activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

  7. Inhibition of PKM2 sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer cells to doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Suppression of PKM2 sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. • Repression of PKM2 affects the glycolysis and decreases ATP production. • Downregulation of PKM2 increases the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. • Inhibition of PKM2 enhances the antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin in vivo. - Abstract: Cancer cells alter regular metabolic pathways in order to sustain rapid proliferation. One example of metabolic remodeling in cancerous tissue is the upregulation of pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 (PKM2), which is involved in aerobic glycolysis. Indeed, PKM2 has previously been identified as a tumor biomarker and as a potential target for cancer therapy. Here, we examined the effects of combined treatment with doxorubicin and anti-PKM2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The suppression of PKM2 resulted in changes in glucose metabolism, leading to decreased synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Reduced levels of ATP resulted in the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of this drug in several triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the combined effect of PKM2 siRNA and doxorubicin was evaluated in an in vivo MDA-MB-231 orthotopic breast cancer model. The siRNA was systemically administered through a polyethylenimine (PEI)-based delivery system that has been extensively used. We demonstrate that the combination treatment showed superior anticancer efficacy as compared to doxorubicin alone. These findings suggest that targeting PKM2 can increase the efficacy of chemotherapy, potentially providing a new approach for improving the outcome of chemotherapy in patients with TNBC.

  8. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  9. Optimal Design for Informative Protocols in Xenograft Tumor Growth Inhibition Experiments in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were (i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth and (ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules, and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e., control versus treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e., "short" and "long" studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 g of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped 3 days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected.

  10. Allosteric inhibition of aminopeptidase N functions related to tumor growth and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, César; Mudgal, Gaurav; Reguera, Juan; Recacha, Rosario; Albrecht, Sébastien; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes proteins and peptides and regulates numerous cell functions. APN participates in tumor cell expansion and motility, and is a target for cancer therapies. Small drugs that bind to the APN active site inhibit catalysis and suppress tumor growth. APN is also a major cell entry receptor for coronavirus, which binds to a region distant from the active site. Three crystal structures that we determined of human and pig APN ectodomains defined the dynamic conformation of the protein. These structures offered snapshots of closed, intermediate and open APN, which represent distinct functional states. Coronavirus envelope proteins specifically recognized the open APN form, prevented ectodomain progression to the closed form and substrate hydrolysis. In addition, drugs that bind the active site inhibited both coronavirus binding to cell surface APN and infection; the drugs probably hindered APN transition to the virus-specific open form. We conclude that allosteric inhibition of APN functions occurs by ligand suppression of ectodomain motions necessary for catalysis and virus cell entry, as validated by locking APN with disulfides. Blocking APN dynamics can thus be a valuable approach to development of drugs that target this ectoenzyme. PMID:28393915

  11. Salinomycin inhibits the growth of colorectal carcinoma by targeting tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Tian, Yaping; Song, Feiyu; Fu, Changhao; Han, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Salinomycin is a monocarboxylic polyether antibiotic that has been reported to induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells with specificity for cancer stem cells. However, its anticancer effect in colorectal cancer stem cells has never been reported. In the present study, we examined the ability of salinomycin to induce cell death in the colorectal cancer stem cell line CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116, and we measured its in vivo tumor inhibition capacity. Salinomycin dose-dependently induced cytotoxicity in the CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116 cells and inhibited colony formation. Salinomycin treatment was shown to induce apoptosis, as evidenced by nuclear fragmentation, an increase in the proportion of acridine orange/ethidium bromide-positive cells and an increase in the percentage of Annexin V-positive cells. Apoptosis was induced in colorectal cancer stem cells in a caspase-dependent manner, as shown by an increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3, -8 and -9. JC-1 staining further revealed that salinomycin induced colorectal cancer cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, salinomycin treatment of xenograft mice inhibited the growth of tumors derived from the CD44+EpCAM+ HCT-116 cells. The present study demonstrated that the antibiotic salinomycin exerts an anti-colorectal cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, suggesting salinomycin as a potential drug for colorectal cancer therapy.

  12. Allosteric inhibition of aminopeptidase N functions related to tumor growth and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Santiago, César; Mudgal, Gaurav; Reguera, Juan; Recacha, Rosario; Albrecht, Sébastien; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M

    2017-04-10

    Cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes proteins and peptides and regulates numerous cell functions. APN participates in tumor cell expansion and motility, and is a target for cancer therapies. Small drugs that bind to the APN active site inhibit catalysis and suppress tumor growth. APN is also a major cell entry receptor for coronavirus, which binds to a region distant from the active site. Three crystal structures that we determined of human and pig APN ectodomains defined the dynamic conformation of the protein. These structures offered snapshots of closed, intermediate and open APN, which represent distinct functional states. Coronavirus envelope proteins specifically recognized the open APN form, prevented ectodomain progression to the closed form and substrate hydrolysis. In addition, drugs that bind the active site inhibited both coronavirus binding to cell surface APN and infection; the drugs probably hindered APN transition to the virus-specific open form. We conclude that allosteric inhibition of APN functions occurs by ligand suppression of ectodomain motions necessary for catalysis and virus cell entry, as validated by locking APN with disulfides. Blocking APN dynamics can thus be a valuable approach to development of drugs that target this ectoenzyme.

  13. Interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 synergistically induce murine tumor regression which involves inhibition of angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, C M; Salhany, K E; Wysocka, M; Aruga, E; Kurzawa, H; Chang, A E; Hunter, C A; Fox, J C; Trinchieri, G; Lee, W M

    1998-01-01

    The antitumor effect and mechanisms activated by murine IL-12 and IL-18, cytokines that induce IFN-gamma production, were studied using engineered SCK murine mammary carcinoma cells. In syngeneic A/J mice, SCK cells expressing mIL-12 or mIL-18 were less tumorigenic and formed tumors more slowly than control cells. Neither SCK.12 nor SCK.18 cells protected significantly against tumorigenesis by distant SCK cells. However, inoculation of the two cell types together synergistically protected 70% of mice from concurrently injected distant SCK cells and 30% of mice from SCK cells established 3 d earlier. Antibody neutralization studies revealed that the antitumor effects of secreted mIL-12 and mIL-18 required IFN-gamma. Interestingly, half the survivors of SCK.12 and/or SCK.18 cells developed protective immunity suggesting that anti-SCK immunity is unlikely to be responsible for protection. Instead, angiogenesis inhibition, assayed by Matrigel implants, appeared to be a property of both SCK.12 and SCK.18 cells and the two cell types together produced significantly greater systemic inhibition of angiogenesis. This suggests that inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is an important part of the systemic antitumor effect produced by mIL-12 and mIL-18. PMID:9502787

  14. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice in thermo-sensitive liposomes group and doxorubicin group were significantly smaller than those of N.S. group. Meanwhile, the combination of near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm significantly enhanced the tumor growth inhibition both on SMMC-7721 cells and the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice. The quality of life such as body weight, mental state, food and water intake of sarcomaia 180 tumor-bearing mice treated with doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes were much higher than those treated with doxorubicin. In conclusion, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes combined with near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm may potentially provide viable clinical strategies for targeting delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Results Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic

  16. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells may Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark Frederick; Contreras, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Low millimolar concentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed. Extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction). It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation), or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate), can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other's efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the interaction of ascorbic

  17. Growth-Inhibiting Activity of Resveratrol Imine Analogs on Tumor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Willenberg, Ina; Krohn, Michael; Hecker, Tanja; Meckelmann, Sven; Li, Chang; Pan, Yuanjiang; Schebb, Nils Helge; Steinberg, Pablo; Empl, Michael Telamon

    2017-01-01

    Although resveratrol exerts manifold antitumorigenic effects in vitro, its efficacy against malignancies in vivo seems limited. This has been increasingly recognized in recent years and has prompted scientists to search for structurally related compounds with more promising anticarcinogenic and/or pharmacokinetic properties. A class of structurally modified resveratrol derivatives, so-called resveratrol imine analogs (IRA’s), might meet these requirements. Therefore, the biological activity of five of these compounds was examined and compared to that of resveratrol. Firstly, the antiproliferative potency of all five IRA’s was investigated using the p53 wildtype-carrying colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT-116wt. Then, using the former and a panel of various other tumor cell lines (including the p53 knockout variant HCT-116p53-/-), the growth-inhibiting and cell cycle-disturbing effects of the most potent IRA (IRA 5, 2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylene]amino]-phenol) were studied as was its influence on cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity. Finally, rat liver microsomes were used to determine the metabolic stability of that compound. IRA 5 was clearly the most potent compound in HCT-116wt cells, with an unusually high IC50-value of 0.6 μM. However, in the other five cell lines used, the antiproliferative activity was mostly similar to resveratrol and the effects on the cell cycle were heterogeneous. Although all cell lines were affected by treatment with IRA 5, cells expressing functional p53 seemed to react more sensitively, suggesting that this protein plays a modulating role in the induction of IRA 5-mediated biological effects. Lastly, IRA 5 led to contradictory effects on cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity and was less glucuronidated than resveratrol. As IRA 5 is approximately 50 times more toxic towards HCT-116wt cells, exerts different effects on the cyclooxygenase-2 and is metabolized to a lesser extent, it shows certain advantages over resveratrol

  18. Gallium maltolate inhibits human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesong; Wang, Timothy W; Lessmann, George M; Saleh, Jamal; Liu, Xiping; Chitambar, Christopher R; Hwang, Sam T

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) represent a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an accumulation of malignant CD4 T cells in the skin. The group IIIa metal salt, gallium nitrate, is known to have antineoplastic activity against B-cell lymphoma in humans, but its activity in CTCLs has not been elaborated in detail. Herein, we examined the antineoplastic efficacy of a gallium compound, gallium maltolate (GaM), in vitro and in vivo with murine models of CTCLs. GaM inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of cultured CTCL cells. In human CTCL xenograft models, peritumoral injection of GaM limited the growth of CTCL cells, shown by fewer tumor formations, smaller tumor sizes, and decreased neovascularization in tumor microenvironment. To identify key signaling pathways that have a role in GaM-mediated reduction of tumor growth, we analyzed inflammatory cytokines, as well as signal transduction pathways in CTCL cells treated by GaM. IFN-γ-induced chemokines and IL-13 were found to be notably increased in GaM-treated CTCL cells. However, immunosuppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, were decreased with GaM treatment. Interestingly, both oxidative stress and p53 pathways were involved in GaM-induced cytotoxicity. These results warrant further investigation of GaM as a therapeutic agent for CTCLs.

  19. Targeting long non-coding RNA-TUG1 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dong, R; Liu, G-B; Liu, B-H; Chen, G; Li, K; Zheng, S; Dong, K-R

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common liver tumor of early childhood, which is usually characterized by unusual hypervascularity. Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have emerged as gene regulators and prognostic markers in several cancers, including hepatoblastoma. We previously reveal that lnRNA-TUG1 is upregulated in hepatoblastoma specimens by microarray analysis. In this study, we aim to elucidate the biological and clinical significance of TUG1 upregulation in hepatoblastoma. We show that TUG1 is significantly upregulated in human hepatoblastoma specimens and metastatic hepatoblastoma cell lines. TUG1 knockdown inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo, and decreases hepatoblastoma cell viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. TUG1, miR-34a-5p, and VEGFA constitutes to a regulatory network, and participates in regulating hepatoblastoma cell function, tumor progression, and tumor angiogenesis. Overall, our findings indicate that TUG1 upregulation contributes to unusual hypervascularity of hepatoblastoma. TUG1 is a promising therapeutic target for aggressive, recurrent, or metastatic hepatoblastoma. PMID:27362796

  20. A novel ATG4B antagonist inhibits autophagy and has a negative impact on osteosarcoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Akin, Debra; Wang, S Keisin; Habibzadegah-Tari, Pouran; Law, Brian; Ostrov, David; Li, Min; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Kim, Jae-Sung; Horenstein, Nicole; Dunn, William A

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated in the progression and chemoresistance of various cancers. In this study, we have shown that osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells lacking ATG4B, a cysteine proteinase that activates LC3B, are defective in autophagy and fail to form tumors in mouse models. By combining in silico docking with in vitro and cell-based assays, we identified small compounds that suppressed starvation-induced protein degradation, LC3B lipidation, and formation of autophagic vacuoles. NSC185058 effectively inhibited ATG4B activity in vitro and in cells while having no effect on MTOR and PtdIns3K activities. In addition, this ATG4B antagonist had a negative impact on the development of Saos-2 osteosarcoma tumors in vivo. We concluded that tumor suppression was due to a reduction in ATG4B activity, since we found autophagy suppressed within treated tumors and the compound had no effects on oncogenic protein kinases. Our findings demonstrate that ATG4B is a suitable anti-autophagy target and a promising therapeutic target to treat osteosarcoma.

  1. A novel ATG4B antagonist inhibits autophagy and has a negative impact on osteosarcoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Wang, S Keisin; Habibzadegah-Tari, Pouran; Law, Brian; Ostrov, David; Li, Min; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Kim, Jae-Sung; Horenstein, Nicole; Dunn, William A

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated in the progression and chemoresistance of various cancers. In this study, we have shown that osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells lacking ATG4B, a cysteine proteinase that activates LC3B, are defective in autophagy and fail to form tumors in mouse models. By combining in silico docking with in vitro and cell-based assays, we identified small compounds that suppressed starvation-induced protein degradation, LC3B lipidation, and formation of autophagic vacuoles. NSC185058 effectively inhibited ATG4B activity in vitro and in cells while having no effect on MTOR and PtdIns3K activities. In addition, this ATG4B antagonist had a negative impact on the development of Saos-2 osteosarcoma tumors in vivo. We concluded that tumor suppression was due to a reduction in ATG4B activity, since we found autophagy suppressed within treated tumors and the compound had no effects on oncogenic protein kinases. Our findings demonstrate that ATG4B is a suitable anti-autophagy target and a promising therapeutic target to treat osteosarcoma. PMID:25483883

  2. The development of adolescents' internalizing behavior: longitudinal effects of maternal sensitivity and child inhibition.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, Anja; Linting, Mariëlle; Juffer, Femmie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Schoenmaker, Christie; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H

    2014-04-01

    Internalizing symptoms such as withdrawn and anxious-depressed behavior are common in adolescence. This prospective longitudinal study helps to gain insight into the development of internalizing behavior, focusing on the role of early parent-child interaction while ruling out genetic similarity as a confounder. More specifically, the central question addressed in this study was whether parental sensitivity and child inhibited temperament predict children's withdrawn and anxious-depressed behavior in middle childhood and adolescence. We followed 160 early-adopted children (53 % girls) from infancy to adolescence. Structural equation modeling was used to test relationships both prospectively and concurrently. The results revealed that more sensitive parenting in infancy and middle childhood predicted less inhibited behavior in adolescence, which in turn predicted fewer internalizing problems in adolescence. The findings suggest that maternal sensitivity lowers adolescents' inhibited behavior and decreases the risk for adolescents' internalizing problem behavior indirectly through lower levels of inhibition. Supporting sensitive parenting in the years before adolescence may protect children from developing inhibited behavior and internalizing behavior problems in adolescence.

  3. pH-sensitive oncolytic adenovirus hybrid targeting acidic tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kasala, Dayananda; Hwang, June Kyu; Hu, Jun; Bae, You Han; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Although oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) are an attractive option for cancer gene therapy, the intravenous administration of naked Ad still encounters unfavorable host responses, non-specific interactions, and heterogeneity in targeted cancer cells. To overcome these obstacles and achieve specific targeting of the tumor microenvironment, Ad was coated with the pH-sensitive block copolymer, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-histidine-co-l-phenylalanine) (PEGbPHF). The physicochemical properties of the generated nanocomplex, Ad/PEGbPHF, were assessed. At pH 6.4, GFP-expressing Ad/PEGbPHF induced significantly higher GFP expression than naked Ad in both coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-positive and -negative cells. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of the Ad/PEGbPHF complex platform, an oncolytic Ad expressing VEGF promoter-targeting transcriptional repressor (KOX) was used to form complexes. At pH 6.4, KOX/PEGbPHF significantly suppressed VEGF gene expression, cancer cell migration, vessel sprouting, and cancer cell killing effect compared to naked KOX or KOX/PEGbPHF at pH 7.4, demonstrating that KOX/PEGbPHF can overcome the lack of CAR that is frequently observed in tumor tissues. The antitumor activity of KOX/PEGbPHF systemically administered to a tumor xenograft model was significantly higher than that of naked KOX. Furthermore, KOX/PEGbPHF showed lower hepatic toxicity and did not induce an innate immune response against Ad. Altogether, these results demonstrate that pH-sensitive polymer-coated Ad complex significantly increases net positive charge upon exposure to hypoxic tumor microenvironment, allowing passive targeting to the tumor tissue. It may offer superior potential for systemic therapy, due to its improved tumor selectivity, increased therapeutic efficacy, and lower toxicity compared to naked KOX. PMID:25575865

  4. pH-sensitive oncolytic adenovirus hybrid targeting acidic tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kasala, Dayananda; Hwang, June Kyu; Hu, Jun; Bae, You Han; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-05-10

    Although oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) are an attractive option for cancer gene therapy, the intravenous administration of naked Ad still encounters unfavorable host responses, non-specific interactions, and heterogeneity in targeted cancer cells. To overcome these obstacles and achieve specific targeting of the tumor microenvironment, Ad was coated with the pH-sensitive block copolymer, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-histidine-co-l-phenylalanine) (PEGbPHF). The physicochemical properties of the generated nanocomplex, Ad/PEGbPHF, were assessed. At pH6.4, GFP-expressing Ad/PEGbPHF induced significantly higher GFP expression than naked Ad in both coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-positive and -negative cells. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of the Ad/PEGbPHF complex platform, an oncolytic Ad expressing VEGF promoter-targeting transcriptional repressor (KOX) was used to form complexes. At pH6.4, KOX/PEGbPHF significantly suppressed VEGF gene expression, cancer cell migration, vessel sprouting, and cancer cell killing effect compared to naked KOX or KOX/PEGbPHF at pH7.4, demonstrating that KOX/PEGbPHF can overcome the lack of CAR that is frequently observed in tumor tissues. The antitumor activity of KOX/PEGbPHF systemically administered to a tumor xenograft model was significantly higher than that of naked KOX. Furthermore, KOX/PEGbPHF showed lower hepatic toxicity and did not induce an innate immune response against Ad. Altogether, these results demonstrate that pH-sensitive polymer-coated Ad complex significantly increases net positive charge upon exposure to hypoxic tumor microenvironment, allowing passive targeting to the tumor tissue. It may offer superior potential for systemic therapy, due to its improved tumor selectivity, increased therapeutic efficacy, and lower toxicity compared to naked KOX.

  5. Granzyme B-based cytolytic fusion protein targeting EpCAM specifically kills triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in a subcutaneous mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Amoury, Manal; Kolberg, Katharina; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Kiessling, Fabian; Fischer, Rainer; Pardo, Alessa; Thepen, Theophilus; Hussain, Ahmad F; Nachreiner, Thomas; Barth, Stefan

    2016-03-28

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with poor prognosis and high prevalence among young premenopausal women. Unlike in other breast cancer subtypes, no targeted therapy is currently available. Overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in 60% of TNBC tumors correlates with poorer prognosis and is associated with cancer stem cell phenotype. Thus, selective elimination of EpCAM(+) TNBC tumor cells is of clinical importance. Therefore, we constructed a fully human targeted cytolytic fusion protein, designated GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv), in which an EpCAM-selective single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) is genetically fused to a granzyme B (Gb) mutant with reduced sensitivity to its natural inhibitor serpin B9. In vitro studies confirmed its specific binding, internalization and cytotoxicity toward a panel of EpCAM-expressing TNBC cells. Biodistribution kinetics and tumor-targeting efficacy using MDA-MB-468 cells in a human TNBC xenograft model in mice revealed selective accumulation of GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv) in the tumors after i.v. injection. Moreover, treatment of tumor-bearing mice demonstrated a prominent inhibition of tumor growth of up to 50 % in this proof-of-concept study. Taken together, our results indicate that GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv) is a promising novel targeted therapeutic for the treatment of TNBC.

  6. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masumi; Knutson, Sarah K.; Warholic, Natalie M.; Kuznetsov, Galina; Xu, Shanqin; Xiao, Yonghong; Pollock, Roy M.; Smith, Jesse S.; Kuntz, Kevin K.; Ribich, Scott; Minoshima, Yukinori; Matsui, Junji; Copeland, Robert A.; Tanaka, Shinya; Keilhack, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1) has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma—a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein—display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers. PMID:27391784

  7. Roles of NGAL and MMP-9 in the tumor microenvironment and sensitivity to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Candido, Saverio; Abrams, Stephen L; Steelman, Linda S; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Fitzgerald, Timothy L; Martelli, Alberto M; Cocco, Lucio; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Polesel, Jerry; Libra, Massimo; McCubrey, James A

    2016-03-01

    Various, diverse molecules contribute to the tumor microenvironment and influence invasion and metastasis. In this review, the roles of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the tumor microenvironment and sensitivity to therapy will be discussed. The lipocalin family of proteins has many important functions. For example when NGAL forms a complex with MMP-9 it increases its stability which is important in cancer metastasis. Small hydrophobic molecules are bound by NGAL which can alter their entry into and efflux from cells. Iron transport and storage are also influenced by NGAL activity. Regulation of iron levels is important for survival in the tumor microenvironment as well as metastasis. Innate immunity is also regulated by NGAL as it can have bacteriostatic properties. NGAL and MMP-9 expression may also affect the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. Thus NGAL and MMP-9 play important roles in key processes involved in metastasis as well as response to therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  8. TRIM16 suppresses the progression of prostate tumors by inhibiting the Snail signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Lu, Zhong; Sun, Yong-Hong; Song, Hai-Tao; Xu, Wei-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is a devastating disease which is characterized by insidious early symptoms, rapid progression and a poor prognosis. Tripartite motif-containing protein 16 (TRIM16) was identified as an estrogen- and antiestrogen-regulated gene in epithelial cells stably expressing estrogen receptors. The protein encoded by this gene contains two B-box domains and a coiled-coiled region that are characteristic of the B-box zinc finger protein family. Proteins belonging to this family have been reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes including cell growth, differentiation and pathogenesis. TRIM16 expression has been detected in most tissues. However, the funtions of this gene remain to be elucidated. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression of TRIM16 was decreased in prostate adenocarcinoma compared with that in normal prostate tissues. The patients with high TRIM16-expressing tumors had a significantly greater survival than those with low TRIM16-expressing tumors. Western blot analysis showed that TRIM16 was downregulated in distant metastatic cancer tissues compared with that in non-distant metastatic cancer tissues. The overexpression of TRIM16 inhibited the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells as well as inhibiting the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition process, whereas TRIM16 depletion enhanced these processes. Moreover, TRIM16 inhibited the Snail signaling pathway. The silencing of Snail by small interfering RNA was performed in order to determine the role of Snail in the TRIM16-mediated tumor phenotype. Taken together, these findings suggest that TRIM16 may be an important molecular target which may aid in the design of novel therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:27748839

  9. The novel Aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibitor biseugenol inhibits gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Lai, De-Wei; Karlsson, Anna Isabella; Wang, Keh-Bin; Chen, Yi-Ching; Shen, Chin-Chang; Wu, Sheng-Mao; Liu, Chia-Yu; Tien, Hsing-Ru; Peng, Yen-Chun; Jan, Yee-Jee; Chao, Te-Hsin; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Arbiser, Jack L.; Sheu, Meei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Biseugenol (Eug) is known to antiproliferative of cancer cells; however, to date, the antiperitoneal dissemination effects have not been studied in any mouse cancer model. In this study, Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression was associated with lymph node and distant metastasis in patients with gastric cancer and was correlated with clinicolpathological pattern. We evaluated the antiperitoneal dissemination potential of knockdown AhR and Biseugenol in cancer mouse model and assessed mesenchymal characteristics. Our results demonstrate that tumor growth, peritoneal dissemination and peritoneum or organ metastasis implanted MKN45 cells were significantly decreased in shAhR and Biseugenol-treated mice and that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was caused. Biseugenol-exposure tumors showed acquired epithelial features such as phosphorylation of E-cadherin, cytokeratin-18 and loss mesenchymal signature Snail, but not vimentin regulation. Snail expression, through AhR activation, is an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) determinant. Moreover, Biseugenol enhanced Calpain-10 (Calp-10) and AhR interaction resulted in Snail downregulation. The effect of shCalpain-10 in cancer cells was associated with inactivation of AhR/Snail promoter binding activity. Inhibition of Calpain-10 in gastric cancer cells by short hairpin RNA or pharmacological inhibitor was found to effectively reduced growth ability and vessel density in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of AhR completed abrogated peritoneal dissemination. Herein, Biseugenol targeting ER stress provokes Calpain-10 activity, sequentially induces reversal of EMT and apoptosis via AhR may involve the paralleling processes. Taken together, these data suggest that Calpain-10 activation and AhR inhibition by Biseugenol impedes both gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination by inducing ER stress and inhibiting EMT. PMID:25226618

  10. Tumor-selective proteotoxicity of verteporfin inhibits colon cancer progression independently of YAP1#

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huabing; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Triner, Daniel; Centofanti, Brook; Maitra, Dhiman; Győrffy, Balázs; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S.; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James; Brenner, Dean E.; Fearon, Eric R.; Omary, M. Bishr; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2016-01-01

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) is a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo signaling pathway. Increased YAP1- activity promotes the growth of tumors, including that of colorectal cancer (CRC). Verteporfin, a drug that enhances phototherapy to treat neovascular macular degeneration, is an inhibitor of YAP1. Here, we found that verteporfin inhibited tumor growth independently of its effects on YAP1 or the related protein TAZ in genetic or chemical-induced mouse models of CRC, in patient-derived xenografts and in enteroid models of CRC. Instead, verteporfin exhibited in vivo selectivity for killing tumor cells in part by impairing the global clearance of high molecular weight oligomerized proteins, particularly p62 (a sequestrome involved in autophagy) and STAT3 (a transcription factor). Verteporfin inhibited cytokine-induced STAT3 activity and cell proliferation and reduced the viabilty of cultured CRC cells. Although verteporfin accumulated to a greater extent in normal cells than in tumor cells in vivo, experiments with cultured cells indicated that the normal cells efficiently cleared verteporfin-induced protein oligomers through autophagic and proteasomal pathways. Culturing CRC cells in hypoxic or nutrient-deprived conditions (modeling a typical CRC microenvironment) impaired the clearance of protein oligomers and resulted in cell death; whereas culturing cells in normoxic or glucose-replete conditions protected cell viability and proliferation in the presence of verteporfin. Furthermore, verteporfin suppressed the proliferation of other cancer cell lines even in the absence of YAP1, suggesting that verteporfin may be effective against multiple types of solid cancers. PMID:26443705

  11. Inhibition of mTOR-kinase destabilizes MYCN and is a potential therapy for MYCN-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Lynsey; Clarke, Paul A.; Barker, Karen; Chanthery, Yvan; Gustafson, Clay W.; Tucker, Elizabeth; Renshaw, Jane; Raynaud, Florence; Li, Xiaodun; Burke, Rosemary; Jamin, Yann; Robinson, Simon P.; Pearson, Andrew; Maira, Michel; Weiss, William A.; Workman, Paul; Chesler, Louis

    2016-01-01

    MYC oncoproteins deliver a potent oncogenic stimulus in several human cancers, making them major targets for drug development, but efforts to deliver clinically practical therapeutics have not yet been realized. In childhood cancer, aberrant expression of MYC and MYCN genes delineates a group of aggressive tumours responsible for a major proportion of pediatric cancer deaths. We designed a chemical-genetic screen that identifies compounds capable of enhancing proteasomal elimination of MYCN oncoprotein. We isolated several classes of compound that selectively kill MYCN expressing cells and we focus on inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR pathway in this study. We show that PI3K/mTOR inhibitors selectively killed MYCN-expressing neuroblastoma tumor cells, and induced significant apoptosis of transgenic MYCN-driven neuroblastoma tumors concomitant with elimination of MYCN protein in vivo. Mechanistically, the ability of these compounds to degrade MYCN requires complete blockade of mTOR but not PI3 kinase activity and we highlight NVP-BEZ235 as a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor with an ideal activity profile. These data establish that MYCN expression is a marker indicative of likely clinical sensitivity to mTOR inhibition, and provide a rationale for the selection of clinical candidate MYCN-destabilizers likely to be useful for the treatment of MYCN-driven cancers. PMID:27438153

  12. Quinazoline derivative QPB-15e stabilizes the c-myc promoter G-quadruplex and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zeng; Liu, Chen; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lei; He, Jinhui; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ribozyme-sensitive element NHE-III1 in the P1 promoter region of the important proto-oncogene c-myc contains many guanine (G)-rich sequences. Induction and stabilization of the G-quadruplex formed by NHE-III1 can downregulate c-myc expression. In the present study, we found that QPB-15e, a quinazoline derivative designed and synthesized by our laboratory, binds to and stabilizes the c-myc G-quadruplex in vitro, thereby inhibiting double-stranded DNA replication, downregulating c-myc gene expression and arresting cancer cell proliferation. PCR termination experiments showed that QPB-15e blocked double-stranded DNA replication by inducing or stabilizing the c-myc G-quadruplex. FRET-melting further confirmed that QPB-15e improved the stability of the G-quadruplex, and CD spectroscopy indicated that the compound interacted directly with the G-rich sequence. In competitive dialysis experiments, QPB-15e bound preferentially to quadruplex DNA in various structures, especially the G-quadruplex within the c-myc promoter region. Moreover, QPB-15e reduced the weights and volumes of tumors transplanted into nude mice. These findings strongly suggest that QPB-15e is a c-myc G-quadruplex ligand with anti-tumor properties, and may be efficacious for treating cancer in humans. PMID:27144522

  13. Functional mutations in mouse norepinephrine transporter reduce sensitivity to cocaine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Gu, Howard H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transporters of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are molecular targets of cocaine, amphetamine, and therapeutic antidepressants. The residues involved in binding these drugs are unknown. We have performed several rounds of random and site-directed mutagenesis in the mouse norepinephrine transporter and screened for mutants with altered sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of substrate uptake. We have identified a triple mutation that retains close to wild-type transport function but displays a 37-fold decrease in cocaine sensitivity and 24-fold decrease in desipramine sensitivity. In contrast, the mutant’s sensitivities to amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methylphenidate are only slightly changed. Our data reveal critical residues contributing to the potent uptake inhibitions by these important drugs. Furthermore, this drug-resistant triple mutant can be used to generate a unique knock-in mouse line to study the role of norepinephrine transporter in the addictive effects of cocaine and the therapeutic effects of desipramine. PMID:18824182

  14. miR-409-3p sensitizes colon cancer cells to oxaliplatin by inhibiting Beclin-1-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shifan; Shi, Huijuan; Ba, Mingchen; Lin, Shengqv; Tang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2016-04-01

    The chemoresistance of colon cancer cells limits the efficacy of chemotherapy. miR-409-3p has been shown to be downregulated in various types of cancer. In the present study, we examined the role of miR-409-3p in colon cancer as well as the effects of miR‑409-3p on the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to oxaliplatin. The expression of miR-409 was significantly downregulated in the human colon cancer cell lines compared with the normal colon epithelial cells. Importantly, the miR-409-3p expression levels were lower in human colon cancer patient samples than in normal colon tissues. Moreover, we observed a negative correlation between the miR‑409-3p levels and resistance to oxaliplatin: the oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells exhibited significantly downregulated miR‑409-3p levels, but higher autophagic activity than the oxaliplatin-sensitive cells. Using bioinformatics analysis, we predicted that miR‑409-3p miRNA binds to the key autophagy gene encoding Beclin-1. Our findings indicated that the overexpression of miR‑409-3p inhibited Beclin-1 expression and autophagic activity by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of Beclin-1 mRNA. In addition, the overexpression of miR‑409-3p enhanced the chemosensitivity of the oxaliplatin-sensitive and oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells. The restoration of Beclin-1 abrogated these effects of miR‑409-3p. In a xenograft model using nude mice, we examined the effects of miR‑409-3p on tumor growth during chemotherapy. miR‑409-3p overexpression sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy, while inhibiting chemotherapy-induced autophagy in a manner dependent on Beclin-1. The findings of our study suggest that miR-409-3p is capable of enhancing the chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells by inhibiting Beclin-1-mediated autophagy.

  15. An Engineered Arginase FC Protein Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jun; Cheng, Bi; Hu, Jiehua; Zhou, Yuehua; Gao, Xin; Gao, Liucun; Mei, Xifan; Sun, Meiyan; Zhang, Zhuomei; Song, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is a semiessential amino acid required for the growth of melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and the enzymatic removal of arginine by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI) or arginase is being tested clinically. Here, we report a genetically engineered arginase FC fusion protein exhibiting a prolonged half-life and enhanced efficacy. The use of this enzyme to treat different tumor lines both inhibited cell proliferation and impaired cellular migration in vitro and in vivo. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that nutritional depletion is a key strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:23737831

  16. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition kills glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor cells in part through loss of SOX2 and delays tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cathy; Fotovati, Abbas; Triscott, Joanna; Chen, James; Venugopal, Chitra; Singhal, Ash; Dunham, Christopher; Kerr, John M; Verreault, Maite; Yip, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Jones, Chris; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru; Singh, Sheila K; Dunn, Sandra E

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) ranks among the deadliest types of cancer and given these new therapies are urgently needed. To identify molecular targets, we queried a microarray profiling 467 human GBMs and discovered that polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was highly expressed in these tumors and that it clustered with the proliferative subtype. Patients with PLK1-high tumors were more likely to die from their disease suggesting that current therapies are inactive against such tumors. This prompted us to examine its expression in brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) given their association with treatment failure. BTICs isolated from patients expressed 110-470 times more PLK1 than normal human astrocytes. Moreover, BTICs rely on PLK1 for survival because the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536 inhibited their growth in tumorsphere cultures. PLK1 inhibition suppressed growth, caused G(2) /M arrest, induced apoptosis, and reduced the expression of SOX2, a marker of neural stem cells, in SF188 cells. Consistent with SOX2 inhibition, the loss of PLK1 activity caused the cells to differentiate based on elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and changes in cellular morphology. We then knocked glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) down SOX2 with siRNA and showed that it too inhibited cell growth and induced cell death. Likewise, in U251 cells, PLK1 inhibition suppressed cell growth, downregulated SOX2, and induced cell death. Furthermore, BI2536 delayed tumor growth of U251 cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model, demonstrating that the drug is active against GBM. In conclusion, PLK1 level is elevated in GBM and its inhibition restricts the growth of brain cancer cells.

  17. Inhibition of establishment of primary and micrometastatic tumors by a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ignar, D M; Andrews, J L; Witherspoon, S M; Leray, J D; Clay, W C; Kilpatrick, K; Onori, J; Kost, T; Emerson, D L

    1998-01-01

    Tumor establishment and metastasis are dependent on extracellular matrix proteolysis, tumor cell migration, and angiogenesis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor are essential mediators of these processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a recombinant human uPAR antagonist on growth, establishment, and metastasis of tumors derived from human cancer cell lines. A noncatalytic recombinant protein, consisting of amino acids 1-137 of human uPA and the CH2 and CH3 regions of mouse IgG1 (uPA-IgG), was expressed, purified, and shown to bind specifically to human uPAR and to saturate the surface of human tumor cells which express uPAR. Daily i.p. administration of uPA-IgG to nude mice extended latencies of unstaged tumors derived from Lox melanoma and SW48 colon carcinoma cells by 7.7 and 5.5 days, respectively. uPA-IgG treatment did not affect the growth of Lox or KB tumors staged to 200 mg before antagonist treatment commenced. The effect of uPA-IgG on the establishment of micrometastases was assessed in SCID mice. KB head/neck tumor cells were injected in the tail vein and allowed to seed for 48 h before initiation of daily i.p. injections of uPA-IgG for 24 days. The number of lung colonies ranged between 5 and 30% of vehicle-treated mice in two separate experiments. Furthermore, a single 800 microg dose of uPA-IgG administered 1 h prior to tail vein injection of KB cells reduced lung colony formation to just 3.5% of vehicle-treated SCID mice. These data demonstrate that antagonism of uPAR arrested metastasis and inhibited the establishment of primary tumors and micrometastases. Thus, small molecule uPAR antagonists may serve as useful adjuvant agents in combination with existing cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Anti-tumor efficacy of new 7α-substituted androstanes as aromatase inhibitors in hormone-sensitive and resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristina; Varela, Carla L; Maurício, João; Sobral, Ana Filipa; Costa, Saul C; Roleira, Fernanda M F; Tavares-da-Silva, Elisiário J; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Teixeira, Natércia

    2017-04-07

    The majority of breast cancer cases are estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)). Although, third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are used as first-line treatment in post-menopausal women, they cause endocrine resistance and bone loss, which limits their success. Therefore, there is a demand to discover new potent molecules, with less toxicity that can circumvent these drawbacks. Our group has previously demonstrated that new 7α-substituted steroidal molecules, 7α-(2ξ,3ξ-epoxypropyl)androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (3), 7α-allylandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (6), 7α-allylandrost-4-en-17-one (9), 7α-allyl-3-oxoandrosta-1,4-dien-17β-ol (10) and 7α-allylandrosta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (12) are potent AIs in placental microsomes. In this work, it was investigated their anti-aromatase activity and in vitro effects in sensitive and resistant breast cancer cells. All the steroids efficiently inhibit aromatase in breast cancer cells, allowing to establish new structure-activity relationships for this class of compounds. Moreover, the new AIs can inhibit breast cancer cell growth, by causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The effects of AIs 3 and 12 on sensitive cells were dependent on aromatase inhibition and androgen receptor (AR), while for AI 9 and AI 10 were AR- and ER-dependent, respectively. In addition, it was shown that all the AIs can sensitize resistant cancer cells being their behavior similar to the sensitive cells. In summary, this study contributes to the understanding of the structural modifications in steroidal scaffold that are translated into better aromatase inhibition and anti-tumor properties, providing important information for the rational design/synthesis of more effective AIs. In addition, allowed the discovery of new potent 7α-substituted androstane molecules to inhibit tumor growth and prevent endocrine resistance.

  19. Blockade of the ERK pathway markedly sensitizes tumor cells to HDAC inhibitor-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Minoda, Ai; Kishikawa, Futaba; Kohno, Michiaki . E-mail: kohnom@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2006-01-27

    Constitutive activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is associated with the neoplastic phenotype of a large number of human tumor cells. Although specific blockade of the ERK pathway by treating such tumor cells with potent mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors completely suppresses their proliferation, it by itself shows only a modest effect on the induction of apoptotic cell death. However, these MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the efficacy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptotic cell death: such an enhanced cell death is observed only in tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated. Co-administration of MEK inhibitor markedly sensitizes tumor cells to HDAC inhibitor-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, which appears to mediate the enhanced cell death induced by the combination of these agents. These results suggest that the combination of MEK inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors provides an efficient chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated.

  20. Highly sensitive detection of multiple tumor markers for lung cancer using gold nanoparticle probes and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanlei; Wang, Wentao; Yao, Shihua; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Honglian; Zhang, Jishen; Jing, Fengxiang; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Cong, Hui; Jia, Chunping; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Jianlong

    2017-03-15

    Assay of multiple serum tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen (CYFRA21-1), and neuron specific enolase (NSE), is important for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a novel serological and histochemical biomarker, was recently reported to be preferentially expressed in lung cancer. Four target proteins were sandwiched by capture antibodies attached to microarrays and detection antibodies carried on modified gold nanoparticles. Optical signals generated by the sandwich structures were amplified by gold deposition with HAuCl4 and H2O2, and were observable by microscopy or the naked eye. The four tumor markers were subsequently measured in 106 lung cancer patients and 42 healthy persons. The assay was capable of detecting multiple biomarkers in serum sample at concentration of <1 ng mL(-1) in 1 h. Combined detection of the four tumor markers highly improved the sensitivity (to 87.74%) for diagnosis of lung cancer compared with sensitivity of single markers. A rapid, highly sensitive co-detection method for multiple biomarkers based on gold nanoparticles and microarrays was developed. In clinical use, it would be expected to improve the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  1. Merlin's tumor suppression linked to inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4DCAF1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism by which the FERM domain protein Merlin, encoded by the tumor suppressor NF2, restrains cell proliferation is poorly understood. Prior studies have suggested that Merlin exerts its antimitogenic effect by interacting with multiple signaling proteins located at or near the plasma membrane. We have recently observed that Merlin translocates into the nucleus and binds to and inhibits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4DCAF1. Genetic evidence indicates that inactivation of Merlin induces oncogenic gene expression, hyperproliferation, and tumorigenicity by unleashing the activity of CRL4DCAF1. In addition to providing a potential explanation for the diverse effects that loss of Merlin exerts in multiple cell types, these findings suggest that compounds inhibiting CRL4DCAF1 may display therapeutic efficacy in Neurofibromatosis type 2 and other cancers driven by Merlin inactivation. PMID:21084862

  2. Pertussis toxin inhibits somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ conductance in human pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, N.; Kojima, I.; Shibuya, N.; Ogata, E.

    1987-07-01

    The effect of pertussis toxin on somatostatin-induced K/sup +/ current was examined in dissociated human pituitary tumor cells obtained from two acromegalic patients. Somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization or K/sup +/ current was observed in 20 of 23 cells in adenoma 1 and 10 of 11 cells in adenoma 2. After treatment with pertussis toxin for 24 h, these responses were completely suppressed (0/14 in adenoma, 1, 0/10 in adenoma 2). Spontaneous action potentials, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/ currents were well preserved after pertussis toxin treatment. When crude membrane fraction was incubated with (/sup 32/P)NAD, a 41K protein was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Hormone release was inhibited by somatostatin and this inhibition was blocked by pertussis toxin treatment.

  3. Genistein sensitizes sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo by enhancing apoptosis and by inhibiting DSB repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, X X; Sun, C; Jin, X D; Li, P; Zheng, X G; Zhao, T; Li, Q

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the radiosensitization effects of genistein on mice sarcoma cells and the corresponding biological mechanisms in vitro and in vivo Using the non-toxic dosage of 10 μM genistein, the sensitizer enhancement ratios after exposure to X-rays at 50% cell survival (IC50) was 1.45 for S180 cells. For mice cotreated with genistein and X-rays, the excised tumor tissues had reduced blood vessels and decreased size and volume compared with the control and irradiation-only groups. Moreover, a significant increase in apoptosis was accompanied by upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 in the mitochondria, and lots of cytochrome c being transferred to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, X-rays combined with genistein inhibited the activity of DNA-PKcs, so DNA-injured sites were dominated by Ku70/80, leading to incompleteness of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs and the eventual occurrence of cell apoptosis. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that genistein sensitized sarcoma cells to X-rays and that this radiosensitizing effect depended on induction of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and inhibition of the double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways.

  4. Oral consumption of pomegranate fruit extract inhibits growth and progression of primary lung tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Kweon, Mee-Hyang; Kim, Kyungmann; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2007-04-01

    To develop novel mechanism-based preventive approaches for lung cancer, we examined the effect of oral consumption of a human achievable dose of pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) on growth, progression, angiogenesis, and signaling pathways in two mouse lung tumor protocols. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] and N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) were used to induce lung tumors, and PFE was given in drinking water to A/J mice. Lung tumor yield was examined on the 84th day and 140 days after B(a)P dosing and 240 days after NTCU treatment. Mice treated with PFE and exposed to B(a)P and NTCU had statistically significant lower lung tumor multiplicities than mice treated with carcinogens only. Tumor reduction was 53.9% and 61.6% in the B(a)P + PFE group at 84 and 140 days, respectively, compared with the B(a)P group. The NTCU + PFE group had 65.9% tumor reduction compared with the NTCU group at 240 days. Immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to determine effect on cell survival pathways and markers of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. PFE treatment caused inhibition of (a) activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and IkappaBalpha kinase, (b) degradation and phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha, (c) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1/2, and p38), (d) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (p85 and p110), (e) phosphorylation of Akt at Thr(308), (f) activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, (g) phosphorylation of c-met, and (h) markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and angiogenesis (inducible nitric oxide synthase, CD31, and vascular endothelial growth factor) in lungs of B(a)P- and NTCU-treated mice. Thus, our data show that PFE significantly inhibits lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice and merits investigation as a chemopreventive agent for human lung cancer.

  5. Targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling with oncolytic virotherapy disrupts tumor vasculature and inhibits breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Gil, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund; Komorowski, Marcin P; Abrams, Scott I; Kozbor, Danuta

    2013-04-02

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise for the treatment of cancer, but their interaction with the tumor microenvironment needs to be elucidated for optimal tumor cell killing. Because the CXCR4 receptor for the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) chemokine is one of the key stimuli involved in signaling interactions between tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment, we used oncolytic virotherapy with a CXCR4 antagonist to target the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling axis in a triple-negative 4T1 breast carcinoma in syngeneic mice. We show here that CXCR4 antagonist expression from an oncolytic vaccinia virus delivered intravenously to mice with orthotopic tumors attains higher intratumoral concentration than its soluble counterpart and exhibits increased efficacy over that mediated by oncolysis alone. A systemic delivery of the armed virus after resection of the primary tumor was efficacious in inhibiting the development of spontaneous metastasis and increased overall tumor-free survival. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with destruction of tumor vasculature, reductions in expression of CXCL12 and VEGF, and decrease in intratumoral numbers of bone marrow-derived endothelial and myeloid cells. These changes led to induction of antitumor antibody responses and resistance to tumor rechallenge. Engineering an oncolytic virus armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents an innovative strategy that targets multiple elements within the tumor microenvironment. As such, this approach could have a significant therapeutic impact against primary and metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Modulation of the tumor microenvironment and inhibition of EGF/EGFR pathway: novel anti-tumor mechanisms of Cannabidiol in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Mohamad; Nasser, Mohd W; Ravi, Janani; Wani, Nissar A; Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Zhao, Helong; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Shilo, Konstantin; Carson, William E; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor role and mechanisms of Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid compound, are not well studied especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the present study, we analyzed CBD's anti-tumorigenic activity against highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines including TNBC subtype. We show here -for the first time-that CBD significantly inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation and chemotaxis of breast cancer cells. Further studies revealed that CBD inhibits EGF-induced activation of EGFR, ERK, AKT and NF-kB signaling pathways as well as MMP2 and MMP9 secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that CBD inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in different mouse model systems. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CBD significantly inhibits the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in primary tumor stroma and secondary lung metastases. Similarly, our in vitro studies showed a significant reduction in the number of migrated RAW 264.7 cells towards the conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells. The conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells also showed lower levels of GM-CSF and CCL3 cytokines which are important for macrophage recruitment and activation. In summary, our study shows -for the first time-that CBD inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through novel mechanisms by inhibiting EGF/EGFR signaling and modulating the tumor microenvironment. These results also indicate that CBD can be used as a novel therapeutic option to inhibit growth and metastasis of highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes including TNBC, which currently have limited therapeutic options and are associated with poor prognosis and low survival rates.

  7. Lapatinib and Obatoclax Kill Tumor Cells through Blockade of ERBB1/3/4 and through Inhibition of BCL-xL and MCL-1

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Nichola; Hamed, Hossein A.; Bareford, M. Danielle; Poklepovic, Andrew; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies in breast cancer cells have shown that lapatinib and obatoclax interact in a greater than additive fashion to cause cell death and do so through a toxic form of autophagy. The present studies sought to extend our analyses to the central nervous system (CNS) tumor cells and to further define mechanisms of drug action. Lapatinib and obatoclax killed multiple CNS tumor isolates. Cells lacking PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) function were relatively resistant to drug combination lethality; expression of PTEN in PTEN-null cells restored drug sensitivity, and knockdown of PTEN promoted drug resistance. On the basis of knockdown of ERBB1-4 (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1–4), we discovered that the inhibition of ERBB1/3/4 receptors were most important for enhancing obatoclax lethality rather than ERBB2. In parallel, we noted in CNS tumor cells that knockdown of BCL-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large)and MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) interacted in an additive fashion to facilitate lapatinib lethality. Pretreatment of tumor cells with obatoclax enhanced the lethality of lapatinib to a greater extent than concomitant treatment. Treatment of animals carrying orthotopic CNS tumor isolates with lapatinib- and obatoclax-prolonged survival. Altogether, our data show that lapatinib and obatoclax therapy could be of use in the treatment of tumors located in the CNS. PMID:22357666

  8. The Rac Inhibitor EHop-016 Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis in a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Humphries-Bickley, Tessa; De La Parra, Columba; Forestier-Roman, Ingrid; Martinez-Ferrer, Magaly; Hernandez, Eliud; Vlaar, Cornelis; Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Washington, Anthony V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Rodriguez-Orengo, Jose; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease still lacks effective treatments, and remains the primary cause of cancer mortality. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop better strategies to inhibit metastatic cancer. The Rho family GTPase Rac is an ideal target for anti-metastatic cancer therapy, because Rac is a key molecular switch that is activated by a myriad of cell surface receptors to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and survival. Previously, we reported the design and development of EHop-016, a small molecule compound, which inhibits Rac activity of metastatic cancer cells with an IC50 of 1 μM. EHop-016 also inhibits the activity of the Rac downstream effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), lamellipodia extension, and cell migration in metastatic cancer cells. Herein, we tested the efficacy of EHop-016 in a nude mouse model of experimental metastasis, where EHop-016 administration at 25 mg/kg body weight (BW) significantly reduced mammary fat pad tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis. As quantified by UPLC MS/MS, EHop-016 was detectable in the plasma of nude mice at 17 to 23 ng/ml levels at 12 h following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 10 to 25 mg/kg BW EHop-016. The EHop-016 mediated inhibition of angiogenesis In Vivo was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of excised tumors and by In Vitro tube formation assays of endothelial cells. Moreover, EHop-016 affected cell viability by down-regulating Akt and Jun kinase activities and c-Myc and Cyclin D expression, as well as increasing caspase 3/7 activities in metastatic cancer cells. In conclusion, EHop-016 has potential as an anticancer compound to block cancer progression via multiple Rac-directed mechanisms. PMID:25389450

  9. Camptothecin analog (CPT-11)-sensitive human pancreatic tumor cell line QGP-1N shows resistance to SN-38, an active metabolite of CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Shimazoe, T; Kuga, H; Sato, K; Kono, A

    1992-10-15

    In the course of our study to determine the cross-sensitivity between CPT-11 and its active metabolite, SN-38, we found a SN-38-resistant human pancreatic tumor cell line, QGP-1N, which shows sensitivity to CPT-11. The IC50 of SN-38 was 152 times greater for QGP-1N than for SUIT-2, also a human pancreatic tumor cell line, whose IC50 of CPT-11 was similar to that for QGP-1N. The uptakes of CPT-11 and SN-38 and the intracellular conversion of CPT-11 to SN-38 could not explain the difference in sensitivity. DNA synthesis of QGP-1N cells was inhibited by CPT-11 which did not affect that of SUIT-2, while SN-38 inhibited the DNA synthesis of SUIT-2 at lower concentrations than that of QGP-1N. The inhibition test of topoisomerase I catalytic activity by CPT-11 or SN-38 revealed no difference in the biochemical properties of the topoisomerase I enzymes to the compounds between these two cell lines. These results indicate that CPT-11 should have its own inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis through a yet unknown mechanism in QGP-1N cells, although SN-38 plays an essential role in the antitumor activity of CPT-11 in SUIT-2 cells. In some cases, the antitumor effect of CPT-11 might be consequent not only on SN-38 but also on CPT-11 itself.

  10. Inhibition of lung tumor growth and augmentation of radiosensitivity by decreasing peroxiredoxin I expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Keng, Peter C.; Shau Hungyi; Wu, C.-T.; Hu, Y.-C.; Liao, S.-K.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In this study, we examined the role of peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) in lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and its influence on these tumor cells' sensitivity to radiotherapy. Methods and materials: We established stable transfectants of A549 (p53+) and H1299 (p53-) lung carcinoma cell lines with Prx I antisense to downregulate their Prx I protein. We then examined their in vitro biologic changes and used nude mice xenografts of these cell lines to compare tumor invasion, spontaneous metastatic capacity, and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Results: The Prx I antisense transfectants of both cell lines showed a significant reduction in Prx I protein production. Prx I antisense transfectants grew more slowly than did the wild type. As xenografts in mice, A549 Prx I antisense transfectants showed a threefold delay in the generation of palpable tumors. The incidence of spontaneous metastasis of Prx I antisense transfectants was significantly less than that of the wild-type cells. Furthermore, irradiation of Prx I antisense transfectants caused more than twice the growth delay compared with the wild type. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that inactivation of Prx I may be a promising approach to improve the treatment outcome of patients with lung cancer.

  11. Herpesviral G protein-coupled receptors activate NFAT to induce tumor formation via inhibiting the SERCA calcium ATPase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; He, Shanping; Wang, Yi; Brulois, Kevin; Lan, Ke; Jung, Jae U; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of proteins that transmit signal to regulate an array of fundamental biological processes. Viruses deploy diverse tactics to hijack and harness intracellular signaling events induced by GPCR. Herpesviruses encode multiple GPCR homologues that are implicated in viral pathogenesis. Cellular GPCRs are primarily regulated by their cognate ligands, while herpesviral GPCRs constitutively activate downstream signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. However, the roles of NFAT activation and mechanism thereof in viral GPCR tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here we report that GPCRs of human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (kGPCR) and cytomegalovirus (US28) shortcut NFAT activation by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which is necessary for viral GPCR tumorigenesis. Biochemical approaches, entailing pharmacological inhibitors and protein purification, demonstrate that viral GPCRs target SERCA2 to increase cytosolic calcium concentration. As such, NFAT activation induced by vGPCRs was exceedingly sensitive to cyclosporine A that targets calcineurin, but resistant to inhibition upstream of ER calcium release. Gene expression profiling identified a signature of NFAT activation in endothelial cells expressing viral GPCRs. The expression of NFAT-dependent genes was up-regulated in tumors derived from tva-kGPCR mouse and human KS. Employing recombinant kGPCR-deficient KSHV, we showed that kGPCR was critical for NFAT-dependent gene expression in KSHV lytic replication. Finally, cyclosporine A treatment diminished NFAT-dependent gene expression and tumor formation induced by viral GPCRs. These findings reveal essential roles of NFAT activation in viral GPCR tumorigenesis and a mechanism of "constitutive" NFAT activation by viral GPCRs.

  12. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-03-29

    The calcium-sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment.

  13. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens

    PubMed Central

    Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The calcium–sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment. PMID:26893368

  14. Metformin suppresses pancreatic tumor growth with inhibition of NFκB/STAT3 inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Bhattacharyya, Kalyan K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Bamlet, William R.; Rabe, Kari G.; Wang, Enfeng; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Oberg, Ann L.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To further elucidate anti-cancer mechanisms of metformin again pancreatic cancer, we evaluated inhibitory effects of metformin on pancreatic tumorigenesis in a genetically-engineered mouse model, and investigated its possible anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenesis effects. Methods Six-week old LSL-KrasG12D/+;Trp53F2-10 mice (10 per group) were administered once daily intraperitoneally with saline (control) for one week or metformin (125 mg/kg) for one week (Met_1wk) or three weeks (Met_3wk) prior to tumor initiation. All mice continued with their respective injections for six weeks post-tumor initiation. Molecular changes were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results At euthanasia, pancreatic tumor volume in Met_1wk (median, 181.8 mm3) and Met_3wk (median, 137.9 mm3) groups was significantly lower than the control group (median, 481.1 mm3) (P = 0.001 and 0.0009, respectively). No significant difference was observed between Met_1wk and Met_3wk groups (P = 0.51). These results were further confirmed using tumor weight and tumor burden measurements. Furthermore, metformin treatment decreased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as well as the expression of Sp1 transcription factor and several NFκB-regulated genes. Conclusions Metformin may inhibit pancreatic tumorigenesis by modulating multiple molecular targets in inflammatory pathways. PMID:25875801

  15. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  16. Mechanism of inhibition of the tumor suppressor Patched by Sonic Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Tukachinsky, Hanna; Petrov, Kostadin; Watanabe, Miyako; Salic, Adrian

    2016-10-04

    The Hedgehog cell-cell signaling pathway is crucial for animal development, and its misregulation is implicated in numerous birth defects and cancers. In unstimulated cells, pathway activity is inhibited by the tumor suppressor membrane protein, Patched. Hedgehog signaling is triggered by the secreted Hedgehog ligand, which binds and inhibits Patched, thus setting in motion the downstream events in signal transduction. Despite its critical importance, the mechanism by which Hedgehog antagonizes Patched has remained unknown. Here, we show that vertebrate Patched1 inhibition is caused by direct, palmitate-dependent interaction with the Sonic Hedgehog ligand. We find that a short palmitoylated N-terminal fragment of Sonic Hedgehog binds Patched1 and, strikingly, is sufficient to inhibit it and to activate signaling. The rest of Sonic Hedgehog confers high-affinity Patched1 binding and internalization through a distinct binding site, but, surprisingly, it is not absolutely required for signaling. The palmitate-dependent interaction with Patched1 is specifically impaired in a Sonic Hedgehog mutant causing human holoprosencephaly, the most frequent congenital brain malformation, explaining its drastically reduced potency. The palmitate-dependent interaction is also abolished in constitutively inhibited Patched1 point mutants causing the Gorlin cancer syndrome, suggesting that they might adopt a conformation distinct from the wild type. Our data demonstrate that Sonic Hedgehog signals via the palmitate-dependent arm of a two-pronged contact with Patched1. Furthermore, our results suggest that, during Hedgehog signaling, ligand binding inhibits Patched by trapping it in an inactive conformation, a mechanism that explains the dramatically reduced activity of oncogenic Patched1 mutants.

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of the tumor suppressor Patched by Sonic Hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Tukachinsky, Hanna; Petrov, Kostadin; Watanabe, Miyako; Salic, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog cell–cell signaling pathway is crucial for animal development, and its misregulation is implicated in numerous birth defects and cancers. In unstimulated cells, pathway activity is inhibited by the tumor suppressor membrane protein, Patched. Hedgehog signaling is triggered by the secreted Hedgehog ligand, which binds and inhibits Patched, thus setting in motion the downstream events in signal transduction. Despite its critical importance, the mechanism by which Hedgehog antagonizes Patched has remained unknown. Here, we show that vertebrate Patched1 inhibition is caused by direct, palmitate-dependent interaction with the Sonic Hedgehog ligand. We find that a short palmitoylated N-terminal fragment of Sonic Hedgehog binds Patched1 and, strikingly, is sufficient to inhibit it and to activate signaling. The rest of Sonic Hedgehog confers high-affinity Patched1 binding and internalization through a distinct binding site, but, surprisingly, it is not absolutely required for signaling. The palmitate-dependent interaction with Patched1 is specifically impaired in a Sonic Hedgehog mutant causing human holoprosencephaly, the most frequent congenital brain malformation, explaining its drastically reduced potency. The palmitate-dependent interaction is also abolished in constitutively inhibited Patched1 point mutants causing the Gorlin cancer syndrome, suggesting that they might adopt a conformation distinct from the wild type. Our data demonstrate that Sonic Hedgehog signals via the palmitate-dependent arm of a two-pronged contact with Patched1. Furthermore, our results suggest that, during Hedgehog signaling, ligand binding inhibits Patched by trapping it in an inactive conformation, a mechanism that explains the dramatically reduced activity of oncogenic Patched1 mutants. PMID:27647915

  18. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8(+) Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL.

  19. HRG inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by inducing macrophage polarization and vessel normalization through downregulation of PlGF.

    PubMed

    Rolny, Charlotte; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Tugues, Sònia; Laoui, Damya; Johansson, Irja; Coulon, Cathy; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Segura, Inmaculada; Li, Xiujuan; Knevels, Ellen; Costa, Sandra; Vinckier, Stefan; Dresselaer, Tom; Åkerud, Peter; De Mol, Maria; Salomäki, Henriikka; Phillipson, Mia; Wyns, Sabine; Larsson, Erik; Buysschaert, Ian; Botling, Johan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; De Palma, Michele; Dewerchin, Mieke; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Carmeliet, Peter

    2011-01-18

    Polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to a proangiogenic/immune-suppressive (M2-like) phenotype and abnormal, hypoperfused vessels are hallmarks of malignancy, but their molecular basis and interrelationship remains enigmatic. We report that the host-produced histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) inhibits tumor growth and metastasis, while improving chemotherapy. By skewing TAM polarization away from the M2- to a tumor-inhibiting M1-like phenotype, HRG promotes antitumor immune responses and vessel normalization, effects known to decrease tumor growth and metastasis and to enhance chemotherapy. Skewing of TAM polarization by HRG relies substantially on downregulation of placental growth factor (PlGF). Besides unveiling an important role for TAM polarization in tumor vessel abnormalization, and its regulation by HRG/PlGF, these findings offer therapeutic opportunities for anticancer and antiangiogenic treatment.

  20. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W; Freeman, Emily L; Anderson, Austen JB; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J; Goodin, Burel R

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST), while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=24) each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT) that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional attention in the future. PMID:26170713

  1. Analog sensitive chemical inhibition of the DEAD-box protein DDX3.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Barkovich, Krister J; Condon, Kendall J; Shokat, Kevan M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-03-01

    Proper maintenance of RNA structure and dynamics is essential to maintain cellular health. Multiple families of RNA chaperones exist in cells to modulate RNA structure, RNA-protein complexes, and RNA granules. The largest of these families is the DEAD-box proteins, named after their catalytic Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp motif. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is implicated in diverse biological processes including translation initiation and is mutated in numerous cancers. Like many DEAD-box proteins, DDX3 is essential to cellular health and exhibits dosage sensitivity, such that both decreases and increases in protein levels can be lethal. Therefore, chemical inhibition would be an ideal tool to probe the function of DDX3. However, most DEAD-box protein active sites are extremely similar, complicating the design of specific inhibitors. Here, we show that a chemical genetic approach best characterized in protein kinases, known as analog-sensitive chemical inhibition, is viable for DDX3 and possibly other DEAD-box proteins. We present an expanded active-site mutant that is tolerated in vitro and in vivo, and is sensitive to chemical inhibition by a novel bulky inhibitor. Our results highlight a course towards analog sensitive chemical inhibition of DDX3 and potentially the entire DEAD-box protein family.

  2. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T C; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-08-09

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax.

  3. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  4. Technical Insights into Highly Sensitive Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Fixed and Live Circulating Tumor Cells for Early Detection of Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Laget, Sophie; Dhingra, Dalia M.; BenMohamed, Fatima; Capiod, Thierry; Osteras, Magne; Farinelli, Laurent; Jackson, Stephen; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Circulating Tumor Microemboli (CTM) are Circulating Rare Cells (CRC) which herald tumor invasion and are expected to provide an opportunity to improve the management of cancer patients. An unsolved technical issue in the CTC field is how to obtain highly sensitive and unbiased collection of these fragile and heterogeneous cells, in both live and fixed form, for their molecular study when they are extremely rare, particularly at the beginning of the invasion process. We report on a new protocol to enrich from blood live CTC using ISET® (Isolation by SizE of Tumor/Trophoblastic Cells), an open system originally developed for marker-independent isolation of fixed tumor cells. We have assessed the impact of our new enrichment method on live tumor cells antigen expression, cytoskeleton structure, cell viability and ability to expand in culture. We have also explored the ISET® in vitro performance to collect intact fixed and live cancer cells by using spiking analyses with extremely low number of fluorescent cultured cells. We describe results consistently showing the feasibility of isolating fixed and live tumor cells with a Lower Limit of Detection (LLOD) of one cancer cell per 10 mL of blood and a sensitivity at LLOD ranging from 83 to 100%. This very high sensitivity threshold can be maintained when plasma is collected before tumor cells isolation. Finally, we have performed a comparative next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of tumor cells before and after isolation from blood and culture. We established the feasibility of NGS analysis of single live and fixed tumor cells enriched from blood by our system. This study provides new protocols for detection and characterization of CTC collected from blood at the very early steps of tumor invasion. PMID:28060956

  5. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression alters immune response in colon tumor microenvironment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Manabu; Hirata, Akihiro; Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Hoshi, Masato; Ando, Tatsuya; Ito, Hiroyasu; Hatano, Yuichiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Toshiya; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru; Hara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that degrades the essential amino acid l-tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway, exerts immunomodulatory effects in a number of diseases. IDO expression is increased in tumor tissue and in draining lymph nodes; this increase is thought to play a role in tumor evasion by suppressing the immune response. A competitive inhibitor of IDO is currently being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of relapsed or refractory solid tumors, but the efficacy of IDO inhibition in colorectal tumors remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of IDO deficiency on colon tumorigenesis in mice by genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition. Ido1-deficient(−/−) mice were crossed with ApcMin/+ mice or were administered azoxymethane with or without dextran sodium sulfate. Ido1 deficiency did not lead to significant differences in the size and number of colon tumors. Similarly, the pharmacological inhibition of IDO using 1-methyltryptophan (1-mT) also resulted in no significant differences in tumor size and number in ApcMin/+ mice. However, Ido1 deficiency altered the immune response in the tumor microenvironment, showing a significant increase in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a significant decrease in the number of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells in the colon tumors of Ido1(−/−) mice. Importantly, 1-mT treatment also significantly altered cytokine expression in the colon tumor tissues. These results suggest that IDO inhibition alone cannot sufficiently suppress colon cancer development in mice despite its immunomodulatory activity in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26033215

  6. Loss of Striatonigral GABAergic Presynaptic Inhibition Enables Motor Sensitization in Parkinsonian Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borgkvist, Anders; Avegno, Elizabeth M.; Wong, Minerva Y.; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Sonders, Mark S.; Hen, Rene; Sulzer, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD) causes hypokinesia, but DA replacement therapy can elicit exaggerated voluntary and involuntary behaviors that have been attributed to enhanced DA receptor sensitivity in striatal projection neurons. Here we reveal that in hemiparkinsonian mice, striatal D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) directly projecting to the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) lose tonic presynaptic inhibition by GABAB receptors. The absence of presynaptic GABAB response potentiates evoked GABA release from MSN efferents to the SNr and drives motor sensitization. This alternative mechanism of sensitization suggests a synaptic target for PD pharmacotherapy. PMID:26335644

  7. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    SciTech Connect

    Jaña, Fabián; Faini, Francesca; Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José; Parra, Eduardo; Ferreira, Jorge

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  8. Deubiquitinase inhibition by small-molecule WP1130 triggers aggresome formation and tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kapuria, Vaibhav; Peterson, Luke F; Fang, Dexing; Bornmann, William G; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas J

    2010-11-15

    Recent evidence suggests that several deubiquitinases (DUB) are overexpressed or activated in tumor cells and many contribute to the transformed phenotype. Agents with DUB inhibitory activity may therefore have therapeutic value. In this study, we describe the mechanism of action of WP1130, a small molecule derived from a compound with Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) kinase inhibitory activity. WP1130 induces rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated (K48/K63-linked) proteins into juxtanuclear aggresomes, without affecting 20S proteasome activity. WP1130 acts as a partly selective DUB inhibitor, directly inhibiting DUB activity of USP9x, USP5, USP14, and UCH37, which are known to regulate survival protein stability and 26S proteasome function. WP1130-mediated inhibition of tumor-activated DUBs results in downregulation of antiapoptotic and upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, such as MCL-1 and p53. Our results show that chemical modification of a previously described JAK2 inhibitor results in the unexpected discovery of a novel DUB inhibitor with a unique antitumor mechanism.

  9. Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kareva, Irina; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Dodd, Oliver; Dashevsky, Olga; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2016-01-01

    Both normal wound healing and tumor angiogenesis are mitigated by the sequential, carefully orchestrated release of growth stimulators and inhibitors. These regulators are released from platelet clots formed at the sites of activated endothelium in a temporally and spatially controlled manner, and the order of their release depends on their affinity to glycosaminoglycans (GAG) such as heparan sulfate (HS) within the extracellular matrix, and platelet open canallicular system. The formation of vessel sprouts, triggered by angiogenesis regulating factors with lowest affinities for heparan sulfate (e.g. VEGF), is followed by vessel-stabilizing PDGF-B or bFGF with medium affinity for HS, and by inhibitors such as PF-4 and TSP-1 with the highest affinities for HS. The invasive wound-like edge of growing tumors has an overabundance of angiogenesis stimulators, and we propose that their abundance out-competes angiogenesis inhibitors, effectively preventing inhibition of angiogenesis and vessel maturation. We evaluate this hypothesis using an experimentally motivated agent-based model, and propose a general theoretical framework for understanding mechanistic similarities and differences between the processes of normal wound healing and pathological angiogenesis from the point of view of competitive inhibition. PMID:27935954

  10. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR.

  11. TCP10L acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Jie; Cai, Hao; Wu, Yanhua; Ma, Haijie; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chao; Han, Dingding; Ji, Guoqing; Yu, Long

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TCP10L was down-regulated in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Expression of TCP10L correlated significantly with tumor size and Milan criteria. • Overexpression of TCP10L attenuated growth of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. • Knocking down TCP10L promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenesis of HCC cells. - Abstract: TCP10L (T-complex 10 (mouse)-like) has been identified as a liver and testis-specific gene. Although a potential transcriptional suppression function of TCP10L has been reported previously, biological function of this gene still remains largely elusive. In this study, we reported for the first time that TCP10L was significantly down-regulated in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples when compared to the corresponding non-tumorous liver tissues. Furthermore, TCP10L expression was highly correlated with advanced cases exceeding the Milan criteria. Overexpression of TCP10L in HCC cells suppressed colony formation, inhibited cell cycle progression through G0/G1 phase, and attenuated cell growth in vivo. Consistently, silencing of TCP10L promoted cell cycle progression and cell growth. Therefore, our study has revealed a novel suppressor role of TCP10L in HCC, by inhibiting proliferation of HCC cells, which may facilitate the diagnosis and molecular therapy in HCC.

  12. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  13. Plant-Made Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Inhibits HER2/Neu+ Cell Proliferation and Retards Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Skrypnik, Ksenia A.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant biotechnology provides a valuable contribution to global health, in part because it can decrease the cost of pharmaceutical products. Breast cancer can now be successfully treated by a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb), trastuzumab (Herceptin). A course of treatment, however, is expensive and requires repeated administrations of the mAb. Here we used an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system to produce trastuzumab in plant cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe the cloning and expression of gene constructs in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using intron-optimized Tobacco mosaic virus- and Potato virus X-based vectors encoding, respectively, the heavy and light chains of trastuzumab. Full-size antibodies extracted and purified from plant tissues were tested for functionality and specificity by (i) binding to HER2/neu on the surface of a human mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell line, SK-BR-3, in fluorescence-activated cell sorting assay and (ii) testing the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of HER-2-expressing cancer cell proliferation. We show that plant-made trastuzumab (PMT) bound to the Her2/neu oncoprotein of SK-BR-3 cells and efficiently inhibited SK-BR-3 cell proliferation. Furthermore, mouse intraperitoneal PMT administration retarded the growth of xenografted tumors derived from human ovarian cancer SKOV3 Her2+ cells. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that PMT is active in suppression of cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:21390232

  14. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  15. Growth inhibition of MCF-7 tumor cell line by phenylacetate linked to functionalized dextran.

    PubMed

    Frank, L; Avramoglou, T; Sainte-Catherine, O; Jozefonvicz, J; Kraemer, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the antiproliferative effect of phenylacetate covalently linked to dextran derivatives (DMCBPA conjugates) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We show that free sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) inhibits the cell growth (IC50 = 14 mM), while an important inhibitory effect is observed for DMCBPA conjugates. The IC50 dose of these conjugates is as low as 1.0 mg/ml, corresponding to 1.3 mM of phenylacetate. The precursors, dextran substituted with methylcarboxylate and benzylamide groups, did not affect the growth of MCF-7 tumor cells. We have observed that MCF-7 cell growth inhibition depends on amount of phenylacetate linked to the conjugate. The data indicated that an optimum antiproliferative effect is more significant when the amount of phenylacetate groups present on the dextran backbone is high. Analysis of doubling time by growth kinetics study shows that conjugates have more time-sustained effect than free NaPA. It is noteworthy that the inhibitory effect is observed at non-toxic concentration. Theses conjugates could be considered as acceptable derivatives to prevent tumor progression.

  16. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer.

  17. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Belmiro; Reis, Flávio; Cerejo, Raquel; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Xavier-Cunha, Maria; Neto, Paula; Mota, Alfredo; Figueiredo, Arnaldo; Teixeira, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids have been tested on prevention and treatment of several cancer types, but the efficacy on “in vivo” bladder cancer has not been analyzed yet. This study aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mixture in an animal model of bladder cancer. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups during a 20-week protocol: control; carcinogen—N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN); ω-3 (DHA + EPA); and ω-3 + BBN. BBN and ω-3 were given during the initial 8 weeks. At week 20 blood and bladder were collected and checked for the presence of urothelium lesions and tumors, markers of inflammation, proliferation, and redox status. Incidence of bladder carcinoma was, control (0%), ω-3 (0%), BBN (65%), and ω-3 + BBN (62.5%). The ω-3 + BBN group had no infiltrative tumors or carcinoma in situ, and tumor volume was significantly reduced compared to the BBN (0.9 ± 0.1 mm3 versus 112.5 ± 6.4 mm3). Also, it showed a reduced MDA/TAS ratio and BBN-induced serum CRP, TGF-β1, and CD31 were prevented. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in a rat model of bladder cancer, which might be due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:23865049

  19. miR-195 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis through modulating IRS1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zou, Chao; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie C; Dress, Andreas; Wardle, Fiona; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Lai, Lihui

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis has been found as an attractive target for drug therapy as it is necessary for tumor growth. Accumulating evidences show that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are a group of highly conserved, single-stranded, short non-coding RNAs, play important roles through directly targeting angiogenic factors and protein kinases. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of miR-195 in breast cancer development and angiogenesis through targeting IRS1. We show that miR-195 is inversely related with Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) in both breast cancer cells and breast cancer tissues. Induction of miR-195 could suppress IRS1 protein expression through binding to its 3'UTR regions either by transfection with miR-195 oligo or by infection with lentivirus encoding miR-195 gene. Moreover, re-expression of IRS1 reverses miR-195-mediated repression of tumor cell growth and miR-195 inhibits tumor angiogenesis through suppressing IRS1-VEGF axis. These data suggest that miR-195 mimics are potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer diagnose.

  20. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  1. Targeting endothelial connexin40 inhibits tumor growth by reducing angiogenesis and improving vessel perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Florian; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Le Gal, Loïc; Derré, Laurent; Meda, Paolo; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial connexin40 (Cx40) contributes to regulate the structure and function of vessels. We have examined whether the protein also modulates the altered growth of vessels in tumor models established in control mice (WT), mice lacking Cx40 (Cx40−/−), and mice expressing the protein solely in endothelial cells (Tie2-Cx40). Tumoral angiogenesis and growth were reduced, whereas vessel perfusion, smooth muscle cell (SMC) coverage and animal survival were increased in Cx40−/− but not Tie2-Cx40 mice, revealing a critical involvement of endothelial Cx40 in transformed tissues independently of the hypertensive status of Cx40−/− mice. As a result, Cx40−/− mice bearing tumors survived significantly longer than corresponding controls, including after a cytotoxic administration. Comparable observations were made in WT mice injected with a peptide targeting Cx40, supporting the Cx40 involvement. This involvement was further confirmed in the absence of Cx40 or by peptide-inhibition of this connexin in aorta-sprouting, matrigel plug and SMC migration assays, and associated with a decreased expression of the phosphorylated form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The data identify Cx40 as a potential novel target in cancer treatment. PMID:26883111

  2. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by tumstatin: insights into signaling mechanisms and implications in cancer regression.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Akulapalli; Boosani, Chandra S

    2008-12-01

    Growing tumors develop additional new blood vessels to meet the demand for adequate nutrients and oxygen, a process called angiogenesis. Cancer is a highly complex disease promoted by excess angiogenesis; interfering with this process poses for an attractive approach for controlling tumor growth. This hypothesis led to the identification of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors generated from type IV collagen, a major component of vascular basement membrane (VBM). Type IV collagen and the angiogenesis inhibitors derived from it are involved in complex roles, than just the molecular construction of basement membranes. Protease degradation of collagens in VBM occurs in various physiological and pathological conditions and produces several peptides. Some of these peptides are occupied in the regulation of functions conflicting from those of their original integral molecules. Tumstatin (alpha3(IV)NC1), a proteolytic C-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domain from type IV collagen alpha3 chain has been highlighted recently because of its potential role in anti-angiogenesis, however its biological actions are not limited to these processes. alpha3(IV)NC1 inhibits proliferation by promoting endothelial cell apoptosis and suppresses diverse tumor angiogenesis, thus making it a potential candidate for future cancer therapy. The present review surveys the physiological functions of type IV collagen and discovery of alpha3(IV)NC1 as an antiangiogenic protein with a comprehensive overview of the knowledge gained by us towards understanding its signaling mechanisms.

  3. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of biomarker response and tumor growth inhibition to an orally available heat shock protein 90 inhibitor in a human tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shinji; Nguyen, Leslie; Vekich, Sylvia; Shen, Zhongzhou; Yin, Min-Jean; Mehta, Pramod P; Kung, Pei-Pei; Vicini, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    PF04942847 [2-amino-4-{4-chloro-2-[2-(4-fluoro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethoxy]-6-methylphenyl}-N-(2,2-difluoropropyl)-5,7-dihydro-6H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxamide] was identified as an orally available, ATP-competitive, small-molecule inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). The objectives of the present study were: 1) to characterize the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of the plasma concentrations of PF04942847 to the inhibition of HSP90-dependent protein kinase, AKT, as a biomarker and 2) to characterize the relationship of AKT degradation to tumor growth inhibition as a pharmacological response (antitumor efficacy). Athymic mice implanted with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were treated with PF04942847 once daily at doses selected to encompass ED(50) values. Plasma concentrations of PF04942847 were adequately described by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. A time delay (hysteresis) was observed between the plasma concentrations of PF04942847 and AKT degradation; therefore, a link model was used to account for the hysteresis. The model reasonably fit the time courses of AKT degradation with the estimated EC(50) of 18 ng/ml. For tumor growth inhibition, the signal transduction model reasonably fit the inhibition of individual tumor growth curves with the estimated EC(50) of 7.3 ng/ml. Thus, the EC(50) for AKT degradation approximately corresponded to the EC(50) to EC(80) for tumor growth inhibition, suggesting that 50% AKT degradation was required for significant antitumor efficacy (50-80%). The consistent relationship between AKT degradation and antitumor efficacy was also demonstrated by applying an integrated signal transduction model for linking AKT degradation to tumor growth inhibition. The present results will be helpful in determining the appropriate dosing regimen and guiding dose escalation to achieve efficacious systemic exposure in the clinic.

  4. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  5. CysLT1R Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Xenograft Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21WAF/Cip1 (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  6. Sensitivity of Tumor Motion Simulation Accuracy to Lung Biomechanical Modeling Approaches and Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the Neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  7. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  8. Dual tumor targeting with pH-sensitive and bioreducible polymer-complexed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Choi, Joung-Woo; Kasala, Dayananda; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have shown great promise in cancer gene therapy but their efficacy has been compromised by potent immunological, biochemical, and specific tumor-targeting limitations. To take full advantage of the innate cancer-specific killing potency of oncolytic Ads but also exploit the subtleties of the tumor microenvironment, we have generated a pH-sensitive and bio-reducible polymer (PPCBA)-coated oncolytic Ad. Ad-PPCBA complexes showed higher cellular uptake at pH 6.0 than pH 7.4 in both high and low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor-(CAR)-expressing cells, thereby demonstrating Ad-PPCBA's ability to target the low pH hypoxic tumor microenvironment and overcome CAR dependence for target cell uptake. Endocytic mechanism studies indicated that Ad-PPCBA internalization is mediated by macropinocytosis instead of the CAR-dependent endocytic pathway that internalizes naked Ad. VEGF-specific shRNA-expressing oncolytic Ad complexed with PPCBA (RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA) elicited much more potent suppression of U87 human brain cancer cell VEGF gene expression in vitro, and human breast cancer MCF7 cell/Matrigel plug vascularization in a mouse model, when cancer cells had been previously infected at pH 6.0 versus pH 7.4. Moreover, intratumorally and intravenously injected RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA nanocomplexes elicited significantly higher therapeutic efficacy than naked virus in U87-tumor mouse xenograft models, reducing IL-6, ALT, and AST serum levels. These data demonstrated PPCBA's biocompatibility and capability to shield the Ad surface to prevent innate immune response against Ad after both intratumoral and systemic administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that smart, tumor-specific, oncolytic Ad-PPCBA complexes can be exploited to treat both primary and metastatic tumors.

  9. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  10. Depolarization Controls TRAIL-Sensitization and Tumor-Selective Killing of Cancer Cells: Crosstalk with ROS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Uchida, Mayumi; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2014-01-01

    Conventional genotoxic anti-cancer drugs target the proliferative advantage of tumor cells over normal cells. This kind of approach lacks the selectivity of treatment to cancer cells, because most of the targeted pathways are essential for the survival of normal cells. As a result, traditional cancer treatments are often limited by undesirable damage to normal cells (side-effects). Ideal anti-cancer drugs are expected to be highly effective against malignant tumor cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. Such selective killing can be achieved by targeting pathways essential for the survival of cancer cells, but not normal cells. As cancer cells are characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, selective apoptosis induction is a promising approach for selective killing of cancer cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising tumor-selective anti-cancer drug. However, the congenital and acquired resistance of some cancer cell types, including malignant melanoma cells, currently impedes effective TRAIL therapy, and an innovative approach that can override TRAIL resistance is urgently required. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage caused by disruption of the maintenance of the normal physiological concentrations of K+ and Na+ and intracellular ion homeostasis. The disrupted ion homeostasis leads to depolarization and apoptosis. Recent evidence suggests that depolarization is an early and prerequisite event during TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, diverse natural products and synthetic chemicals capable of depolarizing the cell membrane exhibit tumor-selective killing and TRAIL-sensitizing effects. Here, we discuss the role of depolarization in selective killing of cancer cells in connection with the emerging concept that oxidative stress is a critical mediator of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunctions and serves as a tumor-selective target in cancer treatment. PMID:24910845

  11. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL) can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. Results THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in cancer cells. Finally

  12. Wogonin inhibits tumor angiogenesis via degradation of HIF-1α protein

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiuming; Yao, Jing; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Mi; Zhou, Yuxin; Wang, Hu; Wei, Libin; Zhao, Li; Li, Zhiyu; Lu, Na Guo, Qinglong

    2013-09-01

    Wogonin, a plant-derived flavone, has been shown recently to have antitumor effects. However, the mechanisms that wogonin inhibits tumor angiogenesis are not well known. In this study, we investigated the effects of wogonin on expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells. We found that wogonin decreased the expression of HIF-1α by affecting its stability and reduced the secretion of VEGF, which suppressed angiogenesis in cancer. Wogonin promoted the degradation of HIF-1α by increasing its prolyl hydroxylation, which depended on prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) and the von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL). Intriguingly, wogonin impeded the binding between heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and HIF-1α. In addition, wogonin down-regulated the Hsp90 client proteins EGFR, Cdk4 and survivin, but did not affect the level of Hsp90. Wogonin also increased ubiquitination of HIF-1α and promoted its degradation in proteasome. We also found that wogonin could inhibit nuclear translocation of HIF-1α. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that wogonin decreased the binding activity of exogenous consensus DNA oligonucleotide with HIF-1α in nuclear extracts from MCF-7 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay also revealed that HIF-1α directly binded to endogenous hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and this binding was significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells treated with wogonin. Preliminary results indicated in vivo activity of wogonin against xenograft-induced angiogenesis in nude mice. Taken together, the results suggested that wogonin was a potent inhibitor of HIF-1α and provided a new insight into the mechanisms of wogonin against cancers. - Highlights: • Wogonin is an all around inhibitor of VEGF signaling. • We firstly demonstrate that wogonin inhibits secretion of VEGF by decreasing HIF-1α. • Wogonin enhances PDH and VHL expression and inhibits Hsp90 function.

  13. Small-molecule targeting of proliferating cell nuclear antigen chromatin association inhibits tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zongqing; Wortman, Matthew; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Seibel, William L; Evelyn, Chris R; Smith, Shanna J; Malkas, Linda H; Zheng, Yi; Lu, Shan; Dong, Zhongyun

    2012-06-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a potential anticancer target, forms a homotrimer and is required for DNA replication and numerous other cellular processes. The purpose of this study was to identify novel small molecules that modulate PCNA activity to affect tumor cell proliferation. An in silico screen of a compound library against a crystal structure of PCNA and a subsequent structural similarity search of the ZINC chemical database were carried out to derive relevant docking partners. Nine compounds, termed PCNA inhibitors (PCNA-Is), were selected for further characterization. PCNA-I1 selectively bound to PCNA trimers with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~0.2 to 0.4 μM. PCNA-Is promoted the formation of SDS-refractory PCNA trimers. PCNA-I1 dose- and time-dependently reduced the chromatin-associated PCNA in cells. Consistent with its effects on PCNA trimer stabilization, PCNA-I1 inhibited the growth of tumor cells of various tissue types with an IC(50) of ~0.2 μM, whereas it affected the growth of nontransformed cells at significantly higher concentrations (IC(50), ~1.6 μM). Moreover, uptake of BrdU was dose-dependently reduced in cells treated with PCNA-I1. Mechanistically the PCNA-Is mimicked the effect of PCNA knockdown by siRNA, inducing cancer cell arrest at both the S and G(2)/M phases. Thus, we have identified a class of compounds that can directly bind to PCNA, stabilize PCNA trimers, reduce PCNA association with chromatin, and inhibit tumor cell growth by inducing a cell cycle arrest. They are valuable tools in studying PCNA function and may be useful for future PCNA-targeted cancer therapy.

  14. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  15. Corollary discharge inhibition of wind-sensitive cercal giant interneurons in the singing field cricket.

    PubMed

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Crickets carry wind-sensitive mechanoreceptors on their cerci, which, in response to the airflow produced by approaching predators, triggers escape reactions via ascending giant interneurons (GIs). Males also activate their cercal system by air currents generated due to the wing movements underlying sound production. Singing males still respond to external wind stimulation, but are not startled by the self-generated airflow. To investigate how the nervous system discriminates sensory responses to self-generated and external airflow, we intracellularly recorded wind-sensitive afferents and ventral GIs of the cercal escape pathway in fictively singing crickets, a situation lacking any self-stimulation. GI spiking was reduced whenever cercal wind stimulation coincided with singing motor activity. The axonal terminals of cercal afferents showed no indication of presynaptic inhibition during singing. In two ventral GIs, however, a corollary discharge inhibition occurred strictly in phase with the singing motor pattern. Paired intracellular recordings revealed that this inhibition was not mediated by the activity of the previously identified corollary discharge interneuron (CDI) that rhythmically inhibits the auditory pathway during singing. Cercal wind stimulation, however, reduced the spike activity of this CDI by postsynaptic inhibition. Our study reveals how precisely timed corollary discharge inhibition of ventral GIs can prevent self-generated airflow from triggering inadvertent escape responses in singing crickets. The results indicate that the responsiveness of the auditory and wind-sensitive pathway is modulated by distinct CDIs in singing crickets and that the corollary discharge inhibition in the auditory pathway can be attenuated by cercal wind stimulation.

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits events related with the metastatic process in breast tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    López-Marure, Rebeca; Zapata-Gómez, Estrella; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Aguilar, María Cecilia; Espinosa Castilla, Magali; Meléndez Zajgla, Jorge; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; Gamboa-Ávila, Ricardo; Gómez-González, Erika Olivia

    2016-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal hormone, has a protective role against cancer. We previously shown that DHEA inhibits the proliferation and migration of cell lines derived from breast cancer; however, the role of DHEA in others events related with these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that DHEA inhibits the expression of proteins and some events related with cell migration and metastasis. We determined the migration in Boyden chambers, the invasion in matrigel, anchorage-independent growth and the formation of spheroids in 3 cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-30) derived from breast cancer exposed to DHEA. The secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and several pro-inflammatory molecules in the secretome of these cells was also evaluated.  DHEA inhibited the migration in transwells and the invasion in matrigel of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Besides, DHEA inhibited the anchorage-independent growth on agar and decreased the size of spheroids, and also reduced the secretion of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in all cell lines. Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) secretion was slightly decreased by DHEA treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results also showed that inhibition of migration and invasion induced by DHEA in breast cancer cells is correlated with the decrease of cytokine/chemokine secretion and the diminution of tumor cells growth.  MCF-7 cells were the most responsive to the exposure to DHEA, whereas ZR-75-30 cells responded less to this hormone, suggesting that DHEA could be used in the treatment of breast cancer in early stages.

  17. A Novel Sulindac Derivative That Does Not Inhibit Cyclooxygenases but Potently Inhibits Colon Tumor Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis with Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Whitt, Jason D.; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V.; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y.; Reynolds, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC50 values of 2 to 5 µmol/L compared with 73 to 85 µmol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC50 for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy. PMID:19470791

  18. A novel sulindac derivative that does not inhibit cyclooxygenases but potently inhibits colon tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Whitt, Jason D; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Reynolds, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC(50) values of 2 to 5 micromol/L compared with 73 to 85 micromol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC(50) for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy.

  19. Copper transporter 2 regulates endocytosis and controls tumor growth and sensitivity to cisplatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Blair, Brian G; Larson, Christopher A; Adams, Preston L; Abada, Paolo B; Pesce, Catherine E; Safaei, Roohangiz; Howell, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    Copper transporter 2 (CTR2) is one of the four copper transporters in mammalian cells that influence the cellular pharmacology of cisplatin and carboplatin. CTR2 was knocked down using a short hairpin RNA interference. Robust expression of CTR2 was observed in parental tumors grown in vivo, whereas no staining was found in the tumors formed from cells in which CTR2 had been knocked down. Knockdown of CTR2 reduced growth rate by 5.8-fold, increased the frequency of apoptotic cells, and decreased the vascular density, but it did not change copper content. Knockdown of CTR2 increased the tumor accumulation of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) [cisplatin (cDDP)] by 9.1-fold and greatly increased its therapeutic efficacy. Because altered endocytosis has been implicated in cDDP resistance, uptake of dextran was used to quantify the rate of macropinocytosis. Knockdown of CTR2 increased dextran uptake 2.5-fold without reducing exocytosis. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with either amiloride or wortmannin blocked the increase in macropinocytosis mediated by CTR2 knockdown. Stimulation of macropinocytosis by platelet-derived growth factor coordinately increased dextran and cDDP uptake. Knockdown of CTR2 was associated with activation of the Rac1 and cdc42 GTPases that control macropinocytosis but not activation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway. We conclude that CTR2 is required for optimal tumor growth and that it is an unusually strong regulator of cisplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity. CTR2 regulates the transport of cDDP in part through control of the rate of macropinocytosis via activation of Rac1 and cdc42. Selective knockdown of CTR2 in tumors offers a strategy for enhancing the efficacy of cDDP.

  20. Copper Transporter 2 Regulates Endocytosis and Controls Tumor Growth and Sensitivity to Cisplatin In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Brian G.; Larson, Christopher A.; Adams, Preston L.; Abada, Paolo B.; Pesce, Catherine E.; Safaei, Roohangiz

    2011-01-01

    Copper transporter 2 (CTR2) is one of the four copper transporters in mammalian cells that influence the cellular pharmacology of cisplatin and carboplatin. CTR2 was knocked down using a short hairpin RNA interference. Robust expression of CTR2 was observed in parental tumors grown in vivo, whereas no staining was found in the tumors formed from cells in which CTR2 had been knocked down. Knockdown of CTR2 reduced growth rate by 5.8-fold, increased the frequency of apoptotic cells, and decreased the vascular density, but it did not change copper content. Knockdown of CTR2 increased the tumor accumulation of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) [cisplatin (cDDP)] by 9.1-fold and greatly increased its therapeutic efficacy. Because altered endocytosis has been implicated in cDDP resistance, uptake of dextran was used to quantify the rate of macropinocytosis. Knockdown of CTR2 increased dextran uptake 2.5-fold without reducing exocytosis. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with either amiloride or wortmannin blocked the increase in macropinocytosis mediated by CTR2 knockdown. Stimulation of macropinocytosis by platelet-derived growth factor coordinately increased dextran and cDDP uptake. Knockdown of CTR2 was associated with activation of the Rac1 and cdc42 GTPases that control macropinocytosis but not activation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway. We conclude that CTR2 is required for optimal tumor growth and that it is an unusually strong regulator of cisplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity. CTR2 regulates the transport of cDDP in part through control of the rate of macropinocytosis via activation of Rac1 and cdc42. Selective knockdown of CTR2 in tumors offers a strategy for enhancing the efficacy of cDDP. PMID:20930109

  1. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in tumor cells by small molecule Src family kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bartscht, Tobias; Rosien, Benjamin; Rades, Dirk; Kaufmann, Roland; Biersack, Harald; Lehnerta, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2017-01-02

    In a series of studies carried out over the last couple of years in various cell types, it was observed that the experimentally used Src family kinase inhibitors PP1 and PP2 and the clinically used Src/Abl inhibitors AZM475271 and dasatinib are potent inhibitors of TGF-β mediated cellular responses such as Smad and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, Smad-dependent transcriptional activation, growth inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and cell motility. While for PP1/PP2 it was demonstrated shown that these agents directly inhibit the kinase activity of the TGF-β type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 5, the mechanism of the anti-TGF-β effect of AZM475271 and dasatinib is less clear. In contrast, the anti-TGF-β effect of yet another Src/Abl inhibitor, bosutinib, is more variable with respect to the type of the TGF-β response and the cell type affected, and lacks a clear dose-dependency. In the light of their strong anti-activin receptor-like kinase 5 kinase effect, PP1 and PP2 should not be used when studying the role of c-Src as downstream mediators in TGF-β/activin receptor-like kinase 5 signaling. On the other hand, based upon in vitro findings, it is conceivable that part of the therapeutic effects of AZM475271 and dasatinib seen in preclinical and clinical studies with solid tumors was caused by inhibition of prometastatic TGF-β rather than Src signaling. If AZM475271 and dasatinib can indeed act as dual Src / TGF-β inhibitors in vivo, this may be beneficial for prevention of metastatic disease in more advanced tumor stages.

  2. Molecular study on copper-mediated tumor proteasome inhibition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIA; CUI, QIUZHI; FAN, YUHUA; BI, CAIFENG; DOU, Q. PING

    2013-01-01

    The metal ion copper is a cofactor essential for maintaining normal biological and physical functions in human beings. High copper levels have been found in variety of tumor tissues and are involved in tumor angiogenesis processes. The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role in cell growth and apoptosis and has been shown as a novel target for cancer therapy. We previously reported that some organic copper complexes can inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells and xenograft models. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oxidation status of copper, Cu(I) or Cu(II), on inhibition of proteasome activity, induction of apoptosis, and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cells. We report four major findings here: i) both Cu(I) and Cu(II) could inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome, but Cu(I) was more potent than Cu(II), ii) purified 20S proteasome protein was able to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I), suggesting that Cu(I) is the oxidation status of copper that directly reacts with the proteasome, iii) when complexed with the copper ligand neocuproine, Cu(I) showed higher ability to induce ROS production in cancer cells, compared with Cu(II), iv) addition of a ROS scavenger in the cancer cell culture-blocked copper-induced ROS generation, but did not overcome copper-mediated proteasome-inhibitory and cell death-inducing events, demonstrating the ROS-independent proteasome-inhibitory property of copper complexes. PMID:20514399

  3. Inhibition of bone collagen synthesis by the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Feyen, J H; Petersen, D N; Kream, B E

    1988-04-01

    We characterized the effect of the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on osteoblast function and DNA synthesis in 21-day-old fetal rat calvaria maintained in organ culture. Protein synthesis was determined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-digestible (CDP) and noncollagen protein (NCP), respectively. Alkaline phosphatase activity was assessed as the release of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenol phosphate. DNA synthesis was determined by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into acid-insoluble bone and total DNA content. PMA at 3-100 ng/ml (4-133 nM) caused a dose-related inhibition of collagen synthesis that was observed 6 hours after adding PMA to calvaria. PMA inhibited collagen synthesis in the osteoblast-rich central bone of calvaria but did not alter collagen synthesis in the periosteum. There was little effect of PMA on noncollagen protein synthesis in the central bone or periosteum. Phorbol esters that do not promote tumor formation in vivo did not alter collagen synthesis in calvaria. PMA stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in calvaria, but indomethacin did not alter the inhibitory effect of PMA on bone collagen synthesis. PMA decreased alkaline phosphatase activity measured after 48 hr of culture and increased the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into bone and DNA content after 96 hr of culture. These data indicate that PMA inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, while stimulating DNA synthesis, suggesting that activation of protein kinase C might regulate osteoblast function and bone cell replication.

  4. Tumor tissue characterization using polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarz, Danielle; Cisek, Richard; Golaraei, Ahmad; Krouglov, Serguei; Navab, Roya; Niu, Carolyn; Sakashita, Shingo; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Asa, Sylvia L.; Barzda, Virginijus; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the ultrastructure of collagen in various tumor and non-tumor human tissues including lung, pancreas and thyroid were investigated ex vivo by a polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy technique referred to as polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) SHG. This involves measuring the orientation of the linear polarization of outgoing SHG as a function of the linear polarization orientation of incident laser radiation. From the PIPO SHG data, the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensor component ratio, χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX', for each pixel of the SHG image was obtained and presented as color-coded maps. Further, the orientation of collagen fibers in the tissue was deduced. Since the χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX' values represent the organization of collagen in the tissue, theses maps revealed areas of altered collagen structure (not simply concentration) within tissue sections. Statistically-significant differences in χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX' were found between tumor and non-tumor tissues, which varied from organ to organ. Hence, PIPO SHG microscopy could potentially be used to aid pathologists in diagnosing cancer. Additionally, PIPO SHG microscopy could aid in characterizing the structure of collagen in other collagen-related biological processes such as wound repair.

  5. The Rho-related protein Rnd1 inhibits Ca2+ sensitization of rat smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Loirand, Gervaise; Cario-Toumaniantz, Chrystelle; Chardin, Pierre; Pacaud, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The small GTP-binding Rho proteins are involved in the agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle. The action and the expression of Rnd1, a new member of the Rho protein family constitutively bound to GTP, has been studied in rat smooth muscle. Recombinant prenylated Rnd1 (0.01-0.1 mg ml−1) dose dependently inhibited carbachol- and GTPγS-induced Ca2+ sensitization in β-escin-permeabilized ileal smooth muscle strips but had no effect on the tension at submaximal [Ca2+] (pCa 6.3). Rnd1 inhibited GTPγS-induced tension without shifting the dose-response curves to GTPγS. pCa-tension relationships were not modified by Rnd1 and the rise in tension induced through the inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase by calyculin A was not affected by Rnd1. The Ca2+ sensitization induced by recombinant RhoA was completely abolished when RhoA and Rnd1 were applied together. Rnd1 was expressed at a low level in membrane fractions prepared from intestinal or arterial smooth muscles. The expression of Rnd1 was strongly increased in ileal and aortic smooth muscle from rats treated with progesterone or oestrogen. Progesterone-treated ileal muscle strips showed a decrease in agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization. The present study shows that (i) Rnd1 inhibits agonist- and GTPγS-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle by specifically interfering with a RhoA-dependent mechanism and (ii) an increase in Rnd1 expression may account, at least in part, for the steroid-induced decrease in agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization. PMID:10200428

  6. Soy extract is more potent than genistein on tumor growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    Soybean and soy products have received much attention for their potential heath benefits. Recently it has been reported that the bioactivity of soy products is influenced by the degree of soy processing. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the influence of diets containing genistein and soy extract on the growth of the estrogen-independent human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, implanted into female Balb/c mice. Four-week-old female athymic nude mice (Balb/c) were acclimatized to an AIN-93G control diet for one week prior to initiating the experimental diets. The animals were placed into three treatment groups, each of which was provided with containing DMSO, genistein (750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) or 0.6% soy extract (containing genistein at 750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) for three weeks from one week prior to the injection of MDA-MB-231 cells (1 x 10(6)/site) and subsequently fed on the AIN-93G control diet until sacrifice. The tumor volumes increased steeply in the control group and the genistein-treated group. However, tumor growth was significantly reduced in the soy extract-treated group compared to the control and genistein-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) also revealed that the soy extract treatment effectively reduced cell proliferation of the implanted tumors. In conclusion, soy extract is more potent than genistein in the inhibition of tumor growth, presumably resulting from the synergistic effect of the various bioactive components in the soy extract.

  7. Promoting tumor penetration of nanoparticles for cancer stem cell therapy by TGF-β signaling pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zu-Qi; Chen, Kai-Ge; Yu, Xiao-Yuan; Zhao, Gui; Shen, Song; Cao, Zhi-Ting; Luo, Ying-Li; Wang, Yu-Cai; Wang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which hold a high capacity for self-renewal, play a central role in the development, metastasis, and recurrence of various malignancies. CSCs must be eradicated to cure instances of cancer; however, because they can reside far from tumor vessels, they are not easily targeted by drug agents carried by nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. We herein demonstrate that promoting tumor penetration of nanoparticles by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathway inhibition facilitates CSC therapy. In our study, we observed that although nanoparticles carrying siRNA targeting the oncogene polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) efficiently killed breast CSCs derived from MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, this intervention enriched CSCs in the residual tumor tissue following systemic treatment. However, inhibition of the TGF-β signaling pathway with LY364947, an inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor, promoted the penetration of nanoparticles in tumor tissue, significantly ameliorating the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles in MDA-MB-231 xenografts and further leading to enhanced internalization of nanoparticles by CSCs. As a result, synergistic treatment with a nanoparticle drug delivery system and LY364947 inhibited tumor growth and reduced the proportion of CSCs in vivo. This study suggests that enhanced tumor penetration of drug-carrying nanoparticles can enhance CSCs clearance in vivo and consequently provide superior anti-tumor effects.

  8. Sorafenib and 2-Deoxyglucose Synergistically Inhibit Proliferation of both Sorafenib Sensitive and Resistant HCC Cells by Inhibiting ATP Production

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ryan; Wani, Nissar A.; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Jacob, Samson T.; Motiwala, Tasneem

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths globally1,2. Sorafenib is the only first-line systemic drug for advanced HCC, but it has very limited survival benefits because patients treated with sorafenib either suffer from side effects or show disease progression after initial response. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel strategies for first-line and second-line therapy. The association between sorafenib resistance and glycolysis prompted us to screen several drugs with known anti-glycolytic activity to identify those that will sensitize cells to sorafenib. We demonstrate that the combination of glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and sorafenib drastically inhibits viability of sorafenib sensitive and resistant cells. However, the combination of other anti-glycolytic drugs like lonidamine, gossypol, 3-bromopyruvate and imatinib with sorafenib does not show synergistic effect. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the combination of 2DG and sorafenib induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1. Mechanistic investigation suggests that the cell-cycle arrest is due to depletion of cellular ATP that activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which, in turn, inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to induce cell cycle arrest. This study provides strong evidence for the therape